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6WXGHQW LQMXUHG DIWHUIDOO 0$77'$5$< 'DLO\(J\SWLDQ A student fell from a window on University Hallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourth floor early Friday morning. An email sent Friday morning to all SIU students and faculty from Chancellor Rita Cheng stated Tyler Gravitt, a pre-major freshman from Matteson, is in the intensive care unit of a St. Louis hospital. Cheng asked for everyone to support Gravitt and his family. The email also said the SIU Department of Public Safetyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s initial investigation shows the incident was an accident. Rod Sievers, university spokesman, said Monday he has not received an update on Gravittâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accident or condition. Students and Carbondale residents who walked by University Hall early Friday morning noticed multiple police cars, an ambulance and police tape that marked off the north side of the building where Gravitt fell. Please see ACCIDENT| 2

TIFFANY BLANCHETTE | DAILY EGYPTIAN

Ray Clover, of Carbondale, rides his bike Saturday through the flash flooding that covered East Walnut Street. The flood shut down several streets in Carbondale until the fire department alleviated the drain system and towing services cleared strewn cars.

/RQJWLPH6,8HPSOR\HHNLOOHGLQSODQHFUDVK 5,/(<6:,1)25' 'DLO\(J\SWLDQ A plane crash in rural Missouri last week killed two southern Illinois men, including a longtime SIU information technology employee. John R. Johnson, a 74-year-old Carbondale native who worked at the university for nearly 20 years, and Carl S. Maiden, 47, of DuQuoin, were killed Wednesday morning when the small plane they were flying crashed in a pasture near Canton, Mo. The two men were flying from Pinckneyville to Iowa for an airshow when the 1956 Piper-23-150 plane

owned by Johnson crashed around 6 a.m., according to a statement from Parrish and Lewis County Coroner Larry Arnold. The two men were pronounced dead at 9:20 p.m. Wednesday. The crash is believed to be an accident, according to reports from Arnold. Jak Tichenor of WSIU knew Johnson through the Experimental Aviation Association Chapter 277 in Carbondale. Tichenor said Johnson was a longtime active member of the group of pilots and flying enthusiasts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a terrible tragedy to lose someone like John,â&#x20AC;? Tichenor said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was a wonderful person who will

be greatly missed by his family and his many friends. My heart goes out to his family and to the family of the other gentleman who was flying with him.â&#x20AC;? Tichenor also said Johnson especially loved antique airplanes, which was what Johnson was flying when he died. â&#x20AC;&#x153;John was one of the smartest people I ever met, and he was a treasure trove of information about antique aircraft and how to keep them flying,â&#x20AC;? he said. Tichenor said Johnson was instrumental in bringing Morris Library into the computer age during his time at SIU. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was also a very friendly person,â&#x20AC;? Tichenor said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never saw

him without a smile on his face.â&#x20AC;? Charles Rodriguez, a visiting lecturer of aviation, worked with Johnson as safety counselors for the Federal Aviation Administration and was also a member of Chapter 277. Rodriguez said Johnson ran an airplane repair business at the Pinckneyville Airport for many years and had a very strong passion for flying. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He possessed varied knowledge in the discipline of aeronautics, and he was an aircraft mechanic and inspector,â&#x20AC;? Rodriguez said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He will be missed by many in aviation.â&#x20AC;? Maiden was also active with Chapter 277 and loved flying,

Rodriguez said. David NewMyer, chair of the aviation department, said he did not know either man, but the loss is very sad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any accident that happens in the aviation world is one too many,â&#x20AC;? NewMyer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any accident that strikes pilots and their families close to home is never good. All of us at SIUC Aviation are thinking of those families in this time of mourning and hope that whatever happened comes to light so that we can learn from the accident.â&#x20AC;? Riley Swinford can be reached at rswinford@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 268.

