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THE HOUSTON APARTMENT ASSOCIATION MAGAZINE HARVEY MARKET REPORT • FOOD DRIVE UPDATE

Houston Apartment Association 4810 Westway Park Blvd. Houston, Texas 77041

www.haaonline.org

ABODE February 2018

Sporting events and weather made 2017 in Houston a very unusual year. Learn how the Houston market is responding in a special report.

ABODE • FEBRUARY 2018 • VOLUME 41, ISSUE 2

d A n i w l r i Y e ar h W

Primary Priorities The industry weights in on key Houston-area races. www.haaonline.org

We See You at the NEXT mixer, PAC luncheon, the HAA Food Drive and much more!


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CONTENTS February 2018

ON THE COVER

FEATURES & PHOTOS

36

30 On the Scene – Photos from the HAA Political Action Committee December Luncheon.

A Whirlwind Year – Sporting events and weather made 2017 in Houston a very unusual year. Learn how the Houston market is responding in a special report by ApartmentData.com’s Bruce McClenny. Also, don’t miss important HR and career topics and photos from NEXT, the Food Drive and much more.

32 On the Scene – Photos from the HAA Food Drive.

Images © Elen33 and Carolyn Franks | Dreamstime.com

46 Get Serious – Here are tips for millennials who want to be taken more seriously on the job.

36 A Whirlwind Year – Bruce McClenny is back with his market report. 42 When “No Comment” Won’t Do – Here are tips on how to handle the media.

50 Find & Retain – Five important factors to consider when finding and retaining top talent. 52 Learning Leadership – An on-site leader shares her go-to leadership tools. 56 Unwelcomed Advances – Learn how to prevent sexual harassment and how to respond when it occurs in the workplace. 60 “I Hate My Job” – Here are the five most common reasons employees aren’t satisfied at work. 64 On the Scene – Photos from the NEXT Holiday Mix-N-Jingle. 72 On Site with ABODE – Take a closer look at one of HAA’s member communities.

COLUMNS & MONTHLY UPDATES 7 President’s Corner – Make a resolution to take advantage of all that HAA has to offer this year. 8 Patron of the Month – Meet and support Cotton Commercial USA. 9 Legislative Update – The apartment industry weighs in on key Houston-area primary races. 11 It’s The Law – In honor of it being award show season, here are a handful of movies that depict odd apartment owner and resident issues. 14 Resident Relations – A resident attempts to patch and paint holes. 19 Upcoming Education – Find out what education courses the Houston Apartment Foundation is offering in February and March. 20 Calendar – HAA’s schedule of events for the next coming months. 26 NAA Update – Home automation and blockchain are among the technologies to watch in 2018. 28 On the Road with HAA – Find out about the latest region meeting and Leasing 101 for outlying areas. 66 Welcome Mat – Find out about the newest HAA members. 67 Go-Getters – Making membership matter! 68 The Ambassador ONE Society – Join the teams for 2018. 70 Portfolio Changes and In the News – Property updates and industry news clips from our members. 74 Index of Advertisers – See the supplier members who support this publication. 75 MarketLine – The latest area market numbers. 76 BackPage – News from around the community.

We welcome your comments. Email us at comm@haaonline.org.

www.haaonline.org

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OFFICERS AND ASSOCIATION LEADERSHIP STARLA TURNBO President-Elect

JOHN BORIACK Vice President at Large

MICHELLE PAWELEK President

DIANE GILBERT Vice President at Large

BARBY LAKE Vice President at Large CLAY HICKS Secretary/Treasurer

CHRISTY RODRIGUEZ Vice President at Large

HOWARD BOOKSTAFF General Counsel

JEFF HALL Executive VP

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Kyle Brown, Immediate Past President Josh Allen Mack Armstrong Cyrus Bahrami Jeff Blevins John Boriack Kyle Brown Joe Bryson Tina Cavaco Grant Crowell Scott Douglas Ian Douglas Gina Erwin John Fedorko Israel Garza Diane Gilbert Stephanie Graves Ira Gross Alison Hall Bryan Head Clay Hicks Deborah Holcombe Jacob Kunath Barby Lake Laura Lestus David Lindley Robert Lopes Sonia Lopez Kristin McLaughlin Carlos Neto Dean O’Kelley Michelle Pahl Velissa Parmer Jenifer Paneral Mark Park Michelle Pawelek Jackie Rhone Christy Rodriguez Kelly Scott Kurt Seidel Kim Small Debbie Sulzer Starla Turnbo Shelley Watson Quintina Willis Tracie Yoder

DIRECTORS EMERITUS Ken Bohan Gary Blumberg Kathy Clem Jack Dinerstein Darlene Guidry Jenard Gross David Hargrove Larry Hill Stacy Hunt Hap Hunnicutt David Jones Mike Koch Dick LaMarche Tim Myers P. David Onanian John Ridgway Eileen Subinsky Steve Sweet Kirk Tate Suan Tinsley H.J. Tollett Pat Tollett Vic Vacek Jr. Beth Van Winkle Jerry Winograd ADVISORY DIRECTORS Terri Clifton Brenda Crawford Tamara Foster Billy Griffin Mary Lawler Cesar Lima Karen Nelsen Lindsay Torres Laura Van Dyck Tony Whitaker GENERAL COUNSEL EMERITUS Joe Bax HONORARY LIFE MEMBERS Claude Arnold Kenn Brown Tina Cavaco Kevin Fenn Diane Gilbert Anita Harrison Dwayne Henson

Mike Koch Merry Mount Monette Reynolds Sherry Stevenson Kirk Tate Suan Tinsley Sonny Unverzagt Del Walmsley Nancé Wells H.P. Paul Young Jeanne Marie Zublin Dicks PRODUCT SERVICE COUNCIL OFFICERS Grant Crowell, CAS, President The Urban Foresters Jacob Kunath, CAS, Vice President Century A/C Supply Laura Lestus, CAS, Secretary The Liberty Group David Lindley, CAS, Treasurer FSI Construction Inc. Israel Garza, CAS, Immediate Past President Maintenance Supply Headquarters MEMBERS Marivel Bownds, CAS, Valet Waste Dixie Caldwell-Greer, CAS, The Liberty Group Peggy Charles, CASE, Sunny Rock International LLC Dylan Coleman, CAS Camp Construction Services Deborah DeRouen, CAS, Respage Derek DeVries, CAS, Camp Construction Services

Brian Febbo, CAS FSI Construction Dan James, CAS Redevelopment Services Debra Knight, CAS, Valet Waste Stephanie Krop, CASE, Buyers Access Liz Levins, CAS, Impact Floors Candis Mohr, CAS, AAA Plumbers Doug Oehl, CAS Power Express Joseph Rodriguez, CAS, The Urban Foresters Blaise Spitaleri, CAS, Rasa Floors Mat Tilley, CAS, WeDoTrash PATRON MEMBERS 1980 CSC ServiceWorks 1986 Craven Carpet 1987 For Rent Media Solutions 1994 AAA Plumbers Presto Maintenance Supply 1996 Houston Planned Energy Systems 1997 RentPath 1999 FSI Construction Inc. 2003 Cotton Commercial USA Inc. Dixie Carpet Installations 2009 Camp Construction Services 2013 Criterion Brock

SPONSOR MEMBERS 1968 Century A/C Supply Hoover Slovacek LLP Reliant 1973 Brady Chapman Holland & Assoc. CORT Furniture Rental 1974 Mueller Water Conditioning 1976 Great American Business Products 1977 Webb Pest Control 1978 Houston Metro Electrical Corp. The Liberty Group 1981 AmRent Marvin F. Poer & Company 1983 Namco Mfg. Co. Inc. Sherwin Williams Company 1984 RENCON 1985 Gemstar Construction Development Inc. 1986 ApartmentData.com 1988 Wallace Garcia Wilson Architects Inc. 1992 Alexander-Rose Associates Saint Clair & Sons Inc. 1998 AAA Staffing Ltd. CoreLogic Rental Property Solutions 2000 Moveforfree.com Inc. Pura Flo Corporation 2001 Apartment Life Inc. 2002 American Fire Systems Classic Touch Painting Direct Energy LP Keystone Resources Southwest Painting Contractors Inc. 2003 Sign-Ups & Banners 2005 LSR Multifamily Swain & Baldwin Insurance & Risk Management United Protective Services 2006 Bell’s Laundries CAD Restoration Services DoodyCalls Lopez Carpet Care & Painting Masonry Solutions Inc. Roto-Rooter Services Co. TXU Energy Multifamily Services Valet Living 2008 ARE Business Solutions Flavor Finish Resurfacing HARCO Insurance Services Texas Turf Management 2009 Contractors Inc. Moen Inc. Redevelopment Services Storm Maintenance & Monitoring 2010 ALN Apartment Data Inc. BAC Products Belfor Property Restoration Certified Termite and Pest Control Cotton Commercial USA FTK Construction Services 2011 DNM Contracting Inc. Fantastic Floors Greenway Environmental Services Infinite Energy Inc. Parking Management Company/PMC Towing 2012 ABC Supply Co. Inc. Accent Sign & Awning Co. BGE/Brown & Gay Engineers Cantrell McCulloch Inc. EnviroSmart Multifamily Pest Solutions Floor and Decor Giordano Construction Go-Staff Inc. Maldonado Nursery & Landscaping Inc.

Nationwide Eviction Texas Concrete Professional Company 2013 ACTIV Answer by Audio Images Arbor Contract Carpet ASAP Steamers Carpet Cleaning Capitol Wrecker LLC Comcast Gambit Construction Gorman Roofing Services Outdoor Elements Pool Works LLC StoveTop FireStop Tidal Renovations LLC 2014 Adventure Playground Systems Inc. Chadwell Supply Classic Same Day Blinds D & G Quality Roofing J National Jonah Systems LLC MX2 Commercial Paving Pathfinder Insurance Group Perma-Pier Foundation Repair of Texas Ram Jack Foundation Solutions Texas Apartment Pool Services The Katy Plumbing Co. WCA Waste Corporation Zillow Group 2015 Air Pro Systems America Outdoor Furniture American Painting & Renovations Inc. ASAP Personnel Inc. BSI Cameras Onsite CertaPro Painters Competitive Choice Inc. CSILED.com DeNyse Companies Division-9 Inc. Fix My Slab Foundation Repair Fulton Law Group PLLC Gateman Inc. Goes Heating Systems Greater Houston Pool Management Holder’s Pest Control Infinity Power Partners Kathy Andrews Interiors Lane Law Firm Notifii LLC Pace Mechanical Services Power Express The Allshouse Group LLC Torocon Services LLC Wilsonart 2016 3'D Painting & Construction LLP 5885 Roofing & Construction Inc. Action Window Coverings Inc. Allied Fire Protection, LP Bath Fitter Cinch – Cabinet Refacing Kits Citi Fence & Concrete E-Systems Pest Management Inc. Ecolo Environmental Inc. Embark Services Fidus Construction Services Fun Abounds Furniture Options Green City Recycler Green City Security Green Days Lawn Care Guardian Chimney Sweep Halo Doors Inc. Hive Houston Metro Security JLL Johnstone Supply Kastle Systems KONE Leah McVeigh Design and Consulting Liquid Waste Solutions Manning Pool Service McCann Total Security Solutions Paul Davis Restoration North Houston Pet and Playground Products Quantum Fitness Ram Construction RoofTec Ross Fried Consulting Sparkle Wash Pressure Washing Sustain-Ability Solutions Texas Southwest Floors The Home Depot ValencePM WASH Multifamily Laundry Systems WellKept

Whitmans Contracting and Roofing 2017 911 Security Cameras, Inc. ACT Security Group Action Gypsum Supply Advanced Property Services All About Doody Pet Soutions LLC All American Mailboxes of Houston Inc. Allegion American Fire Protection Group Anderson Restoration Apartment Total Services APTexx Inc. Aquatic Training Institute ARK Appliances BioTechs Crime & Trauma Scene Cleaning South Houston Buddy's Roofing & Construction Co Byte Time Computing Cano Electric Inc. City Supply Co. Inc. Classic Towing Continental Adjusters Creative Surface Cypress Landscaping & Irrigation Inc. D&C Painting Designs by Holmes Disaster America Disaster Restore 365 Eagle Restore LLC Energy Ogre Ernie Smith and Sons Roofing LLC Fast Forward Services LLC Finishes Etc LLC Flooring4.Us Frost Insurance Agency Gage Multifamily Services General Recon LLC Genesis Panel Systems Gravely & Pearson LLP Griddy Energy H Town Movers and HVAC Services Henley & Henley PC Houston SEAL Patrol Division LLC Lithotech Printed Products/Forms Center Maven Auto Detailing McMahan's Flooring Inc. Media Nation Outdoor MPS Direct Norman Construction NorthMarq Capital On Site Towing LLC Pack-It Movers Paragon Roofing Inc. Paul Ryan Windows POPIC Quick Relief Restoration Re-Mark Technologies Group LLC RealState Investments LLC Reliable Fire Protection Rent Accelerator Residential Waste Service LLC Richmond Equipment Roof Top Innovations Rutherford Services Inc. SEAL Security Solutions Secure Insurance Securecomm Inc. Special Touch Landscaping State Sign - A Comet Signs Company Student Movers Inc. Swiff-Train Company Symmons Industries TD Waterproofing Inc. Texas Crime Prevention Agency Texas Engineered Roofing & General Contracting Texas Eviction LLC Top Notch Fitness & Wellness USA Patrol Division Vima Decor WBI General Contractor Willbanks & Associates 2018 Belvoir Real Estate Group LLC Centex Construction Core 24/7 Restoration Services Finish Factory Inc. Homeland Protective Services Poolworx Rent Debt Automated Collections Wellman Exteriors


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ABODE FEBRUARY 2018 I VOLUME 41, ISSUE 2 Executive Vice President and Publisher

JEFF HALL, CAE jhall@haaonline.org EDITORIAL AND DESIGN STAFF

Director of Publications and Design DEBORAH NIX dnix@haaonline.org Writer/Editor MORGAN TAYLOR mtaylor@haaonline.org ADVERTISING

Vice President of Membership and Marketing AMANDA SHERBONDY asherbondy@haaonline.org CONTRIBUTING STAFF

Vice President and General Manager SUSAN HINKLEY, CAE shinkley@haaonline.org Vice President of Professional Development EMILY HILTON, CPP ehilton@haaonline.org Vice President of Public Affairs ANDY TEAS, CAE ateas@haaonline.org Vice President of Finance NANCY LI LO, CPA nlo@haaonline.org Director of Information Technology ART EIDMAN aeidman@haaonline.org Director of Resident Relations MATILDE LUNA mluna@haaonline.org Director of Events and Meetings EMILY BANNWARTH, CMP ebannwarth@haaonline.org Director of Rental Credit Reporting TINA DEFIORE tdefiore@haaonline.org Education and Meetings Coordinator KAREN MITCHELL kmitchell@haaonline.org Strategic Growth Manager LAUREN TURNER, CMP lturner@haaonline.org Membership and Marketing Coordinator LAUREN WOLFSON lwolfson@haaonline.org Public Affairs Specialist ALPA PATEL apatel@haaonline.org Webmaster and IT Specialist WILL ALFARO walfaro@haaonline.org PRINTER

TGI PRINTED www.tgiprinted.com HOUSTON COMMITTEE Executive Program & Budget Nominating Ethics Investment Fair Housing By-Laws Past Presidents Council Strategic Outreach Legislative HAA Political Action Committee Multifamily Fire Safety Alliance Developers Century Club PAC Fundraising Media Relations Golf Leadership Development Product Service Council Community Outreach Resident Relations Appeals Resident Relations A Resident Relations B Membership Ambassador ONE Society 2018 Expo IROC Education Advisory Council Career/Community Development NEXT HAF Fundraiser Property Awards HAA Street Team

APARTMENT ASSOCIATION COMMITTEES CHAIR STAFF ADVISOR MICHELLE PAWELEK JEFF HALL STARLA TURNBO JEFF HALL KYLE BROWN JEFF HALL BETH VAN WINKLE JEFF HALL CLAY HICKS JEFF HALL KAREN NELSON JEFF HALL ALISON HALL JEFF HALL JENIFER PANERAL JEFF HALL CLAY HICKS LAUREN TURNER STARLA TURNBO ANDY TEAS STACY HUNT/JOHN RIDGWAY ANDY TEAS JOHN FEDORKO ANDY TEAS CYRUS BAHRAMI ANDY TEAS DAVID LINDLEY ALPA PATEL DAVID JONES ALPA PATEL DEBORAH HOLCOMBE ALPA PATEL KIM SMALL ALPA PATEL JACKIE RHONE SUSAN HINKLEY GRANT CROWELL SUSAN HINKLEY QUINTINA WILLIS SUSAN HINKLEY DARLENE GUIDRY MATILDE LUNA ELAINE LEEPER MATILDE LUNA KATHY MOTIS MATILDE LUNA TINA CAVACO AMANDA SHERBONDY DEBORAH DEROUEN/DEREK DEVRIES AMANDA SHERBONDY JACOB KUNATH AMANDA SHERBONDY STEPHANIE BRYSON EMILY HILTON STEPHANIE GRAVES EMILY HILTON KELLY SUESS EMILY HILTON LINDSAY TORRES/DAVID LINDLEY EMILY HILTON MICHELLE PAHL/DAN JAMES EMILY BANNWARTH RICHARD WALL/PENNY SPRANG TINA DEFIORE BRANDON THOMAS LAUREN WOLFSON

HOUSTON APARTMENT ASSOCIATION MISSION AND VISION HAA is the leading advocate, resource and community partner for quality rental housing providers in the Houston and surrounding area. HAA develops leadership in the multifamily industry by engaging broadly diverse membership, embracing effective technology and advocating for a geographically inclusive association.

Visit HAA Online at www.haaonline.org ABODE IS THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE HOUSTON APARTMENT ASSOCIATION. Serving the multihousing industry in Austin, Brazoria, Chambers, Colorado, Fort Bend, Harris, Liberty, Matagorda, Montgomery, San Jacinto, Waller and Wharton counties. ABODE, FEBRUARY 2018 VOLUME 41, ISSUE 2 ABODE (USPS 024-962) is published monthly by the Houston Multi Housing Corporation. Publishing, editorial and advertising offices are located at 4810 Westway Park Blvd., Houston, Texas 77041. Telephone 713-595-0300. The $50 annual ABODE subscription rate is included in all member dues and additional subscriptions are available. The annual subscription rate is $50 for members, $65 for non-members. Advertising rates are available upon request. Contributed material does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the Houston Apartment Association. Copyright © 2018 by HAA. Periodicals Postage Paid at Houston, Texas. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ABODE, 4810 Westway Park Blvd., Houston, Texas 77041.

www.haaonline.org

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2018 HAA Volleyball Tournament Friday, March 23 Gates open at 11:30 a.m. Registration and Practice: 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tournament begins at 1:30 p.m. *Each team must have all players present by 1 p.m. to play.

Festivities include a buffet, networking opportunities and checking out the HAA athletes! Teams are registered on a first-come, first-served basis. All players must be members of HAA. Form your teams now (two per company). Teams are not confirmed until payment has been received. Register your team online with credit card payment at www.haaonline.org.

Third Coast Volleyball Club 5652 Forney Drive (Off Hwy. 59 South, one block west of the Hillcroft and Harwin intersection)

Entrance fee is $250 per team (6 players, 2 alternates). Spectator fee is $20 per person. Requests for refunds must be received in writing by end of business day on March 16 and will be subject to a $50 cancellation fee. No refunds will be granted after March 16 or for no shows. No refunds will be given for individual tickets, but tickets are fully transferrable. Contact the Meetings and Events Department at 713-595-0323, by email at events@haaonline.org or see online at www.haaonline.org for more information.

