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May 2011 Issue No. 111

If May Passes By Forgotten 5.18 Poem by Ko Un

More Fresh Beer The new bar in town

Ecotourism Preserving Thailand’s Gentle Giants


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Gwangju News May 2011


What’s On

Gwangju News

The image has been edited for layout purpose.

Cover Photo

12 Women Police

Photographer: Tae-seong Kim Cover Photo: Making Korea rice popcorn - see page 18 Publisher: Gyonggu Shin Editor-in-Chief: Maria Lisak Editors: Julian Raethel, Minsu Kim Assistant Editors: Seth Pevey, Stephen Redeker Copy Editors: Kyle Johnson, Kathleen Villadiego Coordinator: Karina Prananto Layout and Design: Karina Prananto Proofreaders: Stephanie Peters, Gina Covert, Erin Fahrer,

18 ATEK Volunteers

Samantha Richter, Megan Dwyer, Julian Raethel, Jake Melville, Jon Ozelton, Rob Smith, Gabriel Ward

Researchers: Yinhao Lu, Seoyeoung Park, Kyuri Park Address: Jeon-il Building 5F, Geumnam-no 1-1, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-758, S. Korea

Phone: +82-62-226-2733~4 Fax: +82-62-226-2731 E-mail: gwangjunews@gmail.com Registration No.: 광주광역시 라. 00145 (ISSN 2093-5315) Printed by Logos (Phone +82-62-444-8800)

Gwangju News Magazine is written and edited by volunteers.

Special thanks to the City of Gwangju and all of our sponsors. Copyright by the Gwangju International Center. All rights reserved. No part of this publication covered by this copyright may be reproduced in any form or by any means - graphic, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise - without the written consent of the publishers. Gwangju News welcomes letters to the editor (gwangjunews@gmail.com) regarding articles and issues. All correspondence may be edited for reasons of clarity or space.

20 Moslem Community Gwangju News May 2011

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Contents Featured Articles 7

Feature

2011 Gwangju Summit of the Urban Environmental Accords

Regular Columns 6

Local News

This Month in Gwangju By Jon Ozelton

By Frances Herrington

8 10

Feature

Japan Radiation By Michael Bielawski

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24

By Kathleen Villadiego Feature

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Photo Contest

32

News

33

Living Tips

Jeollado Mothers By Tae-seong Kim

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By Kristi Heyd

By Trevor Homeniuk Community

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Dynamic People in Dynamic Places Community

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A Different Kind of Life

Letters to KOTESOL Language Study

에서’: at/in, from The Marker: ‘에 By Soo-a Jung

By Karina Prananto

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Language Study By Dr. David Schaffer

By Michael Paul Begin

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Home Pages Shopping in Gwangju Buying Organic Foods in Korea

Environment

The Road is not a Driveway 18

GIC Tour

GIC Mudeung Mountain Tour with Warren

Feature

Women Pioneering a New Police Presence 14

Upcoming Events

Literature

Poetry by Ko Un

Community

Warm Smiles in the City of Light

Translated by Chae-pyong Song and Anne Rashid

By Alfian Zohri

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Sport

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K-J Brings his A-Game, Fall Short Once Again Travel

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Pure Love for Gentle Giants Travel

Roosters Awake in Gold

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Education

Kwangju Foreign School: Past, Present, Future

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Food and Drink

Café or Multi-fé?

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Gwangju News’ KPOP Food and Drink

Deung Chon Shabu Shabu Food and Drink

Tofu Ball By Seoyeong Park

By Yinhao Lu

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Entertainment

By Gabriel Ward

By Gerald E. Schoen

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Fash-on with xxl jjdp

By JDragon

By Kerrilyn Strothard

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Fashion By jjdp

By Debra M. Josephson

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The Way Home By Seth Pevey

By Darrell Slater

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Review

More Fresh Beer Coming Soon!

Community Board Dear Korea

By Stephen Redeker

By Jen Lee

Food and Drink

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51

Cartoon

Digby By Leroy Kucia

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Gwangju News May 2011


Gwangju News May 2011

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News

This Month in Gwangju A brief roundup of news stories from in and around Gwangju

thoroughfares into parking lots and bringing traffic to a halt around the stadium. The project has a planned investment of 99.4 billion won, of which 29.8 billion is expected from public funds, 39.6 billion from Gwangju City, and 30 billion from team sponsors KIA.

Gwangju Tower

Gwangju’s Mudeung Stadium

blog.paran.com

New Baseball Stadium Talk of a new baseball stadium for Gwangju’s KIA Tigers has been going on for quite some time. Several plans have come and gone over the years – just a couple of years ago, a grandiose plan to relocate the team to a shiny new indoor dome stadium was announced... which has since been quietly dropped – so it remains to be seen whether anything will ever come to fruition. One thing that is for sure is that the current Mudeung stadium – one of the oldest in Korea – is definitely in need of improvement: at the very least a facelift, if not a total overhaul. According to plans released last month though, KIA can look forward to playing in a newly renovated 25,000 capacity venue by 2015, with a further 5,000 seats to be added after that year’s Summer Universiade (Mudeung’s current capacity is 13,872). The plans also extends to include a wide range of additional facilities, from restaurants and eateries, bars and cafes, recreational facilities such as a gym, screen golf and billiards hall, cultural performances and even a baseball museum. The design will also incorporate a new spacious underground car park, with 1314 parking bays: something which is sorely needed, as present match days see cars park three-deep beside the kerb, turning

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Gwangju News May 2011

Another ambitious construction plan is the Gwangju Tower. This is a proposed 300-m tall construction set for the centre of the city, to attract tourists and act as a landmark icon and focal point for Gwangju. According to the Gwangju Tower Project organizers, a working-level project team is in place, and investors from Hong Kong and elsewhere are said to be interested in the scheme. Construction of the tower would be completed by December 2014, in time for the 2015 Universiade, and the opening of the Asia Culture Complex.

Bus Route Changes Frequent bus users should be aware from April 30, as they may find their regular route has changed. Following consultations with various citizens groups through public hearings, the city has made some alterations to its bus routes. The changes reflect both public opinion, and the evolving landscape of the city, as recently developed areas, such as Suwan district, require greater service. The new routes will go into effect from the last day of April. In total, two routes have been divided, three other merged, four extended, three shortened and 28 have had their courses slightly modified. Check the information posted at bus stops and on board buses to see if you’ll be affected. By Jon Ozelton


Feature

2011 Gwangju Summit of the Urban Environmental Accords wangju will radiate in the international spotlight this October as it co-hosts the Urban Environmental Accords (UEA) Gwangju Summit 2011 with sister city San Francisco. The summit will feature four international conferences, dialogue focused on policies that address urban environmental issues plus exhibitions and events to present new technologies to the public. The inspiration behind the summit is that to achieve success in tackling environmental problems, issues need to be managed locally by cities and their mayors. One hundred and five cities have been invited to attend, including those as diverse and distant as San Francisco, Vienna and Phnom Penh.

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Exhibition. And while the UEA summit remains independently funded by Gwangju city, companies will display their environmentally conscience technologies to the public. Allowing a wonderful opportunity to view innovative green technologies, which may make it into our homes as quick as the iPad. Many will be excited at the opportunity to see an electric car in practice, as one will be in operation around the venue, courtesy of the UAE summit. Also taking place at the KCC is the 2011 International Climate and Environmental Fair, an annual event rejigged to co-inside with the summit. Complete unadulterated delight for the tech-savvy environmentalist among you.

It seems only natural that Gwangju would host the Environmental Summit since proclaiming itself an environmentally conscious city with Mayor Kang Un-Tae at the helm. Dedicated to improving Gwangju’s ecological beauty, Kang has already displayed his commitment by planting 10,000,000 trees around the city. Besides, it can not be argued that the pioneering carbon bank, city’s numerous green parks and restored animal habitats will make the perfect backdrop for such an event. The action takes place October 11-18 at the majestic Kim Daejung Convention Centre (KCC). During the summit, participating cities’ local governments will discuss new measures to reduce greenhouse gasses, share case studies of cities’ excellent environmental policies, establish an innovative new urban environmental evaluation index and apply the world’s first urban clean development mechanism; which you may recognize as ‘carbon credits’.

The pinnacle of the summit will surely be the signing of the Gwangju Declaration. In which, cities show their willingness to contribute to environmental conservation by reducing greenhouse gasses. The hope is that a carbon credit system between cities will be enacted to support the environment without hindering economic systems. Equally as pioneering is the construction and implementation of the urban environmental evaluation index, which will establish the criteria used to determine the success of cities in their sustainable plight. It is anticipated that this index will be adopted as a measure of urban success well into the future. The index will be used to present the UNEP-Gwangju Low-Carbon Green City Award, an acknowledgement of cities’ achievement to successfully address environmental issues. These measures will be particularly useful when the commitments to lower greenhouse gas emissions agreed upon in the 1997 Kyoto Protocol expire in 2012.

Impressive keynote speakers include Earth Policy Institute Director Lester Brown, prominent IPCC [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] Chairman elect and Noble peace prize winner R.K. Pachauri and CNN [Cable News Network] head honcho Ted Turner. Alas, reign in your enthusiasm, as yet, it has not been decided if a public audience is permitted.

Spirits are high as preparations continue for what will be a significant moment in promoting ecologically sustainability. Gwangju has stepped forward as a progressive city considerate of its carbon footprint, helping forward-thinking cities to navigate the sustainability of their urban environment through cooperation and good conscience.

Yet even for those of us not in public office, there are plenty of exhibitions to please. Cities that are particularly eco-friendly are invited to share case studies of how they operate a sustainable metropolitan city in the City

For more information on the UEA Gwangju Summit 2011, in English or Korean, click on http://2011uea.com By Frances Herrington Gwangju News May 2011

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Upcoming Events Festival

Performances

Honam Art Festival Date: ~ June 1, 2011 Topic: Culture Art Place: Gwangju Ilwon (By the Gwangju City Hall) Main Events: Music, Korean Classical, Dance, Writing, Art competition Website: art.kjmedia.co.kr

Damyang Bamboo Festival Date: May 3 ~ 8, 2011 Place: Damyang Bamboo forest Website: www.bamboofestival.co.kr

Dong Chun Circus Date: May 9, 2011 Location: Gwangju Art and Culture Center Grand Theater Admission fee: 16,000 ~ 40,000 won For more info: 062) 510-9303

Lee So Ra: Fourth Spring Date: May 14, 2011 Location: Gwangju Art and Culture Grand Theater Genre: Jazz and Blues For more info: 062) 510-9303

Unstoppable 6 Brothers and Sisters Boseong Dahyang Festival Date: May 4 ~ 8, 2011 Place: Boseong Tea Farm Web site: http://dahyang.boseong.go.kr

2011 Wando Janbogo Festival Date: May 6 ~ 8, 2011 Place: Wando Seashore Park Web site: http://tour.wando.go.kr/ home/tour/festival/jangbogo/

Date: May 4 ~ 15, 2011 Location: U-square Culture Center For more info: 062) 360-8432

Movies @ Gwangju Theater

Sumjin River Railroad Royal Azalea Festival Date: May 7 ~ 8, 2011 Place: Chonnam Goksung Gajung-ri

Exhibitions Gwangju Volunteer Work Fair Date: May 13 ~14, 2011 Kimdaejung Convention Center, 1st and 2nd phase Phone: 062) 613-5584

Dream of Butterfly Date: Until May 15, 2011 Gwangju Museum of Art Exhibition themes are Living Nature, Fun Art, Science and Future For more info: www.artmuse.gwangju.go.kr Phone: 062) 613-7100

Like Fire, Like the Wind Dancer – Choi Seung Hee Date: until August 21, 2011 You can see 150 pieces of photos, 4 art paintings Gwangju Museum of Art For more info: www.artmuse.gwangju.go.kr Phone: 062) 613-7100

Gwangju National Museum Special Exhibition “Chang-am Lee Sam-man, As Water, As Wind” Date: until May 22, 2011 For more info: 062) 570-7061 or e-mail ii070@korea.kr

This month’s Upcoming Events contributors: Yinhao Lu, Seoyeong Park, Kyuri Park

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Gwangju News May 2011

Chungjangno 5-ga (two blocks back behind Migliore) Phone: 062) 224-5858 Films change weekly to bi-weekly. Admission fee: 8,000 won for one film. 21,000 won for 3 films. 30,000 won for 5 films; 50,000 won for 10 films Check online for calendar and prices. (http://cafe.naver.com/cinemagwangju/) The following movies will be shown in May: No Name Stars (Love of May – Ohwolae) Genre: Documentary Language: Korean Synopsis: This revealing documentary looks closely at the lives, past and present, of the people who supported but did not directly participate in the democracy movement of May 1980. Baboya Genre: Documentary Language: Korean Narration : Ahn Sung Gi Synopsis: This is a story about Cardinal Kim Su-hwan, the first cardinal of Korea. The Journals of Musan Genre: Drama Language: Korean Synopsis: This is a story about a North Korean defector who lives in South Korea. This movie received honorable mention at an international film festival.