5HTXLUHGFODVVLQWURGXFHVVWXGHQWVWRXQLYHUVLW\OLIH .$567(1%85*67$+/(5 'DLO\(J\SWLDQ While college-life adaptation classes were offered as options in past semesters, freshmen are now required to spend some time learning about university life. Although the University College 101 core curriculum requirement was approved last year, it was not required of freshmen until this semester, said Amber Manning, a graduate assistant and UCOL 101 teacher. The class aims to help students become more accustomed to the university and college life in general, and class assignments often require students to attend events on campus and then write a paper on their experience, Manning said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody gets to let their hair

down, talk about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been important in influencing them,â&#x20AC;? said Pat Manfredi, director of University Core Curriculum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then we get to talk about, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Here you are. What do you want to look like as an individual four years from now?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Among assignments UCOL class is the lifeline assignment, which requires students to look back at significant events in their lives to see what has helped them to become the individuals they are, Manfredi said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The lifeline for me is really a way to understand where (students) are coming from,â&#x20AC;? Manning said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all human. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all here, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all developing in our own ways.â&#x20AC;? Manfredi said it is important to note that the instructors are connecting with students not just as an instructor, but also as a friend and mentor. If the students are having problems with

roommates or making a transition, they have someone to connect with, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is definitely part of the instructorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role to connect with students,â&#x20AC;? Manfredi said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a major part of the course so that students begin to see SIU as their home and they begin to develop those skills that are going to make them successful when they hit their sophomore, junior and senior years.â&#x20AC;? Events and political issues are often tied into class, Manning said. If students are going through issues as a group, the class will talk about the issue, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because instructors relate to students on a personal level, it gives students and instructors the chance to bridge these (generational) gaps,â&#x20AC;? Manfredi said. Emily Craske, UCOL 101 instructor and coordinator of Student Programs, said she tries to give students the tools

to be successful, including knowledge of reference points on campus and important offices students need to know. However, she said it is up to the students to use those tools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really try to be honest with them and let them know that everything is not going to go their way,â&#x20AC;? Craske said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything is not going to go as planned, and sometimes you have to roll with the punches.â&#x20AC;? Requiring freshmen to take this class and complete the assignments, especially the RSO assignment, can be useful for new students, said Brandon Truax, a freshman from Elgin studying architecture. Truax said after attending an architecture RSO meeting as a part of the course assignments, it helped him to reflect on his experience. Elizabeth Evans-Mosley, a freshman

from Cape Girardeau, Mo., studying criminal justice, said the class would help students become more familiar with the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traditions. In a Facebook poll posted on the Class of 2016 page, several students gave their opinions on the class. User Eric Palley said UCOL is not needed at all. User Rob Goodin said the class is a waste of time and money, and user Bradley S. Maschhoff said the class could be beneficial to those who pay attention. Craske said she tries every class period to let students know she cares about them and their success. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those are powerful words that you can say to a student,â&#x20AC;? Craske said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Should they need anything that maybe their parents or guardians or other friends canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help them with, I am a resource they can use on campus.â&#x20AC;?


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ACCIDENT CONTINUED FROM

The Weather ChannelÂŽ 5-day weather forecast for Carbondale

1

93° 70°

University Hallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bedroom windows do not have screens. Police and SIU faculty on the scene declined to comment until they are ready to give an official press release. Sam Liscovitz, a freshman from Crystal Lake studying automotive technology, said he drove to University Hall with his friends late Thursday night to find multiple police cars in the parking lot. Liscovitz said he saw Gravitt taken away on a stretcher with his face covered. He also said he still feels safe being at SIU despite the incident.

Today Partly Cloudy

20% chance of precipitation

Wednesday

Thursday

94° 69°

91° 66°

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

20% chance of

0% chance of

precipitation

Matt Daray can be reached at mdaray@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 254.

