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Katie GCH. Claddagh’s Hotcakes at Sangrud JH, NA Prize I (CH. Darnelle’s “Party On” JH x CH. Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Explorer SH)

ÔKatieÕ Þnished her Grand Championship in style with a Best of Breed and Group placement under judge Mr. Richard Byrd. Breeders: Courtney Vogel-Bastian & William Bastian Helen & James Witt Owners: Paul & Kristin Wehking Courtney Vogel-Bastian & William Bastian www.claddaghkennel.com 2

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Wire~News

The Journal of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America

Photos from Richard Hirneisen Collection — Pictured in the center is the author’s dog Georgie on an intense point.

D E PA RT M E N T S Summer 2011 - Field Dog Issue

8 9 11 23 24

Club Business

Index to Advertisers

Cover Southpaw Kennel - Megan Smith Editor & Bulletins Inside Front Wehking, Vogel-Bastian New Members & Treasurer Report 3 Pete Paduch Staff & Board Members 6 Steve & Lisa Kreuser & Bernee Brawn 2011 Nationals Info 7 Southpaw Kennel - Megan Smith National Saddle Raffle 10 Justa GWPs - Bernee Brawn 30-31 Heywire, Sure Shot & Justa GWPs 54 Purina 55 Cupola Farm - Courtelis, Johnson, Whitman 56 Tempest Wires - Belinda DeLaby 58 Hard Headed Kennels - Ed Shupp Inside Back Willamette GWPs - Lisa Popescu Back Cover Willamette GWPs - Lisa Popescu

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A RT I C L E S Re g u l a r Fe a t u r e s

12 13 14 16 20 20 28 32 39 43 52 53 57

OFA Results CHIC Program Only the Good Die Young National GWP Rescue Program Field Top Ten Top Sires & Dams 1987 - 2010 Good Dog! Field Top Ten Friendly Fire Wired Reading Good-bye Angus New Titles Becky’s Letter

Photo from Diana Wise Collection

S p e c i a l Fe a t u r e s

25 33 35 44 46 48 50

A Pigeon Primer GWPCA Spring Field Events Midwest Classic Delaware Valley Specialty Suncoast GWP Club Supported Entry GWP Club of Wisconsin Specialty Dogs 101

On the Cover “Jagger” USHR CH Southpaw Time Is On My Side JH, CGC, V, NAVHDA NA Prize I Since Jagger’s registered name “Time Is On My Side” is a song by one of my favorite bands, The Rolling Stones, it seemed only natural to name him after their legendary front man, Mick Jagger. Just like his namesake, he has entertained and amazed me from the first day I laid eyes on him and he doesn’t show any signs of stopping now! From intensely pointing quail wings at 7 weeks old to easily earning his JH title in 4 straight tests at 6 months old, and even instinctively honoring his brace mate at one test. He is the only pup in his litter to earn both his NAVHDA Natural Ability Prize I (with a perfect score) and his UKC Started Hunting Retriever title. His wonderful temperament and versatility make him a joy to hunt over both on upland game birds and waterfowl. He is absolutely everything I ever dreamed of in a gundog. Jagger is also my first show dog and he has been such a pleasure to show. He finished his championship at 17 months old with 3 Majors (his first from the 6-9 month puppy class) and 4 Best of Opposites. He is an amazing companion that always makes me smile and I am very blessed to have him in my life. He gives 110% in everything he does and I can’t wait to see how far he will go!

Megan Smith

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Fr o m t h e E d i t o r Dog Days of Summer are here — hope you’re out playing with your dogs! I’m still looking for ways to reduce the cost of publishing the WireNews. This is my new idea: Have one BIG issue — the one following Nationals. The other issues would be in the 62 page range like this one. I cut 8 more pages from this issue, primarily the standings that are now available on the website. Pages should be added or deleted based on units of 8 because of the way the printing is done. Adding 2 pages would cost as much or more than adding 8. I think it would be good to publish the standings based on the issue. For example, since this is the Field Issue, I included the Field Top Ten. The Best of Breed and Junior Handler standings would be included in the Judges Issue before Nationals. In the Spring issue, I’d include all of the final standings for the previous year when they are available, as well as the current performance dog standings. New Titles should always be printed since they are a one-time event unlike the standings, and it’s nice to “memorialize” it. I know this action will bring controversy, but I thought I’d just do it and gauge the reaction. If you want to share your thoughts, please email me with Standings in the subject line. Just remember, if you want a publication with lots of information printed, you need to support the WireNews with your ad revenue! We had a good number of ads for this issue, so thanks again for your support. With the cuts I’ve made, the ad revenue almost covers the entire cost of this issue! Brent Colvin volunteered to work as the ad manager, and he has been contacting various companies regarding placement of ads in the WireNews. It’s been tough for him to get a good response as everyone is scaling back on

Thanks, Ellen

Bulletins National GWP Rescue, Inc. Needs Your Help! They desperately need money, foster homes, airline miles and coupons. Two more sick dogs found — one in PA and one in NC. Please contact Diane Turner, coordinator of NGWPR, at 520-822-9375 or dturner596@aol.com. Fall Issue Deadline is August 15th We’ll be on a tight schedule and ad pages are already being reserved. The cover was auctioned at last year’s Nationals and Don Padgett was the high bidder. Right now, the back cover and inside back cover are still available. WireMail If you’re not receiving the WireMail emails for up-to-date club news, please send your current email address to Erika Brown, Treasurer at geauxerika@yahoo.com GWPCA Website In the interest of saving club dollars, much of the standard GWPCA business is now published on the club’s website instead of the WireNews. Look for the GWPCA standings & local club information on the website: www.gwpca.com Images for Publication Photos submitted to the WireNews MUST be greater than 1 megabyte or 1000 kilobytes. Image quality starts when you are taking pictures. If you are optimizing battery life and memory cards, you are compromising image quality. So if you’re shooting a GWPCA event and you want to submit photos for publication, check to make sure your camera’s quality setting is on the higher end. Also, when you save pictures in a photo editor, save at the highest possible quality resolution and check to see if they are 300 dots per inch (dpi). The best pictures I get are in the 3 to 4 megabyte range. Field Top Ten The year-end Junior Dogs were missing in the last issue, so they’re printed in this one — see page 20. Top Producing Sires & Dams These standings have also been reprinted as there was an error on the previous list. 8

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CLUB BUSINESS

Treasurer’s Report General Fund - $12,451.13 AllStar - $2,115.89 Maturity - $113.55 Delegate Fund - $6,602.76 Supplemental National Field Trial Trophy Fund - $1,290.00

New Members Danielle & Joyce Gifford & MikeBennett 2341 E 21st Street Tuscon, AZ 85719 (520) 237-2550 danibrewski@gmail.com downrightmike@gmail.com Jerry & Lisa Falk 12338 Crane Avenue Richland, MI 49083 (269) 365-2430 lisamarie50@me.com Richard Carpenter PO Box 553 Mills, WY 82644 (307) 259-3137 wwinddsgwps@aol.com randmcarp1@aol.com Jeffrey Thode 4610 N 139th Ave Omaha, NE 68164 (402) 963-9655 jeffthode@yahoo.com Ted & Meredith Harvey 352 E. Seaspray Rd. Ocean City, NJ 08226 (856) 207-1869 thmss1215@comcast.net mereinoc@yahoo.com

Keith Penniman 9435 Pendergast Rd Phoenix, NY 13135 (315) 695-4421 finewiney@aol.com Roger Ball 1227 Paquonock Ave Windsor, CT 06095 (860) 688-7138 dayhillken@gmail.com George & Nikki Johnson 33828 288th Street Gregory, SD 57533 (605) 835-8391 nkoneill@gmail.com Deborah Luckert 35 Fawn Brook Lane Simsbury, CT 06070 (860) 658-5699 d.luckert@comcast.net Stuart Kerzner 281 Pomona Road Port Republic, NJ 08241 (609) 932-3629

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CLUB BUSINESS

GWPCA & Wire~News Staff WireNews Editor - Ellen Herminghaus - wirenewseditor@gmail.com 6313 Saintsbury Ct. Oklahoma City, OK 73132 (405) 722-7043 Column Contact Email contact info Agility Ashlee Trotter training@creativepaws.com Agility & Obedience Standings Lori Sargent birddog@windsweptwires.net Becky’s Therapy Dog Update Ann Duffin gr8gwp@yahoo.com Canine Health Robin Nelson GWPoint@aol.com Field Top 10 Lynn Sandor sandorcpa@comcast.net From the Whelping Box Laura Myles invernesskennels@frontier.com Good Dog! Debra Galan-Parsons deb507@ptd.net In the Company of Dogs Richard Hirneisen rich.hirneisen@gmail.com Junior Talk WANTED NAVHDA Courtney Vogel courtneyvogel@hotmail.com New Titles Lori Sargent birddog@windsweptwires.net Open Range Diane Turner DTurner596@aol.com Obedience/Field Training Greg Dubois grgdubois@comcast.net OFA Cathy Milachek Ciaradoc@aol.com Rescue column Diane Turner DTurner596@aol.com Show standings Lori Sargent birddog@windsweptwires.net Wired Living Beth Hollenberg patokagwp@verizon.net Wired for Reading Jodi Quesnell idawiregwps@isp.com GWPCA Breeder Referral Bernee Brawn, 1408 Pineville Rd, New Hope, PA 18938

justagwp@tradenet.net

GWPCA Delegate to the AKC Patricia Laurans, 54 Mount Pleasant Rd, Newtown, CT 06470 plaurans@earthlink.net

2011 GWPCA Board of Directors President Ray Calkins, 13235 SW Bell Rd, Sherwood, OR 97140 (503) 682-2968 gwpcascade@aol.com Vice President Elizabeth Dixon, N7815 County Rd N, Spring Valley, WI 54767 (715) 778-4675 bkwdsgwp@svtel.net Secretary Michelle Boyd, 617 Taylor St., Greenville, IL 62246 (618) 664-2250 jboyd1@newwavecomm.net Treasurer Erika Brown, 236 Park Ave, Woodstock, GA 30188 (770) 591-4329 geauxerika@yahoo.com Eastern Director Garnett Persinger, 13838 St. Highway 198, Conneautville, PA 16406 (814) 587-2365 13838@windstream.net Midwest Director Chuck Casanova, 19910 Platte View Rd, Gretna, NE 68028 (402) 691-9489 clc51@hotmail.com Western Director Robert Perry, 527 NW Elm Ave., Suite 3, PMB 200, Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 504-9197 aspendel@aol.com ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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G W P H E A LT H I N F O

OFA Results OFA Number Registration # Registered Name Cardiac GWP-CA42/57M/C-VPI-ECHO SR59070601 TIMO II V. BOCKENHAGEN AT KIMMAXCH DDB GWP-DNA-38/S SR55400801 DUAL SHOT'S BEHIND BARSCH Elbows GWP-EL508F34-VPI GW007322 FUNK'S MOA SHORT GWP-EL497F43-VPI SR42361306 KEN'S LITTLE THUNDER DAISY MAE GWP-EL510F43-NOPI SR44889206 SIERRA NEVADA PALE ALE GWP-EL507F38-VPI SR46095610 SLICK BLITZ PAIGE GWP-EL509F34-VPI SR49504703 GEFHARTE'S SMALL TOWN GIRL GWP-EL506F34-VPI SR50713801 SMOKE CREEK'S EMMA II GWP-EL502F31-VPI SR50836801 WEIDENHUGEL HOPE V JOEY GWP-EL501M31-VPI SR50836808 WEIDENHUGEL HOUSTON V JOEY GWP-EL511M30-VPI SR51629801 BONE POINT'S GEYSER GWP-EL505M27-VPI SR52349201 SCOTIAN WINDSWEPT EXPEDITION GWP-EL498M27-VPI SR52442803 LADD HILLS GENERAL JACKSON GWP-EL504M26-VPI SR53204512 RLBS SOMETHING TO TALK ABOUT GWP-EL503F26-VPI SR53204514 RLBS FLIRTING WITH FAME GWP-EL499M26-NOPI SR53811306 HEDBERG'S PLACE YOUR BETS GWP-EL500M41-VPI SR59070601 TIMO II V. BOCKENHAGEN AT KIMMAXCH Hips GWP-3614G68F-NOPI GW005639 VW'S BRITTA GWP-3596G55F-NOPI GW006491 DOUBLE LL KEYSHA GWP-3600G45M-VPI GW007272 VASSILIJ GW007322 FUNK'S MOA SHORT GWP-3608F69M-VPI SR25283206 WAKOTAS CRAZY TRAIN GWP-3616E46F-NOPI SR40763801 HAAR BARONS BILLIE HOLIDAYCH GWP-3612F45F-VPI SR41958306 RIVER VALLEYS EVE OF BLU SANDS GWP-3611G46F-PI SR42127802 AUTUMN DUFF WILLETT GWP-3595F43F-VPI SR42361306 KEN'S LITTLE THUNDER DAISY MAE GWP-3432G42M-VPI SR44239402 BONE POINT'S FOSTER GWP-3610G38F-VPI SR46095610 SLICK BLITZ PAIGE GWP-3601G34M-NOPI SR48601205 VOM BRITT ENGES RAPAHO SMOKE GWP-3613G34F-VPI SR49504703 GEFHARTE'S SMALL TOWN GIRL GWP-3597G38F-NOPI SR50507401 ALEXA VOM ICON JAEGER GWP-3607E34F-VPI SR50713801 SMOKE CREEK'S EMMA II GWP-3603G31F-VPI SR50836801 WEIDENHUGEL HOPE V JOEY GWP-3602G31M-VPI SR50836808 WEIDENHUGEL HOUSTON V JOEY GWP-3609G28F-VPI SR52044303 NAGGY DAKOTA VOM HESSENJAEGER GWP-3598G27M-VPI SR52442803 LADD HILLS GENERAL JACKSON GWP-3605G26M-VPI SR53204512 RLBS SOMETHING TO TALK ABOUT GWP-3604G26F-VPI SR53204514 RLBS FLIRTING WITH FAME GWP-3599F26M-NOPI SR53811306 HEDBERG'S PLACE YOUR BETS GWP-3606F26F-NOPI SR54750702 SALLEE'S MID NIGHT JESSE GWP-3615G33F-PI SR57039101 MORGAN DT COKE Thyroid GWP-TH209/48M-PI SR40009404 BONE POINT'S ELMO GWP-TH210/45M-VPI SR42688101 CASCADE DOUBLE BARREL GWP-TH208/57M-VPI SR45059901 DOUBLE LL MAC GWP-TH204/39F-VPI SR45736607 RED BARN'S HERE TO STAY GWP-TH207/27M-VPI SR52349201 SCOTIAN WINDSWEPT EXPEDITION GWP-TH205/21F-VPI SR56463006 AIMN HI SCOTIAN GHOSTDANCE, CH GWP-TH206/20M-VPI SR62286701 KIMMAX CAMUS Von Willebrand's GWP-VW55/49M-PI SR40009404 BONE POINT'S ELMO GWP-VW51/42F-VPI SR43476504 INVERNESS NESTLE' QUICK GWP-VW50/40M-VPI SR45135308 INVERNESS ODIN GWP-VW54/32F-VPI SR50836801 WEIDENHUGEL HOPE V JOEY GWP-VW53/32M-VPI SR50836808 WEIDENHUGEL HOUSTON V JOEY GWP-VW52/28M-VPI SR52666301 BACKWOODS DK FYRST GWP-VW48/55M-VPI SR59070601 TIMO II V. BOCKENHAGEN AT KIMMAXCH GWP-VW49/20M-NOPI SR62286701 KIMMAX CAMUS

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Results NORMAL - CARDIOLOGIST, ECHO SALIVA KIT NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL GOOD GOOD GOOD MILD UNILATERAL LEFT FAIR EXCELLENT FAIR GOOD FAIR GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD EXCELLENT GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD GOOD FAIR FAIR GOOD NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL NORMAL GENOTYPICALLY CLEAR GENOTYPICALLY CLEAR GENOTYPICALLY CLEAR GENOTYPICALLY CLEAR GENOTYPICALLY CLEAR GENOTYPICALLY CLEAR GENOTYPICALLY CLEAR GENOTYPICALLY CLEAR


G W P H E A LT H I N F O

German Wirehaired Pointers

OFA evaluations through December 2010 Registry

Evaluations

Cardiac Elbow Hips Patella Thyroid

Rank >50 n/a 66 103 n/a 7

Von Willebrands

n/a

47

42 514 3851 4 273

Percent Abnormal 2.4 2.9 9.0 0.0 11.0 10.3 Autoimmune .7 Idiopathic 13.2 Equivocal 0.0

Percent Normal 97.6 96.7 89.9 100.0 75.8

100.0

Introducing......CHIC #2

Dual Shot’s Behind Bars For more information about our CHIC program go to www.caninehealthinfo.org Click on CHIC BREEDS, then German Wirehaired Pointers, then “search” to find a growing list of GWP’s whose owners recognize the importance of testing for health problems.