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See www.haaonline.org for more details.

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President’s Corner

By MICHELLE PAWELEK, CPM, CAPS, 2018 HAA President

LOOKING FORWARD Make a resolution to take advantage of all that HAA has to offer this year.

OVER THE LAST couple of years, Houston’s apartment market had softened from the oil downturn and an oversupply of units. Until Hurricane Harvey hit, it wasn’t clear when rent specials would disappear. Following the destructive storm, rents increased by $27 on average and 19,000 units were leased, according to ApartmentData.com’s Bruce McClenny. Right now, we’re anticipating a large number of repaired units returning to the market, 6,100 units under construction that will begin leasing in 2018, crude oil prices increasing and a positive job growth forecast. Find out more in McClenny’s 2018 Market Update, starting on Page 36. Also in this issue, you will find a preview of the Houston Apartment Association’s Media Training for Multifamily Professionals presented by Alisha Wade of Ward with an article written by Ward’s Ania Czarnecka. Readers will also find a handful of articles focusing on career development, retaining talent and human resource topics starting on Page 46. Expanding Your Horizons The apartment business is an industry where hard work and dedication can reap great rewards for your career. HAA provides a great support system of classes, networking events and advocacy that make a tremen-

www.haaonline.org

dous difference for both indiThe apartment business is an industry where hard vidual industry professionals work and dedication can reap great rewards for and the business as a whole. your career. HAA provides a great support system of Hone your professional skills classes, networking events and advocacy that make with the numerous educaa tremendous difference for both individual industry tion opportunities throughprofessionals and the business as a whole. out the year, from APPLE sessions, which will kick off on Feb. 7, to the recent State of the Industry Breakfast held last month, to the young professional, you should make the NAA-authored credential programs and most of your membership by joining HAA much more. Take advantage of all the educaNEXT and get involved by attending as many tional and career-building opportunities events as you can this year. Make it a goal. Be HAA and the Houston Apartment Foundaon the lookout for exciting happenings with tion have to offer. this group; they have great things in store for Starting in 2018, HAA is extending two eduthis year. cation courses to Houston’s surrounding counties and its apartment communities. If Sponsorship Auction your community is located in any of HAA’s Of course, we cannot power our career de12-county service areas outside of Harris velopment initiatives and education courses County, apartment management professionwithout our sponsors. Thank you, again, to als will have the chance to attend Redbook all of our dedicated supplier partners who Seminars and Leasing 101 courses, in addisupport HAA and HAF with their sponsortion to the HAA Region Meetings, formally ship dollars, most recently at the first Sponknown as HAA Area Council Meetings. Check sorship Auction of the year on Jan. 31. Your the calendar each issue, located on Page 20, financial contribution and generosity is apto find out when the next Outreach event is preciated, we can’t do it without you. See scheduled in your area. next month’s issue for ABODE coverage of The first HAA NEXT breakfast of 2018 is at the Auction. the end of the month on Feb. 23. If you are a

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These companies have generously supported the Houston Apartment Association with their patron membership. Please give them careful consideration, whenever possible, in your business.

Houston Planned Energy Systems

ForRent.com

HAA Member since 1978

HAA Member since 1987

Cotton Commercial USA Inc.

Criterion Brock

HAA Member since 2003

HAA Member since 1985

Presto Maintenance Supply

AAA Plumbers

HAA Member since 1983

HAA Member since 1984

CSC ServiceWorks

FSI Construction Inc.

HAA Member since 1961

HAA Member since 1999

Craven Carpet

Dixie Carpet Installations

HAA Member since 1986

Camp Construction Services HAA Member since 1994

HAA Member since 1987

RentPath HAA Member since 1979

February Patron of the Month

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Legislative Update

By STARLA TURNBO, HAA Legislative Chair, with ANDY TEAS, CAE, Vice President of Public Affairs

PRIMARY PRIORITIES The apartment industry weighs in on key Houston-area races.

TEXAS HAS BEEN a solidly red state the last couple of decades. Every statewide elected official is a Republican, and the Republican-dominated legislature drew the district lines seven years ago that elect congressmen, state senators and state representatives. Accordingly, March party primary elections have become critically important. Nearly all legislative districts strongly favor either the Republican or the Democratic nominee in the November election, and Republicans in recent years have won all the statewide seats by comfortable margins. The HAA Political Action Committee met in December to take an early look at some of the races that will be top priorities for the apartment industry. Some of these – justice of the peace races especially – get very little attention from most voters. It is up to us to make sure good judges near the end of Harris County’s long election ballot get the recognition they deserve from primary voters, which is no small task. Let’s take a look at a few of next month’s most critical primary races: Justice of the Peace Jeff Williams holds court near Highway 6 and Clay Road – one of the busiest courts in Texas. Though his courthouse was flooded by Hurricane Harvey, Judge Williams has worked tirelessly to keep the wheels of justice turning; first taking evening and weekend shifts at Judge Russ Ridgway’s courthouse in Gulfton, then moving operations temporarily to a former pizza restaurant. Judge Williams has two Republican primary opponents, and has drawn some unfair grief from party hardliners for obeying the law regarding gay marriage. His court is fast and efficient, and he is known by parties on all sides for ruling quickly and fairly, following the law and respecting lease agreements. If you vote in the Republican primary in the western part of Harris County, please remember Judge Williams. In the Democratic primary, on the other side of the county, Judge Don Coffey has drawn an opponent. Coffey was first elected in 2010 when longtime Judge Tony Polumbo retired, and has www.haaonline.org

been a consistently outstanding judge in his native Baytown. If you vote in the Democratic primary anywhere in the Baytown area, please remember Judge Coffey. Also in the Democratic primary: We were surprised by the announced retirement of longtime Judge Zinetta Burney in Precinct 7. First elected in 2004, Burney has been a steady judge at her courthouse on Griggs Road for more than a decade. Her retirement has sparked a six-candidate Democratic primary race. HAAPAC invited all of them to speak at our December meeting, and we were honored to have Audrie Lawton, Cheryl Elliott Thornton, Ray Shackelford and Sharon Burney join us. HAAPAC hasn’t made an endorsement at press time, but two of these well-qualified candidates will almost certainly face each other in a May runoff election. As apartment managers know, eviction cases appealed from the Justice of the Peace courts in Harris County end up in the lap of one of our four county civil court-at-law judges. Judge Theresa Chang has a Republican primary opponent in March and needs your vote in this important county-wide race. Each of our county court judges is well-educated, but Judge Chang’s background is extraordinary. She earned a degree in chemical engineering from Texas A&M and was already a registered professional engineer before earning a law degree. She has been an outstanding judge and should be the Republican Party nominee this fall. We do most of our state legislative campaign work through the Texas Apartment Association PAC, which is funded in part by your generous contributions to HAAPAC, but two local races are so important that our trustees wanted to go above and beyond. Representative Dan Huberty (R-Kingwood) has been a key part of the leadership team of retiring House Speaker Joe Straus, drawing the ire of some extremists who believe Straus has been too pro-business at the expense of social conservative issues. Rep. Huberty was the House author of the apartment industry’s “source of income” bill, which passed in 2015

to prohibit cities like Austin from making the voluntary Section 8 voucher program mandatory. Rep. Huberty took a lot of abuse on our behalf over this important, controversial bill, and is one of the key reasons it stands as state law today. Rep. Huberty has been a champion for the apartment industry and needs your vote in the Republican primary in the Kingwood/Humble area. Representative Sarah Davis (R-West University) is part of a vanishing breed of moderate, pro-business Republicans in the Texas House. She has been a staunch supporter of the apartment industry and other business interests, but was the only Republican to vote against a highprofile abortion restriction bill favored by social conservatives in a special session a few years ago. Accordingly, she gets attacked from both ends of the spectrum each year. Democrats don’t like that she is a Republican while some Republicans don’t like that she is relatively moderate on social issues. As a member of the House Calendars Committee, she has been instrumental in getting important apartment industry legislation set for debate on the House floor. She has a well-financed opponent in March and needs your vote in the Republican primary in the Bellaire/West University area. In Fort Bend County, Justices of the Peace Joel Clouser and Mary Ward have primary opponents (Judge Clouser in the Democratic primary, Judge Ward in the Republican). Both have been good, efficient judges and should be their parties’ nominees for another term. Look for Clouser on your Democratic ballot if you live in the Missouri City area or for Ward on the Republican ballot in Richmond, Rosenberg and in the Greatwood area. If you’re not already registered to vote, make sure your application is submitted by Feb. 5. Early voting for March 6 primary election begins on Feb. 20 and continues through March 2 at convenient locations throughout the county. Help us stand up for the elected officials who work so hard for our industry. Cast your vote, and remind your friends and colleagues to cast theirs! February 2018

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It’s the Law

By HOWARD BOOKSTAFF, Hoover Slovacek LLP , HAA General Counsel

AND THE WINNER IS … In honor of it being award show season, here are a handful of movies that depict odd apartment owner and resident issues.

IT’S THAT TIME of year. The Golden Globe Awards and People’s Choice Awards are already in the books. The Oscars are coming. It fascinates me when Hollywood features owner/resident situations in movies and TV. With some exceptions (like Fred and Ethel Mertz from I Love Lucy), apartment owners typically are not painted as very nice people. They always seem to be knocking on a locked door asking for the past due rent (while the star of the show either hides behind the door or is escaping through a back window). Although the movies are works of fiction, we can learn something from the owner/resident situations they pose. I have selected a few movies, of varying degrees of popularity (I must confess, not all were box office hits) that present these situations. After an exhaustive research effort (including a lifetime of watching movies and scouring the internet), I came up with a few examples that merit discussion. My goal was to find movies that depict “interesting” residents of apartments and analyze how the situations might play out in Texas. Please note that much of the plot and character summaries were found on Wikipedia, but were verified by my memory of the movie! The Super (1991) The Super stars Joe Pesci as Louie Kritski, a heartless New York slumlord, who was convicted of violating the New York City housing code. The sentencing judge gives Kritski an option of either going to prison or living in a vacant apartment in one of his shoddy run-down apartment units until he brings it up to livable standards. Fearing prison, in a close decision, Kritski chooses to live in one of his apartments. Kritski is not allowed to leave the apartment except for routine exercise, grocery shopping, medical emergencies and business relating to building repairs. Additionally, Kritski is not authorized to make any changes to his apartwww.haaonline.org

ment unless all other apartAlthough the movies are works of fiction, we can ments have been afforded the same upgrade. learn something from the owner/resident Over time, Kritski grows symsituations they pose. pathetic with the problems of the residents and makes amends for his greediness through actions such as dohouse in an exclusive area in San Francisco. nating space heaters to residents to help them The apartment owners live upstairs and have cope with the winter. two rental units downstairs. They rent one of Could something like this happen in Texas? the downstairs units to a couple. They then get The movie is more fiction than fact; however, a visit from Carter Hayes (played by Michael the Texas Property Code does have a number Keaton). Hayes visits to view the remaining vaof provisions and procedures for residents to cant unit and immediately expresses a desire get help if an owner fails to repair or remedy to move in. Hayes drives an expensive Porsche conditions in the unit. and carries large amounts of cash, but is relucSection 92.056 of the Texas Property Code retant to undergo a credit check. He convinces quires an apartment owner to make a diligent the owners to waive the credit check in exeffort to repair or remedy the condition considchange for a list of references and an upfront ering the severity and nature of the condition payment of the first six months’ rent, to be and the reasonable availability of materials and paid by wire transfer. labor and of utilities from a utility company. If Before any money is paid, Hayes arrives an owner fails to comply with these obligations, unannounced one morning and shuts himself the resident has certain rights including termiinto the apartment. As the days passed, Hayes’ nating the lease, having the condition repaired promised wire transfer fails to materialize. or remedied, repairing and deducting the repair From inside the apartment, sounds of loud costs from the next month’s rent or obtaining hammering and drilling are heard at all hours certain judicial remedies. of the day and night, however the door is selA resident’s judicial remedies do not include dom answered. It turns out that Hayes has putting the apartment owner in jail or requiring changed the locks and won’t let the owners in. the owner to actually live in the apartment The owners cut the electricity and heat to the community. Rather, a resident’s judicial remeapartment, which causes Hayes to call the podies include: (i) a court order requiring the lice, who reprimands the apartment owners. owner to take reasonable action to repair or Hayes goes on to infest the house with cockremedy the condition; (ii) a court order reducroaches, which causes the other downstairs ing the resident’s rent; (iii) a judgment against residents to move out. The apartment owners the owner for a civil penalty of one month’s rent go further into debt, the husband/owner plus $500; (iv) a judgment against the owner for drinks heavily and the wife/owner suffers a the amount of the resident’s actual damages; miscarriage. Hayes files a lawsuit against the and (v) court costs and attorneys’ fees. husband/owner after the husband/owner assaults Hayes because he is so mad about what Pacific Heights (1990) Hayes has done. Pacific Heights is about a couple (husband When an eviction is finally obtained, and wife) who buy an expensive 19th-century Hayes has disappeared and the apartment February 2018

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law pg 11,12, 59.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:12 PM Page 2

has been destroyed and stripped bare of all of its appliances, light fixtures, wood paneling and the toilet. Turns out Hayes stole the identity of a prior owner, and had a long history of wrongdoing. The movie paints a dim picture on an apartment owner’s ability to get rid of a problem resident under California law. What would happen in Texas? First, never give the keys to a resident unless: (i) the lease has been signed by all parties; and (ii) all monies to be paid prior to occupancy (such as the security deposit and prorated rent for the first month) have been paid in full. Treat all residents equally with respect to credit and criminal background checks. Don’t be fooled by a resident’s well-groomed, smooth-talking outward appearance. If you have a policy of waiving or minimizing credit requirements when rent is prepaid, that’s up to you. However, be sure to get the prepayment before the credit check is waived. Once a resident becomes a problem, prompt action should be taken. Remedies could include providing a notice of lease violation, advising the resident of the problems and asking the resident to cease the inappropriate conduct or pursuing the eviction action. Unlike

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February 2018

California, Texas has fairly favorable laws allowing an apartment owner to retake possession in a relatively quick and inexpensive manner through the eviction process. If a resident disturbs others or acts in an abusive or threatening manner towards other residents or management personnel, the conduct would constitute a default under the standard TAA lease. Section 20 of the lease prohibits criminal conduct, engaging in or threatening violence, behaving in a loud or obnoxious manner, disturbing or threatening the rights of others and disrupting the owner’s business operations. Most of the conduct of Carter Hayes would fall within one or more of these categories. If you discover that a resident has falsified their identity, the resident would be in default of section 32.1 of the lease, which provides that the resident is in default if the resident gave incorrect or false answers in a rental application. Future notices, and the eviction petition against the resident, should be done in the name of the resident’s real name and then “a/k/a” followed by the resident’s fake name. This will allow the judge, jury and constable to match the lease, notice to vacate, eviction petition and judgment.

Ghostbusters (1984) Ghostbusters stars Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis as Peter Venkman, Raymond Stantz and Egon Spengler as eccentric parapsychologists who start a ghost-catching business in New York City. Although the movie does not focus on owner/resident issues, if you are an apartment owner, a number of scenes may have caught your eye. During the movie, the ghostbusters are retained by Dana Barrett (played by Sigourney Weaver), whose apartment is haunted by a demonic spirit, Zuul, a demigod worshipped as a servant to Gozer the Gozerian, a shapeshifting Sumerian god of destruction and chaos. Louis Tully (played by Rick Moranis) is Barrett’s accountant/neighbor. Barrett becomes possessed by Zuul, which declares itself as the “Gatekeeper,” and Tully becomes possessed by the demon, Vinz Clortho, who is the “Keymaster.” The ghosts wreak havoc throughout the city while Tully (possessed by Clortho) advances toward Barrett’s (possessed by Zuul) apartment. The Ghostbusters get the blueprints for Barrett’s apartment building and discover the / See Law, Page 59

www.haaonline.org


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Resident Relations from the RESIDENT RELATIONS COMMITTEE

DIY GONE WRONG

A resident attempts to patch and paint holes, but finds his handy work isn’t up to industry standards. A RESIDENT FILED a complaint

with HAA to dispute charges. According to the resident, the apartment was in good condition at move-out. To ensure receiving a full refund on their security deposit, the resident patched holes in the unit’s walls and painted over the patchwork. The resident was aware that the paint did not exactly match, but they claimed a maintenance technician told them it was satisfactory. The resident’s final bill statement totaled $540.24. Enclosed was a copy of the move out statement. Pictures were also provided. Management responded to HAA and that response was forwarded to the resident. Management stated despite the attempted work

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done by the resident, repairs still had to be made and a full paint was required. He was charged $160 for a full paint and several wall/ sheetrock repairs. Management also stated a carpet replacement was also necessary. According to management, the resident should have been charged $583.45 for the carpet, but in trying to work with the resident, management decreased that charge to $336.24. The resident had minimal, overdue utility charges to pay as well. Management felt the resident was charged accordingly. Enclosed were copies of the lease, application, move-in condition form, notice to vacate and resident ledger. Pictures were also provided. The committee decided in favor of manage-

February 2018

ment with an adjustment made. The committee removed the paint charge of $160, because management failed to provide an invoice. After the adjustment was made and other charges were justified, the resident owes the property $380.24. The resident may wish to pursue this complaint in small claims court. If you are a manager with a resident relations issue, call HAA at 713-595-0300 for direct assistance. Renters can be referred to HAA to speak to a trained consultant Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., and Thursdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated m said, laughing. “ I’ve been with th business for 15 years. I never exp anything. For me, if I get my job or get it right, I’m satisfied with t don’t need recognition. As long a resident and my management an owner are happy, I’m happy. It w good experience, though, feeling way. I didn’t know that someone watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

www.haaonline.org


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Maintenance Mania pg 16.qxp_11-13_04_0601_BookstaffH 1/18/18 3:14 PM Page 1

Maintenance Mania Competitors: $55 (Entry fee for competition, breakfast and awards luncheon)

Register Now! Thursday, April 5

Spectators: $45 (Access to competition event as spectator, breakfast and awards luncheon)

Houston Marriott Westchase

! a i n a M

e c n a n e t n i a M 2900 Briarpark Drive

Show off yo ur maintenanc cheer on yeoskills and ur best! 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. – Registr ation, practice 9:30 a.m. to 11 and breakfast :30 a.m. – Ski lls -b as ed co mpetition Noon to 1 p.m . – Awards lunc heon

Cash Prizes for Contestants! The following cash prizes will be given for achievement in Maintenance Mania competition events • $100 for First Place, Individual category • $200 for First Place, Overall • $100 for Second Place, Overall • $50 for Third Place, Overall Attendees will compete against other Maintenance Professionals in a series of skill-based competitions that challenges them to exhibit talents used on the job every day. Compete for a chance at the National Title – one participant from each region will compete at the National Event at the 2018 NAA Education Conference in San Diego, CA, and will receive an all-expense paid trip to attend!

Register online today at www.haaonline.org


media train pg 17.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:15 PM Page 1

When

“No Comment” Just Won’t Do

Media Training for Multifamily Professionals

Presented by Alisha Wade and OnWardU Communications

This half-day training session will provide an understanding of the media, its mission and the importance of meeting their deadlines. The participants will receive tips and tools to lead interviews; review samples of good and poor interviews from actual news coverage; and experience role-play scenarios by three or four volunteers from the group to simulate realistic interview experiences. Participants will learn how media work, and what role the participants play in an effective public relations effort to promote their property, communicate with stakeholders, and mitigate risk – even if that role is to effectively re-direct to a designated spokesperson.

