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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Wire~News

The Journal of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America

AUTUMN 2013 JUDGES’ AND STANDARD Issue

Regular Features 11 14 16 21 29 30 40 49 52 54 58 59 62 64 66 68

President’s Message/Delegate’s Report Officers & Committee Chairpersons Health Forum – Karen Potter, DVM Financial Legacies – Dick Baldwin CHIC – Robin Nelson, DVM New Beginnings – Debra Galan-Parsons Pet Partners – Ann Duffin We Remember – Jim Isom Breed Standings – Lori Sargent Top Ten Field Dogs – Lynn Sandor Obedience – Kay Braddock Obedience & Rally Standings – Lori Sargent What’s Happening in Rescue – Heidi Baumbarger Agility – Ashlee Trotter New Titles Agility Standings – Lori Sargent Advertising & Content Information

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A Coat of Many Colors – Robin Nelson, DVM A look at the confusing presentations of Thyroid Disease

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A Handler’s Job Is to Help – Leo Boman Tips to become a “helpful” partner for your field dog

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Doggedly - Jerry Allen

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A Discussion of Breed Type - Pat Laurans and Judy Cheshire Understanding the difficult concept of breed type.

Wire~News Future Issues Coming Next Issue Winter 2013 Wire-News Nationals Results and Review HIGHLIGHTING: The Show Ring Competition from the 2013 National Specialty Results from the Nationals Field and Companion Events Updates from the General Meeting and the Awards Banquet Ad Deadline – November15, 2013 Please send Ads & Payment to: Adam Cunningham, Advertising Manager 9088 N. Awl Rd. Parker, CO 80138 ironwiregwp@gmail.com

Content Deadline – November 1, 2013 Please forward Club Business, Photos and Articles to: Diane Turner, Editor turner.p.diane@gmail.com.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Index to Advertisers Cover Victor Malzoni – Hampton Court Inside Judy Cheshire – Heywire/Sureshot 3 Pete & Norma Paduch – Hawk Haven Wires 6 Betty Stroh – Hilltop Farms 7 Betty Stroh – Hilltop Farms 10 Jim & Michelle Boyd 12 Victor Malzoni – Hampton Court 13 Victor Malzoni – Hampton Court 15 Garnett Persinger – Ebbtide GWPs 19 Betty Stroh – Hilltop Farms 27 LaMar & Kay Gunnarson – Ridgehaven Kennels 32 Courtney & William Bastian – Claddagh Kennel 33 Courtney & William Bastian – Claddagh Kennel 34 Courtney & William Bastian – Claddagh Kennel 36 Jim West & Rhonda Haukoos – Wild West Kennels

37 Jim West & Rhonda Haukoos – Wild West Kennels 42 Larry & Diane Turner/Webb Family – CanDo GWPs 43 Audrey & Don Mienke – Caramel GWPs 47 Jack & Kari Loken 50 Cathie & Don Magoon – Cynister GWPs 51 Tom & Jodi Quesnell – Idawire GWPs 56 Meg Eden – Wireswest 57 Catherine Ryan 67 Miranda Wagner – Portraits by Miranda Diana Wise Sarah Ecolani – Fun Time Dog Shop Steve Minas – Upland Ranger CnL Paca Greg & Liz Dixon – Backwoods Kennels 70 Purina Inside Lisa & Octavian Popescu – Williamette GWP Back Pat, Don & Ben Coller – Wingfield Farm

On the Cover

GCH Mt. View’s Ripsnorter Silver Charm “OAKLEY” THE TOP WINNING GERMAN WIRE HAIRED POINTER IN HISTORY 2012 NUMBER ONE DOG IN AMERICA AMONG ALL BREEDS 2011 & 2012 NATIONAL SPECIALTY WINNER 100 CAREER BEST IN SHOWS 240 GROUP FIRSTS THE FIRST TIME IN HISTORY A GERMAN WIRE HAIRED POINTER HAS WON THE GROUP AT WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB It is with humble gratitude that we wish to thank Oakley’s friends, supporters and admirers for traveling with us on this amazing journey. Owned By: Victor Malzoni Jr. Hampton Court Sao Paulo, Brazil Bred By: Claire Wisch, Kelly Wisch, & Helen Witt

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CODE OF ETHICS

German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Code of Ethics The members of the GWPCA are devoted to the continued preservation, protection and improvement of the German Wirehaired Pointer. This Code provides guidelines for ethical practices and care, and seeks to promote good sportsmanship. RECORDS GWPCA members will maintain complete and accurate records for each dog and litter. BREEDING GWPCA members will evaluate any dog or bitch used for breeding, using the criteria set forth by the breed standard. Only those dogs free of recognized genetic defects shall be used in a breeding program. Breeders will be selective with respect to the physical and mental soundness, health, temperament, and natural hunting ability of the dog or bitch. CARE AND TRANSFER OF DOGS No puppies or adult dogs shall be bred, sold or consigned to pet shops or other commercial enterprises Proper care shall be provided for bitch and puppies. Puppies shall be kept until seven weeks of age. All prospective buyers should be carefully screened to assure that puppies have a safe, loving and stimulating home. An honest evaluation of the quality of the puppy will be made. Purchasers are encouraged to spay or neuter all dogs that will not be used for breeding. New owners will receive the following documentation: 1. Written sales contract or co-ownership agreement 2. Copy of the AKC registration 3. Feeding instructions 4. Medical records 5. Three-generation pedigree 6. Training recommendations 7. Copy of this Code of Ethics GWPCA members are prepared to assist puppy buyers when questions or problems arise for the life of the dog. New owners are encouraged to become involved in GWPCA activities, regional GWP clubs, dog training, and/or dog performance events. SPORTSMANSHIP GWPCA members shall always conduct themselves in a manner which will reflect credit upon themselves, their dogs, and the sport of dogs, regardless of location or circumstance.

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BREED STANDARD

The German Wirehaired Pointer Breed Standard GENERAL APPEARANCE The German Wirehaired Pointer is a well muscled, medium sized dog of distinctive appearance. Balanced in size and sturdily built, the breed’s most distinguishing characteristics are its weather resistant, wire-like coat and its facial furnishings. Typically Pointer in character and style, the German Wirehaired Pointer is an intelligent, energetic and determined hunter. SIZE, PROPORTION, SUBSTANCE The height of males should be from 24 to 26 inches at the withers. Bitches are smaller but not under 22 inches. To insure the working quality of the breed is maintained, dogs that are either over or under the specified height must be severely penalized. The body is a little longer than it is high, as ten is to nine. The German Wirehaired Pointer is a versatile hunter built for agility and endurance in the field. Correct size and balance are essential to high performance. HEAD The head is moderately long. Eyes are brown, medium in size, oval in contour, bright and clear and overhung with medium length eyebrows. Yellow eyes are not desirable. The ears are rounded but not too broad and hang close to the head. The skull broad and the occipital bone not too prominent. The stop is medium. The muzzle is fairly long with nasal bone straight, broad and parallel to the top of the skull. The nose is dark brown with nostrils wide open. A spotted or flesh colored nose is to be penalized. The lips are a trifle pendulous but close to the jaw and bearded. The jaws are strong with a full complement of evenly set and properly intermeshing teeth. The incisors meet in a true scissors bite. NECK, TOPLINE, BODY The neck is of medium length, slightly arched and devoid of dewlap. The entire back line showing a perceptible slope down from withers to croup. The skin throughout is notably tight to the body. The chest is deep and capacious with ribs well sprung. The tuck-up apparent. The back is short, straight and strong. Loins are taut and slender. Hips are broad with the croup nicely rounded. The tail is set high, carried at or above the horizontal when the dog is alert. The tail is docked to approximately two-fifths of its original length. FOREQUARTERS The shoulders are well laid back. The forelegs are straight with elbows close. Leg bones are flat rather than round, and strong, but not so heavy or coarse as to militate against the dog’s natural agility. Dewclaws are generally removed. Round in outline the feet are webbed, high arched with toes close, pads thick and hard, and nails strong and quite heavy. HINDQUARTERS The angles of the hindquarters balances that of the forequarters. A straight line drawn vertically from the buttock (ischium) to the ground should land just in front of the rear foot. The thighs are strong and muscular. The hind legs are parallel when viewed from the rear. The hocks (metatarsus) are short, straight and parallel turning neither in nor out. Dewclaws are generally removed. Feet as in forequarters. COAT The functional wiry coat is the breed’s most distinctive feature. A dog must have a correct coat to be of correct type. The coat is weather resistant and, to some extent, water-repellent. The undercoat is dense enough in winter to insulate against the cold but is so thin in summer as to be almost invisible. The distinctive outer coat is straight, harsh, wiry and flat lying, and is from one to two inches in length. The outer coat is long enough to protect against the punishment of rough cover, but not so long as to hide the outline of the dog. On the lower legs the coat is shorter and between the toes it is of softer texture. On the skull the coat is naturally short and close fitting. Over the shoulders and around the tail it is very dense and heavy. The tail is nicely coated, particularly on the underside, but devoid of feather. Eyebrows are of strong, straight hair. Beard and whiskers are medium length. The hairs in the liver patches of a liver and white dog may be shorter than the white hairs. A short smooth coat, a soft woolly coat, or an excessively long coatis to be severely penalized. While maintaining a harsh, wiry texture, the puppy coat may be shorter than that of an adult coat. Coats may be neatly groomed to present a dog natural in appearance. Extreme and excessive grooming to present a dog artificial in appearance should be severely penalized. COLOR The coat is liver and white, usually either liver and white spotted, liver roan, liver and white spotted with ticking and roaning or solid liver. The head is liver, sometimes with a white blaze. The ears are liver. Any black in the coat is to be severely penalized. GAIT The dog should be evaluated at a moderate gait. Seen from the side, the movement is free and smooth with good reach in the forequarters and good driving power in the hindquarters. The dog carries a firm back and exhibits a long, ground-covering stride. When moving in a straight line the legs swing forward in a free and easy manner and show no tendency to cross or interfere. There should be no signs of elbowing out. The rear legs follow on a line with the forelegs. As speed increases, the legs will converge toward a center line of travel. TEMPERAMENT Of sound, reliable temperament, the German Wirehaired Pointer is at times aloof but not unfriendly toward strangers; a loyal and affectionate companion who is eager to please and enthusiastic to learn. Approved October 10, 2006; Effective January 1, 2007

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Presidents Message - Ray Calkins The annual rendezvous of the GWPCA is coming up. We will meet in Nebraska Oct 3-12 for the National Event. Competition is the focus of our gathering and to see the best of the breed. More than that—this event offers the opportunity to renew old friendships, make new ones, discuss and debate in person the issues that affect all of as owners of GWPs, e.g. “animal right”, hunting, rescue and health issues. Whatever your positions --COME-- and make the national event an annual positive opportunity and experience. See you there!

Ray

AKC Delegate’s Report - Pat Laurans I’d like to share with you, the following information which is from AKC Chairman Alan Kalter’s report: Responsible Dog Ownership Days (RDOD) are scheduled throughout September. We are expecting some 650 AKC clubs to hold their own RDOD community event that publicly promotes responsible dog ownership. These events will include a Meet the Breeds to help people determine the right breed for them; health clinics and dog First Aid training; Canine Good Citizen program information; obedience/Rally/Agility/Performance demonstrations; breed rescue information; and kid-friendly dog-related activities. The AKC will be hosting its own RDOD event in Raleigh, NC on Saturday, September 21, 2013 at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds. This event will highlight the AKC programs and services that support responsible dog ownership.. The AKC Meet the Breeds - the world’s largest showcase of dogs and cats - is scheduled in New York City on September 28-29. The event offers the public the unique opportunity to get up close and personal with over 200 breeds of dogs and cats; to talk with responsible breeders and owners about these amazing animals; and determine the right breed for their lifestyle. Throughout September, AKC Communications will continue telling our story using RDOD events throughout the country and the AKC Meet the Breeds event. But we can do more. And that “we” is you and I, and our club members. I encourage everyone to help spread the word about responsible ownership of the dogs we all love. Beyond club RDOD events, we have the opportunity this September to tell our story one-on-one, both in-person and in social media. As always it is my pleasure to serve as the Delegate for the GWPCA.

Notice of Annual Meeting The German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America will hold its annual membership meeting Friday, October 4, 2013, 7 p.m. at the Lancaster Events Center, Lincoln, Nebraska. All interested parties are welcome. A minimum attendance of 10% of the GWPCA membership is required to constitute a quorum.

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2013 GWPCA Board of Directors President Ray Calkins, 13235 SW Bell Rd., Sherwood, OR 97140 (503) 682-2968 gwpcascade@gmail.com Vice President Elizabeth (Liz) Dixon, N7815 County Rd N, Spring Valley, WI 54767 (715) 778-4675 bkwdsgwp@svtel.net Secretary Lori Sargent, 5775 N. Chester Rd., Charlotte, MI 48813 (517) 543-3628 birddog@windsweptwires.net Treasurer Erika Brown, 236 Park Ave., Woodstock, GA 30188 (770) 591-4329 geauxerika@yahoo.com Eastern Director Garnett Persinger, 13838 St. Highway 198, Conneautville, PA 16406 (814) 587-2365 13838@windstream.net Midwest Director Chuck Casanova, 19910 Platte View Rd. , Gretna NE 68028 (402) 691-9498 clc51@hotmail.com Western Director Robert Perry, 527 NW Elm Ave., Suite 3, PMB 200, Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 504-9197 aspendel@aol.com

Committee Chairs & Positions Breeder Referral -- Bernee Brawn – justagwp@verizon.net Bylaws – Mark Sargent – birddog@windsweptwires.net Canine Health (CHIC) – Robin Nelson – gwpoint@aol.com Delegate to the AKC – Patricia Laurans – plaurans@earthlink.net Field Advisory Committee – Elizabeth Dixon – bkwdsgwp@svtel.net Futurity (Field) – Tom Lococo – tom.lococo@novartis..com Futurity (Show) – Laura Myles – invernesskennels@frontier.com GWPU – Open – Volunteer Needed Judges’ Education – Judy Cheshire – heywiregwp@gmail.com National Events Coordinator – Laura Reeves – scotiadawges@gmail.com 2013 Nationals – Rhonda Haukoos – brillowkennels@iowatelecom.net 2014 Nationals – Board of Directors Maturity (Show) - Audrey Meinke – fairwindxx@sbcglobal.net Membership & Wire-News Mailing – Erika Brown – geauxerika@yahoo.com Rescue – Heidi Baumbarger – bluelinekennels@windstream.net ROM – Courtney Vogel – courtneyvogel@hotmail.com Show Advisory Committee – Judy Cheshire – heywiregwp@gmail.com Standard Review Committee – Garnett Persinger – 13838@windstream.net Top Ten Field – Lynn Sandor – sandorcpa@comcast. net Top Ten Other – Lori Sargent – birddog@windsweptwires.net Trophies – Sue Degraw – schnellberg@comcast.net Versatility – Greg DuBois – grgdubois@comcast.net Wire-News Editor – Diane Turner – turner.p.diane@gmail.com Wire-News Advertising – Adam Cunningham – ironwiregwp@gmail.com Wire Mail – Steve Kreuser – gwpca_update@hotmail.com Web Master – Angie Johnson – angiehef@aol.com 14