Please plan to participate as we make a new Health Survey available to our GWPCA membership. We request your help prioritizing current health concerns in our breed. ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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G W P H E A LT H I N F O

“Only the Good Die Young” By Robin K Nelson, DVM Seems we can no longer assume our beloved companions will live to be senior citizens. Over the years, our breed has lost some special dogs, in their prime by most standards. Several conditions are linked to sudden death in a seemingly healthy dog.

F

irst on the list of conditions is a ruptured hemangiosarcoma. This malignant tumor arises from cells lining blood vessels and mainly affects the spleen, heart, and liver. Middle age to older dogs and possibly more males than females can be found dead showing no symptoms suggesting cause of death. German Wirehaired Pointers, like many other large breeds, have a higher incidence of this type of cancer. CLINICAL SIGNS Clinical signs of splenic hemangiosarcoma (HSA) vary and range from vague, nonspecific signs of illness to asymptomatic abdominal swelling to acute death secondary to hemorrhagic shock. Early symptoms can be subtle and easily missed. Some dogs merely show a change in appetite or unexplained vomiting. Splenic growths have the unfortunate tendency to break open and bleed profusely. Pale gums, distended abdomen, lethargy (weakness), or difficulty breathing should be investigated. Like the splenic hemangiosarcoma, the heart-based HSA exerts its life-threatening effects by bleeding. The heart is encased in a thin, membranous sac called the pericardium. The hemangiosarcoma is usually attached to the upper right chamber of the heart. When it bleeds, the blood fills the pericardium until it is so full the heart inside has no room to fill with the blood it has to pump. This condition results in labored breathing, weakness, and emergency circulatory collapse. Hemopericardium can only be relieved by tapping the pericardium with an ultrasound-guided needle and withdrawing the fluid. Pericardiocentesis allows the heart room to fill with blood and resume pumping. A dog showing any clinical signs of exercise intolerance, shortness of breath, or unexplained weight loss should be evaluated by a veterinarian.

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DIAGNOSIS Lab work and x-rays are indicated if the doctor suspects hemangiosarcoma. A complete blood count shows anemia (low red blood cell numbers) and changes in red blood cell structure. Lower platelet counts are identified as the dog’s body tries to clot the hemorrhages associated with this vascular tumor. X-rays of the chest or abdomen can reveal an enlarged heart or abdominal mass in the dog exhibiting “vague” symptoms. Ultrasound clearly shows blood- filled hemangiosarcomas, but only biopsy confirms malignancy. PROGNOSIS Hemangiosarcoma is a very serious disease with a grave prognosis. Most dogs live only a short time (weeks to months) after diagnosis. Since hemangiosarcomas arise from the lining of blood vessels, they are highly metastatic. This tumor has an increased chance of shedding cancer cells into the blood vessels and these cancer cells implant and grow other places like the liver and lungs within months. This tumor is so aggressive, even surgery combined with chemotherapy is usually not curative.

A

second cause of sudden death is dilated cardiomyopathy. This sneaky disease of the heart muscle fibers is characterized by severe cardiac contraction dysfunction. The heart muscle weakens, loses its ability to pump blood effectively, and the electric pathway determining a dog’s heart rate and rhythm is altered. Fatal arrhythmias may develop resulting in sudden death.


G W P H E A LT H I N F O ETIOLOGY Breed-associated dilated cardiomyopathy is likely a genetically programmed inherited disorder, in most cases with unknown mechanism of cause. Doberman Pinschers, Boxers, Great Danes, Portugese Water Dogs, and Cocker Spaniels are breeds known to be genetically predisposed to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Dilated cardiomyopathy is not limited to specific breeds. It is an adult onset disease affecting many large/giant breeds including German Wirehaired Pointers. DCM appears to affect more males than females usually between the ages of four and ten. Proposed causes of idiopathic (unknown cause) dilated cardiomyopathy include: viral infection, underlying immune-mediated disease, nutritional deficiencies such as taurine and L-carnitine, and microvascular (microscopic blood vessel) disease. Toxins such as doxorubicin, a chemotherapy drug used to treat cancers in dogs, and Trypanosomiasis, an uncommon infectious disease found mainly in the southern United States can also cause DCM. DIAGNOSIS Diagnosing dilated cardiomyopathy can be complicated. Structural changes in the heart muscle result in three clinical presentations: 1) Occult disease- the patient shows no obvious clinical signs. A dog is “screened” for another problem and heart abnormalities are detected incidentally, most often by auscultation (listening with a stethoscope) or x-raying the chest 2) Congestive heart failure- the patient shows clinical signs of a steadily progressive disease characterized by lethargy (lack of energy), increased heart rate, coughing, weakness, and weight loss. 3) Cardiac arrhythmias caused by electrical instability resulting in episodes of syncope (fainting) or collapse and sudden death. Do not ignore signs of weakness. Pursuing any unexplained cough, collapsing episode, or change in a dog’s ability to exercise or breathe at rest will lead to an earlier diagnosis. Most cardiac conditions can be suspected with good auscultation and confirmed with an ECG (electrocardiogram) or an echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart). Chest x-rays might show an enlarged heart and/or fluid in the lung tissue or chest cavity. Some dogs in the early stages of DCM have normal chest films but show arrhythmias on their ECG. Cardiac ultrasound can help identify dogs

with DCM before they develop clinical signs. The echocardiogram shows the larger heart chamber size, thinner heart walls, and reduced power of the heartbeat. Decreased systolic (pumping) function and ventricular enlargement confirm dilated cardiomyopathy. This examination is best performed by a board certified veterinary cardiologist. TREATMENT Regardless of whether dilated cardiomyopathy is breed- associated or idiopathic (unknown cause) it is rarely reversible. Humans with cardiomyopathy often receive heart transplants. In veterinary medicine drugs are prescribed to support the heart, reduce clinical signs of congestive heart failure, reduce life-threatening arrhythmias, and prolong survival. The cornerstones of DCM treatment include diuretics (drugs to eliminate fluid from the lungs), ACE inhibitors (blood vessel dilators to help relieve the strain on the heart muscle), digitalis, and pimobendan - a newer medication that increases the strength of contractility of the heart muscle. Progression of the disease varies with each individual dog. Patients that respond to treatment for DCM can feel well and be normal in every way except they lack stamina and endurance. Physical activity may need to be moderated or eliminated according to the disease’s severity. Dogs with DCM are always at risk for sudden death, usually during exercise or excitement. THE FUTURE To suddenly lose a dog without warning or explanation is a heart wrenching experience. Without performing a post mortem exam, we only speculate about the cause of sudden death. Do German Wirehaired Pointers have a heart problem? Are we seeing more hemangiosarcomas in our middle-age dogs? We need the information gathered only when fanciers confirm a cause of death and share the diagnosis. Each day researchers learn more about the heritability of so many conditions. Scientists suspect hemangiosarcoma and dilated cardiomyopathy affect family lines. To learn a dog’s sire, dam, or relative died of cancer or a cardiac condition allows an owner to be super vigilant and suspect a problem early, perhaps when more can be done to provide treatment. Keep a close eye on your “retired” companion. Don’t assume he’s just old and “tired.” Report any depression, unexplained change in appetite or respiratory distress to your veterinarian. You want to be together for “the longest time ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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GWP RESCUE

National GWP Rescue Program – A Frank Discussion By Diane Turner, National Rescue Coordinator

Following is the “good news and bad news” of the GWPCA rescue program. 501c3 Status Granted: There is much good news. After years of waiting, National GWP Rescue, Inc. has received federal non-profit (501c3) status. Donations to rescue will now be tax-deductible. This status will also enable national rescue coordinators and fosters to take dogs out of some shelters and animal control facilities without pull fees or adopting the dogs. And the status offers some liability protection for the club and its officers. Insurance Coverage: The insurance has been finalized and we now have one million dollars worth of liability insurance and $10,000 in property damage coverage per incident. This covers the club, the board, our fosters, our transporters and our evaluators. Acceptance with PetFinder: We have now been approved for a PetFinder account and are awaiting some final paperwork prior to getting the rescue dogs listed with the online agency. The dogs will be listed by region and we have designated the west coast, southwest, rocky mountain, south and east as our regions. New NGWPR Website Coming: In the upcoming weeks, rescue will have a new website. Thanks to Amy and Adam Cunningham, who have donated the site, rescue will not only be able to feature each rescue dog, along with its information, but the site will also allow adoption and foster applications and reimbursement forms to be filled out on-line. The new site will allow us to do volunteer training on-line. We will be able to accept on-line credit card donations and the site will feature a gift-store. Numerous artists have offered to support our online store with their GWP items. These items will be varied in price and will offer a wide variety of unique gifts. Once the store is up and operating items may be purchased with a major credit card.

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New Regional Coordinators: NGWPR is pleased to announce that Garnett Persinger has agreed to be the Eastern Foster Coordinator, Heidi Baumbarger has agreed to serve as the Coordinator for the Southern region, Amy Cunningham will handle the Rocky Mountain area and Diane Turner will act as the coordinator for the Southwest. The coordinators will handle the development of a foster system in each of their areas, they will deal with shelters and animal control facilities in arranging the release of shelter dogs to NGWPR, they will also organize temperament evaluations and transport for the rescues in their area and work with owners wanting to release their GWPs into our rescue program. Owner Release and Shelter Protocol: The rescue program is grateful for the help of our members in identifying dogs in shelters, animal control facilities and owners who wish to re-home their GWPs and we are even more grateful when our members offer to take in a rescue dog. However due to liability issues ALL owner releases must be evaluated for temperament prior to be acceptance into the rescue program. If you are contacted by an owner who wishes to give up a GWP please speak with your regional coordinator or the national coordinator prior to making any commitment on behalf of the rescue program. The owner will be contacted and a temperament evaluation scheduled. Most shelters and animal control facilities do temperament evaluations prior to releasing dogs for public adoption or to a rescue program. Not always are those evaluations an accurate portrayal of the dogs personality, but it can give an indication of an underlying problem. Temperament evaluations may seem an unnecessary step; however, some owners quickly become “rescue savvy” after calling a few local rescues and finding that their dog does not qualify for a rescue program due to a personality issue. In such cases an owner may minimize the problems they have encountered with their dog. It is


GWP RESCUE essential that the dog be evaluated by a member or person experienced with many GWPs prior to acceptance into the rescue program. NGWPR cannot accept any GWP with a history of nipping, biting or aggression to humans or to other dogs into the rescue program. Our evaluators understand and do take into consideration typical male Wire dominance issues. When our coordinators are contacted by the owner of a dog that has bitten a person or is exhibiting aggressive behavior to other dogs, we try to be understanding and we do offer counseling. Oftentimes we can suggest ways to manage such behavior or we can refer them to a training or reactive dog class. National GWP Rescue, Inc. is fast becoming one of the most respected and widely known breed club rescues in the United States. We have formed many unique and wonderful alliances with animal control facilities, other rescue groups and shelters throughout the United States. Being respected and known brings with it a set of issues—and that is an unexpected number of calls to help and take dogs into our program. In every situation there is always a balance and on the flip side of all of the exciting things accomplishments and progress made by NGWPR there are issues that the rescue program is struggling with: Foster Homes Needed: First on the list is the need for foster homes. Only a few members stepped forward and offered to foster NGWPR rescue dogs. Fostering is not an easy take and each of us realizes that it requires, time, money and dedication. But a rescue CANNOT function without fosters homes. Presently we have more non-member fosters who have volunteered their time and their homes to take in a GWP, than members who have offered. The homes of our member-fosters are constantly filled and overflowing with rescue dogs. It is these few members who are responsible for the recent success of NGWPR. The west coast and the northwest are the areas where we are most desperate. The west coast and northwest have an abundance of GWPs in shelter situations and current owners waiting to release their dogs into our program. When there are an abundance of shelter dogs in an area and there are no fosters families available then difficult decisions must be made. Some nice dogs will be euthanized--a tragedy for certain but a reality.

In those cases where a GWP is in an animal control facility and there is a euthanasia protocol in place and there are no fosters available, NGWPR attempts to find a no-kill shelter in the area and have the dog moved. But most local rescue organizations are over-flowing and not always can a GWP be transferred. If the dog is moved to a nokill shelter NGWPR is expected to contribute to the maintenance of the rescue dog housed and cared for by the rescue group. In extreme cases the decision to move the dog to a foster – sometimes states away-- is made. Shipping the dog by Continental Pet Safe has proven to be the least expensive and quickest method of transport. The average cost to ship a rescue across the country is $486. This includes the cost of shipping, a crate and the health certificate. This is expensive, time consuming and difficult at best and it eats up the limited rescue funds. It was disappointing to find that in some cases the ground transports which are well-known and reputable required “donations” that totaled more than shipping a rescue dog by air. West Coast/Northwest Foster Coordinator Needed: We are desperately seeking a West Coast Foster Coordinator. We see more dogs in shelter and have more owner releases in the Northwest and on the West Coast than anywhere in the country. For years Northern California GWP Rescue has handled the Wires in need in the western part of the United States, but due to the increase of GWPs needing to come into rescue, Dr, Cindy Heiller and her volunteers are struggling to keep up. National Rescue currently has only two foster families in the northwest and one in Southern California. A coordinator in this region is needed to help develop a foster system, to work along-side Northern California GWP Rescue and coordinate foster homes, coordinate with shelters and other rescue groups, to arrange transportation and temperament evaluations for GWPs coming into the rescue system. Funds Constantly Needed: The next most pressing issue is a ongoing need to raise money – operating a viable rescue program costs a great deal. Recently three NGWPR dogs have faced serious medical emergencies and the care for these dogs has quickly depleted our account. By their very nature, rescue dogs are subject to medical issues – it is just part of the ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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GWP RESCUE business of rescue. Oftentimes rescue dogs have had no medical care in the past and the stress of being in a shelter situation places these dogs in crisis. Adoption fees cannot cover the rising costs of medical care. Therefore, we must rely on donations from members and the public, fund raising activities and owner release donations. Please make a tax deductible donation to the rescue fund: Donations may be sent to: Carol Calahan Treasurer National GWP Rescue, Inc. 357 W. Treasure Rd. Pearce, AZ 85625 Seeking Fund-raising Coordinator: Currently no member has stepped forward and offered to coordinate NGWPR fund-raising activities. Above all, the Fund-raising Coordinator is a primary position that needs to be filled. Each year at the national specialty show and field trial rescue has a fund-raising activity. Time is running short and we need someone to coordinate NGWPR activities at the specialty. Patty Roberts has jumped in and is collecting donations for the NGWPR silent auction. All donations are taxdeductible. Sue McGraw has graciously offered to receive those items mailed and shipped for the NGWPR auction. Sue Mueller is matting and framing the “Ugly Duck Print.”. Sue will preserve the signed back and allow room for future handwritten comments. Reminder of Breeder Responsibility: When a rescue dog comes into the NGWPR program and the breeder is known, a phone call is placed to the breeder immediately. NGWPR requests that the breeder take the dog back and re-home it. In cases where it is impractical or impossible for the breeder to take the dog back NGWPR requests that the breeder makes a donation to the rescue fund. Recently several breeders have been contacted and not once has a donation been forthcoming. As a responsible GWPCA breeder, each member who breeds a litter must weigh the life-time commitment to the dogs resulting from such a breeding. We are seeing young males and elderly dogs bred by reputable breeders needing to be rehomed and to date, there has been little help from our breeders. So before you breed that next litter, please do some soul-searching – in the event that 18