Media Training for Multifamily Professionals

Thursday, February 22 Dinerstein Reed Prokop Education Center 4810 Westway Park Blvd. off Clay Road and the Beltway 8:30 a.m. – Breakfast and Registration 9 a.m. to 1p.m. – Program Fee: $75 online registration; $90 invoiced Register online at www.haaonline.org. www.haaonline.org

February 2018

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pac wine tasting pg 18.qxp_Ad Index pg 74 1/18/18 3:16 PM Page 1

Wine

ThursdAy, FebruAry 15, 5:30 P.m.

VANTAge med CeNTer

1911 holCombe blVd., housToN, TexAs 77030

Wine and Dine with HAA Past Presidents for an evening of wine and networking.

Attendees will have the opportunity to sample each host’s favorite wine during the evening, vote for their favorite wine and a host winner will be crowned. Appetizers, soft drinks and water will also be served. Please join us!

Who:

Tasting

limited to the first 35 supplier members. spots will not be secured until hAA receives a registration form and payment from the registrant(s). How Much: $275 per ticket (2 attendees per company only, unless registrant is on PAC Fundraising Committee)

National Apartment Association Political Action Committee

YES! I want to attend the NAAPAC Wine Tasting Event! I pledge to contribute to NAAPAC $275 x __________ attendees (maximum 2) = $_________________ ________________________________________/_____________________________________ Name Company ________________________________________/_____________________________________ Name Company Address:________________________________________________________________________ Note: Political contributions to NAAPAC are not tax deductible for federal tax purposes. No Corporate Contributions, please. o designate my contribution to the following NAA Affiliate's Fund our Future goal Affiliate Name: houston Apartment Association o my personal check made payable to NAAPAC is enclosed.

o Please charge my: • Visa • masterCard • American express Name on Card:_____________________________________________________________________ Card Number:_____________________________________________________________________ exp. date:________________ sec. Code:________________ signature:_______________________________________________________________________ date:________________________________ Please return forms to haapac@haaonline.org or by fax to 281-582-1520. Federal law requires political committees to report the name, mailing address, occupation and name of employer for each individual whose contributions aggregate in excess of $200 in a calendar year. Contributions to the NAAPAC are for political purposes. All contributions are voluntary. You may refuse to contribute without reprisal. Guidelines are merely suggestions and you may contribute more or less than the guidelines suggest. NAAPAC will not favor or disadvantage anyone by reason of the amount contributed or the decision whether to contribute.


Educ pg 19, 62.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:16 PM Page 1

Upcoming Education

From the HAA EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

FEBRUARY IROP (3-day course) Thursday, February 1 thru Saturday, February 3 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Program fee: $399 per member; $519 per nonmember A three-day course authored by NAA specially designed to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for new independent owner/managers of rental properties (typically with 200 units or less). See www.haaonline.org for course details. NALP III: Why Your Competition Matters Tuesday, February 6 8:30 a.m. to noon Program fee: $325; $425 per nonmember; $65 per course; $85 per course for nonmembers Sponsored by Brook Furniture Rental See www.haaonline.org for details. NALP IV: Relevant Laws and How to Apply Them Tuesday, February 6 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Program fee: $325; $425 per nonmember; $65 per course; $85 per course for nonmembers Sponsored by Brook Furniture Rental See www.haaonline.org for details. APPLE: Core Session 1 – The Power of Persuasion: Expanding Your Personal Influence with Lisa Trosien Wednesday, February 7

SCHEDULE AND FEES

8:30 a.m. to noon Program fee: $50 Sponsored by Best Plumbing See Page 22 for details. NALP V: The Sales Process and Building Relationships Tuesday, February 13 8:30 a.m. to noon Program fee: $325; $425 per nonmember; $65 per course; $85 per course for nonmembers Sponsored by Brook Furniture Rental See Page 23 for details. NALP VI: Effectively Meeting the Needs of Current Residents Tuesday, February 13 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Program fee: $325; $425 per nonmember; $65 per course; $85 per course for nonmembers Sponsored by Brook Furniture Rental See www.haaonline.org for details. Certified Pool Operator Course (2 days) Wednesday, February 14 and Thursday, February 15 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Program fee: $299 per member Successful completion of this two-day course will result in a five-year certification from the National Swimming Pool Foundation, and ensures pool chemicals are being used properly and when appropriate. We will dispel the myths in pool care and tremendously reduce chemical

are subject to change without prior notification. Notice of cancellation is required two days in advance to receive a refund, less a $15 administrative fee. Seats are guaranteed on a first-come, first-served basis when payment and registration are received in advance of the program. Unless otherwise indicated, courses are held in either the Camden and Michael Stevens Interests Room or the Direct Energy and Liberty Personnel & Executive Search Room at the Dinerstein Reed Prokop Education Center, 4810 Westway Park Blvd. on the second floor of the HAA Office www.haaonline.org

expenses and extend the life of your pool. This is recommended for anyone working with pools as well as property managers, in order to be up-to-date regarding local codes and reducing risk and liability. The course fee of $299 per person includes textbook, exam fees and meals for both days. NALP Market Survey Presentation & Exam Tuesday, February 20 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Program fee: $325; $425 per nonmember; $65 per course; $85 per course for nonmembers Sponsored by Brook Furniture Rental See www.haaonline.org for details. Leasing 101 – The Woodlands Wednesday, February 21 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Location: TBD Leasing 101 is now coming to The Woodlands for a full day. An in-depth introduction to the apartment industry for new leasing professionals as well as those individuals looking to learn more about the industry as a career. This program covers topics including: greeting and qualifying the customer, executing the lease contract, overcoming objections and closing techniques, an overview of Fair Housing and more. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate, as well as a listing of placement agencies

and management companies that are members of HAA. Contact Lauren Turner at lturner@haaonline.org for registration. APPLE: Maintenance 1 – HVAC Industry Changes with Andrew Maloch Wednesday, February 21 8:30 a.m. to noon Program fee: $50 Sponsored by The Liberty Group See Page 22 for details. Media Relations Seminar Thursday, February 22 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Program fee: $75 This half-day training session will provide an understanding of the media, its mission, and the importance of meeting their deadlines. The participants will receive tips and tools to lead interviews; review samples of good and poor interviews from actual news coverage; and experience role-play scenarios by three or four volunteers from the group to simulate realistic interview experiences. Participants will learn how media work, and what role the participants play in an effective public relations effort to promote their property, communicate with stakeholders, and mitigate risk – even if that role is to effectively re-direct to a designated spokesperson. See Page 17 for details. / See Education, Page 62

Building. Seating is limited. You must pre-register. For more information and to register, go online at www.haaonline.org. Notice to Attendees: All pre-registered no-shows will be billed. For admittance into HAA/HAF events, payments will be required at the door if not received prior to the event. Start times listed above include a 30-minute registration period. Notice of cancellation is required two days prior to the event for a refund, less a $15 administrative fee. February 2018

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FEBRUARY S M T W T 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28

Calendar HAA Education, Events and Meetings SCHEDULE

F 2 9 16 23

S 3 10 17 24

MARCH S M T

W T 1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 29

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24 31

FEBRUARY 1

7

13

15

HAA PAC Luncheon Thursday, February 1 11:30 a.m. Sponsored by Ameritex Movers

Ambassador ONE Society Meeting Wednesday, February 7 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sherlock’s Baker St. Pub 10001 Westheimer, 77042 Contact Amanda at asherbondy@haaonline.org for details.

NALP V: The Sales Process and Building Relationships Tuesday, February 13 8:30 a.m. to noon See Page 23 for details. Sponsored by Brook Furniture Rental

NAA PAC Wine Tasting Thursday, February 15 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Vantage Med Center 1911 Holcombe Blvd., 77030 See Page 73 for detail.

Region Meeting: Pasadena Tuesday, February 13 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: TBD Contact Lauren Turner at lturner@haaonline.org for registration.

NALP Market Survey Presentation & Exam Tuesday, February 20 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

1-3 IROP (3-day course) Thursday, February 1 thru Saturday, February 3 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

6 NALP III: Why Your Competition Matters Tuesday, February 6 8:30 a.m. to noon See Page 23 for details. Sponsored by Brook Furniture Rental NALP IV: Relevant Laws and How to Apply Them Tuesday, February 6 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. See Page 23 for details. Sponsored by Brook Furniture Rental

7 APPLE: Core Session 1 Wednesday, February 7 8:30 a.m. to noon See Page 22 for details. Sponsored by Best Plumbing

8 Blue Star Class Thursday, February 8 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. White Oak Conference Center 7603 Antoine, 77088 Contact Alpa at apatel@haaonline.org for details. Sponsored by Presto Maintenance Supply and SentriForce

8-9 TAA Quarterly Meeting Thursday, February 8 thru Friday, February 9 Omni Frisco Hotel 11 Cowboys Way, Frisco, 75034 See www.taa.org foe details.

NALP VI: Effectively Meeting the Needs of Current Residents Tuesday, February 13 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. See Page 23 for details. Sponsored by Brook Furniture Rental

14 Resident Relations Committee A Wednesday, February 14 2 p.m.

14-15 Certified Pool Operator Course (2 days) Wednesday, February 14 and Thursday, February 15 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

20

21 Outlying Leasing 101 – The Woodlands Wednesday, February 21 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Contact Lauren Turner at lturner@haaonline.org for registration. APPLE: Maintenance 1 Wednesday, February 21 8:30 a.m. to noon See Page 22 for details. Sponsored by The Liberty Group

22 Media Relations Seminar Thursday, February 22 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. See Page 17 for details.

23 HAA NEXT: Professional Development Breakfast Friday, February 23 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.

New Supplier Member Orientation Wednesday, February 7 3 p.m. Sherlock’s Baker St. Pub 10001 Westheimer, 77042 All new supplier members welcome. Contact Amanda at asherbondy@haaonline.org for details.

Community Outreach Committee Friday, February 23 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Take a seat at the table to support your business and our industry

Join the HAA Political Action Committee Luncheons on Thursday, February 1 and Wednesday, March 21 See above and www.haaonline.org for details.

UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, all events meet at our Dinerstein Reed Prokop Education Center, 4810 Westway Park Blvd., second floor, in either the Direct Energy and Liberty Personnel & Executive Search or the Camden and Michael Stevens Interests Room. Meetings located at the HAA Offices, 4810 Westway Park Blvd., first floor, will be held in the Redi Carpet and Winograd Families/Judwin Properties Conference Room. See www.haaonline.org for an interactive calendar. 20

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Please note that dates and times are subject to change. Check the calendars at www.haaonline.org for the most up-to-date information.

MARCH 6

8

20

27

APPLE: CORE 2 – “How to Deal with Difficult People. So Many People … So Little Time!” with Jackie Ramstedt Tuesday, March 6 8:30 a.m. to noon See Page 22 for details. Sponsored by Best Plumbing

CAM: Financial Management Thursday, March 8 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. See Page 24 for details.

Redbook Seminar Tuesday, March 20 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Program fee: $125 prior to March 20; $160 See Page 25 for details. Sponsored by AAA Plumbers and Ameritex Movers

Legislative Committee Tuesday, March 27 3:30 p.m.

7

Rosenberg Region Meeting Thursday, March 8 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Formally known as Area Council Meetings, the HAA Outreach department is continuing to bring education to outlying counties with a new title. More information to come. Contact Lauren Turner at lturner@haaonline.org for details.

21

CAM: Marketing Wednesday, March 28 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. See Page 24 for details.

CAM: Industry Essentials & Resident Experience Wednesday, March 7 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. See Page 24 for details. CAS: Industry Essentials & Resident Experience Wednesday, March 7 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. New Supplier Member Orientation Wednesday, March 7 3 p.m. Sherlock’s Baker St. Pub 10001 Westheimer, 77042 All new supplier members welcome. Contact Amanda at asherbondy@haaonline.org for details. Ambassador ONE Society Meeting Wednesday, March 7 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sherlock’s Baker St. Pub 10001 Westheimer, 77042 Contact Amanda at asherbondy@haaonline.org for details.

CAS: Finance Thursday, March 8 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

EXPO Committee Meeting Thursday, March 8 3:30 p.m.

9 ACES Luncheon Friday, March 9 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Location: TBD

13 Leasing 101 (Day and a half) Tuesday, March 13 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

14 Resident Relations Committee B Wednesday, March 14 2 p.m.

HAAPAC Luncheon Wednesday, March 21 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Contact Alpa at apatel@haaonline.org for details. Katy Happy Hour Wednesday, March 21 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Calling all Katy and surrounding area apartment and management personnel. Join us for networking and fun. No suppliers, please. More information to come. Contact Lauren Turner at lturner@haaonline.org for details.

22

Board Meeting Tuesday, March 27 4:30 p.m.

28

Leadership Lyceum Session 2 Wednesday, March 28 9 a.m. Houston City Hall 901 Bagby St., 77002 By invitation only. Contact Susan a shinkley@haaonline.org for details.

29 CAM: Property Maintenance Thursday, March 29 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. See Page 24 for details.

Redbook Seminar Thursday, March 22 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Program fee: $125 prior to March 20; $160 See Page 25 for details. Sponsored by AAA Plumbers and Ameritex Movers

Go-Getters Meeting Thursday, March 29 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Café Adobe 7620 Katy Fwy, 77024 Visit the Go-Getters Corner at www.haaonline.org/gogetters for tips and tools for recruiting.

23

30

HAA Volleyball Tournament Friday, March 23 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Third Coast Volleyball Club 5652 Forney Drive, 77036 See Page 6 for details.

Offices Closed The HAA offices will be closed Friday, March 30 for Good Friday.

The first 2018 Go-Getters Meeting is March 29 at Cafe Adobé, 7620 Katy Fwy. at the Marq E Center

Join the club at our quarterly meetings and learn how you can recruit for HAA. Be the top recruiter for each quarter and win awesome prizes! Plus, for each new member you recruit, you’ll earn a chance to win gift cards ranging from $25 to $250! JOIN A TEAM and build relationships with like-minded members. Get involved with Go-Getters and make lasting industry connections. Visit www.haaonline.org/gogetterscorner to get all the information you need.

www.haaonline.org

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apple pg 22.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:20 PM Page 1

Professional Development: APPLE Workshop Series

Grow your career with the right ideas, the best advice and go to the head of the class – APPLE features some of the best nationallyacclaimed speakers in the industry.

Individual sessions are priced at only $50 each, a real steal for quality education. Annual Property Subscriptions are also available with unlimited attendance for all on-site property staff to all sessions at discounted prices: • Only $199 per year per property for properties with fewer than 200 units • Only $399 per year per property for properties with 200 to 350 units. • Only $450 per year per property for properties with more than 350 units.

Take a bite out of great education opportunities and enroll for 2018 today. Contact the HAA Education Department at education@haaonline.org or see more information and register online at www.haaonline.org.

APPLE is sponsored by

Grab an APPLE! APPLE Track: Core

APPLE Track: Leadership

APPLE: Core - Session 2 March 6 How to Deal with Difficult People. So Many People…So Little Time! with Jackie Ramstedt

APPLE: Leadership - Session I April 10 CapEx: Capital Investment Strategies Made Simple for Managers & Maintenance with Mary Gwyn

APPLE: Core - Session 3 April 24 Top Ten Fair Housing Fails with Katie Rigsby

APPLE: Leadership - Session 2 July 24 Before you Promote with Mindy McCorkle

APPLE: Core - Session 4 June 5 Putting the Resident BACK in Resident Retention With Lisa Trosien

APPLE : Leadership - Session 3 October 24 The Spin Cycle – Managing Employee Turnover with Mindy McCorkle

APPLE: Core - Session 5 August 7 Dear Residents: We Love You So Much We’re Raising Your Rent with Jackie Ramstedt APPLE: Core - Session 6 October 11 Sales Isn’t for Sissies with Katie Rigsby

APPLE Track: Maintenance APPLE: Maintenance - Session 1 February 21 HVAC Industry Changes with Andrew Maloch, Chadwell Supply APPLE: Maintenance - Session 2 September 18 Quick and Efficient Turnovers with Don Willard

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APPLE: Maintenance - Session 3 November 14 OSHA Compliance with Don Willard

APPLE: Core - Session 1 February 7 The Power of Persuasion: Expanding Your Personal Influence with Lisa Trosien

APPLE Track: Marketing APPLE: Marketing - Session 1 May 8 Creating Your Brand Identity, To Stand Out From The Crowd with Marla Posey APPLE: Marketing - Session 2 August 21 Marketing for Suburbs and Small Towns with Mary Gwyn APPLE : Marketing - Session 3 September 20 Let’s Talk Trends -Technology, Digital Advertising and Marketing Trends with Marla Posey

www.haaonline.org


CPO certification pg 23.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:23 PM Page 1

in Be

le l W r w u u o H o Yo Yo D now K ool? P

the Successful completion of this course offers apartment industry personnel a five-year certification from the National Swimming Pool Foundation and ensures pool chemicals are being used properly and when appropriate.

Recommended for anyone working with pools, this course is also a great course for property managers. Make sure you are up-to-date on local codes to help reduce risk and liability by attending this informative session.

www.haaonline.org

or t a r e l Op o -15 o 4 1 P n y fied tificatio , Februar i t r e C ) Cer rsay u h O T d (CP ay an ion

fied

erti

The Certified Pool Operator Certification, better known as CPO, will dispel the myths in pool care and tremendously reduce chemical expenses and extend the life of your pool.

et C

:G

w Kno Instructor: Grant Almquist, Texas Apartment Pool Services

tion t d a s a r r t e t s n i s i Wed Reg rogram xam admin – . a.m ys) k, e –P 8:30 . to TBA es textboo for two da d h 9 a.m 299 (inclust and lunc n Reed i $ a Fee: and breakf Dinerste r, e fee, : HAF tion Cent d., n o i t Loca p Educa Park Blv Beltway Proko Westway ast of the rg. 4810 ay Road e ine.o l n o l .haa www off C t a ne i

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cam pg 24.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:23 PM Page 1

Apartment Managers – Write it down: CAM is the best way to advance your multifamily career! What are you waiting for? Credential Qualifications: • Minimum of 12 months of on-site property management experience in a management role or position (assistant managers do qualify) • Classroom attendance in at least six of the seven scheduled class days • A passing score on parts I and II of the CAM exam within 12 months of enrollment

Course Schedule and Fees: • Total Program Cost: $1,050; Tuition can be paid in full or divided into two payments of $525 • All textbooks, exam fees and meals are included in the course fee • New CAM Candidates must begin the program with the first course on March 7 • The CAM curriculum is comprised of eight modules and is administered by HAA in seven days over the course of six weeks • Check-in and registration begins at 8:30 a.m. • Modules vary in length; classes generally will conclude by 4 p.m. or earlier • Lunch is provided

CAM Course Schedule and Descriptions: March 7: Industry Essentials & the Resident Experience • Summarize the global state of the apartment industry • View property as an investment • Identify the roles of people a CAM will interact with • Describe the value of the CAM role as an investor advocate and resident advocate • Identify characteristics of different types of housing • How to build relationships with residents • Explain the Resident Cycle including: - Lease & Application - Screening - New Resident Education - Ongoing Resident Communication - Resident Retention/Renewal - Move Out Procedures March 8: Financial Management • Relate CAM responsibilities to the financial performance of a property • Analyze an income statement • Develop and manage a stabilized budget • Prevent and solve for bad debt • Perform a property valuation March 28: Marketing • Identify the components of an effective Marketing Plan • Use resources to effectively gather and calculate data needed in a Marketing Plan • Develop a Marketing Plan - Analyze a market including competitors - Identify the internal market readiness of a property - Perform an economic analysis of a property - Analyze and draw conclusions from a Market Plan using the SWOT methodology

• Add value to a property through use of rental income, rates, and/or adjustments • Add value to a property through managing occupancy • Select and write an effective recommendation - Identify types of promotion - Identify types of advertising media • Develop a budget for a Marketing Plan • Measure the success of a Marketing Plan March 29: Property Maintenance • Relate CAM responsibilities to the maintenance of a property • Oversee service requests - Ensure employees in all roles receive the appropriate training to ensure service requests are completed accurately • Manage inventory • Identify the need for a contractor or vendor - Complete the bid process and signing of a contract • Use inspection results to prioritize maintenance and repairs • Develop a preventative maintenance program • Identify maintenance needs for green properties April 11: Legal • Describe reasonable accommodations and modifications for persons with disabilities • Explain compliance with laws that govern applicant screening • Explain the purpose and impact of fair housing laws • Explain how to remain in compliance with fair housing laws • Identify a CAM’s responsibilities in providing safe living conditions with adherence to residence rights • Summarize the bid process requirements • Explain compliance with laws that govern employment practices April 12: Risk Management • Relate risk management to a CAM’s role • Propose a solution to an issue of fraud, theft, embezzlement, etc. to minimize financial risk • Identify necessary preventative maintenance to minimize risk to physical plant • Create a resident education/orientation message to minimize risk to residents • Practice preparing for an OSHA inspection • Create sample guidelines for entering homes to minimize risk to staff/vendors • Create emergency plan for a common regional emergency • Provide the best course of action for various crime emergencies • Prevent and control loss May 3: Human Resources • Identify laws that affect employment procedures • Understand how to manage payroll including benefits, overtime, and rent-free employee housing • Summarize the employment process - Recruit potential employees - Interview applicants - Evaluate candidates - Complete new employee orientation • Maintain employees’ records appropriately • Address employees’ needs throughout the lifecycle of their employment - Identify training needs - Manage performance - Perform an employee evaluation - Execute disciplinary action - Terminate employment

(Proctored Exam Dates to be announced throughout 2018)

For a more detailed synopsis of individual course content and to register, please visit the education page of our website at www.haaonline.org.