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H E A LT H F O R U M

What is Borrelia burgdorferi? A Look at Lyme Disease, Its Causes and Prevention By: Karen Potter, DVM

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ach year we are hearing more and more about Lyme disease in our canine patients. The first Lyme disease outbreak in the United States in humans was identified in Lyme, Connecticut in the 1970’s although reports of the disease can be traced back to Europe in the 1880’s. Lyme disease is an arthropod borne disease that uses ticks as a vector for transmission and is caused by the spirochete bacteria, Borrelia burgdorferi. As the tick population in the United States is shifting, we are beginning to see an increased percentage of our canine companions that are testing seropostive for B. burgdorferi. The Bacteria and The Tick B. burgdorferi is an aerobic, gram negative spirochete bacteria that causes the condition that we know as Lyme disease. The bacterium is most commonly transmitted by Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus, also known as the eastern and western black-legged ticks. It is believed that there are a couple other Ixodes spp. that can potentially carry the disease, however 16

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The bacterium is most commonly transmitted by the eastern and western black-legged ticks

it is much less common and it is unknown whether these ticks feed on people or pets. The carrier ticks inoculate pets and people with B. burgdorferi while they are feeding. Ixodes spp. have a two year life cycle with 3 stages, the larva, nymph and adult. Larva: This is the first stage after hatching. The larvae attach and feed on small animals and rodents. They are most active late summer and fall. The larval stage is when ticks are most likely to acquire B. burgdorferi. Nymph: The second stage of the life cycle that is most active in the spring and summer months. This stage attaches to small and medium mammals and is when most transmission of B. burgdorferi occurs. Adult: The final, adult stage most commonly attaches to deer. They are most active in the cooler months of the fall. The adult female will then lay eggs in the spring that that will hatch into larvae.

H E A LT H F O R U M to the activities that younger dogs participate in , where as older canines are a bit more sedate. Dogs with Acute Lyme disease may present with shifting leg lameness, swollen joints, regional lymph node enlargement and potentially fever, lethargy, depression and anorexia. The joints affected are normally the carpus or the tarsus (the “wrists” and hock joints, respectively). The lameness may last for 3 to 6 days in one joint before subsiding and potentially targeting a different joint in a few days. This is where the description of “shifting leg lameness” comes from.

Younger dogs seem to be more likely to have Lyme Disease perhaps due to their activities.

Chronic Lyme disease is less common in dogs than the acute form. This form is characterized by shifting leg lameness leading to a condition called polyarthritis (inflammation in multiple joints). In Chronic Lyme disease, polyarthritis may persist even with antibiotic therapy. It is rare, however, this may lead to kidney failure, heart problems and neurologic conditions.

There has not been any evidence that adult ticks can pass B. burgdorferi onto their offspring. This implies that the only method of the ticks acquiring the bacteria is from the larvae or nymphs feeding on the reservoir hosts (small mammals and rodents). In order for the nymphs or adults to transmit B. burgdorferi they must be attached for 24 to 48 hours. This is the time it requires for the bacteria to pass across the salivary glands of the ticks and into our pets or us. Clinical Canine Lyme Disease Clinical presentation of Lyme disease is seen in a very low percentage of dogs that test seropositive. Some studies have even shown that less than 5% of dogs that test positive will manifest with clinical signs. These clinical signs typically begin 1 to 5 months after the tick bite that inoculated the dog with B. burgdorferi. Younger dogs seem to be more likely to have Lyme disease. This may be due

Lyme Prevalence Map predicts the shifting tick populations and the disease hot spots for 2013.

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H E A LT H F O R U M Diagnosis With the high percentage of dogs that are seropositive for B. burgdorferi that do not have clinical Lyme disease, care must be taken evaluating the clinical presentation of a dog along with test results. Screening tests that are performed in the veterinary clinic, such as the Idexx 4Dx Snap Test, can be beneficial to identify dogs that are testing seropositive. A positive test, however, only indicates exposure to B. burgdorferi. It does not necessarily mean the dog has Lyme disease. On the other hand, with dogs that are presenting with clinical signs suggestive of Lyme disease, the immediate positive result of these tests can more quickly identify a definitive diagnosis, making treatment decisions quicker and more effective. Other serological testing, such as titer testing can be sent to outside laboratories. These tests are very beneficial but the results will be delayed for a couple days. Skin culture for spirochete bacteria and PCR of the skin are considered most definitive and sensitive, however, these tests are not commonly done in practice. Treatment The first treatment choice for acute Lyme disease is the antibiotic, Doxycycline, every 24 hours for up to 30 days. Although there has been a shortage in the availability of Doxycycline this year, there are other tetracyclines and penicillin type antibiotics that are successful in treating the disease. In regards to treating Chronic Lyme disease, these dogs may require long term antibiotic and pain therapy along with kidney support. This chronic state may never be cleared. Prevention Number one prevention is prevention of ticks. Most tick preventatives are focused on killing the tick prior to the 24 to 48 hours of

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Microscopic image of Borellia burgdorferi (Lyme’s Disease). Courtesy of the CDC.

attachment time that is required to transmit disease. Although you may be using a tick preventative, daily tick checks of your dogs is another line of defense you can provide. Please remember that although you have a tick preventative on your dog, this does not mean that you will never find a tick. The ticks must be on your dog before they can be killed by the preventative. Check for ticks all over the body, but primarily they will be in the ears, groin and armpits. If a tick is found, grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible with hemostats or tweezers and remove. It is very common for a small piece of skin to come along with the tick that you remove. Vaccines are available for Lyme disease. The efficacy of these vaccines has been questioned, however, for a dog that lives in a high-risk area they should be considered. Vaccination of your dog does not replace good tick prevention and daily tick checks. Lyme disease is a true threat and even more to our hunting dog companions. Our dogs are more commonly in the woods and fields and therefore more exposed to those nasty little ticks that carry B. burgdorferi.

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2 0 1 3 N AT I O N A L S P E C I A LT Y

2013 GWPCA NATIONAL EVENTS Come join us for the Event of the Year!

GWPCA Nationals will be held at Lincoln & Raymond, NE October 3rd – 12th This year’s specialty will be held in conjunction with four all-breed shows, so majors will abound! The Branched Oak Trial Ground is a first-class site with gorgeous trees and grassy rolling hills. Visit GWPCA.com and follow the Nationals link for updates & fun facts or follow us on Facebook at 2013 Nebraska GWP Nationals. National Events Schedule: Wednesday: 6 pm - Lancaster Events Center Nebraska Room Welcome Hospitality –Cash Bar & Snacks Thursday:  Supported Entry: judging time TBA 3:00 -6:00 - GWPU Nebraska room 6:30 - Hospitality  7 pm Fun & Games Friday:  All judging times TBA Obedience Judges Education Futurity National Specialty Show Parade of Titleholders -Lunch Break 5:30 - Hospitality 6:00 - Dinner 7:00 – Annual Meeting

Saturday: All judging times TBA National Sweeps/Maturity/Regional Specialty 5:30 - AllStar 7:30 – Banquet Sunday: All judging times TBA GWPCEN sweeps GWPCEN specialty show Thyroid & DNA clinic to follow BOB judging Informal gathering -- 6 pm Branched Club House Monday: 8:00 –Hunt Test area 9 /Derby -- Clubhouse  6:00 - Field trial kick off Dinner Tuesday: 8:00 - Hunt test area 9 / Continuation of Field Trial events –Clubhouse   Wednesday to Completion : Continuation of field trial events

Questions? Contact Rhonda Houkoos at Rhonda@brillowgwps.com or Robin Nelson at gwpoint@aol.com Or Laura Reeves at scotialdawgs@gmail.com

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FINANCIAL LEGACIES

Emergency Pet Preparation Awareness Have a Plan in Place Before a Crisis By Dick Baldwin It is important that we as pet owners have an effective disaster-emergency plan in place. It is in our best interest to be proactive in this endeavor. In the time of a crisis the stress can be overwhelming. Part of a good plan must have a checklist to follow for planning and action. The first step is to be aware of our communities’ preparedness and disaster units. Building rapport and having a relationship with key organizations and their leadership is part of good planning. In the light of Katrina and Tuscaloosa and other natural disasters, communities have established planning and implementation groups. Make sure you are aware of what resources and guides are already in place. • Identify potential shelters. Contact your local emergency management office, animal shelter or animal control office to get advice on where pets can go during a disaster. Make a list of hotels or kennels that would allow you to bring your pets. Make sure to research hotels in areas outside your neighborhood. Check with friends and relatives to see if they would be willing to provide shelter to your pets. • Develop a pet disaster kit. Include emergency food, water, travel bowls, safety harnesses-leashes, carriers, first aide items, medicines, sanitary supplies, i.e. trash bags, etc. toys, blankets, bedding, etc. Add a copy of vet records including immunization cards. • Insure proper identification. Make sure that each pet has a current ID tag or chip. Have a current photo of your pet in your personal emergency kit. Photos will help reunite you in case you and your pet become separated. • Practice your plan. Look for pets during severe weather to see where they may hide. Knowing their hiding places inside and outside the home will speed up your evacuation process. Get a flashing or beeper collar to help locate your pet in case of darkness. Use a trip to the vet, or other event, to practice securing your pet. Time how long it takes. Figure it will take longer during a crisis. • Sheltering at home. If you are unable to evacuate, make sure to get your pet to the safest point in the home. Some pets do better if they are in their crates away from windows or with covers on their cages. Think what would be most comforting for them. Place pet rescue decals on windows and doors to alert rescue teams. • Reducing problems after a disaster. Understand that pets respond to your stress and may become defensive or fearful. Keep your pet in control or confined until you know they will be safe. Be aware of hazards such as debris, chemicals, and other substances that could harm them. These action points are not totally complete because every circumstance may need different application of response. This, however, should give owners an outline of preparedness for most natural disasters. Be aware that terrorism can also be a threat that needs to have different preparedness planning. The scope of this article is intended as an overview only. Economic crisis may also affect how you prepare for them as well. Health crises are another concern that needs to have an action plan. Talk to your family and friends or club members to make sure that there is agreement on pet placement in these emergencies. Dick Baldwin is a financial planner and GWP owner who lives in Ohio. ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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F E AT U R E A RT I C L E

A Coat of Many Colors... Thyroid Disease Is Often Misunderstood and Misdiagnosed By Robin K. Nelson, DVM

1. What is the thyroid gland and why is it important? The thyroid is a small gland located in the neck region on both sides of the trachea or windpipe. Basically the thyroid serves as a “volume dial” for metabolism.

is caused by an immune reaction in the dog’s thyroid gland. Inflammation of the thyroid gland appears in early adulthood and progresses for several years in many affected breeds. Initiating factors are unknown, but the response is the appearance of thyroid antibodies directed mainly at thyroglobulin, a protein produced by and used entirely within the thyroid gland. In some cases, antibodies are also directed at the thyroid hormones T3 and T4. Stresses can affect onset or severity, but only dogs that have the genetic potential can develop autoimmune thyroiditis. Eventually, the autoimmune response results in irreversible destruction of the thyroid glands, an inability to make thyroid hormones, and finally development of clinical signs of hypothyroidism. 4. What does hypothyroidism look like? Observable clinical signs appear after 75% or more of the thyroid gland has been destroyed.

It produces two forms of thyroid hormone. T3 is the active hormone which regulates metabolism at the cell level. T4 is the inactive form created to circulate in the bloodstream. When circulating levels of T4 begin dropping, the pituitary gland at the base of the brain produces a substance called thyroid stimulating hormone or TSH. This hormone triggers the thyroid gland to make and release more T4. When T4 is absorbed into tissue cells, it is converted to T3 for use.

Abnormal skin is a common clinical finding. Dogs suffer hair loss presenting with a rat tail, a bald area around the collar, or failure of hair growth after clipping. Recurring skin infections or ear infections are common. Seborrhea is often a problem as the skin thickens, becomes scaly and greasy, and malodorous. The skin can also be very pruritic or itchy. Dry and brittle coats or shorter, puppy-like coats may also be observed with hypothyroidism.

Virtually every organ in the body is affected when thyroid hormone is low. 2. What is canine hypothyroidism? It is the natural deficiency of thyroid hormone. Hypothyroidism is the most common hormone imbalance of dogs. It is frequently misunderstood, misdiagnosed, and mistreated. The term hypothyroidism should be reserved for the end stages of thyroid disease when the dog’s thyroid gland is no longer capable of producing sufficient hormones to sustain clinical health. 3. What causes hypothyroidism? Ninety-six percent (95%) of hypothyroidism 22

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NGWPR Long-term Foster Dog “Hope” prior to treatment.

F E AT U R E A RT I C L E Other conditions suspected to be associated with hypothyroidism include megaesophagus (digestive tract problems),laryngeal paralysis (difficulty breathing), and new or unexplained aggressive behavior. Aberrant behavior associated with thyroid dysfunction includes unprovoked aggression towards other animals and/or people, seizure disorders, erratic temperament, fearfulness, and phobias. Hope after one month’s treatment. Hypothyroid dogs are often obese or have a difficult time losing weight. They can be lethargic, or appear “mentally dull,” lacking desire to work or play.Some hypothyroid dogs don’t show obvious skin or behavior changes. Non-regenerative anemia and high cholesterol levels may raise suspicion of thyroid disease. Elevated cholesterol( found in 65-80% of hypothyroid dogs) and circulating fats can lead to changes in the eye. Corneal dystrophy is an abnormality of the clear covering of the eye. It can appear as a small white spot or circle on the eye’s surface. Severe forms can lead to painful ulceration.

Corneal Dystrophy can lead to painful ulceration.

Current evidence supports a significant relationship between thyroid dysfunction and dog-to-human aggression. If hypothyroidism is recognized and treated appropriately, outcome follow-ups show significant behavioral improvement. Contrary to popular belief, evidence-based medicine has shown hypothyroidism has very little effect on canine reproduction. 5. What does testing for hypothyroidism involve? Testing for thyroid disease isn’t simple or perfect. True hypothyroidism is a multisystemic disorder and all suspected cases require a general medical workup including a CBC, health profile, and urinalysis. Appropriate thyroid evaluation requires more than just a total measure of T4 (circulating thyroid hormone).Testing for hypothyroidism must include checking for autoantibodies. Measuring autoantibodies is the best available way to diagnose hereditary hypothyroidism. Detection of positive thyroid autoantibodies early in the course of the disease serves to identify dogs at increased risk of becoming hypothyroid in the future. Autoantibodies indicate autoimmune thyroiditis. For months to years antibodies attack and gradually destroy normal thyroid tissue.

