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March 11, 2018

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2 Sunday Times Magazine

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MARCH 11, 2018

Feature

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he animals and plants that live in the wild have an intrinsic value and contribute to the ecological, genetic, social, economic, scientific, educational, cultural, recreational and aesthetic aspects of human well-being and sustainable development. World Wildlife Day was celebrated in 2018 under the theme “Big cats: predators under threat". The UN Secretary General, António Guterres, in his message pointed out that the solution to saving big cats and other threatened and endangered species is conservation policy based on sound science and the rule of law. “It must also give full consideration to the needs of local people. When local communities and economies benefit from wildlife conservation, strategies are much more likely to succeed,” he said. Big cats are keystone species. Protecting them also protects the vast landscapes they inhabit and the wide variety of life they harbour. It is a gateway to protecting entire ecosystems that are crucial to our planet’s health. World Wildlife Day is used as an opportunity to celebrate the many beautiful and varied forms of wild

fauna and flora and to raise awareness of the multi-

tude of benefits that conservation provides to people. At the same time, the Day reminds us of the urgent need to step up the fight against wildlife crime and human induced reduction of species, which have wide-ranging economic, environmental and social impacts. Given these various negative effects, Sustainable

Development Goal #15 focuses on halting biodiversity loss. Big cats are among the most widely recognized and admired animals across the globe. However, today these charismatic predators are facing many and varied threats, which are mostly

caused by human activities. Overall, their populations are declining at a disturbing rate due to loss of habitat and prey, conflicts with people, poaching and illegal trade. For example, tiger populations plummeted by 95% over the past 100 years a n d African l i o n populations dropped by 40% in just 20 years. But a range of measures are underway to arrest this decline. In an effort to reach as wide an audience as possible, the expanded definition of big cats is being used, which includes not only lion, tiger, leopard and jaguar -- the 4 largest wild cats that can roar - but also cheetah, snow leopard, puma, clouded leopard, etc. Big cat species are found in Africa, Asia, and North, Central and South America, representing a virtually global distribution, and representations of big cats, such as for car logos, by sporting clubs and the fashion industry, are used globally. According to the United Nations (UN), over the past century we have been losing big cats, the planet’s most majestic predators, at an alarming rate. World Wildlife Day 2018 provided the opportunity to raise awareness about their plight and to galvanize support for the many global and national actions that are under-

way to save these iconic species. Through World Wildlife Day big cats will generate the level of attention they all deserve to be sure they are with us for generations to come.

Guyana’s wildcats

Six of the 36 wildcat species that exist in the world roam the largely pristine forest and natural corridors that exist in Guyana. • Jaguarondi (Puma yagouaroundi) also known as the Eyra or Otter cat. • Margay (Lepardus wiedii), also known as the Tree Ocelot, Climbing Ocelot, Little Ocelot or Tigrillo. Margay’s fur can be grayish to cinnamon in colour. It is covered with black-ringed rosettes. They have large eyes adapted to night vision since they are nocturnal (active at night). They can survive less than 10 years in the wild and up to 20 years in captivity. Unlike other cats, margay is able to move down the tree, with its head going before its feet. This is possible because it has flexible ankles of the front feet that can be rotated for 180 degrees. • Oncilla (Lepardus tigrinus), also known as the Little Spotted Cat, Tigrillo, Tiger Cat or Little Tiger Cat The body of an oncilla is covered with beautiful fur that can be tan or ochre in colour. Upper side of the body is covered with dark rosettes while the lower side is pale and contains a few spots. Its tail is covered with black rings and ends with black tip. • Jaguar (Panthera onca), also known as the Tiger, Pouss, Turtle Tiger Jaguars are the largest of South America’s big cats. Most jaguars are tan or orange with distinctive black spots, dubbed “rosettes” because they are shaped like roses. Some jaguars are so

dark they appear to be spotless, though their markings can be seen on closer inspection. • Puma (Puma concolor) also known as the Cougar, Panther, Mountain Lion, Red Tiger, or Deer Tiger The Puma is the fifth heaviest of wildcats after the lion, leopard, jaguar and tiger. They have a plain coloured fur ranging from tawny to silver grey or reddish brown with lighter patches on their underparts including the jaws, chin and throat. •Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) also known as the Tigrillo, Painted Leopard, Hagtiger, or Dwarf Leopard. The Ocelot is much larger than its cousins the Margay and the Oncilla, although they bear a striking resemblance. Twice the size of the average house cat, the ocelot is a sleek animal with a gorgeous dappled coat. These largely nocturnal cats use keen sight and hearing to hunt rabbits, rodents, iguanas, fish, and frogs. They also take to the trees and stalk monkeys or birds. It is important to note that all wild cats in Guyana are protected in accordance with the Third Schedule of the Wildlife Management and Conservation Regulations (WMCR) 2013. Therefore, trapping, killing or injuring of these animals is a crime that is punishable by law. Guyana will also join the rest of the world in celebrating International Day of Forests (IDF), on March 21st, 2018. The global theme is , 'Forests for sustainable cities,' and will focus on how forests and trees in urban areas regulate temperature and water flows, provide nutritious foods and shelter, cleanse the air and foster community cohesion and individual well-being, among other benefits.

Ocelot captured on cameratraps near Yupukari village


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MARCH 11, 2018

Sunday Times Magazine

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Feature

Jaguar in Guyana – (Photo by Niels Poul Dreyer focusingonwildlife.com)

Jaguar (photo from gotoguyana. org)

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uyana is in a privileged position of having a healthy jaguar population, which provides ideal opportunities for research and development of strategies to promote the conservation of the species. It is within this framework that the Iwokrama Research Centre and global wild cat conservation organization, Panthera signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) aimed at the development and implementation of actions for the science and conservation of jaguars in Guyana. The Iwokrama Research Centre has been recognised as a key area for Jaguar conservation in Guyana, and research conducted over the years has proven this area, particularly the forest and road to be prime habitat for jaguar sightings. The MOU, which was signed in 2016, signalled a commitment made by the two parties to collaborate on education, research and practical applications for conservation of Jaguars in Guyana with particular reference to the Iwokrama Forest and road. More so, it allows both institutions to jointly develop and implement strategic actions for the science and conservation of jaguars in Guyana, framed under Panthera’s Jaguar Corridor Initiative. The organisations work closely with government agencies including the Ministry of Natural Resources, the Environmental Protection Agency, Wildlife Division, and Guyana Protected Areas Commission amongst others. In particular, programmes are delivered through education, research

and practical conservation applications including sharing information and developing additional co-operative plans to survey for jaguars, educating the public on the value of jaguars and other wildlife and mitigating conflicts between jaguars and people. Globally, jaguar populations are on the decline mainly due to the loss of habitat and conflict with people. As a result, these animals are listed as a ‘near threatened’ species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Panthera first started work in Guyana in 2011 through the jaguar conservation studies in the Rupununi where it was established that the connectivity of the Amazon Rainforest throughout the Rupununi, Iwokrama and other adjacent areas in the northern habitat of the jaguar is important for the long-term conservation of Guyana’s natural heritage. Founded in 2006, Panthera is an organization devoted exclusively to preserving wild cats and their critical role in the world’s ecosystems. Panthera’s team of leading biologists, law enforcement experts and wild cat advocates develop innovative strategies based on the best available science to protect cheetahs, jaguars, lions, leopards, pumas, snow leopards and tigers and their vast landscapes. Panthera works alongside a wide variety of stakeholders in 50 countries around the world to reduce or eliminate the most pressing threats to wild cats thus securing their future and ours, the release said. Most of the work has been done so far in the Rupununi as the savannahs serve as a hotspot for biodiversity and is potentially a crucial area for connecting Guyana’s jaguar populations with those of the Amazon. Conceptualized by Dr. Rabinowitz, the Jaguar Corridor Initiative is the backbone of Panthera's Jaguar Program, which seeks to connect and protect jaguar populations ranging from Mexico to Argentina to ensure the species' genetic diversity and survival.