2018

redbook seminar pg 25.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:24 PM Page 1

All New Redbook Formatting for 2018

SEMINAR

Choose your day. Choose your location.

March 20 or March 22 in Houston

Location – HAF Education Center, 4810 Westway Park Blvd. (off Clay Road and the Beltway)

April 10 in Lake Jackson, location to be announced April 12 in The Woodlands, location to be announced April 17 in Baytown, location to be announced April 19 in Pearland, location to be announced Registration – 8:30 a.m. Program – 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Program Fee (includes lunch) – $125 prepay; $160 invoice Sharpen your knowledge of your legal rights and responsibilities as a rental housing owner or manager by participating in one of the REDBOOK seminars being offered around the state. Seminars emphasize changes in management practices required by new laws passed during the last legislative session as well as updates on key regulatory issues that affect property management. Each section will include an interactive exercise to help you learn how to apply the law to your job. Full of videos and interactive tools, the 2018 REDBOOK seminar will deliver the quality legal instruction you expect from TAA in a totally new way. Here’s your chance to hear from the experts and get answers to your questions.

Presented by Howard Bookstaff, HAA General Counsel

For more information and to register, see online at www.haaonline.org.

Sponsored by AAA Plumbers and Ameritex Movers

At the 2018 Apartment & Rental Housing Legal Seminars, you will • Learn the major changes to TAA’s Rental Application, Lease and other major forms • Understand major operational issues • Get comfortable with the newly re-organized REDBOOK Seminar topics include: • Changes to the TAA Rental Application • Changes to the TAA Lease • Changes to key addenda • Fair housing accommodations & modifications • Crime on property • Parking & towing • Ending the Lease • Handling deposits • Evictions, other remedies • Notices to vacate • Identity theft • Workplace safety • Mold • Disaster preparedness • Forward-looking topics • Reputation management • Payment methodologies • and much more


naa update pg 26,27.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:24 PM Page 1

Industry Update from the NATIONAL APARTMENT ASSOCIATION and the NATIONAL MULTIHOUSING COUNCIL

TECHNOLOGIES TO WATCH Home automation and blockchain are among the technologies to watch in 2018.

ADVANCEMENTS IN business intelligence, artificial intelligence, back office technology, home automation, package storage and many other things is giving apartment operators more and better options. It also leaves them with the quandary of choice. “There are so many new and interesting technologies that are available,” Ansel says. “The biggest challenge is to select the one or two solutions that will have the greatest effect on what you are doing with the least amount of disruption, because managing platform changes can be costly.” Gables is nothing if not ambitious. The Atlanta-based firm is piloting many enterprises backed by new technology, including property management software, learning solutions, sustainability initiatives, associate recognition and resident rewards programs. But what really intrigues Ansel are technologies in development, such as blockchain technology, which she thinks could revolutionize back office functions. For Campo and Bolton, technologies offering remote access to apartments could be a differentiator for their portfolios. “We are increasingly thinking about home automation and how technologies can allow renters to take greater control of their home when they are not there,” Bolton says. “It could be through apps on their phones that allow them to lock and unlock doors, or turn on and turn off lights, set the temperature and monitor their home.” Operators additionally see these technologies as a way to cut energy usage. But it is possible to go too far. With tech giants such as Amazon, Apple and Google offering competing smart-home products, AMLI is carefully letting peers take the lead. “The technology is changing so fast,” Mutz says. “We don’t want to hard-wire for a lot of stuff that will be obsolete in two or three years.” The apartment industry is aiming to be more progressive with its design and construc-

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tion methods. Emerging design trends include flexible floor plans with movable walls, which allow apartment owners to turn one-bedroom homes into a two-bedroom model, depending on market demand. In construction, modular systems, such as creating kitchen and bath areas offsite and installing them as one piece can reduce time and costs and in turn, make rents more affordable. “If you can change the speed at which you deliver something or change the cost to build it, affordability will improve,” Ansel says. CEOs See Opportunities to Incorporate WeWork While the apartment industry’s leaders think leasable office space has a strong future, they are skeptical about the WeLive trend. WeWork is a company that provides shared workspace, community and services for entrepreneurs, freelancers, startups, small businesses and large enterprises. The apartment industry is taking notice. “The WeWork model is something that has a real future,” says MAA CEO Eric Bolton. “There is demand for it and a need for it. It is up to the apartment industry to adopt that model and philosophy and bring it into our communities.” With working space as a popular amenity for work-from-home Millennial residents, apartment owners see the potential to carve their own WeWork space on a smaller scale. “We are trying to create a WeWork environment by offering business centers and more elaborate work areas that feature strong WiFi connectivity and that provide coffee and refreshments for the residents,” Bolton says. “These venues have work stations that are portioned off to create that type of environment.” AMLI Residential is incorporating four or five single office spaces in some of its communities. The company leases them to residents who need office space for workspace or meetings. Chairman and CEO Greg Mutz says these spaces have appeal in communities with approximately 300 apartments or more.

“[Nonetheless], we don’t want to get into the office space business,” he says. “It is an amenity. It is not a big money driver and there is expense keeping the space cleaned and rented.” Ken Valach, CEO of Trammell Crow Residential (TCR), has spoken with companies that are building mixed apartment-office sharing communities in Houston. “It is like a WeWork where residents get priority to use the space, but non-residents also may access it,” he says. In some cases, WeWork is pairing its office space with WeLive, co-living buildings. With shared amenities such as a chef’s kitchen, laundry room, arcade and yoga studio, these developments have been described as dorms for adults. Bolton is skeptical of the WeLive model. “The WeLive model has a tougher future,” Bolton says. “At the end of the day, people would prefer more privacy than not. The only way the WeLive model takes is if you can create opportunities in expensive housing markets where you can offer a location that combines shared living space and offer it at a price that is much less than what they would otherwise have to pay to be in that area.” Gables Residential CEO Sue Ansel and Valach agree that WeLive can work best in pricey New York and San Francisco metros. CEOs Tackle the Labor Crisis With 99,393 apartments, MAA CEO Eric Bolton, began 2017 as the largest apartment owner in the country. Even as the head of a large public company, he knows success is not ultimately determined by how well a deal is financed or built. “The most important variable driving success onsite is the quality of the people who are working on the frontlines, providing service to our residents,” Bolton says. “If you do not get the onsite staff right, good performance will be challenged.” Entering 2018, with the unemployment rate at 4 percent and expected to drop further, findwww.haaonline.org


naa update pg 26,27.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:25 PM Page 2

ing and keeping associates who can take MAA’s systems, processes and tools and drive value for investors at the site level is a big challenge for Bolton. “In this environment, where unemployment rates have continued to come down and new apartment construction has picked up, and you have a lot of developers reaching out trying to staff these properties, they are naturally going to go to some of the bigger companies that have more robust training programs and try to poach their employees,” Bolton says. “One of my areas of significant focus going into next year is to continue to think about the things that we are doing to motivate and reward our onsite associates for doing a great job.” Bolton is not alone. Jay Hiemenz, President and COO of Alliance Residential Company, says “talent and training” are his biggest onsite concerns in 2018. The issue is more acute in high-delivery markets. “There have been 90,000 units built since 2012 in Houston,” Ken Valach, CEO of Trammell Crow Residential (TCR), says. “That is approximately 300 new apartment communities with 300 new staffs and property managers. Finding the people, training them, and getting them up to speed is a real challenge.” In this real estate cycle, superstar managers who specialize in lease-ups are so much sought that they can practically name their own salaries. “The bench is not 10-deep for high-quality community managers,” says Greg Mutz, CEO and Founder of AMLI Residential. “Companies are bidding up the salaries and comps for really good community managers and the top maintenance guys. In addition, most service technicians can leave for a job in the construction industry, which usually pays more, even though more of a boom and bust sort of position.” Gables CEO Sue Ansel says the search for top-notch onsite staffers is uniquely difficult. Adds Camden CEO Ric Campo, “Wage pressure in maintenance positions and shortage of construction workers is the biggest onsite challenge.” Ultimately, a tighter market for labor in any property management position adds expenses. “Out of controllable operating expenses, payroll comprise about 50 percent,” says Valach, who relies on third-party managers to run TCR’s communities. “No matter what you put in the pro forma, you have to pay up to get the best people.” – By Les Shaver

www.haaonline.org

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outreach pg 28.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:26 PM Page 1

On the Road with HAA

1

The Woodlands Region Meeting Thursday, January 11 at One Lake’s Edge Sponsored by 1 The Liberty Group The year is off to a great start for our Strategic Outreach Committee. The first of three outlying candidate screenings to “Pick Your Next Judge” was held. HAA invited local candidates running for Justice of Peace to say a few words and to take questions from the area managers. The HAA Political Action Committee will then send money to support the local candidate that the area managers select. Thank you to Joslin and her team for hosting us again at their beautiful property.

HAA IS REACHING OUT to better serve our members by bringing targeted networking and educational events to different parts of our 12-county service area. Contact outreach manager Lauren Turner at lturner@haaonline.org to sign up for these FREE, management-only events where you can learn about issues affecting your area and network with your fellow managers. Want to host an event? We are looking for member properties to host a Region meeting. Contact lturner@haaonline.org. 28

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www.haaonline.org


outlying leasing 101 pg 29.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:27 PM Page 1

Outlying

Leasing 101

Leasing 101: An Introduction to Leasing and the Apartment Industry From Fair Housing and the TAA lease paperwork to today’s terminology and techniques, the industry’s most seasoned and dynamic instructors are on hand to educate students on the boundless potential that awaits those who choose the apartment management industry as their career. This course is intended as an introduction to the apartment industry for new leasing professionals, as well as those individuals looking to learn more about the industry as a career. Topics covered include: • Greeting and qualifying the customer • Executing the lease contract • Telephone techniques and e-leasing • Overcoming objections and closing techniques • An overview of Fair Housing and more. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate, as well as a listing of HAA member management companies.

Class Schedule: 8 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. – Registration and continental breakfast 8:30 a.m. to noon – Program Noon to 12:30 p.m. – Lunch 12:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. – Program A complimentary lunch is provided.

Know the Lease Class includes TAA Lease paperwork curriculum, brought to you by HAA Legal Counsel, Howard Bookstaff!

For more i

nformati on an www.ha visit us online d to register, aonl at or email ine.org/educatio lturner@ n haaonlin outreach e.org

Program Cost: $65 for students paying in advance $75 for students who provide payment at the door

Outlying Leasing 101 Course Dates: February 21 –The Woodlands Hilton Garden Inn The Woodlands 9301 Six Pines Drive, The Woodlands, TX 77380

June 19 – Sugar Land July 19 – Pasadena October 11 – Lake Jackson

Houston Apartment Foundation • 4810 Westway Park Blvd., Houston, Texas 77041 • 713-595-0300 • www.haaonline.org


pac pg 30,31.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:28 PM Page 1

On the Scene with the HAA PAC 1

HAA PAC December Luncheon Thursday, December 14 at the HAF Dinerstein Reed Prokop Education Center Sponsored by 1 Earthworks Inc. The December HAA Political Action Committee luncheon included a Candidate Screening session. Participating candidates for Harris County Civil Court at Law No. 1 were George Barnstone (D) and Clyde Raymond Leuchtag (R); candidates for Harris County Civil Court at Law No. 4 were Sophia Mafrige (R) and David Tang (R); and candidates for Justice of the Peace Precinct 7, Place 2 were Sharon Burney (D), Audrie Lawton (D) and Cheryl Elliott Thornton (D).

WE’RE ALL ABOUT BETTER GOVERNMENT Threats from government are coming at the apartment industry at a rapid pace. The HAA PAC, the political action committee of the Houston Apartment Association, needs your help to fight bad legislation. HAA members can participate in the PAC on several levels. 2017 registration forms are now available! To join, renew or learn how to become involved with the PAC, see online at www.haaonline.org or contact apatel@haaonline.org. 30

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www.haaonline.org


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food drive pg 32,33,34.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:29 PM Page 1

On the Scene with HAA COMMUNITY OUTREACH HAA Food Drive With the help of Marlo Simmons and Valet Living, HAA-member management companies were challenged to get as many of their properties as possible to collect food for people and pets. Thanks to all of the volunteers, properties, managers and supervisors who got behind this year’s effort

Volunteers Ruk Nal, Green City Recyler Jennifer Devine, Harold Jones, Gary Singleton, Kris Kalh, Jennifer Traxler and Marlo Simmons, Valet Living Brooke Evans and Megan Parrish, RentPath Jon Sewell, Advanced Exercise Marcy Holmes, Designs by Holmes John Boriack, Brenda Reyes, Roberto Ramirez, Francisco Hernandez, Eleazar ArvizuMartinez, Mariana Reyes, Wendy Diaz, Barbara Ford and Angel Quiroz, Veritas Courtney Vitak, CityGate Maria Robertson, Just Energy Lori Stafford, Texscape Services Cliff LeJuene Steven Knott Corey Greer, Advanced Property Services Laura Lestus, Dixie CaldwellGreer, Arely Pena, Claribel Rodriguez and Angie Lavrack, The Liberty Group Kristin McLaughlin, Mohawk Industries Tom McLaughlin Phillip Price and Blake Subinsky, HD Supply Ryan Weis, Brooks Fruge, Austin, Ondrej, Juan Salazar, James Wagner and Bobby Wilson, Impact Floors Billy Griffin, Jeff Blevins, Dylan Coleman, Derek DeVries, Shelby Jurca and Sheila Bailey, Camp Construction Services

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Property Collection Contest Winners Collection Area Decoration Contest 1st Place: Hollister Place Apartments 2nd Place: Bristol Apartments 3rd Place: Idlewilde Apartments Most Food Items Collected 1st Place: Crossings at Cherry Apartments 2nd Place: Legends of Memorial Apartments 3rd Place: Hollister Place Managment Company with Most Food Items Collected 1st Place: Veritas Equity Management 2nd Place: Bell Partners 3rd Place :Steadfast Management Regionals Whose Portfolios Donated The Most Items 1st Place: Jackie Aguirre 2nd Place: Anna Bankston 3rd Place: Kelly Seylar Heart Award Both of these properties were effected by Harvey but still managed to collect donations: Nob Hill Apartments Green Oaks Apartments

www.haaonline.org


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On the Scene with HAA COMMUNITY OUTREACH HAA Food Drive

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www.haaonline.org


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Bruce McClenny is back with his market report. Learn how Hurricane Harvey shook things up for the Houston apartment market. By

BRUCE MCCLENNY, ApartmentData.com

S

porting events and weather made 2017 in Houston a very unusual year. The year began with preparations for hosting Super Bowl LI. According to Rockport Analytics, this event generated a net impact of $347 million for the local economy. In the fall, the Astros won the World Series for the first time in franchise history! From the home games, economic spending of $20 to $30 million was circulated through the economy, said Patrick Jankowski, senior vice president of research for the Greater Houston Partnership. The playoff run and the World Series also contributed in another way much more important than the economic impact. It provided an emotional escape for Houstonians recovering from the devastation of Hurricane Harvey, which hit Houston the last week of August. Economically speaking, Harvey spread $97 billion worth of damage across the Houston metro, according to Moody Analytics. Since Harvey was a rain event more than a wind event, fortunately the enormity of damage was lessened. To this point, CBRE reported that only 40 of the area’s 1,200 office buildings suffered damage, which represents 3.3 percent of the office inventory. Apartments followed suit in terms of a less than expected damage experience. We at ApartmentData.com surveyed 2,681 or 98.4 percent of the 2,725 metro-area properties during September and found 215 properties reported damage of 15,662 units out of the total 638,603 units. In other words, 2.5 percent of the metro-area’s apartment inventory reported damaged or down units. Homeowners suffered the most damage, as derived from reports filed with TXDPS indicating that Harvey damaged 72,000 single-family homes in metro Houston. This level of damage represents 4.8 percent of the 1.5 million single-family homes in the area.

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bruce pg 36,37,38,40.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:31 PM Page 2

$999

$983 1 $97

$968

2 $98

$981

2 $97

9 $1,00

$967

$976

$965 41 $9

$924

1 $92

Houston Overall Occupancy and Rents

04 $9 78 $8

7 $85

91.1% 90.5%

91.0%

91.2%

91.4%

91.1%

91.1%

90.9%

90.5% 90.1% 89.5%

89.4%

89.2%

88.9% 88.4%

Dec13

Mar14

Jun14

Sep14

Dec14

Mar15

Jun15

Sep15

Dec15

Mar16

Jun16

Sep16

Dec16

88.3%

Mar17

88.2%

Jun17

Sep17

Dec17

Copyright© 2018 Apartment Data Services, LLC, All Rights Reserved

Classification Analysis Occupancy ¢/sq ft

Effective Rent $/month 12-Month Trend

3-Month Trend

Absorption (Units) 12 Months 3 Months

As of December 31, 2017

Supply

2017 Construction

13,719

37.7%

165.7

$1,559

5,171

2,049

2016 Construction

21,291

81.3%

162.6

$1,532

3.8%

-3.6%

10,606

1,564

Class A (w/o 16+ const.)

119,761

92.0%

154.3

$1,474

6.3%

4.4%

4,519

1,157

Class B (w/o 16+ const.)