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one of your puppy buyers is not able to care for his/ her dog, will you be available to take back that dog and care for it? If not, then perhaps you should reconsider. Micro-chipping every puppy is essential so that IF the dog ends up in a shelter situation you can be notified. Also, spaying and neutering any puppies not to be used for breeding is so important. It is often the progeny of dogs sold as pets by responsible breeders that end up in rescue. Even if you are not the breeder but your kennel prefix or suffix appears on the sire or dam of a dog coming into the rescue program you will be notified immediately. Wireheart Volunteers who offered assistance: Once again there has been a great effort by our members to make the NGWPR successful. We are grateful for each of their contributions. Bill Richardson of Metamora MI again came to our aid and opened the NGWPR checking account with the Michigan Bank of America when NGWPR treasurer Carol Calahan found that the rescue program would need to re-incorporate in Arizona in order to open a bank account. Reincorporating seemed simple enough, until it was discovered that the cost to file the paperwork was going to bet nearly $1000—the expense was not the initial filing fee but the requirement that any organization applying for incorporation must publish the by-laws in the local newspaper three times. As usual Meg Eden’s home in Terrebonne, OR is overflowing with rescue dogs. Meg continues to train and work with her fosters in the field. Bob and Sean Perry are fostering Kooper, a two year old owner-release with incredible energy and a high-prey drive. Ann Duffin provided transportation for a rescue dog and made arrangements for the dog to see Ann’s vet immediately when it was indicated. As always Dr. Cindy Heiller and Northern California GWP Rescue volunteers have taken in and found homes for GWPs this quarter. Cathie Magoon, who recently had major surgery, went out of her way to provide transportation for the rescue dog Rusket. And, our thanks to Doug Scott, a nonmember Wire owner in San Diego, who is providing a foster home and is working on house manners with Rusket. In Los Altos, CA the Pound Puppy Rescue Group sprang into action when an animal control


GWP RESCUE confiscation netted six two-week old purebred GWP puppies who had no mother. Carol and John Phillips provided foster care for the little ones. NGWPR provided breed information, guidelines for adoptive homes and listed the puppies on the national website. We are happy to report that each of the puppies had been adopted and all are in wonderful homes with experienced owners, except for one, and little Aurora will remain with the Phillips family. In Reno, once again Robyn Orloff, has played an important role by networking and helping with fund raising for the rescue Wires in her area. Mary Ann Finch, who also lives in the Reno area, provided foster care and nursing for Bucky (who has now become Buddy) a young GWP male who was turned loose by his irresponsible breeder/owner and subsequently shot three times by a neighbor. Buddy lost his front leg and the vision in one eye in the shooting. Buddy and his adoptive family have become local celebrities of sorts and have attended several events promoting adoption. NGWPR contributed funds to help pay for Buddy’s surgery and his after-care. In the Denver area, Adam and Amy Cunningham provided foster care for three Wires. Charlie and Banjo have recently gone to their forever homes and Rowan remains with Adam and Amy. Anita and Jim Wilke, of Dodson MT lost their home, most of their belonging and the stores of dog food in the recent flooding. The Wilke’s were moved to a shelter and with them were 19 rescue dogs including Jacob, a young Wire. Anita is the founder of RezQ,Rescue. NGWPR made a donation to RezQ Rescue to help with food. Hiedi and Robert Baumbarger, of Waxhaw, NC have made room and are caring for Jacob, the Wilke’s foster. Jacob flew from Billings, MT to Charlotte, NC to escape the rising waters. Charlie Whipple, a southeastern artist and friend of NGWPR, has volunteered his time and mileage to help transport several Wires from shelters and rescues in the south to Heildi. The Eastern Nebraska GWP Club quickly organized in order to get a GWP male released from an animal control facility in Iowa. Jim West volunteered to foster the dog and Robin Nelson, DVM worked with the facility director to make certain the dog was released. In the end the dog was accidently released to another rescue, just before Jim arrived to pick up the young dog. NGWPR and the members of the Eastern Nebraska

Club are just grateful that the dog is being cared for and will be placed into an appropriate home by the rescue group. Garnett and Kent Persinger, of Conneautville, PA, fostered Riley, an owner release until Riley’s recent adoption by the grandson of one of GWPCA’s founding members. And only days later Garnett took in yet another foster, this time a shelter dog. Our rescue program is grateful to the Ft. Detroit GWP Club Members who participated in the Animal Planet”s Dogs 101 filming. The officers and the members worked exceptionally hard to make a rescue fund raiser happen, only to find that the space designated by the Animal Planet crew was too small and had fire ordinance capacity constraints and they were not able to go ahead with their plans to help NGWPR. Greg and Cathy DuBois of Joliet, Il recently visited the Orphans of the Storm shelter and spent the day with Regal. Regal was in dire need of a grooming and some special guests. Thanks to their efforts Regal was adopted. Though they are not in the position to foster, Greg and Cathy are always available to help. Currently, they are working with an owner who was ready to release her dog into the rescue program. Greg has been counseling the owner and with his help, it seems as if the problems are resolving and the dog will be able to remain in the home. And here on the border, Larry and I currently have two fosters in our home – Hope, a five year old with some health and temperament issues and Kennedy an 8 month old male puppy.

Rescue Statistics for March – June 15, 2011: Dogs listed on the GWPCA website: 21 Dogs released from governmental or private shelters due to NGWPR efforts: 8 (Dogs either adopted or taken into foster care) Owner Releases: 7 (2 adopted/ 5 into foster care) Adopted through NGWPR efforts – includes NGWPR and shelter adoptions: 15 (website, waiting adopter or ads) NGWPR rescue dogs in foster care: 11 Owner to owner transfers: 1 E-mails answered: 382 – Phone calls: 197

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GWP STANDINGS

Field Top Ten January Through Dec 2010

Field Top Ten Rankings are based on dogs defeated. Submitted by Lynn Sandor (sandorcpa@comcast.net) The list of Junior Dogs was accidentally omitted from the last WireNews, so I wanted to get it published in this issue. All other standings will be posted on the GWPCA website @ www.gwpca.com/PointRankings The list of Junior Dogs was accidentally omitted from the last WireNews, so I wanted to get it published in JUNIOR DOGS (PUPPY/DERBY COMBINED) this issue. All other standings will be posted on the GWPCA website @ www.gwpca.com/PointRankings 1 Cascade Ruah R & L Calkins, OR 49 7 JUNIOR DOGS (PUPPY/DERBY COMBINED) 2 Snips Sugar Cookie JH B Roe, GA 47 5 3 Cascade Tina R & L Calkins, OR 42 7 Cascade Ruah L Calkins, OR CA 4 1Jay-Mar's How Do You Like Me Now JH P &RC&Hieber/N Litwin, 40 49 3 7 2 Snips Sugar Cookie JH B Roe, GA 47 4 Jay-Mar's Walk The Line M Braddock/N Litwin 40 5 5 Cascade Tina L Calkins, 6 3Cascade Dasha R &RL &Calkins, OR OR 29 42 8 7 4 Jay-Mar's How Do You Like Me Now JH P & C Hieber/N Litwin, CA 40 7 Big Oaks Pepperjack OKK J & R Schoonover, IN 25 3 3 4 Jay-Mar's Walk The Line M Braddock/N Litwin 40 8 Brillow's Wild West Ponder Rosa J Sodoro 23 2 5 6 Cascade Dasha R & L Calkins, OR 29 9 Sure Shot's Double Dare P Ljungren, WA 21 6 8 Big Oaks Pepperjack R Schoonover, 10 7Jay-Mar's Ready To Run OKK P &JC&Hieber/N Litwin, IN CA 20 25 3 3 8 Brillow's Wild West Ponder Rosa J Sodoro 23 10 Okk Burlap D Vater 20 1 2 9 Sure Shot's Double Dare P Ljungren, WA 21 6 In Junior Dogs, a total of 33 GWPs placed 82 times, defeating 522 dogs. 10 Jay-Mar's Ready To Run P & C Hieber/N Litwin, CA 20 3 10 Okk Burlap D Vater 20 1

DC, FC or AFC Titles Earned Junior Dogs, a total of 33Magic GWPs Woman placed 82 MH times,(B) defeating 522 dogs. FC: FC In AFC Big Oaks Black SR13066007 6-06 (9/17/10) by NAFC DC AFC Cascade Jagd Freund 6-02 x Okk Ebony Flo Laveau 3-04 Breeder: John & Ruth Schoonover DC, FC or Grimslid AFC Titles Earned Owner: Vern FC: FC AFC Big Oaks Black Magic Woman MH (B) SR13066007 6-06 (9/17/10) by NAFC DC AFC Cascade Jagd Freund 6-02 x Okk Ebony Flo Laveau 3-04 Breeder: John & Ruth Schoonover Owner: Vern Grimslid

Top Producers from 1985 to 2010 – Revised List Compiled byBENCH Lori SargentCHAMPIONS (birddog@windsweptwires.net)

Sires & dams on this list must have produced 10 titled dogs

BENCH CHAMPIONS Dams

Sires

Sires & dams on this list must have produced 10 titled dogs CH RIPSNORTER THUNDERHART…………… 51 CH. DRAKKAR'S SHE'S ALL THAT ……………… 19 CH WINDHAVEN’S STUTZER STUMPER… 45 CH GERONOMOS SHOW GIRL……………………15 Sires Dams CH SHURCAN BARON OF AFTERHOURS…… 41 CH MOUNTAIN VIEW’S NEXT STRIKE…………..15 CH GEROMINOS FLYING WARRIOR………… 33 CH BRIAR PATCH RIPSNORTER GAL………… 14 19 CH RIPSNORTER THUNDERHART…………… 51 CH. DRAKKAR'S SHE'S ALL THAT ……………… CH GERONIMOS GLORY OF ASPENROSE…. 25 CH. DRAKKAR'S ALL EYES ON ME CD ……….. 14 CH WINDHAVEN’S STUTZER STUMPER… 45 CH GERONOMOS SHOW GIRL……………………15 DC AFC DUNKEESBARON JUSTA OF TOPAFTERHOURS…… FLITE MH…… 22 41 CH RIPSNORTERS OFSTRIKE…………..15 THE HART.. 14 CH SHURCAN CH MOUNTAIN AFFARRAH VIEW’S NEXT CH LAURWYN CASSIO MOCHA CAKE……… 21 33 CH AFTERHOURS CASSIO LOCKET…………… 13 14 CH GEROMINOS FLYING WARRIOR………… CH BRIAR PATCH RIPSNORTER GAL………… CH RIPSNORTER MAKIN A STATEMENT……. 21 25 CH WINDHAVEN’S OF FORTUNE……… 13 14 CH GERONIMOS GLORY OF ASPENROSE…. CH. DRAKKAR'SWHEEL ALL EYES ON ME CD ……….. CH. DC RLB'S JESSIE THE BODY MH …………….. 19 CH LARKSPURS KAIZANS LET IT BE…………… 11 14 AFC DUNKEES JUSTA TOP FLITE MH…… 22 CH RIPSNORTERS AFFARRAH OF THE HART.. NFCCH NAFC DC CASCADE 17 21 PEGDEN’S POLLY MADISON………………….. 11 13 LAURWYN CASSIOROGUE MOCHAMH……………… CAKE……… CH AFTERHOURS CASSIO LOCKET…………… CH. CH LARKSPURS WINDMILL JH ……… 17 21 CH RIPSNORTERS LIGHTNING STRIKES …… 11 13 RIPSNORTER MAKINWINSTON A STATEMENT……. CH WINDHAVEN’S WHEEL OF FORTUNE……… CH WEIDENHUGEL MERLIN V NICO CD MH ……… 17 CH CASSIO LAURWYN CRUMB CAKE………… 10 11 CH. RLB'S JESSIE THE BODY MH …………….. 19 CH LARKSPURS KAIZANS LET IT BE…………… CH. NFC WILDEFIRE'S WEISEN’S ON TARGET MH… 10 11 NAFC DCBENTLEY CASCADE…………………… ROGUE MH………………15 17 CH JAMAR PEGDEN’S POLLY RITE MADISON………………….. DC AFC JETSET'S RAGTOP DAYWINSTON AT SCOTIA ZOE DANCER…………………… 10 11 CH. LARKSPURS WINDMILL JHJH…….. ……… 14 17 CH LARKSPUR CH RIPSNORTERS LIGHTNING STRIKES …… CH. CH WEIDENHUGEL EINER V PILOT …………………. DANTERS……… 10 10 WEIDENHUGEL MERLIN V NICO CD MH ………14 17 CH TOPMOST CH CASSIOWINDFALL LAURWYNOF CRUMB CAKE………… DC CADENBERG VICTOR V TREY MH ……………. 12 15 CH. WILDEFIRE'S BENTLEY …………………… CH JAMAR WEISEN’S RITE ON TARGET MH… 10 NFCDC NAFC DCJETSET'S AFC RUDOLPH’S BLITZEN DUFFIN 12 14 AFC RAGTOP DAY ATVON SCOTIA JH…….. CH LARKSPUR ZOE DANCER…………………… 10 AFTERHOURS ACE HIGH JH ………………………… 11 14 CH. WEIDENHUGEL EINER V PILOT …………………. CH TOPMOST WINDFALL OF DANTERS……… 10 DC CADENBERG VICTOR V TREY MH ……………. 12 NFC NAFC DC AFC RUDOLPH’S BLITZEN VON DUFFIN 12 AFTERHOURS ACE HIGH JH ………………………… 11

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GWP STANDINGS

FIELD CHAMPIONS / AMATEUR FIELD CHAMPIONS Sires & dams on this list must have produced 3 titled dogs

Sires

Dams

NFC NAFC DC AFC CASCADE IKE MH……………. 11 NAFC DC AFC CASCADE JAGD FREUND …………… 8 NFC NAFC AFC CASCADE STEAMER MH……………… 8 NFC NAFC DC CASCADE ROGUE MH………………… 7 DC AFC DUNKEES JUSTA TOP FLITE MH………… 6 BACKWOODS FLEXIBLE FLYER……………………. 5 NFC DC SURE SHOT’S HOT ROCKS MH ……. 5 NFC FC SURE SHOT'S SLICK NICKEL……………… 5 FC AFC HALB VOM POMMOREGON ………………. 4 OKK BO LAVEAU…………………………..…………. 4 OVERBARON’S COUNTRY HUSTLER……….……... 4 RAWLEE GENE’S DELIGHT………………………….. 4 HAAG’S DIRECTOR TD SH……………………….…… 3 NFC DC JAY-MARS BLAKE'S WINDCZAR SH ………… 3 NFC NAFC DC AFC RUDOLPH’S BLITZEN VON DUFFIN 3 NAFC DC AFC SURE SHOT’S POINT BLANK CD MH… 3

OKK FLO JO LAVEAU ……………… CH. BACKWOODS MO KICK …….. OKK EBONY FLO LAVEAU ……………… RAWHIDE’S DIZZY LIZZY……………… GISELA VON GRAFENBERG ………… FC JAY-MAR'S BLAKE'S BLUE ANGEL RIPSNORTER RLB'S SAMANTHA ………

8 5 4 4 3 3 3

HUNT TEST TITLES

Sires

Sires & dams on this list must have produced 3 master hunters

NFC NAFC DC CASCADE ROGUE MH……………….. NFC NAFC DC AFC CASCADE IKE MH……. DC JAY-MAR’S BLAKE’S WINDCZAR SH DC JED’S SILENT POLAR EXPRESS….. DC SGR DIRTY LAUNDRY……………….. DC SGR SILENT RUNNING MH…………. DC AFC DUNKEES JUSTA TOP FLITE MH………… HANOVER VON TREBORWOLF…………. DC RLB’S JESSIE THE BODY MH CH DARLING’S TICK TOCK MH…………………………. CH. FAIROAKS TIMEBOMB V WIESEN MH NAJ…… GUSTAV JAEGER MH……………………. JAY-MAR’S BLUSASSY’S BARON……… CH. WEIDENHUGEL EINER V PILOT ……………….

MH 7 5 5 5 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

SH 2 6 1 1 5 4 3 4 4 3 3 1 1 1

JH 13 3 1 6 13 18 9 1

Dams NFC DC AFC NAVAHO SIDEKICK MH……….. FC AFC SGR WITCHES’ BREW………….. LARKSPUR'S CARAMEL AT HEYWIRE ……………………. CH. SCHNELLBERG'S IN THE ROUGH CDX SH OA OAJ… CH JAY-MAR’S AUTUMN REIGN CD SH KATRIN JAEGER MH………………………… HELLBENDERS DESERT STORM JH….

