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WEDNESDAY

DAILY EGYPTIAN JUNE 19, 2013

DAILYEGYPTIAN.COM

SINCE 1916

Police investigate accident

VOLUME 98, ISSUE 143

SIUC Student remembered for honor, compassion MATT DARAY Daily Egyptian

CHRIS ZOELLER | DAILY EGYPTIAN

Carbondale police Lt. Mark Stearns, left, and officer Zach Street use survey equipment to take readings Tuesday at the intersection of West Chautauqua and South McLafferty in Carbondale. The intersection was the scene of a deadly accident Sunday where senior Kenton Barrick was killed and five others were taken to nearby hospitals. Stearns said the readings will be used to create a scale model of the scene to help with the investigation of the accident.

Tuition increases may affect enrollment decline TREY BRAUNECKER Daily Egyptian Over the last five years, the university has seen a rise in tuition costs and a downturn in its student enrollment. MSNBC reported June 10th on the rising cost of tuition in America, showing a correlation between college tuition and enrollment. The report said as cost of tuition has increased in the last few years, college enrollment has plummeted. Although other factors affect tuition such as living

costs and student aid, the report said tuition has seen a large bump overall in the last five years. According to the university 20122013 Fact Book, tuition for entry level students has increased $2,708 from $8,899 in 2008 to $11,607 in 2012, a 30.4 percent increase. Continuing student tuition has also increased $3,232 from $7,777 in 2008 to $11,009 in 2012, a 41.6 percent increase. The Fact Book also states that enrollment dropped to 18,667 down from 20,673 five years ago, about a

2,000-student decline. University spokesman Rod Sievers said it is no secret the university has experienced a decrease in enrollment over the past five years, but it would not be fair to attribute the decrease only to tuition costs. “Every university has had to increase their cost for tuition as the years have gone on,” he said. “Some universities, like SIUC, are struggling with enrollment, while others are doing well.” Please see Tuition | 3

Kenton Barrick could be described as someone who was caring, friendly and someone who just enjoyed life. The senior from Anna studying computer science died Sunday afternoon in a multiple-vehicle accident. Police said Barrick was heading north on McLafferty on his motorcycle when he collided with a vehicle at West Chautauqua. The impact caused the vehicle to hit a third vehicle, which in turn hit a fourth. Barrick was taken to Memorial Hospital in Carbondale, where he was pronounced dead shortly after the crash. Susan Farner, Kenton Barrick’s mother, said he was a very positive person who enjoyed life to the fullest and was always there for people. “He was all about his friends and being the best friend he could to whoever he could,” she said. “He really tried to find the good in everybody and he really was a lovey, touchy kind of guy.” Farner said Barrick was never on anyone’s bad side and would always try to find the positives in life. Molly Reeves, an SIU graduate working at Pinch Penny Pub and one of Barrick’s co-workers, said he was one of the most honorable people she has ever met. “(Kenton) totally committed to everything and anything he ever did,” she said. “If it meant driving after working late at the bar to go be with his family, if he had a family event ... he was there.” Reeves said Barrick met his

PROVIDED PHOTO

girlfriend, Courtney Hamilton, while working at Pinch Penny Pub and the two instantly fell for each other. “As cliche as it might sound, it was definitely love at first sight,” she said. “They hit it off, they spent the last two years together, whether it was visiting the theater or spending time with Courtney’s friends.” Hamilton was also on the motorcycle when the crash occurred and was transferred to St. Louis University Hospital for treatment. Reeves said Hamilton was expected to be released Tuesday night. Arrangements for Kenton Barrick’s wake are Thursday at the Rendleman and Hileman Funeral Home in Anna from 4-8 p.m. Barrick will be buried Saturday at the Mackinaw Township Cemetery in Mackinaw. Reeves said the staff of Pinch Penny Pub will be acknowledging Barrick’s passing on the weekend. She said family, close friends and past and present co-workers will be hosting a celebration of life ceremony Thursday at 6:00 p.m. at The Copper Dragon. Matt Daray can be reached at mdaray@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 254.