228,456

91.9%

113.3

$988

4.7%

7.0%

1,200

2,664

Class C

203,989

89.8%

92.1

$780

1.3%

1.5%

-3,028

1,458

Class D

52,763

87.0%

74.8

$641

0.3%

1.3%

-999

96

Overall

639,979

89.4%

114.4

$1,009

4.7%

3.9%

17,469

8,988

Images © Elen33 and Carolyn Franks | Dreamstime.com

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bruce pg 36,37,38,40.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:32 PM Page 3

Harvey most likely created leasing in the range of 19,000 units. This estimate is arrived at by using the adjusted 10,000 units from August, adding the 975 units from September and the 8,308 units from October and November combined.. Performance – Pre- and Post-Harvey The health of Houston’s apartment market is very connected or correlated to job growth. The graph below captures overall occupancy levels and effective rent prices over the last 16 quarters all the way back to the end of 2013. Economic times were very good in 2013 and 2014 when job growth registered 90,400 in 2013 and 118,200 in 2014. This level of job growth produced enough absorption to keep overall average occupancy firmly in the 91.0 percent range as almost 30,000 new units were delivered during ’13 and ’14. With supply and demand in balance, overall average rent levels advanced by $50 in 2013 and by $67 in 2014. These increases produced rent growth of 6.2 percent in 2013 and 7.8 percent in 2014. In 2015, job growth disappeared as job losses in oil production and related industries mounted. Job growth in 2015 was a mere 200 jobs. Occupancy topped out at 91.4 percent in June of 2015 and rent topped out in September at $971. During the fourth quarter of 2015, the overall average rent level dropped to $968. This was the first drop in the overall rent level in 26 quarters. The last time the overall quarterly rent level dropped was in June of 2009 during the Great Recession. During the first six months of 2016, rent levels were able to recover and move higher to a new peak of $983 per month in June of 2016. In September, rents slipped by a couple of dollars to $981, and then in the fourth quarter rents plummeted by $14 to end the year at $967. The steady delivery of over 21,000 units with only 4,500 units of absorption drove the occupancy level down by 2.1 percentage points. Overall occupancy ended 2016 at 88.4 percent. As Houston’s economy bottomed out in 2016 so did its apartment market. Rent levels bounced back during the first quarter of 2017 by $9 to $976 in response to a very good absorption performance of 5,226 units as job growth improved and the Super Bowl came to town. Despite the good absorption number, there were over 5,900 new units delivered, which moved occupancy down by a tenth of a percentage point to 88.3 percent. By mid-year-2017, Houston’s job growth advanced to 22,900 jobs, which represents a huge turnaround from the first halves of the previous two years when 2015’s mid-year job performance was a loss of 10,900 jobs and 2016’s was a loss of 14,500 jobs. This economic momentum translated into absorption for the second quarter of 7,520

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units, which is the best quarterly absorption since 2005 when Hurricane Katrina brought most of New Orleans to our city. Since Katrina, when over 24,000 units were absorbed in a matter of several months, the best quarterly absorption, up until now, occurred in the second quarter of 2013 when 6,643 units were absorbed. Occupancy was able to move higher by six-tenths of a percentage point to 88.9 percent even with the delivery of more than 4,000 new units. Year to date absorption through July was an amazing 13,405 units attained with the help of the stellar second quarter mentioned above. This seven month absorption performance was better than all of 2015 and three times better than all of 2016. What a great start for 2017, and then Harvey arrived in August. Harvey played havoc with absorption, making vacants of damaged units and creating a leasing frenzy from single-family homeowners who abandoned their damaged homes. August’s net absorption was -5,899 units, which contained the forced vacancy of the 15,662 damaged units. Keeping the damaged units in supply understated absorption and masked all the leasing going on with homeowners. Considering that August’s absorption was set to be -15,662 units but turned out to be only -5,899 units, leads to the assumption that the difference of approximatley 10,000 units must account for the hyperleasing by homeowners. In addition, the absorption activity from September, October and November must be considered when calculating the Harvey-Effect on leasing. The 975 units of absorption for September is not that different from any other September, but it must be considered as a net add-on to August. Absorption for October and November are super-extraordinary with October gaining 6,223 units of absorption and November following with 2,085 units. October’s monthly absorption number had not been seen since Katrina in 2005. The 10-year average absorpion for past Octobers and Novembers combined is -249 units. Harvey most likely created leasing in the range of 19,000 units. This estimate is arrived at by using the adjusted 10,000 units from August, adding the 975 units from September and the 8,308 units from October and November combined. The overall average rent level increased by $42 during 2017. Rents advanced by $15 prior to Harvey and then an additional $27 after Harvey. The overall average statistics of rent and occu-

pancy are a consolidation of the performance of each class of property. Classes are determined by a bell curve distribution of market rates. The table on Page 37 shows how overall market performance is mixed and how classes differ in rates and trends. In addition, new construction supply for 2016 and 2017, or properties in lease-up, are separated out to provide a stabilized look at Classes A and B. 2017 Construction – Lease-Ups There are a total of 13,719 units, or 54 properties, comprising the supply delivered in 2017. The product type and geography of these 54 properties are diverse. There are five high-rises, five affordable/tax credits and four seniors-only properties. As far as geography goes, there are 20 urban/infill, or Inner Loop and Galleria-area, properties and 34 suburban properties. Effective rent averages per property range from $866 per month (83 cents per square feet) for an affordable type to over $4,000 per month ($2.77 per square feet) for a high-rise. Rent trends for these properties cannot be calculated due to the continually increasing number and variety of new units being introduced over the time period being analyzed. The occupancy for these lease-ups is low at 37.7 percent. However, during a lease-up, occupancy becomes a tertiary measure and absorption and leases per month or leasing velocity are primary. The absorption over the last 12 months for 2017 construction is 5,171 units. Of the 54 properties in this category, only eight have occupancy greater than 80 percent, even after Harvey. Competition for renters is still intense in this group of properties as evidenced by the level of concessions offered. Forty-two of the 54 properties are offering concessions. To quantify the most aggressive specials: five properties are offering three-months free; 13 properties are offering two-months free; four properties are offering one and a half-month free; and 16 properties are offering one-month free. 2016 Construction There are a total 21,291 units, or 82 properties, delivered in 2016. Just as the 2017 vintage, these properties are diverse in product type and geography. There are six high-rises, five affordable/tax credits, and four seniors-only properties. Geographically, there are 23 urban/infill, or Inner Loop and Galleria-area, properties and 59 suburban properties. Effective rent averages per property range from $852 per month (79 cents per square feet) for an affordable type to over $3,000 per month ($2.37 per square feet) for a high-rise. As a group, the properties delivered in 2016 have an occupancy of 81.3 percent as of the end of 2017. This occupancy level for 2016 product at this point in time is probably surprising to www.haaonline.org


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many, but remember that 2016 was the absolute bottom of economic times for Houston when only 4,500 units of absorption was generated. Introducing new product in 2016 turned out to be lousy timing. By analyzing this group separately, the impact of the Harvey-Effect is highlighted and contrasted. There are properties in this group that benefited greatly from Harvey-leasing and there are some that saw minimal if any benefit. Those properties located near where most of the singlefamily damage occurred benefitted the most. Energy Corridor and Katy saw the most benefit followed by Spring and The Woodlands. In these areas, concessions have been eliminated or scaled back, whereas urban properties located in the Inner Loop and Galleria-area still have significant concessions. Of the 23 urban properties delivered in 2016, all have a concession with six of them offering three-months free and fourteen offering two-months free. The -3.6 percent rent trend over the last three months for 2016 properties may also attract a surprise reaction. All these properties, whether benefactors of the Harvey-Effect or not, have lowered effective rent over the fourth quarter. Class A Without New Construction – Stabilized In general, Class A represents the highest priced properties based on their overall average market rate. As mentioned above, a bell curve distribution method determines which properties make the A grade. Removing new construction units from Class A provides a stabilized occupancy picture. This group’s occupancy is 86.0 percent before 2016 and 2017 construction units are filtered out and 92.0 percent after the adjustment is made. A year ago, occupancy for this group was 88.3 percent. Positive absorption of 4,519 units over the last 12 months fueled this 3.7 percentage point leap in occupancy. As a result of this rally in occupancy, rents jumped by $65 over the course of 2017. Rents were flat for the first seven months of 2017, meaning that all the gain in rent occurred after Harvey. The lack of rent movement prior to Harvey provides some insight into the level of competition that persisted from 2016. Of all the 15,662 damaged units, Class A contributed 2,755 units. The Energy Corridor/City Centre/Briar Forest submarket accounted for 46 percent of the Class A damaged units or 1,254 units. Class B Without New Construction Class B represents the second tier of highest priced properties. The bell curve distribution of market rate creates a Class B that represents 36 percent of the entire market’s supply.

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Class B started 2017 with occupancy at 91.5 percent and by July occupancy advanced to 91.9 percent. Harvey imposed 6,212 damaged units on Class B and created about 3,800 units of leasing resulting in a net drop in absorption of 2,410 units. These actions brought occupancy down to 90.8 percent by the end of September. Harvey-related leasing continued during the fourth quarter as Harvey victims moved from the accommodations of family and friends. Fourth quarter absorption of +2,664 units carried occupancy back to where it was prior to the storm at 91.9 percent. The overall average monthly rent for Class B at the beginning of 2017 was $943. By year-end the rent level jumped by $45 to $988. Prior to Harvey, rent advanced by $13 and then an additional bump of $32 occurred after Harvey. Classes C and D Class C represents 31.9 percent of the overall market supply. Occupancy-wise, Class C peaked at 93.9 percent back in June of 2015. Since then, a steady, persistent decline has plagued Class C up until February of 2017 when occupancy bottomed out at 91.2 percent. By July, occupancy moved forward to 91.5 percent. Harvey forced 6,182 damaged units on Class C as well as created 1,300 units of leasing, which created a net drop in absorption of -4,914 units. By the end of September, occupancy dropped to 89.1 percent. Fourth quarter absorption of 1,458 units moved occupancy to 89.8 percent by year-end. The year began with rent at $770 and by July rent advanced by $5 to $775. After Harvey, rent could only advance another $5 to end the year at $780. Class D experienced a similar occupancy scenario to Class C where occupancy peaked in June of 2015 at 91.0 percent. Occupancy, after sliding the remainder of 2015 and all of 2016, began 2017 at 89.0 percent. Hurricane Harvey had negligible impact on Class D with only 513 units damaged with virtually no leasing gain. Occupancy ended the year at 87.0 percent with rent only able to add $2 for the year going from $639 to $641. 2018 – What to Expect There are numerous aspects to consider when addressing how 2018 will play out. Of major concern and importance will be the exodus of homeowners leaving apartments and returning to their repaired homes. As discussed above, the HarveyEffect leasing of 19,000 units represents an estimate of homeowners to return to their homes. For the sake of estimating, let’s say that 14,000 units become vacant over the course of 2018 relating to homeowners returning to their homes. In addition to this activity, there will be repaired apartment units returning to the market. Of the

15,662 units damaged, approximately 6,000 units have been repaired in 2017 leaving about 9,600 units to return and begin leasing in 2018. Part of the units already returning are two properties that were totally shutdown: Parkside at Memorial (379 units) and Broadstone Energy Park (416 units). On top of all this, another 6,100 units are under construction that will begin leasing in 2018. There is still more to consider in the supply dynamics of 2018, which is the 13,719 units delivered in 2017 that are only 40 percent occupied. All these supply-related aspects create somewhat of a glut of units that could provide resistance to rent gains. Houston’s economic prospects are looking up. According to the Federal Reserve Bank Dallas Branch, the Houston-area is projected to add 75,000 jobs in 2018 provided that the price of crude oil stays above $60 per barrel and the energy industry comes to life again by contributing to job growth. An alternative forecast has been made by the Greater Houston Partnership. Their forecast calls for 45,500 jobs in 2018, and assumes an energy industry in neutral and the price of oil to remain above $50 per barrel. These two forecasts provide extremes based on the health and participation of the energy industry. Let’s assume that job growth for 2018 lands somewhere between these extremes at, say, 60,000 jobs, which is in line with Houston’s long-term job growth average. With this amount of job growth, Houston could expect 12,000 units of absorption based on an industry metric that assumes one occupied unit for every five jobs created. Unfortunately, absorption will be impacted by the homeowners’ exodus as estimated above to be 14,000 units. So, absorption will be a mixed bag in 2018 that will register around -2,000 units, which is the net of +12,000 units being occupied from job growth and 14,000 units being vacated by homeowners. In years after storms, rent growth generally is flat, which can oddly enough turn out to be a good thing. The spike in rent that immediately follows a storm, as with Harvey, is so sudden and strong that holding those gains over the next 12 months becomes the goal. Renewing leases at the new rates will be a challenge since many of those leases signed a year ago carried concessions as much as two-months. A factor that bodes well for positive rent growth is the prospect for job growth bringing more renters to overcome all the challenges discussed above. A 2.0 percent rent growth for 2018 would be considered exceptional. Bruce McClenny is president of ApartmentData.com. For more details, call 281-759-2200 or email bruce@apartmentdata.com. www.haaonline.org


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In line with HAA’s Media Training for Multifamily Professionals seminar presented by OnWardU Communications, here are some tips on how to handle the media By

ANIA CZARNECKA, Ward

When

“No Comment” Won’t Do

W

hen incidents take place at their communities, property managers frequently find themselves on the frontline responding to questions from the news media. When understanding how media works in the era of the 24/7 news cycle, digital news and citizen journalism can help prepare you and your staff to effectively respond when a reporter shows up at your community, protect your company’s reputation and reduce the risk of the situation escalating. During a crisis situation, your first media interaction will set the tone and the course for how long your brand will be in the media spotlight. Educating yourself and your team before you are caught on camera is key. Incidents Covered by News Crews Newsrooms choose to report incidents based on a number of factors. Knowing how they evaluate events will help you determine the likelihood of an unplanned, negative event on your property becoming breaking news. News directors consider whether the event is relevant to or has significant impact on their audience. An incident that involves death or destruction, affects quality of life,

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During a crisis situation, your first media interaction will set the tone and the course for how long your brand will be in the media spotlight. Educating yourself and your team before you are caught on camera is key. has compelling visuals, is trending on social media, seems extreme in some way, involves conflict (especially if there is a perceived victim), or represents a trend is likely to pique media’s interest. Many common apartment issues qualify for a number of these criteria. Take flood damage for example. It involves destruction, affects residents’ quality of life, provides powerful visuals of the now homeless residents, destroyed property or mold, and - if the management doesn’t handle the repairs to the residents’ satisfaction – is a source of conflict and perceived victimhood. No wonder local consumer reporters frequently cover renters’ rights stories. When an incident happens, ask yourself: Is this something that media or any person with a digital device might report? Today, anyone with a cell phone is a citizen journalist and can post a viral story that might be picked up by traditional media, or in many cases, submitted to news outlets via

their websites. Even if the story is limited to social media, the damage to your reputation and leasing goals might be significant and long-lasting since online stories live forever. Would you know what to do to minimize the potential damage when confronted by a reporter? Or would you be caught off guard by someone holding the recording device? Would your plan be to say, “No comment,” or refuse to allow a reporter onto your property? Or would you be able to provide a standby statement or effectively redirect to a company-designated spokesperson? If you answered yes to “No comment,” and barring access, your crisis is likely to spiral out of control. Preparation is Key Talking to someone from the media can be a daunting task, but being prepared and knowing ahead of time what to do and say, can help protect your property’s reputation and reduce the stress for you and your team. February 2018

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When an incident happens, ask yourself: Is this something that media or any person with a digital device might report? Today, anyone with a cell phone is a citizen journalist and can post a viral story that might be picked up by traditional media, or in many cases, submitted to news outlets via their websites. Even if the story is limited to social media, the damage to your reputation and leasing goals might be significant and long-lasting since online stories live forever. First, develop a response plan that spells out the roles of all employees when a reporter shows up, including the designated media contact. Make sure all employees know who the media contact is and are able to correctly redirect all media inquiries to that person. Second, anticipate all possible situations, such as natural disasters, fires, resident relations issues or crime scenarios. Develop short, simple answers to questions a reasonable person would ask in these scenarios, as well as those you hope are not asked. When an actual crisis occurs, you can quickly update and adapt a particular set of talking points to use during the interview. Third, develop a fact sheet about the property, including property history, ownership, number of units and residents, to share with the media. It should also outline company policies applicable in crisis situations, such as repair requests, injuries, evictions, crime incidents and fires. Being ready with facts helps ensure better accuracy in the news report, demonstrates you are not avoiding tough questions and keeps you from having to deliver facts verbally, leading to more interview questions and camera time. When Media Arrives If you are caught off guard by news media on site, give yourself two minutes to think about potential outcomes of the incident and the interview. Could it escalate? What are possible repercussions? Who is most affected/interested in this event? Then, determine your objective as a spokesperson is in this golden moment. This will set the course for how long the story will last and how sensational it will become. Are you trying to reassure those most affected? Keep people safe? Minimize the damage? Something else?

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Next, identify the most important audience you need to reach at this moment. Who are they and what do you want them to think, feel – and most importantly – do? Is your most important audience the other residents? Neighboring homes and businesses? Prospective residents? Focus on the most important, not every, audience you will ultimately need to reach. Once you have determined all of the above in your two-minute readiness check, ask yourself what you would be questioning if a similar incident affected your loved ones. Jot those questions down along with the topicspecific messages and facts about the incident you need to convey to that single most important audience. Keep your messages brief – 10 words – and oriented to the interests and needs of the target audience. During the Interview Ask to discuss the questions and answers with the reporter before the camera begins to roll, but be aware the camera may be rolling regardless of what you perceive or are told. Listen carefully to make sure you understand each question and ask for clarification if needed. Do your best to remain calm and positive and adjust your tone and body language to the circumstances. You don’t want to smile when addressing a fire nor appear to be promoting your company and/or property when people are in harm’s way. Speak clearly and slowly in 10-second soundbites. This will make newsroom editing easier and help assure your message is quoted accurately in the final story. Answer the reporter’s question and bridge logically to one of your key messages. Then stop and wait for the next question. Avoid the urge to fill in gaps of silence.

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Never say “No comment,” and remember there is no such thing as “off the record” even if the camera seemingly stops rolling. Conduct your entire interaction with the reporter and crew as if you were on camera. Stick to the facts. If you don’t know the answer to a question, don’t speculate. Tell the reporter you will do your best to get them an answer after the interview or refer them to your communications team. Agree on your deadline to them, and keep your promises. Missing their deadline causes inaccurate stories to be published and shared virally. After the Interview Even if the reporter has left, your job is not done. Always make sure a designated public relations representative follows up with the reporter and provides promised information in a timely manner, so the reporters can meet their deadlines. Verify deadlines before they depart. Find out when the story will run and watch or read it. Monitor for “domino” coverage by other news outlets. Thank the reporters for the quality of their coverage when appropriate, and correct any factual errors. Would you like to learn more useful tips and get a chance to role play media interviews before you find yourself unexpectedly learning on the job what doesn’t work? Then be sure to register now for our half-day media training session on Feb. 20 designed especially for apartment and management professionals. Participants will learn how the media works in the 24/7 news cycle, how to prepare for potential crises, how to respond quickly and appropriately when media contact their community or organization, and how to help reduce the stress of an already stressful situation. Register online at www.haaonline.org.