4 4 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 1 1

1 1 1

Photo from the Diana Wise Collection

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GWP STANDINGS

Top Producing Sires & Dams of 2010 - Revised Compiled by Lori Sargent (birddog@windsweptwires.net) BENCH CHAMPIONS

Sires

GCH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout Ch. RLB’s Mac the Knight MH DC AFC Jetset's Ragtop Day at Scotia JH Ch. Larkspurs Windmill Winston JH Ch. Ripsnorter's Thunderhart DC Wildwing's Shameless Ch. Afterhours Let The Wookie Win Ch. Aspendel's Red River JH Ch. Cynisters Coffin Keeper Ch. Wildefire's Bentley JH

Dams

6 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2

Ch. Mountain View's Next Strike Ch. Drakkars Ididnt Do It Of RLB RN Ch. Drakkar's She's All That Ch. ADPG Independence Day Ch. Ayla V.D. Sonnenberg Ch. Heywire ‘N Cedrbrk Justa ‘Pon A Time JH Ch. J an J After Hours Dana Ch. Jay-Mar’s Liver And Onions JH DC Piemonte Zoie V Chisola Ch. Scotian Xtra Time Star K’s J’T’Aime Ch. Von Duffin’s Lady Bug CDX

5 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

FIELD CHAMPION / AMATEUR FIELD CHAMPION

Sires

NAFC DC AFC Cascade Jagd Freund NFC FC Backwoods Sure Shot Wilson McNally’s Calahoo MH Ch. Sure Shot’s Rock On JH

1 FC/2 AFC 1 FC 1 FC 1 FC

Dams

OKK Flo Jo Laveau 1FC/1AFC Fancy Pressure Cooker Wilson 1 FC Ch. Justa Ariel Too Tuff to Tame SH 1 FC Solts’ Maggilla Gorilla 1 FC Okk Ebony Flo Laveau 1 AFC

DUAL CHAMPIONS

Sires

Ch. Sure Shot’s Rock On JH

Dams

1

Ch. Justa Ariel Too Tuff to Tame SH

1

HUNT TEST TITLES

Sires

NAFC DC AFC Cascade Jagd Freund FC Von Duffin's Shock and Awe DC Cadenberg Victor V Trey NFC NAFC DC AFC Cascade Ike MH Ch Cynisters Coffin Keeper DC AFC Jay-Mar's Cina's Runaway Train MH Orbekskovens B. Victor DC Wildwing's Shameless Zeb Von Strickert

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MH SH JH Dams 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1

Von Duffin's Coffee Nudge Ch. Jay-Mar’s Liver And Onions JH Marie's Cascade Indiana OKK Ebony Flo Laveau OKK Flo Jo Laveau Ch. Ripsnorter's Its in the Genes NA JH RLB's Whatever Lola Wants Two Ch. Von Duffin’s Lady Bug CDX Ch. Weidenhugel Fanci V Einer

MH SH JH 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1


2011 GWPCA Nationals Ionia, Michigan Hosted by Fort Detroit GWP Club

Come see the beautiful fall colors of Michigan and join us for, what we promise, will be a memorable Nationals!

Event Calendar: Thurs. Sept. 29, 2011 - All Breed Obedience, Beginner Novice & Welcome Party Fri. Sept. 30, 2011 - Fort Detroit GWP Club Specialty & Sweeps, National GWP Obedience/Rally (GWPs only) & All Star Invitational Sat. Oct. 1, 2011 - Futurity, National Sweepstakes, Maturity, All Breed Agility & National Meeting, CGC Testing Saturday dinner – barbeque $20/person plus cash bar; Sun. Oct. 2, 2011 - GWPCA National Specialty Show, Jr. Showmanship, All Breed Agility & Awards Banquet Sunday banquet - $30/person plus cash bar. Mon. Oct. 3, 2011 - Hunt Test Day 1, Field Trial & Water Test Tues. Oct. 4, 2011 - Hunt Test Day 2, Field Trial October 5 to Conclusion - Field Trial **All Information is Subject to Change

Sue DeGraw, Nationals Coordinator schnellberg@comcast.net Barb Tucker, Show/Agility Chairman Kay Braddock, Obedience/Rally Trial Chairman John Schoonover, Field Trial Chairman Mark Sargent, Hunt Test Chairman Roger Doyle, Donations Trish Hirneisen, Hospitality Roger Doyle & Rich Hirneisen, Merchandise There is camping available at the fairgrounds and at the field trial grounds.

Wrangler Available

Host Hotel –

American Inn & Suites, Ionia 616-527-2200 We do NOT recommend any other hotels in the area except the Best American Heritage Inn in Portland, about 15 miles away from Ionia 517-647-2200, gm@greatamericanheritageinn.com We would like clubs to step up and offer to host a hospitality night. Available nights are Monday-Friday. Meals will be offered every day. The more donations we get for meals from clubs, the less each individual will have to pay for their meal. Contact Trish Hirneisen at (248) 258-4884 or rich.hirneisen@gmail.com We are also asking clubs to put together baskets for raffle, like we have done in the past. Ads for the catalog are due July 30 to Arden Shaw. Donations for trophies – information will be available soon and on the Nationals website. Merchandise information will be available

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©2010 GWPCA


FIELD TRAINING

A Pigeon Primer By Greg Dubois Pigeons have been part of my training program for about 8 years. I used them in the later stages of training my first master hunter and from start to finish for my second. While not the best bird for all training situations, with the exception of wild birds, they are best for some scenarios and good for many others. With simple care and feeding, they are tough, resilient and live for many years. In my early pigeon days, I was given an old cock as a potential breeder. He turned out to be just an advisor, but he lived to 16 years old when he escaped from my coop and was killed by a hawk. Wild pigeons you catch work just as well as homing pigeons, but even if you don’t shoot them, they only work once. When they are freed, they return to their barn or bridge where you got them. In order for you to have pigeons that will return to your coop, they must hatch in your coop or you must get them when they are 25 to 35 days old. Younger than that and they are still dependant on their parents for food. Much older and they have “settled” or established their homing instinct for where they were when you got them. Like most birds, pigeons have an incredible rate of growth. The hen lays two eggs over the course of two days. The chicks hatch 18 days after the second egg is laid. If you wish to put a solid band on the chicks, that should be done at 4 to 5 days old. At about 25 days old, the chicks are fully feathered and nearly adult sized. At this age, I start placing them on the landing board with the cage over it at least 1 to 2 times per day. This gives them a look at the outside world and if they want to get back into the coop they have to learn to go through the bobs (a one way door). For the first few times, I put adults with them so they see the older birds go through the bobs. At about 30 days old, after I let the adults out to fly, I let the youngsters walk out on the uncovered landing board. I don’t force them to fly; I let them decide what to do. They may choose to fly over to the garage roof, or just to the coop roof, or just go back in through the bobs. During this exploratory stage, I stay nearby to discourage a hawk attack. If they are not joining the adults after a week of this, I will shoo them out with the rest of the flock come exercise time. After they have been flying with the rest of the gang around the neighborhood for a week or so, I start taking them down the road with adults. The training schedule would be 5 releases from 1 mile, 5 releases from 3 miles, 5 releases from 6 miles and then 5 releases from 10 miles. There are different schools of thought on this, but my distance progression is along the route to my training grounds which are 14 miles away as opposed to going in various directions.

Racers in my area take their birds west toward Iowa on I-80, releasing the birds at ever longer distances, as this is the direction from which the races start. Young birds, less than 1 year old, race up to 300 miles so 14 miles is a walk in the park.

The two birds at left are sunning on the landing board with the cage in place. A few “dog-friends” have expressed they would like to keep homers, but don’t want to deal with them hanging around the neighborhood perched on houses like city pigeons - my method pretty much eliminates their concern. My birds get fed once per day in the late afternoon 1 to 2 hours prior to dusk. I measure the amount of food such that the feed trough is empty or nearly empty from the previous day’s feeding so when they are let out they are feeling hungry. I remove the cage from the landing board and let out the settled birds (it is much simpler if the whole coop is settled). Then, as a group, they make wide circles high above the house sometimes out of sight for a minute or two. This air show goes on for 15 to 20 minutes. During this time I fill their food tray and waterer so when they are done flying, and return to the coop, dinner is served. They know if they linger outside the coop, their buddies will get the good seeds, so there is rarely any that are slow to return. The combination of food and the time of day are two strong motivators for the birds to promptly return to the coop. An hour ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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FIELD TRAINING or so after letting them out, I return to the coop and do a head count. If all are back or if it is dusk the landing board cage goes back on. Until last fall, if I had the occasional straggler who returned late or not until morning, I might leave the landing board cage off over night. Well, I paid dearly for that bad habit last October. I had the best flock of settled birds I had ever had and I left the landing board cage off when a pretty but stubborn hen did not return to the coop at dusk that night. What must have been a raccoon entered through the bobs and killed 12 birds, leaving me with 2 extremely traumatized cocks and the pretty straggler who returned the next morning wondering what the hell had happened. The three left were all siblings so not the best group to reseed the coop with. To add insult to injury, the killer somehow exited through the bobs leaving me no chance to avenge the crime.

A cock is sitting eggs in center box and his 35-day old chick is playing house in nest bowl on the right

With cage removed and sliding door on left closed, birds can enter through the bobs at right but cannot exit through them. Housing for homers does not have to be elaborate. My coop was actually made from quail coop plans and housed quail for years. But with a few modifications such as a sliding door, the bobbed door, the landing board and removable cage, a pigeon coop was created. I later added interior perches and nesting boxes. This coop has a wire floor that is 4’ x 4’ and at 5’7”, I can comfortably stand in it. It holds about 10 birds. Last summer I added an outdoor extension to accommodate a larger flock. For winter, I close up the ventilation spaces around the bottom and staple heavy plastic sheeting around the upper screens to break the wind. This simple winterization seems to work in the Chicago area weather to keep the birds healthy. 26

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Several years ago, it occurred to me that this coop was a bit on the small side. At times when I have had 6 to 8 birds, with one pair nesting, there is a very small bench to draw from. Even though they can be prolific breeders, the size of this coop limits the breeding pairs to one, maybe two. So, if you lose a few birds and the racers are not breeding, it will take months to rebuild your training flock. With a larger coop of 15 to 20 birds, a few loses to hawks or dogs will not significantly affect your ability to keep using the remaining birds. The larger coop will allow more pairs to breed so you will have more birds in the pipeline. If you feel you have enough birds, you can always remove the eggs when laid. My dogs love hard boiled pigeon eggs. A good source of protein and one more way the pigeons can earn their keep. While I have not tasted a pigeon egg, ask me about the deviled quail eggs my wife made one year as a joke for a 4th of July celebration. Your best source of 25 to 35 day old pigeons is either someone who races or a dog trainer who keeps a coop. You might find racers in your area by going to the American Racing Pigeon Union website, http:// www.pigeon.org/findaclub.php. In order to have a healthy coop, it is nice to have a mentor to advise you on issues that may arise. Racers breeding for racing season (in August and September in the Chicago area) may be willing to part with excess chicks in the April/ May time frame. That same racer may have a surplus of adults in the fall he does not want to feed through the winter. These pigeons could be breeders for you next year or killers to shoot over your dog to brush up for hunting season. While wild caught birds are just as good as homers, it is a bad idea to put wild birds into your established coop. One sick or parasite laden bird could damage the health of all of your birds.


FIELD TRAINING If you expect your homers to fly home 20 miles, twice a week from your training grounds, they must be healthy. This is not to say that pigeons are wimps. My wife has stitched up several birds caught by a dog or hawk and within a few weeks they have been good as new. Basic pigeon equipment includes: feeder, waterer, grit bowl, scraper, and nest bowls. I use a dust mask when I am scraping the dried droppings. This equipment can be obtained from a variety of sources. If you don’t have a local retailer, internet suppliers include: New England Pigeon and Livestock Supply http://www.nepigeonsupplies.com/, Siegel Pigeon http://www.siegelpigeons.com, Vitaking Supply http:// vitakingproducts.com/ and to some extent, Lion Country Supply http://www.lcsupply.com/ . As for dog training with pigeons, they have their place in many drills. I like them in radio release launchers for dogs that creep or forge on point, or break on the flush. They are good in launchers for stop to wild

flush drills. They work well for early honor training, and pretty much any situation you want a bird in the air that your dog can’t catch. Pigeons can stretch your quail/chukar dollar if you intersperse them in training sessions with birds you are shooting. To keep your dog on its toes, you should occasionally shoot a pigeon for it to retrieve. That way it does not think pigeons always fly away. Here is where the killers or wild birds come in handy. In conclusion, pigeons are tough and pretty easy to care for. In some training scenarios, they are the best alternative to wild birds and they provide a reusable resource in your training program that in the long run can save you money. In their own way they are every bit the athletes that our dogs are. Truth be told, I often sit on the patio after letting the gang out for their evening exercise flight and watch as they streak over the house in formation in ever smaller circles until they decide to return to base for their evening meal.

Identifying Young Birds to Settle in Your Coop One source of young birds you can settle in your coop is wild-caught youngsters. But how do you know they are old enough to be taken from the parents? How do you know if what you caught is young enough to settle in your coop? In the picture on the right is a bird about 30 days old. Note the cere (flesh around the nostrils) is a pink, flesh color and smooth. On the one year old bird at left, the cere is larger, and will be more white in color. The eye on the young bird is dark, making it hard to distinguish the iris, pupil etc. In older birds, the pupil remains a dark circle, but it’s usually surrounded by an orange or yellow color. Note the fuzzy feathers on the head. If this is gone, the bird may still be young enough to settle, but this amount of peach fuzz is good. Another visual marker is primary flight feather length. The picture at right is of the 30 day old bird’s wing, note the shorter length of the 9th and 10th primary feathesr (lowest feathers in photo). In older birds the 9th and 10th feathers will be longer making the wing tip more pointed.

When young birds are fed or are stressed by handling, they make a squeaking sound. You may hear young pigeons referred to as squeakers. This is another reliable clue as to whether they are young enough to settle in your coop. As I mentioned before, I wouldn’t introduce wild birds in my established coop for health reasons as one sick bird could wreck the whole flock. ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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GOOD DOG!

Can We Still Be Friends?

Thoughts on the leadership role and choosing the right trainer…for you AND your dog! By Debra Galan-Parsons

In the last issue, we focused on successfully introducing a new pup (or dog) into your environment. This was accomplished by establishing a leadership role and laying down the rules, boundaries and limitations of your home. These rules have been determined by you, and it is now your job to maintain your pups respect by enforcing, and sometimes re-enforcing what is expected of him in his new environment. By this point your pup has demonstrated how much he admires you. He doesn’t think that you are mean, in fact, he thinks you are the greatest thing since sliced bread, and will do just about anything to please you. It is vital that you do not get frustrated with him, (I realize how tough that can be!), but instead, take a deep breath, and regain your positive energy before any attempt to correct or redirect any unwanted behavior. Say, for example, that little pup that has followed you for the past few weeks as if he is on an invisible leash has just turned 14 weeks. You take him outside, feeling quite confident he won’t leave your side, and in a flash he is 25 yards away. 28

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What do you do? Scream frantically? Run like a crazy person after him? Or worse yet, catch him and holler at him? (Don’t laugh, we’ve all been there.) Well, unless he is in a dangerous situation, you’d be best to “put your calm on”, quietly walk up to him, and hook up that drag line that will soon become your new best friend! Instead of thinking how horrible an experience that was, try to consider it as a training opportunity and learn from it. Remember, this pup is a direct reflection of you. If you doubt yourself, then he will doubt you. If you are not confident, he will remain in a confused state of mind, which could lead to a whole ton of problems later in his life, and we certainly don’t want that! Working at the dog’s level, not at your expectations, will improve the relationship between you. So, you have this great new friend and you have wonderful visions of how you’d like him to be. Whether you are a seasoned dog person, or a first time dog owner, I can’t stress enough the importance of a basic obedience class. The benefits will always outweigh the cost, and if you choose the right trainer and class, you’ll have a heck of a great time! Some of the best camaraderie I’ve ever known was with a group from a local pet training class, years later we are all still friends; although, our doggie interests have taken us in different directions. Before you start shopping for a class, there is one more thing to keep in mind, and that is the differences amongst our dogs. Just like humans, they are all similar, but different. Take time to observe your dog and figure out what approaches will be most beneficial to him. Say, for example, your new dog is much softer than your last one, and your former obedience instructor is somewhat old school, insisting on harsh correction for all dogs. Although this approach may have worked for your other dog, it may not be the best for this one. Train


in according to the individual, and be willing to change in order to achieve success. Now you are ready to look for a class for both you and your dog. It is a good idea to know what type of class you are looking for. Many training classes are primarily for pet training, while other beginner classes are geared toward competition obedience. Although neither could really hurt your pup’s future, the methods, people, and dogs in the class could be entirely different! My first competition puppy obedience class was a real eye opener, I’m sure that many of you would agree! It’s always a good idea to observe a class before registering. When observing, look for the following: how many people are in the class? Is it very large (too large for the instructor to handle)? Is the group matched up accordingly (at a similar level)? Do you like the way the instructor conducts the class? Does the instructor offer different solutions for different dogs? Is she/he flexible? How do the people and dogs look? Confused? Having fun? Like robots? Also note what training methods are primarily used. Clicker only? Correction only? Both? None? E collars? And what equipment are the students using? Are they all using one universal tool, or are there different dogs using different devices? Note differences in collars, halters, and harnesses. If you are able to speak with the trainer, ask her/ him to explain the primary method and tools used, and why they feel their method is successful. This is also a good time to find out if they are open to an alternative method or tool. Personally, I feel that a good trainer will be able to explain why a certain method works for them in a way that you understand. They should be able to help you achieve your goals with your dog, while being open to a variety of tools and avenues to get there. It is important that a trainer be flexible, understanding there is never one right answer for all dogs, or the people who have them. A trainer, although skilled with dogs, also needs to be equally skilled with humans. Just yesterday, I saw two different clients, one hour apart. Client “A” had been at her wits end with her young, exuberant lab mix, and is completely frustrated that her husband has had absolutely no issues controlling this pup (I might add she has some muscular problems, giving her little strength in her arms). I sent her home two weeks ago with one of my prong collars, after of course explaining how to use it in complete detail. She returned yesterday, shoulders high, and that young guy walking on a loose lead. So did the tool fix the problem? No. It was the confidence this lovely woman now had in controlling her dog. We had a great hour, and her dog worked beautifully. I doubt that she will need to use that training aid for very long. Client “B” took a

GOOD DOG!

puppy class with me approximately one year ago. She returned to me to work on some specific issues she now faces with her dog on a daily basis. She came to the lesson with her girl on a harness, which is probably not my tool of choice, but realizing this woman can’t get by the “I don’t want to hurt my dog” mind set, I chose to work with what we had. The end result? She left with several confidence and attention building exercises, for BOTH of them. She really understood her dog better and therefore will be able to extinguish most of the unwanted behaviors before they ever happen. So it wasn’t the tools, but how I helped these two very different people understand how to get their goals accomplished, and how to understand their dogs. Always trust your instincts. If you like the instructor, you are likely to enjoy the course. If that “little voice” in you is saying “hmmm, not sure about this one”, then you need to continue your search. Just because someone is considered “the best” doesn’t necessarily mean that they are the best for you. And if you have fun learning, so will your dog! Your dog truly doesn’t care about the methods you choose. As long as you present the information in a way that he clearly understands, then he’ll be cool. In the end, methodology really doesn’t matter, as long as the result is a happy, well-balanced dog!