ILLINOIS PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES WEIGHTED AVERAGE ANNUAL UNDERGRADUATE TUITION AND FEES, FISCAL YEARS 2007-08 TO 2012-13 Southern Illinois University Carbondale Entry Level

2007-08 8,899

2008-09 9,813

2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 10,545 11,121 10,411

2012-13 11,607

Continuing Students

7,777

8,514

9,602

10,104

10,509

11,009

Entry Level

7,033

7,831

8,336

8,401

8,865

9,256

Continuing Students

6,453

6,543

7,308

7,923

8,298

8,654

7,990

8,783

9,429

9,987

10,534

10,930

6,814

7,367

8,161

8,905

9,526

10,104

Entry Level

11,130

12,240

14,272

15,747

16,472

17,033

Continuing Students

10,454

11,405

13,001

14,396

14,800

15,280

Entry Level

9,019

9,814

10,310

11,417

12,230

12,276

Continuing Students

7,359

8,219

9,082

9,889

10,603

11,698

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Eastern Illinois University Entry Level Continuing Students University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Illinois State University

Source: SIUC Fact Book by Dept. of Institutional Research & Studies

Josehn Issangya I Daily Egyptian


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19,

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The Weather Channel® 5 - day weather forecast for Carbondale, IL Today

Wednesday

Thursday

87° 64°

85° 65°

89° 68°

90° 70°

90° 72°

Partly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

20% chance of

10% chance of

0% chance of precipitation

0% chance of precipitation

precipitation

Friday

precipitation

Saturday

20% chance of precipitation

About Us The Daily Egyptian is published by the students of Southern Illinois University Carbondale 50 weeks per year, with an average daily circulation of 15,000. Fall and spring semester editions run Monday through Friday. Summer editions run Wednesday through Thursday. All intersession editions will run on Wednesdays. Free copies are distributed in the Carbondale and Carterville communities. The Daily Egyptian online publication can be found at www.dailyegyptian.com.

Mission Statement The Daily Egyptian, the student-run newspaper of Southern Illinois University Carbondale, is committed to being a trusted source of news information, commentary and public discourse, while helping readers understand the issues affecting their lives.

Copyright Information © 2013 Daily Egyptian. All rights reserved. All content is property of the Daily Egyptian and may not be reproduced or transmitted without consent. The Daily Egyptian is a member of the Illinois College Press Association, Associated Collegiate Press and College Media Advisers Inc. and the College Business and Advertising Managers Inc.

Publishing Information The Daily Egyptian is published by the students of Southern Illinois University Carbondale and functions as a laboratory for the department of journalism in exchange for the room and utilities in the Communications Building. The Daily Egyptian is a non-profit organization that survives solely off of its advertising revenue. The Daily Egyptian receives no student fees or university funding. Offices are in the Communications Building, Room 1259, at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, Ill., 62901. Bill Freivogel, fiscal officer.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19,

CARLA K. JOHNSON

A nonprofit group helping to spread the word about President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul launched a campaign Tuesday that will target states with high numbers of uninsured Americans and tackle their skepticism with straightforward messages. The “Get Covered America” campaign will include door-to-door visits by volunteers, brochures handed out at farmers markets and churches and, possibly, partnerships with sports leagues and celebrities, said Anne Filipic, a former White House official who recently became president of Enroll America, the group sponsoring the campaign. The group’s research shows 78 percent of uninsured adults don’t know about opportunities that will

TUITION CONTINUED FROM

1

Sievers said the university is funded by two main sources; tuition gathered from enrolled students and money from the state. He said because of Illinois’ economic issues, the state has been reducing the amount of money it provides to higher education institutions for the past several years. “As state dollars have dwindled, and this applies to all universities in the state, tuition has increased across all colleges to try and offset the loss of state revenue,”

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be available to them in 2014 under the Affordable Care Act, Filipic said Tuesday during a phone call with reporters. The campaign is expected to cost tens of millions of dollars, including a seven-figure media ad buy. “If they don’t know about it, then they won’t enroll,” Filipic said. “We’ve done our research. We know people want to know what the law means for them in a ‘just the facts’ sort of way.” Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius has drawn criticism from Republicans for making fundraising calls for Enroll America. Earlier this month, Sebelius told members of Congress she made five phone calls for Enroll America, two of which involved actual fundraising solicitations, to Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and H&R Block, entities not regulated by HHS.