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Here are a nine tips for millennials who want to be taken more seriously on the job. By

ANNE LOEHR, Keynote Speaker, Author, Consultant and Trainer

Get

Serious J

ust like all younger generations, members of the millennial generation (those born between 1981 and 2001) struggle with being taken seriously at work. But why should they be taken seriously? They are lazy, entitled, high-maintenance, in need of handholding and unwilling to pay their dues … right? Wrong. Those are the common stereotypes of the millennial generation and you can read about them everywhere. In fact, it seems like the media nearly overdoses on dissecting and analyzing everything about millennials (also known as Generation Y or Gen Y). I’m guilty too. I’ve written about how to speak so Gen Y will listen, recruiting and retaining millennials, quick tips for managing millennials, ways to motivate them and much more. But this time I’m not going to talk about millennials; I’m going to talk to them. Millennials, this article is for you. While I can’t dispel all the stereotypes about your generation in one post, I can help you when it comes to being taken more seriously at work. Here are nine tips for millennials to be taken more seriously at work: Tip 1: Let people talk about themselves and listen to them carefully. People love talking about themselves. Why? Because talking about themselves

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Just like all younger generations, members of the millennial generation (those born between 1981 and 2001) struggle with being taken seriously at work. But why should they be taken seriously? They are lazy, entitled, high-maintenance, in need of handholding and unwilling to pay their dues … right? Wrong. makes them happy, literally. Harvard University’s Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Lab found that self-disclosure activates two parts of the dopamine system in the brain, both associated with pleasurable feelings. However, this tip isn’t just about making others talk. When it comes to being taken more seriously, your ability to truly listen to others will earn trust and respect. Regardless of generation, our attention span is a whopping 17 seconds and our brain works 100 times faster than we speak. It’s not easy to listen and it takes practice. So, what can you do? Start by being aware that there are three levels of listening: Read more about listening and watch a video on the lost art of listening here: http://www.anneloehr.com/2014/11/06/leadership-lost-art-listening/.

Tip 2: Work on tone, grammar and overall rhetoric. Edit ruthlessly. Younger generations always have slang; text messaging just made it worse. Despite that, grammar still matters! Edit all of your correspondence with care, and pay close attention to your actual language when speaking. Also, take a video of yourself speaking or ask a friend to observe you, in order to identify the “um” or “like” filler words dominating your conversations. It’s better to pause to think about the word you’re going to say next rather than fill it with an unnecessary filler word. Pausing is actually quite powerful. How so? When you pause during a conversation, you slow the conversation down and gain control. People look up and pay attention when there is a pause. That’s the way to be taken more seriously.

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The millennial generation is seen as more casual than others. They rang in the era of jeans at work and have widespread causal relationships with higher-ups due to social media. Be aware of this perception and make an effort to brush up on business etiquette and dressing appropriately. Dressing appropriately doesn’t mean the same thing in every industry. While a corporate law firm may require a suit and tie, dress jeans may be more appropriate at a startup. Know your audience. Tip 3: Know what is going on in the world. To combat the stereotype that Gen Y is entitled and lazy, you need to be even more on point with current events than others. It’s imperative that you know not only what is going on in your industry locally, but also globally. Make sure that you are also aware of non-industry current events. Tip 4: Be both humble and confident. Asking for feedback is a great way to be

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taken more seriously. It takes confidence and humility to ask a client or colleague what they think of your performance. But be prepared to take that feedback in a non-reactionary way and make changes as needed. P.S. This is a great time to use those listening skills. Tip 5: Brush up on business etiquette. Dress like a professional. The millennial generation is seen as more casual than others. They rang in the era of

jeans at work and have widespread causal relationships with higher-ups due to social media. Be aware of this perception and make an effort to brush up on business etiquette and dressing appropriately. Dressing appropriately doesn’t mean the same thing in every industry. While a corporate law firm may require a suit and tie, dress jeans may be more appropriate at a startup. Know your audience. Speaking of etiquette, always be early for all meetings, calls and events. You need to dispel the myth that you’re lazy, so show up ready for action! Tip 6: Display accountability. Displaying accountability will work wonders for your quest to be taken more seriously. When something goes wrong, take responsibility. Absolutely never throw anyone else under the bus. Why? The outcome of throwing someone under the bus will be worse for your reputation than the outcome of owning up to your mistake. Tip 7: Show conviction. Don’t always say yes. Question and challenge thinking respectful-

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ly with open-ended questions. Your opinion and creativity are valuable, so don’t give them up in an effort to avoid rocking the boat. Tip 8: Keep posture open and upright. Not only does body language affect the way others see you, it also affects how you see yourself. Social psychologist Amy Cuddy explains this well in her TED Talk, “Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are.” Click the link below to watch the video and learn how postures of confidence affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, allowing you to be taken more seriously. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ks_Mh1QhMc. Tip 9. Be way more prepared than you think you need to be. Every time. Always prepare for at least five questions you’ll be asked or objections someone will make to your idea. This will give you confidence and show others that you are ready. If a pitch is involved, practice it forwards and backwards so you can always jump in when the time is right and shorten it if you’re given 10 minutes less than you expected. The good news is that following these tips will do more than just help you be taken more seriously. They will also prepare you for success as you continue on your career journey. In fact, half of these tips are great for leaders, which may be your goal. So keep them safe in your back pocket; you never know when they’ll come in handy. Anne Loehr is an internationally sought-after keynote speaker, writer, consultant and trainer. She helps leaders in large organizations connect today’s everyday decisions to the future workplace. Her end goal is to help organizations retain their top talent and not only survive, but thrive. To learn more about Anne, check out www.anneloehr.com or follow her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/anneloehr.

Want to see current and previous issues of ABODE online? Go to http://issuu.com/haa_abode.

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Here are five important factors to consider when finding and retaining top talent. By

I

t should come as no surprise that we will all face a difficult time in finding top talent in 2018. November 2017 Bureau of Labor Statistics lists the national unemployment rate at 4.1 percent. Companies throughout the United States are expanding and hiring at higher levels than many projected, and this number is growing as our economy continues to show signs of growth. The competition for qualified candidates is driving salaries up and forcing companies to consider alternative options to attract the new talent needed to grow while focusing on plans to retain existing staff. Most companies are seeing the negative impact of turnover and now realizing how vital staff retention is and, in some cases, this has become a larger focal point than the addition of new staff. With an increase in demand for hiring, we all must take a look at our current recruiting strategy and determine what is and is not working. Here are five easy steps to follow to help you get out ahead of your competition and secure the candidates you need. Culture – Many people feel this is only for the millennial crowd, but it expands through all levels. While culture can be a vague term, it is a large part of why people choose to make a move to a new company and an even more significant factor when an employee decides not to leave. Having a defined culture that is felt by all who interact with your company and those you employee will give you a definite advantage. Candidates are trying to determine your culture during the interview and, make no mistake about it, they are interviewing you as much as you are interviewing them. Job Descriptions – What has changed since you created your job description? Many of us build our descriptions day one and use the same information to recruit years later. Companies who fail to adopt recruiting strategies to meet current needs and changes within the company often make bad hires. We are all guilty of hiring to a profile that no longer matches the current need, but matches the job description we have hired to for previous candidates. To

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MATTHEW SMITH, The Liberty Group

With an increase in demand for hiring, we all must take a look at our current recruiting strategy and determine what is and is not working. Here are five easy steps to follow to help you get out ahead of your competition and secure the candidates you need. successfully recruit new candidates, you must know what you are lacking and how a new hire can fill that void. Employees want to know how they can make an individual impact. Sharing how they can do this by explaining their impact through their work will create a sense of ownership and pride in what they will be doing. Flexibility – Life happens outside of work. How we navigate the day-to-day with our teams can either help or hurt. Companies capable of creating more flexibility within the job develop a culture of caring and understanding leading to a stronger worklife balance. This added flexibility lets employees see how engaged we are and offers proof that we want our teams to be happy. Happy employees are engaged employees, and committed employees produce a better bottom line. Leadership – For any company to be successful, it must have strong leadership at all levels. Employees and prospective candidates want to see an engaged leadership team that not only understands the day-today issues, but also works to find solutions and ways to make employees’ work life better. You may not always have the answers, but leadership that fails to respond loses the faith and support of the employees they need to survive. Candidates interviewing with your company will research and try to find as much as they can about leadership styles and who they will be reporting to. Don’t Stop Recruiting – Great companies know the key to winning the battle for top talent is to be recruiting continually. Just because you may have a full staff does not

mean that cannot change tomorrow and you will be racing to find replacements. Having a constant candidate pipeline allows you to adjust quickly as needed and see potential upgrades or candidates that can have a positive impact on your business. With the qualified candidate pool tightening, it is more important than ever to expand your options. We all must look at candidates differently, with the goal of finding the skill-set we need in those candidates who may be working outside of our industry or those with limited experience but who show the aptitude and drive to be successful candidates. Successful recruiting campaigns cast a wide net and work through a larger pool to find the right talent with the goal of targeting specific skills and needs. In the past, it was easy to set major limitations on job searches because the candidate pool was much more robust. All companies must re-examine current hiring needs and identify additional recruiting sources that may provide new candidate options. Matthew Smith is the executive vice president of personnel services and COO of The Liberty Group Executive Search & Personnel. For 40 years, The Liberty Group has been a trusted adviser to real estate companies. From executive search and contract employment to temporary staffing and personnel, The Liberty Group can handle your staffing needs. For executive search, contact info@thelibertygroup.com. For apartment staffing services contact apply@thelibertygroup.com.

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Learning Leadership

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An on-site leader shares her go-to leadership tools. By

I

n a day in which social media is king, there seems to be a Facebook group for everything. One that I’m shamelessly a member of is a support group for property management. It can tend to be more of a rant group, with colleagues venting about issues they have on-site or looking for advice. More often, I see complaints about a lack of leadership in the workplace. Some of the posts I have read in the past month: “Can anyone help? I’ve contacted my supervisor and cannot get an answer.” “How would you feel if your regional director popped up for a surprise visit, you are running the office alone, handling a movein, have two residents waiting to speak with you, and a prospect waiting to tour. Your regional says, ‘I’ll just see you tomorrow.’ Shouldn’t they help you?” “Property managers – What do you actually ‘do’ on a daily basis?” And my personal favorite: “A terrible supervisor can make even the best and most loyal employee run for the hills.” Throughout my career, I have had experiences with both good and poor leadership. As I’ve been promoted through the ranks, I always try to emulate the good in those who helped me craft my skill(s). The Facebook posts got me thinking about ineffective leadership in the workforce and what qualities effective leaders possess. While I am no expert, here are a few qualities that have helped me build award-winning teams and individuals in this industry. Passion We must possess a passion for this industry, but most importantly we must be passionate about people. As leaders, we have the distinguished honor to make an impact on people’s lives each and every day. Whether it be a resident or an employee. Far too often, we get caught up in the logistics of this business, the reports, the goals, the deadlines, that we miss the opportunities to change someone’s day. Is it your groundskeeper’s birthday? Show up with a cupcake. Did your assistant manager just hit a huge delinquency goal? Celebrate it. Does your lead maintenance

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KRISTIN SETTLES, CAM, NALP, FDC Management

Being in a leadership role is never an easy thing and there is really no instruction manual for it. Remember adaptability, as leadership styles will change day-to-day. However, being able to effectively and efficiently lead your team is the defining factor for having a successful property. It starts at the top and works its way down. technician’s son or daughter play soccer? Ask them about their last game. Take five minutes out of every visit to get to know a member of your staff and write down a few facts. At a company I previously worked for, whenever someone new was hired an email was sent out companywide with a picture of the new hire and three facts about him or her. Then, minute by minute, emails would start rolling in congratulating them on their new job, welcoming them to the family. After all, that is what we are, correct? Family. Be passionate about your family. Knowledge Yes. You must know how to do your job. However, does your employee or the position beneath you know how to do your job? Why or why not? What would happen if you had to step away for a significant period of time or took a vacation? Who would step in for you? My career has been one long training session. And throughout my career, I have always been trained for the next position. Because of that, I have been able to teach what I have learned to those in positions below mine. Currently, I’m training my leasing consultant and assistant manager to do my job, because I want them to have the tools and knowledge to be a property manager one day. I do not fear job loss, rather I embrace job promotions. If my employees were to leave my company today, I want the company that is fortunate enough to get them, to want all of my employees. I want them to actually be as invaluable as I feel they are. I encourage them to learn details and skills that are not included in their job descriptions. When I infect them with my

passion and pass on valuable knowledge, it ignites a fire to learn more, to be better and to achieve greatness. That is immeasurable. Approachability and Transparency Are you feared or embraced when you are on-site? As leaders in this industry, we know that our days are never-ending. Often, we work from home, we are always on-call and most always operating our lives in “work mode.” How does that affect our time onsite? I’ve experienced both sides of the spectrum. I’ve had managers who come in, say hello, walk property, and open their laptop and work until it is time to go home. My office became their office, and I had no idea what they were doing. I felt ignored. I’ve also had managers that did the aforementioned. After they walked property, they were all about me, my staff and my property. They never opened their laptop, and if they needed to review a report, they sat with me and showed me what they were looking at, always training me to have their eye. Their door was truly opened at all times. I looked forward to their visits because I knew I was going to learn something new. They made it easy for me to ask questions, to air frustrations and to learn from them. I always knew what they were thinking and where I stood. Nothing was hidden. Admitting Mistakes We are all human and we are all fallible. Yes, even you and me! Unbelievable, I know. However, all mistakes are an opportunity to learn something new. As a leader, I have always gained respect when I am humble enough to say that I have made a mistake. It trickles down and my teams have an easier February 2018

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time telling me and each other when they have errored in judgement. It has created an atmosphere that is conducive to learning and growth instead of belittlement and fear. It has harvested deeper respect for each other built camaraderie throughout the team. Motivate, Motivate, Motivate No one wants to work for negative Nancy. It is human nature to want to be uplifted and inspired. As a leader, it is my job to make sure that each individual on my team is genuinely encouraged on a daily basis to be their best self. To do this, you can brag about them on social media; host an Employee Appreciation Day or a Maintenance Appreciation Week at your property; post “wanted” signs with their picture in your common areas with a caption that reads “Wanted: For having 20 years in the industry and being such a great staff member.” Thank you notes are an easy and thoughtful way to offer encouragement, as is buying lunch one day. Working alongside your employee reminds you how tough their job is and it shows that you care. Motivation, encouragement and support go a long way in this industry and are the driving force behind employee retention. There is also always something to be said about the simplicity of an authentic, “Good job!” Being in a leadership role is never an easy thing and there is really no instruction manual for it. Remember adaptability, as leadership styles will change day-to-day. However, being able to effectively and efficiently lead your team is the defining factor for having a successful property. It starts at the top and works its way down. In the process, don’t forget that you are just as much a team member as the entire staff. Always give credit to the ones that make it happen, the team and be prepared to take the fall when it comes time. That is my definition of a leader. Kristin Settles is a property manager for FDC Management and an active HAA member. She won the HAA Honors Award for the 2017 Portfolio Supervisor of the Year, and has watched many of her properties and team members win awards throughout the years. Settles has been in the industry for seven years, and offers hands-on leadership experience. She holds both the National Apartment Leasing Professional (NALP) and Certified Apartment Manager (CAM) designations.

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Rental Credit Reporting provides Houston’s

apartment industry with the most effective rental credit reporting tool available. RCR gives your leasing staff immediate access to information about which prospects have fulfilled their leases and who have been residents in good standing. RCR also tells you who hasn’t paid rent, who has broken leases and who has received their deposit refund.

Rental Credit Reporting (RCR) was established in 1977 to solve screening problems the Houston Apartment Association founders felt plagued the local apartment industry. RCR has unsurpassed data on resident rental histories in the Houston region. The Houston Apartment Association and CoreLogic are partnered to expand RCR and include the following searches in one bundled report with immediate and unlimited inquiry access. National Landlord-Tenant Data – Searches more than 34 million landlord-tenant court records including filings, judgments and liens. Local resident rental history including evictions, amount owed at move-out, broken lease information, NSF checks, deposit disposition. Texas Criminal Data – Instant delivery of available felony and misdemeanor records from Texas statewide and 18+ supplemental counties including Harris, Montgomery and Fort Bend. Terrorist Check – Automated search tool that identifies known or suspected terrorists and fugitives from various data sources, including the FBI, other federal agencies as well as state and local law enforcement agencies. Sex Offender Search – Instantly informs your staff if a prospective or current resident is a registered sex offender. Move-in/Move-out Entry – Submit your property’s rental history data online through RCR's familiar and easy-to-use tools. Eviction Entry – Protect yourself and other properties by registering your evictions with RCR. Inquiry History – Know where else your applicant is applying. Quick and Easy – Information is entered into an easy-to-use Web application and a decision is delivered instantly. Cost Effective – Automated decisions save your staff time. Immediate Access – Inquiries concerning prospective residents can be made online, 24/7. Monthly Activity Report – No need to guess if you’re getting what you are paying for – each owner/management company can access a monthly report showing their properties system use. Subscribe Today – For approximately 32 cents per unit per month, RCR can help make sure you know just who your prospective residents are. * For properties 49 units or less, you have unlimited inquiries for $10 per month.

a service of

in partnership with

To subscribe or to learn more, call RCR at 713-595-0300, email rcr@haaonline.org or visit www.haaonline.org.


Image © Katarzyna Bialasiewicz | Dreamstime.com

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Learn how to prevent sexual harassment and how to respond when it occurs in the workplace By

LUCY WHITTINGTON, Heartland Payment Systems

Unwelcomed Advances

W

e sure had our fair share of Harvey in 2017, and I’m not just talking about the hurricane. The issue of sexual harassment has become a public, open conversation now. In only the past few months we have seen an unparalleled amount of sexual harassment accounts surface. From Hollywood to Main Street and all workplace environments in between, there are a vast array of industries bringing this issue to the forefront and now in our collective consciousness. As an employer, if you haven’t done so already, this is as good a time as any to inspect what internal controls are in your workplace. The U.S. Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC) defines workplace sexual harassment as “unwelcome sexual advances or conduct of a sexual nature which unreasonably interferes with the performance of a person's job or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.” Sexual harassment can range from persistent, offensive sexual jokes to inappropriate touching to posting offensive material on a bulletin board. Sexual harassment at work is a serious problem and can happen to both women and men.

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The U.S. Equal Opportunity Employment Commission (EEOC) defines workplace sexual harassment as “unwelcome sexual advances or conduct of a sexual nature which unreasonably interferes with the performance of a person's job or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.” Sexual harassment can range from persistent, offensive sexual jokes to inappropriate touching to posting offensive material on a bulletin board. Sexual harassment at work is a serious problem and can happen to both women and men. Both state and federal laws protect employees from sexual harassment at work. Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. While Title VII is the base for sexual harassment claims, states have sexual harassment laws that may be even more strict. According to the EEOC, nearly 27,000 charges of sexual harassment were filed for the 2016 fiscal year. This number doesn’t include charges filed with state and local agencies or situations where employees went directly to an attorney, and many

employees who are victims of sexual harassment or are affected by it don’t report incidents at all. Victims and witnesses of sexual harassment often refrain from reporting it because the harasser has the power to retaliate or because the organization does not have adequate channels for reporting in place. In many other cases, victims report the harassment and nothing is done about it; the harassment is excused and the complaints are rebuffed. Word gets around that the organization tolerates harassment, causing employees to cease

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reporting it internally. They either keep quiet, file charges with a governmental agency or seek out an attorney. None of these outcomes is good for employers or for the people they employ. If litigation ensues, harassment can cost employers hundreds of thousands of dollars (millions even) if harassment is pervasive in the company culture. And when harassment continues unabated, victims suffer physically and psychologically, and often see their careers stifled. Needless to say, the workplace should be a safe and secure place, and it’s the employer’s responsibility to make it that way. Employers can and should do everything in their power to prevent harassment and appropriately respond when it occurs. Training employees on what constitutes as harassment and how to respond to it is a good and necessary first step, and employers also need to establish multiple options for reporting, investigating allegations promptly and thoroughly, and taking appropriate steps to discipline violators. The EEOC recommends these additional preventive measures: • Make an organizational commitment to diversity, inclusion, and respect—and establish policies and procedures to hold people accountable to that commitment. • Empower those who are responsible for responding to allegations of harassment and preventing harassment from occurring. • Establish a sense of urgency and seriousness about prevention by spending appropriate amounts of time and money on training or other prevention and response activities. • Survey employees on whether they’re currently being harassed or know of harassment taking place. • Avoid rewarding managers for minimum complaints on their team, as doing so could incentivize the suppression of reporting. • Protect people from retaliation. • Assess risk factors. • Assess preventative measures already in place to ensure they are effective. • Clarify what behavior is prohibited. • Use discipline proportional to the offense (sexual assault and an offhand remark shouldn’t necessarily have the same consequence). For any of these measures to work, employees need to know that if they report harassment, their report will be taken seriously, they’ll be protected from retaliation and the harassment will stop. In short, they need to trust their employer. Consequently, anything an employer does to foster distrust will make anti-harassment measures much less effective. When it comes to preventing harassment, employers cannot say one thing and do another. Honesty and accountability are key. Trust can take time to build, but it can be lost in a moment. Lucy Whittington is a senior product advisor for Heartland Payment Systems. Heartland serves businesses of all sizes and is vested in helping you achieve your goals. Heartland specializes in payroll, human resources, payment processing as well as solutions in marketing and customer analytics. Heartland’s Payroll+HR is a full-service approach encompassing custom tools and resources that cut through the confusion of compliance issues, the latest employment laws and regulations, and more. Integrity, fairness and transparency are our core values. We focus on customer relationships and advocacy. To learn more contact Lucy Whittington at 713-445-6819 or Lucy.whittington@e-hps.com.

