Issuu on Google+

August 2011 Issue No. 114

Pete Ross Farewell to a Scotsman

Gwangju World Music Festival 2011 Preview

North Korean Railroad The path to freedom


2

Gwangju News August 2011


What’s On

Gwangju News

12

Cover Photo Photographer: GFN Radio Cover Photo: Pete Ross (article on page 10)

Migrant’s Counsel Center

Publisher: Gyonggu Shin Editor-in-Chief: Julian Warmington Editors: Julian Raethel, Minsu Kim Assistant Editors: Seth Pevey, Stephen Redeker Copy Editors: Kathleen Villadiego, Kyle Johnson Coordinator: Karina Prananto Layout and Design: Karina Prananto Proofreaders: Jake Melville, Julian Raethel, Erin Fahrer, Jon Ozelton, Lindsey Shear, Samantha Richter, James Munro, Rob Smith, Pete Schandall, Gina Covert, Kathleen Villadiego

Researchers: Seoyoung Park, Kyuri Park Address: Jeon-il Building 5F, Geumnam-no 1-1, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-758, S. Korea

Phone: +82-62-226-2733~4 Fax: +82-62-226-2731 E-mail: gwangjunews@gmail.com Registration No.: 광주광역시 라. 00145 (ISSN 2093-5315) Printed by Logos (Phone +82-62-444-8800)

20 Ultimate Frisbee

Gwangju News Magazine is written and edited by volunteers.

Special thanks to the City of Gwangju and all of our sponsors. Copyright by the Gwangju International Center. All rights reserved. No part of this publication covered by this copyright may be reproduced in any form or by any means - graphic, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise - without the written consent of the publishers.

24

Gwangju News welcomes letters to the editor (gwangjunews@gmail.com) regarding articles and issues. All correspondence may be edited for reasons of clarity or space.

Gwangju Summer Hotspots Gwangju News August 2011

3


Contents Featured Articles 10

Feature By Julian Warmington

12

Regular Columns

Farewell Pete Ross – Positive Philosopher DJ 6

Upcoming Events

9

Local News

Feature

A Helping Hand for Migrant Workers By Kathleen Villadiego

14

By Jon Ozelton

Feature

Gwangju World Music Festival

26

Feature

28

Photo Contest

32

Cartoon

The Underground Railroad By Wil Rawlins

18

Perspective

36 Community

20

22

40

Sport

41

Sport

23

42

Sprint Together for Tomorrow 24

44

Right Under Your Nose 30

By David Holt

33

By Julian Warminton

34

46

47

48

By Stephanie Swayne

37

Society

Animal Cruelty Stopped in its Tracks By Frances Herrington

38

Health

Don’t Touch My Drugs By Michael Bielawski

4

Gwangju News August 2011

Bab Boda Wang Mandu Food and Drink

Steamed and Folded Eggs GIC Program Review

Hwasun Tour Fashion

Fash-on with xxl jjdp By jjdp

Community

The Sights and Sounds of Summer

Glove

By Alan Brown

By Jessie Calderon

35

Movie Review

By Seoyoung Park

Community

1,000 Man Benefit Concert

Selected Poems

By Darrell Slater

Community

Meet the Neighbors

Literature

Food and Drink

45

Travel

Russia

Language Study

‘-세요' : Imperative Sentence Endings

By Seth Pevey

Travel By Anna Corbett

Letters to KOTESOL

Translated by Chae-pyong Song and Anne Rashid

Sport By Seoyoung Park

Language Study

By Soo-a Jung

Gwangju’s First 10km Mock Race By Christina Green and Julian Warmington

2011 UEA: Carbon Credit and Carbon Trading

By Dr. Dave Schaffer

ROK Ultimate By Hughie Samson

Environment By Frances Herrington

Gwangju Hoop Group By Amanda Straub

Digby By Leroy Kucia

Living Abroad on the Flipside By Kim Yu Rim, Chi Ho and Wil Rawlins

19

News

Home Pages

By David Holt

16

This Month in Gwangju

50

Community Board

50

Dear Korea By Jen Lee


Upcoming Events Festival

Movies @ Gwangju Theater Chungjangno 5-ga (two blocks back behind Migliore) Phone: 062) 224-5858 Films change weekly to bi-weekly. Admission fee: 8,000 won for one film. 21,000 won for three films. 30,000 won for five films; 50,000 won for ten films. Check online for calendar and prices. (http://cafe.naver.com/cinemagwangju/) The following movies will be shown in August:

2011 Muan White Lotus Festival Location: Hoesan White Lotus Ground, Muan county, Jeollanam-do Date: Until Aug. 13, 2011 More info: http://tour.muan.go.kr/culture/festival

3K Special (Japanese Director) Kimura Takeo, Kinosita Keisuke, Kobayahi Masaki. Three maestro directors film collection. Twenty-six films will be shown free with Korean and English subtitles. Release date: Aug. 4 - 10, 2011

At the Muan White Magnolia Festival, which began as the White Lotus Festival in 1997, you can view exotic scenery in different settings. This is because various exotic performances and shows are held throughout the day and into the night. The Baekryun Performance includes brilliant shows such as creative percussion, dance, mimes, and both fusion and traditional Korean music. The meeting of light and Baekryun, held at night, imbues the summer night with a dazzling feast of lights and magnolias, using image shows with water screens, graphic lasers, beam lasers and fireworks.

Incendies (2010) Twins journey to the Middle East to discover their family history, and fulfill their mother's last wishes. Adapted from Wajdi Mouawad's acclaimed play, Incendies tells the powerful and moving tale of two young adults' voyage to the core of deep-rooted hatred, never-ending wars and enduring love. Written by Mylène Chollet.

Ganjin Celadon Festival Location: Goryeo Celadon Porcelain Kilns, Daegu-myun, Gangjin county, Jeollanam-do Date: July 30 - Aug. 7, 2011 Website: http://www.gangjinfes.or.kr/

GIC is organizing a tour to this Festival. Date: August 6, 2011 (Sat.) Itinerary: Gangjin Tea Garden – Muwisa Temple – Gangjin Celadon Festival Price: 15,000 won (10,000 won for GIC members) Please visit GIC website (www.gic.or.kr) to register

Jungnamjin Aqua Festival Location: Around the Tamjin River Date: July 29 - Aug. 4, 2011 Phone: 061) 860-0224, 0380 (day), 061) 863-7071 (night, weekend) Website: http://www.jhwater.kr/

6

Gwangju News August 2011

Release date: Aug. 13, 2011 Genre: Drama Director: Denis Villeneuve Stars: Lubna Azabal, Mélissa DésormeauxPoulin and Maxim Gaudette Country: Canada, France Language: French, Arabic, English

Exhibitions Diversity: International Art Exhibition 문화적 다양성 전 Date: Aug. 25 at 10:00 a.m. - Sept.8 at 6:00 p.m. Venue: Eunam Museum, Gwangju Opening ceremony: August 25 (6 pm) Media preview: Aug. 23-24 An aptly named international art exhibition featuring seven international artists and 11 talented Korean artists who have studied abroad. Covering a variety of mediums and subjects, the exhibition is intended to show the "cosmopolitan potency" of the city of Gwangju. Organized by independent curator Hye-seong Lee (Tak). Artist List: 김성우 (installation), 송숙남 (printmaking), Anjee DiSanto (photography), 최재영 (acrylic on canvas), 김주희 (jewelry/sculpture), 오병욱(metal sculpture), Nadine Bouliane (mixed media), 조용신 (video installation), Doug Stuber (acrylic on canvas), 박광숙 (oriental painting), Gilda Wilson (oil on wood), 변경섭 (acrylic on canvas), Mark Eaton (photography), 조강현 (acrylic on canvas), Evelyn Curry (digital photo collage), Nate Rood (acrylic on paper), 주미희 (wire sculpture), 윤재원

Namdo Landscape and Life Date: Until Aug.14, 2011 Gwangju Museum of Art For more info: www.artmuse.gwangju.go.kr Phone: 062) 613-7100


Sports Gwangju FC Soccer Team August Match Schedule Date

Match Team

Time

6 27

Gyeongnam FC Jeju United

19:00 19:00

Venue: Gwangju World Cup Stadium (광주월드컵경기장) Direction: Take buses 6, 16, 20, 26, 47, 74 and get off at Worldcup Stadium bus stop Ticket Price: Adult 10,000 won, Family (4 people) 30,000 won Website: www.gwangjufc.com

KIA Tigers Baseball Team August Match Schedule Date

Match Team

Time

9 10 11 16 17 18 26 27 28 31

LG LG LG Lotte Lotte Lotte SK SK SK LG

18:30 18:30 18:30 18:30 18:30 18:30 18:30 17:00 17:00 18:30

Venue: Gwangju Mudeung Baseball Stadium (무등경기장) Directions: Take buses 16, 38, 51, 53, 58, 89, 95, 98, 151 and get off at Mudeung Stadium bus stop Ticket Price: Adults 7,000 - 12,000 won; Students (13 - 18): 4,000 - 9,000 won; Children (under 13, 2,000 - 6,000 won) Website: www.tigers.co.kr (Korean)

Performances

This Month at Holiday Inn Gwangju Dear Readers, Our big news this month is the August and September Australian Beef BBQ promotion at the Holiday Inn outdoor terrace. This will also feature unlimited OB draught beer from 7.00 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. And the real exciting extra value to this promotion is Tourism Queensland will provide an opportunity for each paying guest who will automatically go into a draw for a prize that includes a fully guided tour of the Gold Coast and Sydney for ONE couple, including airfare, meals and accommodation valued at 5 million won. The draw for the prize will be on the evening of October 2, 2011. The BBQ menu will feature a plate of three cuts of BBQ’d Australian Beef plus additional buffet items of salads, stirfry, and wedges all available at the outdoor terrace as you dine in the cool of the August and September evenings. All this is priced at 39,900 won per person (net). Great value. We are very proud to have Meat Livestock Australia, OB Breweries and Tourism Queensland as great sponsors of this unique and special occasion. We look forward to welcoming you all to this wonderful promotion and don’t forget, reservations are essential. Reservation for Outdoor Terrace: 062) 610-7061

Gwangju World Music Festival Location: Main stage - Chomdan Ssangam Park Premium stage - Bitgoeul Civic Culture Center Party stage - Geumnam-ro Park, Kunsthalle Date: Aug. 26 - 28, 2011 Website: http://www.gjwmf.com/

Jo Sumi Concert Location: Gwangju Culture and Art Center Grand Theater Date: Aug. 30, 2011 Admission fee: 30,000~150,000 won This month’s Upcoming Events contributors: Seoyoung Park, Kyuri Park

Michael Wilson General Manager Holiday Inn Gwangju Michael.Wilson@ihg.com Watch our website for further details www.holidayinngwangju.com Gwangju News August 2011

7


Editorial/ GIC Talk

[ Editorial ]

A Word from Our Editor-In-Chief

It is worth repeating yet again that, apart from the design team, Gwangju News is made with volunteer effort. Over the last few years I’ve been impressed by Maria Lisak’s energy, passion, boundless wisdom, high level of specialized training, and her vast experience. I can think of no other foreigner who has embodied that spirit of selflessly volunteering her time for GIC in general, and for a year up until last month, as editor-inchief for Gwangju News. Maria negotiated the role with sensitivity, dealing with issues that arise amongst the confluence of cultures and characters when people are suddenly expected to work together. She has set the bar high, leaving Gwangju News somehow continuing to achieve ever-greater heights of quality. To Maria I give thanks for her last year’s worth of effort with Gwangju News. From her I draw inspiration, and take the challenge to be half as good, with a healthy dose of trepidation! While I am very happy to know that Maria continues to work with GIC, it is equally sad to lose the input of another female member of the magazine’s volunteer staff. One of the beautiful things about the local English language community is our diversity. It is always valuable to have a variety of voices and faces reflected in these pages, and also in the people and perspectives working together to publish this glossy document of our shared time here. It is an important goal to accurately reflect the rich mixture of people, places and events we meet, visit and experience. It is a great thing therefore to see that breadth of content in this issue in particular, with articles on topics as diverse as locally based migrant workers, the arts and sporting events. But each month’s issue builds on the success of those immediately before, and the volunteers who then step forward to lend a hand. Will you join in the challenge?

By Julian Warmington

[ GIC Talk ] Time & Place: Every Saturday, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m., GIC office (5th floor of Jeon-il Bldg) For more information: visit www.gic.or.kr or contact gic@gic.or.kr Check out pictures from previous GIC Talks http://picasaweb.google.com/gictalk Click for the highlight clips of GIC Talk at www.youtube.com/user/GICTALK

August 6 Topic: Opening of an art show ‘E.A.E.P. (Environmental Awareness Education Program) Postcards’ Speakers: Andrea Hildebrand and Trevor Homeniuk (ESL Instructor, Artist) There will be an opening of an art show at this Talk. In this exhibition over 300 postcards will be displayed. The postcards were made by fourth and fifth grade elementary school students from schools in the Gwangju area during E.A.E.P. (Environmental Awareness Education Program) in 2010 and 2011. The speakers Andrea and Trevor who have been running E.A.E.P. since May 2010 will share their experience and products. For more information please see page 50.

August 13, 20, 27 No Talk

8

Gwangju News August 2011

Gwangju News has a Bargain for You! Are you a local Gwangju or Jeollanam-do business? How long have you been in business? We have a grant program that offers steep discounts depending on how long you’ve been in business. Contact Karina Prananto or Julian Raethel at gwangjunews@gmail.com for details. If you’re in business... less than one year 1-2 years 2-3 years 3-4 years 4-5 years

Up to 50% off Up to 40% off Up to 30% off Up to 20% off Up to 10% off

Join GIC as an organizational member. Free opportunities to regularly advertise.


News

This Month in Gwangju A brief roundup of news stories from in and around Gwangju Gwangju City to Monitor Taxi Drivers Although convenient and cheap taxis are one of the plus points of living in Korea, the standard of taxi driving here often leaves a lot to be desired. As such, as part of an ongoing campaign, Gwangju city announced details of a monitoring scheme in an effort to improve standards. One hundred “monitors” will be designated to assess the city’s almost 3,500 taxis. They will grade a variety of factors, in an effort to prevent poor driver attitude to passengers, incorrect meter usage and overcharging, and reckless driving. Additional checks will run until October in the areas around the bus terminal, airport and other locations frequented by taxis. The plans aim to enhance management of the taxi industry by providing more incentives for good taxi drivers and imposing stricter punishments on drivers who get poor marks on the city’s assessment. Offending drivers will receive a 4-hour education program for a first transgression, with repeat offenders facing the possibility of fines or ultimately the loss of their license.