Sports This Month at Holiday Inn Gwangju Gwangju FC Soccer Team Match Schedule Date

Match Team

Time

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Daejeon Citizen Incheon United

15:00 15:00

Venue: Gwangju Worldcup Stadium (광주월드컵경기장) Direction: Buses 6, 16, 20, 26, 47, 74 get off Worldcup Stadium bus stop Ticket Price: Adult 10,000 won, Family (4 people) 30,000 won Website: www.gwangjufc.com

KIA Tigers Baseball Team Match Schedule Date

Match Team

Time

1 10 11 12 17 18 19 20 21 22 27 28 29

Lotte Doosan Doosan Doosan LG LG LG Hanhwa Hanhwa Hanhwa Lotte Lotte Lotte

17:00 17:00 18:30 18:30 18:30 18:30 18:30 18:30 17:00 17:00 18:30 17:00 17:00

Venue: Gwangju Mudeung Stadium (Baseball Field) 무등경기장 Directions: Buses 16, 38, 51, 53, 58, 89, 95, 98, 151 get off Mudeung Stadium bus stop Ticket Price: Adults 7,000 - 12,000 won; Students (13 18):4,000 - 9,000 won; Children (under 13: 2,000 - 6,000 won) Website: www.tigers.co.kr (Korean)

GIC Gallery Exhibition Rabbit Tales Exhibition Period: May 7 ~ 21, 2011 Opening with Artists Talk: May 7 (Saturday), 3 ~ 5 p.m. at GIC Gallery For a month in April the art workshop participants gathered to make, discuss and share their art about rabbits. The group exhibition will show a variety of painting, drawing and illustration. Art by Erin Heath

The entire Employee team is proud to present our events to the readers of Gwangju News. Each month we will highlight some of the very special offerings. In addition, you as a valued reader will have the opportunity to make direct contact with Michael Wilson (General Manager) and provide any ideas and comments. My wife Gilda (French) and I are thrilled to be living in Gwangju having spent many years in other Asian, Middle East and Pacific countries. Gilda has developed a circle of friends within the cultural and French communities whilst assisting at the Orphanage each Saturday teaching English. She has also been learning Korean which I am proud to say she has done very well and rescued me on many occasions. Gilda is an Artist and enjoys all manner of art & cultural activities. We opened Holiday Inn Gwangju in December 2010. The Hotel is quickly becoming a new centre and focus for meetings, events, private dinners and family get-togethers. EXECUTIVE LOUNGE BAR 10TH FLOOR This wonderful cosy (sky) lounge bar is now offering “Happy Hours” from 6.00pm to 8.30pm. For 30,000 won inclusive per person, you can enjoy unlimited house wine and cold hors d’oeuvre food. This is a great venue to rendezvous with friends or business partners and enjoy each others company in an intimate & luxurious atmosphere. LOBBY LOUNGE BAR Throughout May we’ll be offering Ginseng Tea with three small deserts for 22,000 won inclusive per person. The Lobby Lounge is the perfect place to meet for business or relax after an evening in Hourglass. HOURGLASS RESTAURANT Our Lunch offer of book four and pay for three has been a great success and will continue through May. The offer means that for 22,275 won per person net you can enjoy a wonderful buffet lunch full of delicious Korean, Asian and Western offerings.

We all look forward to seeing at our great new Hotel. Thank you. Michael Wilson General Manager Holiday Inn Gwangju Michael.Wilson@ihg.com Watch our website for further details www.holidayinngwangju.com Gwangju News May 2011

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Feature

Japan Radiation eoul – It has been over a month since the initial earthquake and tsunami that devastated the Japanese Fukushima nuclear reactor that has been leaking radiation worldwide. There is so much confusing information about the severity of the situation, for most of us it’s really difficult to know if we need to worry about radiation.

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Dr Bob Bowman, a nuclear physicist and former Director of Advanced Space Programs Development in the U.S., said this, “There will be a lot of people that will get cancer and never know that it came from radiation … you won’t be able to tell which cancers came from this radiation and which are from some other source.” This statement illustrates a key point, that there could be severe consequences from the radiation but it may not affect people for years or even decades and when it finally does it still may not be associated with the radiation. It’s easy to see how

making people take this threat seriously can be very challenging. In fact people may still be getting cancer from the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown in Russia, when 50 tons of radioactive material was released, which may have contributed to over a million cancers worldwide according to Alexey Yablokov of the Center for Russian Environmental Policy in Moscow. At Fukushima there was over 1,600 tons of radioactive mixed uranium and plutonium. Japan recently raised the severity of the disaster to a level seven, the highest level, meaning they consider this disaster at least equal to Chernobyl. Nuclear physicist Arnold Gundersen explained, “There are seven nuclear reactors and fuel pools that are not being cooled here and there’s been three meltdowns and an explosion at a fuel pool so the net effect is that this is certainly a catastrophe on the level of Chernobyl.” To cool the reactors they are dumping sea water into them. Now there is 60,000 tons of contaminated water at reactors one and three that is making repair efforts difficult, reported by Japan Today. At reactor four the water temperature is rising, indicating more damaged fuel rods. They are currently dumping at least 11,500 tons of radioactive sea water into the ocean, and now the local seawater has radiation levels over 65,000 times the safe limit. Inside reactor two the radiation level is ten million times over the safe levels,

Radiation released from Japan

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Gwangju News May 2011

news.naver.com


Feature

Radiation reading

yahoo.com

A baby being inspected for radiation levels csmonitor.com

according to Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO). It’s not just going into the ocean, according to Kyodo News, “The concentration levels of radioactive iodine and cesium in groundwater near the troubled numbers one and two reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have increased up to several dozen times in one week, suggesting that toxic water has seeped from nearby reactor turbine buildings or elsewhere, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Thursday.”

example Berkeley University in California reported over 180 times safe radiation levels in the drinking water a few weeks ago. In contrast here in Korea, where the radiation has to travel completely around the world to get here, schools and baseball games are being cancelled, all while children in Fukushima continue to go to school and play outside. Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano indicated that the Prime Minister said the Fukushima area may be uninhabitable for some time, but he later retracted that comment after other officials got this danger, the Japanese angry at him.

In response to all this danger, the Japanese and U.S. governments are simply raising the “In response to all radiation safety limits, in and U.S. governments are simply raising the TEPCO is now Japan from 600 counts radiation safety limits... and in Canada the saying the per minute (CPM) to government simply turned off their radiation radiation leakage 100,000 CPM. In the US could continue for Mike Adams of detectors, while the U.S. is mostly not several months. NaturalNews.com reporting data from theirs.” That means you explained “The EPA need to take (Environmental c e r t a i n Protection Agency) precautions. Avoid rain which can contain the maintains a set of so-called “Protective Action radiation, research where your food comes from Guides” (PAGs). These PAGs are being quickly (especially seafood), and if radiation levels are high revised to radically increase the allowable levels of in your area, take potassium iodine (but ask your iodine 131 (a radioactive isotope) to anywhere from doctor first) to help protect your kidneys from 3,000 to 100,000 times the currently allowable radiation. Remember no one is going to just get sick levels.” from the radiation, but years or decades from now there could be serious consequences, so it’s better to And in Canada the government simply turned off just be safe now. their radiation detectors, while the U.S. is mostly not reporting data from theirs. So far only some By Michael Bielawski universities have been releasing information. For

Gwangju News May 2011

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Feature

Women Pioneering a New Police Presence hy people choose a particular profession is certainly a topic of interest. And what drives a woman to go into a field that is largely male-dominated definitely stirs curiosity.

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Children know early on what they want to be when they grow up and when you ask them about this, they’ll very often say an exciting profession like being an astronaut, a singer, or a professional athlete. One very common choice particularly for young boys is a police officer, but for a young girl in Korea, giving this same answer is quite unique. Seon-ye Kim is a student at Gwangju Women’s University and also the student body president for the Department of Police Law. She is in her third year, and her course is helping her to prepare for the tough recruitment exam she’ll need to pass in order to be a police officer. But passing the exam is just one of the hurdles. Candidates must also demonstrate sound powers of reasoning and judgment, be certified in the use of various computer programmes, have a driver’s license, and be skilled in a form of martial arts like taekwondo or kendo. So what made Seon-ye, this seeming shy and softlyspoken young girl, want to join the ranks of law enforcement? When Seon-ye was a young girl she got lost and could not find her way home. Wandering the streets, quite distraught, she started to cry. Then a police woman found her and helped her get home. That moment in her life kindled her dream to be a police officer, and as she got older and her awareness of injustices grew, she set herself on the path to fulfilling that dream. Seon-ye, despite first impressions, has a lot to convey. She answers all the questions with a mixture of calmness, assertiveness, confidence, and passion, and her convictions are solid. 12

Gwangju News May 2011

Above: Seon-ye at the University park; Below: Kumdo training


Feature

Study time

Seon-ye and her classmates

She wants to join a profession that is not only largely male-dominated but one where a large part of the duties female officers perform is limited to the scope of administrative based tasks. Moreover, women do not generally go to the scene of the crime, and this is a practice which Seon-ye is ready to challenge. “I want to go to the crime scene and encounter anything,” she said.

strong chance of success with their chosen profession. “I chose to study at Gwangju Women’s University because it has a very good rate for producing female police officers and very good facilities,” she said. And this is something the department is very proud of.

There has been a tendency in Korea as well as in many parts of the world for crimes against women not to be taken seriously or for the offender to be let off lightly. Women are often doubly-victimised first by their attacker and then by the system that’s supposed to protect and defend all victims of a crime. And crimes of a sexual nature are, if not totally dismissed, dealt with in an insensitive manner. Seonye recognizes the void left by a lack of women in the force. “Sexual crimes are getting worse that’s why we need more female police officers; there are things that only women can ask and think of,” she said. And she is obviously not afraid of going against the grain or of the dangers that come with the job. When asked about this, she responded, “If I was worried about it, I wouldn’t have started.” Currently there are well over 6,000 female police officers serving in various police stations around Korea. Gwangju alone has 65 police stations and has become well-reputed as for being the “cradle” for those wanting to join the police force with 17 universities in Jeollanam-do having a police department. And Seon-ye along with the other dedicated women in her department have a very

Established in 2002, Gwangju Women’s University’s Department of Police Law can boast to having the highest success rate. “Despite our short history, we are ranked number one for examination pass rates. For a local university, this is almost revolutionary,” said Kyoung-hoon Kim, director of the department. This achievement also applies to the employment rate of their graduates, being the best in the country. Kim also has high hopes for the women who embark on the course. “We are working towards cultivating an elite group of women,” he said. There are various career pathways for those who complete the course, but right now, of the 250 students enrolled in the program, about 90 percent of them want to pursue a career in policing and become the guardians of their city and its people. Seon-ye is brave not just because of the path she has chosen to follow but because of the beliefs and values propelling her forward. That she and others like her will one day be the much needed advocate for all women is a great comfort. By Kathleen Villadiego Photos by Seongbeom Jo Contributors: Yeong-ju Ahn, Seoyoung Park

Gwangju News May 2011

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Feature

Jeollado Mothers The Faces too Sad to Miss

By Tae-seong Kim

“Mom”. I am sad just thinking about her. So sad because I miss her so much, and she is so poor. But, I still want to call her, even though my throat becomes sore

What is “Mom” to us? Mom’s image is not a woman who lives in a city, who likes to do her nails, or wear perfume. ⇨ Brushing off wild sesame seeds in Hwasun

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Gwangju News May 2011

What I imagine is a woman who lives in the country, who smells the dust and soil.


Feature

She was like a stake one day. She gave energy to her kids, and a flower of hope. Their life is only for sacrifices, only love for their kids.

⇨ Walking in Yeonggwang Folk Village

That’s why moms are sad, and tired but also strong, precious, beautiful and great.

....So I miss her more.

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hotographer Tae-seong Kim was born in Gwangju in 1970. His first exhibition of Jeollado’s Mothers was held in 2008, followed by a second exhibition in 2009. He was involved in various exhibitions nationwide as well as in Shanghai, China. He is currently active as a photographer for Jeonlado.com magazine. You can view more of his photos at : http://blog.naver.com/r6940 ⇨ Pounding dwaenjang in Muju Micheon Village Gwangju News May 2011

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Environment

“The Road is not a Driveway” t's stronger than carbon fiber, has a 4 lb. bamboo frame, hemp fiber lugs, and every one is unique. At $3,000, this bike is a bit pricey for most people, but these bikes are gaining a lot of popularity. They're more sustainably manufactured than most bikes, take 40 hours to construct, and show how much bike technology has really become a labour of love. But why such an elaborate and thoughtful ride? Because people just love cycling. From the more high-tech to classic gliders, extreme bike races (Valparaíso Downhill) and cycle communities (critical mass), it is obvious that the global love for the sport is contagious. Even governments are supporting this love and are now offering people more incentives to ride. And as a bonus cyclists contribute to the overall health of themselves and the planet.

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A recent U.S. study shows that this all only makes sense: • 40 percent of all trips are within two miles of the home (cycle-able) • 50 percent of the working population commutes five miles or less to work • more than 82 percent of trips five miles or less are made by personal motor vehicle • American households devote 18 percent of every dollar to be spent on mobility

• American families spend more on driving than health care, education or food • more than one-third of the poorest families’ income goes to transportation And if that's not enough encouragement think about the reduced emissions, reduced transit congestion, self-empowerment (getting somewhere on your own), cardiovascular benefits, social networking (clubs races), fun, increased exploring, saving on transport costs, creative stimulation, gas costs and car repair. Internationally, governments are helping citizens take to the street by spending more money on bike highways and cycling infrastructures because worldwide air quality is getting worse. The IPCC suggests “that developed countries need to reduce emissions by 25-40 percent below 1990 levels by 2020, and 80-95 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, in order to stabilize atmospheric greenhouse gases…” Korea is also addressing its air quality by increasing the emphasis on cycling. Gwangju is getting in on the action and has recently created a road safety campaign for cyclists through Chonnam National University. The Korea Times notes that the Seoul Metropolitan Government has been installing 88.3 kilometers (54.9 miles) of bicycle lanes over the past two years, and a bike safety campaign will be held on the 2nd and 22nd of each month this year, along with other cycling advocacy. The government allocated 1.83 trillion won ($1.6 billion) to renovate and build transportation infrastructure, like public buses and bicycle lanes.