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Law, continued from Page 12 building is a gateway to summon Gozer and bring about the end of the world. The Ghostbusters’ goal is to keep the Gatekeeper away from the Keymaster. Barrett’s and Tully’s apartments are a mess after each is demonized. In one scene, a demonic dog breaks through the wall of Tully’s apartment to the hallway. Once Zuul and Clortho go to the roof, the structure is torn apart (despite the best efforts of the Ghostbusters). A lot of damage and destruction to the apartment building. What would we do in Texas? Residents come in all shapes, sizes and mental states, and (believe it or not) claims of residents being visited by demons is nothing new. However, if you have complaints about excessive noise and disturbances, the conduct would be a violation of paragraph 20 of the lease. Although it would be best to deal with the situation before the demons go to the roof and tear apart the building, this conduct would also present a violation of the lease. Section 25.2 of the lease requires that the resident use customary diligence in maintaining the apartment and not damaging or littering the common areas. This provision was clearly violated by Tully and the demon/dog that broke through his apartment to the hallway. Section 13.1 provides that the resident must promptly pay or reimburse the apartment owner for loss, damage or costs of repairs or service in the apartment community because of a lease or rules violation, improper use, negligence or other conduct by the resident, invitees, occupants and guests. This section 13.1 could also support a default of the lease if the damages were not paid for by the residents. American Psycho (2000) Similar to Ghostbusters, American Psycho was not focused on an owner/resident situation, but featured many issues that would be

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sensitive to any apartment owner-watching audience. The movie involved a wealthy New York investment banker named Patrick Bateman (played by Christian Bale) whose life revolves around dining at trendy restaurants and keeping up appearances for his circle of wealthy and shallow associates. When Bateman is upset, he murders a homeless man and kills the man’s dog. He then gets a coworker drunk at a Christmas party and takes him back to Bateman’s apartment. He then murders his coworker with an axe in his apartment. He then goes to the coworker’s apartment to stage a situation so that others believe the coworker has left the country. After being interviewed about the coworker’s disappearance, Bateman takes two prostitutes to his apartment, tortures them and they leave bruised and bloodied. Bateman then gets together with two other women in his missing coworker’s apartment. He kills one of the women and chases the other while naked and wielding a chainsaw down the stairs of the apartment building. He then kills her with the chainsaw. Very disturbing conduct! If you have someone like Bateman in your apartment community and discover any disturbing criminal conduct, the police should be called immediately. Bateman has committed a bunch of lease violations (not the least of which is keeping corpses in his apartment!). He is also an unauthorized occupant in his coworker’s apartment (where he also left corpses). Violations would include several subsections of paragraph 20 and paragraph 25.2 regarding maintaining the apartment and not damaging or littering the common areas. Eagle Eye (2008) The plot of Eagle Eye also had nothing to do with apartment owners and residents, but depicts a resident situation that merits discussion.

Jerry Shaw (played by Shia LaBeouf) is a Stanford University dropout who learns his identical twin brother Ethan, an officer in the U.S. Air Force has been killed. Following the funeral, Shaw is surprised to find $751,000 in his bank account. Later he finds his Chicago apartment filled with weapons, ammonium nitrate, classified DOD documents and forged passports. He receives a phone call from a mysterious computer-generated voice who warns that the FBI is about to come to his apartment and arrest him. Of course, before he finds out he had a bunch of money in his bank account, the owner of his apartment approached him for his rent, which Shaw did not have. Before he got the money, he tried to avoid the apartment owner , but afterward, he was happy to pay the owner in cash. What would you do with Shaw in Texas? Discovery of weapons, bomb making materials and forged passports would be disturbing to say the least. After you call the police, you would have to determine what other action should be taken against Shaw. Although you may believe his story that he had no idea that these items were in his apartment, can you take the risk? Sometimes it’s better to try to evict and lose than do nothing at all. If you try to evict Shaw, but lose because the judge believes that he was set up (as the movie later shows), you may have additional defenses if he later causes problems at the property consistent with what was in his apartment. If, on the other hand, you do nothing (believing Shaw’s story that he was set up), and something happens later, you can be assured that you would be held accountable to any victims of his conduct in a subsequent lawsuit. Good luck to all the Oscar nominees! Be sure to watch for apartment owner/resident situations in future movies.

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We want our employees to be happy, right? Here are the five most common reasons employees aren’t satisfied at work. By

ROBERT COTE, Hire Priority

S

ometimes keeping our employees happy can seem like an impossible task. However, happy employees equal better productivity, which translates to a more profitable organization. Improving employee happiness levels doesn't have to be a chore. Here are the top five reasons employees typically hate their jobs. 1. Disconnection To be an effective leader you have to forgo being your employee's best friend. However, this professional distance can sometimes backfire on the well-intending manager. One of the reasons employees dread going to work is having to answer to someone where there is a lack of connection. This can create an awkward, uncomfortable environment and relationship between. The most effective way to fix this undesirable situation is to check in with each employee on a weekly basis and convey your experiences in the workplace. Make it a point to tell them how the job they are doing is helping you do your job better. You can connect professionally without compromising professional distance. 2. They Don’t See Value in their Job It can be extremely detrimental to the success of an employee when they feel like their job doesn’t matter or doesn’t bring any value to the company. Monotony can often lead to one believing they aren’t a valued asset to the company. As a manager, find a way to convey how your employee’s efforts contribute to what the company is accomplishing on a daily, weekly, monthly and yearly basis. Perhaps do a monthly job highlight where you post on a message board in the workplace how a certain job contributes to the company so the whole staff sees how their co-workers contribute. / See I Hate My Job, Page 63

Making sure employees are happy doesn’t have to be rocket science, but it does have to be a concern. Investing time and effort into employee happiness now can save you a lot of headaches down the road and make sure you get the very best from your workers. www.haaonline.org

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Education, continued from Page 19

HAA NEXT: Professional Development Breakfast Friday, February 23 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Program fee: $10 This niche group within HAA is dedicated to the networking and professional development needs of HAA members 35 and younger. Network with your peers at this low-cost breakfast and grow your career together among the next generation of HAA leadership.

MARCH APPLE: CORE 2 – “How to Deal with Difficult People. So Many People … So Little Time!” with Jackie Ramstedt Tuesday, March 6 8:30 a.m. to noon Program fee: $50 Sponsored by Best Plumbing This APPLE session focuses on addressing and handling lifealtering situations that occur in the blink of an eye. Learn how to properly confront residents, prospects, vendors, governmental agencies, law enforcement personnel, shoppers, testers, other teammates and more in difficult situations and how to de-escalate situations. See Page 22 for details. CAM: Industry Essentials & Resident Experience Wednesday, March 7 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Program fee: $1,050; Tuition may be paid in full or divided into two payments of $525. New CAM candidates must begin the program with the first course on Wednesday, March 7. This module covers the details of the global state of the apartment industry, the property as an investment, the role as a CAM credential holder, advocating for the resident, different housing types, building relationships with residents and more. See Page 24 for details.

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CAS: Industry Essentials & Resident Experience Wednesday, March 7 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Program fee: $625; $125 per module This program is a generalized overview of the role of an apartment property manager. This program includes information on customer service, occupancy management, property and personal security, emergency management and resident relations. CAM: Financial Management Thursday, March 8 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Program fee: $1,050; Tuition may be paid in full or divided into two payments of $525. New CAM candidates must begin the program with the first course on Wednesday, March 7. Topics include: relating CAM responsibilities to the financial performance of a property; analyzing an income statement; developing and managing a stabilized budget; preventing and solving for bad debt; and performing a property valuation. See Page 24 for details. CAS: Finance Thursday, March 8 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Conquer your fears of finance by attending this highly informative module. Topics covered in this section include: investment objectives, how to add value to an existing investment, a basic mathematics refresher, as well as financial statements, budgets and property valuation. ACES Luncheon Friday, March 9 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Location: TBD Program fee: $55 Please note that this program is open only to executives in property management (owners, presidents, regionals,

supervisors, marketing/training directors, etc.). Eligible attendees to ACES luncheons are permitted to invite any of their staff to the programs, provided the registration also includes at least one person at the supervisor level or above. Leasing 101 (Day and a half) Tuesday, March 13 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Program fee: $65 prior to March 13; $75 An in-depth introduction to the apartment industry for new leasing professionals as well as those individuals looking to learn more about the industry as a career. This day and a half program covers topics including: greeting and qualifying the customer, executing the lease contract, overcoming objections and closing techniques, an overview of Fair Housing and more. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate, as well as a listing of placement agencies and management companies that are members of HAA. If you are not working for a member company of HAA download this registration form www.haaonline.org/images/pro grams/pdf/leasing101_2017.pdf. Redbook Seminar Tuesday, March 20 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Program fee: $125 prior to March 20; $160 See Page 25 for details. Redbook Seminar Thursday, March 22 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Program fee: $125 prior to March 20; $160 See Page 25 for details. CAM: Marketing Wednesday, March 28 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Program fee: $1,050; Tuition may be paid in full or divided into two payments of $525. New CAM candidates must begin the program with the first course on Wednesday,

March 7. Learn all you need to know about creating an effective marketing plan by using resources to effectively gather and calculate data needed in a marketing plan; analyze a market including competitors, identify the internal market readiness of a property, perform an economic analysis of a property, analyze and draw conclusions from a market plan using the SWOT methodology, add value to a property through use of rental income, rates, and/or adjustments, add value to a property through managing occupancy, select and write an effective recommendation, identify types of promotion, identify types of advertising media, develop a budget for a marketing plan and measure the success of a marketing plan. See Page 24 for details. CAM: Property Maintenance Thursday, March 29 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Program fee: $1,050; Tuition may be paid in full or divided into two payments of $525. New CAM candidates must begin the program with the first course on Wednesday, March 7. Relate CAM credential holders’ responsibilities to the maintenance of a property. Topics include: overseeing service requests, ensuring employees in all roles receive the appropriate training to ensure service requests are completed accurately, managing inventory, identifying the need for a contractor or vendor, completing the bidding process and signing of a contract, using inspection results to prioritize maintenance and repairs, developing a preventative maintenance program and identifying maintenance needs for green properties. See Page 24 for details.

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I Hate My Job, continued from Page 61 3. A Craving for Meaning and Purpose No matter how good the intentions are of a company, at the end of the day work can often just be work. As human beings, we are constantly seeking meaning and purpose in our lives beyond what we do to pay our bills. An employer is in a very important position in a person's life, because they take up the majority of the person's waking hours. This fact can be forgotten by employers when a company is consumed by their bottom line, however it is better to be considered and acted on. Programs that allow the employee to engage in charitable activities have shown to be big morale boosters. The key is to make sure employees can participate during work hours, you don't want to ask for more of their time, because then they are likely to not participate and you lose out on those morale boosting benefits.

#mynews #mynetwork #myfriends #myhaa

4. Underdeveloped Skills A good leader sets their employees up for success. When this doesn’t happen from the start, failure is almost always guaranteed. A big way to make this mistake is by providing the wrong tools to the employee, with the purpose of building the skillset they need to be successful in their position. Many leaders take for granted that the things they see as simple and obvious may not be the case for someone new to the job or company. Keep in mind that an employee may not admit they feel unprepared for a task for fear of being terminated or ridiculed. Make sure you require the employee to participate in on-going paid training. Not only will this show the employee they are valued, it will ensure they feel confident in accomplishing the job at hand. 5. They Feel Unheard It’s impossible to make everyone happy, but it’s not impossible to make sure everyone is heard. This simple concept, giving your employees a voice, can go a long way in keeping up morale. In the age of modern technology, you can have employees email suggestions to you at a certain time every week so you can make time to read and reply to them. It’s not enough to welcome opinions, you have to address them in a respectful and prompt fashion to make employees feel like they are worth sharing. Making sure employees are happy doesn’t have to be rocket science, but it does have to be a concern. Investing time and effort into employee happiness now can save you a lot of headaches down the road and make sure you get the very best from your workers. Robert Cote is a director at Hire Priority Staffing & Executive Search with more than 15 years of staffing and search experience and more than 10 years of executive oversight and direct profit & loss responsibility experience. Hire Priority has been one of the leaders in multifamily job placement since 1990, providing temporary, temp-to-hire, payroll hire, permanent placement, training and career coaching. Cote can be reached at rcote@hirepriority.com.

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Get in the picture! ABODE magazine is your source for what’s happening in the Houston-area apartment market. Every month, our members-only publication highlights industry news and trends, plus photos of YOU, our members, from HAA events! ABODE is your source for industry-specific legal and legislative news as well. Share your promotions and new hires in our “People on the Move” column, or the latest development in your area of expertise by writing an article. Look for ABODE in the mail the first week of each month, or read online at issuu.com/haa_abode. Contact the Communications Department at comm@haaonline.org for details and contact Amanda at asherbondy@haaonline.org to advertise. ABODE is your HAA, and it’s #notjustaprettyform!

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On the Scene with the HAA NEXT

1

NEXT Holiday Mix-N-Jingle Sponsored by 1 Brookway Horticultural Services Thursday, December 7 at Christian’s Tailgate – Heights HAA young professionals enjoyed an evening of fun and games to celebrate the holiday season.

MEET THE NEXT GENERATION OF HAA LEADERSHIP. This niche group within HAA is dedicated to the networking and professional development needs of HAA’s young professionals. Network with your peers and grow your career together among the next generation of HAA leadership! To Learn how to become involved with NEXT, see online at www.haaonline.org/next. 64

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Welcome Mat

Introducing HAA’s NEW MEMBERS

OWNERS

499 East Tidwell Investments LLC Hamza Ali 3033 Chimney Rock Road #350 Houston, TX 77056 832-831-6310 x5 Redstone Apartments

Calhoun Apartments LLC Pat McCarley 1302 Waugh Drive #849 Houston, TX 77019 713-299-8800 Calhoun Apartments Greg Comer Greg Comer P.O. Box 841602 Houston, TX 77284 281-770-5510 MBlue Properties Inc Shohrat Allayev 14335 Ella Blvd. Houston, TX 77014 832-286-4290 Aspen Apts Cranbrook Downs Apartments Fall Lake Apartments Nimes Real Estate Jaime Hinojosa 201 W. 5th St. 11th Fl #36 Austin, TX 78701 979-575-3726 Referred by Diane Gilbert, CPM PLZ Investment LLC Marline Santos P.O. Box 161 Prairie View, TX 77446 936-857-9500 Empty Eye Old 290 Apartments Progress Residential Property Manager LLC Sara Lena Trenkel 312 Spring Hill Drive #500 Spring, TX 77386 936-577-4523 Progress Residential Properties

Windsor Communities Telisha Ryans 1203 Dunlavy St. #100 Houston, TX 77019 617-973-9680 The Allen House Apartments Memorial by Windsor Apartments Domain by Windsor Apartments Windsor West University Apartments The Sovereign at Regent Square Apartments Midtown Houston by Windsors Worldwide Equities Inc Lollie Tristan 2310 S Eldridge Houston, TX 77077 832-300-4409 Saint James Place Apartments Westbury Park Apartments Vista on Gessner Apartments

SUPPLIERS

365 Restoration Services Cliff Martin 9330 LBJ Fwy #900 Dallas, TX 75243 855-745-7378 General Contractors, Fire/Water Damage Restoration Allstate Insurance Agency Jerry Ford Jerry Ford 9360 N. Sam Houston Pkwy #250 Humble, TX 77396 713-819-3762 Insurance, Insurance Consultants Anderson Restoration Annette O’Neal 12920 Cypress North Houston Cypress, TX 77429 281-376-7474 General Contractors, Fire/Water Damage Restoration, Roofing Contractors

City-Wide General Contractors Inc. Sandra Y. Lopez P.O. Box 36679 Houston, TX 77236 713-782-3442 General Contractors, Painting Contractors

Dogwood Building Supply Russ Phemister 901 Bridge St. Winston Salem, NC 27101 214-298-5517 Cabinets, Lighting Fixtures & Supplies Referred by Deborah DeRouen, CAS Fort Bend Battery & Golf Carts Ted Lee 2112 1st St. Rosenberg, TX 77471-4349 713-204-1510 Golf Cars & Carts Referred by Paige Tater Forthea Interactive Marketing Holly Gary 2727 Allen Pkwy #1200 Houston, TX 77019 713-568-2763 Advertising Agencies, AdvertisingInternet, Marketing Consultants & Services Referred by Merideth Savoie Innovation Painting Co. & Restoration Martin De La Cruz 1259 Blackberry Hollow Drive Houston, TX 77073 281-250-6394 General Contractors, Painting Contractors MVP Executives LLC Lindsey Wentzel 33136 Magnolia Circle #F Magnolia, TX 77354 832-497-5057 Executive Search Consultants, Personnel Consultants Referred by David Koenig, CAS Proforma Angelini & Diamond Solutions Andrea Winans 11131 McCracken Lane #B Cypress, TX 77429 281-304-8406 Advertising-Specialties, Direct Mail Service, Printers, Promotional Products, T-Shirts, Uniforms Referred by Andrea Winans

RDM Contracting Rusty McCarthy P.O. Box 130 Bedias, TX 77831 936-206-4051 Carpenters, Fire/Water Damage Restoration, Roofing Contractors, Remodeling & Repair-Building Contractors, Roofing Consultants, Waterproofing Contractors, Welding Retrahtec Pest Control Inc. Larry Foster 13311 White Oak Landing Houston, TX 77065 281-897-9128 Pest Control Services, Termite Treatment, Exterminators The Walkway Grinders Rubin Rodriguez 3003 Seagler Road #5113 Houston, TX 77042 832-629-6033 Concrete Contractors, Paving Contractors Triple B Plumbing LLC Norman Barnes 1300 N. May St. Madisonville, TX 77864 936-307-0753 Referred by Claude Arnold Vima Decor Chelsea Wallace 1411 W Walnut Hill Lane Irving, TX 75038 512-243-5645 Counter Tops, Cabinets I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

PropertyTaxes.Law Brandon Barchus 7503 Shadyvilla Lane Houston, TX 77055 832-919-8800 Tax Consultants-Ad Valorem, Legal Services

ALL SUPPLIER MEMBERS are listed online at haabuyersguide.com, searchable by product/service category or company name. 66

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I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

www.haaonline.org


Go-gets feb pg 67.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:46 PM Page 1

The Go-Getters HAA’s MEMBERSHIP RECRUITERS

MAKING MEMBERSHIP MATTER Recruit all year round and become part of the Go-Getter Club.