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GWP STANDINGS

Field Top Ten January Through March 2011 Field Top Ten Rankings are based on dogs defeated. Submitted by Lynn Sandor (sandorcpa@comcast.net) Dogs Defeated

Number of Placements

35 34 30 29 25 23 22 20 20 12

2 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1

AMATEUR SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS) 1 CH Rlb's Got Moxie At Drakkar MH E Shupp, PA 2 Wingfield's High Cotton JH D & P Coller 3 FC Wiredwest Sureshot Oakley MH N Solt, UT 4 High Power's Jolt To The System B DeLaby, FL 5 Big Oaks Jacpine Savage V Grimslid, WI 6 NAFC DC Cascade Tumalo Tess J & S Williams, OR 7 Snowy River's Tnt Timber Tick B Silcott/M Verdoorn 8 Griffs Viking Prairie Dustin' Daisy JH L Boman In Amateur Senior Gun Dogs, a total of 8 GWPs placed 13 times, defeating 119 dogs.

44 27 19 12 6 5 4 2

3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1

JUNIOR DOGS (PUPPY/DERBY COMBINED) 1 Brillow's Big Wild Western R Haukoos, IA 2 Backwoods Monja M & J Brown 3 Tumalo Bea J &S Williams, OR 3 Harvey's Justa Jeff T Harvey 5 Misty Meadows Annie W Siemers 6 Ebbtide Justa Gotta Believe G Persinger/ Brawn/R Haukoos 6 HH Vixens Late Arrival E Shupp, PA 8 Tumalo Bolt J &S Williams, OR 9 Sure Shot's Double Dare P Ljungren, WA 10 Justa Gotta Keep the Faith C Heiller, CA 10 Wilsons Snickerdoodle B Roe, GA In Junior Dogs, a total of 21 GWPs placed 40 times, defeating 247 dogs.

38 23 21 21 20 13 13 12 11 10 10

4 2 3 3 4 3 2 2 1 2 2

Dog Name

Owner

OPEN SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS) 1 High Power's Jolt To The System JH B DeLaby, FL 2 Sure Shot's Pretty Summer Endless Play JH H Stapgens, Alaska 3 NAFC DC Casade Tumalo Tess J & S Williams, OR 4 NAFC DC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now M Ezzo/B Brawn, PA 5 Big Oaks Jacpine Savage V Grimslid, WI 6 Backwoods Drama Queen G Dixon / E Barrett Dixon 7 CH Sure Shot's Sonora Gone Heywire P Ljungren, WA 8 Wingfield's High Cotton D & P Coller 9 Tumalo Timberjack J & S Williams, OR 10 CH Rlb's Got Moxie At Drakkar MH E Shupp In Open Senior Gun Dogs, a total of 12 GWPs placed 16 times, defeating 267 dogs.

 

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GWPCA FIELD EVENTS

GWP Club’s Spring Hunt Test Reports GWPC of ENE Walking Field Trial By Rhonda Haukoos Cool, brisk, overcast weather, but no precipitation, greeted the start of the GWPC of E NE’s walking field trial at Branched Oak Field Trial grounds in Raymond, NE (near Lincoln) on March 5, 2011. Eager, well-dressed handlers from several states showed up with their dogs to compete for placements in the OGD, AGD, OLGD, AWP, AWD, OP and OD stakes that were offered. Over 80 entries were received for this trial, and German Wirehaired Pointers, German Shorthaired Pointers, Vizslas, Pointers, Brittanies and Irish Setters were all represented. Juvenile stakes were held on the East Course and broke dog stakes on the Main Course. The East course saw plenty of action with a large, talented entry of puppies and derby dogs. AWP kicked off on the East Course first. There were many first-time handlers welcomed in this stake. Other field trial participants and the judges were very positive and helpful. Judges Bonnie Bergmeyer and Bruce Bryant watched all the entries and were impressed enough to present, in addition to the four regular placements, Judge’s Awards of Merit to a Brittany and a GSP. The winner was a GWP, Brillows Big Wild Western, “Wiley” handled by 16 year old Morgan Legband for owner Rhonda Haukoos. Second, third and fourth place went to a GSP, a pointer and a Vizsla, respectively. OLGD had judges David Bartlett and Mike Zimbelman in the saddle to determine the top dogs. It was a retrieving stake and when the dust settled on the callbacks, a GSP came out on top. The lone GWP was Sure Shot’s Pretty Summer Endless Play, “Player” owned by Hilde Stapgens and handled by Jim West to a second place finish. Meanwhile, back on the East Course the Open Derby was getting ready to run under the experienced judgment of Jim Douglass and Bruce Bryant. There were many talented entries in this stake, and in the end, a Brittany was declared the winner, followed by a GSP and two Vizslas. AGD followed the OLGD on the Main Course. This was also a retrieving stake so a call back was held. Judges David Bartlett and Bob Koser called back their top four dogs from a tough and classy stake. The GSP’s swept the AGD. Sunday was very cold and windy for the start of the OP. Wearing many layers of clothes and smiles, judges Bonnie Bergmeyer and Mike Zimbelman arrived ready for the challenge. Many of the same pups from Saturday were running in this stake, too; however, puppies will be puppies — how did they perform and how did this set of judges see it? Winning under the guidance of Rhonda Haukoos, was Brillows Big Wild Western. The balance of the placements went to two GSPs and a Brittany. Quality bird dogs on the Main Course were making for an enjoyable OGD stake for judges James Douglass and Bob Koser to watch. Upon completion of the stake, the placements were given to four different breeds! The winner was a pointer, second to a GWP, third to a Vizsla, and fourth to an Irish Setter. The second place GWP was CH Sure Shot’s Sonora Gone Heywire, “Sonora”, owned by Penny Ljungren and handled by Rhonda Haukoos. Thanks goes out to all who entered and supported our trial. Because of the participation again this year of multiple handlers, honest judges and our caterers, George and Karen Wagner, we had a very successful event. We also gained two new members. John Hixson and Adam Cunningham. Adam also bought a raffle ticket for the Heskett saddle. Good luck Adam!! Bill Perkins, Leo Boman, Jim West, Brian Silcott, Katy Boman, Staci Sullivan, Chuck Casanova, John Hixson and myself were aided by many friends of the sport to make this trial run smoothly. Thanks again, one and all.

Del Val GWPC Hunt Test By Kathy Tufano The Delaware Valley German Wirehaired Pointer Club held its May Hunt Test the 28th & 29th with a very good turnout. There were 46 dogs with 72 entries over two days - 26 dogs, 21 bitches. Breeds represented were 5 Wirehairs, 1 WPG, 6 Brittanys, 18 GSP, 6 Vizsla, 5 Irish Setters, 1 English Setter, and 1 Irish Red & White Setter. The Master test had 5 Qualifiers with 2 Finishers out of 4 and a half braces. A Vizsla finished, and a GWPJERELIN’S JUSTA PAT HAND SH “Tippy” handled by Jerry Krepak finished, too. The Senior Test had 2 Qualifiers, and the Junior Test had 21 Qualifiers of which 5 were Finishers. 2 GWPs qualified. In the Junior Handler Test, Nick Hellets handled a GSP- BUCK RUN JOSEY WALES MH and he qualified. WAY TO GO NICK! Sunday had 3 qualifiers in the Master Test in three braces - one was a GWP. The Senior Test had 2 Qualifiers, and the Junior Test had 19 Qualifiers including 1 GWP, along with 3 Finishers including 1 GWP. We had good weather - hot, but dry. The food was great, and a good time was had by all! We are planning another Hunt Test for October 29 & 30. Hope to see you all there. ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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April 9th FDGWPC Field Trial Photos From Richard Hirneisen

Danica, Roger Doyle’s GWP, flies off the line for the Derby. Roger is on the right in long green coat.

FDGWPC members, L-R: Bill and Gail Richardson; back to camera -unidentified; Jim Yates, Mark Sargent, and Ed Tucker.

May 28th FDGWPC Walking Field Trial Photos - Highland Field Trial Grounds, Michigan From Richard Hirneisen GWP Placements: AGD – 2nd place, FC/AFC SGR Lumark’s Krista Von Pines MH (Krista) owned by Walt and Delores Furesz, handled by Jim Yates OPEN DERBY - 3rd place, Backwoods Monja (Spike), owned by Chuck Cooper OPEN PUPPY - 4th place, Aimn Hi Go Daddy Girl (Danica), owned by Roger Doyle WATER TEST (qualified) - Scotian Windswept Expedition (Clark), owned by Mark Sargent

Sue Degraw & Tigger on the left and Mike Braddock & Jet on the right, before their AGD breakaway in the center.

2011 Inaugural GWPCA Midwest Classic From Rhonda Haukoos, Field Trial Secretary What a great weekend it was! Friday was more than a tad bit windy - we needed seat belts on our saddles, but the weather cooperated by staying cool enough for the dogs while holding off on any precipitation! What a blessing that was. All breeds were welcome at the weekend field trial. That didn’t deter the wirehairs. A 33 dog OLGD saw NFC/FC Brillows Wild West Show (Miss Kitty) and NAFC/DC/AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now (Louie) take 2nd and 3rd place, respectively. Harvey’s Justa Jeff (Jeff) and Misty Meadows Annie (Annie) placed in a very strong derby field. The 30 dog OGD was won by Ch SureShots Sonora Gone Heywire (Sonora) for a 5 point major. ALGD saw Zippin Calahoo (Zip) take 4th place and Louie win it to finish his Amateur Field Championship! There wasn’t anyone in Nebraska saying that the GWP is not competitive in open company. The Amateur Walking Puppy and Amateur Walking Derby for the GWPC of E NE’s weekend trial were limited to GWPs only. This allowed some new faces to hit the field for the first time and was a great opportunity for them to learn the ropes from friendly, helpful, “old timers” of the sport. (Sorry all, but most of us have been around for a long time!) 34

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The Inaugural GWPCA Midwest Classic opened with the Amateur Gun Dog, followed by the Derby Classic and the Open Gun Dog Classic on Monday. Plenty of bird work and top quality bird dogs made the whole event a pleasure to watch. Galleries were good-sized for all of the braces as people were watching with interest and showing support for their competitors. It was wonderful to see. This event was about the dogs, not the people. Dogs were here from Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska, Alaska, Washington, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Missouri, and Indiana - an impressive draw from across the country! We thank all of our supporters like TriTronics for providing two collars so that we could award them to the OGD and OD winners, Purina for their unwavering financial and product support, ProPac for sponsoring the saddle that was awarded to the winner of the AGD, Heskett Saddleworks for making a reasonable deal so that we could afford to offer their goods, Belinda DeLaby for donating to dinner, Angie Johnson of Reece Design for putting together a beautiful and timely website for the event, as well as all those folks who worked so hard to put this together in a relatively short time frame. Bernee Brawn, Judy Cheshire, Leo Boman, Bill Perkins, Art Armbrust and others behind the scenes. Mike Braddock, Ben Coller, Vern Grimslid, Tony McGrane, and Adam Cunningham all stepped up during the running of the trial to marshal, plant birds or anything else that was needed.

2011 Midwest Open Gun Dog Classic – Judges: Jim Douglass and Stan Truksa Submitted by Bernee Brawn 2011 Mid West Classic Open Gun Dog Placements 1. 2. 3. 4.

NFC/FC Brillows Wild West Show JayMars How Do You Like Me Now FC Wingfields High Cotton FC/AFC Overbarons Chix Dig Me MH

Brace 1: JayMars How Do You Like Me Now (Grevious) O: N. Litwin, P.&C. Hieber H: Jim West Zippin Calahoo (Zip) O/H: Quintin Wiseman Grevious broke away to the left side of the course and took the line all the way around and to the bottom. After we went thru keyhole we found him standing on the bottom line. All was in order after the flush and we went on. He continued forward with purpose and strength to his second, well-handled find. After crossing the dam, he had a find on the sparse tree line before going down the hill, across the flats and across the bridge to finish. Zip moved strong and to the front. On her find she took a bit of a hop and Quintin decided it was too much and picked her up. Brace 2: NAFC/DC/AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now (Louie) O: B. Brawn & M. P. Ezzo H: Jim West FC/AFC Overbarons Chix Dig Me MH (Digger) O/H: Tony McGrane Louie broke away strong and moved into the burr field where he was found pointing. Jim flushed and Louie showed good manners and style. He rimmed the lake field and moved into the area of tree island. While moving through, a Š2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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GWPCA FIELD EVENTS single quail popped, he stopped. Another popped, he stood, then the rest of the covey popped and it was just too much to for him to bear. He was harnessed up and headed to camp. Digger’s first cast took him up the hill to the cover to the south.  We found him again in the lake field working the west hedgerow.  He had a find in the hedgerow and another in the southwest corner of the lake field. Digger hunted through the cover past the rock crossing and up through the tree island. Digger had a nice covey find in the east-west hedgerow and he handled it beautifully. Tony cast him off, and Digger used the country well, hunting all the heavy cover thoroughly. The end of his 45 min. came at the dam over the pond.   Brace 3 Ch Sure Shot’s Sonora Gone Heywire (Sonora) O: Penny Ljungren H: Jim West FC Big Oaks Black Magic Woman (Pepper) O/H: Vern Grimslid Both Pepper and Sonora broke nicely up the hill, moving very strong. The two of them took the cut into the lake field well ahead of their handlers and were spotted standing on the buffet line. The birds flushed wild and after a short discussion, both girls decided not to hang around . Unfortunately, this decision ended both of their time on the ground. Brace 4: NFC/FC Brillows Wild West Show (Miss Kitty) O: Rhonda Haukoos H: Jim West Jed’s Blue Angel UD RAE (JET) O/H Mike Braddock Jet went to work and broke away nicely and with purpose. Her first find was in the burr field, where she unfortunately found every cocklebur in there. After a short de-burring Mike sent her on. Her second find was on the left side of the lake field, good work for Jet and Mike. Her third find was on the buffet line, all in order. Her fourth find was in a low-lying clump after the watering point at the back of the course. Again, all in order. Her fifth find was a hawk kill and after relocation, Mike sent her on. Jet finished her 45 minutes just below the rock crossing. Miss Kitty opened with a blast down the line and across the flats. She carded three well spaced finds through the 45 minutes and finished across the flats. Brace 5: Sure Shot’s Endless Summer Play (Player) O: Hilde Stapgens H: Jim West Snowy Rivers TNT Timber Tick (Tick) O/H: Brian Silcott Player had a strong forward breakaway that wrapped toward the lake edge. He was found standing on the bottom line and handled the pair of birds well. He was sent on and raced forward through the rock crossing and over the hill. He was seen standing on the edge of the tree island. Unfortunately, an injured bird was flopping around and it was more than this young dog could handle. He was ordered up. Tick ran a nice gun dog race and handled her birds with style. Brace 6: Wildwires Holy Terror (Tara) O: Earl Fowls H: Jim West Big Oaks Jacpine Savage (Bull) O/H: Vern Grimslid Bull broke away snappy, strong and covering the ground nicely. He had a non-productive on the hill, very close to where Tara had pointed, but Vern couldn’t find the bird for him. Unfortunately even though he searched everywhere, no other birds were on his card this day. Tara deviated from the norm and cast to the right, up the hill and took the tree line all the way across the field and through the keyhole. She proceeded to the fence line and was found standing. She handled this bird with good manners and was sent on to a second find at tree island. She handled this well and stayed forward to finish. Brace 7: FC Wingfields High Cotton O/H: Ben Coller Cotton broke strong and rimmed the break away field, then the lake field. Found standing in tree island, Ben flushed the bird and Cotton held beautifully. He continued a strong forward race with his 2nd find on the T hedgerow - high and tight, all in order for the flush. Cotton then headed down the hedgerow toward the second water bucket where he stopped in a tangle of brush, wood and downed trees. Ben tried hard, but could not produce a bird for Cotton. Ben decided to take him on. Cotton moved forward on the course hunting hard. The course at this point crossed back in front of tree island and Cotton pointed again. After a long relocation, Ben finally flushed the bird and Cotton showed good manners. This ended his 45 minutes.