She also called three health care companies to “suggest that the entities take a look at the organization (Enroll America)” but did not make a fundraising solicitation to those three. They were Johnson & Johnson, Ascension Health and Kaiser Permanente. Sebelius said the HHS secretary has the legal authority to raise money for initiatives that support government health programs. The federal government itself will spend millions on marketing and advertising about the health law, but the spending will vary greatly across the nation because some Republican-led states haven’t sought federal dollars for ad campaigns. Enroll America’s campaign will start with 50 events in 18 states, Filipic said. The group has staff on the ground in eight states, including

Texas and Florida and others where government officials have resisted key parts of Obama’s health law such as the expansion of Medicaid. “We know that most of the uninsured don’t know about the new coverage options coming this fall, let alone whether or not their state is expanding Medicaid,” Filipic said. “Many of the uninsured are eligible for Medicaid today but have not enrolled, and those who are not eligible for Medicaid may qualify for coverage through the marketplace.” Obama’s national health law requires that nearly all Americans have health insurance beginning in 2014 or pay a penalty. New insurance marketplaces are scheduled to be operating in every state by Oct. 1. People who are uninsured will be able to comparison-shop for affordable health plans on these websites and

many will qualify for tax credits to help them pay for coverage. The organization is building a predictive model to determine where to target the uninsured and will track which of its tactics are most effective, Filipic said. “We’re going to be doing a lot of testing to see what works,” she said. “What moves someone to attend an event or call a phone number? We’ll be doing a lot of work to test and analyze that.” In a parallel effort, a group called Doctors for America plans to host training sessions for doctors and print posters and brochures for medical waiting rooms. Skepticism about the law’s benefits is widespread. Enroll America’s January survey of 1,814 adults found that most people are skeptical they’ll be able to find affordable health insurance that covers their needs.

he said. Sievers said if students are struggling to pay for college, they have several options to find additional money, such as financial aid. The university Fact Book states that since the 2007-2008 school year, college loan funding has increased by $31,151,427 while student work funding has decreased. The total money students received for work in 2008 was $36,366,820 compared to $34,951,778 in 2013, a total decrease of $1,415,042 over five years.

However, gift aid from the university, such as scholarships, gifts and waivers, has increased by $25,580,619 in the last five years. “Although the university is increasing tuition, students do understand the importance of a college education. That is why they are paying for it,” Sievers said. “The university understands this and we are working with students to find new ways to pay for rising tuition.” While some students said they feel differently about the costs, others said they think several of the school’s amenities are worth the money.

Rico Santos, a senior from Dietrich studying information technology, said the tuition at the university is much more than what he paid at Lake Land Community College in Mattoon, but it is worth the cost. “It is a four-year university, so I do expect to pay more than I did for community college,” he said. “At Lake Land, we did not have a Student Center, Recreation Center, Writing Center or a larger library, so it is nice to have those options even if it does cost more.” Charlie Katt, a senior from Effingham studying criminal justice, said when on-

campus housing, costs for books and meal plans are added to student tuition, the cost nearly doubles for basic amenities easily found outside of campus. “I think the programs are great, I do think the advisors are really helpful,” he said. “The people that I talk to know what they’re talking about and what they are doing, but I could see how people are wary about coming to college when adding all the expenses together.” Trey Braunecker can be reached at tbraunecker@dailyegyptian.com or 618-536-3311 ex:259


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19

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ARTS, EN

Second City co-founder brought intellect to comedy CARYN ROUSSEAU Associated Press CHICAGO — Comedy fans know the names — John Belushi, Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, Joan Rivers — but before those famous faces graced Hollywood movies or the “Saturday Night Live” stage they were discovered by Bernie Sahlins, co-founder of The Second City. Alumni of the Chicago comedy club spent Monday remembering Sahlins, who died Sunday at age 90, as an innovator who along with business partners Howard Alk and Paul Sills opened the theater in December 1959. It quickly gained national attention and helped establish Chicago as a vibrant comedy town. “Bernie was absolutely crucial in the formative years of Second City, as important a figure as it’s ever had,” said comedian and actor Robert Klein, who went on from Second City in 1965 to star on television series and in movies. Second City caught on within months of opening, despite some early money problems and other issues. It became instrumental in the growth and development of improvisational