Without adequate thyroid hormone, nerves do not conduct electrical impulses normally. Neurological signs such as general weakness, listlessness, poor coordination, seizures, or even unexplained, non-painful lameness can suggest hypothyroidism. Focal nerve problems associated with hypothyroidism include facial paralysis appearing as a droopy eye or lip, and vestibular disease presenting with a head tilt, bizarre eye motion and balance disruption.

Autoantibodies are an indication of immunemediated thyroid disease NOT a measure of thyroid function. Some dogs with autoantibodies never become hypothyroid. There has been controversy in recent years concerning the possible contribution routine vaccination might make to the origin of thyroiditis in dogs. Lowgrade false positive results can occur if a dog has been vaccinated recently, especially with rabies vaccine.

Hypothyroidism can affect the heart causing bradycardia (slow rate) or an abnormal rhythm.

Discordant test results are common when interpreting a thyroid panel. They may reflect intermediate stages of thyroid disease. Metabolic, infectious, endocrinologic, and ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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F E AT U R E A RT I C L E cancerous illnesses can all cause low thyroid hormone values. Dogs on seizure medications, (phenobarbital or potassium bromide), prednisone or other corticosteroids, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs used for injury or arthritis pain, separation anxiety medication like clomipramine, or sulfonamide antibiotics can all have abnormally low total T4. It is best to measure T3, T4, TSH, autoantibody levels, and consider clinical signs and clinicopathologic abnormalities prior to deciding whether to treat a dog for hypothyroidism. 6. What does the OFA thyroid profile show? Importantly, the OFA profile measures autoantibodies to thyroid hormone proteins. This information allows us to diagnose hereditary autoimmune thyroiditis at an early stage. Actual T3 and T4 levels show whether or not a significant enough amount of thyroid tissue has been destroyed to require oral thyroid supplement. The serum free T4 is arguably the most accurate test of thyroid gland function and carries the highest priority of the thyroid hormone tests. It is least likely to be influenced by nonthyroid illness. TSH, if elevated, supports the diagnosis of hypothyroidism. 7. Why repeat a thyroid profile? Unfortunately, hypothyroidism seldom demonstrates obvious clinical signs before 3-5 years of age, so dogs are well into the showing and breeding years. Because of the variable onset of the presence of thyroid autoantibodies, periodic testing is necessary. Dogs that are normal at one year of age may test positive for autoantibodies at six years of age. The majority of affected dogs will have autoantibodies by four years of age. The OFA thyroid-registry database suggests annual testing for immune-mediated thyroid disease for the first 4 years. Any test showing significant levels of thyroid autoantibodies confirms a diagnosis of hereditary hypothyroidism. Dogs with autoantibodies, low T4, and high TSH have had thyroid destruction to the point of requiring treatment. Sometimes a thyroid profile is difficult to interpret and labeled “equivocal,” especially early in the course of immune-mediated thyroiditis. The interpretation of results from baseline thyroid profiles in intact females is more reliable when they are tested in anestrus. Health screening should be performed 12- 16 weeks AFTER the onset of the previous heat cycle. Thyroid profiles should be repeated annually to monitor dogs on thyroid medication.

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Indices of thyroiditis: a. Free T4 (FT4) – this procedure is considered to the “gold standard” for assessment of the thyroid’s production and cellular availability of thyroxine. FT4 concentration is expected to be deceased in dogs with thyroid dysfunction due to autoimmune thyroiditis. b. Canine Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (cTSH) – This procedure helps determine the site of the lesion in cases of hypothyroidism. In sutoimmune thyroiditis the lesion is at the level of the thyroid and the pituitary gland functions normally. The cTSH concentration is expected to be abnormally elevated in dogs with thyroid atrophy from autoimmune thyroiditis. c. Thyroglobulin Autoantibodies (TgAA) – This procedure is an indication of the presence of the autoimmune process in the dog’s thyroid. Certification a. Normal FT4 Within normal range Ctsh Within normal range TgAA Negative

b. Positive autoimmune thyroiditis FT4 Less than normal range cTSH Greater than normal range TgAA Positive

c. Positive compensative autoimmune thyroiditis FT4 Within normal range cTSH Greater than normal or equal to normal TgAA Positive

d. Idiopathically reduced thyroid function FR4D Less than normal range cTSH Greater than normal range TgAA Negative e. All other results are considered equivocal

8. Why repeat a thyroid profile? Unfortunately, hypothyroidism seldom demonstrates obvious clinical signs before 3-5 years of age, so dogs are well into the showing and breeding years. Because of the variable onset of the presence of thyroid autoantibodies, periodic testing is necessary. Dogs that are normal at one year of age may test positive for autoantibodies at six years of age. The majority of affected dogs will have autoantibodies by four years of age. The OFA thyroid-registry database suggests annual

F E AT U R E A RT I C L E testing for immune-mediated thyroid disease for the first 4 years. Any test showing significant levels of thyroid autoantibodies confirms a diagnosis of hereditary hypothyroidism. Dogs with autoantibodies, low T4, and high TSH have had thyroid destruction to the point of requiring treatment. Sometimes a thyroid profile is difficult to interpret and labeled “equivocal,” especially early in the course of immune-mediated thyroiditis. The interpretation of results from baseline thyroid profiles in intact females is more reliable when they are tested in anestrus. Health screening should be performed 12- 16 weeks AFTER the onset of the previous heat cycle. Thyroid profiles should be repeated annually to monitor dogs on thyroid medication. 9. How is hypothyroidism treated? Because of its wide safety margin and efficacy, the treatment of choice is T4 hormone known as levothyroxine. Synthetic thyroid hormone replacement will need to be administered lifelong. The typical starting dose is .02mg/kg or .1 mg per 10 pounds administered orally twice a day. This is a much higher dose than is necessary in man because the oral absorption of levothyroxine is lower in dogs. Administering synthetic thyroid hormone should result in normal serum concentrations of T3, T4, and TSH. Retesting a thyroid profile after 4-8 weeks of therapy confirms normal thyroid hormone levels have been achieved. A blood sample is drawn 3-7 hours after administering the levothyroxine. The thyroid medication may need to be adjusted based on retest results. In addition to providing thyroid supplementation for dogs showing typical signs of hypothyroidism, some veterinarians promote levothyroxine treatment in the early stages of autoimmune thyroiditis prior to T3 and T4 levels dropping below normal. Oral thyroid hormone may correct underlying thyroid imbalance, reduce the possible risk of developing other immune-mediated disorders, and hopefully control or prevent the thyroiditis from progressing to depletion and exhaustion of the thyroid gland.

Healthy and beautiful – no one would suspect this is a dog with thyroid disease.

10. What is the prognosis for hypothyroidism? The prognosis is excellent for return to normal function following adequate treatment in most hypothyroid dogs. With appropriate therapy, all the clinical signs and clinicopathologic abnormalities associated with hypothyroidism are reversible. The dog’s general sense of well being and activity level will improve within weeks, but improvement in skin and cardiac function may take months. 11. Why worry about canine hypothyroidism? Though typically not fatal, hypothyroidism means a subnormal life, especially left undiagnosed or untreated. Immune-mediated thyroiditis, accounting for approximately 95% of the cases of hypothyroidism, is inherited. Early detection and appropriate breeding can reduce the incidence of hypothyroidism in offspring. Any test showing significant levels of thyroid autoantibodies confirms the diagnosis of hereditary thyroid disease. Studies of the mode of inheritance in dogs are inconclusive to date. Like hip dysplasia, it is likely polygenic. Laboratory and pedigree analyses of affected families show a progressive earlier age of onset of thyroiditis or clinical signs of thyroid dysfunction, along with an increased proportion of affected versus normal offspring in successive litters.

Knowing the status of a dog AND the status of the dog’s lineage allows breeders to determine which breedings are most appropriate for reducing the incidence of autoimmune thyroiditis in the offspring.

Breeding normal testing dogs that have come from litters which have mostly tested normal is recommended. Robin K Nelson is a veterinarian currently practicing in Omaha, NE. She has owned a GWP or two since 1980. In early 2000, Dr. Nelson read the article “Canine Hypothyroidism: Prevalence of Postive TgAA in Laboratory Samples from German Wirehaired Pointers” featured in a veterinary journal. Finding it interesting, she decided to run a thyroid profile on her seemingly normal GWP. Her dog’s thyroglobulin autoantibodies were six times what they should be, providing evidence of ongoing thyroiditis. Dr. Nelson tested and medicated her GWP for 10 years gaining first-hand experience in managing hypothyroidism in German Wirehaired Pointers.Today, Dr. Nelson continues to be very interested as advances in genetics make it possible to better understand and hopefully prevent autoimmune thyroiditis. ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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ENDOCRINE RESULTS

NORMAL Procedure Free T4 2S (OFA)

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (OFA) Thyroglobulin Autoantibody (OFA)* Total Thyroxine (T4) OFA Total Triiodothyronine (T3) OFA Free T3 (OFA) T4 Autoantibody (OFA) T3 Autoantibody (OFA) OFA CLASSIFICATION = NORMAL

Ref Range (8-26)

10

9 0 30 1.5 4.0 L 19 2

(0-37)

Units pmol/L

(15-67) (1.0-2.5) (4.5-12.0) (0-20) (0-10)

mU/L % nmol/L nmol/L pmol/L % %

Ref Range

Units

16 12 17

(8-26) (0-37)

pmol/L mU/L %

39 .4 L 8.4 11 16 H

(15-67) (1.0-2.5) (4.5-12.0) (0-20) (0-10)

nmol/L nmol/L pmol/L % %

EQUIVOCAL Procedure Free T4 2S (OFA) Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (OFA) Thyroglobulin Autoantibody (OFA)* Total Thyroxine (T4) OFA Total Triiodothyronine (T3) OFA Free T3 (OFA) T4 Autoantibody (OFA) T3 Autoantibody (OFA) OFA CLASSIFICATION = EQUIVOCAL

AUTOIMMUNE THYROIDITIS Procedure Free T4 2S (OFA) Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (OFA) Thyroglobulin Autoantibody (OFA) *

8 >144 H 222

Ref Range

Units

(8-26) (0-37)

pmol/L mU/L %

Total Thyroxine (T4) OFA 14 L (15-67) Total Triidothyronine (T3) OFA .2 L (1.0-2.5) Free T3 (OFA) 4.5 (4.5-12.0) T4 Autoantibody (OFA) 11 (0-20) T3 Autoantibody (OFA) 41 H (0-10) OFA CLASSIFICATION = POSITIVE COMPENSATIVE AUTOIMMUNE THYROIDITIS

*Thyroglobulin Autoantibody (OFA): <10 % Negative 10-25% Inconclusive >25% Positive L = Low Result; H = High Result

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nmol/L nmol/L pmol/L % %

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AGILITY

2013 AGILITY STANDINGS

2013 Agility Standings

These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – June 30, 2013 as reported on Dog Scores website (www.dogshowscores.com) – compiled by Lori Sargent. Each dog’s score is added to the number of seconds under time for that run and tallied for the year. The highest 3 scores are summed to determine total points. Ties will be broken using highest average score. NOVICE 1. CH Heywire’s Justa Casual Look BN JH NA NAJ – L. Friess/J. Jacobs 2. CH Reece Afterhours Pretty is as Pretty Does RN JH – M&A Johnson/C. Whitmore NOVICE FAST 1. GCH Aimn Hi Jet Set’s Dancing With the Stars AX AXJ NF CA – L. Reeves/A. Merfeld 2. CH Paradox SGR Lady Madonna MH OA OAJ – P. Lunde OPEN 1. CH Heywire’s Justa Casual Look BN JH NA NAJ – L. Friess/J. Jacobs 2. Newman OA OAJ – E&W Drifka 3. Afterhour’s Joie DeVivre NA AXJ NF – D. Philibert/M. Rosenblatt/C. Chism 4. Afterhours Edged Weapon TD OA OAJ – D. Cutter OPEN FAST 1. GCH Aimn Hi Jet Set’s Dancing With the Stars AX AXJ NF CA – L. Reeves/A. Merfeld 2. MACH Jed’s SF Blue Belle UDX OM1 RE SH MX MXB MXJ MJB NF – M&K Braddock EXCELLENT 1. Afterhour’s Joie DeVivre NA AXJ NF – D. Philibert/M. Rosenblatt/C. Chism 2. GCH Aimn Hi Jet Set’s Dancing With the Stars AX AXJ NF CA – L. Reeves/A. Merfeld 3. Afterhours Edged Weapon TD OA OAJ – D. Cutter 4. Afterhours Memphis Red Hot Lover BN RE OA AXJ OF – S. McKeever/J. Quattroch 5. Rosie Rocket AX OAJ NF – M. Richard EXCELLENT FAST 1. Afterhours Memphis Red Hot Lover BN RE OA AXJ OF – S. McKeever/J. Quattroch EXCELLENT FAST PREFERRED 1. CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXB MXJ MJB MXP3 MXPB MJP XF XFP T2BP – S. Jackson MASTER PREFERRED 1. CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXB MXJ MJB MXP3 MXPB MJP XF XFP T2BP – S. Jackson MASTER 1. MACH2 Vom Grafenauer’s Free Spirit VCD1 RA JH MXG MJC XF – A. Trotter 2. CH MACH Scotian Whiskey River MXS MJS – C. Eberhardt/L. Reeves 3. Afterhour’s Frosted Mocha MX MXS MXJ MJS MXF MFB – D&M Rosenblatt 4. MACH Jed’s SF Blue Belle UDX OM1 RE SH MX MXB MXJ MJB NF – M&K Braddock 5. CH Cynister’s Jumpin’ Jack Splash RN MX MXB MXJ MJB CGC – D&A Anderson 6. GCH Aimn Hi Jet Set’s Dancing With the Stars AX AXJ NF CA – L. Reeves/A. Merfeld 7. Jed’s Easy Street JH AX AXJ – E&B Tucker 8. Rosie Rocket AX OAJ NF – M. Richard FAST MASTER PREFERRED 1. CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXB MXJ MJB MXP3 MXPB MJP XF XFP T2BP – S. Jackson

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337 190 188 71 123 115 108 105 191 70 304 194 114 109 105 74 220 347 381 368 367 358 347 333 307 124 220