Skate

Spicy soup of skate culture.go.kr

Good news for those who enjoy eating pungent stinky fish – Yeongsanpo in Naju is trying to revive its status as the place to go and eat skate, and has unveiled grand plans to restore the ferry terminal, inland lighthouse and surrounding areas, to once again become a regional and national center for skate.

The ambitious scheme has a budget of around 17 billion won, and plans to transform the 10,000square-meter area into a “Street of Skate” by September this year. By developing the docks and ferry areas into a marina, providing skate shops and restaurants, installing tourist facilities and offering cruise boats, they hope to attract tourists from all around to experience Yeongsanpo’s signature dish. Yeosu Expo Latest There are now less than 300 days to go until the start of the 2012 World Expo, which will be held on our doorstep, in Yeosu, Jeollanam-do, and will run from May 12th until August 12th next year. According to the organizing committee, preparations are progressing well, with ten exhibition halls taking shape, and the event’s signature item, the high-tech marine multimedia show “Big O”, also well under way.

Breathing Flower in front of Kunsthalle

Choi Jeong-hwa

Gwangju Relay Art Project at Kunsthalle A new art project featuring international and local artists is coming together in Gwangju. Installation of art works and sculptures at the Gwangju Relay Art Project, titled “Dingsdabumsda?” (“Whatchamacallit?”) is underway at the Kunsthalle downtown, including the 10-meter high “Breathing Flower” by Choi Jeong-hwa, which is already in place at the fountain in front of the old Provincial Office. Installation of exhibits will continue over the coming weeks, in preparation for an opening party, scheduled for September 2nd at 8 p.m. The exhibition will be open until October 23rd.

Tickets for the event have recently been released for sale to the general public, with several ticket types and packages available, and a 10% discount for purchases made before the end of this year. Tickets can be bought online at www.expo.or.kr or www.interpark.com (both Korean only). Tickets will be available offline from the start of next year. Gwangju Universiade Language School The city is once again recruiting for its language schools, in preparation for the 2015 event. Local residents interested in studying either English, Chinese, Spanish or French for 14 weeks from September can apply online: www.gwangju2015.kr By Jon Ozelton Gwangju News August 2011

9


Feature

Farewell Pete Ross Positive Philosopher DJ ete Ross of local radio station GFN is leaving town for good. He has been in Gwangju for many years. In that time, he has been at the center of many intersecting scenes and groups within the English language community. On the verge of return to his homeland of Scotland, and amidst a hectic weekend of packing, moving, and socializing, he folded his lanky-long legs under a table and perched on the edge of a chair for a sitdown chat with Gwangju News.

P

10

A prominent DJ with the newly-established radio station since its start more than two years ago now, Pete originally came to Korea to teach English. When asked if he thought he’d stay in town so long he answers instantly, “Absolutely not. I thought it would be a year, but after two months I realized it would be longer.” He continues effusively, listing the things he enjoys about life in Gwangju that have kept him here, including the pace of life, friends and differences he has enjoyed between here and his home town. “When I first came here everything was fresh and exciting. The socializing, the food, the hours of work, the different clock and the convenience of the Korean way of life; the only problem was the language, but I actually enjoyed breaking the language barrier, and other things were not a problem,” he said.

Pete outside his beloved GFN

Pete remembers his first impressions in Gwangju, of enjoying winter for its clear blue sky days, and the absence of Scottish-style cold winter rain. More difficult for him is singling out favourite memories of his entire life in the city. Apart from spending time with friends he has made here, he marks his work with GFN as a good stretch. He notes that his enjoyment of life in Korea has “gone up a level” due to finding a job he thoroughly enjoys getting up for each day.

asked about the most difficult challenges he dealt with in his Korean life. “Being able to realize why you should not get angry about things you would back home. The UK has very set rules and manners, and of course there are rules and manners in Korea, but they are different. It’s important to look at and respect them – to adapt and understand those different rules and manners – but not lose your own sense of identity.”

A philosophical, reflective side of Pete emerges when

Pete continues by skipping lightly from the

Gwangju News August 2011


Feature

intercultural to the personal challenge of running a marathon for the first time, describing it as the single hardest thing he has done in his years in town. He seems satisfied with having completed two entire marathons despite not having achieved the time he wanted, “… but maybe next time.” He also seems at peace with having virtually given up smoking, adding, “I’ve not given up but I don’t think about it now. I’m still “a smoker” but only a couple a week in social situations. I’ll stop completely for the next marathon – and for paying 12 pounds a pack in the UK!” His philosophical streak reemerges briefly again when asked about regrets, “I don’t believe in regrets, but rather in learning from mistakes.” After a brief pause he adds, “But I could have learned more (of the) Korean language.” When asked about changes he has noticed in Korea itself during his time in Gwangju, Pete answers by referring to food. A recent international selection of beer is welcome, and when he first arrived the only cheese available was sliced and wrapped in plastic. He describes the advent of the local western foods boom as “good, but also to the detriment of Korea’s own food culture.” The deep answers continue as he replies on the topic of how he himself has changed given his time in town. “I’m less of an A*H*. I think you just grow up; priorities and your focus changes. I host the radio station, and the mic is still my best friend so I’m still in touch with my ego, but [I’ve learned] it’s better to affect what’s going on around you with positive changes rather than negative ones.” Perhaps one of the most positive regular contributions Pete has made outside the radio station is to the social scene of the quiz night in one of the foreigner’s bars down town. Having run the weekly evening for years, he describes the story of how he became the almost legendary host with insults as entertainingly harsh as his questions were difficult, “I didn’t start the quiz night. I was in a team that was good. I’m a bad loser but a worse winner. In some ways I was responsible for numbers dwindling at one point. They told me I was responsible for bringing everyone back. That’s where my love affair with the mic started.” The other social circle in which Pete has been a famously regular fixture is the local soccer club. He attributes the football team as being a big reason he agreed to staying for a second year in Gwangju, as it

Top: (from left) David St.John, Sue Han, Michael Siming and Pete Above: Working the interview

provided an instant support network and a great mixture of people with whom to socialize. He declines the offer to share any stories, saying they would all be unprintable within family publications. Given the opportunity to offer advice to expats new to Korea, Pete returns to his earlier idea, “Embrace the differences as positive.” We agree that this is a fine place to end the discussion. On further consideration it also reflects Pete’s decision to leave Gwangju now, on a positive note. Clearly, he has been enjoying his job and life here. A positive enjoyment of life is a greatly powerful philosophy to take back home, just as it is to share with others via a microphone, a soccer ball, in running shoes, or over a pint down at the local. By Julian Warmington Photos by Julian Warmington and courtesy of GFN

Gwangju News August 2011

11


Feature

A Helping Hand for Migrant Workers government funding. One of these is located in Songjeong Park, a facility which despite having limitations and obstacles, pulls its resources together to help remedy the problems confronted by workers. At the helm of this particular center is one very dedicated woman. Muriel Park is a counselor who is currently taking on about 40 cases a month, with the help of only one other full-time staffer and a small team of volunteers. They assist employers and workers mainly from Vietnam, Indonesia, the Philippines and East Timor mostly employed in the manufacturing, construction, agricultural and fisheries industries. The cases they deal with vary in degree of seriousness. The more common grievances relate to the withholding of salaries, while some need more administrative assistance such as filling in daunting forms. There are, however, a number of cases where workers are desperate to change employers due to substandard working conditions, or conflicts with other employees or their boss. There have also been cases of violence among co-workers and physical abuse with workers being beaten by their bosses.

hey strive to represent those without a voice: those who come to Korea hoping that promises of a decent salary and employment conditions are fulfilled.When reality sets in and difficulties arise, the dedicated people working in counsel centers are there to help

Finding solutions to these problems requires opening the lines of communication between employer and employee, something Muriel is well practiced in. “I listen to [the workers] then I sometimes call the employer or I visit the working places. After I listen to both sides then maybe if there’s something wrong with the employers then we ask them to listen to the worker’s needs, and sometimes there’s something wrong with the workers then we usually let them know the Korean culture or custom,” she said.

Within the migrant centers scattered around Gwangju there are counsel centers for foreign workers. In April this year, 30 of these centers were granted

According to Muriel this initial step is usually effective, but an employer’s change in attitude is not necessarily born of sympathy. “The employer thinks

Muriel Park

Julian Warmington

T 12

Gwangju News August 2011


Feature

Muriel at work

Migrant’s Counsel Center

the worker is there by himself, but once we visit them they think ‘ah there are some more people behind them’. I get the feeling that they usually become more careful when they treat the workers because they are conscious about […] some organization or some kind of NGO,” she explained. However, the process is sometimes prolonged especially in cases where an employer, even after giving assurances that they will pay an employee’s wages, continually puts off doing so. In situations like this, the big guns are called in but only as a last resort. “If they don’t keep the promise several times then we bring the case to the labor office. They call the employer and they have the power, so usually [the employer] follows. But before that, we hope it can be solved between the employer and me” said Muriel. A common complaint from workers, and what seems to be the core of all the problems, is that they are illprepared for the transition to life here. This is also echoed by Muriel. “Usually when they enter Korea they attend some kind of workshop but just one day then they are sent to the real working place,” she said. Depending on the providing center, there are workshops that run for up to three days, instructing new workers on language, culture, and workplace practices. But in Muriel’s opinion this is less than sufficient. “I think it would be better for the workers to be given that kind of education for at least three months […] it’s necessary,” she said. There are also limitations to what the center can

Muriel in front of the Migrant’s Counsel Center Julian Warmington

provide, and this has a lot to do with a lack of funding. “The services are still poor. The policy and the financial support, I think it’s in the stage of just [the] beginning. This is the first try of our government to support immigrant centers and to pay for counselors.” But Muriel believes things have gotten better. “I can feel that something improved […] related to the relationship [with the workers] but the working condition itself cannot be improved quickly,” she explained. Although change is slow, the center continues to work with its less-than-adequate resources and put forward suggestions to the labor office in hopes of bridging the gap of understanding between migrant workers and employers. By Kathleen Villadiego

Migrant’s Counsel Center Gwangju Apostolate Migrant Center was appointed as a Support Center for Foreign Workers by the Human Resources Development Service of Korea. Workers and employers with problems can be given help and advice from counselors. Phone: 062) 959-9335/ 019-588-2133/ 011-9602-7266 Operation time: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. (Saturday and Monday off) E-mail: muriel-park@hanmail.net Subway: Get off at Songjeong Park (송정공원) Station and walk toward Songjeong Middle School. Busses: 29, 38, 39, 62, 97, 98, 99. Get off at Yeonggwang-tong intersection bus stop and walk toward Songjeong Middle School.

Gwangju News August 2011

13


Feature

Gwangju World Music Festival Eric Aliana performing at the free concert in July

he Gwangju World Music Festival (GWMF) will be returning for its second year this August. From the 26th - 28th residents of Gwangju will be able to visit one of several locations around the city and listen to some fascinating music from the four corners of the globe. The event, which is funded by the Korean government, is in an attempt to boost the interest of world music in Korea. Jung Du-yong, the team leader of the GWMF Public Relations Department, says that “[Gwangju Festival is] to teach people about differences of music and dance.”

T

Between 30 and 40 acts are set to appear from over 15 countries, with the organizers hoping to emulate the turnout of last year’s festival by topping the 20,000 mark. As well as the world music there will be a number of musical workshops standing by to enlighten those who know little about this alternative scene. In preparation for this occasion the organizers had put together a small teaser turnout a few weeks back. On July 2nd in Geumnam-no Park, GWMF arranged a “pre-concert in hope of rustling up interest for the main event.” So on a sticky, hot Saturday evening roughly 300 - 400 revelers turned up and packed in 14

Gwangju News August 2011

to see Cameroonian Erik Aliana & Korongo Jam as well as Korean group, Sunday Klaxons perform – the latter seemingly entertaining the crowd the same way a drunk uncle would entertain at a wedding, by waving their arms around and shouting, “whoop, whoop, whoop!” Both groups are due to play at the main staging in August, with Eric Aliana being a possible festival highlight. On that Saturday evening though he managed the nigh-on impossible: getting a rather sleepy gathering of Koreans out of their chairs and singing about the struggles of Africa. Even the ajumma with high-waist trousers who had stood motionless throughout was now up dancing like apartheid was only just ending. Speaking to Du-yong before the show, he spoke of how the majority of the Korean music is governed by an “idol” society, but he believes that such festivals as these can really enlighten people and show that there is still other music out there. “If people experience world music, like fusion music, such as Korean traditional and pop, [then] people will become more interested.” However, world music will have to try a lot harder to be popular in Korea. The pop industry here doesn’t have much time for alternatives in music, they are


Feature

and world music are new and small in Asian countries. I can compare [the music scene] with Vietnam from where I just came back [from]. There is a big market for pop idols too. I was invited to play with local musicians and Tung Duong, a famous young pop singer. The experience came as one of the most exciting and exhilarating of my life and the welcoming in the media was incredible.” Whether you know a lot about traditional Korean music or world music, or you just like being amongst a large crowd on a summer’s evening, it is certainly worth a visit. Get there! Eric Aliana performs in front of an exclusive audience in Gwangju

For more information check out www.gjwmf.com (English version)

considered niche and not profitable, so therefore the real talent gets moved aside.