Jaguar relocation

Late last year, villagers from Fair View, the only community within the boundaries of the Iwokrama Forest, contacted Iwokrama’s Management regarding a jaguar they had trapped. It was reported that the jaguar was a frequent visitor to the village and was hunting dogs in particular. The Village was understandably fearful as the attacks were becoming increasingly frequent. Iwokrama immediately contacted the Environmental Protection Agency and the Wildlife Conservation and Management Commission for assistance. A number of other partners were also engaged for advice including Panthera, Protected Areas Commission and Matt Hallett (University of Florida) who is currently conducting PhD research on Jaguars in Guyana. Soon after, an expert staff team of the Wildlife Conservation and Management Commission arrived at Fair View and with the assistance of Fair View residents and qualified Iwokrama Rangers, were able to secure the animal in a special cage for transfer. They later successfully relocated the an-

imal to another area within the Iwokrama Forest- away from the village of Fair View. Iwokrama Research indicates that the Iwokrama Forest supports healthy populations of jaguars and their prey; both within areas designated for wilderness preservation and sustainable utilisation. Although Fair View Village exists within the Iwokrama Forest, human-jaguar conflict happens only intermittently; it is gen-

test the concept of a truly sustainable forest where conservation, environmental balance and economic use can be mutually reinforcing. The IIC collaborates with the Government of Guyana, the Commonwealth and other international partners and donors to develop new approaches and forest management models to enable countries with rainforests to market their ecosystem services whilst carefully managing their re-

Jaguar about to be transported after been trapped

erally mitigated by support from Iwokrama, the actions of village leadership and the tolerance of local wildlife by village residents. Environmental and other organizations such as Iwokrama, Conservation International-Guyana, World Wildlife Fund -Guyana, National Toshaos Council can also assist with linking communities to the relevant government regulatory bodies. It must be emphasized that the Jaguar (Pantera onca) and all of the other five species of cats in Guyana are protected by law. (Photo and excerpts from DPI)

About Iwokrama

The Iwokrama International Centre (IIC) was established in 1996 under a joint mandate from the Government of Guyana and the Commonwealth Secretariat to manage the Iwokrama forest, a unique reserve of 371,000 hectares of rainforest “in a manner that will lead to lasting ecological, economic and social benefits to the people of Guyana and to the world in general”. The Centre, guided by an international Board of Trustees is unique, providing a dedicated well managed and researched forest environment. The forest is zoned into a Sustainable Utilization Area (SUA) and a Wilderness Preserve (WP) in which to

sources through innovative and creative conservation practices. Iwokrama brings together 20 local communities (approximately 7,000 people) who are shareholders and participants in the IIC’s sustainable timber, tourism, research operations and forest management activities through complex co-management and benefit sharing arrangements; Scientists and researchers engaged in ground breaking research into the impacts of climate change on the forest and measuring the scope and value of its ecosystem services; and A portfolio of sustainably managed and certified business models using innovative governance systems which include participation of the private and public sectors and the local communities, earning income from the forest and its natural assets whilst employing international social, environmental and economic best practice, whilst still keeping abreast of the ever changing thinking on funding for environmental projects in the face of climate change and the perennial scarcity of international finance. This alliance and the Centre’s work programmes are committed to showing how a rain forest can be used for real sustainability, real climate change protection and real community benefit.


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Sunday Times Magazine

guyanatimesgy.com

MARCH 11, 2018

Feature

Shell Beach Scenery - (photo by Marco Farouk Basir)

-Securing the future existence of marine turtles in Guyana

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he Guyana Marine Conservation Society (GMCS) was established in 2000 with the primary mission of ensuring the future existence and population recovery of all the four species of marine turtles known to nest in Guyana, while addressing the needs of the communities. Engagement of the indigenous communities in alternative income projects to reduce their dependency on harvesting of sea turtle meat and eggs was an integral element in the successful launch and continued existence of North West Organic line of products which can be found in the leading supermarkets today. GMCS was founded by its President Mrs Annette Arjoon-Martins, who managed and spearheaded many community outreach programmes pertaining to the conservation of the marine turtles, in collaboration with the local stake holders, governmental and donor agencies. GMCS’s mission is part

ucation and awareness programs.

Shell Beach Protected Area (SBPA)

SBPA is one of Guyana's protected areas managed by the Protected Areas Commission; other protected areas include the Kaieteur Falls National Park and the Kanuku Mountains Protected Area (KMPA). The SBPA, along with KMPA, was created in 2011 after the passage of the Protected Areas Act in 2011. SBPA is in the northwestern part of Guyana in Region 1( Barima-Waini) and stretches over 120 km (75 miles) of beaches and mudflats along the Atlantic coast. The coastal beaches are made of fragmented shells rather than sand, hence the generic name shell beach. Shell beaches can be found in Suriname and French Guiana, which also have marine turtle nesting grounds. The SBPA covers an area of 123,055 hectares (1,203 sq km, 304,074 acres). In the in-

das). They visit the beaches from February to August each year. Turtle monitoring takes place at Almond Beach during this period. It also has a diversity of other animals and birds. (Reference: SBPA management plan, 2014) Since the area was declared a protected area it falls under the management of the Protected Areas Commission which has continued the programme of recording and tagging of marine turtles, data collection on all field based monitoring activities.

GMCS Past Projects

Several other projects include a Monitoring Programme; this involves the empowerment of the resident Amerindian peoples to be the stewards of the resources upon which they ultimately depend. GMCS actively employed persons from the Waramuri, Santa Rosa and Almond Beach communities, who would ordinarily have been turtle hunters or consumers, so that they can experience an alterna-

It takes a team effort to protect the four species of marine turtles known to nest in Guyana

nizes and conducts research that will promote the protection and conservation of cultural, natural and archaeological resources within the Shell Beach area. Human intervention and engagement, such as fish-

Activism

Annette Arjoon is a pilot, aviation and environmental advocate; she is the President of the Guyana Marine Conservation Society (GMCS) and the National Air Transport Association (NATA) Her expertise in designing and implementing alternative livelihood programs for the indigenous communities that depended on sea turtle meat in the Shell Beach Protected Area resulted in her being awarded the Anthony Sabga Caribbean Award for Excellence in Public and

A previous rescue mission; in the photo the drowned Leatherback turtle was brought ashore by GMCS representatives

of a global effort and involves the tagging and monitoring of the nesting marine turtles and awareness campaigns which has played a major role in the declaration of Shell Beach as a Protected Area. Legislation now governs the illegal take of all the endangered species from within that area and persons caught in illegal acts will face the consequences of the law. According to the current GMCS President, Mrs. Arjoon-Martins, other aspects of GMCS thematic areas of work include biodiversity surveys, community outreach, and the design and delivery of environmental ed-

land portion of the protected area, it is bound by the rivers named Moruca, Barabara, Biara, Baramani, and Waini. SBPA is special because it has Guyana's largest and most intact mangrove forests considered the most important ecosystems to the security of biodiversity in the Guiana Shield. It is also an important nesting ground for four of the world's threatened species of marine turtles namely, the leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea), hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata), olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea), and green turtle (Chelonia my-

tive to killing the animals. In addition Community Development seeks to identify economic alternatives for user communities as a means of achieving sustainable livelihoods. Environmental Education and Awareness; GMCS works with stakeholders at all levels to promote awareness of the need to protect the marine turtles and natural resource management of the area. GMCS has, over the years, trained numerous teachers from neighbouring communities in promoting conservation messages in the classroom Research; GMCS orga-

ing activities in the nearby coastal waters and in front of nesting beaches, contributed to the loss of many adult turtles that had been caught accidently and drowned in nets. However this was resolved by collaboration with the Ministry of Agriculture which has assisted in having no fishing zones implemented at the most populated nesting beaches and the respecting of same by the local fishermen. Marine turtle nesting and monitoring activities will begins in February and concludes in the later part of August.