“Korea is addressing its air quality by increasing emphasis on cycling.” 16

Gwangju News May 2011


Environment

Old fashioned transportation (bikes vs. cars in Korea) Higher income citizens are enjoying bike riding which apparently encourages more bike use. In Korea the division of social classes has been an obstacle for cycling on the street because in the past bicycling tended to be done by lower income families. Since cars have been more expensive and luxurious than bicycles, they were typically more sought after. Luckily, low income people continue riding their bikes in the streets so Korean motorists are used to cyclists. This awareness can be good for road safety and those interested in riding on the streets, but skeptics may prefer the safer bike specific pathways (in Gwangju: the river path or the path in front of Chosun University). Thankfully, as long as people are enjoying bike rides, this classist stereotype can be easily hijacked.

attention for cyclist rights. People often show up to CM meetings wearing signs and costumes and have a lot of fun. The parade-like gathering can often be followed up by members lobbying the local government for bike lanes, education, safety and general awareness. South Korea has been taking part in the CM movement since 2001. Seoul, Busan, Gongju, Incheon and Suwon all have their own CM events monthly. Korean groups apparently like to use the slogans “Regain the road deprived by car”, “My heart beat when meet bicycle!” and "This road is not driveway” to appeal to people. You can check out Critical Mass Korea's wiki site at http://criticalmass.wikia.com/wiki/South_Korea or even learn how to make your own critical mass at http://critical-mass.info/howto/.

“Nice bike!” Cycling offers people a great social opportunity through various bike campaigns and clubs in most cities. Critical Mass is an unorganized group of cyclists who meet at a predetermined location typically on the last Friday each month. Without any specific leader and usually initiated by hand-billing or word of mouth, CM attendees take off on a mass cycle through city streets to get

Check out local club Gwangju Trisports too, if you feel like getting outside to run swim or cycle: www.gajgflawww.gajgfla By Trevor Homeniuk (IPCC stands for intergovernmental panel on climate change, Currently 194 countries are members of the IPCC. They are a UN based scientific organization made up of a wide variety of international members. Some of the IPCC members come from countries whose GDP rely hugely on oil exports, and so they create really dry, but factual, climate reports.)

Gwangju News May 2011

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Community

Dynamic People in Dynamic Places Chatting with an ATEK volunteer ith nearly a month and a week remaining in her tenure here in Korea, Jessica Glaeser, of Denver, Colorado, has a lot to do. As Volunteer Chair, Interm Vice President and general member of ATEK – the Association for Teachers of English in Korea – Jessica busies herself with making phone calls, sending copious e-mails, setting up volunteer meetings, establishing agendas, coordinating new contacts, and securing resources for the many initiatives she currently has in the works, and for those coming down the pike. With this, in addition to her fulltime professional teaching load, one may wonder exactly what this woman eats for breakfast to get so much accomplished in one day. From single-handedly cooking up large batches of Tex-Mex chili for organizational promotion and cultural awareness at an international food expo, to conjuring nearly inhuman levels of air pressure within her lungs and cheeks to inflate intractable carnival balloons to entertain children at a local orphanage on the other side of Busan, Jessica, like the many other dedicated, resourceful, and gregarious individuals who comprise ATEK, is everywhere, and she gets the job done.

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“You’re there not to get paid, but to give something back…..you’re there to serve,” Jessica said from behind her ceramic bowl of chilled makkoli – a well-earned Saturday evening indulgence. The soju parlor adjacent to the art gallery where we convened was buzzing with Koreans and waygookin alike, and a guitar was being passed around at another table, a group of Korean professors laughing and puffing at their cigarettes and clutching for a few scant memories of tunes they could barely command their fingers to play. I hurriedly scribbled her words into my notebook, wishing once again that I had taken that shorthand class in high school. “I guarantee that it will be the best day of your month,” she added, speaking of the various, events that ATEK volunteers initiate. I couldn’t bring myself to disagree – the afternoon I spent with the group at the orphanage 18

Gwangju News May 2011

was a knee-slapping good time, and a memorable one at that. Not only were the kids a hoot, but I made some new friends too. Founded in 2009 by Tom Raniey-Smith, Jason Thomas and Tony Hellmann, ATEK is a non-profit organization by which foreign English instructors in Korea can establish a common voice for mutual benefit, while advancing English education in a community that sets both professional and ethical standards of conduct. Its official mission statement, bylaws, member forums, and directories can be accessed at www.atek.or.kr. Membership is free. But ATEK people do a great deal more than this. Jessica continued to describe other initiatives coordinated by ATEK, including benefit programs and events for at-risk youth, cooperative endeavors with other volunteer organizations such as Habitat for Humanity, volunteer teaching programs for those Koreans and immigrant non-Koreans who cannot afford private English lessons, orphanage visits, cultural awareness programs, holiday charity events, food and clothing drives for the elderly


Community

known about ATEK when my first employer in Korea threw me into an apartment with no hot water and the landlord nowhere to be found; or when I was detained by immigration officials at Incheon airport for having forgotten to bring my alien registration card with me. Oops. Friends are good to have in moments like these.

ATEK volunteers hard at work

or impoverished, teaching resource and consultation programs for expat teachers…..the list goes on and on. Perhaps the single most important service that ATEK provides is a means by which expat educators can gain valuable support that may not otherwise be available on the job. Recognizing that the solutions to problems like overbearing and unreasonable employers, out-ofcontrol students, or substandard working conditions are not always easy to find, most veteran expat educators will attest that social and professional support can make the critical difference between a renewed and rewarding teaching contract, and permanently abandoning the country. Crucial support systems like ATEK can certainly provide that needed edge. If there is no ATEK chapter in your area, there’s no reason why you can’t contact ATEK to propose initiating your own. Then, you can launch initiatives similar to those undertaken by ATEK Busan: a timely and ongoing food and supplies drive for a local women’s shelter, occurring in the wake of new Korean legislation that has severely cut back funding for this essential program . Of course, new volunteers are always needed for programs such as these. Talking with Jessica, I caught myself wondering if my life would have been a lot more comfortable had I

After our interview, Jessica excused herself, but I decided to stay on and soak up some more of that Korean rice wine I’ve grown so fond of. Draining the last bit from my ceramic bowl, I looked over again at the group of laughing Korean professors at the other table. A little louder and a bit rowdier now, they clearly knew each other well, a familiarity obviously facilitated by a common language and heritage. Were they to lift themselves out of their comfortable sociocultural environment and into one they had little knowledge of for a year or more, how would they fare? How would they handle the difficulties and frustrations of intercultural communication? How would they organize in order to surmount those difficulties and promote their interests? Better yet, would they be able to see their interests and those of their hosts as other than mutually exclusive? I wasn’t really prepared to answer those questions at the moment. I just wanted more makkoli. Typical waygookin, drinking himself into a stupor, I thought. Good thing there are people like Jessica out there doing more important things. For more information about ATEK, including how to volunteer, please contact busan.volunteer@atek.or.kr. Story and photos by Michael Paul Begin

Gwangju News May 2011

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Community

A Different Kind of Life A story of a faith in Gwangju

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wangju, as the Hub of Asian Culture, is in fact a multicultural city. Beyond the western community, the city also is comprised of people of many different ethnicities and backgrounds.

Take Dyan Primastie, for example. Dyan arrived in Korea on February 2010 from Central Java, Indonesia. She is here to accompany her husband, Arfan Sindhu Tistomo, who is currently a Master program student at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST) in Cheomdan, Buk-gu, Gwangju. Being a foreigner with a totally different background, it is a completely different life to what Dyan and her husband used to live. As a Moslem, she needs to be very careful in choosing foods. To this day, they still find difficulties when going out to eat at a restaurant. Basically she is allowed to eat vegetables or seafood. When buying items from supermarkets, she also has to read the ingredients carefully, as to not accidentally eat anything that contains pork or pork oil. To eat daily, she and her husband buy ‘halal’ meats from a Moslem supermarket near the Gwangju Mosque. To cook Indonesian foods, she buys the ingredients from an Asian mart around Cheomdan and vegetables from a local supermarket. When asked whether this complicates her life, she said “Alhamdullilah (“Thanks to God”), Korea has the KMF (Korea Moslem Federation) and IMUSKA (Ikatan Moslem Korea = Korea Moslem Association). These are all based in Seoul, which give us lots of information and guidelines for halal foods in Korea, so that we can still practice Moslem values in terms of foods in a foreign country.” However, she considers her life in Korea to be quite convenient. “There’s a small room which is allocated for the Moslem community in GIST so that we can pray there. When we are invited by Koreans, they prepare seafood or vegetables for us. We have a good relationship with Koreans and other foreigners who are not Moslem. Even among other countries’ Moslem believers, we organize a meeting every month, so we are close with each other,” she added. 20

Gwangju News May 2011

When asked whether there’s a difference between the Moslem community in Indonesia and in Korea, she said that “it’s very different, but it is a very interesting experience for us, to meet many Moslem communities from many countries, however in terms on how we pray, we have the same principles. We also have the Indonesian Moslem Community in Korea, where we meet once a week online to discuss and learn more about Islam.” For now, Dyan has to be satisfied with the lesser facility provided for the Moslem community in Gwangju; The Gwangju Mosque, which is located in Buk-gu, is not big enough to accommodate the increasing number of Moslems who come to Gwangju. “I hope that Gwangju has a big mosque like the one in Itaewon, Seoul or in Busan. The Gwangju Mosque that exists now is just a two-story house which is too small and it won’t fit for big celebrations like Ied Mubarak. Moslem women won’t be able to attend the ceremony as there’s not enough space for all of us. We wish to have a bigger mosque with an Islamic Center where people can learn more about Islam, and we also hope to have more halal restaurants near the mosque. Currently, there’s only one small supermarket which sells halal foods in the basement of the mosque”, she said. Dyan’s husband will conclude his Masters program by August. Since he is a government civil officer in Indonesia, he has to obtain approval to continue for a Doctorate degree. Dyan hopes she can continue living in Korea, as she feels she has adjusted to her life here. “Whenever I go out, little children look at me strangely, maybe because I wear jilbab (Moslem women’s headscarves) and the way I dress is rather different. They sometimes approach me and say ‘annyeonghaseyo’ or ‘hello’. They are very cute.” By Karina Prananto Photo courtesy of Dyan Primastie


Community

Warm Smiles in the City of Light also a street food vendor where I drop by regularly just to have sweet potato with “topokki”. Although I can only greet them and say thank you, they were nice to ask me where I am from and sometimes I get a discount. It is not that bad for an alien I guess huh? was greeted by the cold wind when I first arrived in Incheon International Airport on March 1. It was my first trip to Korea and without realizing it, I made my first mistake. I underestimated the weather. For a guy who spent most of his life at a tropical region, I blame myself. It was minus 2 degrees and I only had a leather jacket on me, a pair of jeans and old dark doc marten’s boot. In my country, you would be sweating like a pig if you dressed like me, but I guess there’s a bigger world out there. But for some reason I blamed the news for announcing it was spring.

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I bought a bus ticket and prepared for the 300 kilometer bus ride to Gwangju. Four hours later I arrived and was welcomed by a lady whom I referred to as “Mr. Heejeong” when we were exchanging emails. As soon as we introduced each other, she said, “I am no Mr., I’m Miss Kim Heejeong.” I nodded and said, “Nice to meet you,” pretending nothing had happened. We went for a lunch on that day, which was a national public holiday and again it was my first time eating Korean food. I was introduced to Kimchi (which I consider it as a sacred Korean dish), Lapokki, Bibimbap, Soup and Rice. Frankly speaking everything tasted weird, and to all Koreans, especially the girls, I am sorry, I find it hard to like the Kimchi. I have cooked sometimes in my house - I am smart enough to carry some spices from home as I’m fussy when it comes to food. Oh well, I am not a good cook but my record so far is quite impressing. Two local colleagues have dinner at my place and never did they complain about my food, or are they just being polite? I don’t know. Deep down I hope they will ask me to cook again. Time flies so fast and my life is great. I have an alien card now, my work is cool, the food is good but the weather is still cruel though. I find the people in Gwangju are super friendly. I now have my favourite spot to eat dinner, and

I have realized that the people love to drink and they can drink a lot. For me, as a young Malaysian, we do drink but not after work on weekdays, yes weekdays, until 4 in the morning. If you do that in Kuala Lumpur you would be begging for an MC from your doctor the next day. But here, no matter how hard they drink, they would still be able to get up and go to work. For that my Korean friends, I salute you! Back to the weather, I am still adjusting and every morning I’d look at the mirror and said, ‘do I look like Michelin’? For those of you who never heard of Michelin, Michelin is the white giant mascot for racing tyres. I would stuff myself with three layers of shirts before putting a jacket and they say it is spring. I am still baffled because if it is spring, it is supposed to be warm and maybe a little bit of cold wind. I guess I am an alien here. I must say that I miss Malaysian food for those who have been there, you’d know how the food tastes like and the variety of food that we have. The hot sunny weather and nahh, I am not going to write about it. All I wanted to say is, it has yet to be a month since I arrived, and I have plenty of time to enjoy and a lot to discover. One thing I have learnt despite knowing that they can drink all night long, the Gwangju people were once fighters, a freedom fighter for democracy who fight for a cause and shoot for a reason. Never did they surrender nor did they give up. Known as the city of lights, the citizens of Gwangju have brightened up the world with their spirit of peace and harmony. Courageous men and women, professors and students, doctors and hawkers who raised their arms on the street that day and later died during the uprising, have surely inspired millions of people, and I am one of those millions of people who has been truly inspired, and for that my Korean friends once again, I salute you. Story and photo by Alfian Zohri Gwangju News May 2011

21


Sport

K.J. brings his A-game, falls short once again orea’s favorite golfing son, Wando resident, and Gwangju University graduate K.J. Choi shot an even par in the 4th and final round of the US Masters last weekend to drop from a five-way tie for 2nd place to a shared 8th place finish.