For more stories please visit : davidholt.wordpress.com or follow on twitter: #DavidAndrewHolt

With so many K-pop groups saturating the market and deadening the principles of artistry, this festival, which has sought to invite performers from around the world, is really a testament to Korea’s efforts of trying to diversify its culture. World music is probably not everyone’s cup of tea, but according to Du-yong, giving the people the opportunity to at least give it a listen is paramount to the genre’s ethos. “We can only consider ‘idol’ music in Korea, only girl and boy groups. We don’t get the chance to experience world music. Our festival is a very good chance to hopefully experience this.” With so many different musicians taking the stage throughout the three-day event there is sure to be something for everybody’s taste. The official website for the August show lists a number of acts that are set to appear. Playing on the Main Stage at Cheomdan Ssanggam Park, are such artists as Tiempo Libre, a Grammy-nominated Cuban band that is based out of Miami. And Amazigh Kateb, a North African singer who has become a prominent artist in both the French and Algerian music scene. There are many more groups such as Omara Mactar Bombine, Altan Urag, Regina Carter’s “Reverse Thread,” a classically trained jazz violinist and Nguyen-Le, a Vietnamese Parisian guitarist whose set, along with Ms. Carter’s, will see out the closing night on Sunday. Nguyen-Le has seen how the “pop idol” mentality can take over a country’s music industry, but he believes that events such as these can help merge pop with more traditional music, in the hope to make it perhaps more soulful and passionate. “I know jazz

Story and photos by David Holt

Artist Profile: Nguyen-Le Born in Paris to Vietnamese parents, Nguyen-Le began his life painting and drawing, but at the age of 15 he surprised his parents by becoming a selftaught musician. His main focus was jazz, but he also looked to fuse his music with other genres from around the world. In 1995 he released Tales of Viet-Nam, an album in which he started to integrate a selection of world music elements with ethnic musicians in his music. The album has been occasionally compared with Miles Davis’, “Kind of Blue.”

Gwangju News August 2011

15


Feature

The Underground Railroad nation divided, torn by the prospect of war. A disenfranchised people whose lives consist of daily toil and suffering brought on by their callous master. For these people there is but one chance to achieve freedom and prosperity, and that is to escape from this fractured country to their neighbors, to seek asylum. All the while gripped in fear for risking their lives and the lives of their loved ones; for if they are caught the repercussions are dire.

A

For many this would describe an era in American history when African American slaves would flee to the north to break free of their bondage from cruel masters. However this also describes the modern day tragedy of the North Korean refugee. To escape, the North Koreans use a system similar to that of escaping African-American slaves known as the Underground Railroad. There are many reasons why this tragedy has come about. It starts with the motive for North Koreans to leave their country in the first place. Most arguably, the crushing desperate poverty is the main inciting factor for the North Korean exodus. The food crisis is another strong factor along with government persecution. The abysmal situation has claimed an estimated three million lives in North Korea over the past ten years. At first, to escape their desperate lives their home country, North Koreans sought asylum in China. The escapees would try to find refuge in foreign embassies, consulates, churches and international schools in various Chinese cities. However about ten years ago Chinese authorities cracked down on escaping North Koreans. When they are caught by Chinese security, North Koreans are immediately interrogated and repatriated. The punishment in North Korea for fleeing the country can vary from hard labor, torture and even execution. This punishment is not just limited to the person who 16

Gwangju News August 2011

Two Chinese guards try to stop a North Korean refugee as her two-year-old child looks up at the Japanese Embassy in China

tried to escape, but also anyone the government believes collaborated. Therefore family and friends are subject to punishment as well. To avoid capture, various new routes to escape North Korea are being used. One that some use is through Mongolia. This route is particularly arduous since the refugees would have to cross the Gobi Desert, risking their life from exposure to the arid terrain. The route to Mongolia has become increasingly less popular in the last few years as Chinese security forces have increased border presence there.


Feature

Refugees at the Spanish Embassy in China seeking asylum

Chinese authorities try to stop refugees from entering the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Routes through Indo-china also exist. These routes come with their own peril as well. Going through Burma (Myanmar), refugees have to worry about being harassed by the United WA Army and gangs of drug traffickers. These groups are known to capture and torment refugees since they don’t have to suffer much, if any, repercussion from international or local government agencies. Vietnam has proven to be a successful route for escapees. In July 2004 the Vietnamese government allowed 468 North Koreans to be flown to South Korea. After this incident, however, border controls were substantially tightened.

Korea as well. So to avoid antagonizing anyone, the Thai government has taken a “hands off/blind eye” approach. From this many escapees come to Thailand and head straight to a local police station at an advantageous moment to be “arrested”. They will not be sent to a jail however. North Korean refugees are placed in an open compound community where they are not punished for leaving. This is reminiscent of the time when African-American slaves would escape to an anti-slave or slave-neutral state in the U.S. They wouldn’t be stopped in these states but wouldn’t be helped too much either. This depended on geographical location and the political affiliation of the state.

Now the “go to” escape route in this Underground Railroad is through Thailand. Refugees prefer to escape to Thailand since there is no fear of repatriation from the Thai government. This policy towards the North Korean refugees came from a political stalemate with other countries regarding the issue. While Thailand is the third largest trade partner with North Korea they are also a strong ally to the U.S. and conduct significant trade with South

Also like the African-American slaves of old, the North Korean refugees do not escape on their own. The Underground Railroad used to free North Koreans is a complex organization of activists, religious groups, smugglers and fellow expatriates operating various planned routes and safe houses. Human smuggling can be an expensive endeavour with estimating costs of about US$5,000 at a minimum. Refugees are able to pay by receiving resettlement grants from South Korea when they arrive, equivalent to about US$10,000. The situation for North Korean citizens is grim and a potentially tragic humanitarian crisis of large proportions in the making. More awareness on this subject could be a catalyst for positive change for the North Korean people. The documentary, Seoul Train sheds more light on the workings of the Underground Railroad and the brave people that try to escape and those who help them.

A North Korean child scrounges for food on the dirty ground

By Wil Rawlins Photos from www.seoultrain.com Gwangju News August 2011

17


Perspective

Living Abroad

on the Flipside

M

oving to a different country can be daunting for anyone, especially young students. Wil Rawlins caught up with a couple of middle school students who have lived abroad to talk about their experiences.

#1 Chin-ho 3rd grade middle school I still remember the first day when I went to an Australian school. It was tough. I remember vomiting on the first day because of all the stress I got from being in an unfamiliar place with unfamiliar people and not being able to express myself because of the language difficulties. It was like that for a year or two before I could get used to the language and start to use it. After Chin-ho (center) and his about two years I had classmates no problem understanding most conversations and could speak basic English. I think it was after about five years that I became completely fluent with English. My family spoke Korean at home and lived like typical Koreans. We ate Korean food, went to a Korean church and had Korean friends. There still is racism in Australia, just like a lot of other countries. People of other races pretty much identify all Asians as Chinese and often tease them. Also, they are sometimes disregarded. Returning to South Korea was not what I wanted at the time, but now that I have adjusted to Korea, I don’t regret coming back. There were some culture clashes I experienced. In Australia violence can’t be used by teachers or anyone. However in Korea it is very common for teachers to carry around “punishment sticks” and hit students with it. Also, I found it weird not seeing any houses but just a lot of apartments. I 18

Gwangju News August 2011

think having learned to speak fluent English was very beneficial for me. English is considered a very important subject in Korea, so Korean students are jealous of me. I personally consider myself more Korean than Australian. Although I’m an Australian citizen and my nationality on the passport states that I’m Australian, I think for me, Korea is a better country to live in. The food here suits my taste better. The people, the language and everything feels more comfortable and familiar. If I had a chance to show my Australian friends something in Korea, it would definitely be all the delicious food and the entertainment category; the well-developed entertainment on TV, Internet cafés, karaoke, etc. I would show my Korean friends the beautiful scenery in Australia. Especially the beaches and famous sites like the Sydney Opera House and the Great Barrier Reef. I’d show them my old house too because it has a swimming pool.

#2 Kim Yu-rim 3rd grade middle school When I was six years old, our family made a big decision to move to America. I knew how to read and write Korean pretty well then, but I barely knew a word of English. When I first started attending school in Missouri, I was the only Asian in our Yu-rim (left) and her classmate grade; I had to speak and listen to the unfamiliar language for eight hours a day, which helped me learn English quickly. At home, however, I still used Korean, which was easier at that time. The traditions and food at home weren’t very


Perspective

different from when we were in Korea because of our Korean neighbors and cousins, so sometimes it felt like we were still back in our native country. After two years, our family made another move to California. By then, although I stuttered a little, I gradually started to speak English fluently, and it became more comfortable than speaking Korean. Although my mom was proud of me for adapting to a whole new environment so well, she used to get upset when I spoke in English at home, because she was afraid that I might forget Korean and completely ignore my home country. This was pretty confusing and frustrating for me since I had to act and speak differently depending on who I was with and where I was. Another four years had slipped by, and our family returned to Korea, which was a huge shock to me because I couldn’t imagine how I’d adjust in a country that seemed so foreign at that time, and how I had to leave all my friends behind. As expected, the year that I came back from the States was pretty rough. Fortunately

though, I adapted to this country pretty quickly, due to strong support from my parents and my friends. When my friends visit Korea, I’d like to show them my house, town and especially the karaoke rooms because I don’t think they’ve ever been to one. To my Korean friends, I wish that they could experience how American kids have more time for themselves, because I think it’s such a pity how Korean students have to follow the same pattern of moving from school to afterschool programs every day. Now that I’ve stayed here for quite a while, and even though I still miss America, I really enjoy living in Korea, and I’m planning to stay here at least until college, or even longer. I think I have a huge advantage in being bilingual, because there are many choices open to people like me. Even though I live in Korea now, I think I should keep improving my English skills so that I can be flawless in both languages. Story and photos by Kim Yu Rim, Chi Ho and Wil Rawlins

Gwangju Hoop Group H

ula hoops are not just for kids anymore, and the Gwangju Hoop Group is spinning in circles of excitement over them! So what's all the hooplah about?

Well, hooping is a fun and creative way to express yourself with the by-product of exercise. Perhaps the extent of your dancing ability is the hokey-pokey. Hooping is a transformative way to build confidence in both your body and yourself. A hula hoop is the best dance partner! Another reason you'll fall in love with hooping is because it's a puzzle. It's difficult to have your body manifest and perform what you see in your mind's eye. However, when it happens, it's exhilarating! The Gwangju Hoop Group is an opportunity to explore a new way to exercise and feel new in your body. Any and everyone is invited to participate in and create events. Hoopers whirl their way over to the May 18th Memorial Park in Sangmu for hoop jams. They work up a sweat, all while laughing and enjoying the silly and fun nature that is hooping! So let your hair down, kick off your shoes, and spin round with the Gwangju Hoop Group. Find us on facebook or at: peacefulwhirled@gmail.com.

Story and photo by Amanda Straub

Gwangju News August 2011

19


Sport

ROK Ultimate Frisbee arty Nedjelski is from British Columbia, Canada. Before coming to Korea he worked for Royal Caribbean International. Marty worked on board various cruise ships around the world, and he prepared activities and games for kids and teenagers on board.

M

From dodgeball to foosball to “duck, duck, goose “to nightclub DJ, Marty considers this experience one of the most interesting of his life. Really, in many ways, it was a dream come true; but according to Marty, the dream isn’t over yet. Marty came to Korea in 2008 and currently works at Dongguk University. He loves living in Korea and his coming here has turned from “experiencing something” to “not wanting to leave.” He studies Korean intensively, he is married to a Korean, and he has many good Korean friends. In addition to immersing himself into Korean life, Marty considers it very important to stay fit. He likes keeping in shape, he likes staying active, and he likes spending time outdoors. Shortly after his arrival, Marty created a Facebook group looking for people to play ultimate frisbee. Within 24 hours 50 members had joined the group, and it became obvious to him that he wasn't the only one looking for something new to do. “I love sports,” says Marty, “and I graduated from university with a degree in sports management. When I started looking for people to play ultimate (frisbee) with, enough people were interested to form a league. Seeing that that is something that’s right up my alley, I decided to give it a try. My friends, my colleagues, my wife, and I all decided we would give it a shot.” ROK Ultimate started in Daegu in August 2009 with

20

Gwangju News August 2011

Going in for the block


Sport

five Daegu teams. Eleven other teams are now spread across the country. Since the league's debut more than 500 players have participated and this season alone will see 200. The league consists of mixed-level, mixed-age, predominantly expat players. Several Koreans play as well, however, and the youngest player to have played was 16 while the oldest was over 50. According to Marty, “The reason I decided to start an ultimate league instead of another is because ultimate is the perfect sport for males/females, young/old, beginners/pros - everyone can play together! The sport has a quick learning curve, and it doesn't involve much more than a disc. It really is the perfect sport to play when you want to have a 'mix' of everything. And the league works really hard to make sure that each team is balanced so that everyone can play.” Currently Marty and his colleagues are hoping that a 12th team can start up in Gwangju this fall. “I would like to see teams start up in every city,” says Marty, “and Gwangju is next on our list. The sport is relatively untouched in Korea, so it's a blank slate that we can do just about anything with it. “If three or four people commit to making a Gwangju team, it's guaranteed that next year even more people will want to play. Everything will snowball from there, and soon Gwangju will have a new and convenient sport which everyone will be able to play." Want to get involved? It’s easy as pie! For more information look for Republic of Korea Ultimate (ROK-U) on Facebook or visit www.rokultimate.com. By Hughie Samson Photos courtesy of ROK Ultimate

Top: Marty Nedjelski Left: Technique is everything

Gwangju News August 2011

21


Sport

Gwangju’s First Mock 10km Race t’s far too early on a Saturday morning, and it’s the middle of the rainy season in July. Seven young expat women are lined up behind an imaginary line on the red trail between the two wet green strips of grass beside a churning Gwangju River. As the rain starts to fall a man standing comfortably dry under an umbrella shouts “GO!” The women, sporting colorful clothes and shoes, start running through the rain. They will run for five kilometers, and then turn around and come all the way back again. Gwangju News met with Christina Green, a runner and one of the organizers of the race, and asked her about what it was like to manage this group of people in such an odd event.