Annette Arjoon Martins

Civic Service in 2009. She was the recipient of the Golden Arrow of Achievement, one of Guyana’s National Award, in 2017 for her contribution to environmental protection. She is the Chair of the Environment Committee of the Private Sector Commission and the PSC representative on Thematic Area 2: Sustainable Management of Natural Resources and Expansion of Environmental Services: stewardship of natural patrimony of the Green State Development Strategy (GSDS).


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MARCH 11, 2018

Sunday Times Magazine 5

Feature

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Harpy Eagle - The Harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja) is one of numerous threatened specied in the UECC

s part of their vision, Conservation International (CI) imagines a healthy and prosperous world in which societies are forever committed to caring for and valuing nature for the long term benefit of people and all life on earth. Their ultimate goal is to protect the most fundamental things that nature provides to all of us: our food, our fresh water, our livelihoods and a stable climate. CI was founded in 1987 with program offices and partners in more than 30 countries, including Guyana. In 1996, CIG was registered as a non-profit company, and in 2002 signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the government of Guyana. CI’s science, policy and fieldwork

training, employment, and investments in socioeconomic development. For instance, in return for contributions to conservation, the VCIF has invested in an Ecotourism lodge in Rewa, sheep-rearing facilities in Apoteri, and a handicraft center in CrashWater. The Conservation Concession demonstrates how to achieve biodiversity conservation as a transaction between a willing seller and a willing buyer, without requiring new legislation or impinging on national sovereignty. Using existing provisions for timber concessions in Guyana, CI has effectively acted as an intermediary between global willingness-to-pay for conservation and Guyana’s

– Empowering societies to sustainably care for our global biodiversity on earth that includes parts of Venezuela and Brazil and almost all of Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana. Although in the past, remoteness and inaccessibility have protected the Guiana Shield, concerted road-building efforts by the region’s governments threaten to accelerate habitat destruction, which is why the establishment of a robust protected area network is an urgent priority. The location of the UECC is highly strategic, forming a link in two chains of planned protected areas – one that spans Guyana from northwest to southeast, and another that stretches eastward from Venezuela across Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana into Brazil.

of Guyana received title to the land in 2004 and partnered with Conservation International and the government of Guyana to have the entire area established as a protected area.

Creating a Conservation Economy

This new protected area is part of the High Biodiversity Wilderness Area of Amazonia and a key part of the Guiana Shield corridor. It is home to several endangered species and the over 200 persons who live in the village of Masakenari. The Wai Wai need this area for the survival of their people and the traditional way of life and are worried about new and encroaching threats from mining, logging and the wildlife trade. Incursions along their border with neighboring Brazil have already led to illegal mining. The Wai Wais have already stopped trading in wildlife, a practice previously done solely for economic survival and are now looking to conservation and the benefits of keeping their biodiversity to provide for family and economic development. The protection of this area ensures continuity to the traditional lifestyle and with long term support they plan to continue living on the land.

Protecting Key Habitat

focuses on protecting and maintaining the health of the species, habitats and ecosystems that are the building blocks of a healthy planet.

Upper Essequibo Conservation Concession

In July 2002, Conservation International and the Government of Guyana entered into an agreement that protects 200,000 acres of pristine forest by establishing the world’s first ‘Conservation Concession’. Under this unique approach, CI obtained a 30-year logging license for a portion of the upper Essequibo River watershed, with the objective of managing the area for conservation rather than timber exploitation. For this right, CI pays the Government of Guyana annual fees comparable to those that would have been paid by a logging company, and has also provided a Voluntary Community Investment Fund (VCIF) to ensure benefits to local communities.

Benefits

The Upper Essequibo Conservation Concession (UECC) conserves a significant parcel of high biodiversity-value rainforest while generating revenues for Guyana equivalent to those obtainable from logging. In addition, three communities near the UECC – Rewa, Apoteri, and CrashWater – receive

ability to supply biodiversity conservation services. The key to this success is that the approach directly addresses the opportunity cost of conservation; by replacing lost timber revenues, it has made foregoing logging acceptable to the Government of Guyana. Modeled on a standard business transaction – the resource lease – this arrangement has proven to be cost-effective for CI and economically viable for Guyana’s development. Thus, the approach responds to growing calls for transfers from developed to developing countries to finance conservation, while respecting developing countries’ sovereignty by leasing the area in question and preserving ultimate Government authority. The UECC represents a particularly notable achievement in Guyana, where years of effort to create a national protected area system have only recently begun to bear fruit. In a challenging political and legal context that was long deadlocked with respect to protected area creation, this approach resulted in clear, unambiguous conservation of 200,000 acres. Moreover, this was achieved using a transparent and participatory approach that gave local communities a direct stake in successful conservation.

Biodiversity Importance

Guyana’s forests are part of the Guiana Shield, a region of about 75 million acres of the least disturbed tropical forests

The UECC contains all the elements of a rich, functioning wilderness ecosystem. Most of Guyana’s tree species are present, including the southernmost stands of the endemic and high value Greenheart. The concession protects critical watershed services: the Upper Essequibo River is Guyana’s largest source of fresh water, and anchors an aquatic system that features the highest recorded freshwater fish diversity in the world. Finally, the area is home to numerous endangered species, such as the tapir, cock-of-the-rock, harpy eagle, black caiman, giant armadillo, giant river otter and the giant river turtle. All eight of Guyana’s primate species are present, as are at least three of Guyana’s six cat species – the jaguar, ocelot, and puma. (Story complements Conservation International , CI)

Konashen

– A First for Guyana

Guyana’s first Community Owned Conservation Area (C.O.C.A.) is now the largest protected area in the country and is managed exclusively by an indigenous group. This will effectively bring more than one million acres of rainforest under sustainable management while ensuring the continued development of the Wai Wai people and their traditional way of life. The Wai Wai of Konashen District in the south

The conservation of this key part of the Guiana shield corridor also allows for the preservation of the home of several important species such as the Harpy Eagle (Harpia harpyja) and the Jaguar (Panthera onca), the Giant River Otter (Pteronura brasiliensis), the Cock-of-the-Rock (Rupicola Rupicola), the Blue Poison Frog (Dendrobates tinctorius) and the Emerald Boa (Corallus caninus). The Community Owned Conservation Area now expands the area of the Guiana shield

that has been placed under formal protection and expands the corridor by linking directly into the Para State Protected Area in Brazil.

are being developed to create partnerships for research and eco-tourism development.