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Choi captured the hearts of many South Korean golf enthusiasts who stayed up into the early hours of a chilly April Monday morning to find out if he could finally bring home one of golf’s biggest prizes held at Augusta National. After carding an unexpected -5 in the 1st round of the tournament along with fellow countryman Y.E. Yang, Choi then continued his fine form through the next two days to be within striking distance of his first Majors win. Scores of -2 and -1, in the 2nd and 3rd rounds respectively, left Choi eight under par going into the tournaments’ final day. He was tied at -8 along with fellow professionals Jason Day (Australia), Adam Scott (Australia), Angel Cabrera (Argentina) and eventual winner Charl Schwartzel (South Africa). Entering the final day, Rory McIlroy

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Gwangju News May 2011

led the way with a commanding -12, four strokes in front of his closest challengers. Choi’s excellent play came as a surprise to many. Choi started the last rounds play on -8 and was as low as -10 going down the 17th hole until birdies on the 17th and 18th holes brought him back to evens for the day and final scorecard of -8. On a frantic last day at Augusta Choi had a share of the lead with only nine holes left to play. K.J. was looking good for a late charge of birdies to win himself the famous Green Jacket prize and an invite to The Masters tournament for the rest of his mortal life. Alas, it was not to be. Choi’s playing partner – South African Charl Schwartzel – made such a charge with consecutive birdies at the 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th holes sending him to an unbeatable final score of -14.


Sport

Choi can take heart from the fact he finished above 3rd round leader and final day favourite – Rory McIlroy. The Northern Irishman had a devastating final nine holes that may go down as one of the biggest chokes in Master’s history. With nine holes to play McIlroy was still in contention on a -11 before a triple bogey destroyed any hopes he had of winning his own first Major. More bogeys followed on the back nine and poor McIlroy ended up with a final card of 4, carding a final round of 80 to finish tied for 15th. BBC Sport reported overall winner Charl Schwartzel saying, “He (McIlroy) is such a phenomenal player. He’ll win one”. I’m sure that made Rory feel much better. Thanks Charl. Never the less, Choi gave his fans here in Korea something to cheer right up until the final few holes of the competition in Augusta, a course where he has had relative success over the years without finishing top of the pile. Choi spoke to PGATOUR.com and attributed his success here to the similarity of The Seoul Country Club where he won the Korean Open in 1999. Choi teeing off

“I feel comfortable because I know where to hit the ball on to the green and I know where to attack the fairways,” said Choi. “The fact that there are so many galleries here on both sides of the hole, it really enables me to focus. It’s easy to set the target.” Champion Schwartzel also paid tribute to his playing partner Choi when asked about his experiences with the Korean throughout the final 18 holes of the competition, “He always looks calm,” Schwartzel said. “You know, his golf swing never changes. He doesn't get all too excited on the course. Those sorts of things help when you're around a guy. You can feed off each other with those sorts of things.” Choi may have not won the Masters this time up but he proved once again that he enjoys this tournament even at the ripe old age of 40. Fellow Korean Y.E. Yang finished with a 73 on the day dropping him to -3 and an overall 20th place finish. Another South Korean native Anthony Kim didn’t participate in the final two rounds as he failed to make the cut after Friday’s play ended.

Naver

Both Choi and Yang showed the world that Koreans can mix it with the top talent from the USA and Europe while promoting the game in Asia, adding much hype to the Korean Open and approaching Asian tour featuring some of Europe’s elite. It is K.J. Choi however, who can once again walk away from The US Masters with his head held high.

By Darrell Slater Source: http://sports.yahoo.com/golf/pga/news?slug=reumasterschoi_pix http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/robhodgetts/2011/04/awes ome_augusta_welcomes_new_m.html http://sports.yahoo.com/golf/pga/news?slug=pgatour_ com-uncategorized_2011 http://www.majorschampionships.com/masters/2011/n ews/calm-mcallister-041011.cfm

Gwangju News May 2011

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GIC Tour Preview

GIC Mudeung Mountain Tour with Warren ay will be the first GIC “Gwangju Tour” of 2011. Spring has arrived. The plum and cherry blossoms have come and gone and the weather is getting warmer everyday. May is the "queen of months" with clear skies and fragrant breezes, so why not go outside and join the next GIC tour?!

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In the most elegant of months, the tour will visit Gwangju’s spiritual icon, Mudeung Mountain. Starting at Wonhyosa (temple), dedicated to one of Korea’s most famous Buddhist Saints, participants will walk along one of the major ancient footpaths that traverse the sacred mountain. Passing groves of pines, steep rock falls, and shrines to Korea’s mountain gods, the trail gently meanders to its end at the Uijae Museum and Culture Center. Here participants can view fine landscape paintings by one of Korea’s masters, Heo Baek Ryun, who went by the pen name: Uijae. Uijae was a devoted teacher and artist. He cultivated his artistic skills and philosophical teachings while living on the slopes of Mudeung Mountain. Among other things, he was also an advocate for Korea’s agricultural development, environmental awareness, and traditional tea culture. Appropriately spring is the time for harvesting and making “new tea,” and the tour would not be complete without being able to appreciate the beauty and flavor of fresh green tea. Finally, after a couple hours of mild walking and learning about Mudeung Mountain’s historical culture, participants will end the tour with a delicious vegetarian lunch at a Buddhist buffet restaurant. The local specialty, boribap or barley rice is the best thing on the menu. Please come out and enjoy a wonderful May day in Gwangju!

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Gwangju News May 2011

Tour Overview GIC Mudeung Mountain Tour with Warren Date: May 21, 2011(Sat.) Venue: Mudeung Mountain, Gwangju Cost: 15,000 won (10,000 won for GIC member) Itinerary: Wonhyosa – Walk along the major ancient footpaths - Uijae Art Museum – Tea Ceremony – Sujata (Buddhist buffet) Anyone interested can join the tour. To register and for more information, please visit GIC Website: www.gic.or.kr or gictour@gic.or.kr


Travel

Pure Love for Gentle Giants Elephant Nature Park – Chiang Mai, Thailand y heart still skips a beat when I reminisce about my recent month’s travels through Thailand. The ancient cities and ruins of Sukhothai, Lopburi and Arruthaya (the original capital) still captivate the souls of the Thai people. They embrace Buddha’s message purely in their heart, Buddha lockets on their necks with daily rituals around their Spirit House by lighting incense and offerings to the celestial beings. Contrasting, but just as eminent, is the presence and admiration for King Bhumibol Adulyadej. Larger than life billboards, statuettes placed on holy grounds, family shots at the bow of the ferryboat, rainbow neon signs at university entrances, and the anthem played at the movie theatre … the king is everywhere. But the one symbol that ties both old and modern world together is the Asian Elephant. Doing ecotourism and volunteering at Elephant Nature Park in Chiang Mai encourages broader views and awareness of this gentle, but highly endangered humanlike giant.

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Their Significance Elephants form an important part of Thai culture and national symbols. It is easy to spot this from the open markets with their mark on the silk ties, handicrafts for appeal to the tourism industry, to the advertisement logos on beer and soda bottles (Chang products). Their spiritual significances started when Queen Maya, mother of Buddha, was only able to conceive after having a dream that a white elephant enter inside her. This is highly auspicious and considered royal status in Thailand. Moreover, Thai Buddhists incorporate Hindu beliefs with the “Ganesh” – the Hindu gods with an elephant’s head, seen at temple entrances. Elephants are revered so much so that on March 13th each year is Thai Elephant Day. This is to bring awareness of the importance of elephant conservation.

Cultural Contradictions – Elephants roam the cityscape

⇨ New family bonding time after a dip in river. 26

Gwangju News May 2011

Alike with cultures around the world, there is always evidence of cultural contradictions within a nation. But, to me, this one is hard to swallow or comprehend. The alarming starter; there are NO laws to protect or fund reserves, as they are considered to be livestock like chicken or cow. The population of elephants in Thailand was approximately 100,000 in the early 1900s. Today, that figure is approximately 3,000–4,000 with almost half of that number domesticated and the remainder living wild in National Parks. Your math is correct, its population is only around 5 percent of what it was a century ago… and diminishing.


Travel

Hope “Naughty Boy” running free

Grazing elephants upclose

This problem started with the logging industry and brutal treatment by keepers who abuse them. Elephants are jabbed with knives and spears (including their eyes and inner ear), overworked and overdosed on amphetamines to increase their stamina. When they are no longer able to work, they are abandoned and die, as they can no longer fend for themselves. Logging is no longer legal, thankfully, but the results speak for itself. Now with less forest work, the Mahouts, keeper and driver of the elephants, bring their elephants into big cities like Bangkok for money as Thais and foreigners have a soft spot for these creatures. What is not realized is these elephants can’t tolerate city life; it’s another form of abuse. Elephants need about 250kg of food a day. They may get half of that and it is not nutritionally balanced. Their sense of sound far exceeds humans; Could you imagine the effects from traffic to them? These are some of the alarming details I learned about from Elephant Nature Park, and it all started with a tear jerking video on our transport to their reserve from downtown Chiang Mai.

or two, their goals, efforts, and passion from the tour guides and volunteers are far from outdated. Sangduen Chailert (Lek), founder, operates this educational park. “Her lifequest is to provide a sanctuary for elephants to live in a peaceful natural environment.” She has hopes of a future where they could be released back into the wild, but until there’s government protection, they will stay with her and crew. Now over 30 rescued elephants reside here. Many came with grim hopes of survival, including a baby boy called Hope “Naughty Boy”, now with a typical teenage rebellion. Elephants are very human in many ways, with life expectancies into their 70s and gestation periods of over 18 months. Also, these elephants have created new family units and recovered due to the financial support of ecotourists and private funding. The key ingredient to the success is Lek’s techniques. She proves that pure love builds relationships and industry between man and animal.

100% Run by Ecotourism and Love

To read more about the 34 rescued elephants and the rewards of ecotourism, please go to: http://www.elephantnaturepark.org

Although Elephant Nature Park’s website could use a facelift Story and photos by Debra M. Josephson

⇨ Ecotourists cooling down elephants from the summer heat. Gwangju News May 2011

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PHOTO CONTEST Submit your best shot of Korea! To enter the Photo Contest, simply send your name, photo and picture description to gwangjunews@gmail.com.

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A man at the construction site of the Asia Culture Complex

Green Tea Ice Cream 28

Gwangju News May 2011

Photo by Jessica Solomatenko

Photo by Mesa Schumacher


Photo Contest

This month’s photo contest was judged by Mark Eaton. Mark Eaton has exhibited his photographic work in art galleries as well as other public and private venues in the United States and South Korea.

A sea view at Galdu-ri, Songji-myeon, Haenam, Jeollanamdo

The German Bar Drums

Photo by Andrea Galvez

Photo by Wendy Perkins Gwangju News May 2011

29


Travel

Roosters Awake in Gold

– A Photo Essay from Myanmar

By Kerrilyn Strothard

Let Shwedagon Paya steal your heart and dance in your memories for years to come after you visit. It is the most sacred place in all of Myanmar, and it is visible from almost any vantage point in the former capital of Yangon, as it stands tall and above the rest of the city. When entering the temple, you pay a 6,000 kyat entrance fee (roughly 6,000 won), all of which goes to the government. It’s the unfortunate price of seeing such an incredible wonder. You should mostly steer clear of government-run guesthouses and transportation during your stay in Myanmar, but this site remains an absolute must-see.

⇨ Ask if your guesthouse offers traditional Myanmar breakfasts. Pictured above is pe nam bya, which is Indian flatbread served with boiled garden peas with a bit of groundnut oil. This breakfast was offered free with a night’s stay at the Motherland Inn 2 in Yangon (which also conveniently offers free airport pickup). 30

Gwangju News May 2011


Travel

⇨ Your cheeks will ache from returning so many smiles. Burmese people are some of the sweetest and most smiley people I’ve ever encountered. They smile at a glance, and show warm interest in visitors who take the time to strike up a conversation. At Inya Lake , these two kiddies sat down and smiled. This is the biggest lake in Yangon, and it is a hangout for middle schoolers with guitars and couples alike. For tourists, it’s a nice stop since it’s free (compared to the slightly more jazzed up Kandawgyi Lake). Rent a bicycle for 3,000 won a day and ride up Inya Road to have your own lake adventure.

⇨ The Than Zay Market will give your sinuses a kick. Get yourself to the New Bogyoke Market on Shwedagon Paya Road, and walk south to the Indian quarter. You’ll soon hear and smell the street market located where Shwedagon Paya Road meets Anawaratha Road. Enjoy free smiles and fish flopping out of their containers.

⇨ Hunt for lucky snakes on the street and strike up a conversation with the vendor. Often the greatest conversations and connections you’ll develop in Yangon will be with street vendors.

Gwangju News May 2011

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News

Home Pages Want to write about news from your country? Contact the Editor for more information: gwangjunews@gmail.com.

Australia New drinking and intoxication laws are set to put a damper on the culture of getting blind drunk on a Friday or Saturday night with your mates. The state of NSW is going to make the act of “shouting drinks” to an alreadydrunk friend illegal, with those committing such an act possibly ending up in court. According to the NSW police minister “friends and family needed to shoulder some of the responsibility of curtailing a drunk’s boozy night before [they] became a menace.” It’s a bit harsh but at least it eliminates the confusion of doing rounds. Source: news.com.au

By Kathleen Villadiego

U.S.A Watch Out for One-Armed Residents! While the country is facing a complete financial meltdown, the one-armed residents of Maine can feel a little safer: they will be able to carry three inch switchblades as a means of protection. Traditional pocket knives are considered both difficult and hazardous to open in emergency situations. Every state has its own policy about the legality of switchblades but Maine is the first to pass this legislation. Other states may soon follow with similar exceptions. It’s nice to know that no one will threaten these residents at the risk of personal safety! Source: http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110407/ od_nm/us_maine_switchblades By Aisha Hobbs

New Zealand After the February earthquake ended the rebuilding has begun. At this stage the bill is $1.1 billion, but of course with everything like this it is only going to rise and by a fair amount. There are many suggestions about how to pay for this work; among them is to borrow more money, and another is to sell off public assets, which the government seems to be leaning towards. One suggestion met with anger was forcing repayments from those with student loans and increasing the interest on the loans. This would lead to a greater number of graduates doing a runner from New Zealand.