CHIC

Meet the latest chics! By Robin Nelson, Canine Health Chairperson

AFTERHOURS THORNWOOD DIRTY LITTLE SECRET #88798

WEIDENHUGEL JETTA V TREFF #90475

INVERNESS WHISKEY LULLABY #90245

DUAL SHOT’S FLYING HIGH #90588

CHIC REQUIREMENTS Hip Dysplasia - OFA Evaluation (min 24 months) OR PennHIP Evaluation (min 12 months) Elbow Dysplasia - OFA Evaluation (min 24 months) Autoimmune thyroiditis - OFA Evaluation from an approved laboratory- Minimum of 2 years of age, prior to breeding, and yearly thereafter until 4 years of age Eye Examination by a boarded ACVO Ophthalmologist- any age, yearly if in a breeding program - Results registered with OFA or CERF Congenital Cardiac Database - OFA Evaluation with exam by cardiologist (min 12 months) von Willebrand’s Disease (Optional) - OFA Evaluation from VetGen or Clear by Parentage ** In addition to the breed specific requirements listed, a CHIC requirement across all participating breeds is that the dog must be permanently identified via microchip or tattoo in order to qualify for a CHIC number.

www.caninehealthinfo.org ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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NEW BEGINNINGS

Utah Stray Warms the Hearts of a Pennsylvania Couple Cross-Country Trip Brings Coco Home By Debra Galan-Parsons Photos by Pam Strathmeyer

“There is just something special about Coco” – G. Messersmith When Gail and Jack Messersmith considered adding a new dog to their York, Pennsylvania home, a stray German Wirehaired Pointer in Salt Lake City, Utah was the farthest thing on their minds. The Messersmith’s, are long-time Standard Poodle owners and had always been two-dog family. So with only one dog in the household – their young poodle, Bentley – they began to search. They were hopeful that they would be able to give a Standard Poodle in the rescue system a home. As the search for another dog progressed and none of the available poodles would fit into their lifestyle, Jack and Gail became frustrated. Finally, the couple had to consider other breeds and among the breeds that were discussed was the German Wirehaired Pointer. They were already familiar with the breed, as long time friends, Jack and Pam Strathmeyer have always had Wires, and their most recent addition Pfeffer was an NGWPR rescue. Gail admits that it was both the Strathmeyer’s and their dogs that convinced her to adopt a GWP. Meanwhile far to the west, in Utah, Coco, then dubbed as Coral, had been picked up by local authorities and was at one of the Salt City animal control facilities. The volunteers from Utah’s Perfect Pointers pulled Coral from the shelter that is well-known for the numbers of dogs that must be euthanized. Coral was entered into the UPP program but days passed and no one expressed interest in the young Wire. 30

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NEW BEGINNINGS

So as arrangements were being made for the NGWPR transport driven by Jack McIlwany to go east, the two rescue programs decided that Coral would have a better chance of finding a home in the east. Long-time foster and GWPCA Eastern Director, Garnett Persinger, agreed to care for Coral . It wasn’t long until Coral and several other GWPs were speeding along I-80 headed east with Jack. Meanwhile, word spread about the dog that had made her way to Erie, Pennsylvania, and the Messersmith’s soon found themselves taking the five-hour drive to the Shoalwater Kennel to meet Coral and hopefully return with a new dog. Return with a dog is just what they did. According to Gail, a special bond between Gail and Coral began to build on the trip home. By the time Jack and Gail arrived home with Coral, they were attached to the rather confused liverroan . It was a good thing, that the bond had been quickly formed, as there were going to be some bumps in the road ahead! One of the first things that the Messersmith’s did was to change Coral’s name to Coco. She did not know “Coral” anyway as it had been assigned by the shelter in Utah. But amazingly, almost instantly she responded to “Coco.” When Coco was introduced to Bentley, things were less – than-perfect to say-theleast. Fearing the worst as the dogs roared at each other, Gail immediately called Jack Strathmeryer to come help. Within an hour and thanks to Jack Strathmeyer’s prompting of “let them work it out” the two dogs were off and running. A year and a half later, the dogs remain the best of friends. They certainly did work it out! As we discussed Coco’s progress and setbacks, Gail explained to me that where they reside, walks are mandatory, and Coco has come so far – from a dog that may have never been on a leash, to one who now walks daily through her neighborhood. Coco also had very little idea of how to play with toys or interact with

Walks are mandatory-- Coco has come so far. other dogs. Today, she interacts with Bentley, playing tug games and ball, something Gail feels Coco was not even aware of before she arrived at the Messersmiths. Although still a work in progress, Coco has come a long way. Gail continues to be amazed with the relationship that she and Coco have developed, stating, “All of the dogs that I have had over the years were loving and loyal. But there is just something special about Coco. I could not ask for a more loving pet and companion. And I am so glad that we gave a GWP a try – there is truly something special about the breed.” Gail urges anyone considering taking on a GWP rescue to do so,” although it takes total devotion and hard work. You won’t be sorry,” she says, “because the loving rewards you receive make up for it!” Thank you Gail, Jack, and Bentley for welcoming Coco into your home and sharing the love for our special breed!

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F E AT U R E A RT I C L E

A Handler’s Job is to Help Dogs Need Consistency in Training and in the Field By Leo Boman

You’ve been working hard all summer or winter long to train, condition, and prepare your hunting companion for the upcoming season. Your dog is ready to perform, so it’s now your time to help him/ her be more successful afield. Team Work Whether it be hunting, testing, or trialing; it’s the bond between dog and handler that brings about great memories and full game bags. It’s a pleasure to watch a handler and dog work well together. Unfortunately it’s not as easy to watch a dog/ handler team struggle. To build teamwork you must also build trust. This trust is only achieved through fair and consistent training; clear communication and quality time spent working together.

always walk around your dog twice while doing a rain dance, or go through a sequence of baseball signals telling your dog to steal home; figure out what your routine is. Use that routine to your advantage to reinforce desired behaviors like steadiness on game or walking correctly at heel. Your routine can be as simple as momentarily stopping to close your gun, or taking your sunglasses off when your dog is on its way back from a retrieve.

In your training, be consistent with your commands. This replication not only builds a strong association for the dog, it also helps you remember what command to give during crunch time. I don’t know how many times I have seen a handler (myself included) give a wrong or inconsistent command, and the dog respond adversely. If your cue to retrieve is fetch, only say fetch (not OK, Dead Bird, Get It, etc). Also in training, you have intentionally or unintentionally reinforced a routine. Whether you 38

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If you are running a brace, keep an eye on both dogs.

F E AT U R E A RT I C L E You’re A Handler Not A Spectator All too often a handler will get caught up in the moment and become another member of the gallery. Take a good look at the situation, and most importantly pay attention to your dog. If you are running with a brace-mate, keep an eye on both dogs. I have always been one to believe, that little good can come of two unfamiliar dogs in a field together. With multiple dogs on the ground, it’s usually a good idea to give each other some space to work. This will help keep the dogs out of trouble and give you, as a handler, some time to react in an emergency situation. I also often hear, “I thought I wasn’t supposed to talk to my dog.” If that was the case, you might as well have turned your dog loose and stayed back at camp. You don’t have to keep your hands in your pockets, kick rocks, and watch your dog go up in smoke. Help your dog find and pin birds more consistently by keeping the wind in its face. Keep your dog from wandering into those tempting thickest that hold the previous day’s coveys. You can also bring your dog in from the side so it can get a good view to stick that honor. All the little things will help position your dog to be successful more often. There are also a couple other types of handlers I like to refer to as “Thomas the Tank Engines,” and “Horror Film” handlers. The first is the person that you wish would swallow their whistle after five minutes in the field. Repetitively blowing on that whistle can have a major affect a dog’s performance. If you are tired of listening to or blowing on that whistle, just think of what’s going through the dog’s head. There is also the hard core hacker. This is the type of person that makes you want to jump out of your skin every time he or she speaks or yells. Constantly hacking a dog can kill its desire to work, independence to get out and search, as well as willingness to cooperate. On The Flush Your dog has worked hard to locate a bird, and is hopefully cooperative enough to stop and hold point. Your task is to get the bird in the air for a safe and clean shot. Far too often I’ve watched people creep in on birds like Elmer Fudd hunting rabbits. Walk in with confidence, at an angle so that your dog can see you, and make a strong effort to flush.

Trust your dog , cue on his body language and follow his nose. and body and let his/ her nose be your guide. Slow flushing can build unnecessary stress and excitement in young dogs and entice them to creep or break. On the contrary there are also those handlers that take little caution in how or where they are flush which can send a rising bird into waiting jaws, or create an extremely difficult shot and retrieve. Another trend among new and experienced handlers alike is making a poor attempt at flushing, then turning around and quickly relocating their dog into a bad situation. The old adage “trust your dog” has transcended generations. If your dog has gotten a good enough whiff of scent to lock up tighter then Fort Knox, you can at least make a valiant effort to check out the surroundings. Start close, and work your way out quickly scanning clumps, holes, and bushes. While you’re looking around, don’t forget to check the wind direction, and possibly those low hanging branches. You and your dog have trained for months and the two of you have formed a great bond. So when you are in the field or competing, remember to take every opportunity to support your canine partner. Help your dog excel at his job by limiting your handling errors and enhancing each opportunity that the two of you are afforded. Leo Boman lives in NE and has owned and trained Drahthaars/GWPs for over 20 years and breeds under the Black Star prefix.

There is no need to do the prairie shuffle, or kick around aimlessly killing grass. Cue on your dog’s eyes ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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THERAPY DOG

The Transition By Ann Duffin It has been interesting, introducing Fly to the Therapy Dog routine. She has done beautifully and loves her new job. The staff at the hospital dreaded Becky’s retirement and had concerns about working with a new dog. Now they love Fly as much as they loved Becky. I think Fly is also going to enjoy having the students read to her at the school once classes start. The hardest part is leaving Becky at home. In the elevator yesterday, a hospital employee (whom I do not know) made the comment, ”Oh, this is Becky’s replacement!” It took me by surprise but in a pleasant way. And Fly just wiggles and grins—she does what we call a squint and grin and it always brings a smile to anyone who meets her. Recently at the hospital we had a totally new experience. We visit the cancer area and the waiting rooms. Then we go to our assigned floor to visit patients. Usually we will slowly walk by a room and see if anyone in the room shows interest in a visit from us. In one room, a young lady saw us and asked us in. As we came into the room, we saw an older woman bent over and talking softly to a man sitting in a chair. When she saw her daughter pointing to Fly, she said to her husband, “Honey, you have a special visitor.” He said “I can’t see her.” (I got the feeling that he recently had lost his eye-sight.) His wife said, “It’s a dog!” He couldn’t believe it, and started to cry. Fly put her head into his lap so he could pet her and he just kept petting and sobbing. Soon his wife and daughter were crying and I had to blink back my tears. I don’t know when Fly’s presence has meant more to anyone. As we left the room, we heard a “code blue in pediatrics” announced - that means a life and death situation . It was a reminder that life is so precious. Until Next Time, Ann and Fly

Doggedly By Jerry Allen Courtesy of the Ruffed Grouse Society Watching my German wirehair work foot scent of a pheasant yesterday, I realized where the term doggedly comes from. She doesn’t quit. The pheasant ran inside thick brushy undercover beneath stunted twenty-foot oaks, traveling fast. Chara pushed under or jumped over tangles with almost every step. My legs ached trying to follow and the oaks clawed at my clothes. We were hunting in a wildlife management area where hunters earlier chased all the pheasants out of the fields and into surrounding woods. The land is lumpy, not real hills but rather rolling crevasses, some twenty feet deep. Repeatedly Chara pointed and I did my best to rush ahead, only to find no bird. Then she would take off again, nose to the ground, trying to sort out the scent. Twice I caught glimpses of the bird before it disappeared into the brush, encouragement enough to keep me chugging on. We came to an open tote road and Chara locked up solid about thirty feet from its edge. My spirits soared, thinking we might have the pheasant cornered. I dashed ahead to the road and pushed back into the mess toward the dog, hoping for a flush. Thirty feet to my left I spotted the pheasant, crouched low and long like a torpedo, dashing up the hill and then disappearing over the crest. I called Chara to heel and we left for the truck, already twenty minutes past when I promised myself we would leave for an appointment. Chara came along, but with protest in her eyes. Jerry Allen is a writer, artist and craftsman who lives in MA and enjoys his GWPs. 40

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NGWPR MICROCHIP PROGRAM “Your Puppy’s Ticket Home” Microchips provide constant identification for your pet. Animal Control Facilities, Shelters, and Vet Offices scan each lost animal. A microchip provides a name, phone number & address so that the owner/breeder can immediately be contacted. NGWPR MICROCHIPS CAN BE PURCHASED FOR $18 PER CHIP! NGWPR CHIPS INCLUDE LIFETIME REGISTERATION WITH NO ANNUAL FEE! THE $18 FEE INCLUDES SHIPPING! NGWPR KEEPS A LOG OF EACH LITTER MICROCHIPPED – AN ADDED PROTECTION! NGWPR recommends that you microchip your litters. Microchipping each puppy in your litter provides peace of mind. You know that none of your pups will ever end up in a shelter and euthanized because you didn't know the pup was there. Each chip comes in a sterile package with its own syringe & needle. It’s simple, easy & does not require a vet to insert the chip. Breeders can be listed as the primary or secondary contact without any liability. (The AKC Legal Department designed the CAR program to provide liability protection to breeders who microchip their puppies)

More and more competitive & health testing programs are requiring DNA & Microchips to identify each dog.

For more info on this program, please contact Diane Turner at dturner596@aol.com or 520-490-2601. PLEASE CONSIDER MICROCHIPPING ALL OF YOUR PUPPIES BEFORE THEY LEAVE YOU!