HAA works because our members support each other and the industry. The association is your best bet for informed referrals when you are looking for a new product or service provider. If your property deals with a vendor that is not a member, encourage your contact with that company to join HAA and discover all we have to offer!

What is a Go-Getter? The Go-Getter Club is a year-round membership recruitment group comprised of individual HAA members who work for owner/management and supplier companies.

Why recruit for HAA? Joining the Go-Getters will give you additional exposure and special recognition among HAA members. You are also helping to strengthen your association with new members and increased involvement. HAA events create opportunities to talk with your peers, make new industry connections and develop lasting relationships.

Recruit all year long! Go-Getter meetings are now quarterly: March 29 July 12 September 27 December 6 Visit www.haaonline.org/gogetters for details

THE GO-GETTERS ARE THE BACKBONE of the Houston Apartment Association. By recruiting new members, the Go-Getter Club helps both new management and supplier companies and the association grow for the future. To join the club and get going on recruitment, see online at www.haaonline.org or contact Amanda and Lauren in the Membership Department at members@haaonline.org.

www.haaonline.org

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ambass pg 68, 69.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:47 PM Page 1

The Ambassador ONE Society HAA’s WELCOMING COMMITTEE

JOIN THE TEAMS!

Come learn and grow with one of HAA’s most active organizations – just for supplier members.

H

AA’s Ambassadors are making their way around town to bring energy to the association and share valuable information with supplier colleagues. What is the Ambassador ONE Society? This “Organized Network Exchange” is composed of supplier member volunteers who represent the Houston Apartment Association. The Ambassadors develop and reinforce relationships among product and service companies and strive to promote professionalism in the multifamily industry. They are tasked with sharing industry news as well as contacting new and current property management members to keep them up-to-date on HAA benefits and services as well as upcoming events. If you are lucky enough to have an Ambassador visit your property, take this opportunity to gain valuable information about HAA and get more involved. They are your resource for updates on HAA happenings and industry news. The Ambassador will be sure to not take too much of your time, but their efforts will help HAA better serve you. As a supplier, getting involved with the Ambassador ONE Society can increase your customer base as you contact HAA members. The initial contact is a great opportunity to introduce yourself as a volunteer of HAA along with your company. After tending to HAA business, give your business card and follow up with a thank you note. Each month, HAA hosts a meeting for the Ambassadors to network and share industry leads. HAA supplies Ambassadors with a list of members to contact and in turn, Ambassadors reach out on behalf of HAA and share updates amongst each other. When changes occur at a property, the volunteers work together to find out more information about management changes as well as product or service needs associated with those changes that may benefit another Ambassador. The sharing of property information proves to be a huge help in keeping supplier members versed on industry happenings. The Ambassadors are representatives of the HAA and act as a bridge to promoting benefits and services to property teams. They make HAA’s connection with members stronger and long-lasting.

1

2

3

Mark your calendars and join us! Meetings are held on the first Wednesday of each month:

February 7 • March 7 • May 2 June 6 • August 1 • September 5 October 3 • November 7 1. Team “The Cool Kids Corner” 2. Team “Ambassador Strong” 3. Team “Cash ME Onsite”

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1

2

1. Ambassador Co-chair Deborah DeRouen, ResPage 2. Ambassador Co-chair Derek DeVries, Camp Construction Services. 3. Ambassador ACE Candis Mohr, AAA Plumbers 4. “One of the Year” Vince Mallace. 3

4

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Portfolio Changes The following owner/management companies have added the listed properties to their portfolios: • 499 East Tidwell Investments LLC: Redstone Apartments, 66 units at 5401 Werner St. • Alliance Residential Company: Memorial Hills Apartments, 308 units at 4200 Scotland St. • Allied Orion Group: Crosby Plaza Apartments, 86 units at 6616 FM 2100 Road in Crosby. • AM Hayden Properties: Edgewater Apartments East, 216 at 7215 Spring Cypress Road in Spring. • Ashford Communities: Ashford Cove at Briar Forest, 296 units at 10925 Briar Forest Drive. • Better World Properties LLC - Sumar: Spencer Square Apartments, 116 units at 3200 Federal Road in Pasadena. • Boyce Group Investments LLC: White Cliff Apartments, 30 units at 3402 Dover. • CKR Property Management LLC: Alice Street Apartments, 64 units at 3603 Alice St. • ComCapp LLC: Cypress Apartments, 422 units at 11111 Grant Road in Cypress. • Cortland Management LLC: Venue at Richmond Apartments, 230 units 5200 Pointe West Circle in Richmond; Venue Spring Plaza, 340 units at 21145 Spring Plaza Drive in Spring; Stratus Cinco Ranch, 186 units at 6207 Katy Gaston Road in Katy; Sovereign Spring Cypress Apartments, 253 units at 2539 Spring Cypress Road in Spring; Sovereign at Cinco, 300 units at 6800 Gaston Road in Katy; and North Haven, 310 units at 17802 Mound Road in Cypress. • Creative Property Management: Lyon’s Village Apartments, 24 units at 3300 Lyons Ave.; Britton’s Place Apartments, 48 units at 3730 Lyons Ave.; and Pleasant Hill Village, 165 units at 3814 Lyons Ave.

• Davis Development: Vue Kingsland Apartments, 423 units at 18021 Kingsland Blvd. and Avion at Shadow Creek Ranch, 276 units at 2101 Kingsley Drive in Pearland. • DayRise Residential: Wood Bayou Apartments, 36 units at 12380 Wood Bayou Drive. • Greystar: Encore Montrose, 211 units at 4508 Graustark St. and 3101 Place Apartments, 3101 Vista Drive in Rosenberg. • Kaplan Mgmt Co. Inc.: The Grove at 43rd, 85 units at 2006 W. 43rd Street. • Karya Property Management: Eden Pointe, 197 units at 1307 Wilcrest Drive; Hunter’s Chase Apartments, 328 units at 10000 Hammerly Blvd; and Hammerly Oaks Apartments, 520 units at 8791 Hammerly Blvd. • Light Hill Partners: 4300 Rosslyn, 27 units at 4300 Rosslyn Road. • Portico Property Management: Waterstone Place Apartments, 168 units at 516 Stafford Springs Ave. in Stafford; Enclave at Woodbridge Apartments, 348 units at 15015 W. Airport Blvd. in Sugar Land; and Westmount at Copper Mill Apartments, 234 units at 15910 FM 529 Road. • Q10 Property Advisors: 2100 Woodhead Apartments, 14 units at 2100 Woodhead Street. • RDYTX LLC: Castle Court I Apartment, 6 units at 1601 Castle Court. • The Richdale Group: Tanglewood at Voss Apartments, 376 units at 7510 Burgoyne Road. • Richmark Properties: Clearpoint Crossing Residences Apartments, 252 units at 11400 Space Center Blvd. • Scenic Property Group: Verandas at Bear Creek Apartments, 160 units at 5455 Timber Creek Place Drive. • United Apartment Group Inc: San Martin Apartments, 112 units at 22910 Imperial Valley Drive and Mira Bella Apartment, 266 units at 22921 Imperial Valley Drive. I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

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I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

www.haaonline.org


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In the News Crystal Jackson has joined The Dinerstein Companies as a portfolio manager.

Jackson

Liz Levins, CAS, has recently joined the Impact Floors team. Proforma Angelini & Diamond Solutions welcomes the addition of Andrea Winans.

Levins

Winans

Grimes

Shipman

Belvoir Real Estate is excited to annouce that Pat Grimes and Reggie Shipman joined the team as senior director and multifamily assets specialist, respectively. On Dec. 4, Parawest Management won the Houston Marketer of the Year in Real Estate for the second year in row. CriterionBrock adopted the brand of its parent company, Interior Logic Group, and began business at the start of 2018 as Interior Logic Group Property Services. They can be found online at www.interiorlogicgroup.com/propertyservices.

In Memoriam It is with great sadness that we inform you of the passing of Frances Torres, a 20-year employee of HAA. Torres retired from HAA in 2015, and was a Flores hardworking and very loyal member of the HAA team. She passed away on Nov. 30.

Have something to report from your company or for yourself? Email us your news at comm@haaonline.org.

www.haaonline.org

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On Site with ABODE

By HAA Staff

HOME SWEET SPRING SYNC at Harmony will make you feel right at home.

Property: SYNC at Harmony Apartments Owner/Management: Oren Blatt/SYNC Location: 3530 Discovery Creek in Spring, right off Grand Parkway Toll Road Units: 308 Built: 2015 Web: www.syncatharmony.com Interesting features: SYNC at Harmony Apartments is a luxury community located in Spring, where convenience and style are combined to provide residents with a specific lifestyle experience. Amenities include a pet-friendly bark park, a billiard room with a shuffle board, valet trash service, a screened in sunroom, detached garages, a conference room, a resort pool with cabanas and a poolside grill, a 24-hour fitness center and more. Outside of the community amenities, this property’s location is something to brag about. With HEB located right at the community’s gates, residents can walk to get their groceries. Not only that, but SYNC at Harmony is located in close proximity to all major highways, granting residents easy access to Downtown Houston. The current team recently took over the property in May, and they have been hosting many creative resident functions since. A property favorite was their event in collaboration with Papa Murphy’s Take ‘N’ Bake Pizza in which the children of the community got to make and bake their own pizza. Another resident hit was their breast cancer awareness function in which the adults of the property got to decorate wine glasses. This property is a perfect home for families in Spring.

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I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

February 2018

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a

I wasn’t expecting it at all. I was surprised that they nominated me!” he said, laughing. “ I’ve been with this business for 15 years. I never expect anything. For me, if I get my job done or get it right, I’m satisfied with that. I don’t need recognition. As long as my resident and my management and the owner are happy, I’m happy. It was a good experience, though, feeling that way. I didn’t know that someone was watching!”

www.haaonline.org

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ad index feb pg 74.qxp_Ad Index pg 74 1/18/18 3:50 PM Page 1

Index of Advertisers By CATEGORY

A/C Supplies

Laundry Equipment & Supplies

Century A/C Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 281-530-2859 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.centuryac.com

Scott Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 713-686-7268 . . . . . . . . .www.scott-equipment.com

Carpet Installation

Locks & Locksmiths

Dixie Carpet Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 281-261-6334 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.dixiecarpet.com

CKI Wholesale Lock Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 713-462-0704 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.ckilock.com

HAA reserves the right to reject any advertising if its content is inappropriate or inconsistent with HAA’s standards for publication or HAA’s business interests, in HAA’s sole opinion.

Maintenance Supplies Countertops Impact Floors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 800-951-9462 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.impactfloors.com

Johnstone Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 713-803-6231 . . . . . . . . . .www.johnstonesupply.com

Movers Electric Contractors Affordable Quality Electric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 713-695-5992 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.acuityelectric.com Brandt Electrical A/C & Heating Services . . . . . .1 281-693-3383 . . . . . . . . . . .www.brandtelectrical.com

Ameritex Movers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 713-484-MOVE . . . . . . . . . .www.stressfreemove.com

Paving Contractors Pavement Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 281-758-8434 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.nopothole.com

Furniture – Outdoor Texacraft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 800-231-9790 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.texacraft.com

Plumbing Contractors AAA Plumbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 713-462-4753 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.aaaplumbers.com

General Contractors Camp Construction Services . . . . . . . .Back Cover 713-413-2267 . . . . . . . .www.campconstruction.com

Resident Screening Service

Cotton Commercial USA Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 877-511-2962 . . . . . . . . . . .www.cottoncompanies.com

CoreLogic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Inside Front Cover 888-297-8821 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.corelogic.com

Disaster America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 888-4-CATUSA . . . . . . . . . . . .www.disasteramerica.com

Resurfacing

FSI Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 832-767-1115 . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.fsiconstruction.com

Perfect Surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 713-952-0202 . . . . . . . .www.perfectsurfaceinc.com

Gambit Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 832-987-4242 . . . . .www.gambitconstruction.com Gemstar Construction & Development . . . . . . .41 281-821-1195 . . . . . .www.gemstarconstruction.com

Screens Ameristar Screen and Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 713-683-6767 . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.ameristarglass.com

RENCON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Inside Back Cover 713-666-3636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.rencon.com Security Control Equipment/Systems Glass – Plate, Window, Etc.

SentriForce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 888-671-2202 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.sentriforce.com

Ameristar Screen and Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 713-683-6767 . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.ameristarglass.com Swimming Pool Service Poolsure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 800-858-POOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.poolsure.com

Insurance Harco Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 713-681-2500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.harco-ins.com

Trash Hauling Waste Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 713-354-5230 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.thinkgreen.com

Landscape Contractors Outdoor Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 713-955-0990 . . . . . .www.outdoorelementstx.com Texscape Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 281-846-3779 . . . . . . . . . .www.texscapeservices.com

HAA Products & Services Rental Credit Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 713-595-0300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .www.haaonline.org/rcr

www.haaonline.org/rcr

Want to see current and previous issues of ABODE online? Go to http://issuu.com/haa_abode. Or view this issue on your computer, iPad or smartphone at http://issuu.com/haa_abode/docs/abode_feb2018.

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Marketline pg 75.qxp_Layout 1 1/18/18 3:51 PM Page 1

MarketLine By BRUCE MCCLENNY, President, ApartmentData.com

HOUSTON

• • •

Snapshot 89.4% $1,014/mo. 115.0¢/sq.ft./mo. 882 sq.ft.

Past 12 Months: 4.7% rental rate growth 17,469 units absorbed

• • • • • • • • • •

98.0 –

– 90.0

– 89.0

96.0 –

– 88.0

Recently Opened (12 months): 66 communities 17,191 units

94.0 –

Under Construction: 32 communities 8,531 units

Occupancy (%)

Operating Supply: 2,728 communities 639,979 units

Rental Rate (¢/sq.ft./mo.)

Occupancy: Price: Rental Rate: Size:

• • • • • •

• • •

Nov 17

Dec 17

Oct 17

Sep 17

Jul 17

Aug 17

Jun 17

May 17

Apr 17

Mar 17

Feb 17

Jan 17

Nov 16

Dec 16

Oct 16

Sep 16

Jul 16

Aug 16

Jun 16

May 16

Apr 16

Mar 16

Proposed Construction: 54 communities 15,741 units

Feb 16

Jan 16

– 87.0

History of Effective Rental Rate & Occupancy for All Units

Hottest Submarkets Over the Past Three Months

Concessions

Annualized % of Market Rank Submarket Absorbed 1 Greenspoint/Northborough/Aldine 7.7% 2 Almeda/South Main 9.0% 3 Baytown 11.6% 4 Bear Creek/Copperfield/Fairfield 6.7% 5 Westchase 5.5%

Rental Rate Growth % 3.4% 2.1% 2.1% 2.5% 2.4%

Total Units Class w/Concessions All 227,191 A 77,250 B 65,631 C 72,777 D 11,533

% of Total Units 35% 50% 29% 36% 22%

Average Special -2.7% -4.8% -1.5% -1.8% -1.5%

Citywide Effect -7.1% -9.1% -5.3% -5.1% -6.8%

One Month Free = -8.33%

THE FIRST TABLE ABOVE GIVES A SNAPSHOT of the current market conditions. The graph displays the overall occupancy and effective rental rates over the past 24 months. These statistics are derived from a continuous survey of all apartment communities in the Houston region. The effective rental rates are the calculated net of concessions and utility adjustments. The second table lists the five hottest submarkets in the Greater Houston area. There are a total of 41 submarkets, and the ranking is based on the best combination of rental rate growth and absorption over the past three months. The third table distributes and analyzes concessions (specials) by classification. Concessions generally are represented by three types of specials: move-in, months free or floor plans. The effect of these specials is captured and prorated over a lease term to arrive at a percentage reduction in market or street rents.

TEXAS

Dallas/Ft. Worth

San Antonio

Austin

Occupancy: Price: Rental Rate: Size:

Occupancy: Price: Rental Rate: Size:

Occupancy: Price: Rental Rate: Size:

91.6% $1,070/mo. 122.8¢/sq.ft./mo. 871 sq.ft.

90.2% $909/mo. 107.1¢/sq.ft./mo. 849 sq.ft.

90.9% $1,175/mo. 134.7¢/sq.ft./mo. 872 sq.ft.

Past 12 Months: 4.8% rental rate growth 14,325 units absorbed

Past 12 Months: 2.7% rental rate growth 3,805 units absorbed

Past 12 Months: 1.8% rental rate growth 6,979 units absorbed

Operating Supply: 2,964 communities 690,497 units

Operating Supply: 863 communities 181,904 units

Operating Supply: 924 communities 214,468 units

www.haaonline.org

ApartmentData.com has been providing apartment data and marketing products since 1986. ApartmentData.com provides real-time access for property specific information, market surveys and historic submarket data for more than 2.5 million apartment units in Texas, Georgia and Arizona. For more information, contact Bruce McClenny at 800-595-8730. © 2018 ApartmentData.com

February 2018

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with News from around the COMMUNITY

HAA Members “Deck the Halls” Deck the Halls, a holiday project started by the late Lisa Purdy of Purdy Designs, gives a family in need a helping hand to make the holiday a little brighter. A family is selected from nominations made by multifamily managers and their home is fully decorated for the holiday. This includes a fully-decorated Christmas tree, a wreath for the front door, a dining table decorated with all the trimmings, gifts under the tree, a holiday dinner and new home décor and furniture as needed. This year’s Deck the Halls recipient was Johnnie Buchanan. Johnnie has worked in the multifamily industry for 18 years and and her family of seven lost all their belongings during Hurricane Harvey. Thanks to these HAA member donors for their generosity: AAA Plumbers; Lance Price, American Fire System; Ameritex Movers; Debra Moore, ApartmentData.com; Gary Kiker, Dixie Carpet; Bill Roberts, ICONstrux; Tonya Yates, Kings III; Elaine Clayton, Purdy Designs; Dan James, R&E Development; RENCON LLC; Kelly Stephens, Texas Turf Management; and Mark Yates, YKM Investments.

Personal donations and services were provided by Elaine Clayton, Susan Dear, Candy Crew, Becky Nunez, Christina Hand, Whitney King, Erin McCary, Debra Moore, Chris Nelson, Jill Payne, Greg Pettis, Gina Purdy, Mark and Jackie Rhone, Joanne Rios, Nick Sabula, Linda Spring and Cary Tallent. Johnnie and her family were extremely grateful for the help this holiday season.

ONLINE STATISTICS for the Houston Apartment Association Website and Social Media www.haaonline.org Total visits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9,984 Visitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7,050 Most visited pages: 1. Jobline Board 2. Rental Credit Reporting 3. Rental Owner Complaint Form

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February 2018

HAA Jobline Apply button cicks . . . . . . . . .1,828 Job postings for the month . . .50 Resume postings . . . . . . . . . . . . .133 Job seeker signups . . . . . . . . . . . .48

Twitter @HAAOnline www.twitter.com Followers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5,573

Facebook http://tinyurl.com/2ae7gnq

Houston Apartment Association Group members . . . . . . . . . . . . .2,131

Linkedin http://tinyurl.com/2667ppr Houston Apartment Association Group followers . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,831

www.haaonline.org


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