India

Due to the destruction many have had to rent motor homes or have been forced to live in camping grounds. Many will be stuck in this situation as Christchurch has identified a need for at least 12,000 people to assist in the rebuild.

April 2, 2011. Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai. Four runs needed with 11 balls remaining. Kulasekara bowls. Dhoni hits a six. A nation erupts. A billion scream. That was the end of the ICC Cricket World Cup. Having won its last World Cup 27 years ago, the nation searched for something to be happy about. India beat Australia in the quarters then beat 'archrivals' Pakistan in the semifinal. By beating Pakistan, the team ensured that they would be forgiven even if they lost the finals to Sri Lanka. In the finals, Sri Lanka, batting first, set India a target of 275 to win. India, uncharacteristically, played a steady inning to beat Sri Lanka. The long wait had ended. For a country obsessed with cricket, probably the only sport in which it has something to boast about, this was the pinnacle. I can only hope and pray we now find 11 among a billion to kick the ball around and play Football.

By Blair Fitzgerald

By Mano Samuel

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Living Tips

Shopping in Gwangju L

et Gwangju Guide website help you with your shopping. Here are some things you can find in it:

Foreign Grocers: UG, Filipino stores, Chinese grocers, Asia marts. Plus info on getting to Costco in Daejeon. Miscellaneous: The dollar store or rather the cheon won store. Bookstores: There is more than Youngpoong at the Bus Terminal if you are looking for English books. Electronics: Franchises like HiMart in addition to neighborhood streets of electronics like Geumnam and Bando. And of course the Youngsan Market of Gwangju – Kumho World. Clothing: boutiques, franchises and outlets galore all around the city. Traditional Markets: a disappearing piece of the Korean city landscape. Check out the newly buffed up Yangdong market, the struggling Daein market, the bustling neighborhood markets of Malbau and Namgwangju. Department Stores: These are landmarks around the city as well as being chock full of brand names: Shinsaegae, Lotte, Hyundai. These department stores are mini cities. You can take hobby classes (art, yoga, exercise) in the upper floors, as well as buy your groceries and eat at upscale restaurants located in the basement. Big Marts/Hyper Stores: Emarts, Home Plus, Lotte Mart, Lotte Super keep popping up in every neighborhood. Secondhand Stores: The Beautiful Store dominates the second hand store market, but there are several others that cater to specialties like children’s clothes or fashion, like at the two locations of Tokyo Juice in Chungjangno. G r o c e r y S h o p p i n g: So many places to shop. Convenience stores like 711 and GS 25 and Ministop. Mom and Pop Marts offer the best prices with limited selections. Next are Lotte Super Centers and similar neighborhood supermarkets. Next up are the hyper marts like Lotte Mart, Emart, and HomePlus. The

Buying organic food in Korea I enjoy eating organic food and I’ve found a few ways to get it in Korea. The easiest is at the big grocery stores; E-mart, Homeplus, Lotte Mart, and Hanaro Mart. Some stores have an organic produce section to make it easier for your, but most just have it mixed in with the regular foods. One thing all orgainc labels have in common is a symbol. It is a blue and green outline of an apple with a leaf attached. You’ll also notice a higher price which is a pretty big giveaway that it’s organic. There are also two organic food shops around the country; 초록마을 (Green Village) and icoop. Green Village is the easiest to use. Everyone pays the same price. Icoop has two prices, one for members and one for non-members. Becoming a member can be a bit of a pain since their system doesn’t like foreigner ID numbers. Though with the help of a Korean friend, it can be done. A third option exists on the Internet. Icoop (icoop.or.kr) has a wonderful website with a wider selection than the shops have. In addition, if you order over 15,000 won worth of products they will deliver it to your house for free. Delivery is only on specific days and you have to order 3-7 days in advance. I usually place my order seven days in advance to make sure that they have what I want in stock. There is a limited quantity and some things go quickly. There’s an enrollment and monthly fee. Again registering can be a pain, so have a Korean friend call the office. I’ve never been disatisfied with the produce they’ve sent me. By Kristi Heyd

department stores have groceries, wine and imported goods in their basements – pricey but worth the splurge occasionally. Small entrepreneurs offering international fare include the foreign grocers mentioned above. Whether looking for a new food shopping center, or needing to update your wardrobe for the season, check out the Gwangju Guide at gwangjuguide.or.kr to help you get around.

Gwangju News May 2011

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Language Study

Letters to KOTESOL If you have a question for Dr. David, please send an e-mail to gwangjunews@gmail.com letting us know your question, student’s age and proficiency level

Dear Dr. Dave, There is a sizable gap between properly composed English and commonly spoken English. In America especially, most people use so much slang and pop culture references in everyday speech that truly proper grammar and pronunciation stands out as unusual. When is the best time to begin introducing details of more natural speaking? Should that be reserved for advanced levels, after the rules are well understood, or is it better to introduce the contradictions to intermediate or beginner levels? Wendy =) Dear Wendy, It appears that you hold the belief that formal written English is the only acceptable or “proper” form of English. This is just not a true picture of English. In broad terms, there are two styles of English that any speaker has – a spoken style and a written style. They differ quite a bit for any individual. Also there are several sub-styles of both spoken and written English depending on who you are communicating with and the formality of the situation. Each sub-style is “proper” if used in the correct situation. I think that it is best to introduce the more formal spoken and written styles first, but we should not impose the written style norms on spoken English. They are different. I don’t speak the way I write, and I don’t think we should try to make our students do so. As for contractions, of course, introduce the full forms first, but begin practicing the contracted forms early in speech, and require the full forms (except for –n’t) in writing. Dr. Dave By Dr. David Shaffer Dr. David Shaffer is a professor of English at Chosun University, where he has taught in the graduate, undergraduate, and TESOL certificate programs for many years. Dr. Shaffer is presently the President of the Gwangju-Jeonnam Chapter of Korea TESOL and invites you to attend teacher development workshops at their monthly Chapter meetings. Web: www.koreatesol.org/GwangjuJeonnam Email: gwangju_kotesol@yahoo.com

34

Gwangju News May 2011

Dear Dr. Dave, What is the best path to having a successful career in ESL, particularly here in Korea? Would you recommend a certain qualification or do you think experience is more highly valued? R the ambitious Dear Ambitious, It used to be the case that any bachelor’s degree was satisfactory to teach English in Korea. But the times are a-changing. Teacher training programs require a master’s degree in TESOL or equivalent. Many university language programs prefer a master’s degree and often a master’s degree in a language-related field. If one does not have a master’s, a bachelor’s degree with an accompanying TESOL certificate is preferable. Experience is not enough today. The educational qualification to base the experience on is becoming more and more of a requirement. So, if you have only a bachelor’s degree in a non-TESOL-related field and want to pursue a career in TESOL, I suggest that you enroll in a 100-hour or more TESOL post-graduate certificate program soon. After that, I suggest that you consider a higher certificate or an MA-TESOL master’s degree program. More and more good programs are becoming available online. Dr. Dave

Gwangju - Jeonnam KOTESOL May Chapter Meeting Time: Saturday, May 7, 2011, 1:30 p.m. - 4.30 p.m. Place: Chosun University, Main Building (Bon-gwan), 2F, Room 2123 (CU TESOL). (Admission is free. Membership is encouraged.) Contact and Schedule Information: http://www.koreatesol.org/GwangjuJeonnam Email us: gwangju_kotesol@yahoo.com


Language Study

The Marker: '-에서’: at/in, from Dialogue 소라: 존씨, 안녕하세요? Sora: Hello, John

aseyo?] [ jonsssi, annyeongha

존: 네, 안녕하세요? 소라씨, 지금 어디에 가요? [ ne, annyeongha aseyo?.. Sora assi, jigeum eodie ga ayo?] John: Yeah, How are you? Sora, where are you going now? 소라: 시내에 가요. [ sina aee ga ayo..] Sora: I am going downtown. 존: 거기에 왜 가요? [geogie wae gayo?] John: Why are you going there? 소라: 시내에서 친구를 만나요. [ sin naeeseo chin ngurreull mannayo o.] Sora: To meet my friend. 존: 저도 그래요. 서점에서 친구를 만나요. [jeodo geuraeyo. seojeomeseo chingureul mannayo.] John: So am I, I am meeting my friend at the bookstore. 소라: 아, 그래요? Sora: Really?

[ a, ge eurraeyo o?]

존: 같이 가요. [ ga achi ga ayo..] John: Let's go together. Reference: 김성희 외. (2009). 서강한국어1A 서울: 도서출판 하우 서강한국어. Retrived January15, 2011 from http://korean.sogang.ac.kr

Grammar The marker '-에서' : at/in, from The marker '-에서' has two meanings. One is 'at' or 'in' indicating the place where an action takes place. Another meaning is 'from', indicating a starting point or cause. Example •식당에서 저녁을 먹어요. (I eat dinner at the restaurant.) •카페에서 친구를 만나요. (I am meeting a friend at the cafe.) •한국에서 왔어요. (I come from Korea.)

Vocabulary 지금[jigeum]: now 친구[chingu]: a friend 서점[seojeom]: a bookstore 가요[gayo]: go

시내[sinae]: downtown 만나요[mannayo]: meet 같이[gachi]: together 식당[sikdang]:a restaurant

By Soo-a Jung Soo-a Jung is an instructor at the GIC Korean Language Class

2011 GIC Korean Language Class Schedule 3rd May 14 - June 30 4th July 9 - August 25 5th September 5 - October 22 6th November 5 - December 22 For more information, please contact Moon So-eun at (062) 226-2733/4 or e-mail gwangjuic@gmail.com

Gwangju News May 2011

35


Education

Kwangju Foreign School:

Past, Present and Future The Only Foreign School in Gwangju In the spring of 1999, Kwangju Foreign School (KFS) was established as the first and only foreign school in the city of Gwangju. Even though the school has a history of educating students for over 10 years, with a vast majority of its graduates moving on to universities abroad, many foreigners living in Gwangju still know very little about the school program. Initially, the school enrolled just 13 students in a pre-K to grade 8 elementary program. As the school developed to meet the needs of its students, the school soon expanded its program to a pre-K to grade 4 elementary, a grade 5 to grade 8 middle school, and a grade 9 to grade 12 high school by the fall of 2001. In a few short years, enrollment rose to over 100 students and has held steady ever since. Today, the school offers a comprehensive pre-K to grade 12 college-prep program based on United States curriculum standards. It is fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), an accreditation agency located in the state of California; WASC accredits over 4,000 public, private, and international schools in California, Hawaii, and throughout Asia. The school has a current enrollment of 108 students and a faculty of 15 foreign teachers and 3 Korean teachers. The 6:1 student to teacher ratio allows for individualized attention to promote student success. The many curricular and extracurricular programs offered at the school provide students with the experiences and skills to be successful in a competitive global society. Advanced Placement courses, foreign language, orchestra, choir, athletic programs, Model United Nations, and various afterschool activities are some of the opportunities students are offered at KFS. The school continuously reviews the needs of the students and searches for ways to enhance the students’ educational experience and promote student learning.

A New Home and a New Beginning As the school expanded its programs and increased enrollment, it became evident the school outgrew its original campus in Yangsan-Dong. Realizing the need to move to a purpose built campus, the director of the school worked closely with the Gwangju city government to develop and implement a plan to construct a new worldclass facility to take KFS into the 21st century. The site of the new facility is located in Cheomdeon near the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST). Construction began in March 2011 and is scheduled to be completed by December 2011. The new campus will allow the school to continue to grow in both programs and enrollment. 36

Gwangju News May 2011

With the construction of the new campus underway, there is a sincere effort by the administration of the school to reach out to the foreigners living in Gwangju to attract prospective students and meet the needs of the foreign community. While KFS is one of the least expensive foreign schools in Korea, it is still a costly investment for many English teaching couples living in Gwangju. In addition to the new campus, a financial aid package has been developed to help alleviate the financial strain and make KFS the first choice among Gwangju’s foreign families. Under the new financial aid program, foreign families can receive a significant discount based on the following criteria: (1) student performance in the classroom, (2) parent involvement in the school, and (3) household income.

KFS Hosts Foreign Family Events On April 30, 2011, the school hosted a foreign family social event at the Yangsan-Dong campus. Foreign families gathered together for a BBQ and other social activities. It was an opportunity for parents to learn more about the school program and mingle with the school’s teachers. KFS plans to host such events on a regular basis and encourages all foreign families to attend. For more information about school programs, financial aid opportunities, or future foreign family events, please email principal@kwangjuforeignschool.org.

By Gerald E. Schoen, Principal Kwangju Foreign School


Literature

Poetry Ko Un was born in Kunsan, Jeollabuk-do in 1933. As a recipient of numerous literary awards, Ko Un is one of the most famous contemporary poets in Korea. Since his debut in Hyondae Munhak in 1958, he has since produced over 120 literary works, including novels and critical writings. In 2010 he completed Maninbo, a now 30-volume poetry collection that had been published in installments over a period of twenty three years.