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GWPCA FIELD EVENTS

2011 Midwest Amateur Gun Dog Classic – Judges: Ken Chenoweth & Bonnie Bergmeyer Brace 1: FC Big Oaks Black Magic Woman (Pepper) O/H: Vern Grimslid JayMars How Do You Like Me Now (Grevious) O: N. Litwin, P.&C. Heiber H: Leo Boman Pepper ran a nice gun dog race with a find about 7 min out - all in order for Vern and Pepper. She finished her 45 near the pond. Grevious started strong but was under a bird and went home on the rope. Brace 2: Ch Sure Shot’s Sonora Gone Heywire - (Sonora) O: Penny Ljungren H: Bernee Brawn Zippin Calahoo (Zip) O/H: Quintin Wiseman Zip broke strong and forward. After a short absence, Quinton’s scout Chase Verdoorn found her dug in down in the valley after the stand of trees. Bird flushed and all in order. Zip finished strong and to the front. Sonora took the right side of the breakaway and was found standing a bird at the end of the line on the right side of the lake field. Bird flushed and she displayed good manners. Moving on, she covered the ground always forward and heading for objectives. Her second find was on the heavy hedgerow that is bird haven! Good style, all in order for the flush. Sonora finished her 45 in the breakaway field still going strong and forward. Brace 3: FC Wingfields High Cotton JH (Cotton) O/H: Ben Collier NAFC/DC/AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now (Louie) O: B. Brawn & M. P. Ezzo H: B. Brawn Cotton broke nicely taking the left edge of the lake field and was moving with speed and animation. Louie broke strong and was found standing on the right side of the lake field - all in order. Louie scored again in the stand of trees after the creek crossing. Unfortunately, Cotton chose not to back that day and he was picked up. Louie handled it all and showed good manners. Cast off, Louie went over the hill and a bird popped on the hedgerow, and he decided to help us save some time by not stopping to flush. Brace 4: NFC/FC Brillow’s Wild West Show (Miss Kitty) O: Rhonda Haukoos H: Leo Boman Snowy Rivers TNT Timber (Tick) O/H: Brian Silcott Miss Kitty made a huge opening move and was found standing on the buffet line at the top of lake field. Unfortunatley, the bird popped before Leo could get there and Kitty decided to go with it. No report on Tick - I didn’t get to see Ticks performance in the Amateur. Brace 5: Big Oaks Jacpine Savage (Bull) O/H: Vern Grimslid Ch Idawire Field of Dreams (Fritz) O/H: Adam Cunningham Bull had a great breakaway and was found standing on the left edge of the lake. An unfortunate flush of an uncooperative quail ended Bull”s bid today. Fritz ran a nice gun dog race with a find on the tree line on the right side of the lake field - all in order. At 18 minutes Fritz scored again, good manners. Adam cast him off and at the 20 minute mark he was standing again in a thicket. Fritz decided Adam needed some help with the flush, and thus ended his bid. Brace 6: FC/AFC Overbarons Chix Dig Me MH (Digger) O/H: Tony McGrane Jeds Blue Angel UD RAE (Jet) O/H: Mike Braddock Digger’s first find was on the pine edge at about 15 min out - all in order. Digger had a wild pheasant find in the heavy cover after the creek crossing. The bird flushed wild before Tony could get there, Digger stood like a champ! He finished the course by the pond where the course headed back toward camp. Jet started her brace like she meant business and for an older dog was showing good speed and purpose. Her find was in the thicket after the creek crossing and she pointed with style. Mike flushed and shot, and the bird flew a short distance. Unfortunately Jet was sure that the bird was still back there and refused to go forward with Mike.

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GWPCA FIELD EVENTS Brace 7: Sure Shot’s Endless Summer Play (Player) O: Hilde Stapgens H: Leo Boman Player started strong and made a nice opening cast. He was found standing on the buffet line at the top of the lake field and handled it well for Leo. He was a bit rough to get to move forward, but finally did so and had a second find. 2011 MidWest Classic Amateur Gun Dog Placements 1. 2. 3. 4.

Ch SureShot’s Sonora Gone Heywire FC/AFC Overbarons Chix Dig Me MH Zippin Calahoo Big Oaks Black Magic Woman

The derby dogs broke away into the big field just in front of the clubhouse. This is a large open field and a challenge to young Wirehairs. The course then swung into the lake field, over the hill on the right and utilized the open fields. We then swung back over the hill and headed back toward camp. All in all, these youngsters showed a lot of heart and drive and were up to the challenge presented to them. Some showed more maturity, some showed their youthfulness, they all had fun and found and pointed their birds. 2011 MidWest Classic Derby Placements 1. Harvey’s Justa Jeff O: Ted Harvey H: Jim West 2. Big Oaks Sweet Thing O/H: Vern Grimslid 3. Brillows Big Wild Western O/H: Rhonda Haukoos 4. Griff’s Viking Prairie Dustin’ Daisy JH O/H: Leo Boman Judges Award of Merit - Aimn Hi Go Daddy Girl O/H: Roger Doyle

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IN THE COMPANY OF DOGS

Friendly Fire By Richard Hirneisen

Do dogs have built-in GPS? It was a cool April morning, clear as a bell, a perfect day to run dogs. Georgie and Buzz, my wirehairs, were in their crates in the back of my truck. They couldn’t see where we were going, but somehow they knew we were getting close because they started to whine even before I turned off the paved highway. As I hit the bumpy gravel road, their whines escalated to a chorus of yips, yaps, and yelps. A couple hundred yards before our destination, I noticed the clear sky was hazing over. And, though my truck windows were closed, I smelled smoke. I pulled into the parking lot of the Silo Course of the Highland Field Trial Area. I could see for a half mile out over the course. I knew this place like my own back yard. I’d run my dogs here for twenty years. Done field trails and hunt test by the dozens. The grass was burnt black, still smoldering in spots. Trees were charred as high up as flames had licked. Tendrils of smoke rolled upward into the haze from burning brush piles. Several fire trucks were parked in the lot. Firefighters were looking out over the course, watching for flare-ups. Others could be seen at the edges of the burned area, making sure flames didn’t jump firebreaks. This could have been a disconcerting scene had I not known the reason for the fire. I sat in my truck, taking in the view, thinking of the many changes I’d seen here over the years. Georgie and Buzz quieted down, except for an occasional whine. I’d take them to the Barn Course, two miles south, later. I knew this was this was friendly fire, deliberately set, carefully contained, part of a plan to restore an ancient ecosystem. And I knew how it all began, and why.

Two hundred and fifty years ago, this land, like much of southern Michigan, was covered with tall native grasses and scattered groves of white, pin and black oak and hickory – an ecosystem that had evolved after the glaciers of the last ice age retreated northward during the mother of all global warmings 12,000 years ago. Biologists call this ancient ecosystem “oak barrens.” It extended west of Lake Michigan into what is now Wisconsin, and covered more than two million acres. In this vast area lived a host of animals no longer found here – bison, elk, bear, wolves, bald eagles, greater prairie chickens. Fires ignited by lightning strikes raged across this land, leaving behind nutrients that promoted healthy re-growth. Fire was one of nature’s tools that helped sustain this ecosystem. But it was not only Mother Nature who used fire to advantage. Native Americans set fires to stimulate plant growth that would attract game, to control insect pests, and to increase visibility for hunting and spotting human enemies before they got too close. Oak and hickory seedlings require light to germinate and grow. That is, they are shade intolerant. They are also fire dependent. Thick insulating bark and deep taproots allow oak saplings to sprout vigorously after a burn. These small oaks (called “grubs”) look like scattered shrubs on the oak barrens landscape. They grow a little each year and it may take decades before they reach their full height. Fallen oak leaves curl in autumn; they catch the wind, roll, and tumble. They burn well, helping to spread fire. However, the trunks of mature oak and hickory trees are flared, or “buttressed,” a protection that keeps fuel – leaves and grasses – away from the base of the tree.

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IN THE COMPANY OF DOGS

Three weeks after the burn In the absence of fire, many native shade-tolerant trees such as beech, cherry, red maple and sugar maple colonize and eventually replace the oak-hickory forest. These trees have thin, fire-sensitive bark. Frequent fires restrict these fire-intolerant species to places where fire does not spread well, like the moist soils of wetlands and flood plains. For millennia, the oak barrens were a constantly shifting mosaic of prairie grasses and scattered oak groves and woodlands, as vegetation responded to changes in fire frequency and intensity. The more frequent and intense the fires, the more dominant prairie grasses became. In the absence of fire, these areas would first become shrubby, then savanna (very sparse woodlands or sparsely-treed woodland), then closed-canopy oakhickory woods, and eventually closed-canopy forest. In the early 1800s, when the first great wave of settlers arrived in Michigan, there were more than 700,000 acres of oak barrens in Michigan’s southern tier of counties. More than 200,000 of those acres were in Oakland County, where I live. That’s how it got its name. The settlers saw opportunity here, a chance to prosper. Two hundred years of settlement, extensive tilling and grazing of the land, fire suppression, the gradual spread of invasive, non-native plant species, and the growth of villages, towns, roads, cities and subdivisions, all had their effect. Today, in all of Michigan, only a few thousand scattered acres of oak barrens, once the pervasive ecosystem, remain. In 1944, the State of Michigan began acquiring land for the Highland State Recreation Area. In 1947, a portion of the park was dedicated as the Highland Field Trial Area (HFTA) and reserved exclusively for field dog training and competition. No hunting was allowed in those early years, though it is today. In 1948, the Highland Field Trial Grounds Association (HFTGA), a 40

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local chapter of the Michigan Field Trial Association, was founded. Today a consortium of thirteen dog breed clubs works with the State of Michigan to promote hunt tests, field trials, and habitat improvements at Highland. The Fort Detroit German Wirehaired Pointer Club, which I belong to, is one of those participating clubs. Highland is one of the two field trial areas in Michigan (Ionia is the second) where we hold our field events. Highland has two separate field courses, the Silo and the Barn, together about 1,000 acres. Most weekends, from early April until mid-November, both courses are booked with field events In the 1990s, Mark Sargent, a biologist and habitat restoration specialist with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), identified scattered

February Crew: FDGWP members, far left, Roger Doyle; 2nd from left, Mark Sargent; 3rd from left, Dan DeGraw; 2nd from right, Mike Braddock.


in remnants of the oak barrens ecosystem at the Silo Course. Mark is past-president of both the Fort Detroit German Wirehaired Pointer Club and the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America. In 1997 the MDNR began a pilot program to restore the oak barrens ecosystem at Highland, which meant, among other things, clearing brushy areas, planting

native grasses, and supervising the yearly April burns. The Michigan State Park Stewardship Program, which works with non-governmental organizations to restore threatened ecosystems, enlisted volunteers from the HFTGA to help with restoration. Since field-trialers and hunt test participants prefer plenty of open space to run their dogs and do not like woody brush and tangled thickets that make it difficult to work a dog, the HFTGA recognized opportunity here. In the past decade, HFTGA volunteers have contributed thousands of hours to the restoration project. Proceeds from annual HFTGA fund-raising banquets also go to the restoration project, though in recent years the malaise in Michigan’s economy has curtailed, at least temporarily, these events. The last one, attended by more than 200 field trialers, raised $8900. Since the first banquet in 1997, more than $100,000 has been contributed. For the DNR and the HFTGA, this collaboration has been a win/win deal. Last September I met Ray Fahlsing, the biologist who heads the State Park Stewardship Program, at the Silo Course. He had agreed to give me a guided tour of the habitat restoration effort thus far. Though I’d walked the course many times in the last twenty years, I wanted to see it through the eyes of the man who knew most about it. Ray was on his way to meet some buddies in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula for the archery deer season opener and some grouse and woodcock hunting. His Weimaraners, Lexus, Jack and Remy, were in the back of his truck. I grabbed my notebook and camera and we walked out onto the course, leaving the Weims behind,

IN THE COMPANY OF DOGS

yelping in protest. They thought they were at Highland to play. Ray began my tour at the “breakaway,” pictured at left, where competing dogs in field trials are released to run. He told me that the annual burn would occur when conditions were favorable – on a dry, calm day immediately following several dry days, usually in April. That’s when non-native cool-season grasses have started to grow and are most vulnerable to damage by fire, but native warm-season grasses haven’t started to grow in earnest and their deep root systems allow them to rebound after being scorched. After the burn, the ground is black and covered with ash, which increases heat absorption from the sun. This in turn stimulates the growth of the warm-season prairie grasses, and gives them a further advantage over the cool-season grasses that were hurt by the fire. He pointed out a delicate wildflower rarely found outside remnant oak barrens – rough blazing star. It made a comeback on the Silo Course after controlled burns began in 1997. We saw another survivor, aromatic sumac, a small fire-dependent shrub with red berries fringed in delicate white fuzz. It’s a native oak-barrens shrub with an open growth form that provides good cover without too much density, a perfect cover for planted birds in field trials. We walked through golden fields of waist-high little bluestem, a native grass which cloaked hillsides crowned with mature pin and black oak, and, fields of big bluestem, called “turkey foot” because of the distinctive shape of its seed head that grows taller than a man. Ray told me that each autumn native prairie-grass seeds are collected at Highland by college biology students employed by the MDNR’s Michigan Civilian Conservation Corps and by volunteers from several conservation and ecology groups. The following spring they broadcast the seed or drill-plant seedling plugs grown in greenhouses over the winter. At the south end of the Silo Course, where restoration efforts have only recently begun, Ray pointed out a grove of tall, dying pin cherry trees. Leafy, jungle-like climbing vines completely hid the trunks and lower branches of the trees. The scene reminded me of North Carolina and elsewhere in ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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IN THE COMPANY OF DOGS the South where I’ve seen kudzu, an incredibly fastgrowing invasive plant, covering trees, telephone poles, fences, signs, buildings – everything in its path – in a smothering death embrace. It’s a scourge there, and has proven difficult to eliminate. At Highland the culprit is Asiatic bittersweet, and we saw acres of woodland being strangled by its fastgrowing vines. Ray called it a “terrible” plant, very destructive to this ecosystem. Efforts to destroy it on the course have met with some success, and Ray said he hopes to beat it back. He told me that other oak barrens remnant areas in Michigan had been considered for this restoration project but it was the cooperation of the field trialers of the HFTGA that made the difference. “We’re surprised,” Ray said, “at the quality of the oak barrens, like the one pictured above, that we’ve gotten back at Highland because of this partnership – and I think the field trialers were surprised at the results, too.” In the past decade, I’ve witnessed a marvelous transformation at Highland. Areas once thick with maples, Scotch pine, boxelder, ash, cherry, willow, and Siberian elm, and choked with invasive bush honeysuckle, autumn olive, and Asiatic bittersweet, are now blanketed with big and little bluestem and Indian grass. Here and there, pockets of wild lupine, prairie dock, tall coreopsis, rough blazing star, and

Georgie in new grass a few weeks after the fire.