SARAH GARDNER | DAILY EGYPTIAN

Cpl. Allen Willmore investigates the scene where Tyler Gravitt, a pre-major freshman from Matteson, fell from a fourth-story window early Friday morning at University Hall. Gravitt was taken to Memorial Hospital of Carbondale and later transferred to a hospital in St. Louis. The Department of Public Safetyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s initial investigation concluded that the fall was accidental.

precipitation

Friday

Saturday

84° 64°

76° 54°

Scattered T-Storms

Partly Cloudy

40% chance of

20% chance of

precipitation

precipitation

Reaching Us

About Us The Daily Egyptian is published by the students of Southern Illinois University Carbondale 50 weeks per year, with an average daily circulation of 15,000. Fall and spring semester editions run Monday through Friday. Summer editions run Tuesday through Thursday. All intersession editions will run on Wednesdays. Free copies are distributed in the Carbondale and Carterville communities. The Daily Egyptian online publication can be found at www. dailyegyptian.com.

Mission Statement The Daily Egyptian, the student-run newspaper of Southern Illinois University Carbondale, is committed to being a trusted source of news; information, commentary and public discourse, while helping readers understand the issues affecting their lives.

Copyright Information Š 2012 Daily Egyptian. All rights reserved. All content is property of the Daily Egyptian and may not be reproduced or transmitted without consent. The Daily Egyptian is a member of the Illinois College Press Association, Associated Collegiate Press and College Media Advisers Inc. and the College Business and Advertising Managers Inc.

Publishing Information The Daily Egyptian is published by the students of Southern Illinois University Carbondale and functions as a laboratory for the department of journalism in exchange for the room and utilities in the Communications Building. The Daily Egyptian is a non-profit organization that survives solely off of its advertising revenue. The Daily Egyptian receives no student fees or university funding. Offices are in the Communications Building, Room 1259, at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, Ill., 62901. Bill Freivogel, fiscal officer.

Phone: (618) 536-3311 Fax: (618) 453-3248 Email: editor@dailyegyptian.com Editor-in-Chief: Tara Kulash ........................ ext. 252 Managing Editor: Lauraann Wood ............... ext. 252 Campus Editor: Lauren Duncan .................. ext. 255 Sports Editor: Sarah Schneider ................. ext. 256 Pulse Editor: Brendan Smith ................... ext. 273 Opinion Editor: Deâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Vontae Weaver ............ ext. 261 Photo Editor: Chris Zoeller ...................... ext. 251 Web Desk: Benjamin Bayliff ................ ext. 257 Advertising Manager: Lisa Cole ............................. ext. 230 Business Office: Chris Dorris ....................... ext. 223 Ad Production Manager: Matt Weidenbenner ........ ext. 244 Business & Ad Director: Jerry Bush ........................... ext. 229 Faculty Managing Editor: Eric Fidler .......................... ext. 247 Printshop Superintendent: Blake Mulholland ............. ext. 241


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,VDDFJLYHVIDUPHUV UHOLHIIURPGURXJKW $VVRFLDWHGSUHVV L I T T L E RO C K , Ark. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Several days of rain have given farmers in the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s midsection a welcome break from irrigating and hauling water for livestock as they contend with the worst drought in the U.S. in decades. The remnants of Hurricane Isaac dropped several inches of rain on wide areas of Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana and Missouri as the storm trudged north. Some spots got more than a half-foot of rain. Some farmers had rushed to bring in crops before the storm, fearing strong winds or even flash flooding could destroy what they had managed to salvage from drought. In Arkansas, where farmers have been struggling with triple-digit temperatures and little rain, Robby Bevis, 35, saw the storm knock down several of his 150 acres of rice. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hate to see any of it down, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not as bad of percentage as what it could have been,â&#x20AC;? he said. The 3 inches of rain that fell on Bevisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fields between Scott and Lonoke also cut him a welcome break from watering his soybeans. He had been planning to irrigate before the remnants of Isaac sloshed through the region late last week. He figured the rain might have saved him $10 or $15 an acre, although â&#x20AC;&#x153;the majority of the expense was throughout the summer.â&#x20AC;? In Illinois, Kenneth Metcalf said the storm put some water back in his