Community-based Management

The government of Guyana is pursuing legislation to establish a national system of protected areas and a financing mechanism that will provide long-term support to the Wai Wai’s Community Owned Conservation Area. Continuing technical advice and support from Conservation International for training and infrastructure, and an environmental education program and conservation club for the students and youth of the community will provide for the growth in skill development and capacity that will enable the community to manage their lands and resources for current and future generations. (Story complements Conservation International, CI)

The Wai Wai community is now moving forward with conservation and development planning for the community conserved area. With the technical advice of Conservation International, the community leadership group has completed their long term Management Plan, and is in the process of completing their first two-year Operating Plan. Six community members recently completed training as qualified rangers and para-biologists, and a community-led training program has revitalized their traditional craft enterprise. Under the new operating plan, a management training program will be implemented for the community leadership and opportunities

Planning for Longterm Sustainability


6 Sunday Times Magazine

guyanatimesgy.com

MARCH 11, 2018

Literary Corner

By Petamber Persaud

Riding high on top of choppy waves he pebbled into play with his first book, Pulling the Punches: Defeating Domestic Violence, Luke Daniels now creates a tsunami with his new book, Defeating Domestic Violence in the Americas: Men’s Work by contending that domestic violence is ‘politically motivated violence in support of patriarchy’, pointing out that the social structure is designed whereby mainly men are put in charge of state apparatus and mainly men becoming policy makers, holders of high offices, heading other organisations like military, political, religious, social, endowing them with wealth and power exercising control, sometimes absolute control. Daniels also shows how this pandemic of violence thrives in a climate of inequality, machismo, and lack of respect fuel by the socialisation for violence in the movies, violent video games and in sports like boxing. Although this book focuses on the Americas (referring to the Caribbean, Central, South and North America), the ground rules are the same for any society in which domestic violence is allowed to prevail and fester. By constantly using the phrase ‘men’s work’ with supporting facts and figures, the author repeatedly emphasises that domestic violence is not only a women’s issue. The phrase ‘men’s work’ is pregnant

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here was once a butterfly who wished for a bride, and, as may be supposed, he wanted to choose a very pretty one from among the flowers. He glanced, with a very critical eye, at all the flower-beds, and found that the flowers were seated quietly and demurely on their stalks, just as maidens should sit before they are engaged; but there was a great number of them, and it appeared as if his search would become very wearisome. The butterfly did not like to take too much trouble, so he flew off on a visit to the daisies. The French call this flower "Marguerite," and they say that the little daisy can prophesy. Lovers pluck off the leaves, and as they pluck each leaf, they ask a question about their lovers; thus: "Does he or she love me?- Ardently? Distractedly?

with all manner of connotations for individuals who are burdened by historical baggage thrust upon them and contemporary constraints of neo-liberal society. The phrase ‘men’s work’ points fingers directly at governments which are led mainly by men and whose role it is to protect its citizens (the UN proclamation of Universal Declaration of Human Rights, December 10, 1948). Governments have access to

Very much? A little? Not at all?" and so on. Every one speaks these words in his own language. The butterfly came also to Marguerite to inquire, but he did not pluck off her leaves; he pressed a kiss on each of them, for he thought there was always more to be done by kindness. "Darling Marguerite daisy," he said to her, "you are the wisest woman of all the flowers. Pray tell me which of the flowers I shall choose for my wife. Which will be my bride? When I know, I will fly directly to her, and propose." But Marguerite did not answer him; she was offended that he should call her a woman when she was only a girl; and there is a great difference. He asked her a second time, and then a third; but she remained dumb, and answered not a word. Then he would wait no longer, but

resources and have the power to end violence and as the author contends ‘it is a dereliction of duty to pass the buck to charitable organisations, women’s organisations or non-governmental organisations (NGOs)’. This book challenges men, especially men in government, to take the responsibility seriously of ending all violence by putting forward ‘solutions for government to bring an end to so-

flew away, to commence his wooing at once. It was in the early spring, when the crocus and the snowdrop were

cialisation for violence’. This book, like his first, rests firmly on the conviction that there is a beginning and there must be an end. To this end, the author gives a detail history of violence, hoping that ‘raising awareness about our history of violence will help towards a positive change in attitudes and behaviours’. One commentator says, ‘Daniels roots his analysis on the systemic violence intrinsic in the process of discovery, conquest, exploitation, slavery, colonialism and its corollary in the Americas: the rise of ...imperialism’. Along the way, the author demolishes many myths about violence towards women and hints at solutions: end inequality, defeat machismo, provide justice, enforce domestic violence laws, control violent TV programmes, protect young people from violent video games and support art and culture that promote non-violence. Defeating Domestic Violence in the Americas: Men’s Work is made up of ten chapters with notes, an introduction, a bibliography, and an index, all designed to bring elucidation and elicit action in such a way as to vindicate the book’s premise: there is a beginning and there must be an end. This book may not win a popularity contest but it will be one of the books that will make a difference to our world. Responses to this author telephone (592) 2260065 or email: oraltradition2002@yahoo.com

in full bloom. "They are very pretty," thought the butterfly; "charming little lasses; but

Encounter with a Snake On the path to cut a bag of grass for my cow An evening scouting snake I detected at my feet Beautiful in colour as its kind, yet frightening to view;

Petrified, I stood in state of shock, As the reptile, reared its dancing head, Not to strike, but to enhance a change of course And swiftly indeed, it left my presence Heading very fast for safer ground; And I left alone, Continued on my way Smiling and wondering Wondering if the snake had retreated From what it thought to be its death Not knowing that I had yet to learn the art Of taking lives, unlearnt even now. Krishna Nand Prasad

they are rather formal." Then, as the young lads often do, he looked out for the elder girls. He next flew to the anemones; these were rather sour to his taste. The violet, a little too sentimental. The lime-blossoms, too small, and besides, there was such a large family of them. The apple-blossoms, though they looked like roses, bloomed to-day, but might fall off to-morrow, with the first wind that blew; and he thought that a marriage with one of them might last too short a time. The peablossom pleased him most of all; she was white and red, graceful and slender, and belonged to those domestic maidens who have a pretty appearance, and can yet be useful in the kitchen. He was just about to make her an offer, when, close by the maiden, he saw a pod, with a withered flower hanging at

the end. "Who is that?" he asked. "That is my sister," replied the pea-blossom. "Oh, indeed; and you will be like her someday," said he; and he flew away directly, for he felt quite shocked. A honeysuckle hung forth from the hedge, in full bloom; but there were so many girls like her, with long faces and sallow complexions. No; he did not like her. But which one did he like? Spring went by, and summer drew towards its close; autumn came; but he had not decided. The flowers now appeared in their most gorgeous robes, but all in vain; they had not the fresh, fragrant air of youth. Story by fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen- he was a Danish author best known for writing children's stories including "The Little Mermaid" and "The Ugly Duckling. Continued next week

Notice to Readers

If you have a poem and/or short story you would like to publish on our Literary Corner page, please email to timessundaymag@gmail.com. Kindly include your correct name and a contact number in your email. If you have any questions, please call 223-7230 or 223-7231.


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MARCH 11, 2018

Sunday Times Magazine 7

Feature

-Youths involved in community enhancement

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he community helpers of the Non Pariel Green House Club maybe very young and lacking in terms of experience, however, the participants are setting an example for adults in their community. These vibrant young people are involved in the first Pilot project - recycling old tires and discarded plastic bottles to build a Community Training Centre. The funding was awarded by the Ministry of Education Youth Innovation Project (YIPOG).

and very soon the Non Pariel green house club will be completed,” he told the Guyana Times Sunday Magazine. Alluding to the main functions of the group, Mr. Putulall further explained that the long term goal is to become involved in more environmental projects. The management committee, he added is comprised of members aged 18-45 years, while youths of all ages from the community are involved in the project.