and sketch comedy. Sahlins had an eye for talent, and he hired and nurtured the early careers of numerous future stars. “Bernie saved my life,” actor Alan Arkin is quoted as saying in Sheldon Patinkin’s 2000 book, “The Second City: Backstage at the World’s Greatest Comedy Theater.” ‘’Second City wasn’t a theater ensemble to me, it was a halfway house ... Bernie not only gave me a job, he took me in. I became his family, he became my family — the first family that I even had and loved.” Patinkin, who serves as Second City’s artistic consultant, said his longtime friend played a critical role not just in establishing the theater but also in recruiting the talent. “He was great at it,” Patinkin said. “Look at the list of our alumni, many of them were found by Bernie. Bernie was really good at picking out the right ones.” In his 2002 memoir, “Days and Nights at the Second City,” Sahlins seemed aware of that influence. “For somehow this tiny venture quickly became an important phenomenon in the recent history of theatre, heralded for its

contribution to popular entertainment,” he wrote. “One reason is, I believe, that we never thought of ourselves as popular entertainers.” Instead, colleagues remembered Sahlins as an intellectual who graduated from the University of Chicago and brought those edgy smarts with him to Second City. “You had to work from the top of your intelligence,” said comedian David Steinberg, who was with Second City in 1964 and has worked on television shows such as “Curb Your Enthusiasm” and “Mad About You.” ‘’That was the rule that Second City broke in comedy: don’t talk down to an audience ever; talk to the smartest person in the audience.” Michael McCarthy interned under Sahlins in 1981 and has written for “Saturday Night Live,” ‘’Sesame Street” and Comedy Central. He said Sahlins would talk endlessly about the mission of comedy and tell him to “always, always, always ask yourself, ‘What are you trying to say, and is it funny?’” Ramis, former cast member turned directorwriter-actor-producer, told The Associated Press in 2009 that Sahlins brought a higherbrow style to comedy. “It was OK to be smart,” Ramis said. “It was

OK to be intellectual.” And George Wendt, famous for “Cheers” before his time at Second City, told AP in 2009 that Sahlins demoted him to the touring company from the main stage. “He thought I was playing it too safe,” Wendt said. “He wanted me to loosen up.” Klein remembered Sahlins as an intellectual, but fun boss who loved cigars. “Not the kind who would put a lamp shade on his head at a party, but he had opinions on everything,” Klein said. Andrew Alexander, who along with business partner Len Stuart bought The Second City from Sahlins in 1985, said Sahlins will be remembered for always urging performers to work at the top of their intellect. “You think about that theater, and think of all the stars that came out of it ... from Belushi to (Dan) Aykroyd to Alan Arkin. It’s extraordinary, the amount of talented people that came out of it,” Alexander said. Klein said he owes a great deal to Sahlins for hiring him. “I went to the Yale drama school and that wasn’t nearly as valuable as making $150 a week at Second City,” Klein said.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19

Pulse

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ARTS, EN

Second City co-founder brought intellect to comedy CARYN ROUSSEAU Associated Press CHICAGO — Comedy fans know the names — John Belushi, Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, Joan Rivers — but before those famous faces graced Hollywood movies or the “Saturday Night Live” stage they were discovered by Bernie Sahlins, co-founder of The Second City. Alumni of the Chicago comedy club spent Monday remembering Sahlins, who died Sunday at age 90, as an innovator who along with business partners Howard Alk and Paul Sills opened the theater in December 1959. It quickly gained national attention and helped establish Chicago as a vibrant comedy town. “Bernie was absolutely crucial in the formative years of Second City, as important a figure as it’s ever had,” said comedian and actor Robert Klein, who went on from Second City in 1965 to star on television series and in movies. Second City caught on within months of opening, despite some early money problems and other issues. It became instrumental in the growth and development of improvisational

and sketch comedy. Sahlins had an eye for talent, and he hired and nurtured the early careers of numerous future stars. “Bernie saved my life,” actor Alan Arkin is quoted as saying in Sheldon Patinkin’s 2000 book, “The Second City: Backstage at the World’s Greatest Comedy Theater.” ‘’Second City wasn’t a theater ensemble to me, it was a halfway house ... Bernie not only gave me a job, he took me in. I became his family, he became my family — the first family that I even had and loved.” Patinkin, who serves as Second City’s artistic consultant, said his longtime friend played a critical role not just in establishing the theater but also in recruiting the talent. “He was great at it,” Patinkin said. “Look at the list of our alumni, many of them were found by Bernie. Bernie was really good at picking out the right ones.” In his 2002 memoir, “Days and Nights at the Second City,” Sahlins seemed aware of that influence. “For somehow this tiny venture quickly became an important phenomenon in the recent history of theatre, heralded for its