well, relieving him of the burden of having to buy and haul in hundreds of gallons of water each day for his 160 head of cattle. But Metcalf, 75, said he doubts the break will last long as the stormâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last clouds burn off and higher temperatures return, baking the area east of Springfield where he also grows corn and soybeans. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be hauling water here again in a few days,â&#x20AC;? he said. Still, it lifted his spirits to see so much rain, 4 or 5 inches by his estimation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think everybody feels better,â&#x20AC;? he said, noting the rain was a start toward replenishing lakes and wells. Farther south, Mike Campbell said he got 3 inches of rain on his farm in Edwardsville, which is about 30 miles from St. Louis. He said it was too late for it to do anything for his corn, and he had worried the stormâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winds would destroy what little he had left. But the stalks were still standing Monday morning. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was actually surprised at that because the stalk quality is just terrible,â&#x20AC;? said Campbell, who has been farming for 35 years. Still, the thin, dry stalks have left him little to harvest. During one run with his combine last week, he was getting about 30 bushels an acre, far short of the 150 bushels he would hope for in a normal year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It sounded like the combine was shut off. There was just so little stuff going through it,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It's the worst I've ever seen.â&#x20AC;?


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:25/' 1$7,21 )HXGVDFRQFHUQDVFKLOGUHQLQKHULW0RRQ VHPSLUH +<80$+.,0 $VVRFLDWHG3UHVV GAPYEONG, South Korea â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Unification Church patriarch Sun Myung Moon leaves behind children who have been groomed to lead a religious movement famous for its mass weddings and business interests â&#x20AC;&#x201D; if family feuds donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bring down the empire. Moon, the charismatic and controversial founder of the church, died Monday at age 92 at a churchowned hospital near his home in Gapyeong County, northeast of Seoul, two weeks after being hospitalized with pneumonia, church officials said. Flags flew at half-staff at a Unification Church in Seoul as followers trickled in, some wiping away tears as they wondered what would happen to a movement defined for decades by the man who founded it in 1954. The Rev. Moon and wife Hak Ja Han have 10 surviving children and in recent years, the aging Moon had been handing power on the churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s religious, charitable and business entities to them. But there have been reports of family rifts. One son sued his motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s missionary group in 2011, demanding the return of more than $22 million he claimed was sent without his consent from a company he runs to her charity. His motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

group eventually returned the money after court mediation. Church officials said the son, known as Preston, is no longer in charge of any church operations. Moonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death could expose further rifts within the church, said Kim Heung-soo, who teaches the history of Christianity at Mokwon University in the central city of Daejeon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a high possibility that internal discord will deepen,â&#x20AC;? Kim said. The church has amassed dozens of businesses in the United States, South Korea and even North Korea, including hotels, a ski resort, sports teams, schools, universities and hospitals. One expert said the churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business prospects appear brighter than its religious future. Tark Jiil, a professor of religion at Busan Presbyterian University, described the church not as a religious organization but as a corporation made up of people with similar religious beliefs. The church wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give details about how much its businesses are worth, other than to describe them as part of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;multibillion-dollarâ&#x20AC;? empire. Many new religious movements collapse after their founders die, but Tark said the Unification Church would likely survive. But its success as a religious entity will depend on how smoothly it resolves any family feuds and how well Moonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offspring

rise to fill their fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charismatic role, he said. Moon himself served 13 months at a U.S. federal prison in the mid-1980s after a New York City jury convicted him of filing false tax returns. And there has been tragedy in the family. One son committed suicide in 1999, jumping from the 17th floor of a Reno, Nev., hotel, officials said. Two other sons reportedly also died early, one in a train wreck and another in a car accident. Key to the churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s religious future is the Rev. Hyung-jin Moon, the U.S.-born 33-year-old who was tapped to succeed his father several years ago to serve as head of the church. Known as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Seanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; back at Harvard, where he studied, he is more fluent in English than Korean and has signs of his father's charisma but with an American sensibility. His sermons, delivered in English, are designed to appeal to the next generation of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Unificationists,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; the name followers prefer over the moniker â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moonies.â&#x20AC;? He told The Associated Press in 2009 that he questioned Christianity when he was younger. But his father stood by him throughout the phase, and asked followers not to criticize him when he turned to Buddhism briefly after his brother's death in Nevada. An older brother, Kook-jin Moon, a 42-year-old also known as Justin, runs the Tongil Group, the

churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business arm. The church has amassed dozens of business ventures over the years, including the New Yorker Hotel, a midtown Manhattan art deco landmark and the Yongpyong ski resort in South Korea. It gave the University of Bridgeport $110 million over more than a decade to keep the Connecticut school operating. Moon also founded the Washington Times newspaper in 1982. The church also owns a professional soccer team, schools and hospitals. It also operates the Potonggang Hotel in Pyongyang and jointly operates the Pyeonghwa Motors automaker in North Korea. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unification of South Korea and North Korea was a long-cherished ambition of the Rev. Sun Myung Moon,â&#x20AC;? church official Kim Kabyong said in Seoul. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He invested a lot in this. We are so heartbroken that he could not accomplish this.â&#x20AC;? Sun Myung Moon, who was born in a rural part of what is now North Korea, founded the movement after migrating south during the Korean War. He wrote in his autobiography that he received a personal calling from Jesus Christ to carry out his work on earth. The churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doctrine is a mixture of Christian, Confucian and traditional Korean values, emphasizing the importance of the family unit but also encouraging multicultural unions.

Moon conducted his first mass wedding in Seoul in the early 1960s, and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;blessing ceremoniesâ&#x20AC;? grew in scale over the years. He encouraged his followers to call him and his wife their â&#x20AC;&#x153;True Parents,â&#x20AC;?and often paired up the newlyweds himself before the mass ceremonies. Richard Panzer, president of the Unification Theological Seminary in Barrytown, New York, called Moon â&#x20AC;&#x153;a historical figure in the history of religion.â&#x20AC;? He said Moon made an â&#x20AC;&#x153;enormous contribution to understanding of the suffering heart of God and a lot of contributions toward world peace.â&#x20AC;? The seminary, established by Moon in 1975, is an interfaith institution with Buddhist, Christian and Muslim professors, Panzer said. The Unification Church claims 3 million followers, though exmembers and critics put the number at no more than 100,000. Joo Seung-ja, 64, said news of Moonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death was hard to accept. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how to express this feeling,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since he taught us true love, we will live our lives by preaching true love throughout the whole world till the end,â&#x20AC;? she said. Church officials said Moonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s funeral will take place Sept. 15 after a 13-day mourning period, with a massive new sports and cultural center built recently on the churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sprawling campus accepting mourners starting Thursday.

-BCPS%BZNBSLFEXJUIQBSBEFT QPMJUJDBMTQFFDIFT (66$002+$00(' $VVRFLDWHG3UHVV TO L E D O , Oh i o â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Parades, picnics and politicians celebrated the American worker on Labor Day, with President Barack Obama seeking votes from Ohio union members and rivals for Senate seats marching in Massachusetts and Virginia. But for many, Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s holiday was a last chance to enjoy a final summer cookout, roller coaster ride

or day at the beach. Or perhaps even a stroll from Michiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Upper Peninsula to its Lower Peninsula â&#x20AC;&#x201D; along the longest suspension bridge in the Western Hemisphere. Politics was a big part of Labor Day, the time when much of the public usually starts to pay attention to the campaigns. Terence Glaze, a 47-year-old firefighter, waited to catch a glimpse of Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motorcade at the presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speech in Toledo, but his

two young sons were eager to get to the movies instead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a time for the family to be together and just spend time with one another. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the most important aspect,â&#x20AC;? Glaze said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I do also think about the sacrifices unions have made, as it relates to wages, as it relates to safety issues,â&#x20AC;? he added. At his speech to members of the United Auto Workers and United Steelworkers, Obama noted his

decision to rescue automakers General Motors and Chrysler in 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a move opposed by his rival, Republican nominee Mitt Romney. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If America had thrown in the towel like that, GM and Chrysler wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist today,â&#x20AC;? Obama said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The suppliers and the distributors that get their business from these companies would have died off, too. Then even Ford could have gone down as well.â&#x20AC;? Romney supporter Kenneth Harbin, a member of the University

of Toledo College Republicans, waved signs for his candidate outside the rally and scoffed at Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to visit the labor stronghold. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gotta come home and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I did for you. Now hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what you can do for me,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Harbin said. Getting union voters in Ohio to turn out in November will be crucial for Democrats. About 650,000 workers in the state â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or 13 percent â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are union members. The national average is just less than 12 percent.