I

Christina says the group was born out of the experience she shared with friend, Meghyn Cox. They both ran the May 18 Memorial Run this year. Having enjoyed both the training and the actual experience of the race, they wanted to participate in another event soon, but had no time to travel around the country to others being staged outside the city. In order to keep motivated with their training they decided to stage events themselves. They deliberately wanted the first event to be smaller, and so restricted it to female members of the Facebook group, Gwangju Running Club. Preparation involved measuring the route thoroughly. Christina ran the course three times before the big day, just to be sure of the distance. She decided upon the turn-around point, and locations for water stops. Meghyn and Christina appealed on Facebook and to friends for male volunteers to help with handing out water, clocking times and general support. Christina describes the interest in the run as amazing. “Many people liked the idea and wanted to participate. On the day of the race, seven lovely ladies showed up. The weather was rainy, hot and humid, however that didn’t stop our fearless runners and volunteers!” Runners were from the USA, South Africa and Peru. Interesting was the unity shown by the racers; well, at first, at least. They deliberately ran the first five kilometers as a block group, having decided to split up and run at their own individual paces only after the 22

Gwangju News August 2011

The grueling 10 kilometers

half-way turn around for the final five kilometers. This gave the already distinctive event a stronger sense of shared enjoyment. A few hardy and willing males also turned up to offer support. After the run Christina said, “The race would not have been possible without the help of some great male volunteers...We owe them a huge ‘Thank you!’” Because there were many interested who couldn’t make the first Mock Race, Christina and Meghyn decided to create another event. The next run will be on September 24. Christina says, “We will use the same running course which starts and finishes at Yangdong Market. Most importantly, the next race will be open for both men and women!” For more information on joining the upcoming race or volunteering, please visit the Gwangju Running Club on Facebook. By Christina Green and Julian Warmington Photos courtesy of Christina Green


Sport

Sprint together for tomorrow: IAFF World Championships Daegu 2011 he World Championships in Athletics is an event organized by the International Association of Athletics Federations and held every two years. The upcoming event will be held in the city of Daegu, from August 27 to September 4. Those who run the fastest, jump the highest, and leap the farthest will be all gathering together!

T

Daegu has previously hosted the 2003 Summer Universiade and three matches of the 2002 FIFA World Cup. Located in the heart of the southeastern region of the Korean Peninsula, Daegu is a major transportation hub for the country with its convenient transportation networks connecting to every city in Korea. Seven expressways, the high speed Korean Express Sarbi, the mascot of the IAAF (KTX), an World Championships Daegu Train international airport, 2011 and an hour's drive to the harbour makes Daegu an attractive major transportation hub. If you plan to visit Daegu from Gwangju, you have to go U-Square, as unfortunately there is no train service. Daegu, with its clear rivers, thick forests, and parks makes it the “greenest� city in Korea. Event Summary Event: IAAF World Championships, Daegu 2011 Date: Aug. 27 ~ Sept. 4, 2011 (9 days) Event size: 212 countries, 6,000 athletes (plus 3,500 officers and 2,500 reporters) 47 events (24 for male, 23 for female)

Match scene during the athletic competition

Event Venue Daegu Stadium Located 9 kilometers from the Daegu International Airport, Daegu Stadium is one of the most unique stadiums with its arched roof. Address: 540 Daeheung-dong, Suseong-gu, Daegu Events list for the IAAF World Championships - Track Events: include sprints, middle-distance running, long-distance running, steeplechase, hurdles and relays. - Field Events: events performed off the tracks include jumping and throwing events where athletes compete for distance and height. - Combined Events: these events combine track and field events, such as long jump, shot put, high jump, discus, pole vault, and javelin. - Road Races: these events are performed outside of the stadium. There are marathons and walking races. If you need more information, check out: http://www.daegu2011.org/ By Kyouri Park and Seoyoung Park Photos from www.daegu2011.org

Gwangju News August 2011

23


Travel

Right Under Your Nose here is a Korean saying that roughly translates to "Under the lantern is where it is darkest". In other words, it is easiest to miss what's right in front of you. This summer why not rediscover Gwangju and all it has to offer? Things you may have forgotten or overlooked for the bright lights of Busan and the beaches of the south coast. Here are just a few ideas for fun in and around the city that many of us call home. Some of them you may already be familiar with, but added with a few unknown facts to perhaps stir your curiosity.

T

Mudeung Mountain Aside from the numerous paths and trails that lead up to the peak, the mountain boasts many hidden gems. Dotted with temples and historical sites in easy reach, it offers a great local day out. Wonhyosa and Jeungsimsa temples are a relatively short walk from the bus station at the bottom of the mountain which is serviced by the No. 9 and No. 15 buses among others. The latter temple is one of the oldest and largest sites in Gwangju containing an abundance of culturally significant monuments. Set into the mountainside, surrounded by trees and fresh water streams, it is difficult to believe these beautiful retreats are so close to the hubbub of downtown. Alternatively, jump on the No. 187 and follow a winding road through the mountainside, past the "observation center" which provides stunning views of the city and great iced drinks to cool you during the summer. Continue on to Gwangju lake and eco-reserve and then to Soswaewon gardens. Damyang A 40-minute bus ride north of the city takes you to the bamboo forest at Damyang. The purple No. 311 bus from U Square will drop you at the entrance to the park, just past a low stone bridge over the river where bikes and kitschy tandem carriages hung with plastic flowers are available to rent. The bamboo forest is a collection of winding paths through overhanging stems. Take in views of the mountains and the "bamboo

24

Gwangju News August 2011

cultural village". Even on a rainy day the cool shade is welcome and the surrounding restaurants serve a variety of bamboo-based dishes for you to sample. Family Land North of the city the faded glory of Family Land amusement park is an interesting diversion from the high-tech and highly polished norm of Korea. Despite the unsettling feeling that it could be the set for a low budget horror movie, the limited rides are great fun including the “Viking” pirate ship, a water flume ride, the alarmingly rickety “Atomic Mouse” and the “Dragon Chase” which has a double corkscrew and a loop. The park also includes a water-park and a zoo, though the latter is only to be recommended to those with a strong stomach as some of the conditions are truly appalling. Several buses run to the parks including the No. 15, No. 86 and No. 180. Get off at Uchi Park (it’s one of the last stops) and cross the road to the entrance. Naju Waterpark Through the heat of the Korean summer it’s hard to beat a day out at a good water park. The fantastic Naju Waterpark, about 50 minutes southwest of the city, is well worth a visit. The resort runs a free shuttle bus from U-Square leaving at 10 a.m. and 12 p.m. from the main bus stops outside the terminal entrance, with the last bus returning at 6:50 p.m. The park itself consists

View over Family Land


Travel

Mountain God shrine at Mudeung Mountain

Mountain stream on Mudeung Mountain

The bamboo forest at Damyang

of several good quality rides including the “Black Hole”, a brilliant water rollercoaster; a “Lazy River” which, despite the name, attempted to drown this writer several times; and the terrifying “Tornado”, a giant cone which rafting riders speed up the side of, holding on for dear life. The indoor pool provides some much needed relaxation with scores of variously positioned button operated water jets ranging from a soothing bubble massage to water jets so powerful they threaten to rip your skin off. The park is pricy with a 46,000 won entrance fee and an extra 1000 - 2000 won charge to ride some of the bigger flumes. But with free transport there and back it’s well worth splashing out. May 18th National Cemetery Along with several other sites across Gwangju, the May 18th National Cemetery commemorates the Democratic uprisings of the early 1980s and provides a resting place for those killed in the brutal military repression. Reached by the aptly numbered No. 518 bus and situated a little way from the northern border of the city, the cemetery is a peaceful and introspective place consisting of the cemetery itself, the huge memorial

tower and a museum full of thought provoking displays and information in both Korean and English. If you have some time to spare, the helpful staff will play a 40 minute English language DVD in the video room which depicts in graphic detail the series of events that shook this nation a mere 31 years ago. The most affecting aspect of this beautiful memorial sight is that it is still growing day by day. Those who played a part in the uprisings have the right to be buried here if they wish and many of the graves, as well as the pictures in the photographic memorial hall, are dated as recently as 2011. It is a poignant reminder that many of the people who pass you on the street and sit next to you on the bus lived through this violent era and fought to make this city, and this country, what they are today. This article only scratches the surface of the many and varied sights and activities that Gwangju and the surrounding area have to offer. Downtown and the city’s environs are littered with parks and areas perfect for a lazy picnic on a summer’s day. Both Gwangju FC and the Kia Tigers would welcome your support at any of their home games that run through the summer, and the various museums dotted around the city will cool you down and culture you up. The massively underrated Gwangju Guidebook is a fantastic resource for exploring these and many other interesting attractions, providing bus numbers and subway stations as well as websites and phone numbers. Please visit the GIC for a copy in September. So this summer consider taking some time to discover what’s been hiding here in Gwangju all along, right under your nose. You won’t be disappointed. Story and photos by Anna Corbett

Gwangju News August 2011

25


News

Home Pages Want to write about news from your country? Contact the Editor for more information: gwangjunews@gmail.com.

Australia

Malaysia

Many get annoyed at finding junk mail in their letterbox, but how would you feel if you found a dog’s severed genitals in your mailbox? That’s exactly what happened to a man in Melbourne. When collecting his mail, the man discovered parts of a dog’s testicles and scrotum in two vacuum-sealed bags. As there was no message left with the package, police are unsure of any motives but they are “treating the incident as an animal cruelty case”. And according to a vet, it seemed that the parts had not been removed with “proper veterinary procedure.” In any case, whatever happened to just egging someone’s house for kicks? Source: news.ninemsn.com.au By Kathleen Villadiego

United Kingdom Dominating the UK news this month has been the unfolding revelations that leading newspaper News of the World hacked into the phones of many “people of interest” over a period of several years during the last decade. These included footballers and celebrities as well as, much more worryingly, the families of those who died in the 7/7 London bombings, and the phone of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler. The story took an unusual twist when it was discovered that it was none other than Hugh Grant (yes, the Hugh Grant) who played a key role in uncovering the scandal by wearing a microphone disguised as a pen and accosting one of the journalists involved. The movie, helping to make the issue go public, can only hope that when the inevitable screenplay is penned, they find someone else to play him; though it will probably be Colin Firth… By Anna Corbett

26

Gwangju News August 2011

For the past few weeks, the Malaysian government has been cracking down hard on the people. This is due to a movement calling for a free and fair election. The ‘BERSIH’ movement logo mynewshub.my movement is called “Bersih”, which means “clean” and the theme color for the movement is yellow. On July 9, 30,000 people rallied on the streets of Kuala Lumpur demanding for a change in the electoral system. Sixteen hundred protesters were arrested and one was killed after he was allegedly hit by a tear gas canister. The government also arrested hundreds of people before the July 9 protest for wearing yellow colored tshirts with “Bersih” printed on it. The peaceful demonstration was hit by tear gas and splashed with acid liquid fired by the police. However, many Malaysians have pledged to wear yellow shirts every Saturday as a symbol of protest against the corrupted electoral system. By Alfian Zohri

New Zealand A lone sheep was found enjoying the delights of downtown Wellington one late Friday evening recently. The party animal was exploring the wonders of Ghuznee and Vivian streets when some surprised and possibly scared members of the public phoned the police. By the time a patrol car finally located the sheep, it had been rugby tackled by some over-zealous martial-artists, who thereafter kept it company until police officers arrived to take it away for questioning, and maybe a barbeque. By JJ Parkes


News

Vietnam

Indonesia

Every year in early July, the university entrance examination takes place in Vietnam. A large number of high school students with their parents from all over the country rush to the big cities for this important examination. Therefore, the cities become very crowded with lots of traffic jams and cheap hotels are overloaded. To deal with these problems, a large number of volunteers have participated in a big campaign called “Lending your hands” to help the candidates and their families to find university and hotel locations. Student volunteers stay at bus terminals and crowded streets during the exam days, willing to take the candidates to the right places. Many pagodas, institutes or working centers also supply free shelters for students during the period. Some provide them with free meals and other supplies. “I came to Ho Chi Minh City with my mother but we have no relatives here,” one HUST (Hanoi University of Science and Technology) candidate said, “and I don’t have much money to stay in a hotel. Luckily, I found some volunteer students who help me to find free shelter so that I can stay here comfortably during the examination days. I am very confident now and I will do my best in this exam!”

Lombok to host the Lombok Sumbawa Pearl Festival 2011 The annual festival that has been held for three times in the past, Lombok (a small island just next to Bali) is organizing the Lombok Sumbawa Pearl Festival from July 8, 2011. Pearl buyers from domestic and abroad have come to this tourism island to commence bidding on the pearls. The festival consists of many events; namely pearl harvesting, traditional dances, arts and crafts exhibitions and pearl auctions which hopes to attract tourists to boost the economy of the area. Pearls from Mataram, the capital city of Lombok, are said to have high quality and originality. In this event, 200 kilogram of pearls are brought in from all over the country; 10 times more than the previous year. However, the most favorite is the Nusa Tenggara (where Lombok island is located), which possesses 27 different kinds of colors. This pearl is said to have a very high standard of quality. At this time, the pearl production in Lombok reaches 36,117 tons. Foreign investment itself reaches Rp.76 billion (US$ 8 million). Hopefully this investment will help the economy of the region, which is always overshadowed by its more popular neighbor, Bali Island.

By Khac-ha Nguyen By Karina Prananto

U.S.A

South Africa

L.A. takes fitness to new heights If you want to conquer your fear of heights and get in shape at the same time, consider taking a Zumba class on the 18th story helipad of the InterContinental Century City hotel in Los Angeles. The US$15 class includes the hip-shaking rhythms of Latin music and an incredible view of the Fox Studios and Hollywood Hills. Even if you aren’t a guest, you get valet parking and time to hit the showers. For those who can’t feel the burn after the class, US$40 will get you special access to the indoor fitness center, outdoor Jacuzzi and pool. It sounds like a fantastic way to feel healthy and on top of the world!

Shark researchers in South Africa got a little closer than they would have expected when a nine foot, half ton shark jumped from the water right into the crew’s boat. Team leader Dorien Schroder described the event, saying, "Next thing I know I hear a splash, and see a white shark breach out of the water from [the] side of the boat hovering, literally, over the crew member who was chumming [throwing food bait] on the port side." The team had to keep the shark hydrated with a hose pipe before a rescue team could return it back to the water using ropes and a crane. Fortunately, the shark didn’t get hurt in the ordeal.

Source: travel.usatoday.com Source: www.huffingtonpost.com By Aisha Hobbs By Stef Potgieter

Gwangju News August 2011

27


PHOTO CONTEST Submit your best shot of Korea! To enter the Photo Contest, simply send your name, photo and picture description to gwangjunews@gmail.com.

W I N N E R

Two girls at the beach near Jeju City

Wando 28

Gwangju News August 2011

Photo by Nathan Busch

Photo by Joanne Whitham


This month’s photo contest was judged by Mark Eaton. Mark Eaton has exhibited his photographic work in art galleries as well as other public and private venues in the United States and South Korea.