If May Passes by Forgotten What will we do if May passes by forgotten? What will we do if May passes by forgotten? One midnight in May martial law descended upon us. We were beaten up like dogs and dragged in. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? One day in May we rose up, clenching a thousand-year-old anger, clutching empty hands, we rose up. We ran to the fresh green street, our street, to Kumnam-no, the street of liberation, to rise up. We drove away the pitch dark night, firing our hearts with democracy, people, and nation against the division of treason against the treason of forty years of fascism, against the tank of martial law we rose. Sing! Fight! Bury these ghastly bodies! On this fresh green street, our street, soon we fell down from bullets, shedding blood. We fell, spilling red blood– collapsed corpses, we were dragged on and on, covered by gray dust, covered by ash, we were taken somewhere like dead dogs, carried on the military trucks that rushed by. Oh, Mangwol Cemetery is not the only place, the only place. Seven hundred, eight hundred, or two thousand patriots are still buried in unknown territory. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? One day in May we fought to the end, at Province Hall, in deserted back alleys, we fought, stepping on the bloodstains of our dead comrades. We fought proudly in the name of the Civilian Army of the Gwangju Uprising, against foreign forces, against compradors, against the legacies of the Yushin dictatorial reform, defending the lives of our land who could not be desecrated, we died with punctured chests. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? At dusk, in the street outside Province Hall, a high school student tore his clothes and his cry echoed through the streets: “my sister was murdered brutally and ferociously– give me a gun. I can fight.” Soon after, he too, was shot and killed. “Your beautiful breasts chopped like tofu.” Oh, young girls and pregnant women were stabbed to death. In the streets, back alleys, and dead ends 38

Gwangju News May 2011

young men were killed and dragged away. One day in May, on the street of democracy, people, and nation, suddenly the savages descended: the 20th Division of Yangpyong, the Special Troop, the 31st Division. The martial law troops of the 7th Airborne, the 3rd Airborne, and the 11th Airborne broke in, randomly shooting M16 rifles, crushing with their gun handles, stabbing again and again with their fixed bayonets; reeking of liquor, they shot to death even those who surrendered. Oh, the screams of this Inferno ran over the streets, like waves. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? What will we do if May passes by forgotten? Afterwards, the silence of the tremendous terror, like the steel grave, extended over the living and the dead. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? From death we had to start all over again. Those who survived, even those who forgot their grief had to return and start all over again in the street of death. We have died and have no words. We have lived and have no words. We were jailed, gagged, without even the sky to look towards, gnashing our teeth, every heart filled with a thousand years of bitter resentment, swallowing this time of shame. Down the violated street military boots of the 5th Republic marched heavily. After that May, we carried death on our backs. One snowy day, we first came out to Kumnam street and Chungjang street, and shook one another’s hands once again: “You are alive.” “You are, too.” Then we ran to Mangwol cemetery and wept. Since then we came together every year and rose up. Over and over we identified the enemies hiding on the dark side, blowing our hot breath and defrosting the windows. The star spangled banner flies high over this land–


Literature

this land swarms with Japs. Now Gwangju is not Gwangju—Gwangju is not only a place. It is the heart of the history of this land. So many people rose up in every street– every town, people met whispering: lives of workers have become lumps of coal, cows are worth nothing, and farmers have swallowed pesticides and perished. A taxi driver burned himself up. Families have been asphyxiated by coal fumes. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? College students set themselves on fire, falling like flowers, and tens of others are ready to follow. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? Billions of Won were spent on teargas, apple bombs, and other god-damn bombs, which blew up in our eyes and made us blind, or shocked our chests and we collapsed. Those who threw a stone were dragged out and beaten up till they vomited blood. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? What will we do if May passes by forgotten? The struggle for justice has not ended in the factories or the schools. Even in prisons the struggle goes on for victory. But in the cities of deception the flag of blood-ties waves strong, Japan’s ruling party gleefully enters in and out, like eunuchs who visit their in-laws. Even the trash of the Yushin dictatorship has returned to take its part. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? To break these foreign forces, these compradors, this betrayal, to sweep up this division and this fascism, to achieve our independence, our equality, and our reunification, to dance a dance of history, let our bodies terribly rot, buried deep in this history.

오월이 가면 고은 5월이 가면 어이하나 5월이 가면 어이하나 5월 어느 날 한밤중 계엄령이 덮쳤는데 우리는 개처럼 두들겨 맞으며 끌려갔는데 5월이 가면 어이하나 5월 어느 날 우리는 일어섰는데 천 년의 분노 웅켜쥐고 맨주먹 쥐고 일어섰는데 신록의 거리 그 거리 해방의 거리 금남로에 달려가 일어섰는데 아 우리들의 가슴팍에 민주 민중 민족의 불질러 캄캄한 밤 몰아냈는데 반역의 분단 반역의 팟쇼 40년 계엄령의 탱크 앞에서 일어섰는데 노래하라 싸워라 처절히 묻어버려라 이 몸뚱아리 신록의 거리 그 거리에서 이윽고 우리는 총 맞아 쓰러졌는데 피 뿜으며 붉은 피 뿜으며 쓰러졌는데 쓰러진 송장으로 질질 끌려갔는데 횟가루 뿌려 재 뿌려

We will fight, dead. We will fight, feverishly living. So we live, out of breath. Oh, May! Oh, May! Oh, May of the splendid, green, dazzling days! What will we do if May passes by forgotten? On a day dense with teargas we shed tears and cough. The cuckoo sings; at night it sings mournfully. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? Oh, dead fighters, friends, a hundred years of struggle is not over yet. We have to fight a hundred years more, friends. We must fight on from generation to generation. What will we do if May passes by forgotten? What will we do if May passes by forgotten? No matter what, we will always unite again. The scattered will meet again. Blood-boiling May, the month of struggle that shakes the whole body, May, you are us. United, we move on, breaking the waves of the ocean. Although May has passed, May is always alive in us. We ourselves are May. We are May. We are May. Shouts bursting from seven million of our people! The masses of joy and embracing that will burst from every corner of this land on that morning! Oh, that’s our May. Liberation achieved from death. That day, come quick!

뒈진 개처럼 어디론가 실려갔는데 질주하는 군용트럭에 실려갔는데 아 망월동은 하나가 아니다 하나가 아니다 아직도 모두 그 어딘가에 7백의총으로 8백의총으로 2천의총으로 파묻혔는데 5월이 가면 어이하나 5월 어느 날 마지막까지 도청에서 흩어져 버린 뒷골목에서 우리는 죽어간 동지의 핏자국 밟고 싸웠는데 그 이름 광주항쟁시민군으로 싸웠는데 외세와 맞서 매판과 맞서 유신잔재와 맞서 아 이 땅의 욕될 수 없는 삶을 지키다가 가슴 뚫리며 죽어갔는데 그 5월이 가면 어이하나 어느 고교생 황혼의 거리 도청 앞에서 옷을 찢으며 온 거리 떠나가라고 울부짖었는데 내 누나가 잔인무도하게 학살당했는데 나에게 총을 주세요 나도 싸울 수 있어요 그러다가 그 학생마저 총 맞아 죽어갔는데 두부처럼 짤려나간 어여쁜 너의 젖가슴 아 그렇게도 싱그러운 처녀들 임신한 아낙네 찔려서 죽어갔는데 거리에서 골목에서 막다른 뒷골목에서 Gwangju News May 2011 39


Literature

사나이들 죽어서 끌려갔는데 5월 어느 날 민주 민중 민족의 거리에 이윽고 야만인 그들이 닥쳤는데 양평 20사단 상무대 병력 31사단 7공수 3공수 11공수 계엄군 쳐들어와 M16소총 마구 갈겨댔는데 개머리판으로 찍어대고 총검으로 푹푹 찔러댔는데 술냄새 진하게 풍기며 투항자도 전원 사살했는데 아 그 지옥의 비명이 거리에 파도처럼 넘쳤는데 5월이 가면 어이하나 5월이 가면 어이하나 그 뒤 엄청난 공포의 도가니 무덤 같은 정적이 죽은 자와 산 자에게 길길이 뻗쳤는데 그 5월이 가면 어이하나 모든 것은 죽음으로부터 다시 시작해야 했는데 산 자들이 돌아와 통곡마저 잃어버린 그들이 돌아와 모든 것을 죽음의 거리에서 시작해야 했는데 우리는 죽어서 말이 없고 우리는 살아서 말이 없고 우리는 감옥에서 자갈 물려 바라볼 하늘도 없이 이를 악물고 가슴마다 천 년의 원한 꽉 채워서 욕된 세월 삼키고 있는데 저 능욕의 거리에서 제5공화국 군화소리 지나가는데 그 5월을 지나서 죽음을 하나씩 등에 지고 우리는 눈 내리는 날 처음으로 금남로 충장로에 나와서 눈을 맞으며 우리는 서로서로 빼앗긴 악수를 찾았는데 너 살았구나 너 살았구나 그러나 우리는 망월동으로 달려가 엉엉 울었는데 그리하여 우리는 해마다 다시 뭉쳐 일어섰는데 우리는 희미꾸레한 저쪽에 숨은 적과 원수들을 훅 훅 뜨거운 입김 불어 닦아내고 몇 번이나 확인했는데 이 땅의 하늘 높이 성조기는 펄럭대는데 이 땅은 쪽바리 득실대는데 광주는 이제 광주가 아니다 광주만이 아니다 그것은 이 땅의 역사 거점이다 그리하여 모든 거리거리마다 일어섰는데 모든 마을마다 수근거리며 모였는데 노동자의 생목숨 숯덩이가 되고 소값이 똥값 되어 농민이 농약 먹고 뻗어버렸는데 택시기사가 제 몸 불살라 쓰러지고 한 가족 몇 식구가 연탄불 먹고 식어가는데 5월이 가면 어이하나 대학생이 분신자결 산화하는데 분신반 몇십 명이 줄줄이 나서고 있는데 5월이 가면 어이하나 최루탄 사과탄 개지랄탄 몇 10억 원어치로 눈에 맞아 눈 멀고 가슴 맞아 꼬꾸라지는데 돌멩이 하나 던지다가 끌려가 몰매 맞고 피 토하는데 5월이 가면 어이하나 5월이 가면 어이하나 공장에서도 학교에서도 정의의 싸움 끝나지 않고

감옥에서도 싸우고 싸워 이기는데 그러나 기만의 도시마다 혈맹의 기 끄떡없는데 일본 자민당만 삐까번쩍 드나드는데 유신 쓰레기까지 다시 돌아와 한 몫 잡는데 5월이 가면 어이하나 이 외세 이 매판 이 반역 깨부수기 위하여 이 분단과 팟쇼 사그리사그리 쓸어내기 위하여 우리 자주와 우리 평등 우리 통일을 위하여 아 이 역사의 춤판 한바탕 춤을 위하여 오늘 처절히 썩어버려라 이 몸뚱아리 이 역사 속에 깊이깊이 묻혀서 죽어 싸우리라 펄펄 살아 싸우리라 우리는 이렇게 살아서 숨막히는데 5월이여 5월이여 찬란한 신록 눈부신 날의 5월이여 5월이 가면 어이하나

최루탄가스 자욱한 날 눈물 질질 흘리며 콜록대며 뻐꾸기 우는데 밤이면 접동새 슬피 우는데 5월이 가면 어이하나 아 죽어간 전사들이여 벗들이여 백 년 싸움 아직도 끝나지 않았다 백 년도 더 싸워야 한다 5월이 가면 어이하나 5월이 가면 어이하나 그러나 우리는 언제나 새로 뭉친다 흩어진 자 다시 모인다 피 끓어오르는 5월 온몸 퉁겨오르는 항쟁의 5월이 우리 아니냐 우리는 뭉쳐 큰 바다 파도 가르며 나아간다 5월이 가도 언제나 우리에게 5월이 살아 있다 아 우리야말로 5월이다 5월이다 5월이다 온 겨레 7천만의 함성이여 그 아침 삼천리에 터져나올 환희의 전선이여 포옹이여 아 그것이 우리들의 5월이다 죽어서 이룬 해방이다 어서 오라 그 날

Photos by Mark Eaton Translators’ Brief Bios:

Chae-pyong Song is an associate professor of English at Marygrove College in Detroit, Michigan. Anne M. Rashid is an assistant professor of English at Carlow University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where she teaches American literature and creative writing courses. She and Song have published translations in The Korea Times, New Writing from Korea and Gwangju News.