A model depicting the Non Pariel Green House Club

Work in progress

According to the Project Officer, Mr. Romel Putulall , given that the volunteers understand the benefits of having a community center and ground, the youths from the community are voluntarily working on this project. “ We are making awesome progress

Even though the project is not yet completed, the Project Officer lauded the efforts of the young volunteers and encouraged others to become involved, whether it is through volunteering or sponsorship for the completion of the project. “ I would like to

Together we can: These vibrant young people are involved in the first Pilot project recycling old tires and discarded plastic bottles to build a Community Training Centre

Taking a break from their voluntary efforts

encourage everyone to come out and help,” he stated . The Group had received a grant from the Ministry of Education - Youth Innovation Project (YIPOG) in 2017, of $4 million. The overall total of the project cost approximately 9 million. The group is registered as an NGO and is managed by a Committee of 12 persons,

which includes two (2) representatives from the Buxton/Foulis NDC - Mr. Jagdeep Singh - Vice Chairman of Buxton and Ms. Sharmilla Prashad - Councillor. Putulall added that most of the young volunteers are between the age range of 7 to 18 years, who willingly worked on weekends- Saturday and Sundays to get the job done.


8 Sunday Times Magazine Travel and Tourism

K

araudarnau, Deep South Rupununi is cowboy country. Over 1000 persons, mainly Wapishana Amerindians reside in the community along the banks of the winding Rupununi River. In English, the name means Snake Hill. The community is located in the Deep South Rupununi, Region Nine , close to Aishalton. In addition to many friendly residents, the village has several schools and churches, a health post, several shops, a rice mill and a peanut butter factory. During the day, most of the villagers are at work; farming is the primary activity in the village. However, at the day’s end and on weekends, the streets come to life. Karaudarnau, Sawariwau and Mururanau are the three Wapichan communities in Region 9 that have embarked on a pilot programme to develop quality bilingual education for primary school children, with the aim of adequately responding to the needs of the indigenous children as well as passing on wisdom and traditions of their culture. Indigenous peoples have been part of the Rupununi landscape for millennia. Anthropologists have discovered Paleo-Indian petroglyphs, dated to be several thousands of years old along the course of the Rupununi River. Before the colonization of Guyana and the Rupununi region, the Makushi Amerindians, Wai-Wai and the Wapishana all inhabited the area. The Makushi migrated from what is now known as modern Brazil and Venezuela, to the northern areas of the Rupununi River, over four-hundred years ago. The Makushi Amerindians continue to live in the Rio Branco savannahs and northern Rupununi, surviving off of the abundance of fish, wildlife and forest resources of the area. The Rupununi River, also known by the local indigenous peoples as Raponani, flows through the Rupununi region. The name Rupununi originates from the word rapon in Makushi (a dialect of one of the communities), which is a black-bellied whistling duck (Dendrocygna autumnalis) found along the river. (Photos by Girendra Persaud )

MARCH 11, 2018

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MARCH 11, 2018

Sunday Times Magazine 9

Health

S

tudies have shown that by immersing into wildlife— observing, breathing, touching—forest bathing (or shinrin-yoku as it’s called in Japanese) benefits the body and the soul. In this hyperconnected, hi-tech era, it can help decrease stress levels, heart rate, blood pressure, and improve overall wellbeing. National Geographic Photographer Tali Kimelman experienced this first hand while

thinking. “You walk and let everything get into you,” she says. It’s a labor of active observing: “[You] stop, look at the colors, the details, the little drops moving … There is another world in there,” she says. At times Kimelman gets intimate with mesmerizing close-up images of flowers. She keeps her communion with nature simple, intentionally not labeling the plants with their scientific names. “It’s the left side of the brain working when you

immersing herself in Arboretum Lussich, a lush, 470-acre nature reserve on the southeast coast of her native Uruguay. Over a period of two years, she returned to this forest to explore, diverging from the pathways and allowing herself to get lost. The immersion freed her from her continuous

label things, and then you don't allow yourself to just experience what you see…,” she says. “So I was like, ‘You know what? I don't care what the names of the things are.’ I just want to see them and see how beautiful they are.” (www.nationalgeographic. com) PhotosForest Bathing by Tali Kimelman


10 Sunday Times Magazine

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MARCH 11, 2018

Fashion

& G

uyanese Designer, Darshanie Kistama is multi-talented and her works reflects her versatility. During a recent interview with the Guyana Times Sunday Magazine, the artist revealed that she currently working on pursuing a degree in "Fine Arts" at an overseas Art institute. “I feel that I am a lot better at working Themes : The sea in more than one life: Medium : hand field of art rather painted bottle than doing just painting and textile design. I am taking the opportunity to further enhance my skill, as well as learning a few more disciplines such as youth art education, photography, interior designs and much more,” she explained. The young Guyanese artist revealed too that, once she has completed her studies, she aspires to open an Art School of her own. “I can be able to give back to my community by teaching what I learnt to the younger generations,” Darshanie said. Darshani Kistama was among veteran Ms Darshanie Kistama

Guyanese artists exhibiting their artwork at Castellani House, last year , during the exhibition titled Ganga Ship 1917: The Long Journey”. It was her inaugural exhibition at the art gallery. Darshani displayed artistic paintings, drawings, saris and beautifully handpainted bottles. She is inspired by nature and her “commitment” to her religion, which is a central theme in most of her art. She continues to encourage young and aspiring artists to “paint what you feel; everyone may have their own different techniques and skills, which makes them unique at what they do, but stay true to yours; do not give in to discouragement and always try to excel yourself in whatever form of art you wish to pursue”.

Themes: Nature's new born :Medium: Photography

Theme 'forever wild': Medium: Textile design


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MARCH 11, 2018

Sunday Times Magazine 11

Home & Cooking

Recipe

This vegetarian meal in a bowl shows how something delicious can be made from mostly cupboard ingredients. Ingredients

1 tbsp sunflower oil ½ bunch spring onions , whites and greens separated and sliced 1 red pepper, diced 1 Scotch bonnet chilli, deseeded and pounded to a paste 1 garlic clove, chopped 1 tsp dried thyme

Method

Heat the oil in a large saucepan. Sizzle the spring onion whites, pepper, chilli paste and garlic for 5-8 mins until soft and fragrant. Add the thyme, curry powder and spices, then cook for 1 min more, Stir in the tomatoes, then cook for 2 mins to soften slightly. Crumble in the stock cube, then add all

1 tsp medium curry powder 1 tsp allspice 3 plum tomatoes, chopped 1 vegetable stock cube 410g can kidney bean , rinsed and drained 410g can black-eyed bean, rinsed and drained 2 x 400g cans coconut milk juice 2 limes

the beans and the coconut m i l k . Simmer for 10 mins. Turn off the heat and stir in most of the spring onion greens, the lime juice and some seasoning. Ladle into bowls and scatter with remaining spring onions just before serving. (Recipe from Good Food magazine)

Bold shapes and bright colours give a space personality. Popular patterns and bold colours are trending in interior designs today. DON'T shy away from using bold colour for your accent wall. As long as you have the right accents around the room to coordinate with your new choice, you can choose whatever colour makes you happy. DO think outside of the box when you are considering your new accent wall.