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A Discussion of Breed Type By Pat Laurans and Judy Cheshire Reprinted from Wire-News Fall 2006

What is “breed type”?

it is often called the “essence of the breed.” Philosophically, ‘essence’ is the attribute or set of attributes that make an object what it fundamentally is – the necessary properties that it cannot exist without. Initially, this may be a difficult concept. But once it’s understood, it will stay with you forever. “Type” is something that you can identify instantly and paints a complete, technicolor picture in your mind. Using one sentence, one could say the GWP is a rough-coated, medium-sized, athletic hunting dog with a determined, sometimes demanding, nature. There is certainly a lot left out – no description of head shape, proportion of the body or color; no size parameters, tail set or length, top-line or gait. But it does give an impression. That is how we begin to set type. The German Wirehaired Pointer is a performance breed – it is first and foremost a versatile hunting dog – and it’s major attributes have to do with performing its function. But those attributes must also distinguish him from other versatile hunting breeds. For the purpose of a discussion on “breed type,” we can divide the elements of breed type into three major categories: Coat, Athleticism and Character. The narrative of our standard helps to further define these elements. The General Appearance section of our standard begins to set the stage in our minds – “ The German Wirehaired Pointer is a well muscled, medium sized dog of distinctive appearance. Balanced in size and sturdily built, the breed’s most distinguishing characteristics are its weather-resistant, wire-like coat and its facial furnishings. Typically pointer in character and style, the German Wirehaired Pointer is an intelligent, energetic and determined hunter. “ Our standard states, “A dog must have a correct coat to be of correct type.” It is a double coat consisting of an undercoat that may vary with the season but must always be present, and a distinctive outer coat that is straight, harsh, wiry and flat lying, approximately one to two inches in length. The standard also talks about the coat being weather resistant and somewhat water repellent. The outer coat is long enough to

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F E AT U R E A RT I C L E protect against the punishment of rough cover, but no be so long as to hide the outline of the dog. This implies a natural coat that is not long enough to “sculpt” the outline of the dog underneath it. The coat on the skull is naturally short and close fitting. Furnishing on the dog’s face, legs and chest are distinguishing factors of the bred and should be functional. Furnishing should provide protection from thorns, seeds and other debris but should not be excessive. Long, soft furnishings will conversely be detrimental because they attract and hold dirt, burrs irritating grasses and seeds. A truly correct, natural coat needs only minimal trimming and should never be scissored or clipped. The coat of the GWP is different in nature from that of an Airedale, Welsh or Lakeland Terrier. It should not require the kind of stripping that is necessary in those breeds. Coats may be neatly groomed to present a dog natural in appearance. Excessive grooming to present a dog artificial in appearance should be severely penalized. Our standard also addresses the color and color patterns of coat and specifies that the head is liver, sometimes with a white blaze and the ears are liver. A GWP of correct breed type will have a coat with harsh wiry texture, will not be overdone or excessively groomed and will have a basically liver head.

Proportion and movement must be balanced and harmonious. All the pieces must fit together in a flowing outline that is cohesive. From the tip of the nose to the end of the tail, the outline must fit together and create one piece that is pleasing to the eye. The dog must be athletic enough to run in open spaces, turn and weave through heavy cover and endure whatever conditions are thrown their way. The head has parallel planes and is placed on a graceful neck with a natural arch that is long enough to reach and retrieve game. The neck flows into a strong back that is short and straight. The tail is set on as a continuation of the back and is carried at or above the horizontal when the dog is alert and moving. There is a perceptible slope from the withers to croup.

Movement is free-flowing and groundcovering, while the top-line remains firm on the move. The underline of the body GWPs are triathlon athletes of sorts. As displays a deep chest and an apparent tuckversatile hunting dogs, they have to be able up. Reach and drive are paramount. Correct to run and swim . . . they may not be able to angulation is important so that the dog can cycle, but they have a third venue that is more cover the maximum amount of ground with a a “catch-all” and includes retrieving, tracking minimum amount of effort. Economy of gait and dispatching small furry creatures. The is preeminent for any working dog. While outline of the dog, both standing still and balance is always desirable, balanced straight moving, must present a picture of graceful angles are incorrect. An athletic dog with both power. strength and graceful movement

continued on page 48

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GWPU

When, Where, How Much & How Date: Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 Location: Lancaster Events Center, Nebraska Room Fee: Payable at the door. $20 with reservation, Cash or Check made to GWPCA, includes both sessions $25 withOUT reservation, Cash or Check made to GWPCA,  includes both sessions To Reserve Space: Email Cindy Heiller, GWPU Coordinator at gwpdoc@sbcglobal.net

Session #1 Time: 3 p.m. Field Introduction Roundtable Speakers: Tracy Nelson, NAVHDA judge/professional trainer Steve Kreuser, Hunt Test judge, amateur trainer/handler Tom Maneely, AKC field rep and field trialer Moderator: Cindy Heiller Topics will include: * Starting your puppy in field training * The differences & similarities between Hunt tests, Field trials and NAVHDA tests * Early introduction to birds * Gun proofing * Q&A Session #2: Time: 4:30 p.m. How to Beat the Show Pros Speakers: Robert Perry & Laura Reeves, PHA Moderator: Cindy Heiller Topics will include: * The amateurs’ advantages * Interactive hands on trimming tips & handling tips * Training tips from the professionals (You are encouraged to bring a dog!!!! Lots of Q&A) For more information go to GWPCA.com 46

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F E AT U R E A RT I C L E continued from page 45

– a dog that has the ability to cover ground effortlessly, work his way through hedgerows, briars and brambles and adapt quickly to multiple environments – that is the picture that is being created. Character embodies attitude, temperament and confrontation of lifestyle. Yes, a dog has a lifestyle. Character is seen in a dog’s expression and carriage. Physical attributes enhance expression. A dark eye, with correct oval shape, gives a look of confidence and intelligence, rather than a very light, wideeyed look of surprise. Of course, young dogs may have a lighter eye. Eye color will darken with age, and a dark ring around the iris of a young dog will indicate that. However, a truly yellow eye is never desirable. A GWP should not have a “hard” look or a “keen” expression like that of a terrier. The look should be intelligent and eager to please. “. . . the German Wirehaired Pointer is an intelligent, energetic and determined hunter.” “Of sound, reliable temperament, the German Wirehaired Pointer is at times aloof but not unfriendly toward strangers; a loyal and affectionate companion who is eager to please and enthusiastic to learn.”

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A GWP should not be aggressive. It may stand its ground with other dogs and will probably not back down from a challenge. It should never show aggression towards people. A Wirehair does have a strong sense of personal space and may not appreciate a stranger encroaching on that space. But that should never excuse aggressive behavior. A GWP should always have a confident attitude. All these pieces contribute to type. “Type” is a look that shouts “German Wirehaired Pointer.” There are GWPs that are sound in movement and do not have breed type. These are merely generic dogs. There are dogs with very good type but are not necessarily sound. But they are definitely better than the generic dog. The goal is to strive for dogs that are both typey and sound and that have the intelligence and talent to excel in the field. That’s a pretty big bill to fill. But we are moving in the right direction and, as a breed, we can be proud that we are keeping it together. For such a small breed in numbers, we have an incredible amount of Dual Champions, Champion AFCs and Champion Master Hunters. We are fortunate to have so many dedicated breeders and owners who strive to excel with their Wirehairs. Continue to keep in mind that the welfare of the breed should be our most important goal.

WE REMEMBER

We Remember By Jim Isom

Recently we lost an icon of our breed. Dr. Genevieve Capstaff, 1916 - 2013, was ninety-six years young when she passed away. Genevieve was involved with the acceptance of our breed by the American Kennel Club in 1959 and owned one of the early dual champions, DC Haar Baron’s Hans, who was titled in 1964. She was one of the founders of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of Illinois and was a driving force since its inception. Though she continued her career as a college instructor until her early 80’s, Genevieve still found the time and energy to participate in club activities and serve as an officer. Over the years, Genevieve opened her home to many friends and fanciers for the International Kennel Club dog show which is held in Chicago. She was a kind and generous hostess and she will be missed by all of us.

2013 BIS/Group Competition

These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – June 30, 2013 as reported on the AKC website (www.akc.org). The number following each entry represents the number of BIS, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3, Group 4 (left to right) placements for the calendar year – compiled by Lori Sargent. 1. GCH Mt. View Ripsnorter Silvercharm (D) – C. Wisch/K. Wisch 2. GCH Mountain View National Acclaim (D) – N&P Paduch 3. GCH Heywire ‘N Highfields Hey Look Me Over (B) – P&L Kincaid/B. Brawn 4. GCH Harvest Meadow’s Truth Be Told (B) – L. Minnick/A. Resnick 5. CH Darnelle’s Makin’ the Shot (D) – J Herrera/D Pusateri/L Napoli 6. CH H&H Lookout Celtic Field of Vision (B) – J&M Boyd/J. Witt/E. Shupp 7. CH Hawk Haven’s Go Daddy’s Girl (B) – P&N Paduch 8. GCH Drakkar’s RLB Celtic Private Eye (D) – J&M Boyd/J. Wilkinson 9. Daybreak’s Jewel Thief at Enjoy’s (B) – D&J Winterbottom/D. Phillips

21,662 – 17/34/1/1/0 4,932 – 1/6/5/4/7 2,355 – 1/1/3/6/4 378 – 0/0/2/1/2 184 – 0/0/1/0/0 157 – 0/0/0/1/1 133 – 0/0/0/0/1 80 – 0/0/0/1/0 70 – 0/0/1/0/1

2013 Breed Point Competition

These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – June 30, 2013 as reported on the AKC website (www.akc.org). 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

GCH Mountain View National Acclaim (D) – N&P Paduch GCH Harvest Meadow’s Truth Be Told (B) – L. Minnick/A. Resnick GCH Mt. View Ripsnorter Silvercharm (D) – V. Malzoni GCH Heywire ‘N Highfields Hey Look Me Over (B) – P&L Kincaid/B. Brawn GCH Aimn Hi Jet Stream SH CGC (B) – K&L Gunnarson GCH Geronimo’s Goddess V Dazzle (B) – L. Myles/J. Steffes GCH Neudorf’s Cool Hand Luke Afterhours (D) – F. Newirth/C. Whitmore CH Lookout’s Point of View (B) – S. DeGraw/J. Witt GCH Cynister’s Time Turner CanDo JH (D) – C. Milachek/C. Magoon GCH Ebbtide Lookout Gambler JH (D) – A. Summerfield/G. Persinger/H. Huber/F. Funderburk 10. UDK Hershey’s Chocolate Delight (D) – L&T Uhrich ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

376 84 72 53 49 43 35 23 22 22 18 49

ust what we were looking for!

A litter competitive in the field and the show ring!

Sire: Ch Cynister’s Believe it or Not

Ch Idawire J Edgar “Hoover”

TCGWP Specialty (Fall 2012) Winners Dog GWPCEN Specialty (Fall 2012) Best of Winners Owned by Tom & Jodi Quesnell

Ch Idawire Jazz Singer “Jazz”

GWPCEN (Fall 2012) Winners Bitch Owned by Tom & Jodi Quesnell

Dam: Ch Piemonte Idawire Echo V Chisola

Ch Idawire Cynister Jagged Edge “Jake” Finished with 4 majors Puppy points; #4 GWPCA Junior Dog 2012 Owned by Cathie Magoon & Jodi Quesnell

Idawire Cynister Just Go With It “Jenny”

Puppy and Derby points--#5 GWPCA Junior Dog 2012 Owned by Cathie Magoon & Jodi Quesnell

These pups are all currently training to run in field trial Gun Dog stakes this fall! Jake, Jazz and Jenny are trained by Jim West & Rhonda Houkoos; Hoover was trained by Greg Dixon.

Idawire GWPs

Tom and Jodi Quesnell www.idawire.com Sheridan, Wyoming 50

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Cynister Wires

Cathie & Don Magoon www.cynisterwires.com Norco, CA

4 new champions in less than 3 months!

Ch Idawire King Ralph “Ralphie” (Ch Fogarty WindwalkersAce JH x Ch IdawireAmerican Pie) 1st Place—2012 GWPCA Nat’l Puppy Stake Bred & owned by Tom & Jodi Quesnell

Ch Ironwire Idawire Black Eyed Pea “Fergie” (NAFC/DC/GCh Ariel’sJustaGotta Go Now x Ch Piemonte Idawire QuietRiot) Finished with 4 Majors Bred by Jodi Quesnell & Adam Cunningham Owned by Tom & Jodi Quesnell

Ch Idawire Apple Pie Ala Mode “Icy” (Ch Fogarty WindwalkersAce JH x Ch Idawire American Pie) Puppy Points; #7 GWPCA Junior Dog 2012 Bred by Tom & Jodi Quesnell Owned by Bruce & Sue Mueller, St. Croix GWPs

Ch Cynister Idawire Cat’s Pajamas “Jami” (GCHMt. View Ripsnorter SilverCharm x Ch Cynister Idawire Shattered Image) Best Opposite Sex—GWPCANat’l Sweeps & Futurity 2012 Bred by Cathie Magoon & Jodi Quesnell Owned by Cathie Magoon & Jodi Quesnell

In addition to their new show championships, these youngsters are looking good in the field. Ralphie and Icy are both in training for broke dog field trial stakes. For information about upcoming litters, please visit our websites:

www.idawire.com

www.cynisterwires.com ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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F I E L D R E S U LT S

Top Ten Field Results January - June 2013 Top Ten Field Results January – June 2013

This field top- ten list was compiled by Lynn Sandor in memory of Guy Rezzardi. We trialers lost a very special person when Guy left us. His passion was trialing. He was there for us—always willing to help, always finding words & ways to encourage & support us. I miss you, my friend. Field Top Ten Rankings are based on dogs defeated. Please contact Lynn with any comments and/or corrections email: sandorcpa@comcast.net

Dog Name OPEN SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS)

Big Oaks Sweet Thing Tumalo Teddy NGDC FC Brillows Big Wild Western NFC NAFC FC AFC Tumalo Timberjack 5 FC High Power's Jolt To The System 6 CH Hh Vixens Late Arrival 7 DC Cascade Double Barrel

Owner

Dogs Number of Defeated Placements

138 115 102 98

8 5 3 6

66 59 48

2 5 4

43 39

3 3

37

2

1 FC AFC Tumalo Teddy 2 Snowy River's Tnt Timber Tick 3 DC Dual Shot's Behind Bars

69 56 54

5 4 5

4 5 6

51 38 37

6 4 5

37 31 31

4 3 3

12 12

1 1

1 2 3 4

V Grimslid, WI S & J Williams, OR R Haukoos, IA J & S Williams, OR

B Delaby, FL E Shupp, PA G Wickwire/S Satter/R Calkins, OR 8 DC Sure Shot's Sonora Gone Heywire P Ljungren, WA 9 FC Jay-Mar's How Do You Like Me P Hieber/N Litwin/C Hieber Now 10 Backwoods Buck Forty-Five G Dixon/ E Barrett-Dixon, WI In Open Senior Gun Dogs, a total of 25 GWPs placed 63 times, defeating 1,024 dogs. AMATEUR SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS)

6 8 8 10 10

S & J Williams, OR B Silcott/M Verdorn K & W Yamashita/K Hawkins, OR FC AFC Wingfield's High Cotton D & P Coller, IN CH Schnellbergs Freedom Reigns S Degraw, MI DC Cascade Double Barrel G Wickwire/S Satter/R Calkins, OR Big Oaks Sweet Thing V Grimslid, WI CH Rld Schnellbergs Criminal Intent S De Graw, MI NFC NAFC FC AFC Tumalo J & S Williams, OR Timberjack MACH Jed's Sf Blue Belle M & K Braddock, MI Wireswest First Dibs M Eden, OR In Amateur Senior Gun Dogs, a total of 16 GWPs placed 47 times, defeating 460 dogs.