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Review

Classic Movie Review

The Way Home

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oday’s movie is dedicated to all the grandmothers out there. Jibeuro, or The Way Home, is a touching family classic of extremely high caliber. Although it was written and directed by the somewhat obscure Lee Jeong Hyang, it is one of the finest films I’ve seen to date. No matter your nationality, this would be the absolutely perfect film to watch with your grandmother, or any elderly person you’re close to. The story starts when a single mother is forced to leave her spoiled city-boy son in the Korean countryside due to economic hardships and a run-off husband. This young, metropolitan Seoulite is left alone with his mute grandmother, and conflict soon ensues. He treats her terribly at first, hates the country and wants only to eat hamburgers and play his Gameboy. Somewhat predictably over the course of the film, he learns the importance of humility, respect, and love for others through his relationship with his Granny. Thematically it is much deeper than this somewhat unoriginal plot might indicate. In particular it seems to condemn the gigantic generation gap created in Korea during recent times, and the sweeping changes in lifestyle that seem to have begun taking place since around the year 2000. One poignant scene, in which the boy rudely demands "Kentucky chicken", and his well-meaning Grandmother instead prepares traditional Korean chicken soup, is particularly telling. Secondly, the film kind of champions a rural and bucolic lifestyle, showing country people as almost morally superior to city folk. The two characters from the city seem to be selfish and self-occupied, while the

country characters seem to live to help each other and appreciate the simple pleasures of hard work and independence. Third, and perhaps foremost, the movie serves as a reminder to respect the elderly, a tradition so central to Korean culture. Because one of the two main characters is a mute, this is one of the few films that you could watch without subtitles or a high level of Korean. The movie relies on visuals to tell the story, and there is probably no more than five minutes of dialog throughout. In fact, the style of this film reminded me a lot of Kurosawa's flicks, where he really focuses on using the camera and the actions of the characters to tell the story. It works seamlessly and really lends itself to the peaceful and idyllic setting of the film. If your grandmother is still around, watch this film with her; you'll finish it closer to her than you started, guaranteed. By Seth Pevey First published in the Gwangju Blog

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Fashion

Fash-On with xxl jjdp Beige, Belts and Bags

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ummer is almost here, and now that the cherry blossoms have come and gone, many people cannot wait to fully enjoy the amazing outdoors in the sun and take a dip in a refreshing mountain stream. This month I will be covering some basic investment items and transitional spring/summer trends. To me, investment pieces are items that initially might seem a bit pricey, but as these purchases are made for, and because of their quality, rest assured that they will last you for the rest of your life. This summer will be hot, hot, hot! Those not so familiar with the Korean summer will soon discover that after the pleasant warm and dry days of spring have gone - the monsoon season soon approaches, with surprise rain showers any time of the day, so let’s be prepared. Although it is already May, mornings and evenings might still be a bit chilly, and I often wear a light jacket that I can quickly shed as the mercury rises. In times of trouble, filling my need is none other than a tan or fawn classic trench coat. I purchased mine about four years ago, and the number of compliments I have received are uncountable. This proves the same for the various outfit combinations a trench coat seems to enable. Simply wear it with jeans and a t-shirt, or with a full suit (for both men and women) and you are bound to be one of the classiest people around. Purchase a traditional longer trench that reaches just below the knee, or slightly above, and this will take you from spring to summer effortlessly. It will also double up as a rain coat for those ‘splish-splash’ moments which are just around the corner. Also make sure to get a fabric which dries easily so you don’t need to worry about carrying a wet coat around all day. A quality trench will also take you from fall to winter, so although the initial purchase might seem expensive, you can literally wear this coat all year round. No matter what country you are in, it is a sign of class and distinction which adds immediate professionalism to any outfit. I also have a more updated, shorter version which is more like a blazer or a crepe shirt. Pair with jeans, chinos, 42

Gwangju News May 2011


Fashion

or even a pair of cargo shorts and you will stay cool and stylishly comfortable throughout your day. Now onto belts and accessories. A great brown belt is another great investment piece. It goes well with most colors in the neutral spectrum – black, white, beige, and also works especially well with navy. The only concern when wearing a brown belt is ensuring that it matches your shoes. A brown belt with black shoes is a total faux pas. Invest in real leather, as if taken care of it will last you forever. Belts are also great for updating outfits, so ladies, simply pair with a simple skirt or over a blazer, and you are immediately edgier and more ‘Fash-on’ forward. Gwangju is also really fortunate that it is not too far from many outdoor activities, as Mudeung Mountain, nature trails and even the beach are all within close range. Therefore, in order to stash all your necessities like sunblock, your camera, a refreshing drink and a snack, invest in a durable and classic backpack. When out purchasing, think about your size requirements and what you will be wearing, but like all of our other investment pieces, buy a genuine quality backpack will last a long time. The featured backpack in this month’s edition is genuine leather mocha chocolate and has removable straps, so it can work as a backpack or as a holdall for more formal occasions.

Another piece worth having is a weekend or getaway bag. I recently found a vintage Penguin of London oxblood leather specimen, which will hold a change of clothing for a great weekend getaway to Seoul, Busan or wherever you decide to go. Keep one thing in mind, always travel in style. The final item featured for this month is the iconic desert boot. Made from suede, which goes well with chino’s, jeans or shorts, it also transitions well from season to season. Be sure to take care of the suede with the correct after-care products. Color trends for early summer include rich browns and over-dyed pastels, as they tend to reflect the heat and keep you cooler. Black and beige also work remarkably well for girls as a graphic ethnic print. Pair with military boots and a simple ponytail for a slick ‘city girl’ look. So go out, enjoy nature and look your best at every possible moment. By xxl jjdp Photos by Billy Cho (Shot on Mudeung Mountain) This month’s Fash-on was sourced from Lotte Department store in downtown Gwangju. Vintage penguin weekend bag - Tokyo juice.

Gwangju News May 2011

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Entertainment

Gwangju News’

K-pop

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ello everyone! This is Jdragon, a lover of everything KPop!

Let me introduce you to my friend. “Hi, I am BigBang, and you will hate that you love me.”. This is probably the main message of this month’s article. So get ready to fall in love. BigBang, one of Korea’s biggest idol groups, have victoriously returned after lying dormant for nearly two years. Their comeback sent not only the Korean music industry into a tizzy, but also the hearts of fans worldwide. Having released about four albums in the past few months, there seems to be no end in sight, as they have baptised 2011 the year of BIGBANG. This five-member idol group, represented by YG Entertainment, debuted about five years ago. The charismatic members include group leader, song writer, producer and fashionista GDragon, T.O.P, Taeyang, Daesung and Seungri. Each member has also had major solo success with albums while on break from actual group activities. First, Taeyang released his international album Solar with hits like ‘I need a girl’ and ‘I’ll be there’. After that, GDragon and T.O.P released their full album at the tail-end of December 2010, conquering the charts with songs like ‘High High’, ‘Oh yeah’ and ‘Knock Out’. This was followed up by Seungri and his album. VVIP.

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Once solo promotions were done, BigBang released their fourth mini album. All of the songs on that album delivered what the industry now calls an “all kill” on the music charts. The album’s six songs immediately ranked in the top spots on online and offline music sales, and according to a consulting firm, they had the best selling songs for all of March 2011. Three weeks after the release of their fourth mini album, they announced they would be re-releasing that exact album, now titled 4.5 Special Edition, with two new title tracks, ‘Love Song’ and ‘Stupid Liar’. This move was pure genius, meticulously merging their old sound with their new electronic rock. They have recently also extended their contracts with their agency for another five years, and are preparing for the release of their full album later this year, which will feature top international producers. Japanese concerts and promotions are also lined up for them. I am also highly anticipating the comeback of 2NE1, as their new album should drop late April or May. I can only hope. So, if you have just been introduced to Kpop or would like to purchase your first album, I would highly recommend giving BigBang’s 4.5 Special Edition a try. By JDragon – Stay Kpoptastic JDragon is one half of the dynamic K-pop duo who bring you GFN98.7FM’s KPOPULAR daily. Listen on www.gfn.or.kr right after the midday news.


Food and Drink

Café? Or “Multi-fe”? (Multi Café) rom a survey by the KNSO (Korea National Statistical Office), in 2010 Korea imported 117,000 tons of coffee, totaling $420 million (by comparison, 91,000 tons was imported in 2007, 170,000 tons in 2008, and 150,000 tons in 2009). Which means on average, an adult in Korea drinks 312 cups (10 grams per cup) of coffee annually, and the rate is continuously increasing. In spite of this reality, one question comes up: “Are people enjoying drinking the coffee or just enjoying the café?”

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Unlike in the past, coffee drinking culture is shifting from just drinking to entertainment. People go to a café not only to drink but to have fun. Lights, moods, design, service, quality, and many other aspects draw people’s attention. For this reason cafés have became the number one dating place for Korean couples. The following are some questions and answers from random couples in a café. Q. “Why do you go to a café?” A. “There is no other place to go for a date.” Q. “Do you like drinking coffee?” A. “Not really, we just enjoy the mood here”. Q. “Then why are you drinking Americano?” A. “Because it looks cool!” The constant best selling drink in cafés these days is Americano. Of course there are lots of people who actually enjoy its bitter and sour taste. On the other hand, people, and especially young couples, might order an Americano for other reasons. As one of the interviewees said, “it looks cool”. In Korean society, how one is seen and evaluated by others is very important. For example, when a person says that he or she enjoys drinking wine, people tend to admire them, or think of them as upper class. Therefore, the wine industry in Korea is growing in popularity. The “Americano” example can demonstrate the importance of being perceived highly by others in Korea.

From the guys’ perspectives, they want to be seen by their girlfriends as “ganji nam” – ganji means smart, fashionable, well-mannered, and ‘cool’, and nam simply means a guy). They also want to give off the perception that “I’m knowledgeable about coffee too”. Due to those ideas many guys order Americano even though they mayn’t actually like it. As for the girls, they enjoy the café for the mood, design, quiet place, etc. It’s a place where they can talk and spend time with friends or lovers. What they are going to drink is not important. It’s where that really matters. Cafés are well aware of these needs and what people want. The number one priority for them is good use of space, and a pleasing interior design. A space which is both open (in order to let other people see) and that contains individual spaces for groups of people is the goal. Nowadays cafés often have complimentary computer service, toast, books, magazines, dining and meeting rooms, wifi zones, etc. They are selling services, and the drinks are the sub product. As for the coffee taste? That comes after! In terms of amount sold, coffee is the second highest trade product (oil is the first). Approximately 400 million cups are sold per day in the World (from SBS documentary, Coffee Hunter). Korea currently ranks 11th. What’s behind this coffee boom? Is it the coffee itself that makes demand go up? Or is it the café making people drink more? Story and photos by Yinhao Lu Gwangju News May 2011

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Food and Drink

More Fresh Beer Coming Soon! ave you ever entered a bar in Gwangju and been greeted by the owner with a handshake and a smile? If that's happened to you, then most likely you've been to the German Bar downtown. Seungcheol Song is the owner and greets all his Korean and foreign guests in this fashion. Song has a university degree in beer brewing and serves up his own fresh "Weizen" beer. Very soon he will open another location ("new" German Bar) right here in downtown Gwangju (in order to make more beer and keep us all very happy). He's come a long way from learning his trade in Germany to entertaining his guests in Gwangju. Gwangju News sat down to have a chat with him about his past, his future, and beer.

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Song brews his own beer

Gwangju News: When did you live in Germany? Song: I lived there from about 1985 to 1999. About 15 years. GN: When and why did you decide that you wanted to brew beer for a living? Song: I was five or six years old and I remember my grandfather making his own Korean rice wine at home. He always said to me, "When you get older, you must make good wine for me.� He wanted me to learn how to do it. It was in high school that I decided to go to Germany and learn about beer brewing. GN: You decided in your late teens to travel and learn how to make beer. Why Germany? Song: Only in Germany could you go to a university and learn about beer brewing. Maybe it's different now, but at that time, not in England or Japan or the USA. GN: What did you enjoy the most about living in Germany? Song: Being with many friends. Every weekend we would have one or two parties. When the weather was good, we would have picnics. What was great was our friends were from all over the world, and we would cook and eat different food all the time. So I really enjoyed eating and drinking with these various people. It was a chance to learn all about 46

Gwangju News May 2011

different foods and cultures. Seeing different countries was also very enjoyable for me. I would often go on tours of southern Europe. GN: Your friends were not only Germans, but people from other countries? Song: Yes, people from Turkey, Iran, Italy, the Czech Republic, I have a lot of foreign friends. We always had a different menu of food! I learned how to cook food in Germany. People were not inviting us out to dinner at restaurants all the time. Actually, they were inviting me to their homes, and there I could learn how to cook different foods. GN: What do you like best about living in Gwangju? Song: I came here mainly because my wife is from Gwangju. I lived in Seoul for a short time as well. Living here is much cheaper than in Seoul. Here there is certainly not as much traffic. There's a lot more breathing room compared to the bigger city. It's much more peaceful here in Gwangju. GN: If you had to go shopping for beer at a local store, what kind would you buy? Song: I really don't buy beer from stores in Korea. I drink my own. But in Germany, I like Paulaner, Erdinger, and Weiss beers. I really enjoy Weizen beer the best. That's what I drink. It's the most like Korean rice wine.


Food and Drink

new German Bar? Song: In the future, maybe in another few years, I would like to open another place. It will be my own place; a free standing restaurant with parking. There I will offer more German style beer and food. There will be more food than on the current German Bar menu.

GN: What are some of the challenges of owning and managing your own bar? Song: There's the financial aspect. If business is slow, I'm not making money and when many people are coming, then business is good. It's not consistent. Also, I work with mainly one helper. So I'm doing many things for this bar, such as making the beer and cooking the food. It can be a lot of work.

GN: When will the new German Bar open for business? Song: I have been working for a long time on the interior. I've been doing everything myself, with some friends, so it has taken some time to get ready. I still have some furnishings to purchase and put in place to make it ready for the public. There's still a little work left, but I'm hoping to open in earlyMay. We will have a big announcement when this time comes.

GN: Where do you make your beer? Song: I have my own franchise. I have beer machinery in Mokpo and Suncheon. I make it there and bring it here. Other businesses sell my beer in those locations. GN: Why are you opening another bar here in downtown Gwangju? Song: Because of beer machinery. Right now it's a little difficult to brew beer due to the distance. I can't brew beer everyday. I will eventually build the brewing machines at the new bar. So, then I will be able to make beer everyday. I will only brew small amounts of beer, but it will be a number of different kinds and flavors. GN: Sounds great! What kinds of beers would you like to make at the new bar? Song: I'll be making the same beer I offer now (Weizen, Berry Weizen and Dunkles). I still have to decide about the new ones, but I'm thinking about dark bitter beers, a pale ale type, maybe a seasonal beer. I can even make light beers too, anything. GN: Will there be food at the new bar? Song: Yes! Yes! Especially fresh sausage, steak and salads, I'll be making it there. GN: What's coming in the future, after the

Song working hard in the “new� German Bar

GN: We're looking forward to it! Thanks so much for talking with us today. (The new German Bar will be located downstairs behind the North Face store downtown). Look for a future article in the Gwangju News about the construction of Song's new microbrewery. If you want to try some of Song's beers and can't wait for the opening of the new German Bar, visit his current location downtown (near Burger King and across from Seven Monkeys Coffee). He is offering a discounted price on his beers as a promotion for the opening of the new bar. For German Bar updates visit: facebook.com/germanbar1 By Stephen Redeker Photos by Stephen Redeker and Myoung-ok Yoo

Gwangju News May 2011

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Food and Drink

등촌샤브샤브 Deung Chon Shabu Shabu eung Chon shabu shabu is located downtown in the narrow alley tucked behind the YMCA. I’d never heard of shabu shabu until I’d come to Korea, but I’m glad that I’ve come to know and love it. It is actually of Japanese origin but seems to have been embraced by Korea.