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other native oak barrens wildflowers, are re-appearing. Clusters of black, white, and northern pin oak dominate the hilltops. It’s a lovely new landscape, with ancient antecedents. For me, it’s a perfect place to run my dogs and replenish my spirit, a human-friendly landscape. Additional acreage in the Highland Recreation area (and elsewhere in southern Michigan where remnants of oak barrens survive) has been identified and is being restored. But the Highland Field Trial Area has been a uniquely successful project because of the cooperation between local sportsmen and women and the State. A few weeks later Georgie, Buzz, and I were back on the Silo Course. Little blue stem and Indian Grass had already sprouted from the ashes, covering the hills with a blanket of lush green. The delicate lavender flowers of native wild lupine bloomed in the meadows. The hilltop oaks were budding, even though their lower trunks were still blackened from the fire. The hills were coming alive again – looking a little more like they might have two hundred years ago.


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Wired for Reading By Jodi Quesnell Thanks to everyone who commented on my last two book reviews. I hope everyone enjoyed those books as much as I did. I also appreciated the recommendations for other books. My Life in Dog Years by Gary Paulsen is a collection of short stories about special dogs from Gary’s past. Gary is clearly a dog lover and his love and respect for these dogs is readily apparent. I believe that most of us have had a “once in a lifetime” dog, and Gary is clearly lucky enough to have had a number of dogs that fit this description. His stories include dogs from his childhood as well as dogs from his experience as a dog musher. He even tells the story of a special hunting companion. The thing I enjoyed most about these stories was how these dogs touched his life. These stories are easy to read and they end all too quickly.

Another book worth reading is Saving Cinnamon: The amazing true story of a missing military puppy and the desperate mission to bring her home by Christine Sullivan. Anyone who has shipped a dog will shudder as this worst-case scenario is played out by a Navy Lieutenant who falls in love with a stay puppy while deployed to Afghanistan. After making arrangements to have Cinnamon shipped home, things go desperately wrong and she is abandoned in Turkey by the person who was supposed to be escorting her to the US. Once Cinnamon is “lost” Christine Sullivan takes it upon herself to help her brother locate Cinnamon. She works with animal welfare organizations and dog lovers halfway around the world to locate her brother’s missing dog. Along the way she encounters numerous obstacles but never gives up. Cinnamon’s story is one that will anger you and give you hope. In the end it is the story of dog lovers and the extraordinary efforts they make to save the life of one special dog.

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Delaware Valley German Wirehaired Pointer Club “Summer Splash” By Judy Cheshire

The Delaware Valley German Wirehaired Pointer Club hosted their first “Summer Splash” Specialty in conjunction with the Keystone cluster of dog shows on the weekend of June 3-5, 2011. Good weather, good dogs, good hospitality and good friends contributed to a great time! Much thanks to Bernee Brawn, whose lovely home was “Del Val Central” from Thursday afternoon through Sunday! Old friends were greeted and new friends were made; delicious food (thanks to everyone for bringing treats and becoming assistant chefs!!!!) and drink abounded and dogs romped everywhere! Thank you to all the exhibitors who came from as far away as Michigan, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Virginia and to our trophy chairman, Audrey Meinke, for the delightful array on our trophy table. Our new show site and dates brought us to the beautiful Bucks County area of Pennsylvania on the brink of summer. Lots to do and see! The weekend “kickoff” was on Friday with the Greater Philadelphia Dog Fanciers Association, followed by the Specialty with the Huntingdon Valley KC and a supported entry with Burlington County KC. Each day brought majors for both dogs and bitches and two new champions were made on Sunday – Ch. Ebbtide’s Not a Whole Lotta Sleep (Patti Roberts) and Ch. Heywire ‘N Cedarbrook’s RNs Fancy SH (Wendy & Rich Warwick).

Congratulations to all the winners! Here are the results: Greater Philadelphia Dog Fanciers Association - Judge: Arlene Davis WD/BOW – Heywire’s I Made You Look (Paul & Kathy Brown) WB – Heywire’s Justa Casual Look (Jennifer Jacobs & Lee Friess) BOS – Ch. Heywire’s Don’t Look Now JH (Steve & Lisa Kreuser & Bernee Brawn) BOB – Ch. Heywire ‘N Highfield’s Hey Look Me Over (Pam & Larry Kinkaid)

Huntingdon Valley Kennel Club - Judge: Patricia Laurans DVGWPC Specialty/Sweeps - Judge: Carole Richards Best in Sweepstakes – Ch. Heywire’s Don’t Look Now JH (Steve & Lisa Kreuser & Bernee Brawn) Best Opposite Sex in Sweepstakes – Hawkhaven’s Go Daddy’s Girl (Pete & Norma Paduch) Best in Veteran Sweeps – Ch. Ariel’s Justa New Attitude CD, SH, NAJ (Mary Pat Ezzo & Bernee Brawn) BOS in Veteran Sweeps – Ch. Heywire ‘N Caramel’s Timepiece MH, UT (Tom Jarnich) WD/BOW/BPIS – Geaux All In Schnellberg (Sue DeGraw) RWD – Heywire ‘N Justa’s Look Who’s Talkin” (Bernee Brawn/Rhonda Hookaus) WB – Ebbtide’s Not A Whole Lotta Sleep (Patti Roberts) RWB – Hawkhaven’ Go Daddy’s Girl (Pete & Norma Paduch) BOS – Ch. Heywire’s Don’t Look Now JH (Steve & Lisa Kreuser & Bernee Brawn) BOB/Group 2 – Ch. Heywire ‘N Highfield’s Hey Look Me Over (Pam & Larry Kinkaid) Select – NAFC/DC/AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now (Mary Pat Ezzo & Bernee Brawn)

Burlington County Kennel Club - Judge: Lowell Davis Supported Entry/Sweeps - Judge: Richard William Powell) Best in Sweepstakes – Geaux All In Schnellberg (SueDeGraw) Best Opposite Sex in Sweepstakes – Ch. Heywire ‘N Highfield’s Hey Look Me Over (P. &L. Kincaid) WD – Heywire ‘N Cedarbrook’s RNs Fancy (Wendy & Rich Warwick) WB/BOW/BOB – Ebbtide’s Not A Whole Lotta Sleep (Patti Roberts) BOS – NAFC/DC/AFC Ariel’s Justa Gotta Go Now (Mary Pat Ezzo & Bernee Brawn) Select – Ch. Heywire ‘N Highfield’s Hey Look Me Over (Pam & Larry Kinkaid) Select – Ch Heywires Don’t Look Now JH (Steve & Lisa Kreuser & Bernee Brawn) Photos on the next page are from the Del Val GWPC Specialty and Sweepstakes 44

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Best of Breed — Heyleigh

BOS Specialty & Best of Sweeps — Josh

Winners Dog — Jake

Best Opposite Sweeps — Danica

Winners Bitch — Lottie

Best Veteran Sweeps — Trudy ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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Suncoast German Wirehaired Pointer Club Supported Entry By Angie Johnson

Great dogs, great friends, and lots of fun pretty much sum up the Suncoast German Wirehaired Pointer Club Supported Entry on Saturday, May 8, 2011 in Watkinsville, GA. Our Supported Entry was held in conjunction with the Oconee River Kennel Club all-breed show at the beautiful Oconee Heritage Park.We could not have asked for a better host. The Oconee River KC and show chair Julie Gentry opened their “hospitality” doors to our club. Thank you, Julie, for our club’s designated grooming and parking. You were a major part of our successful event. For our Supported Entry we had the lovely Ms. Anne Savory Bolus as our judge and 17 German Wirehaired Pointers vying for 4 points. Not only were the points up for grabs, but through donations from our board members, we also had great prizes. We want to thank Belinda DeLaby for donating a GWP Print Quilt and Quillo for Winners Dog and Bitch, and Angie Johnson for donating grooming boxes for Best of Breed and Best of Opposite; but the generous donations did not stop with the prizes. We also want to thank Bob and Kathy Marks for donating a lovely GWP Framed Print. Through their generosity we were able to raise $135.00 for the club by raffling the print during the Suncoast-sponsored BBQ lunch. Now for the results . . . BEST OF BREED - GCH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH By Ch Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Lookout - Ch J An J Afterhours Dana JH. Dog. Owner: Kiki Courtelis & Michael & Angela Johnson & Christine Whitmore., Paris, KY 40361. Breeder: M & A Johnson & C. Whitmore. (Frank J Murphy, Agent). BEST OF WINNERS - Geaux For Broke By Ch Schnellbergs Freedom Reigns - Ch Ripsnorter’s Mt View Charismatic Owner: Erika & Josh Brown., Woodstock, GA 30188. Breeder: Erika & Josh Brown & Helen Witt & Sue DeGraw BEST OF OPPOSITE & WINNERS BITCH - CH Afterhours Trickeration JH By Ch Shurcan Baron Of Afterhours - Ch Carrera Four Wheel Drive CD JH. Bitch Owner/Breeder: R Wickes DVM & M Hancock & C Whitmore & C Chism., Crystal River, FL 34429. SELECT DOG - CH ADPG The Patriot MH By Ch Ire-Ja’s Chief Bearhart - Ch ADPG Southpaw Heart In Hand. Dog. Owner: Danielle Gerbert., Walterboro, SC 29488. Breeder: Danielle McCallum Gerbert SELECT BITCH - CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Charismatic By Ch Ripsnorter’s Thunderhart - Ch Mountain View’s Next Strike. Bitch. Owner: Erika Brown & Helen Witt., Woodstock, GA 30188. Breeder: Helen Witt & Claire Wisch& Kelly Wisch. WINNERS DOG - Afterhours It’s All About Jaxon! By Ch Afterhours Stormin’ Norman - GCH Afterhours Cute As A Button JH. Owner/Breeder: Alexis Chism& Allison Chism& Christi Chism., Reddick, FL 32686 RESERVE WINNER’S DOG - Reece Afterhours Major Tempest By GCH Ripsnorters MT View Lookout - Ch J An J Afterhours Dana JH. Owner: Belinda DeLaby& A. Johnson & C. Whitmore., Orlando, FL 32817. Breeder: M&A Johnson & C Whitmore RESERVE WINNER’S BITCH - Afterhours Best of Both Worlds By Ch Afterhours Stormin’ Norman - GCH Afterhours Cute As A Button JH. Owner/Breeder: Alexis Chism& Allison Chism& Christi Chism., Reddick, FL 32686

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Best of Breed — Truman

Best of Opposite — Allie

Best of Winners — Penny

Winners Dog — Jaxon ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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GWP Club of WI Show Specialty - May 7, 2011 From Courtney Vogel-Bastian

There was a new venue this year in attempt to have better weather, better venue, and more entries. The Specialty was in conjunction with a 3 day all breed show. There were 8 entries in puppy sweeps, 1 entry in veteran sweeps, and 19 GWP’s entered in regular classes, which offered majors. There were many out of state guests that traveled long-distance to attend. The club offered hospitality with a grill-out on Friday night, and an awards banquet at a local restaurant on Saturday night. The club held a silent auction on Friday and Saturday, and also sold club logo’d merchandise. Everyone had a great time. Watch for more information on the annual Midwest Wirefest, which starts next year!! Sweepstakes: Judge: Ms. Kylie Jo Hirschy-Seivert Best In Puppy Sweeps CladdaghNRipsnorter Back To Madtown. Breeders, Courtney Vogel Bastian & Lisa George. By CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax & Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle. Owners: Courtney and William Bastian Best of Opposite in Puppy Sweeps CladdaghNRipsnorter’s Back’N Badger. Breeders, Lisa George & Courtney Vogel. By CH Timo II V.Bockenhagen At Kimmax & Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle. Owners: Bob & Ann Karrick Best Veteran in Sweeps Darnelle’s All That And More SH CD. Breeders, Terrence Boldin. By CH Wildefire’s Bentley & CH Drakkar’s She’s All That. Owners: Courtney & William Bastian. Regular Classes: Judge: Ms. Gloria Kerr 12-18 Month Dogs 1. Reece Afterhours In The Eye Of The Storm. Breeders, Michael Johnson & Angie Johnson & Christi Chism. By CH Reece Aftrhours The Buck Stops Here JH & CH Afterhours Once In A Lifetime JH. Owner: Linda C. Eidemiller. Bred By Exhibitor Dogs 1. Waldgeist Timo’s Angel. Breeders, Russ Saatoff. By CH Timo II V.Bockenhagen & Ebby II Vom Spanger-Forst. Owner: Russ Saatoff. 2. Backwoods DK Fyrst. Breeders, Greg Dixon & Liz Barret-Dixon. By CH Katholt’s C. Sixtus & Backwoods Dallas Alice. Owner: Liz Barrett-Dixon. 3. CladdaghNRipsnorter’s Back’N Badger. Breeders, Lisa George & Courtney Vogel. By CH Timo II V.Bockenhagen At Kimmax & Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle. Owner: Bob & Ann Karrick 4. Bonniedale’s Last Minute Surprize. Breeders, Bonnie Crawford. By Wreck Of Bonniedale JH & Heidlwolf Cheyenne MH. Owner: Bonnie Crawford. American Bred Dogs 1. Aimn Hi Rough N Ready. Breeders, Jim & Carolyn Isom & Genevieve Capstaff. By DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH & CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH. Owners: Carolyn & Jim Isom & Genevieve Capstaff. Winner’s Dog Reserve Winner’s Dog Waldgeist Timo’s Angel Reece Afterhours In The Eye Of The Storm 9-12 Month Puppy Bitches 1. Backwoods Momentary Lapse Of Reason. Breeders, Greg Dixon & Elizabeth Barrett Dixon. By FC Final Approach & Backwoods Almost Famous. Owners: Rebecca S. & Mark W. Smith. Bred By Exhibitor Bitches 1. Afterhours N Game On’s Made You Look. Breeders, Maura Rakowski & Christine Whitmore. By CH Fancher’s Game Misconduct JH & CH Afterhours Just One Look JH. Owner: Maura Rakowski. 2. Ironwire Abba Rocks Idawire. Breeders, Jodi Quesnell & Adam Cunningham. By CH Idawire Field Of Dreams & CH Cynister Idawire Childs Play. Owner: Jodi Quesnell. 3. Waldgeist Alannah. Breeders, Russ Saatoff. By CH Timo II V.Bockenhagen & Ebby II Vom Spanger-Forst. Owner: Russ Saatoff. 4. CladdaghNRipsnorter Back To Madtown. Breeders, Courtney Vogel Bastian & Lisa George. By CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax & Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle. Owners: Courtney and William Bastian Open Bitches 1. RLB’s Pin Up Girl. Breeders, Roger Bultman. By CH RLB’s Mac The Knight MH & CH Scotian Xtra Time. Owners: Stacy E. Risler & Roger Bultman. Winner’s Bitch Reserve Winner’s Bitch Afterhours N Game On’s Made You Look RLB’s Pin Up Girl Best of Breed Best of Opposite CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax CH Claddagh’s Hotcakes At Sangrud JH 48

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Vicki DeGruy — DeGruy Photography

Best of Breed — Timo

Best Opposite — Katie

Winners Dog — Angel

Best in Sweepstakes — Madison

Winners Bitch — Party

Best Opposite in Sweepstakes — Dachs ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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FOR THE FUN OF IT

Dogs 101 - GWP Segment By Richard Hirneisen

On April 26 several wirehair owners, including a contingent from the FDGWPC, attended the 1st anniversary party of the Ugly Dog Distillery, in Chelsea, Michigan. Ugly Dog makes only one product, Ugly Dog Vodka. An Animal Planet crew was on hand to tape the celebration for an upcoming segment about GWPs for their popular series, “Dogs 101.” Though we all drank a toast to the distillery’s owners, it was really just water in those cups. Our GWPs stayed sober throughout the entire celebration. For those who haven’t seen “Dogs 101,” each show consists of five brief segments, each on a different breed, highlighting the history of the breed, temperament, etc. It seems to be aimed at people who might be looking to buy a dog, and dog lovers in general. We encouraged them to depict our great dogs in field situations, but were not successful. They did film a field sequence somewhere; however, we weren’t asked to participate. We don’t have the air date for the GWP segment yet, but we‘ll let you know as soon as we do.