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F I E L D R E S U LT S

JUNIOR DOGS (PUPPY/DERBY COMBINED) 1 Brillows W'West Justa Here Wego

B Brawn, FL

70

9

2

R & D Donohue/A Johnson/M Jensen P Ljungren/B Brawn/ S Kreuser S & E Kreuser/B Brawn J & W Johnston A Cunningham, CO B Brawn, FL C Griffith, OR R Haukoos, IA C Heiller/K Boyd/L Sandor/M Eden S & J Williams, OR

50

7

46 43 33 32 30 28 26 25

4 8 5 3 6 5 3 2

25

3

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Again Reece Woodwynd Daisy's Something To Talk About Sure Shot's It's A Jungle Out There Sure Shot's Justa Goin' Heywire Brillows Justa JjjDrifter Ironwire Barn Owls Sure Shot 'N Justa's I Be Leavin' Tumalo Griffith's Fire & Light Brillows Wildwest Justa Over Yonder Weidenhugel Kate V Gus

10 Tumalo Kyle

In Junior Dogs, a total of 36 GWPs placed 101 times, defeating 668 dogs.

THYROID CLINIC

2013 NATIONALS We are making arrangements to draw blood for OFA thyroid profiles on Sunday, October 6, 2013 after the GWPCEN Specialty and Sweepstakes. For those interested, this will be a great opportunity to complete a CHIC requirement or screen a dog for immune-mediated thyroid disease. We will overnight our samples to Michigan State University on Monday, October 7th. A minimum of 10 participants will be necessary to receive a discount. We hope to offer the test for $65-$75. All samples must be mailed in one “batch” with one payment. If you are interested in having your dog’s thyroid function checked, please contact Robin K Nelson at gwpoint@aol.com . We will need to confirm numbers and collect payment prior to arranging for the discounted price. Download and complete the Application for Thyroid Database with your dog’s registered name, number, date of birth, microchip #, etc. You will need your GWP, your partially completed Thyroid Database application, and a second check for $15 payable to OFA. Come to the designated Thyroid Clinic location at the Lancaster Event Center on Sunday. We will do the rest! The AKC DNA CLINIC will be held at the same time and place. DNA registration will be required for GWPS over 2 years of age for the Nationals 2014 field and conformation events. The AKC fee at National specialties is reduced to $30 rather than the regular $40. Please bring a copy of your AKC registration form and contact Ray Calkins at gwpcascade@gmail.com so we have the kits available and the correct information for your dog!!

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OBEDIENCE

Beginner Novice Meets Minimum Requirements for GWPCA Versatility Award By Kay Braddock, Obedience Columnist

Beginner Novice is a relatively new class offered by AKC. It is one of the optional titling classes along with Graduate Novice, Graduate Open and Versatility. The rules for these classes went in to effect July 1, 2010. These classes are considered “optional titling” classes because they are not required for the regular AKC obedience titles of Novice, Open or Utility. Upon earning 3 qualifying scores in Beginner Novice, a dog earns a BN following its name. There are two Beginner Novice classes--Beginner Novice A and Beginner Novice B. To be eligible for A, the handler must own the dog or be a member of the owner’s immediate family. They must not have handled a dog that has earned any previous AKC obedience title. In B, the owner or anyone else may handle the dog. Anyone that has ever earned an obedience title must enter B. There are 5 exercises in the Beginner Novice class.

Kay and Cash work a Beginner Novice Exercise. The GWPCA versatility committee recently recommended to the board s0me changes in the requirements for a GWPCA Versatility award. One of those changes is that the minimum requirement in the area of obedience is either a Beginner Novice title or a Rally Novice title. A Canine Good Citizen (CGC) will no longer be considered as the minimum requirement in the area of obedience. The reasoning was that both Beginner Novice and Rally Novice titles are judged by AKC licensed judges and require 3 qualifying scores. With this change in mind, I thought it would be useful to discuss the exercises and rules for Beginner Novice. 54

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1) Heel on Leash 40 points 2) Figure 8 40 points 3) Sit for Exam 40 points 4) Sit Stay 40 points 5) Recall 40 points Heel on Leash. The judge is looking for teamwork in this exercise. The only commands that the judge will give are “Forward” and “Exercise Finished”. Before the exercise begins, the judge will ask, “Are you ready?” If you have your dog’s attention and feel ready to begin, tell the judge “yes”. If you are not ready, do not hesitate to say “no”. Rather than the judge calling turns and halts, Rally signs are used. The following signs may be used--”Right Turn”, “Left Turn”, “About Turn”, “Slow”, “Normal”, “Fast” and “Halt/Sit”. You must show a noticeable change of pace for “Fast” and “Slow”. The only “Halt/Sit” sign will be at the end of

OBEDIENCE

the exercise. The handler enters the ring with the dog on a loose leash and stands with the dog sitting in heel position. You can hold the lead in either hand or both hands. Any tightening or jerking of the lead will be penalized while heeling. The handler should move briskly. A handler that is constantly jerking or tightening the lead will receive a non-qualifying score. Minor deductions are taken for the dog forging, lagging, heeling wide, crowding, poor sits, failure to sit at a halt and other imperfections. The handler is allowed a one time single phase of encouragement such as “Good boy.” Minor deductions are taken for additional commands. Figure 8. Again, the judge is looking for teamwork. The commands that the judge will give are, “Forward”, “Halt”, and “Exercise Finished”. The handler will stand midway between two ring stewards, facing the judge. The ring stewards stand about 8’ apart. The handler heels in a figure 8 pattern around the stewards. The handler can go in either direction. The handler will go around each steward twice. There will be halt after the first time around and again at the end. Scoring is the same as for the Heel on Leash exercise. Sit for Exam. In this exercise the dog must sit in position while examined by the judge. This exercise is performed on a 6’ lead. The judge will say, “Sit your dog and leave when ready.” The handler stands with the dog sitting in heel position. The handler commands the dog to stay and goes to the end of the 6’ lead and faces the dog. The judge approaches the dog from the front. The judge touches only the dog’s head. After the exam, the judge will say, “Back to your dog.” The handler walks around the dog and returns to heel position. The dog must remain sitting until the judge says, “Exercise finished”. A dog will receive a nonqualifying score if it lies down, stands up or moves from the position where it was left, growls or displays any resentment during the exam. Minor deductions are taken for leash tightening, Substantial deductions are taken for an extra command after the handler has left. Minor, substantial or even an NQ can be given for shyness. Sit Stay--Handler Walk Around the Ring. The handler stands (usually in the center of the ring) with the dog in heel position. The leash remains on the dog but is placed on the ground between the dog and the handler. When the judge says, “Sit your dog”, the handler sits their dog if they are not already sitting. The judge will say, “Leave your dog”. The handler will give the dog a command to stay and walk around

the inside perimeter of the ring. Upon completing a full perimeter, the handler will return to heel position by walking behind the dog. When the handler has returned, the judge will say, “Exercise finished.” Substantial deductions are made for a dog that has any movement from the spot where it is left. Also deductions are made for whining or barking. Moving a substantial distance results in an NQ. Recall. In this exercise, the dog must stay where it is left until the handler calls it. The handler stands with the dog sitting in heel position. On the order from the judge, the handler commands the dog to stay and walks forward about 25’. On the judge’s order, the handler commands the dog to come. The dog must come directly at a brisk pace and sit in front of the handler. No finish is required. The handler can give a one time phrase of encouragement when the dog is coming. A dog given an extra command to stay will receive an NQ. An extra command to come is given a deduction. In Summary. Beginner Novice was developed as a bridge between Rally and Novice obedience. There are no group stays or off leash heeling which most green dogs find difficult. My observation of common errors are handlers that have a continual tight leash or handlers that frequently correct their dogs by jerking on the leash. If you enter this class, be prepared to heel on a loose leash. Practice entering a ring. Make sure that you have your dogs attention when you go through those gates. Allow a quick look around the ring by your dog, and then focus their attention back on you. If the judge asks, “Are you ready” and your dog is yawning, scratching or sniffing the floor, tell the judge “no” and try to get your dog’s attention before beginning. Beginner Novice handlers are allowed a walk-through without the dog. It gives the handler an opportunity to learn the heeling pattern. Be prepared to leave your dog with someone or have a crate where you can leave your dog while you do the walk-through. Handlers can enter both Beginner Novice and Novice at the same trial. You can not get a High In Trial from Beginner Novice or any other optional titling class. The Sit/Stay Walk Around the Ring can be difficult for some dogs because the handler has to walk around behind the dog. Since dogs usually want to keep an eye on their handler, practice walking around behind your dog while it is in a sit-stay. Since this is the first experience in the ring for most dogs, relax, keep it fun and make it a positive experience. AKC has a video on YouTube demonstrating a Beginner Novice class. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8vG8izORnk

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OBEDIENCE

2013 Obedience Standings

These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – June 30, 2013 as reported on the Dog Show Scores website (www.dogshowscores.com) – compiled by Lori Sargent. The highest 3 scores are summed to determine total points. BEGINNING NOVICE 1. Reece Afterhours RKM Tempest Win One for the Gipper RN BN – A. Johnson/C Whitmore/K Marks/B DeLaby 2. CH Heywire’s Justa Casual Look JH NA NAJ BN – L. Friess/J. Jacobs 3. Rohan Vom Treborwolf – M. Rounds 4. CH Reece Afterhours N Dusty Steele N Thyme JH CA BN – J&A Cornell/A Johnson 5. Reece’s Razzle Dazzle RN – L&O Leal 6. Afterhours Gefhartes Anticipation RN – C&R Fangman/N. Suggs 7. GP’s Lost Shaker of Salt – D. Galan

579.5 564.5 559.0 358.0 190.5 181.0

NOVICE 1. Afterhours Edged Weapon TD OA OAJ CD – D. Cutter 2. CH Heywire N Justa’s Look Who’s Talkin’ CD – S. Finkel 3. I Spy Mischief and No Good BN – D&S McNamara 4. CH Tumalo’s Gus RA – M. Brown 5. Cooper CD RN – C&B Gross 6. Andreas Vom Merkel CD – J. Fleming 7. Jerelin’s Nacote of Mill Pond BN RN JH CGC – S. Kerzner

591.5 578.0 380.5 363.0 360.0 188.5 184.5

OPEN 1. MACH Jed’s SF Blue Belle UDX OM1 RE SH MX MXB MJS NF T2B – M&K Braddock 2. CH Drakkar’s RLB He Caught My Eye CDX BN GN RE – D&B Leveque 3. OTCH Larkspur’s Glengarry Glen Gus VCD1 UDX2 OM3 JH – L. Swisher 4. Afterhours Edged Weapon TD OA OAJ CD – D. Cutter

584.5 578.5 197.0 193.0

UTILITY 1. MACH Jed’s SF Blue Belle UDX OM1 RE SH MX MXB MJS NF T2B – M&K Braddock 2.

582.0

577.0

2013 Rally Standings

These rankings are based on competition during the period January 1 – June 30, 2013 as reported on Dog Scores website (www.dogshowscores.com) – compiled by Lori Sargent. The highest 3 scores are summed to determine total points. NOVICE 1. Cooper RN CD – C&B Gross 2. CH Reece Wired to Win at Harvest Meadow’s Afterhours RN – L. Minnick/A. Johnson 3. CH Ripsnorterncladdagh Backfld N Motion JH RN – M. Howard/L. George 4. Reece’s Razzle Dazzle RN – L&O Leal 5. CH Surefire’s Secret Little Spot CD BN JH RN – J&A Payton 6. Reece Afterhours Jax’s Woodland Star RN – L&M Patterson 7. GCH CH Cynister’s Time Turner CanDo JH – C. Milachek/C. Magoon 8. Afterhours Gefhartes Anticipation – C&R Fangman/N. Suggs 9. CH Reece Afterhours N Dusty Steele N Thyme BN JH CA – J&A Cornell/A. Johnson 10. CH Cynister’s Just in Time CanDo – C. Burk ADVANCED 1. CH Larkspur’s Intrepid V Erebus UD JH OAP OJP RAE – A. Kostishak/G. McCain 2. Jerelin’s Nacote of Mill Pond BN RA JH CGC – S. Kerzner 3. Willamette’s Sachi RN JH CGC – L&O Popescu/A. Wilson 4. Willamette’s Zorra RN JH CGC – L&O Poposcu 5. Reece Afterhour RKM Tempest Win One For the Gipper RN BN – Johnson/Whitmore/Marks/Delaby 6. Cooper RN CD – C&B Gross EXCELLENT 1. CH Larkspur’s Intrepid V Erebus UD JH OAP OJP RAE – A. Kostishak/G. McCain 58

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278 273 270 267 262 236 190 189 167 157 296 276 84 83 79 77 282

RESCUE

What’s Happening With Rescue

By Heidi Baumbarger, NGWPR National Coordinator

THE GOOD Adoptions are up! We have adopted out six dogs in the last month, including our 12-year-old TIP! We have a new Fund Raising Coordinator! Please welcome Deanna Donahue who takes the reins for the fund-raising activities. We are grateful to our past fund-raising coordinator Patti Roberts, who did an exceptional job each year and whose efforts helped keep the rescue checkbook in the black. MEET THE NEW NGWPR FUND-RAISING COORDINATOR Hello, I’m Deanna Donahue and I’m the new NGWPR Fund-Raising Coordinator. Recently a very special dog named Scruffy came into the lives of several GWPCA members who live in Florida. Junior member, Alexis Chism opened all of our eyes to the need for funds for these wonderful dogs that the National GWP Rescue helps. So after following the example set by a very caring little 11-year-old girl, I volunteered to take the lead on fundraising for this wonderful cause.  So, this year at the GWP Nationals NGWPR will be hosting several fundraising events. We will host the 1st Annual Duck Chuck (which will be a 50/50), raffle items and one very special Gift Basket that one lucky winner will take home. We are working on other special fund-raising items that will be announced in the next few weeks.  And don’t forget the highlight of the rescue fundraising activities will be the annual auction of the “Ugly Duck Print” which is traditionally the final event at the annual awards banquet. The old print has traveled the world and each year the highest bidder records his or her name and the amount of the winning bid on the back for posterity, then takes the print home for the year. It is a piece of GWPCA/NGWPR history and it’s yours for a year if you make the highest bid!