contribution to popular entertainment,” he wrote. “One reason is, I believe, that we never thought of ourselves as popular entertainers.” Instead, colleagues remembered Sahlins as an intellectual who graduated from the University of Chicago and brought those edgy smarts with him to Second City. “You had to work from the top of your intelligence,” said comedian David Steinberg, who was with Second City in 1964 and has worked on television shows such as “Curb Your Enthusiasm” and “Mad About You.” ‘’That was the rule that Second City broke in comedy: don’t talk down to an audience ever; talk to the smartest person in the audience.” Michael McCarthy interned under Sahlins in 1981 and has written for “Saturday Night Live,” ‘’Sesame Street” and Comedy Central. He said Sahlins would talk endlessly about the mission of comedy and tell him to “always, always, always ask yourself, ‘What are you trying to say, and is it funny?’” Ramis, former cast member turned directorwriter-actor-producer, told The Associated Press in 2009 that Sahlins brought a higherbrow style to comedy. “It was OK to be smart,” Ramis said. “It was

OK to be intellectual.” And George Wendt, famous for “Cheers” before his time at Second City, told AP in 2009 that Sahlins demoted him to the touring company from the main stage. “He thought I was playing it too safe,” Wendt said. “He wanted me to loosen up.” Klein remembered Sahlins as an intellectual, but fun boss who loved cigars. “Not the kind who would put a lamp shade on his head at a party, but he had opinions on everything,” Klein said. Andrew Alexander, who along with business partner Len Stuart bought The Second City from Sahlins in 1985, said Sahlins will be remembered for always urging performers to work at the top of their intellect. “You think about that theater, and think of all the stars that came out of it ... from Belushi to (Dan) Aykroyd to Alan Arkin. It’s extraordinary, the amount of talented people that came out of it,” Alexander said. Klein said he owes a great deal to Sahlins for hiring him. “I went to the Yale drama school and that wasn’t nearly as valuable as making $150 a week at Second City,” Klein said.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19,

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Level: 1

FOR RELEASE APRIL 4, 2012

THE Daily Commuter Puzzle

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

06/19/13

5 In the direction of 6 Wear away 7 Belonging to yours truly 8 Whale group 9 2/5 and 3/5 10 Do the job of a longshoreman 11 Enlarge a hole 12 Autry or Kelly 13 Small whirlpool 19 Huge beast of Africa or Asia, for short 21 Evergreens 24 Hatfield and McCoy, e.g. 25 Weathercock 26 Mocked 27 Weak & fragile 28 Solid precipitation 29 Listed 30 Beer 32 Football kick 33 Wrath 35 __ Sampras 37 Items on a pantry shelf

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved Monday’s Puzzle Solved

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

Unscramble four Jumbles, Unscramble thesethese four Jumbles, Unscramble four Jumbles, one letter tothese each square, one letter to each square, one letterfour to each square, to form ordinary words. to form four ordinary words. to form four ordinary words.

VIRSO

VIRSO VIRSO VIRSO

©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

by David L. Hoyt and JeffMedia Knurek Tribune Services. All rights reser

Tribune Media Services, ©2013©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. Inc. All Rights Reserved. VICIL ©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. All Rights Reserved.

VICIL VICIL VICIL

(c) 2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

38 Reason to wed 40 One of the 12 Apostles 41 Give up land 43 Silk tree 44 TV’s Diane __ 46 Sicker 47 Spill the beans

06/18/13

48 49 50 52 53 55

Frilly trimming Help in crime Noisy Formal combat Exclusively This month: abbr. 56 Greek letter 57 __ lift; T-bar

RADNOG

RADNOG RADNOG RADNOG

TENLER TENLER TENLER TENLER

6/19

Now arrange the circled letters

Now arrange the circled Now arrange the circled lettersletters to Now form thethe surprise answer, as arrange the circled letters to form surprise answer, tosuggested form the surprise answer, as as byby the above cartoon. tosuggested form the surprise answer, as the above cartoon. suggested by the above cartoon. suggested by the above cartoon.