Fishing by hand in Suncheon's Dong Cheon

Gwangju Downtown

Photo by Melanie Steyn

Photo by Magdelene Marron Gwangju News August 2011

29


Travel

Russia It is called the Motherland by those who live there. A vast and boundless country that neither Hitler nor Napoleon could conquer. Russia, the biggest landmass country in the world, twice the size of Canada. The home of bitter Siberian winters, Lenin and Trotsky, the tsars, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy and Solzhenitsyn, the KGB, Yuri Gagarin and vodka.

I

A thirty-day visa to see the largest country in the world? Possible? Certainly not, but by jumping on and off the great Trans-Siberian railway you’re guaranteed not to have visited a country like this before. Donghae, Korea is the only ferry port that links these two countries and gives travelers their first glimpse of Russian people. Their gruff exterior, their hardened faces, it’s not easy to get any warm feelings from these children of the Iron Curtain. They keep to themselves as they board, shoving past one another to get to their cabins and crack open a bottle. The ferry ride is 24hours, more than enough time to meet some strangers. Sitting alone, you are quickly invited for a drink and, depending on your habits, it could be for just one or it could quickly be for the rest of the evening. Vladivostok is the eastern city that, up until the late 1980s, not even Russian people were allowed to visit. My initial thoughts before arriving gave a picture of a Soviet bloc city with row upon row of brutish, unforgiving buildings – it was anything but. Along the streets stood European buildings full of color and style that could have been taken from any city in Rhone Alpes or Prague. You need only a day or so before you begin the first leg of your train journey, so do as most Russians do: eat a large bowl of potatoes and drink a bottle of vodka and crash out in a scary hotel with all the charm of ‘Stalin – The Musical’. Tickets for the Trans-Siberian can be bought online, but you need to exchange the E-ticket for an authentic one before you board, and unfortunately this can be a hassle. Russian queues are not renowned for their pace and attendants have about as much passion as a dead race 30

Gwangju News August 2011

St. Basil’s Cathedral late at night, Moscow

horse. Eventually you will get through, but be forewarned. There are three classes you can travel: first– Spalny Vagon, second– Kupe and third – Platskartny. Most westerners prefer second class, but the cheapest by a long shot is the Plaskartny, which houses over fifty beds in one carriage. This is usually packed with Russian soldiers and families who chat, sing, play cards and drink and are very welcoming to strangers. If you are by yourself, then this is a great way to meet true Soviet characters like Vladimir, a stumpy rotund individual that looked like he enjoyed eating babies for breakfast and who proudly showed off his hammer and sickle tattoo to me every ten minutes. Most travelers take off from Vladivostok to Lake Baikal, stopping in the city of Irkutsk, but there are a number of cities along the route that would be worth spending a day or two in. Khabarosk, Chita and Ulan-Ude – a city for those traveling down through Mongolia and onto Beijing. It is a three day ride to Irkutsk covering 4106 km (2665 miles). Upon arriving a quick consultation of your guidebook will reveal numerous hostels and hotels that all offer comfortable beds and English speakers, luxuries which are currently unavailable in Vladivostok. Most travelers will spend a night and then head to the lake the


Travel

following morning, but there are plenty of interesting places to see within the town. Lake Baikal, or the ‘Pearl of Siberia’, is a sight to behold, especially during winter when you can see the mountains that surround it 80km away. It is almost 30 million years old and the deepest lake in the world, which holds 20 percent of all unfrozen Russian poster advertising a fresh water making it as theater production, clear as the vodka sold Vladivostok nearby. In 1996 it was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Moscow. After almost six days in third class I highly recommend spending one night in the Spalny Vagon – the first class carriage. If it is summer you’ll appreciate the air-conditioning, and if it is winter you’ll love the heaters. The food onboard is a little tastier, the beds are more comfortable. Unfortunately, other passengers seem a bit more distant. Moscow is grand and impressive. The buildings are sublime and the city is steeped in history. The Kremlin is an awesome sight to behold as well as the Red Square and St. Basil’s Cathedral. The occasional Moskvich can appear slightly sour and disgruntled, but don't let that throw you off. It's still a city well worth discovering. A few days spent in Moscow is imperative as there is so much to see, but the real Russia lies on the trains and in the restaurants and cafés of all the other towns and cities, and therein lies its history. The Russians are strikingly nationalistic, flag-waving and tough; but deep down like nothing more than sharing a drink.

From Irkutsk you can venture to Novosibirsk or Omsk, or you can continue onwards to Yekaterinburg, (two days, 3375km (2110miles)) one of the truly historic Russian cities. It was here on July 16th 1918, that Tsar Nicholas II and his family were slain by the Bolsheviks. From Vladivostok to Yekaterinburg the transition from stereotypical Russia to a more westernized place is obvious. Life moves at a quicker pace; there is more English appearing randomly and the hospitality of people has increased ten-fold. The final part of the train journey takes just a day, only 1778km (1110miles) to

Story and photos by David Holt David Holt writes at: http://davidholt.wordpress.com/ www.flickr.com/photos/davidandrewholt https://twitter.com/#!/DavidAndrewHolt For Trans-Siberian information & tickets: www.realrussia.co.uk http://www.seat61.com/Trans-Siberian.htm For ferry information: http://www.trans-siberian.su/ferry-korea-japan.php

The Great Trans-Siberian - the longest train journey in the world Gwangju News August 2011

31


Cartoon

32

Gwangju News August 2011


Community

Meet the Neighbours 1. Who is your hero or favourite person for inspiration? 2. What is your favourite Korean snack food? 3. When was the last time you saw a play, a musical, a concert, or live production? 4. What’s your favourite fair trade product? 5. Where is your favourite place in Gwangju? 6. If you could invite any three people to share a dinner party with you, whom would you invite?

Bryan Simmons (Lives in Juweol-dong and works near there.) Stage Name: Dj Hypnotiq or Hypnotiq

1. My father is an inspirational person to me because he is a very strong person mentally and handles everything positively no matter how much negativity is around him. 2. My favorite Korean snack is Mandoo. 3. The last play I saw was Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, in the Lotte Mart next to the soccer stadium. It was last year around fall with my hagwon. The play had a nice little twist to it. It was fun to watch it even though I didn't understand what they were saying, but the looks on the children faces made it memorable. 4. I like Ben and Jerry’s ice-cream. 5. My favorite place in Gwangju is under the bridges beside the river. I like to take walks along there blasting my music through my headphones while deep in thought. 6. Jerry Seinfield because I love his stand-up and he has done well with it. I use to do stand-up comedy before I came to Korea and possibly could get some advice from him. Dr. Cornell West because he has so much wisdom and hopefully some of that wisdom will stick with me and I will become wiser. Spike Lee because he is one of my favorite directors and since I am an actor he could give me knowledge about the entertainment industry and maybe just maybe he would put me into one of his movies.

Jo Park (From Naju.) Studied at high school and university in the USA, majoring in drama.

1. Angelina Jolie? Ha ha… No, my mother. I greatly lack in patience, but she is the most selfless, devoted person that I know. Someday I’d like to find someone or something that I could devote myself to that passionately, in the same way. 2. “Margaret” cookies. I could eat two boxes of them!

3. My own play [which I directed], Picasso at the Lapin Agile [written by Steve Martin]. It was magnificent, I must say; ha ha! It was emotional for me; nerve wracking and cathartic because it was the chance to express myself in a play and present to a lot of people in a short period. I was lucky to have a high energy cast but I really wanted to express it in an energetic way, so I’m happy to have directed a great team to that vision. 4. A chocolate bar just called “Chocolate”. I think it’s made by Aramdaeun Gagae (The Beautiful Store). It’s very rich in flavor, and tastes slightly bitter like dark chocolate should be. 5. The Kimdaejung Convention Center staircase landing areas, next to the stairs, just below the café. I like good architectural design anyway, and this space has an ambience I like. 6. Michael Cain! I am such a big fan and feel I would like him as a person too. He’s sassy and classy and a good actor. I’d like to also invite Gordon Ramsey and Jamie Oliver to have a cook-off; a cooking competition. I’d have Michael Caine make sassy remarks about their cooking!

Media Romadona Shoe Addict (high heels). Proudly Anti-social

1. There is someone who I want to do a similar thing to. She makes money blogging about fashion and shoes. And she’s funny. I’d love to write in a funny way. And work from home. 2. Bbushon Bbushon, the dried noodle you have to crunch in the packet. And twigim mandoo. 3. It was winter 2009. I don’t remember ‘cos I fell asleep. It was a classical music concert and I got a ticket for free. 4. Coffee. 5. Chosun University. I went away for three months and came back and saw the main building and it felt familiar. It was like home. It felt good. 6. One would be any of my ex-boyfriends because none of them talk to me anymore. Another would be that blogger I mentioned: Amber McNaught – foreveramber.co.uk. Story and photos by Julian Warmington

Gwangju News August 2011

33


Community

Boohwal guitarist, Kim Tae Won

Jessie Calderon

1000 Man Miracle Benefit

cry for help was given and answered earlier this month when the citizens of Gwangju came out in full force to support the cause behind the 1000 Man Miracle Benefit Concert. Seven year old MDream* resident, Ginam Jung was in dire need of a liver transplant, and now due to the outpouring of support, MDream is on the path to making this a reality for him.

A

Ginam came to MDream in October 2010 and shortly after arriving, his critical condition was discovered. Born without a biliary tract, the bile was building up in his system and causing his liver to shut down. Ginam’s spleen, which was working overdrive, was contributing to a distended belly and compromising his growth. After going to the hospital and many tests later, the prognosis didn’t deliver any better news. His liver was compromised and would need to be replaced. MDream is a permanent home to over 90 children that go there for a variety of reasons. However, with so many kids to care and provide for, a health problem of Ginam’s magnitude was devastating news for MDream, especially since Ginam would be on costly medication for the rest of his life. The entire procedure, the consequent doctors’ visits, likely emergency care, and medication into adulthood was conservatively estimated to be over one hundred million won. Creatively thinking of how to make Ginam’s care a reality was how the 1000 Man Miracle Benefit Concert was born. The musical event is the brainchild of MDream’s Secretary General, Chung Eunkang, and Professional Korean Drummer, Bak Sang Yeol, who thought that 34

Gwangju News August 2011

Boohwal vocalist, Jeong Dong Ha

since nothing of this magnitude had ever been done in Gwangju before, it was worth a try. They figured that if they could get the message out about Ginam and get some great artists to attend, then the people would come, and come they did. The concert featured a variety of artists that appealed to different audiences. The artists ranged Ginam Jung from mega selling rock band Boowhal, DJ Wreckx a pioneer DJ in Korea, B-Boy, CCM Singer Lee Eun Hye, ballad singer Yoon Han Gi, and Gwangju’s own Jessie Calderon. The 1000 Man Miracle was a night that packed a punch and was a great step in the right direction. However the work with raising funds for Ginam and his care is still not finished. The concert was a start but they still need help in making this miracle a reality. If people continue to contribute and donate, MDream will be on target for reaching their once seemingly impossible goal. For more information on how you can help or more information about Ginam, visit MDream.org or Ginam’s Tumblr Page http://1000miracle.tumblr.com/english. * Moodeung Dream Garden, a children’s home

Story and photos courtesy of Jessie Calderon


Community

The Sights and Sounds of Summer a nt to beat the heat and experience some culture at the same time? Grab your family and friends and head on over to the Gwangju Museum of Art for the Sights and Sounds of Summer concert and art expo on Saturday, August 27th at 3pm. The concert and art expo is a collaborative effort of the Gwangju International Center and the Gwangju Museum of Art. These organizations thrive to bring the local and foreign communities together and want you to enjoy some music and art at the same time. It’s a great way to experience something new, learn ways to get involved in the community and meet some new friends!

W

The concert will feature various musical acts from local and foreign expats. The performers include: Da Megook Movement A hip-hop group that has taken Korea by storm. They are a collective group of DJs and hip-hop artists that specialize in underground music. They have been performing at various venues in Gwangju as well as around Korea. Kyle Yoon A concert pianist with extensive experience performing in Korea and abroad. He was a guest for the Eclipse Ensemble and is currently a member of Kyle Trio. Trevor and Andrea These Gwangju locals came here from Canada, where they studied art together at the Ontario College of Art and Design. You can see this musical pair singing and playing guitar together on the streets of downtown Gwangju, or out and about at one of the many festivals or concerts around the city. Mange This duet’s name is a combination of their first names’, Mike and Ange. These two came to Korea from Wales and the USA, respectively. Mike plays the guitar and ukulele, but prefers to play the ukulele. “I Ange and Mike like covering songs you wouldn't expect on the uke. I like to surprise people.” Ang

One of Mark Eaton’s works for display

completes the duet by providing lyrics sung with her soulful voice. Caleb Sekeres This Megook native’s first great passion in life is playing the classical piano. He writes and sings original compositions, mostly ballads and jazz-style songs. He even recorded two CDs, “Last Night Meditations” and “American Korean”. He is currently an instructor at Chosun University. In addition to the concert, three artists, Doug Stuber, Michael Simon and Mark Eaton, will have their works on display. You can also enjoy face/body painting, as well as an art experience with our artists. So come on out and enjoy the Sights and Sounds of Summer at the Gwangju Museum of Art. By Stephanie Swayne Photos by Mark Eaton and Mange

The Sights and Sounds of Summer Concert and Art Expo Date: Saturday, August 27, 2011 @ 3:00 pm Venue: The Gwangju Museum of Art Museum entrance fee: Adult 500 won / Student 300 won / Children 200 won Directions: Bus No. 83, 64 Biennale Bus stop/ Taxi driver show this: 광주시립미술관 (“Gwangju Shirip Misoolgwan”) For questions or more information please contact the GIC at 062-226-2732~4

Gwangju News August 2011

35


Environment

2011 Gwangju Summit of the Urban Environmental Accords

Carbon Credits and Carbon Trading he 1997 Kyoto agreement raised the profile of tradable carbon permits as a policy instrument for successfully dealing with CO2 emissions. The 2011 Gwangju Summit of the Urban Environmental Accords advocates that the same approach, if run between cities, could curb emissions, and has invited the world to participate in making changes locally, to impact the state of the environment globally.