Contemporary Kitchen With Blue Floral Wallpaper

Floral Mosaic Tile Shower in Zen-Like Master Bath

D

iscover the unsung hero of your pantry, and learn clever ways to use this versatile vinegar. Toss a Salad, and More If the only time you reach for apple cider vinegar is when you’re whipping up a tasty vinaigrette, you’re missing out. Apple cider vinegar has loads of uses beyond the salad bowl. Known as ACV among aficionados, apple cider vinegar is basically apple cider that’s fermented. The fermentation process results in a vinegar packed with probiotics and enzymes—all good stuff for your body. Treat a Sting Apple cider vinegar (ACV) helps neutralize the formic acid in bee venom (that’s what causes the stinging, burning sensation). Simply soak the stung body part in ACV, or soak a cloth with ACV and place it over the sting. Repeat every 15 minutes as necessary. With honey bee stings, remember to remove the stinger before applying ACV. CV helps relieve swelling and reduce itching thanks to the potassium it contains. Clean the Kitchen Mix equal parts unpasteurized ACV and water in a clean spray bottle. Use this mixture to cut through grease, clean up grime and wipe out bacteria. The smell disappears as the vinegar evaporates. This cleaner is ideal for stove tops, counters, sinks and laundry room surfaces. It’s great for cleaning up metal tea kettles and the plastic touch pad on microwave and stove

control panels. It also makes cleaning the inside of a microwave super easy. Spritz it inside the microwave on all surfaces, heat for 25 seconds, and wipe with a paper towel. Keep Fleas Away Some dog owners rely on an apple cider vinegar and water spray to keep their pets flea-free. Blend a 50-50 mix of ACV and water, add a few drops of flea-repelling lavender or cedar essential oil, and spritz your pooch before he heads outside. Use care when spraying your dog, avoiding eyes, nose and ear areas. Check with your pet’s vet before using this flea repellent. Get Beautiful Skin Apple cider vinegar is said to bring natural healing to skin cells, and some claim it can help to prevent break-outs and reduce acne scarring (thanks to its anti-inflammatory qualities). It has antibacterial properties that some think may help eliminate acne-causing bacteria. For a simple toner, steep fresh curly parsley in boiling water for roughly 10 minutes (parsley helps boost collagen production). Mix one-quarter to one-half cup of cooled, drained parsley water with 1/2 teaspoon unpasteurized ACV and up to 20 drops of tea tree oil (antifungal, antiviral). Store in a cool, dry place for daily use. Stash in the fridge for long-term storage (several weeks). Apply with a cotton ball, or use a spray bottle to spritz on skin. Floral Accent Wall Blooms Behind TV


12 Sunday Times Magazine

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MARCH 11, 2018

Puzzles

Crossword ACROSS

98 Cold feet 99 Secluded valleys 1 Sidewalk eateries 100 Bran provides it 6 Hard hat's support (hyph.) 101 Hogged the conversation? 11 Went with 102 Mongkut portrayer 16 Stew ingredient 103 Feel sorrow 21 Dragon puppet 104 Cat calls 22 View from Giza 105 Toy dog 23 Space, poetically 106 Neutral color 24 Effrontery 107 Jules -- of sci-fi 25 Upscale cookie 108 Car owner's proof 26 Tribal adviser 109 Food wrap 27 Coast 111 "Pal Joey" penner 28 Set a price 113 Redden 29 Show disapproval 115 Gentle 30 Luxury fur 119 Removes water 32 Makes special mention of 121 Ulterior motive 34 Ill- -- gains 123 Entertain 36 Linear unit 125 Haul into court 38 Pick up 126 Fishing net 40 Movies 127 Raw 42 Heroic exploits 129 They branch out 43 Oscar or Tony 131 Humiliate 45 Raises the lid 133 Caravan halts 47 Surfer jargon 134 Petal extract 49 "Kim" novelist 135 Archaeology find 52 Virginia caverns 136 Occupied 53 Crowbar 137 Twist violently 54 Got the trophy 138 Staggers around 57 Things to uphold 139 Cut some slack 58 "Cosmos" host 140 Disreputable 59 Preside 60 Met role DOWN 61 Part of REM 1 Dr. Huxtable on TV 62 Cornered (2 wds.) 2 Bauxite giant 63 Stubble 3 Elevator stop 64 Estonian coins 4 Half of zwei 65 Words of surprise 5 Realizes 66 Kind of admirer 6 Arctic floater 68 Uncouth 7 Crooner's tune 69 Victoria's consort 8 Comforter stuffing 70 Vast emptiness 9 Is, for them 72 Perfume bottle 10 Daybreak, in verse 73 Big name in marches 11 Fate 74 "La Mer" composer 12 Parthenon site 75 Overturn 13 Not these 77 "The Count of -- Cristo" 14 Always, in verse 78 Pave over 15 Remnant 79 Sweetie pie 16 Running amok (3 wds.) 82 Fault phenomenon 17 Like folk art dolls 83 Chestnut or bay 18 Peeved 84 Ponytail site 19 Microwaves 88 Teen bane 20 Beatty of films 89 Broods silently 31 Ladd and Shepard 90 French brandy 33 Barracuda habitat 92 Top 40 song 35 More peculiar 93 Puts in a kiln 37 The One-L Lama 94 Messy quarters 39 Nutty confection 95 Brain parts 41 Harvests wool 96 Zen master's poem 44 Rugged country

Word Search

Nature around us

46 Supplicate Zeus 48 Livy contemporary 49 Bolshoi rival 50 Baking potato 51 Coke rival 52 Price tag 53 Tibet's capital 54 Urgent messages 55 Bloodhound clues 56 Disgustingly dirty 58 Fine viol. 59 Quit 60 Reddish-brown 62 Breezing through 63 Type of force 64 Corsica neighbor 67 Levels out 68 -- out (dozes off) 69 Prudential competitor 71 Less shiny 73 Drenches

74 Faculty honchos 103 Most ornery 76 Cherry seeds 104 Business deals 77 Tractor preceders 105 Handled incorrectly 78 Pilot's assent 106 Pickling solutions 79 Cartoon duck 107 Sacker of Rome 80 Farewell 108 Fall headlong 81 Of fields and meadows 109 Prepare to testify 82 Zorba portrayer 110 Pop up 83 Chenille items 112 -- couture 85 "Take -- --!" 114 Glittery fabrics 86 Walleyed fishes 116 Port near Kyoto 87 Chopin opus 117 Welded 89 Hi-fi 118 Smaller than small 90 Gauzy trap 120 Deface 91 Treat a muscle pull 122 Besides 94 Phony coin 124 Grabs a bite 95 "Wimoweh" beast 126 Farm female 97 Gambling stakes 128 AAA suggestion 99 Auctioneer's warning 130 Give -- -- shot 100 Not domesticated 132 "Phooey!" 101 Solemn promises See Solution on Pg 13

KATHLEEN SAXE

WORD GAME TODAY'S WORD -- RHETORIC (RHETORIC: RET-er-ik: The art of using language effectively and persuasively.) Average mark 40 words Time limit 60 minutes Can you find 56 or more words in RHETORIC?

recto rector retch retro rhetor rice ricer rich richer riot

rioter rite rochet rote hector heir heritor hero heroic hire

hirer hoer echo erotic etch ethic tech their thrice throe

tier tire torch tore trice trio troche ocher other otic

icer itch cero chert chirr chit choir chore cire cite

coheir coir core corer cote crier

RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of "s," such as "bats" or "dies," are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a "d" or an "s" may not be used. For example, if "bake" is used, "baked" or "bakes" are not allowed, but "bake" and "baking" are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.


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MARCH 11, 2018

Sunday Times Magazine 13

Tech

C

hina's first space station launched in 2011 and was supposed to wind up in the Pacific Ocean. Now it's anyone's guess where the thing will land.Tiangong-1 is no April Fool's joke. The out-of-control Chinese space station is now predicted to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere sometime around the beginning

lated section of the South Pacific, with any surviving fragments falling in the sea. But as early as March 2016, reports began to suggest that Tiangong-1 was malfunctioning and ground crews had lost control of the craft. In other words, there appears to be little chance of performing the manoeuvres to steer it to a graceful breakup over the ocean.