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I recently dined there, and it was a wonderful meal. The restaurant itself was fairly typical of Korean restaurants with floor seating and low tables. The staff were great and provided a friendly, efficient service, so that my friends and I did not have to wait long for our food to arrive. Standard shabu shabu consists of paper thin slices of beef, which are served uncooked on a large plate. The beef is accompanied with sliced mushroom, minari (which is a green vegetable of which the English translation is ‘buttercup’), and of course kimchi. Like sam-kyop-sal and all the other various forms of Korean BBQ, shabu shabu is a hands-on dining experience as one cooks the ingredients at their table as they eat. The difference is that instead of frying them on a hot plate, they are submerged and boiled in a broth which is flavoured with a variant of spice paste. The meat and vegetables are so thinly sliced that it only takes a minute to cook. The first time I tried this was at Deung Chon Shabu Shabu in Bongson-dong with a co-worker at the time. It is the original branch of four (the chain is unique to Gwangju) and is equally as good as the one downtown, if not slightly better. It was a culinary treat to the extent that I ate so much I was playing the scene with Mr. Creosote in Mont Python’s The Meaning of Life in my head when we got up to leave. The tender, soft beef almost melts away in the mouth, and the mushrooms and minari are a perfect accompaniment to it.

Another point of difference from samgyubsal and the like is the condiments that come with the dish. The ubiquitous red spice paste is there, but one also gets a small dish of soy sauce and wasabi (giving away the dish’s Japanese roots). Some beef, mushrooms and minari dipped in the soy sauce and wasabi is amazing, and it is why I like shabu shabu so much. Because of its lack of grease, shabu shabu is a welcome alternative to samgyubsal, as it doesn’t sit as heavy, which can only be a good thing if it is Saturday night and you are planning on having a late night after eating. The other two Deung Chon shabu shabu restaurants are found in Sangmu and Duan-dong. I have not been to them, but I can say that the ones in Bongson-dong and downtown are fantastic and are certainly worth a try if you haven’t been before. Co-workers of mine tell me that they are the most well-known purveyors of said dish in the city. As mentioned the branch downtown is in the alleyway behind the YMCA. I have only ever had the standard variety, which costs 10,000 won per person, but the portion sizes are large. I was with two friends at the one downtown, where we ordered three portions. We couldn’t eat it all and we could have done with only two. To get to Bongson-dong restaurant, take bus 28, 59, 75, or 76 and get off at Jo-Bong-Cho-Kyo bus stop. It will be either right next to the bus stop or directly across the road depending on which direction one is coming from. Either way it is hard to miss. If you cannot get any of those buses, take bus 27, 37, 48, or 98 and get off at Bongson Samik Apt (south). Then walk to the main intersection only 30 metres or so away and take a right. You will pass a Holly’s coffee on the corner, and then walk about 100 metres. Deung Chon is on the left. Story and photo by Gabriel Ward

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Food and Drink

Korean Easy-Cook Recipe

두부 동그랑땡 Tofu Ball

How to make Tofu Ball

ofu is a food made by coagulating soy milk and then pressing the resulting curds into soft white blocks. There are many different varieties of tofu, including fresh tofu and tofu that has been processed in some way.

T

Tofu and the technique of its production were introduced into Korea and then Japan during the Nara period. It also spread into other parts of East Asia. Tofu has very little flavor or smell on its own, so it can be used either in savory or sweet dishes, and it is often seasoned or marinated to suit the dish. It is low in calories and fat, and is rich in iron. Tofu is so highly esteemed in Korean culture that the menus of many Korean restaurants are based almost entirely on tofu, including some which feature only sundubu jjigae (a stew made with soft tofu) and gochujang (red chili paste). By Seoyoung Park

(information from Wikipedia)

Things to prepare (three servings): 1/2 a block of tofu, 1/2 each of carrot, onion, green onion, chili pepper (optional), 1 tsp of salt, three eggs

Cooking method: 1. Chop all the vegetables. 2. Put the chopped vegetables and tofu in a bowl and add three eggs. Add the chili peppers for a spicier flavor. 3. Mash it up with one teaspoon of salt 4. Cook it in the oil heated fry pan, making a small ball (it will be easy to use a spoon) 5. Press the balls slightly with a spatula until the balls are cooked through. 6. Finally, you can enjoy your tofu ball as it is, or with ketchup.

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Community Board

GIC News

Facebook: Gwangju Artist Collective E-mail: gwangjumaria@yahoo.com

GIC Journal: Social Discourse of Disquiet A new space for writers, artists and photographers. This publication allows people to explore different forms of art in South Korea. We would like to bridge the gap between arts that are perhaps lost in translation. We would like to hear your ideas and opinions. If you would like to get involved please e-mail selina.gicjournal@gmail.com Please join our facebook group - GIC Journal: Social Discourse of Disquiet. Please look at the work-in-progress at http://gicjournal.wordpress.com Check out the "What's On" page for art events in Gwangju.

Sports Gwangju Men’s Soccer The Gwangju international soccer team plays regularly most weekends. If you are interested in playing, e-mail: gwangju_soccer@yahoo.com.

Gwangju Ice Hockey Team Looking for men and women of all ages to join us every Saturday night from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. at Yeomju Ice Rink near World Cup Stadium. If you are interested, contact either Andrew Dunne at atdunne@gmail.com or Chris Wilson at kreeco@rogers.com

Meditation Session There will be Meditation Session offered every Saturday from 5 - 6 p.m. after the GIC Talk. Anyone is welcome to join although RSVP is preferred. Fifteen-minute Introduction to Meditation followed with 30-minute sitting. The remaining time will include a reading from The Compass of Zen. Bring a firm cushion to sit on and a light warm blanket. Jeans are not recommended. Please contact the GIC for more info.

Gwangju Guidebook Volunteers Help GIC update the second version of Gwangju Guidebook due to print in October 2011. Korean and English speakers needed for fact checking and copy editing. Contact karina@gic.or.kr if interested.

Art Gwangju Artist Collective Artists and art lovers, we invite you to meet up monthly at GIC for workshops, chat and encouragement. Stop in to discuss your art and community art events.

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Gwangju News May 2011

Gwangju Chaoreum Taekwondo Address: 1187-3 Chipyeong-dong Seo-gu, Gwangju Phone: 062) 384-0958 Location: Chaoreum Taekwondo Gym is located on the third floor of Jeong-yeon (K-1) building (just beside the bus stop) Buses : 62, 63, 64, 518 (bus stop: 상무대우아 파트 - Sangmu Daewoo Apateu) Taxi directions: "Sangmujigu Kumho Daewoo Apart ro gajuseyo". Method of instruction is in English Weekday Classes: 8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.(from Monday to Friday) Sunday Classes: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Community Sung Bin Orphanage Sung Bin Orphanage is looking for creative/ active/ energetic/ outgoing/ enthusiastic longterm volunteers to join in our regular Saturday program. We would like you to give at least two

Saturdays per month. As well as being a friend, you will be asked to teach basic English to girls aged 7 to 14. Meet every Saturday at 1:30 p.m. in front of downtown Starbucks. All are welcome. For more volunteering information please contact Al Barnum at: al_barnum@yahoo.com.

Apostolate to Migrants Center Address: 802-4 Songjeong -2dong, Gwangsan-gu, Gwangju Phone: 062) 954-8004 Subway: Get off at Songjeong Park (송정공원) Station and walk toward Songjeong Middle School. Busses: 29, 38, 39, 62, 97, 98, 99 Get off at Yeonggwang-tong intersection bus stop and walk toward Songjeong Middle School. Sunday masses: 10:00 a.m. (Indonesian/ East Timor); 3:00 p.m. (English) at the Migrant Center; 6:00 p.m. (Vietnamese) 2nd Sunday: 11:00 a.m. Mass for multi-cultural families Migrant’s Counsel Center is open! Gwangju Apostolate Migrant Center was appointed as the Supporting Center for Foreign Workers by the Human Resources Development Service of Korea. Workers and employers with problems can be given help and advice from counselors. Phone: 062) 959-9335/ 019-588-2133/ 011-9602-7266

Gwangju Jumbo Taxi If you’re traveling in a big party or simply need transportation in and around Gwangju, Gwangju Jumbo Taxi provides service to Bus Terminal, Airport and others. With a seat capacity of up to 9 people, you can travel in comfort. Friendy and hospitable, Mr. Kim will help you travel with safety and comfort. Whether you are going from/ to Gwangju Airport or simply to travel around the city, give Jumbo Taxi a call. Call to reserve at 010-5086-7799 (Mr.Kim) or refer to www.gjtaxi.co.kr for the price list.


Cartoon

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GIC Talk

[ GIC Talk ]

Time & Place: Every Saturday, 3:00 - 4:30 pm, GIC office (5th floor of Jeon-il Bldg) For more information, visit www.gic.or.kr or contact Moon So-eun at: gwangjuic@gmail.com Check out pictures from previous GIC Talks http://picasaweb.google.com/gictalk Click for the highlight clips of GIC Talk at www.youtube.com/user/GICTALK

May 7 Topic: Opening of an Art Show Rabbit Tales Speaker: Leroy Kucia (Comic Artist) and Art workshop participants The coordinator and participants of the Art workshop Rabbit Tales will talk about the process of the workshop and their artwork.

May 14 Topic: Cultural Energetics; In the Sciences Speaker: Andrew O’Donnell The physiology of the body and of the mind's thought, and of consciousness, at the beginning of the 21st Century, seems barely tapped into, and hardly ever understood. What scientific evidence is there for a form of energy that is properly in tune with the bodily universal vibrations ofthe human soul, with meditation and with mystic ecstacy? How can the evidence for this form of energy assist us societally, in order to transcend the nihilism and entropy of the institutions that have thus far sustained us, globally? This talk takes in learning from innovations in free energy and its own precarious lineage through the 19th and 20th centuries, along with a study of examples from Renaissance hermetics, psycho-analysis, and the fields of modern psychology and parapsychology.

May 21 Topic: Shamanism and Traditional Religion in Korea Speaker: Warren Parsons (Professor at the Dongshin University)

Korea has a variety of religions. Past kingdoms and contemporary governments have all been influenced by one or the other. Whether it is Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, or Capitalism, existing along side these institutions many Koreans have maintained a traditional belief system. In modern Gwangju, there are many active examples of these traditional religious practices. Often these beliefs have merged and adapted over the years adding layers and complexity to peoples' faith. The talk is an overview of Shamanism and Korean folk religion in Gwangju and Korea. Included will be a partial viewing of the documentary 영매, which highlights several traditional priests/ shamans called Mudangs. Following the talk there will be a short walk to visit a local shrine to pay respect to the Mountain God.

May 28 Topic: South Africa – A country that takes your breath away. Literally. Speaker: Pieter de Kock South Africans have many things to boast about. Excellent weather, great food, the big five of the animal kingdom, 11 national languages, Nelson Mandela, living space, mineral riches and strong sports teams. But we also top the violence chart, and have one of the highest, if not the highest, murder rate in the world. I have been living in super safe Korea for the last 11 months of my life, and will be returning home in June. Someone living in, and coming from the first world might have trouble understanding this move. Especially when the price I pay for sunlight might be my life, or that of my family and friends. I will try to explain my decision, by serving you with the pro's and cons of my beautiful country.

2011 GIC 3rd Korean Language Class Please register until May 10, 2011

Saturday Classes

Weekday Classes Level

Days

Textbook

Level

Textbook

Beginner 1-1

Monday & Wednesday

서강한국어 1A (Pre-lesson ~ Lesson 1)

Beginner 1-1

서강한국어 1A (Pre-lesson ~ Lesson 1)

Beginner 2-1

Tuesday & Thursday

서강한국어 1B (Lesson 1 ~ Lesson 4)

Beginner 1-2

서강한국어 1A (Lesson 2 ~ 6)

Beginner 2-2

Monday & Wednesday

서강한국어 1B (Lesson 5 ~ Lesson 8)

Beginner 2-1

서강한국어 1B (Lesson 1 ~ 4)

Intermediate

서강한국어 2A (Lesson 1 ~ 4)

- Period: May 16 – June 30, 2011 (Twice a week for 7 weeks)

- Class hours: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2 hours) - Tuition fee : 80,000 won (GIC membership fee: 20,000 won/ year and textbooks excluded) cash only

Not

e

* The tuition fee is non-refundable after the first week. * A class may be canceled if fewer than 5 people sign up. * Textbooks can be purchased at the GIC

- Period: May 14 – June 23, 2011 (Every Saturday for 7 weeks)

- Class hours: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2 hours) - Tuition fee: 50,000 won (GIC membership fee: 20,000 won/ year and textbooks excluded) cash only

GIC is located on the 5th floor of the Jeon-il building, the same building as the Korean Exchange Bank, downtown. The entrance is located immediately to the north of the bank. Contact GIC office for more information. Phone: 062-226-2733/4 E-mail: gwangjuic@gmail.com Website: www.gic.or.kr

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Gwangju News May 2011


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Profile for Gwangju International Center

(EN) Gwangju News May 2011 #111  

Featured articles: - Women Pioneering a New Police Presence - Japan Radiation - Jeollado Mothers (Photo Gallery) - Pure Love for Gentle Gian...

(EN) Gwangju News May 2011 #111  

Featured articles: - Women Pioneering a New Police Presence - Japan Radiation - Jeollado Mothers (Photo Gallery) - Pure Love for Gentle Gian...

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