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NICOLE HESTER | DAILY EGYPTIAN

The SIU womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cross-country team competed in an intrasquad meet Friday at SIU. Sadie Darnell, a sophomore from Festus, Mo., studying elementary education, took first place. Darnell has been running cross-country since the seventh grade. The teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next race will be at the Walt Crawford Opening Friday in Charleston. '(0$5,23+,33660,7+ 'DLO\(J\SWLDQ The SIU cross-country team saw its first action of the season Friday in an intrasquad meet. The Saluki Early Bird started with inclimate weather but cleared up for the race. Sophomore Sadie Darnell won the 4k for the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team with her finishing time of 14 minutes and 54 seconds. Darnellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time was just 10 seconds ahead of secondplace freshman runner Kirsten Levi. Sophomores Tori Parry and Jaime

Hershfang, third- and fourth-place finishers, completed the race at 15:07.8 and 15:50.4 respectively. Junior runner Jacqueline Lintzenich said she is now prepared for the season ahead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bring it on,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team really expects to do big things this year.â&#x20AC;? Lintzenich said although she hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t raced in a year, she did better than expected. Unattached freshman Brandon Shemonia won the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4k race at 12:24.9. Freshman Oscar Medina finished at a close second with

12:25.1. The third- and fourth-place finishes were also close as sophomore runner Nick Schrader and freshman Juan Carrera finished with times of 12:25.3 and 12:25.5 respectively. Schrader said the race was a good start to the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was good to get the rust off my legs,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We should be ready for Eastern.â&#x20AC;? Sophomore runner Cole Allison, fifth-place finisher, said the race gave him an opportunity to see how fit he was. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was nothing challenging. I just had to get it done,â&#x20AC;? Allison said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It

was like a fast workout.â&#x20AC;? Allison said this race will get him back into the right racing mentality. Unattached freshman Alex Chavez said he felt as good about the race as he could want. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I did pretty good out there today, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just glad it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rain,â&#x20AC;? he said. The Saluki cross-country team will travel to Charleston for the Walt Crawford Open Friday.

DeMario Phipps-Smith can be reached at dsmith-phipps@dailyegyptian.com

or 536-3311 ext. 269.

FOOTBALL CONTINUED FROM

8

The Salukisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; most exciting play of the night came with a little more than eight minutes left in the second quarter, when McCall took a screen pass from Faulkner 74-yards down the sideline for a game-tying touchdown, 14-14. The play matched the Salukisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; longest play from scrimmage of last year, had by Strother against Ole Miss Sept. 10. The Panthers responded to the Saluki touchdown quickly and scored on touchdown passes on consecutive drives from Garoppolo. Garoppolo finished the night with a career-high five touchdown passes. A 3-yard pass from Faulkner to sophomore tight end MyCole Pruitt brought the Salukis within a touchdown heading into the half. McCall scored his third touchdown on the first drive of the third quarter, but the Saluki offense didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t strike again. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After the game, I said â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one guy in this room that should be getting his butt chewed, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mine,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Lennon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have (the team) prepared and ready to play at the level we needed to. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what is disappointing. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a better team; we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t show it.â&#x20AC;? The Salukis will travel to Miami, Ohio Saturday to face division 1 Bowl Championship Series opponent Miami University. Kickoff is scheduled for noon. Ben Conrady can be reached at bconrady@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 282.