Anyone interested in contributing to the Gift basket and Raffle items please contact me at DoubledPicards@me.com.  Thanks in advance! Deanna Donohue, NGWPR Fund-Raising Coordinator NGWPR has saved several dogs from high kill shelters recently. Numerous people stepped up to help when things became urgent. Thanks to all of those who offered help. THE BAD We are still in need of help in the following areas:                   Foster homes – We still don’t have enough foster homes, especially in the south east      Website – I am currently managing the website, but I need help.   NEW WEBSITE Please visit our new website if you haven’t.  We have a lot of wonderful dogs available for adoption and it is fun to see all of the dogs that are ready for adoption – many of their stories will touch your heart. And it is rewarding to read the updates about those NGWPR dogs who are now settled in forever homes. There is now a PayPal donation button that makes supporting NGWPR easy ! MICROCHIPS FOR BREEDERS You can now order microchips for your litters from Diane Turner at dturner596@aol.com . Chips are the new universal chips by offered by the AKC CAR program. Each chip is self-contained with its own syringe and is ready for insertion. Chips offer lifetime registration for the initial $18 cost of the chip. You can now pay for microchips by using the NGWPR Pay Pal system. Simply go to  www. nationalgwprescue.com. Remember a microchip is your dog’s ticket home!

©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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RESCUE Meet Muppet our NGWPR Featured Dog for Autumn!

Scruffy - Our Newest Special-Needs Rescue Dog Many of you have been following Scruffy on Facebook. For those of you who haven’t, here is a little history on this sweet, but struggling guy. Scruffy, an approximately 18-month-old male German Wirehaired Pointer, was pulled from a high-kill shelter in Florida just in the nick of time. We knew he was heartworm positive, but felt he was worth saving, despite our dwindling funds. Everyone who has come in contact with Scruffy is amazed at his personality. He is very loving and is so grateful for the second chance he now has.

Muppet dock-diving on a recent outing with fosters Jeff and Peggy Matz. Muppet has been in rescue far too long and for some reason hasn’t generated a lot of interest.  She is a special girl and is quite young.  Jeff Matz, Muppet’s foster dad, has spent a good deal of time training Muppet and we feel she will be an excellent companion and possibly a great hunting dog.  According to Jeff, Muppet is a playful, but wellmannered girl, who would love to be loved.  Muppet likes to cuddle and play ball, but also shows high prey-drive and is not gun shy. With proper training she may make a very nice hunting companion. Muppet comes when called and heels off leash.  She does need a strong pack leader as she has been known to test authority and fancies her- self a bit of a watch dog.  Muppet would do best in a home without other dogs, as she can be a bit dominant, but may be okay with a submissive male, as long as her owner establishes pack leadership.   Muppet is very active and athletic and would most likely excel in a sport like agility or flyball.  Muppet has recently discovered dock diving and she may enjoy that sport. For more information about Muppet please contact Jeff Matz at jpmatz@yahoo.com or 651-2614924. 60

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Shortly after getting Scruffy out, he came down with a severe case of kennel cough, which turned into pneumonia. During his hospitalization for respiratory treatment, it was discovered that Scruffy’s heart was severely enlarged. The vet strongly recommended an ultrasound to discover the cause of the heart problem, as the vets felt the dog might have had a prior heart condition that would make it impossible for Scruffy to withstand the heartworm treatment. The cost of the ultrasound was $350, yet the rescue board felt it wise to do the procedure prior to assuming the cost of Scruffy’s heartworm treatment. A decision had to be made – Scruffy’s medical expenses were extreme and mounting by the moment. And the expense for Scruffy’s treatment was just one major medical crisis that NGWPR had faced during the spring and summer. For the first time since NGWPR’s inception, the board feared that the funds to treat Scruffy might not be available when the time came. And no one knew know how the program could guarantee that the funds would be there. Fortunately, 11-year-old Alexis Chism had started a serious fund-raising campaign on Facebook to get the necessary funds “to save Scruffy.” Alexis stepped up her pleas when she got the news about his enlarged heart. Suddenly donations started pouring in! The ultrasound was immediately ordered and thankfully results were positive. Scruffy’s heart did not show any other signs of heart disease. Reviewing the ultrasound, the vet made the determination that Scruffy could withstand the heartworm treatment.

RESCUE Scruffy’s health is improving daily. He has a long road ahead of him, but because of the generosity of all those who have donated, NGWPR will be able to continue to treat him. Thanks to everyone who has donated, but please keep the donations coming! We have many other dogs in need and Scruffy’s treatment isn’t over yet. If you are unable to donate, please contact us to find out other ways you can help. Every German Wirehaired Pointer deserves a chance for a happy life. Your donations and the help of all of our dedicated volunteers can make that possible. Scruffy with his 11-year-old heroine, Alexis Chism, and friends

National GWP Rescue Annual Meeting

The annual meeting for National German Wirehaired Pointer Rescue, Inc. will be held on Thursday, October 3rd in the lobby of the New Victorian Suite’s hotel at 7:30 pm. The rescue program Board of Directors invites all members of the GWPCA attending the National Specialty to attend. President Cindy Heiller, DVM will preside over the meeting and introduce the officers, directors, and regional coordinators who are present. At the meeting National Coordinator Heidi Baumbarger will recap the 2012-2013 rescue year and the fund-raising events at the National will be discussed. Heidi will present a list of needs for the upcoming year. _____________________________________________________________________________________ Please Plan to Attend – the Rescue Program belongs to each GWPCA member! _____________________________________________________________________________________ Rescue volunteers are hopeful that this year many of the GWPCA members will attend and participate. The Rescue Board of Directors is always mindful that the rescue program belongs to each GWPCA member and we look forward to any input about the program that our members offer.

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AGILITY

Travel Safety By: Ashlee Trotter, WireNews Agility Columnist

N

o matter what sport we engage in with our dogs, we all have the same challenge when it comes to traveling with our canines – how do we get any number of dogs traveling with us to the destination miles away safely and efficiently?

Statistics show that most car accidents happen close to home, so as much as the dogs enjoy riding loose in our cars and hanging their heads out of the windows, it is not safe for them to do so. By definition, you can’t predict when an accident will happen so even a quick trip for ice cream can end suddenly and badly. I had that experience in April 2005 when a teenager drove through a red light at twice the posted speed limit. My canine companion suffered neck and back injuries in the accident and we spent several long days working with the vets to find a treatment that worked for him. Things were so serious that I could only hope that I was doing the right by having him treated instead of euthanizing him. Though he did eventually recover the experience convinced me of the importance of properly restraining the dogs when traveling. Below I have listed some things to consider before you take to the road. 1. ID the dogs a. Each dog should be wearing an ID tag and be should be microchipped. Be certain that the microchip information is current. If you have moved or changed phone numbers be sure you have called and updated the contact information for the microchip. 2. Secure the dog in the vehicle. You need to ensure that if a window breaks or a door flies open in a crash that the dog is not able to flee and risk further being hit by on-coming traffic or fleeing the scene and getting lost. A secured dog is also not a threat to responding emergency personnel. Unfortunately, if a dog is scared/hurt and defending his people in the car from paramedics, responding police officers may have to take action to neutralize the threat by euthanizing the dog. 62

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AGILITY a. Dogs are safest in crates that are secured to the vehicle with cargo straps rated for more weight than that of the dog and the crate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; remember crash forces increase the amount of weight that the straps must bear. Bungee cords are not sufficient. b. If not in a crate, secure the dog in a seatbelt harness. There is not a harness that has passed high-speed crash testing yet, but most accidents are lower speed and something is better than nothing. 3. Readily available emergency information for your dog(s). a. Each of my crates also has a pencil pouch for a 3 ring binder attached to the crate containing emergency information. Included in the pouch is an information sheet that has profile pictures showing unique markings and a head shot of each dog. Other pertinent information is also included such as name, microchip, age, health issues, medications and vaccination status. I also include contact info for three people that can respond to take care of the dogs in the event of an emergency and with the information I have a signed release authorizing any of those individuals to make medical decisions for the dogs in the event I am unable to do so. 4. Placement of dogs within the vehicle a. Since I have only 2 GWPs that I transport I have the luxury of placing their crates in the middle of the van, I use the back hatch door for stowing equipment or gear. The placement of the dogs in the middle of the van provides some protection from rear end collisions. b. The crates are also accessible from more than one door and side of the vehicle and I carry bolt cutters that are accessible from the front and middle seats in case the crates need to be cut open. Fortunately I have never used them due to a traffic accident, but they were used once at an agility trial to free a dog whose paw had been caught in a wire crate. 5. Leashes are placed with each crate and extra leashes are also in the van at all times. Sample Crate Information Card

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NEW TITLES

AKC New Titles May– June 2013 Compiled by Lori Sargent CHAMPION CH Bailey’s Farm Windswept Zeke (D) SR63519106 (5/25/13) by CH Inverness Yankee Gunnar x CH Windswept’s Solar Flair SH; Breeder: Lori Sargent & Mark Sargent; Owner: Michael Bailey & Brenda Bailey CH Idawire Cynister Jagged Edge (D) SR71114803 (5/12/13) by CH Cynisters Belive It Or Not x CH Piemonte Idawire Echo V. Chisola; Breeder: Jodi Quesnell; Owner: Jodi Quesnell & Cathie Magoon CH Ironwire Idawire Black Eyed Pea (B) SR71728402 (5/24/13) by NAFC GCH DC AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now x CH Piemonte Idawire Quiet Riot; Breeder: Adam Cunningham & Jodi Quesnell; Owner: Jodi Quesnell CH Reece Afterhours N Dusty Steele N Thyme JH CA (D) SR72901402 (5/19/13) by GCH CH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH x CH Afterhours Once In A Lifetime JH; Breeder: Angie Johnson & Christi Chism & Mary-Lynn K Jensen Ph.D. & Michael R Johnson; Owner: Joni Cornell & Angie Johnson & Alexis Cornell CH Reece Woodwynd Daisy’s Something To Talk About (B) SR72901401 (5/19/13) by GCH CH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH x CH Afterhours Once In A Lifetime JH; Breeder: Angie Johnson & Christi Chism & Mary-Lynn K Jensen Ph.D. & Michael R Johnson; Owner: Richard Donohue & Mary-Lynn K Jensen Ph.D. & Angie Johnson & Deanna Donohue CH Tumalo’s Gus RA (D) SR62958403 (5/28/13) by Von Steuben’s One Ups Ya x NAFC DC AFC Cascade Tumalo Tess; Breeder: John Williams & Sandy Williams; Owner: Mary Ransom Brown CH Hh Lookout Field Marshal (D) SR69016406 (6/1/13) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Rlb’s Got Moxie At Drakkar MH; Breeder: Edwin Shupp & Joyce Wilkinson & James Witt; Owner: Cynthia Heiller D.V.M. & Edwin Shupp & Kathleen Boyd

CH Von Duffin’s The Mighty Quinn (D) SR50675102 (6/28/13) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Rudolph’s Blitzen Von Duffin x CH Von Duffin’s Double Ott; Breeder: Ann P Duffin & Terry J Duffin; Owner: Ann P Duffin & Terry J Duffin

FC Uodibar’s Freebee (B) SR62229506 (5/25/13) by Brillows Jackson Flyer x NFC FC Brillows Wild West Show; Breeder: Rhonda Haukoos; Owner: Claire Wisch & Kelly Wisch & Rhonda D Haukoos

CH Willamette’s “Mr. Bones” RN JH CGC (D) SR69115802 (6/29/13) by CH Caramel N Heywire’s Mocha Chip At Star K x CH Drakkar’s Rlb’s Secora CD RE JH CGC; Breeder: Lisa Popescu & Octavian Popescu; Owner: Lisa Popescu & Octavian Popescu

DC AFC Cascade Double Barrel (D) SR42688101 (6/15/13) by Cascade Ozernaya x Cascade Franki Lin; Breeder: Raymond L Calkins & Lynn M Calkins; Owner: Gary Wickwire & Raymond L Calkins & Sandra Wickwire

CH Wirewick Dalliance (B) SR74129501 (6/30/13) by CH Caramel N Heywire’s Mocha Chip At Star K x GCH CH Afterhours Trickeration JH; Breeder: Robert Wickes D.V.M. & Christi Chism & Christine Whitmore & Marion Hancock; Owner: Robert Wickes D.V.M.

I Spy Mischief And No Good CD BN (D) SR52537814 (5/25/13) by Shasta Otto Man x Heart River Naughty But Nice; Breeder: Michelle Pool; Owner: Dennis McNamara & Selma Mc Namara

GRAND CHAMPION GCH CH Windswept’s Anduril Flame O’ The West JH (D) SR63519104 (5/26/13) by CH Inverness Yankee Gunnar x CH Windswept’s Solar Flair SH; Breeder: Lori Sargent & Mark Sargent; Owner: Marten Compton & Lori Sargent GCH CH Surefire’s Thorny Little Secret JH (B) SR56797902 (6/8/13) by DC Nyramskov’s H. Hector x CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine RN JH; Breeder: Joan Payton & Andy Payton; Owner: Joan Payton & Andy Payton

FIELD CHAMPION

DC AFC Tumalo Teddy (D) SR62958410 (6/23/13) by Von Steuben’s One Ups Ya x NAFC DC AFC Cascade Tumalo Tess; Breeder: John Williams & Sandy Williams; Owner: John Williams & Sandy Williams

DC AFC Proulx’s Wireswest Big Jake (D) SR44876602 (5/4/13) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Von Duffin’s Lady Bug CDX MH; Breeder: Meg Eden; Owner: Carrie E Proulx & Joseph A Proulx II

©2013 GWPCA

Cooper CD RN (D) PAL257317 (6/8/13) Owner: Christine Gross & Brad Gross

BEGINNER NOVICE

DC Cascade Double Barrel (D) SR42688101 (5/25/13) by Cascade Ozernaya x Cascade Franki Lin; Breeder: Raymond L Calkins & Lynn M Calkins; Owner: Gary Wickwire & Raymond L Calkins & Sandra Wickwire

WIRE NEWS

COMPANION DOG

CH Heywire N Justa’s Look Who’s Talkin’ CD (D) SR61537102 (6/21/13) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Heywire ‘N Cedrbrk Justa ‘Pon A Time JH; Breeder: Judy Cheshire & Bernee Brawn & Doug Ljungren; Owner: Steven Finkel

CH Idawire Apple Pie Ala Mode (B) SR68670201 (6/20/13) by CH Fogarty Windwalker’s Ace JH x CH Idawire American Pie; Breeder: Jodi Quesnell & Thomas Quesnell; Owner: Bruce Mueller & Susan Mueller