“Dogs 101”producer interviews FDGWPC members Pam Doyle and Trish Hirneisen, with Millie and Georgie, who couldn’t care less.

FDGWPC member Mike Braddock and his wire, Cash, get the TV star treatment.

Hey Doggy – this is a GWP segment!!! Beat it!! 50

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FOR THE FUN OF IT

More Dogs 101 Photos

A GWP lineup – some FDGWPC GWPS and their owners

Barb Tucker, FDGWPC Agility Chairperson, hams it up for the camera. Hmm, maybe it was vodka . . .

That’s Ruger, the distillery owner’s GWP, on the label

Owners of the distillery, John Dyer (R) and Dewey Winkel (L). John owns three wires.

Top Shelf Kennels Where great people and great dogs unite.

Jeff Jalbert

Puppies & Training Stud Services Started Hunting Dogs

Wirehairy

Horace, ND PH: 701.277.7011 Cell: 701.367.3722 TopShelfWirehairs@msn.com Breeder of NA and UT Award Litters Home of VC Top Shelf’s Blazing Belle

©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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WIRED LIVING

Good-bye Angus By Beth Hollenberg

Angus died April 23, 2011 at 6:12 a.m. I’m sure of the time. He screamed and woke me up. It was a scream that I never want to hear again – never want to hear the likes of it again. He’d quit eating a week earlier, but, he was drinking and going outside. I knew he was uncomfortable, but, with GWPs, uncomfortable can take on serious meanings. I was going to take him to the vet – somehow, but he was too big for me to lift into the van and he was never one for jumping. He would get his front legs up and expect me to put the rest of him in. This was a Saturday. I had started a temp job that week. I had no money, but was going to take him to the vet anyway. He wasn’t getting better. He was in pain and I could no longer lie to myself and say he’d get better. Turned out I didn’t have to take him to the vet’s, but I did have to take him out of the house. He was heavy – dead weight. I got him outside the door and covered him with a towel. Later, I moved him a bit further from the front door. I bought a tarp that evening, to cover him in order to protect his body from the rain. I called a friend to help me bury Angus, but he and his family wouldn’t be able to come until Sunday, so I got a shovel and tried digging a grave. Within seconds it was full of water – my yard collects all the rain from the street. Then everything stopped. My mind, my thoughts all focused on the fact that he was gone. Dinah kept checking his body throughout the weekend. There was no money for cremation. There was barely enough money for gas to get to work. My first paycheck wouldn’t arrive for another 10 days according to the recruiter. The neighbors may report me for breaking a city ordinance by burying him in the yard. Although, it really would have been more like burying him at sea, if I could get a hole dug at all. Animal control would take deceased pets and dispose of the bodies for free, but only during the week. Sunday came and so did my friends. They lifted him and placed him in the back of the van. I had prepared Angus by wrapping him in a towel and tarp. He was ready for his last ride. I wasn’t. Monday came and I went to Animal Control during lunch. Angus was gone. Angus is gone. But, he isn’t. I still trip over him when I try to leave the bedroom. He always blocked the door. He slept there to keep the boogey man away. But, he wasn’t there when he died – he was by the kitchen entrance. That is where Dinah and I found him. I will write at the computer and look over to the crates where he would lie down and watch. He was always watching and I would always look up and see 52

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him. And things were right with the world. Angus inherited front yard privileges and the trusted position of being loose in the house after Gander died. Angus was quiet. I miss him and yet, more than any of the others who have crossed over, I feel that he is still here. A quiet presence that is just on the border of awareness – a calming presence, a protective presence. I think that he will never truly be gone. Even a month later, I look for him at his “spots”. Dinah misses him. She looks at me when I call his name. She believes that his privileges are now hers. We have had some arguments. She still has to eat in her crate; she still has to go in the backyard on workday mornings. But she goes with me when I leave the house on errands. She jumps into the van. I bought her a safety harness so she can ride in the middle seat. She puts her head into the collar because that means “bye-bye”. And always, I look for Angus. And now, he isn’t there. It’s just Dinah and me. The two of us are alone. We notice that we are alone. The first week without Angus, it was difficult to know if she was glued to me or I was glued to her. I hate that he is gone. Yet, I’m grateful that he isn’t hurting anymore. Angus has crossed over. He chose his time and the place. I just didn’t want him to leave and I didn’t want to recognize the fact that he was ready to go. Some days, I just think he is sleeping in the next room. Other days, I look to his favorite sleeping places and I grieve. He is able to run and play. And I have the memories.

He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader.  He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion. -Unknown


GWP STANDINGS

New Titles - January 1, 2011 to March 31, 2011 CHAMPION CH Aimn Hi For Jet Set’s Dancing With The Stars (B) SR56463003 (1/23/11) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH; Breeder: Jim Isom & Genevieve Capstaff & Carolyn Isom; Owner: Robert F Bonaccorso & Jane L Bonaccorso & Laura Reeves-Lococo CH Jay-Mar’s Colonel Mustard (D) SR43510201 (1/30/11) by CH Jay-Mar Surefire’s Big Secret RN JH x CH Jay-Mar’s Star Spangled Banner MH; Breeder: Nickol Litwin; Owner: Aimee Wolfe & Susan Haller & Laurence J Libeu CH Cascade Double Barrel (D) SR42688101 (2/11/11) by Cascade Ozernaya x Cascade Franki Lin; Breeder: Ray Calkins & Lynn M Calkins; Owner: Gary Wickwire & Ray Calkins & Sandra Wickwire CH Darnelle’s Last Tango In Paris (B) SR49147301 (2/20/11) by CH Wildefire’s Bentley CD JH x CH Drakkar’s She’s All That; Breeder/Owner: Ellie Pusateri & Jane Myers CH Jonnee Blue JH (B) SR46095611 (2/21/11) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Rudolph’s Blitzen Von Duffin x Slick Shooten Maggie JH; Breeder: Brady Shannon; Owner: Robert R Lewis & Randall R Berry CH RLB’s Sage Sedona Timecam JH (B) SR53204513 (2/19/11) by CH Rlb’s Mac The Knight MH x CH Scotian Xtra Time RN; Breeder: Roger Bultman; Owner: Mr. Al Brazdzionis & Mrs. Paula Brazdzionis CH Cynister Celtic Heir O’ Cando (B) SR49848102 (3/4/11) by CH Cynisters Winter Solostice x Cynisters Jitter Bug V Calypso; Breeder: Cathie Magoon & Courtney Magoon; Owner: Joann Steffes CH Cynisters Winter Solstice (D) SR23054603 (3/26/11) by CH Cynisters Coffin Keeper x CH Cynisters American Dream; Breeder: Cathie Magoon & Courtney Magoon; Owner: Joann Steffes CH Paradox SGR Lady Madonna SH NA NAJ (B) SR47646105 (3/6/11) by SGR Burnt Toast x SGR Poison Ivy JH; Breeder: Gail Richardson; Owner: Paula Lunde GRAND CHAMPION GCH CH Afterhours Cute As A Button JH (B) SR49504701 (1/8/11) by CH Afterhours Let The Wookie Win x CH Adpg Independence Day; Breeder: Linda D Medlock & Beth Carter & Danielle Gerbert; Owner: Alexis Chism & Christi Chism & Allison Chism

GCH CH Mountain View National Acclaim (D) SR52430803 (2/25/11) by CH Rlb’s Mac The Knight MH x CH Mountain View’s Next Strike; Breeder: Claire Wisch & James Witt & Kelly Wisch & Helen GeorgeWitt; Owner: Norma Paduch & Pete Paduch GCH CH Aspendel’s Pale Rider JH (B) SR15562201 (3/11/11) by CH Larkspurs Windmill Winston JH x CH Aspendel The Warrior’s Maiden; Breeder: Robert Perry & SEAN FERRARO & ASHLEY MCCLURE; Owner: Betsy Watkins & Sean Ferraro & Robert Perry UTILITY DOG Prince Zachery Von Duffin UD RE (D) SR18902702 (2/20/11) by Ida Hills’ Will be Magic x Smoke Creek’s Reload; Breeder: Jerry G Newton; Owner: Donna Leveque & Bob Leveque UTILITY DOG EXCELLENT Larkspurs Glengarry Glen Gus VCD1 UDXOM1 JH (D) SR06311601 (2/26/11) by DC Cadenberg Victor V Trey MH x Larkspurs Molly McGee; Breeder: Linda Forrestel & Gina Mccain; Owner: Leslie Swisher COMPANION DOG CH Drakkar’s Rlb’s Secora CD RE (B) SR51817505 (1/22/11) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout x CH Drakkars Ididnt Do It Of Rlb RN; Breeder: Roger Bultman & Joyce Wilkinson & Terrence Boldin; Owner: Lisa Popescu & Octavian Popescu CH Roy The Upland Hunter CD RE (D) SR42625603 (3/12/11) by CH I’Am A Triple Dual Shot CD x Annie Mae Hunter; Breeder: Fred Daggett & Amber Daggett; Owner: Lisa Popescu & Octavian Popescu RALLY EXCELLENT Jay-Mar’s On The Road Again RE (D) SR53880202 (3/25/11) by DC St Croix’s Diamond Jim x CH Jay-Mar’s Liver And Onions SH; Breeder: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber; Owner: Judith Rowley TRACKING DOG Afterhours Edged Weapon TD (D) SR53690110 (3/27/11) by CH Afterhours Let The Wookie Win x CH Afterhours Memphis Mafia; Breeder: Christine Whitmore & Christi Chism; Owner: Deborah Cutter SENIOR HUNTER Whiterock Targhee’s Cassie SH (B) SN91092001 (5/8/10) by Thunderhill’s Frisco x Whiterock Miss Maine Jagerin; Breeder: Remillie A Norsworthy & Willard R Norsworthy; Owner: Denis Scott Hofflander & Susan Hofflander

JUNIOR HUNTER Ripsnorterncladdagh Backfld N Motion JH (B) SR62716303 (2/13/11) by CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax x Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle; Breeder: Lisa George & Courtney J Vogel-Bastian; Owner: Marguerite Howard & Lisa George Dicey Von Dreihund Knight JH (B) SR54604704 (3/20/11) by Rueben Von Dreihund Knight x Smoke Creek’s Roxy; Breeder/Owner: Jay Stockdill Dual Shot’s Midnight Rip Off JH (B) SR55400802 (3/20/11) by DC Wildwings Shameless x Dual Shot’s Miss Kitty JH; Breeder/Owner: Karla Hawkins CH J an J After Hours Dana JH (B) SR19726107 03-07 (3/19/11) by J An J Afterhours Big Bucks JH x AfterhoursTo Be Or Not To B; Breeder: Joan Hussar; Owner: Michael R Johnson & Christine Whitmore & Angela E Johnson AGILITY EXCELLENT CH Scotian Whiskey River AX AXJ (B) SR35640805 (2/19/11) by CH Wildacres Boxcar Willie SH x CH Scotian Jetset’s Dreamcatcher; Breeder: Laura Reeves & Carolyn V Isom & Jane Bonaccorso; Owner: Chris Eberhardt & Laura Reeves-Lococo OPEN AGILITY Jed’s SF Blue Belle CDX RE JH OA OAJ (B) SR48693303 (2/27/11) by CH Jed’s Wild Turkey x Jed’s Lexus Lx Von Duffin; Breeder: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker; Owner: Mike Braddock & Kay Braddock OPEN AGILITY JUMPER Jed’s SF Blue Belle CDX RE JH OA OAJ (B) SR48693303 (2/27/11) by CH Jed’s Wild Turkey x Jed’s Lexus Lx Von Duffin; Breeder: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker; Owner: Mike Braddock & Kay Braddock MASTER EXCELLENT JUMPER Afterhours Major’s Sunny Sky CD RAE AX MXJ XF (D) SN88983804 (2/3/11) by CH Afterhours Major League x CH Afterhours Spirit In The Sky; Breeder: Christine Whitmore; Owner: Susan McKeever & John Quattrochi NOVICE AGILITY PREFERRED Harvey AX AXJ NAP (D) ILP151080 (1/22/11) Owner: Elizabeth Drifka NOVICE AGILITY JUMPER PREFERRED Harvey AX AXJ NAP NJP (D) ILP151080 (1/23/11) Owner: Elizabeth Drifka AGILITY FAST NOVICE Afterhours Memphis Red Hot Lover RN NA NAJ NF (D) SR53690103 (1/29/11) by CH Afterhours Let The Wookie Win x CH Afterhours Memphis Mafia; Breeder: Christine Whitmore & Christi Chism; Owner: Susan McKeever & John Quattroch ©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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COU

S

The birds are scarce, but he continues his search working the ditches and fence rows quartering through the field. He slams on point and you say to yourself, "this is what it‘s all about." His breeding, your training/conditioning combined with high-quality nutrition have made this possible. Give him the high-quality nutrition that helps keep him in the field when other dogs are heading for the truck. Feed what many top field trialers feed — Purina® Pro Plan® Performance Formula.

• Real chicken is the #1 ingredient, for a high-quality protein source to help support muscle mass for strength and provide energy • VO2 max optimizes oxygen metabolism so dogs burn fat more efficiently • Natural sources of glucosamine for joint health and mobility m • High levels of antioxidants to help support a healthy immune system • Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, including EPA and DHA • Highly palatable For more information of interest to sporting dog enthusiasts, visit www.proplan.com/sportingdog/mag Purina is a proud sponsor of:

Trademarks owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A., Vevey, Switzerland 54

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D E LTA T H E R A P Y D O G S

Hi Everyone, How many of you know what March 2 is? It is Dr. Seuss’s birthday! I didn’t know it either until recently when we walked into our school for reading as we do on most Wednesday mornings. As we entered the pod area, where we generally pick up our kids, we saw that all the students and teachers were dressed in their pajamas. The room mothers were cooking green eggs and ham, and apple juice had been poured. The students were running around, as excited as I ever seen them, so we just sat down and watched the activity. It was clear that I couldn’t listen to a reader until the green eggs and ham were consumed! Eventually things calmed down, and my mom said it was really evident today that the Delta dogs at my school are bomb proof! The lady in charge of the Delta dogs wore her pajamas, and said she hadn’t told the rest of us in advance because she didn’t think we would wear our pjs. My mom got home and told my dad - he said there was no way that she was going out of the house in hers! I don’t wear pjs myself, so I can only surmise that hers are “well-worn”. Recently at the hospital, a gentleman stopped me and my mom and said, “That is the dog!” We looked at him curiously, and he said that he had been a patient at the hospital about six months ago and we had visited him in his room. He said our visit was the nicest thing about his stay in the hospital and he would never forget it. I just smiled and wiggled my tail some more. He petted me a bit longer and again said, “Thank you. “ My mom could only say “Well thank you back - that is why we are here.” I don’t know why people appreciate me so much. I just love them all - maybe they can see that in my eyes. We have now finished reading at school for the year. In the picture, you can see how cute one of my students is. He was in the hallway one day recently when we walked into school. He ran to me and asked if he could take me to the library. He grabbed my leash and off we went. He is so proud of me, and I feel the same about him. I will miss him this summer. He hopes he can read to me next year, but only time will tell. I will concentrate on the hospital over the summer, and just maybe I can bring some more smiles! Have a wonderful summer! Becky

©2010 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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Hard Headed Kennels & Lookout Kennels Litter Announcement

BIS BISS GCh. Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Lookout “Scout” x Ch. RLB’s Got Moxie at Drakkar MH “Moxie”

Breeders: Edwin Shupp, Jim Witt, Helen Witt, Joyce Wilkinson

This litter will have it all...Conformation, field ability, good coats and temperaments. Puppies are due July 4th Weekend 2011!

“Scout”

Moxie is a dual purpose girl - she excels in the show ring AND the field! Moxie is currently the #1 Amatuer Gun Dog* and she is close to finishing her Grand Championship. *AKC statistics as of March 31, 2011

Scout’s record speaks for himself. But, not only does his record speak loudly, he is passing his great traits to his Get.

“Moxie”

Top Winning GWP in Breed History 2009 & 2008 National Best In Specialty Show Winner Multiple Best In Shows and Best In Specialty Shows Hard Headed Kennels - Ed Shupp 717-586-8836 hhwires@comcast.net

www.hardheadedkennels.com Design58by KMK Design WIRE www.kingsmillkennel.com/kmkdesign.html NEWS ©2010 GWPCA

Lookout Kennels - Helen & Jim Witt 740-397-0171 RipsnorterGWP@hotmail.com

www.lookoutgwp.com


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Wire~News 2011 Summer