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(Answers tomorrow) (Answers tomorrow) (Answers Monday) (Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: SHIFT EXACT GENTLY FORGOT IMAGE BENIGN PIRACY Jumbles: ABATE Jumbles: SHIFT EXACT GENTLY FORGOT )ULGD\ÂśV Yesterdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jumbles: SHIFT EXACT GENTLYthought FORGOT Yesterdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Yesterdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The retriever that the the Answer: Yesterdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s After his male climbing companion started to female panic, Answer: The male retriever thought that female $QVZHUVAnswer:Answer: The male retriever thought that the female retriever â&#x20AC;&#x201D; FETCHING he told herwas towas â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;GET A GRIP FETCHING retrieverretriever was â&#x20AC;&#x201D; FETCHING

Aries â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re entering a two-day profitable phase. New evidence threatens complacency. A breakthrough develops regarding your perspective on money and finances. A friendinspiresyourdream.Sharetheresults.

Cancer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re entering a cooperative period. Communicate straight up, without arrogance, gullibility or fear. Find a way to work smarter in teamwork, and then bask in the sun with friends.

Libra â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Make love a priority. You can solve any problem through partnership. Listen and learn. Count coins and pay bills for the rest of this period.

Capricorn â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tough job, but someone has to do it ... extra points for being gentle. Today and tomorrow are good for fun and games. Keep track of winnings.

Taurus â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on top of the world, and you know it. Finishing what you promised is most impressive. Over the next few days, redesign your situation for the better.

Leo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fierce competition could lead to career advancement. A female supplies key information. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a test coming, and you may need to turn down an invitation. Encourage someone.

Scorpio â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stay out of somebody elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s argument. Delegate to a worthy partner for awhile. Work can be fun, too, you know. Infuse meetings with imagination.

Aquarius â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Be a gracious host and leader, even if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a disagreement.Your home and family could require more attention. Check instructions again. Let friends know what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve discovered.

Gemini â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dress the part. Following the rules helps. Patience is required today, so take your time. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to choose yet. Encourage your team, which has brilliant ideas.

Virgo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Look into the future and imagine where you want to be, then start taking the necessary steps to get there. You could be like Merlin, and live backwards into the present. Visualize it.

Sagittarius â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Postpone expansion (translation: add to your savings). Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re entering a work phase, and your status is going up. Avoid distractions.Postponetravelandlaunching new ventures. Gather information.

Pisces â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Today is a 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Plan carefully. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try a new trick now. Find another way to work smarter to provide the requested services. Push past old barriers. You can do it.


632576

DAILY EGYPTIAN 78(6'$<_6(37(0%(5_'$,/<(*<37,$1&20_3$*(

SOURCE | WWW.SIUSALUKIS.COM

NICHOLAS BURKE | DAILY EGYPTIAN

)RRWEDOOGUXEEHGE\(DVWHUQLQRSHQHU %(1&215$'< 'DLO\(J\SWLDQ SIU coach Dale Lennon said he expected a fast-paced game, one where no lead would be safe, before Thursday nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season opener at Eastern Illinois University. Lennon was right about the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speed. Both teams ran more than 90 plays, but the Salukis never held the lead as a 6-yard gametying touchdown run by junior running back Mikaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;il McCall knotted the score at 28-28 on the third quarterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first drive. Eastern then scored three unanswered touchdowns to reach the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final score 49-28. The Salukis struggled to keep up with the Panthersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; no-huddle approach throughout the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel like the first half we were winded,â&#x20AC;? said senior defensive end Eze Obiora after the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were moving the ball really fast. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to be ready for that. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to be prepared for that.â&#x20AC;? When the Saluki defense seemed to finally gain a grasp of the offensive flow, Easternâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new coach Dino Babers called for some trickery that the secondary wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t prepared for. The gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first score was a sign of things to come as Eastern set the Saluki defense up with a series of screen passes for short gains. Then, on the Panthersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; second drive, quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo lateraled the ball to receiver Sam Hendricks, a play that happened several times before. This time, instead of running with the ball, Hendricks remained behind the line of scrimmage and tossed a 40-yard pass downfield to fellow receiver Chavar Watkins. Sensing the screen, the Saluki defense jumped to make a play on Hendricks. By the time Watkins received the pass, SIUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secondary could do nothing but watch him stroll into the end zone for a 7-0 lead. Eastern ran the exact play in the third