An artist's rendition of Tiangong-1 in orbit

of April. Most of it will burn up on the way down, but it's possible some pieces of the 9-ton spacecraft could make it to the surface. Tiangong means "Heavenly Palace" in English and Tiangong-1 was China's first space station, launched in 2011. The original plan for the craft's demise was a controlled reentry that would allow it to burn up over an unpopu-

Instead, it's all up to chance. According to a new projection from the European Space Agency last Tuesday, the space station is expected to make a likely uncontrolled re-entry roughly between March 29 and April 9. The ESA stresses that it won't be possible to make a precise prediction about exactly when or where Tiangong-1 will burn up and how much of it will get all

the way through the atmosphere to the surface. That said, the Chinese space station is fairly easy to track and ESA says in an online FAQ that we should know about a day in advance of the craft's end which regions of the planet might be able to see it actually burning up in the sky. Predicting where any impact might occur is significantly more difficult, however. "Even 7 hours before the actual re-entry, the uncertainty on the break-up location is a full orbital revolution -- meaning plus or minus thousands of kilometers," writes ESA's Daniel Scuka. Tiangong-1's orbit spans from 43 degrees north to 43 degrees south, or from the central United States down to the southern tip of Australia, according to Jay Melosh, a professor of earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences at Purdue University. He explains that it could come down anywhere between the two points but is more likely to land at either extreme because the station spends more time there. "It's like a pendulum – it spends more time at the limits of its swing than when it's moving fast," Melosh said in a statement last month. (CNET)

A

second-generation model with improved performance and a $300 third-gen device with two cameras are in the works. Snap is apparently working on new versions of its Spectacles wearable camera, according to a recent report . The company is said to be working on two new Spectacles products: a second-generation model that offers bug fixes, performance improvements, and new colors, and a more ambitious

version that could feature two lenses and more ad-

Crossword Solution

vanced camera technology that could cost up to $300. Snap is apparently also in conversations with major glasses companies including Luxottica and Warby Parker to license out its camera technology. As part of the company’s expanding camera ambitions, Heath also reported that Snap quietly acquired imaging company FiveFocal at the end of last year. The second-generation version of Spectacles is apparently pretty far along; the product is already said to be in the manufacturing phases for a Q2 or Q3 launch. Given that Snapchat infamously took a massive $40 million loss on the first generation of Spectacles, only selling around 150,000 units, the company is expected to produce far fewer units for the new generation of hardware. (The Verge)

M

icrosoft recently confirmed that it plans to move Windows 10 S from a dedicated operating system to a special “S Mode” for versions of Windows 10. In a new blog post, Microsoft’s Joe Belfiore admits that the original version of Windows 10 S, that locked a PC down to using just Windows Store apps, was confusing. “We have also heard feedback that the naming was a

Surface Laptop running Windows 10 S

G

oogle is adding a new activity dashboard to Docs, Sheets, and Slides that lets users with the ability to edit files check to see who else viewed the file and when they viewed it, via Engadget. If you’re the kind of person who turns on read receipts to

bit confusing for both customers and partners,” admits Befliore. To avoid this confusion, Microsoft is now creating an S Mode for each version of Windows 10. “Starting with the next update to Windows 10, coming soon, customers can choose to buy a new Windows 10 Home or Windows 10 Pro PC with S mode enabled,” says Belfiore. It’s not clear how simply moving this Windows Store lockdown to a mode will alleviate some of the confusion around Windows 10 S, but perhaps Microsoft will make the unlock process even more obvious. Previous rumours also suggested that Microsoft was planning to allow Windows 10 Home users to disable the S Mode free of charge, but Windows 10 Pro customers with S Mode enabled on their device will be forced to pay $49 to get access to a full version of Windows 10 Pro. It turns out these rumours were inaccurate. “If a customer does want to switch out of S mode, they will be able to do so at no charge, regardless of edition,” says Belfiore. That should avoid any confusion around unlocking full versions of Windows, and now it’s up to PC makers to choose whether to enable the new S Mode or not. (The Verge)

know when your friends and colleagues have seen your message but not responded, now you can get that same experience with the documents you share. With the new activity dashboard, you can find out if Jeff really read that memo last week. Or, more practically, users who

accidentally mess up share permissions on documents can find out who accidentally managed to get access to the file. G Suite administrators will now be able to turn on the activity dashboard feature, and the feature will roll out to users starting on March 21st. (The Verge)


14 Sunday Times Magazine

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MARCH 11, 2018

Bollywood/Hollywood

I

ndian cinema icon Shashi Kapoor and India's first female superstar Sridevi were honoured at the 90th Academy Awards ceremony here during the "In Memoriam" montage. The Indian stars got a musical tribute by Eddie Vedder who took the stage to sing Tom Petty's "Room at the top". Actress Jennifer Garner introduced the segment by paying tribute to late star Audrey Hepburn. "There is no joy without sorrow," Garner said, and then acknowledged the loss of film world with the departed souls. Son of Prithviraj Kapoor and younger brother of Raj Kapoor and Shammi Kapoor, Shashi Kapoor made his debut in Bollywood with the 1961 film "Dharmputra" after working as a child artist. He passed away in December 2017. Bollywood's ultimate "charm house" Shashi Kapoor then went on to make a name for himself globally by associating with international cin-

I

rrfan Khan-starrer Hindi Medium will hit the big screens in China on April 4, following the success of movies by Bollywood stars Aamir Khan and Salman Khan in the country. China has a quota on the number of overseas movies that can be screened in the country each year. But Indian films are finding increased presence there. For the release of Hindi Medium, which takes a comical look at the underbelly of India’s education system, the Chinese authorities opted for the film’s teaser poster instead of the main poster. The poster reflects the disparities in society and as the

T

I

The Barbie dolls represent real ‘sheroes’

Oscars 2018 remember late actors Shashi Kapoor and Sridevi in memoriam

ema. He was honoured with the Padma Bhushan -- the third highest civilian honour -- by the Indian government in 2011. In 2015, he was bestowed with the Dadasaheb Phalke Award. Sridevi, known for her ability to slip into myriad roles, expressive eyes, sheer comic timing and her fluid dancing skills, died on

film Hindi Medium does, the image holds a mirror up to our society where the ability to speak fluent English is ignorantly considered a yardstick to measure sophistication and elitism. Producer Dinesh Vijan of Maddock Films said, “This is exactly what made Hindi Medium so significant. The idea that we give importance to material wealth and our social image over the value of humanness and love baffles me, but sadly it’s what drives most of society and portraying this in a light yet meaningful form is what resonates with audiences universally.” Hindi Medium, direct-

he 'Transformers: The Last Knight' actor reveals that he laughs it off, adding that the 45-year-old beauty 'deserves somebody far better than me.' Jennifer Garner and Josh Duhamel have weighed in on their dating rumours. In a new interview with Entertainment Tonight, the actors, who play parents for Nick Robinson's Simon in upcoming movie "Love, Simon", laugh the rumours off, assuring that there's no truth to them. Josh, who split from ex-wife Stacy Ferguson in September 2017, joked, "We're going to church, the whole thing," when asked about the inevitable dating rumours surrounding him and his costar. Jennifer responded, "Yeah, I know. Did you know you were a Methodist?"

February 24. Her death left everyone shocked, and saddened. They were included in the annual montage along with stars such as John Heard, Tony Anne Walker, Jane Foray, Robert Osborne, Martin Landau, Glenne Headly, Roger Moore, George A. Romero and Jerry Lewis.