T

The developed world has many choices on how to reach their targets of reduced emissions. One way is to fund technologies which produce energy but emit less CO2 than current technologies. Other Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) emission reduction projects include renewable energy, and fuel switching. The overarching aim of CDM is to lower the global output of greenhouse gases (GHG) which are (unequivocally) altering the climate.

CDM could hold the key for our environment

What are Carbon Credits (CER)? Often expressed on the news with two hard Cs, carbon credits are the generic term for any tradable permit representing the right to emit GHG into the atmosphere. One Certified Emission Reduction (CER) equals one tonne of CO2 or its equivalent (tCO2e). Companies are given an allowance of carbon credits called a “cap”. Nations are attempting to abide by limits set in the Kyoto Protocol. Elsewhere, governments are taking the initiative themselves by imposing limits or taxes on carbon emissions. Australia’s carbon tax of AUD$23 (26,000 won) per CO2 tonne – deeply unpopular with voters and industry – will be

36

Gwangju News August 2011

implemented by the Labour government nonetheless in order to curb GHG. How does CDM Carbon Trading Work? Industries who are unable to stay within the CO2 emission limits can buy the excess from those who produce less. The idea behind ‘cap and trade’ is that it makes sense for you to make my reductions for me; I then pay you for your excess carbon credits (or CERs). Economic success! You make money from selling CERs, and I don’t need to change the way I do business. So the corporate sector chortles at the opportunity to buy their way out of their obligations. The incentives for change are there. CERs were created to assist in a switch to greener technologies. It’s expensive and in some cases implausible to change a company’s emissions overnight (think energy or transportation industry). Tradable CERs give businesses the option to fund GHG saving projects taken by others or to seize the opportunity to switch to greener activities themselves with the financial motivation of selling their excess CO2 credits. How will Urban CDM work under the Gwangju Urban Environmental Accords (UEA)? The Urban CDM will be the first financial system giving carbon emission rights to cities. Awarded by the United Nations, calculations will be based on the quantity of reduced emissions when compared to the cities standard emission. These CERs can be traded with other cities or sold on the global carbon market. The UEA emphasis is that a city is the ideal unit to cope with climate change in a practical way because projects can be adapted to the needs of the community; cities in developing countries will also benefit from the technical and economical support. For more information on the UEA Gwangju Summit 2011, in English or Korean, click on http://2011uea.com By Frances Herrington Frances Herrington blogs at http://theveganurbanite.wordpress.com Photos from World Bank and greenhouse.netne.net


Society

Animal Cruelty Stopped in Its Tracks his past month the National Assembly of South Korea amended the Animal Protection Law (APL) to provide fundamental rights of life for animals, and toughen the punishments for those who violate them. As of February 2012, offenders found guilty of cruelly killing or unfairly injuring an animal, may be punished by a year in prison or fined up to 10 million won.

T

Four years in the making, the amendment came about from the tireless efforts of Voice4Animal, CARE, KAAP and Congressmen Cho Seung Soo and Kim Hyo Seok; who managed to win over an unreceptive government. Its ratification is an acknowledgment that it’s time for the law to reflect the views of the country. But is the new animal protection law enough and will it be enforced? The purpose of the law change is to reduce animal cruelty and abandonment; necessary to keep up with the growing trend of pet ownership. Owners are now obliged to register their pets in efforts to curb abandonment which peaked last year at 100,899, four times that of 2003 figures. However, regulations for businesses that sell animals have been eased from mandatory registration to voluntary reporting, making it difficult to monitor indiscreet dog breeders. Park So Youn from Coexistence of Animal Rights on Earth (CARE) informed Gwangju News that the organization had recently rescued two Pyrenees dogs from an abandoned breeding business, dumped by the owner when it became unprofitable. Unattended and locked in their cages, the other 25 dogs had not been so lucky and either starved to death or died from the harsh winter. CARE workers found rats feeding on their bodies. These stories provide the motivation for stricter animal protection laws.

Under the new APL “Five Freedoms for Animals” cruelties such as starving, neglecting, allowing an animal to become or remain diseased or making an animal fearful will be punished with fines or imprisonment. In addition the APL establishes the formation of a National Animals Welfare Committee, set up to oversee animal welfare issues. “On paper it is a good thing”, says Leo Mendoza, owner of Busan Abandoned Pet Sanctuary (BAPS). “However, even though we appreciate the sentiment behind it, they have not lain out enforcement requirements and despite the fact that there are currently laws against the torture of animals, there has never been strict enforcement.” Park So Youn shared his sentiments, ‘The Act does not include the definition of animal abuse, humanitarian rearing, transportation and butchery of animals or the prohibition of [animals being] buried alive.” The most recent live burials took place in February. Four thousand pigs were buried alive in Paju, Gyeonggi, which were suspected to have contracted foot and mouth disease. The newly established provision on the “humanitarian disposal” of animals may sound absolute, but it’s open to interpretation. The Kyunghyang Shinmun wrote, “These reforms are a significant first step for consciousness regarding animal protection in Korean society”. It is a misconception that compassion for animals is at the expense of that for humans and hopefully this small victory will encourage people's enthusiastic participation in future campaigns on animal issues. By Frances Herrington Photo courtesy of CARE Gwangju News August 2011

37


Health

Don’t Touch My Drugs eoul – It’s common sense to be healthy, exercise and especially have a diet rich in nutrition. Most people are aware of the basic vitamins and minerals – C and D, fish oils, magnesium, potassium, amino acids – There are over 30 or so considered essential for our everyday health. However what may surprise people is that now the United Nations is moving to restrict and even ban vitamins. For example, in the US, many everyday vitamins are already classified as “drugs” by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

S

Sponsored by the UN, World Health Organization (WHO) and FDA is the Codex Alimentarius Commission, who is moving to ban all over-thecounter vitamins, minerals, herbs or other natural supplements of any kind, all at the apparent request of the multi-billion dollar pharmaceutical industry. In the US the FDA wishes to enforce this policy without consulting elected representatives. Natural substances already declared illegal include vitamin B6 which naturally occurs in fish and chicken and lovastatin of red yeast rice that lowers cholesterol. Vitamin C, magnesium, and other B vitamins are also officially considered drugs by the FDA.

You are what you ingest http://corporationtocommunity.com

US Congressman Henry Waxman snuck the legislation into a Wall Street reform bill that passed in 2010 allowing the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to write its own laws without Congress regarding regulation of nutrition. Even before that the FTC routinely fined nutrition companies millions for claiming their foods are healthy, even claims that could be considered common knowledge such as that walnuts help cholesterol or that cherries (now officially drugs) fight cancer, are considered false advertising with sever legal consequences. The European Union (EU) has just banned all herbal medications and supplements. For example in Denmark they have banned adding vitamins and minerals to food, and only government-approved fortified vitamins are allowed for sale. In addition all fruits and vegetables must be radiated and covered with pesticides, and all meats must use growth 38

Gwangju News August 2011


Health

cancer wonder drug be? It is THC, the main active ingredient from none other than the devil itself, marijuana. Incidentally the cancer-causing alcohol and tobacco industries are the two largest financial contributors to Partnership for a Drug Free America. Why does it seem like everything good for us is being treated like a dangerous drug? All while, for example, a substance once considered for biological warfare, aspartame, is in tens of thousands of food products, or the main ingredient in rat poison, fluoride, is in US drinking water and toothpaste worldwide. Could it be that the policy towards health is not prevention of illness at all, but rather the more financially lucrative treatment of illnesses? Pills! Pills! Pills!

healthplusrx.com

hormones and antibiotics. As crazy as it all sounds, this is not a joke. These days US Amish families are often SWAT-teamed with guns drawn just for selling fresh milk, eggs, and produce. And companies that sell nutritional foods are often regulated and fined out of business. Even Whole Foods Inc. was absurdly accused of being a monopoly by the US Federal Trade Commission while real monopolies like Wall Mart push GMO foods. Also heavily restricted by big industries via government regulations are alternative cancer treatments. While there is no automatic “cure for cancer”, there are at least few known natural substances that are believed to dramatically reduce cancer risks. And at least two have a surprising quality in common… they are banned or illegal. One example is vitamin B17, made famous from G. Edward Griffin’s 1974 book, A World without Cancer. It argues that numerous studies conclude that a lack of this essential vitamin in our diet is a primary cause of cancer. Now if for arguments sake we are to assume that is completely false, there is still the question of why it is banned in the US. That means it cannot be sold in the US, but it can still be ordered from overseas. However if a doctor gets caught recommending B17 to a patient, the hospital will lose government grants. Even natural occurring B17 like apricot seeds and bitter almonds are banned.

Other journalists like Alex Jones and Webster Tarpley believe there is a more sinister motive beyond just greed that makes the establishment want to keep our health down. It is called eugenics, and it was made a dirty word after the Nazis and Soviets practiced the science meant to control populations both physically and behaviorally. Alex Jones says the science is alive and well today, but practiced under other names and done obviously a bit more subtle than those used in concentration camps. One documentary that details the history of eugenics is End Game, produced and directed by Jones and available for free online. We cannot say we were not warned. Two hundred and thirty-five years ago Benjamin Rush, a physician and signer of the US Declaration of Independence said, "Unless we put medical freedom into the constitution, the time will come when medicine will organize itself into an undercover dictatorship . . . denying equal privileges. All such laws are un-American and despotic..." By Michael Bielawski

There is another well known substance that several top institutions including Harvard and Madrid universities and declassified US government studies indicate actually “burn cancer cells”. What could this Gwangju News August 2011

39


Language Study

Letters to KOTESOL If you have a question for Dr. Dave, please send an e-mail to gwangjunews@gmail.com letting us know your question, student’s age and proficiency level

Dear Dr. Dave, Some of my students really, really don't want to learn English. When is it time, if ever, to just stop trying with them and focus all your energy on the enthusiastic students? Disgruntled Old Man Dear Disgruntled, The age of your students is an important consideration here. As long as the student is too young to grasp completely what the long-term effects would be of not learning English, a teacher should not give up on them. If the student is older, and if the teacher has explained to them the consequences of not putting forth an effort in your English class, possible in a private oneon-one, then you could let the student decide their own fate. However, constant efforts to engage the most reluctant students results in the student also putting forth an effort. If they see that their teacher is sincerely interested in them, the chances are that they will become interested in English. Dr. Dave Dear Dr. Dave, I'm working at a public middle school where the students' level is very low. Their motivation is similarly low and it seems whatever I try (games, creative group work, incorporating pop culture into lessons...), they just aren't interested. Any advice (short of buying a ticket home) would be greatly appreciated. D the frustrated Dear Frustrated, As you know, motivation is key. What you need to do is find out what your students’ interests are. You can do this through a simple needs analysis. You could do this through a written survey, or through a class activity: “I like ___, but I don’t like ___.” Once you have identified common interests of the group, center you lessons and activities on these topics. Your lessons should include a lot of interaction – some teacher-tostudent interaction, but more student-to-student interaction. Try to make this interaction include tasks that they have to complete through using English with each other. Dr. Dave Dear Dr. Dave, I teach conversation to students who often have no business in a conversation class. Their parents want them exposed to a native teacher sometimes before they can answer basic questions. My question is two parts then. 1) Since I have no native co-teacher, what 40

Gwangju News August 2011

is your opinion on me using the native language in class in order to get my point across? I'm aware this takes away from their exposure but how can I do it surgically and appropriately in order to make sure they are really learning? 2) How can I explain to the powers that be that a student is too low for a

conversation class without creating hurt feelings? A

Dear A, In my opinion, there is no student who has no business in a conversation class. Listening and speaking are the basic skills. Students need to be able to understand English in order to speak it; and they need to be able to understand and speak English in order to read and write it. Learners should be exposed to conversation classes from the very first day that they learn English. It seems to me that the problem that you are describing is a situation where there are English learners with no conversation teacher skilled in teaching at the learners’ low level of proficiency. To solve the problem you need to either re-train an existing teacher or hire a teacher skilled in teaching lower-lever learners. Korean is a resource that can be used to advantage in the classroom. However, it should be used sparing. Use it only when explanations in English are not successful; otherwise, learners will come to rely on the Korean explanations and tune out the English.

Dr. Dave

By Dr. Dave Shaffer Dr. Dave Shaffer is a professor of English at Chosun University, where he has taught in the graduate, undergraduate, and TESOL certificate programs for many years. Dr. Shaffer is presently the President of the Gwangju-Jeonnam Chapter of Korea TESOL and invites you to attend teacher development workshops at their monthly Chapter meetings. Web: www.koreatesol.org/GwangjuJeonnam Email: gwangju_kotesol@yahoo.com

Gwangju - Jeonnam KOTESOL August Chapter Meeting Date and Time: Saturday, August 6, 2011, 1:30 p.m. Place: Chosun University, Main Building (Bon-gwan) 2F, Room 2123 (Lab 8). Admission: free. Membership is encouraged. Visit our Chapter online for contact and schedule information: www.koreatesol.org/GwangjuJeonnam E-mail us: gwangju_kotesol@yahoo.com


Language Study

‘-세요': Imperative Sentence Ending Dialogue 소라: 존씨, 안녕하세요? Sora: Hello, John!

[ jonsssi, annyeongha aseyo?]

존: 네, 안녕하세요? 소라씨, 오늘 뭐 하고 싶으세요? [ ne, annyeongha aseyo?.. Sora assi, oneul mwo ha ago sipeusseyo?] John: Yeah, How are you? Sora, what would you like to do today? 소라: 음... 등산하고 싶어요.[ eum.... deungssanha ago sipeoyo..] Sora: Um... I would like to climb the mountain. 존: 그럼 무등산에 가세요. [geureom, Mudeungsane gaseyo] John: If you like, go to Mt. Mudeung. 소라: 아, 무등산이 좋아요? [ a, Mud deun ngssani jo oayo o?] Sora: Ah, is Mt. Mudeung good? 존: 네, 좋아요. 거기에서 폴을 만나세요. [ne, joayo. geogieseo poreul mannaseyo.] John: Yes, it is. Please meet Paul there. 소라: 폴이 누구세요? [ po ori nugusseyo o?] Sora: Who is Paul?