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AMATEUR FIELD CHAMPION

CH Heywire’s Justa Casual Look BN JH NA NAJ (B) SR61537110 (5/17/13) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Heywire ‘N Cedrbrk Justa ‘Pon A Time JH; Breeder: Judy Cheshire & Bernee Brawn & Doug Ljungren; Owner: Lee Friess & Jennifer Jacobs Rohan Vom Treborwolf BN (D) SR66288608 (5/12/13) by Fritz Von Treborwolf x Alpha Von Treborwolf; Breeder: Robert West; Owner: Morgan Rounds CH Reece Afterhours N Dusty Steele N Thyme BN JH CA (D) SR72901402 (6/22/13) by GCH CH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH x CH Afterhours Once In A Lifetime JH; Breeder: Angie Johnson & Christi Chism & Mary-Lynn K Jensen Ph.D. & Michael R Johnson; Owner: Joni Cornell & Angie Johnson & Alexis Cornell

UTILITY DOG EXCELLENT 2 MACH Jed’s Sf Blue Belle UDX2 OM2 RE SH MXB MJS NF T2B (B) SR48693303 (6/22/13) by CH Jed’s Wild Turkey x Jed’s Lexus Lx Von Duffin; Breeder: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker; Owner: Mike Braddock & Kay Braddock

NEW TITLES

OBEDIENCE MASTER 2

TRACKING DOG EXCELLENT

MACH Jed’s Sf Blue Belle UDX OM2 RE SH MXB MJS NF T2B (B) SR48693303 (6/2/13) by CH Jed’s Wild Turkey x Jed’s Lexus Lx Von Duffin; Breeder: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker; Owner: Mike Braddock & Kay Braddock

CH Claddaghnripsnorter’s Back’N Badger TDX MH CGC (D) SR62716305 (5/5/13) by GCH CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH x Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle; Breeder: Lisa George & Courtney J VogelBastian; Owner: Bob Karrick & Courtney J Vogel-Bastian & Ann Karrick

RALLY NOVICE Reece Afterhours Jax’s Woodland Star RN (D) SR72901404 (5/26/13) by GCH CH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH x CH Afterhours Once In A Lifetime JH; Breeder: Angie Johnson & Christi Chism & Mary-Lynn K Jensen Ph.D. & Michael R Johnson; Owner: Lori Patterson & Michael Patterson Reece’s Razzle Dazzle RN (B) SR72733304 (5/26/13) by CH Afterhours Reece Flying Solo JH x CH J an J After Hours Dana JH; Breeder: Michael R Johnson & Christine Whitmore & Angela E Johnson; Owner: Lorraine Leal & Orlando Leal Cooper CD RN (D) PAL257317 (6/8/13) Owner: Christine Gross & Brad Gross CH Reece Wired To Win At Harvest Meadow’s Afterhours RN (D) SR69398204 (6/1/13) by CH Laurwyn Cassio Piece Of Cake x CH J an J After Hours Dana JH; Breeder: Michael R Johnson & Christine Whitmore & Angela E Johnson; Owner: Lisa Minnick & Angela Johnson CH Surefire’s Secret Little Spot CD BN RN JH (D) SR56797905 (6/2/13) by DC Nyramskov’s H. Hector x CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine RN JH; Breeder: Joan & Andy Payton; Owner: SAA

JUNIOR HUNTER Black Star’s Xplosive Big Bang Theory JH (B) SR75556501 (5/25/13) by Griffs Xplosive Gunner x L.B.’s Good Golly Miss Dotty MH; Breeder: Leo O Boman; Owner: Leo O Boman Claddagh’s Artemis Violet Moon JH (B) SR74176502 (5/26/13) by GCH CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH x GCH CH Claddagh’s Hotcakes At Sangrud JH; Breeder: Paul Wehking & Kristin E Wehking & Courtney J Vogel-Bastian & William Bastian; Owner: Steve Handevidt & Melissa Lembke & Linda Handevidt & Courtney Vogel-Bastian Claddagh’s Dual Citizen At Hirsch JH (B) SR75625301 (5/25/13) by CH Claddaghnripsnorter’s Back’N Badger TDX MH CGC x CH Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Explorer SH; Breeder: Courtney VogelBastian & William Bastian; Owner: Courtney Vogel-Bastian & Catherine Ryan Claddagh’s Dual Threat JH (D) SR75625304 (5/26/13) by CH Claddaghnripsnorter’s Back’N Badger TDX MH CGC x CH Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Explorer SH; Breeder: Courtney VogelBastian & William Bastian; Owner: Melissa M Wendt & Courtney Vogel-Bastian Deutsch Dually’s Electric Blue JH (D) SR74022205 (5/26/13) by Deutsch Dually’s Alwheel Drive x Windswepts Charlotte Express; Breeder: Mark Krueger; Owner: Adam Saba Dual Shot’s Git Er Done Gauge JH (D) SR67869404 (5/19/13) by DC Dual Shot’s Behind Bars x CH Dual Shot’s Buffalo Girl JH; Breeder: Karla Hawkins; Owner: Karla Hawkins Ellie Boomerox Hines JH (B) SR60624409 (5/26/13) by Mcnallys Scotians Boomer JH x Rockin Roxy; Breeder: James League & Nicole League; Owner: Sam Hines & Kathy Hines Griffs Double Ll Finman JH (D) SR68077305 (5/19/13) by Double Ll Mac x Griffs Quasie Lady MH; Breeder: Dan Griffith; Owner: Anitra Balchan

Sure Shot ‘N Justa’s I Be Leavin’ JH (B) SR72885901 (5/18/13) by NAFC GCH DC AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now x DC Sure Shot’s Sonora Gone Heywire; Breeder: Judy Cheshire; Owner: Bernee Brawn Sure Shot’s Justa Goin’ Heywire JH (B) SR72885902 (5/25/13) by NAFC GCH DC AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now x DC Sure Shot’s Sonora Gone Heywire; Breeder: Judy Cheshire; Owner: Steven C Kreuser & Elizabeth Kreuser & Bernee Brawn Upland Dog’s Jazz JH (B) SR64084802 (5/5/13) by Indy V. Den Drei Teufeln x Upland Dog’s Stella; Breeder: Douglas A Burnett; Owner: Douglas A Burnett Alexander JH (D) SR70109001 (6/15/13) by CH Inverness Odin x Inverness Pistol; Breeder: Edward L Toft II; Owner: Edward L Toft II GCH CH Ebbtide Lookout Gambler JH (D) SR69993003 (6/9/13) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Ebbtide’s From The Ashes; Breeder: Garnett Persinger & James Witt & Howard Huber III; Owner: Ann Summerfelt & Garnett Persinger & Howard Huber III & Frank Funderburk Wireswest Tailor Made JH (D) SR44876609 (6/2/13) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Von Duffin’s Lady Bug CDX MH; Breeder: Meg Eden; Owner: Meg Eden Zeke Von Upland JH (D) SR73080501 (6/16/13) by Indy V. Den Drei Teufeln x Upland Dog’s Stella; Breeder: Douglas A Burnett; Owner: Ralph W Cumbee

JUNIOR HUNTER RETRIEVER GCH CH Ripsnorterncladdagh Backfld N Motion RN JH JHR (B) SR62716303 (4/19/13) by GCH CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH x Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle; Breeder: Lisa George & Courtney J Vogel-Bastian; Owner: Marguerite Howard & Lisa George

SENIOR HUNTER Covey Creek’s Dark Side Of The Moon SH (D) SR67981902 (5/25/13) by CH Sure Shot’s Rock On JH x Ol Sut’s Madchen Von Etta; Breeder: Deborah Ann Smith; Owner: Lindsay Brooks & Thomas Brooks

Lock N’ Loaded Ruger JH (D) SR71581104 (5/26/13) by L.B.’s Pointdacious Jazzy Java x Sawyer Kickass Brown Molly Jones; Breeder: Bridgett C Jones; Owner: Thomas Lee Hepburn Jr. ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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NEW TITLES

New Titles con’t

EXCELLENT AGILITY JUMPER

MASTER HUNTER

Afterhour’s Joie De Vivre NA AXJ NF (B) SR45156705 (6/22/13) by CH Afterhours Fuzzy Navel x CH Weaver’s Morgen Raine; Breeder: David M Weaver; Owner: Diane Philibert & Christi Chism & Mark Rosenblatt

GCH CH Aimn Hi Jet Stream MH CGC (B) SR61717307 (5/19/13) by GCH CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH x CH Devata Rip It Up At Scotia; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom; Owner: Kay Gunnarson & LaMar Gunnarson CH Claddaghnripsnorter Back To Madtown MH (B) SR62716304 (5/26/13) by GCH CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH x Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle; Breeder: Lisa George & Courtney J VogelBastian; Owner: Courtney J Vogel-Bastian & William Bastian Three Devils Jasper MH (D) SR48059608 (5/18/13) by Three Devils Speak Thunder x Three Devils Agape; Breeder: Jeff Funke; Owner: Thomas Brougham CH Idawire Field Of Dreams MH (D) SR44786805 (5/26/13) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Idawire Zip A Dee Do Dah; Breeder: Jodi Quesnell; Owner: Adam Cunningham Piette’s Okk Whiskey River MH (D) SR51136605 (6/9/13) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Rudolph’s Blitzen Von Duffin x FC AFC Okk Left To Do It; Breeder: John Schoonover & Ruth A Schoonover; Owner: Randal Piette DC AFC Wireswest Mardi Gras MH (B) SR44876603 (6/1/13) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Von Duffin’s Lady Bug CDX MH; Breeder: Meg Eden; Owner: Meg Eden

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MASTER AGILITY EXCELLENT GCH CH Aimn Hi For Jet Set’s Dancing With The Stars MX MXJ OF CA (B) SR56463003 (6/9/13) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom & Genevieve M Capstaff; Owner: Laura Reeves & Angela Merfeld

MASTER EXCELLENT JUMPER

AGILITY FAST OPEN

GCH CH Aimn Hi For Jet Set’s Dancing With The Stars AX MXJ OF CA (B) SR56463003 (5/19/13) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom & Genevieve M Capstaff; Owner: Laura Reeves Lococo & Angela Merfeld

PREFERRED AGILITY EXCELLENT

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXB MXJ MJB MXP3 MXPB MJPB PAX XF XFP T2BP2 (B) SR11401304 (5/5/13) by CH Weidenhugel Merlin V Nico CD MH x CH Scotian Northern Light JH NA NAJ; Breeder: Stephanie Rainwater & Jack Rainwater & Laura Reeves; Owner: Shannon L Jackson

COURSING ABILITY

GCH CH Aimn Hi For Jet Set’s Dancing With The Stars AX MXJ NF CA (B) SR56463003 (5/4/13) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom & Genevieve M Capstaff; Owner: Laura Reeves Lococo & Angela Merfeld

Reece Afterhours N Dusty Steele N Thyme JH CA (D) SR72901402 (4/12/13) by GCH CH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH x CH Afterhours Once In A Lifetime JH; Breeder: Angie Johnson & Christi Chism & Mary-Lynn K Jensen Ph.D. & Michael R Johnson; Owner: Joni Cornell & Angie Johnson & Alexis Cornell

MASTER BRONZE JUMPER PREFERRED

CANINE GOOD CITIZEN

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXB MXJ MJB MXP3 MXPB MJPB PAX XF XFP T2BP2 (B) SR11401304 (5/5/13) by CH Weidenhugel Merlin V Nico CD MH x CH Scotian Northern Light JH NA NAJ; Breeder: Stephanie Rainwater & Jack Rainwater & Laura Reeves; Owner: Shannon L Jackson

Lendar’s Elementary My Dear Watson Von Justa CGC (D) SR74160701 (5/1/13) by NGDC FC Brillows Big Wild Western x Hellbenders Justa Monster Mash; Breeder: Bernee Brawn; Owner: Darlene E. Rak

BUSINESS CARDS

BACKWOODS KENNELS Bird Dogs Trained Field Trial/Hunt Test Training Summer Camp – North Dakota Winter Camp – Texas Greg & Liz Dixon www.backwoodsbirddogs.com www.rockcreekwalkers.com Greg: 612-805-1508 Liz: 612-865-7556

Place your Business Card Here! $30 per Issue or $60 Yearly ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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A D R AT E S

The German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Wire-News The GWPCA Wire-News is published by the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America, Inc. The GWPCA is a non-profit Michigan corporation which was founded in 1959 to promote and develop the German Wirehaired Pointer. Since 1959 the GWPCA has been recognized by the American Kennel Club as a member club responsible for the development of the GWP in the United States. The GWPCA Wire-News is published for GWPCA members and is a benefit of membership. The editors of the Wire-News wish to encourage members to write interesting and informative articles for the Wire-News. The editors reserve the right to edit any article sent for publication and the right to refuse any article deemed inappropriate. Letters and articles published in the Wire-News do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the GWPCA or the Wire-News staff.

Publishing Schedule

Issue Autumn 2013 Winter 2013

Aug. 1 - Content Nov. 1 - Content

Deadlines

Advertising Rates

Front Cover (Color)—Includes inside story Back Cover (Color) Inside Front or Back Cover (Color) Full Page Black & White Half Page Black & White Quarter Page Black & White Business Card - yearly Business Card - per issue Color (Contact Ad Manager for availability)

Aug. 15 - Advertising Nov. 15 - Advertising

NonMember Member $250 $300 $200 $250 $200 $250 $75 $100 $60 $75 $40 $50 $60 $75 $30 $35 $100 additional per page

Ads must be camera ready. Ad space may be reserved prior to deadline. Ad dimensions: 8.75 in.x11.25 in. Text must be kept within ½ inch of each side so it is not lost when page is trimmed.(See page 70 of the 2013 Spring Wire-News for more detailed information.) If you need assistant preparing your ad please contact the graphic artist of your choice or you may contact one of the following to help you: Angie Johnson @ angiehef@aol.com Sean Perry @ Aspendel@aol.com Trinitie Webb @ trix.are.fer.kidz@gmail.com, Each of those listed above will provide with their costs for ad design and the photos and text needed. Wire-News offers the names of those who can help but accepts no responsibility for the quality of the work. Payment must be received by the ad deadline: Send payment to Adam Cunningham, Advertising Manager 9088 N. Awl Rd. Parker, CO 80138 – Contact Adam @ ironwiregwp@gmail.com or 303-720-2275. Content Articles should be in Mircosoft Word 9 pt. Century Schoolbook – single spaced, single column. Be sure to include by-line as you wish it to appear. Please forward in a document file to: Diane Turner, Editor @ turner.p.diane@gmail.com. Contact Diane at 520-490-2601 if you have questions. Photos: Photos to accompany articles must be forwarded in a separate file. TIFF is the preferred format for electronic submission. This format produces large files but it does not lose information. JPG images should be the largest pixel format (2400x1900 or similar). Snapshot images (400x300 pixels) will not produce well enough for publication. (See page 70 of the 2013 Spring Wire-News for more detailed information.) DIGITAL IMAGES SHOULD BE AT LEAST 1 MB. 68

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Wire~News Fall 2013