(Times of India)

ed by Saket Chaudhary, also features Pakistani actor Saba Qamar. Of late, Aamir’s Secret Superstar and Salman’s Bajrangi Bhaijaan -- the actor’s first movie to release in China -have done well in the country. According to film producers and distributor, the Chinese audience is receptive to Indian stories irrespective of whether a movie features a ‘star’. At the recently concluded Ficci Frames 2018, there was a discussion on the appeal of Indian films in China. On whether Aamir’s popularity is working in favour of his films, Prasad Shetty, Director, China Peacock Mountain Group, said, “I know people are talking about his popularity in China, but the fact is that he really worked hard to connect with people of China. He went there, interacted with people and that makes a difference to earn popularity. When asked if only big budget films work in China, Shetty said, “Hindi Medium will release in China. That is a content-heavy film.” (Hindustan Times)

n honor of International Women's Day, which was celebrated on march 8th , Barbie honoured director Patty Jenkins, gold medalist Chloe Kim, and a bunch of other incredible women from across the globe with their very own dolls, as part of their 'Shero' program. Past honourees include Ashley Graham, Misty Copeland, and Ava Duvernay. "As a brand that inspires the limitless potential in girls, Barbie will be honoring its largest line up of role models timed to International Women’s Day, because we know that you can’t be what you can’t see,” said Lisa McKnight, SVP and GM of Barbie. Each of the interna-

T

he speculation emerges as the Warner Bros. is reportedly trying to recruit Chris McQuarrie, who has worked with Cruise on several films, to direct 'Green Lantern Corps'. Is Tom Cruise wanted for the new Green Lantern movie? Warner Bros. is courting Oscar-winning filmmaker Christopher McQuarrie to direct "Green Lantern Corps", the new iteration of the DC comic books, according to That Hashtag Show. McQuarrie has worked with the

tional Sheroes will get her very own one-of-a-kind doll to celebrate breaking boundaries in their chosen fields. Along with Jenkins and Kim, the other women being honored this year include: Bindi Irwin (conservationist, Australia), Nicola Adams, (boxing champion, UK), Çağla Kubat (windsurfer, Turkey), Hélène Darroze, (world-renowned chef, France), Hui Ruoqi (volleyball champion, China), Leyla Piedayesh (designer and entrepreneur, Germany), Lorena Ochoa (professional golfer, Mexico), Martyna Wojciechowska (journalist, Poland), Sara Gama (soccer player, Italy), Xiaotong Guan (actress and philanthropist, China), Yuan

55-year-old actor on several films, including "Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation", the upcoming "Mission: Impossible - Fallout" and "Jack Reacher". WB was previously reported trying to lure Leonardo DiCaprio to play the Joker by hiring Martin Scorsese for an origin movie about the Batman villain. Thus, speculation emerges that the studio is trying to recruit the three-time Golden Globe Award winner by bringing McQuarrie for the "Green Lantern" re-

Josh later continued, "We're both private people, I laugh at it [the rumours]." The "Transformers: The Last Knight" actor went on singing praises for the mother of three, saying, "Jen is an amazing catch. She deserves somebody far better than me." Jennifer and Josh were said to have found love again in each other and built their romance during breaks from the filming of the coming-of-age flick. "That's the best time for those intimate conversations, the ones you have

Yuan Tan, (prima ballerina, China), Vicky Martin Berrocal (entrepreneur and fashion designer, Spain). Kim feels equally excited about representing different parts of being a woman and a role model, saying, “I’m so honored to be considered a role model and want girls to know that they can be athletic and girly at the same time!” Along with the one-of-a-kind dolls honoring these innovators, Barbie is also launching a new collection called Inspiring Women, which will be available to all in stores. The first three dolls will be Amelia Earhart, Frida Kahlo, and Katherine Johnson (of Hidden Figures fame). Glamour

boot. Should the rumor be true, Cruise may play a more experienced Hal Jordan or he could play another version of the superhero or a villainous character in the movie. A brief logline for "Green Lantern Corps" reportedly reads, "Former test pilot Hal Jordan, now a veteran of the intergalactic group of protectors of peace and justice known as the Green Lantern Corps, mentors young recruit John Stewart." While it remains to be seen if Cruise will slip into the green suit, the actor can be seen in "Mission: Impossible - Fallout", which will hit theaters across the nation on July 27. He reprises his role as Ethan Hunt in the sixth installment of the action spy film franchise, joined by the likes of Henry Cavill, Rebecca Ferguson (II), Simon Pegg, Alec Baldwin, Ving Rhames, Sean Harris and Michelle Monaghan in the cast.(Ace Showbiz)

at the beginning of a relationship to happen," a source revealed. "Away from home and looking for companionship, it's easy to see what happened." The source noted that "anyone in Jen's shoes, after all she went through with Ben [Ben Affleck], would doubt whether they could ever trust a man again," considering that the 45-yearold actress split from the Batman depicter over alleged infidelity. The source, however, added that "Josh is truly a good guy, and spending time with him opened her up emotionally." The source also claimed that the "Alias" alum and Josh might make a good partner for each other. "Josh is a homebody and craves the simple life," said the source. "With Jen, he'd get that in spades. She's very sweet and family-oriented." (Ace Showbiz)


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MARCH 11, 2018

Sunday Times Magazine 15


16 Sunday Times Magazine

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MARCH 11, 2018

Fun Times

Archie

Use your ingenuity to bypass complaints. If you stay (March 21- on top of what's expected of April 19) you, it will be easier to avoid being put in an awkward position. Stick to the truth.

ARIES

You'll learn from the expeTAURUS riences you've had with peo(April 20- ple looking for help. Listen May 20) and make suggestions, but don't do the work or pay for someone else's problem. Listen to the advice beGEMINI ing offered and consider your (MAY 28- choices. Paying a price for June 20) past mistakes will allow you to move more freely. Someone you least expect will be deceptive. Partnerships will need to be handled with care. Listen to (June 21- complaints and criticism, and July 22) consider how best to deal with problems without making matters worse. Understanding and kindness are encouraged.

CANCER

LEO (July 23Aug. 22)

Dilbert

Peanuts

Say what's on your mind. Honesty and integrity are the most important factors if you want to get things done. If you pussyfoot around a conflict, you'll end up being used.

VIRGO (Aug. 23Sept. 22)

You can socialize, but don't go over budget when doing so. There are cheap ways to have fun. Just spending time with someone you love should be enough to make this a great day.

LIBRA (Sept. 23Oct. 23)

Partnerships will be on shaky ground if you cannot come to terms with who is responsible for what. Equality will be the only way to bring order out of chaos.

Don't feel the need to folSCORPIO (Oct. 24- low someone who is prone to Nov. 22) unpredictability. Acting on an emotional whim will lead to trouble and could affect your reputation. Personal problems surSAGITTARIUS rounding a partner, parent or (Nov. 23someone you live with must be Dec. 21) dealt with thoughtfully. Don't jump to conclusions or take sides. Show support and compassion, but don't be gullible.

Calvin and Hobbes

Listen attentively, but don't CAPRICORN share personal information, (Dec. 22- and keep your assets, possesJan. 19) sions and status well hidden. Take a unique approach to the way you handle your cash. Invest in yourself. An emotional matter inAQUARIUS volving money should be (Jan. 20- handled smartly. Joint venFeb. 19) tures are best avoided, and if someone owes you, it's time to collect. Don't purchase unnecessary items. You'll be faced with deciPISCES (Feb. 20- sions that you may not want to Mar. 20) make. Consider what will happen if you let someone else intervene. You are best off staying in control.

Sunday times magazine march 11, 2018  

Sunday times magazine march 11, 2018

Sunday times magazine march 11, 2018  

Sunday times magazine march 11, 2018