Vocabulary 등산 [deungsan]: hiking; (mountain), climbing 친구 [chingu]: a friend 무등산 [mudeungsan]: a mountain in Gwangju 숙제 [sukje]: homework 결혼 [gyeolhon]: marriage 연필 [yeonpil]: a pencil 같이 [gachi]: together

존: 오늘 무등산을 가는 제 친구예요. [ oneul Mudeungssaneul ga aneun je chinguyeyo..] John: He is my friend who will go to Mt. Mudeung today. Reference: 김성희 외. (2009). 서강한국어2A서울: 도서출판 하우 서강한국어. Retrived July 4, 2011 from http://korean.sogang.ac.kr

Grammar‘-세요' : imperative sentence ending ‘-세요' is one of the sentence endings which can be used for indicating polite questioning in the interrogative(-세요?) and polite order(command) in the imperatives(-세요). This ending is more polite than the sentence ending '-어요.' (1) '-세요?': This form implies respect of the speaker for the subject of the sentence, but the answer to this‘-세요?’must be‘-어요’when referring to yourself in the first person. Example: GIC에 가세요? (Do you go to the GIC?) 숙제 하세요?(Do you do your homework?) 결혼하세요? (Are you married?) (2) '-세요.': This form means“Please do something”when referring to the second person. Example: 연필 주세요. ( Please give me a pencil.) 폴을 만나세요. (Please meet Paul.) 미나씨와 같이 가세요.(Please go with Mina.) By Soo-a Jung Soo-a Jung is an instructor of the GIC Korean Language Class Gwangju News August 2011

41


Literature

Selected Poems by Koh Jung-hee Jiri Mountain

Translated by Chae-pyong Song and Anne M. Rashid

Koh Jung-hee (1948 ~ 1991) was born in Haenam, Jeollanam-do, and studied at Hanshin University. A passionate feminist, she often offered sharp criticism on modern Korean society, whether it was political oppression or gender inequality. In June 1991, she died, swept up by a torrential rain while climbing up the Snake Valley of Jiri Mountain, a mountain she loved a great deal and wrote about often. Known for resistance poetry, particularly based upon the Gwangju Uprising, as well as for lyric poems, she derived many of her poetic inspirations from Gwangju and Jeolla-do (often known as Nam-do). In her lifetime she published at least ten collections of poetry and received the Korean Literature Award in 1983.

Preface Poem I climb the mountain, carrying the weight of my life. When I collapse at the summit where I cannot climb further, washing away the sweat that gushes up, there the mountain takes on the weight of my life and hangs it green on the ridge: the mountain I climb the mountain, carrying sorrow. When, leaning against the sorrows of the twelve summits rising ahead, I take off the sorrow as tall as me, there the mountain takes on the burden of my sorrow and scatters it over the clean water of twelve valleys: the mountain, the mountain I climb the mountain, carrying solitary days, and when I meet the ridge dizzy with wild flowers, and bury the loneliness as big as my life, there it takes on the burden of my loneliness and makes my heart tender and peaceful: the mountain, the mountain, the mountain As we spin the way of revolution from the wheel of history, do people hold one another’s hands to spin the way of love? Standing on the mountain path with more mountains ahead, when I cry over the thought of you that pierces deep into my bones, there the mountain receives the tears of my love, and opens the dazzling field of royal azaleas: the mountain, the mountain, the mountain

42

Gwangju News August 2011

서시 제 삶의 무게 지고 산을 오른다 더는 오를 수 없는 봉우리에 주저앉아 철철 샘솟는 땀을 씻으며, 거기 내 삶의 무게 받아 능선에 푸르게 걸어주네, 산 이승이 서러움 지고 산을 오르다 열두 봉이 솟아 있는 서러움에 기대어 제 키만한 서러움 벗으면, 거기 내 서러움 짐 받아 열두 계곡 맑은 물로 흩어주네, 산산 쓸쓸한 나날들 지고 산에 오르다 산꽃 들꽃 어지러운 능선과 마주쳐 네 생애만한 쓸쓸함 묻으면, 거기 내 쓸쓸한 짐 받아 부드럽고 융융한 품 만들어주네, 산산산 저 역사의 물레에 혁명의 길을 잣듯 사람은 손잡아 서로 사랑의 길을 잣는 것일까 다시 넘어가야 할 산길에 서서 뼈 속까지 사무치는 그대 생각에 울면, 거기 내 사랑의 눈물 받아 눈부신 철쭉꽃밭 열어주네, 산, 산, 산


Literature

The Spring of Jiri Mountain Part I: A Letter Written at the Snake Valley Passing by the Sumjin River bend, I have seen a light rising, flashing over the southwest wind, lying down at the reed field. The tail of the light follows me, exposing the damp loneliness that flows between my ribs, bursting a single blossom of mountain magnolia. This cool scent that coils around my whole body, hung on the mountaintop of the Snake Valley. May’s splendid sunlight sheds a long light through the verdant green, ruffling its sorrowful feathers, opening a way to get to you. You who stand upon the faraway ridge, you who cross over the valley with deafening thunder-when I climb the ravine, following you who are ahead of me, the sticky darkness that I couldn’t shed for thirty years is washed away clean by the grand rapids; capillary vessels whose six thousand knots are untied overflow with spring water; from between heated flesh and bones the laughing sound of fully blooming violets transforms into you, the beautiful, and climbs over the mountain, ascending to heaven like cloud, like wind.

Bound for the South When the moon is full in mid-July, envisioning home, I run down the road to Haenam, the place that I miss-the road I take to watch the evening glow below Mother’s grave, the road the typhoons Thelma, Alex, Vernon, and Win swept over, the road that the floods ravaged and devilish waters shredded. The end of the peninsula, the clouds of solitary spray. Giving my heart to the South, to the South, I suddenly want to bow, putting my two hands together. Passing the Honam Plain, I want to bow. The rice stalks that sway vibrantly are like the veins of Father hunching over the field. The horseweed flowers that bloom wildly are like Mother’s attentive care that lingers around the mountains and streams of my home. The Mudeung Mountain that rises up purely, the white-naped crane that hops, the white poplar tree that dazzles-today these do not look ordinary, and I want to bow to the picturesque landscape. I want to kneel down and kiss the land of the South.

지리산의 봄 1--뱀사골에서 쓴 편지 남원에서 섬진강 허리를 지나며 갈대밭에 엎드린 남서풍 너머로 번뜩이며 일어서는 빛을 보았습니다 그 빛 한 자락이 따라와 나의 갈비뼈 사이에 흐르는 축축한 외로움을 들추고 산목련 한 송이 터뜨려놓습니다 온몸을 싸고도는 이 서늘한 향기, 뱀사골 산정에 푸르게 걸린 뒤 오월의 찬란한 햇빛이 슬픈 깃털을 일으켜세우며 신록 사이로 길게 내려와 그대에게 가는 길을 열어줍니다 아득한 능선에 서계시는 그대여 우르르우르르 우레 소리로 골짜기를 넘어가는 그대여 앞서가는 그대 따라 협곡을 오르면 삼십 년 벗지 못한 끈끈한 어둠이 거대한 여울에 파랗게 씻겨내리고 육천 매듭 풀려나간 모세혈관에서 철철 샘물이 흐르고 더웁게 달궈진 살과 뼈 사이 확 만개한 오랑캐꽃 웃음 소리 아름다운 그대 되어 산을 넘어갑니다 구름처럼 바람처럼 승천합니다

남도행 칠월 백중날 고향집 떠올리며 그리운 해남으로 달려가는 길 어머니 무덤 아래 노을 보러 가는 길 태풍 셀마 앨릭스 버넌 윈이 지난 길 홍수가 휩쓸고 수마가 할퀸 길 삼천리 땅 끝, 적막한 물보라 남쪽으로 남쪽으로 마음을 주다가 문득 두 손 모아 절하고 싶어라 호남평야 지나며 절하고 싶어라 벼포기 싱싱하게 흔들리는 거 논밭에 엎드린 아버지 힘줄 같아서 망초꽃 망연하게 피어 있는 거 고향 산천 서성이는 어머니 잔정 같아서 무등산 담백하게 솟아 있는 거 재두루미 겅중겅중 걸어가는 거 백양나무 눈부시게 반짝이는 거 오늘은 예삿일 같지 않아서 그림 같은 산과 들에 절하고 싶어라 무릎 꿇고 남도땅에 입맞추고 싶어라

Gwangju News August 2011

43


Review

Movie Review

Glove 글러브

O

ne of the strengths of Korean cinema is that the films tend to shy away from formulas. However, every once and a while it can be a pleasure to watch one that really gets on board with a time tested plot and see how it is portrayed from a Korean point of view. Since most foreigners will already be so familiar with these “cinematic archetypes”, having been nursed on the tripe of Hollywood, it can be quite interesting to see the same stores from the point of view of another cultural paradigm. Enter Glove (Globu), a baseball movie that follows the clichés and contrivances of baseball movies to a T-A League of Their Own, Major League, the Rookie etc. They all revolve around people you wouldn’t expect to play baseball, wait for it, playing baseball (oh my god!). It is a time tested formula. Let us not berate it for its unoriginality, but rather embrace it as a fun and entertaining facet of baseball culture. As you might expect, in this movie we have a washed up pro-player, one of the biggest stars in Korea until he starts to drink and hang out late at bars, eventually getting himself some charges for assault among other things. It seems he is suspended from the league. In the film his manager is a smooth talking fat man who is there for comic relief and to talk sense to our wild protagonist. They eventually come up with a scheme in order to get him back into the league’s good graces—coaching deaf kids. If you’ve ever seen a sports movie you should have no problem filling in the rest on your own. The director is Kang Woo Seok. While there is so little English info about him, he is a big fish to be sure, and is often cited as one of the top Korean directors, sometimes even called the most powerful man in Korean cinema. There’s not a whole lot to say about his style, but he thrives on making merely entertaining films if not high art. There is only one really notable actor in this, but he is a big name to be sure. Most of you will know Jeong Jae

44

Gwangju News August 2011

Yeong, who is quickly becoming another personal favorite of mine, particularly after I saw him in one of my favorite movies and one which I often talk about: Castaway on the Moon or Kimshi Pyolugi. He gives a decent performance here, if perhaps a bit shallow and ultimately disappointing for a thespian with such range and power. There are the typical motifs done very well here: issues of pride, all so common to these underdog sports films, hold up well when you translate them into the Korean mindset – where fitting in and excelling are of make or break import. Being deaf makes you different. Although the culture is changing, so often it seems the equation reads “different equals bad”. This did add a third dimension, however slight. There are some real weaknesses to the movie. The film is pretty predictable throughout with the end as a slight exception. There are moments where it is too maudlin and overbearing. Yet, all in all I’d say that it is quite entertaining. If not special, it was pleasant to watch, and interesting to see an old story retold and dressed up in a Korean outfit. By Seth Pevey Photo from koreanmovie.com First published in the Gwangju Blog


Food and Drink

밥보다 왕만두 R

Bap Boda Wang-Mandoo

esidents of Gwangju on the hunt for some new and tasty eats should look no further than the new giant dumpling take-out store that has opened its doors in the Pungam-dong area.

Opened on May 31st and close to the World Cup Stadium, Bap Bo Da Wang Mandoo has arrived just in time for summer, allowing local residents the chance to get their fill of fast, delicious, and innovative fresh food. Owner and operator Jeung Jeong Ju set out on his latest adventure having spent years working in the hospitality industry in Korea. He decided that he wanted to do something different with his time, assessed his options and came to the conclusion that a niche giant dumpling shop was the way to go. “I want to be the mandoo king” stated Jeong Ju when asked why he had opened such a different store, “No one else has a shop like this in this area. I am the first!” Giant dumplings or “Wang Mandoo” as they are called in the native Korean tongue (wang meaning king) found their origins in China. The Chinese call them jiaozi and, as I’m sure you’re aware if you have been in Korea for any amount of time, they have been adapted over the ages and now come in a variety of styles, shapes, sizes and with various fillings. Typically they consist of a ground meat and/or vegetables wrapped into a rolled piece of dough, which is then sealed by pressing the edges together or by crimping the top. The dumpling is then steamed over 10-15 minutes. At about the size of a regular hamburger they are a hearty fill. Jeong Ju’s new establishment is colorful but basic. At present the menu consists of only three items; gogi mandoo (pork and vegetable), kimchi saewoo mandoo (kimchi and shrimp), and a sweet red-bean filled dumpling which name escapes me. The store has been ear marked as a take-away only enterprise but there is a six – eight seater table and chairs inside for the lucky ones. Being next door to a Family Mart also gives you the option to utilize the convenience store’s outdoor furniture too, where, if waiting for your mandoo, Jeong Ju will gladly furnish your table with the usual complimentary sides such as Kimchi, rice cakes and fresh vine tomatoes. Beer and

Above: Owner and operator, Jeung Jeong-ju Left: Finished product

other drinks can also be purchased from the mart to enjoy with your mandoo. Through the plate glass shop frontage passers by can watch Jeong Ju and his friendly staff make these traditional mandoo before they are taken outside and cooked in front of the shop on the sidewalk. Jeong Ju has purchased special steaming equipment to cook his mandoo in a traditional way. At only 1,000 won per serve, they certainly give you that extra option for a light lunch. For 2,000 won you can have a heavy meal. Being a steamed snack they also add a healthier choice to your list of favorite munchies. Trust me and try it out. This stuff is delicious! Bap Boda Wang Mandoo can be found across the road from Woo Mi Gwangjang Apartments, next to Family Mart in the Pungam-dong area of Gwangju. Tell a cab driver “Pungam jigu, Woomi Gwangjang ga juseyo,” from anywhere in the Gwangju area and you will be dropped off right outside. Story and photos by Darrell Slater Gwangju News August 2011

45


Food and Drink

Korean Easy-Cook Recipe

S

Steamed Eggs & Folded Eggs

teamed eggs and folded eggs are two of the easiest dishes to make. They are very popular as side dishes. It is easy to see steamed eggs in Korea’s bars or restaurants as an appetizer. Most elders and children love this dish.

Folded eggs are Koreans’ favorite menu item in a packed lunch. You can make many different kinds of folded eggs, depending on which ingredients you add. Also, it is perfect to serve to guests, with its high nutritional value and good appearance. Story and photos by Seoyoung Park

How to make steamed eggs and folded eggs Things to prepare (two - three servings): 7 eggs (2 for steamed eggs / 5 for folded eggs), salt, a bowl, water, chopped green onion, carrot, onion, chili pepper (optional)

Steamed Eggs: 1. Break the eggs into the bowl. 2. Beat the eggs and add 1/2 teaspoon of salt. 3. Add a half cup of water and stir them together. 4. Sprinkle some red pepper powder and sesame or chopped green onion (optional). 5. Put the bowl with eggs in the microwave and heat it up for 3 minutes.