A:A: A: Answer: A:

Pick up the Daily Egyptian each day to test your crossword skills

Com so e colu 3-by (in b cont digit For how Sud

www SCRAMBLED WORD GAME THATTHAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. and HoytJeff and Jeff © 2013 TheKnurek Mepham Group. Distributed by David L. Hoyt Knurek

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

DOWN Small rodents Smell Solid ground Owned

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by3 box (in bold borders) contain every digit, 1 to 9. For strategies on how to SOLUTION solve Sudoku, visit TO TUESDAY’S PUZZLE w w w. s u d o ku . o rg. u k .

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

1 2 3 4

3 4

Thursday’s Answers:

by Jacqueline E. Mathews

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

ACROSS 1 Insect attracted to a flame 5 Musical beat 10 Egg on 14 Has no __; is clueless 15 Hunter constellation 16 Requirement 17 Rip __; feature of a parachute 18 “Alice in __” 20 Make a blunder 21 Become dim 22 Warm and inviting 23 Blazing 25 By way of 26 Can’t __; hasn’t enough to buy 28 “Messiah” composer George F. __ 31 Uses a lever 32 Grand or spinet 34 Afternoon rest 36 All __; listening 37 Pierre or Marie 38 Racing sled 39 Not well-lit 40 Row of seminar speakers 41 Celestial body with a long tail 42 Feel sad about 44 Acute, as pain 45 “__ a tough job but...” 46 Shore stroller 47 Accuse 50 Actor Rob __ 51 Fuss & bother 54 Scientist’s workplace 57 Astonish 58 Top cards 59 Halt temporarily 60 __ over; faint 61 Alpha’s follower 62 More impolite 63 In a lazy way

2

(Answers tomorrow) (Answers tomorrow) (Answers tomorrow) (Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: RELIC BOGUS CLOSET ADJUST BOGUS CLOSET ADJUST Jumbles: RELIC Jumbles: RELIC BOGUS CLOSET ADJUST Yesterday’s Thursday’s Yesterday’s Jumbles: RELIC BOGUS CLOSET ADJUST Yesterday’s She to tried to make a in dent incredit her credit card Answer: Yesterday’sAnswer: She tried make a dent her card Answer: SheShe tried to to make a adent ininher card Answers: tried make dent her credit credit card Answer: debt, but she couldn’t — BUDGE IT debt, but — BUDGE IT IT debt, butshe shecouldn’t couldn’t debt, but she couldn’t— —BUDGE BUDGE IT

Aries — Today is a 7 —Create a new personal look. Get experienced support and your partner’s advice. Gather information, and make your choice. Go over finances. Favor strategy over impulse.

Cancer — Today is a 7 —They’re saying nice things about you. A lucky break provides a hefty assignment. Unleash your affections and play. Count your winnings. Your private feelings align with logic, and it all makes sense.

Libra — Today is a 9 — Finish work in private conversations with partners. Start making notes for your next project. Accept a generous offer. You’re held to high standards. You’re especially charming now.

Capricorn — Today is a 7 — Your friends are really there for you.Together, you’re stronger. Open your mind to greater possibilities. Listen carefully. Devise a plan. Stash away the surplus. Guard against being impetuous.

Taurus — Today is an 8 —Accept encouragement from one you admire, and rely on one you trust. Keep to your path, and add water to your daily rituals. Dreams from the past resurface. Relax and think it over.You’re not alone.

Leo — Today is a 6 —Only bet on sure things. Learn from an engineering type. Start planning a project at home. Count your blessings. The money is coming in. Be prepared, and play strictly by the rules.

Scorpio — Today is a 9 — Take on the leadership role. The action is behind the scenes, and there are perks. Your status rises with your credit rating. You can get what you need. Invest in your career.

Aquarius — Today is a 7 — Have fun with a new toy.Travel beckons, but take care. Await new orders. Re-assess the situation. The money is available. Career takes priority now. You’d like to get into a cozy retreat.

Gemini — Today is a 9 — Setlongrange goals to realize a creative dream. You can get whatever you need. Today and tomorrow get quite productive. Study. Follow through even if emotions sag at home.You’re gaining respect.

Virgo — Today is a 7 —You’re exceptionally intelligent. Dig for answers, and they’re not hard to find. Messages finally get to all group members. Produce the results and gain the rewards. Share exuberance.

Sagittarius — Today is a 7 — Teach as you learn. Go to friends for explanations. Complete projects, and achieve a new record. Continue to hold yourself to high standards. You’re luckier than you thought you’d be.