Folded Eggs: 1. Break the eggs into the bowl and add 1 full teaspoon of salt, chopped vegetables and beat them up all together. 2. Spread the beaten eggs on a heated fry pan with cooking oil. 3. Fold the eggs 3-4 times and cook at low heat for about 10 minutes until it gets cooked through.

46

Gwangju News August 2011


GIC Program Review

Hwasun Tour GIC Tour with Warren une’s tour took us to the area surrounding the Naju lake. At our first stop, the Hwasun Dolmen Site (a UNESCO listed World Heritage Site), we took a walk through a valley containing more than a hundred dolmens dating back to the seventh century BC. We learned about the history and legend surrounding these monuments.

J

After a delicious lunch of duck stew we made our next stop at Unju Temple. Unju Temple originally held a collection of over a thousand stone Buddha statues and pagodas, unique amongst temples in Korea. It is said that they were built by celestial stonemasons on the orders of the Buddhist monk, Doseon, in order to prevent the Korean peninsula “capsizing” due to the relative lack of mountains in the southwestern Honam region. Our final stop on the trip was Dorae Village, typical of the Korean aristocratic class, the Yangban of the late Chosun period. We were able to get an insight into the traditions and lifestyle of that time and social class. As with previous tours, participants got to see difficultto-get-to places and learn intriguing facts about Korean culture and history. To register for the next GIC tour, go to the GIC website: www.gic.or.kr. By Alan Brown Photos by Seo Jaeryang

Top: The biggest dolmen on display in Hwasun Dolmen Site Above: Dorae Village in Naju

[ Tour Overview ] Gangjin Celadon Festival Tour Date: August 6, 2011 (Saturday) Cost: 15,000 won (10,000 won for GIC member ) Itinerary: Gangjin Tea Garden - Muwisa Temple - Gangjin Celadon Festival Anyone interested can join the tour. To register and for more information, please visit GIC Website: www.gic.or.kr or gictour@gic.or.kr

Gwangju News August 2011

47


Fashion

Fash-On with xxl jjdp The streets of Gwangju: Blue and White.

S

ummer calls for easy dressing so let’s simplify. What is fresher and easier to wear than simple blue jeans and a white top, right? No matter who you are the contrasting palette of blue and white refreshes and hollers, “Bring on Summer!” It is said that a journey of a thousand miles starts with one step and how better to start your summer explorations than in a great pair of jeans. Just like that journey and its memories, so too can your favourite jeans tell an unforgettable story. Think about your favorite pair of jeans. How long have you had them? Where did you buy them and can you bear to part with them? In my case, I can still remember where I bought my first pair of designer jeans (New York) and how they changed from full length to ripped jeans and eventually into my favorite shorts. I still can’t part with them. Here are some things to watch out for when thinking about buying and taking care of denim. First is Fit! Fit is the make-or-break aspect for any outfit as jeans that fit well can make you feel great. I find that a slimmer fit that is tapered toward the leg works well to show off any figure best. I usually aim to for a skinnier jean in a darker wash. But you might like to go for a boot cut or even a standard cut. The key is finding what works best for your body type. Just remember to purchase the correct length as well or else it might create unneeded weight at your ankles which might actually make you look shorter. Darker washes are great all year round but in summer a lighter wash is more on trend for a day-look. The Optional Extra Dungarees or Overalls. These are the ultimate expression of yourself this summer by cutting loose from the office protocol. Dungarees and overall-type denims are great as a multipurpose choice and it immediately calls for a more casual look. You can pair it up with a simple T-shirt and trainers for a more casual look or with a shirt and tie for

48

Gwangju News August 2011


Fashion

an edgier night time look that is as unexpected as it is amazing. And as always we have been champions of the denim shorts as the ultimate summer shorts, so if you haven’t already gotten a pair, go get some or make your own now!!! For the Brave I have also decided to include acid-wash jeans in this issue as it is a great throwback to days of old as a refresher for any closet. Of course many may not feel like they can carry off this 80s standard but I say give it a try. You never know, you might love it. Aftercare Lastly, taking care of your denim is very important, if you do, it will last you longer. First, always follow the washing instructions as this will best care for your jeans. Also jeans don’t need to be washed after every wear. Depending on your activity, wash after ever fifth wear or so to maintain the integrity of the fabric as well as the color and cut. Air dry jeans so you don’t stretch or degrade the fibers, ensuring you and your jeans have a long relationship. White! The perfect accent for your jeans is a classic white tshirt, V-neck, or a round or plain white shirt. A white shirt always makes people look fresh and refined and all you need to do is soak in the admiration with your effortless style.

When it comes to choosing a basic white shirt, invest in a fitted cotton button-down shirt. Pay a little extra for the added luxury as this will most probably become your go-to shirt for any simple dinner party/amazing summer time adventure, or choose a plain-collared white polo, which travels remarkably well too. Like denim, white shirts also need extra care and I would suggest of course washing them only with other white clothing to limit color transfer. Never use bleach as this tends to discolor the shirt and also damages the fabric. Or you can dry-clean for about 2,000 won per shirt. Less mess, less fuss. For home laundering I would advise also air drying and using the steamer function on your iron as best not to scorch your fabric. That’s it. Easy and Blue and White. Now all you need to do is throw on your favorite denim and your best white shirt and you are in for a summer of effortless cool. And of course a styling hat - for protection from the summer heat. Peace, By xxl jjdp Photos by Billy Cho Shot on location outside of Kunsthalle in downtown Gwangju. White shirt available from Zara, Fred Perry Shirt from Shinsegae Department Store, Acid Wash Jeans from Brand Market, Dungaree’s - Tokyo Juice, Hat - Van’s at Abc mart

Gwangju News August 2011

49


GIC Gallery/ Dear Korea

ravel agencies – a thing of the past? Well, if you like to have someone do the work for you to find the best price as well as pay in Korean won, then check out

[ GIC Gallery ]

Title: E.A.E.P. (Environmental Awareness Education Program) Postcards Volunteers: Andrea Hildebrand & Trevor Homeniuk (ESL Instructors, Artists) Exhibition Period: August 6 ~ 20, 2011 Opening with Artists Talk: August 6 (Saturday), 3 ~ 5 p.m. at GIC Gallery Andrea and Trevor have been running E.A.E.P. (Environmental Awareness Education Program) since May 2010. E.A.E.P. is a program aiming to facilitate learning amongst elementary students through a variety of fun handson activities, songs and games. The program is to teach students about diverse topics related to the environment and conservation. The elementary level of this program deals primarily with global warming and climate change.

The postcards were made by fourth and fifth grade elementary school students from schools in the Gwangju area in 2010 and 2011. Each student took part in an environmental education workshop presented by two volunteer expats: Andrea and Trevor, both artists and teachers, and a number of generous Korean facilitators. The goal was to create and present a significant body of work based on young learners’ perceptions and creative interpretation of the current climate crisis. Each student had been prepped on renewable energy vocabulary along with global warming problems and solutions prior to creating the works. The target audience being the local citizens and ultimately the international influence of the minister of the environment (the recipient of the postcards: Yu Young-suk). Andrea and Trevor hope that these students’ expressions of their love of nature will provoke some thought into how valuable the current health of our planet is, and how we should urgently make a change to more sustainable decisions. In this exhibition over 300 postcards will be displayed.

50

Gwangju News August 2011


Community Board

GIC News GIC Journal: Social Discourse of Disquiet Got something to say that’s deeper than the latest travelogue? Wondering about the space in between cultures and have some lessons to share? Have art that people generally don’t ‘get’? You have a home at SDoD. A space for artists, photographers, writers, pundits, and critics to share about Gwangju, the art scene, art without a capital A, and expressing your confusion, clarity and kookiness through your creative ventures. Get involved. Check out the website: http://gicjournal.wordpress.com. Contact us to contribute: selina.gicjournal@gmail.com

Gwangju Guidebook Volunteers Help GIC update the second version of Gwangju Guidebook due to print in August 2011. Korean and English speakers needed for fact checking and copy editing. Contact karina@gic.or.kr if interested.

Girls High School. Buses: 1, 15, 17, 27, 28, 35, 36, 55, 80 (bus stop: 살레시오여 고 - Salesio Yeogo) Taxi directions: "Salesio Yeogo jungryu jang gajuseyo". Method of instruction is in Korean-English. Weekday Classes: 7:30 - 10:00 p.m. (from Monday to Friday)

Community Sung Bin Orphanage Sung Bin Orphanage is looking for creative/ active/ energetic/ outgoing/ enthusiastic long-term volunteers to join in our regular Saturday program. We would like you to give at least two Saturdays per month. As well as being a friend, you will be asked to teach basic English to girls aged 7 to 14. Meet every Saturday at 1:30 p.m. in front of downtown Starbucks. All are welcome. For more volunteering information please contact Al Barnum at: al_barnum@yahoo.com.

Apostolate to Migrants Center

Art Gwangju Artist Collective Our group is organic and multi-disciplinary: painters, photographers, illustrators, and media artists. It includes members from all around the world. Our aim is to stimulate the flow of creative energy through workshops, discussion and community art projects. Facebook: Gwangju Artist Collective E-mail: gwangjumaria@yahoo.com

Address: 802-4 Songjeong -2dong, Gwangsan-gu, Gwangju Phone: 062) 954-8004 Subway: Get off at Songjeong Park (송정공원) Station and walk toward Songjeong Middle School. Busses: 29, 38, 39, 62, 97, 98, 99. Get off at Yeonggwang-tong intersection bus stop and walk toward Songjeong Middle School. Sunday masses: 10:00 a.m. (Indonesian/ East Timor); 3:00 p.m. (English) at the Migrant Center; 6:00 p.m. (Vietnamese). 2nd Sunday: 11:00 a.m. Mass for multi-cultural families.

Spanish/ Korean Language Exchange

Sports Gwangju Men’s Soccer The Gwangju international soccer team plays regularly most weekends. If you are interested in playing, e-mail: gwangju_soccer@yahoo.com.

Gwangju Ice Hockey Team Looking for men and women of all ages to join us every Saturday night from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. at Yeomju Ice Rink near World Cup Stadium. If you are interested, contact either Andrew Dunne at atdunne@gmail.com or Chris Wilson at kreeco@rogers.com

Gwangju Chaoreum Taekwondo Add: 1187-3 Chipyeong-dong, Seo-gu, Gwangju Phone: 062) 384-0958 Location: Chaoreum Taekwondo Gym is located on the third floor of Jeong-yeon (K-1) building (just beside the bus stop) Buses : 62, 63, 64, 518 (bus stop: 상무대우아파트 - Sangmu Daewoo Apateu) Taxi directions: "Sangmujigu Kumho Daewoo Apart ro gajuseyo". Method of instruction is in English Weekday Classes: 8:00 - 9:00 p.m.(from Monday to Friday) Sunday Classes: 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Do you want to learn basic Spanish? Or do you want to review what you have learned in the past? Do you want to learn Korean phrases and grammar? Or do you want to practice speaking in Korean? Come join the Spanish/ Korean language exchange group every Saturday at 5:00 p.m. at the GIC. Free for GIC members. For more information, contact Juan Esteban Zea (juanestebanzea@gmail.com)

Gwangju Jumbo Taxi If you’re traveling in a big party or simply need transportation in and around Gwangju, Gwangju Jumbo Taxi provides service to the Bus Terminal, Airport and other places. With a seat capacity of up to 9 people, you can travel in comfort. Friendy and hospitable, Mr. Kim will help you travel in safety. Whether you are going from/to Gwangju Airport or simply to travel around the city, give Jumbo Taxi a call. Call to reserve at 010-5086-7799 (Mr.Kim) or refer to www.gjtaxi.co.kr for the price list.

Brazilian Jiujitsu in Gwangju Add: 522-3 Jisan-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju Phone: 010-9354-6279 Location: Basement of the 20000 Eyeglass shop near Salesio Gwangju News August 2011

51


Korean Language Class

2011 GIC 4th Korean Language Class Please register by August 31, 2011 (class may be cancelled if less than 5 people sign up)

Saturday Classes

Weekday Classes Level

Days

Textbook

Level

Textbook

Beginner 1-1

Tuesday & Thursday

서강한국어 1A (Pre-lesson ~ Lesson 1)

Beginner 1-1

서강한국어 1A (Pre-lesson ~ Lesson 1)

Beginner 1-2

Monday & Wednesday

서강한국어 1A (Lesson 2 ~ Lesson 6)

Beginner 1-2

서강한국어 1A (Lesson 2 ~ 6)

Intermediate

Tuesday & Thursday

서강한국어 2A (Lesson 1 ~ Lesson 4)

Beginner 2-2

서강한국어 1B (Lesson 5 ~ 8)

- Period: September 5– October 20, 2011 (Twice a week for 7 weeks) - Class hours: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2 hours) - Tuition fee : 80,000 won (GIC membership fee: 20,000 won/ year and textbooks excluded) cash only

Intermediate

서강한국어 2A (Lesson 5 ~ 9)

Korean Reading Class • Period: September 10 – October 22, 2011 (Every Saturday for 7 weeks) • Class Hours: 1: 40 p.m. - 2:40 p.m. (1 Hour) • level: Intermediate (서강한국어 2A~) • Tuition Fee: 30,000 won (GIC membership fee: 20,000won for a year and textbooks will be provided)

- Period: September 10 - October 22, 2011 (Every Saturday for 7 weeks)

- Class hours: 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (2 hours) - Tuition fee: 50,000 won (GIC membership fee: 20,000 won/ year and textbooks excluded) cash only

GIC is located on the 5th floor of the Jeon-il building, the same building as the Korean Exchange Bank, downtown. The entrance is located immediately to the north of the bank. Contact gic@gic.or.kr (or by phone 062-226-2733/34 and www.gic.or.kr for more information.

52

Gwangju News August 2011


Advertisement

Gwangju News August 2011

53


Advertisement

54

Gwangju News August 2011


Advertisement

Gwangju News August 2011

55



August 2011 #114