Pisces — Today is an 8 — Travel and romance both look good for the next couple of days. Double dating is especially fun. Your partner comes up with a brilliant thought. Remind someone of his or her charms.


SPORTS

DAILY EGYPTIAN WEDNESDAY

|

JUNE 19, 2013

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DAILYEGYPTIAN.COM

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PAGE 8

All-Stars fumble against regional foes

CHRIS ZOELLER | DAILY EGYPTIAN

Members of the Western Kentucky and Southern Illinois All-Star football teams dive for a loose ball Friday in the end zone during a match-up between the two all-star teams at Saluki Stadium. The play resulted in a touchdown by Western Kentucky before the ball was stripped loose by Southern Illinois. Despite the 42-20 loss, Southern Illinois holds a 5-4 series lead in the annual game between the teams, which features graduating high school seniors from the neighboring regions.

TYLER DIXON

The Chicago Blackhawks and the Boston Bruins have landed themselves in a Stanley Cup Final battle for the ages. While Chicago is fighting for a fifth Stanley Cup, Boston wants number seven and has gained the momentum, leading 2-1 in the series. The last time two of the original six NHL teams played in a Stanley Cup Final was in 1979 when the Montreal Canadiens beat the New York Rangers. Both the Blackhawks and the Bruins have won a Stanley Cup in the past five years. The Blackhawks won the 2009-2010 trophy after beating the Philadelphia Flyers 4-2 in six games and the Bruins took home the cup the very next season after beating the Vancouver Canucks 4-3 in a seven-game series. A triple-overtime game one kicked off the finals, ending on a high note for the Blackhawks. Chicago was able to win game one at home as Andrew Shaw scored his fifth goal of the playoffs with 12:08 remaining in the third overtime period.

Game two went Boston’s way with the Bruins’ winger Daniel Paille scoring his third playoff goal in overtime. Boston’s center David Krejci has also led the team offensively. Krejci has 23 points total in the playoffs so far with nine goals and 14 assists, leading all players for the Bruins. Goalie Tuukka Rask has three shutouts, two against the Penguins and the other in game three against the Blackhawks, when they won 2-0. Three different players lead Chicago in each major category. Veteran winger Marian Hossa has 15 points while center Patrick Sharp has scored nine goals. Patrick Kane, a right winger, has nine assists. Goalie Corey Crawford has more than 100 saves in the three games of the Stanley Cup Finals with 51 in game one alone. The Blackhawks beat the Minnesota Wild in their opening-round series 4-1. They trailed 3-1 in the second series against rival Detroit Red Wings, but fought back to win three straight games and advance to the conference finals. The Blackhawks defeated defending champions the Los Angeles Kings

in five games. Boston’s opening round was more difficult than Chicago’s. Boston was pushed to the brink by the Toronto Maple Leafs, which had them down 4-1 with less than 13 minutes left in game seven of the series. Boston then scored three goals, forced the game into overtime and were able to advance. The Bruins then knocked off the New York Rangers 4-1 in the second round and swept the Pittsburgh Penguins in the third round. Boston held Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin to zero points in the series, outscoring the Penguins 12-2 in the four-game sweep. One of the Blackhawks’ downfalls is not being able to convert during power plays. They are zero out of 11 in the finals, and a combined seven out of 51 in the rest of the playoffs. “The Blackhawks not being able to capitalize on the power plays has been hurting them all playoffs,” Lewis Marien, a sophomore from Decatur studying photojournalism, said. Some students think the series will go to a game seven because the teams are evenly matched.

“Chicago in 7,” John Przanowski, a senior from Grayslake studying radio-television, said. He said he believes that both teams deserve to be there because both worked hard during the season and in the playoffs. Ira Altman, an associate professor in agribusiness economics, is the faculty overseer for SIU’s roller hockey club. Altman said he grew up in Saskatchewan, Canada and has been an Edmonton Oilers fan his whole life. Altman said he thinks Boston is more physical but Chicago has more skill. Despite picking the Blackhawks to win in seven games, he said he thinks it will be a tough series for both teams. “Boston and Chicago both won (the Stanley Cup) recently, it’s a pretty good match up,” Altman said. Game four is Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. on NBC. Boston has home ice in games four and six, if game six is necessary. Game five will be in Chicago as well as game seven, if needed. Tyler Dixon can be reached at tdixon@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 259.


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