Tiffany Blanchette | DAILY EGYPTIAN SIU running back Steve Strother, center, gains yards during Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season-opening game against Eastern Illinois University. The Salukisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offense struggled to escape the Panthersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense and earned a 49 - 28 loss. quarter with the same result. As well as the Panthers offense started, the Salukis began play just the opposite. Junior quarterback Kory Faulkner threw back-toback interceptions in the first quarter, but the defense held strong. A 6-yard run by McCall tied the game at 7-7 to end the first quarter. It was the first of three touchdowns on the night for McCall in his first game as a Saluki, which is perhaps one of the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

lone bright spots. McCall had more success running between tackles than fellow running back senior Steven Strother. McCall finished the night with 56 yards on 11 carries â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an average of 5.1 yards per carry â&#x20AC;&#x201D; compared to Strotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 44 yards on 12 carries, a 3.6 clip. After the game, McCall said he was happy about his performance running the ball but came up short holding on to the football â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he fumbled twice â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and protecting the

quarterback. Faulkner was sacked twice, but ended up on his back at the end of play much more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just here to play. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take my reps and make plays,â&#x20AC;? McCall said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My first priority is to protect the quarterback. By any means, I try to stop the pass rush in its tracks.â&#x20AC;? Please see FOOTBALL | 5


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NICOLE HESTER | DAILY EGYPTIAN

The SIU womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cross-country team competed in an intrasquad meet Friday at SIU. Sadie Darnell, a sophomore from Festus, Mo., studying elementary education, took first place. Darnell has been running cross-country since the seventh grade. The teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next race will be at the Walt Crawford Opening Friday in Charleston. '(0$5,23+,33660,7+ 'DLO\(J\SWLDQ The SIU cross-country team saw its first action of the season Friday in an intrasquad meet. The Saluki Early Bird started with inclimate weather but cleared up for the race. Sophomore Sadie Darnell won the 4k for the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team with her finishing time of 14 minutes and 54 seconds. Darnellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time was just 10 seconds ahead of secondplace freshman runner Kirsten Levi. Sophomores Tori Parry and Jaime

Hershfang, third- and fourth-place finishers, completed the race at 15:07.8 and 15:50.4 respectively. Junior runner Jacqueline Lintzenich said she is now prepared for the season ahead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bring it on,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team really expects to do big things this year.â&#x20AC;? Lintzenich said although she hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t raced in a year, she did better than expected. Unattached freshman Brandon Shemonia won the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4k race at 12:24.9. Freshman Oscar Medina finished at a close second with

12:25.1. The third- and fourth-place finishes were also close as sophomore runner Nick Schrader and freshman Juan Carrera finished with times of 12:25.3 and 12:25.5 respectively. Schrader said the race was a good start to the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was good to get the rust off my legs,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We should be ready for Eastern.â&#x20AC;? Sophomore runner Cole Allison, fifth-place finisher, said the race gave him an opportunity to see how fit he was. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was nothing challenging. I just had to get it done,â&#x20AC;? Allison said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It

was like a fast workout.â&#x20AC;? Allison said this race will get him back into the right racing mentality. Unattached freshman Alex Chavez said he felt as good about the race as he could want. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I did pretty good out there today, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just glad it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rain,â&#x20AC;? he said. The Saluki cross-country team will travel to Charleston for the Walt Crawford Open Friday.

DeMario Phipps-Smith can be reached at dsmith-phipps@dailyegyptian.com

or 536-3311 ext. 269.

FOOTBALL CONTINUED FROM

8

The Salukisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; most exciting play of the night came with a little more than eight minutes left in the second quarter, when McCall took a screen pass from Faulkner 74-yards down the sideline for a game-tying touchdown, 14-14. The play matched the Salukisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; longest play from scrimmage of last year, had by Strother against Ole Miss Sept. 10. The Panthers responded to the Saluki touchdown quickly and scored on touchdown passes on consecutive drives from Garoppolo. Garoppolo finished the night with a career-high five touchdown passes. A 3-yard pass from Faulkner to sophomore tight end MyCole Pruitt brought the Salukis within a touchdown heading into the half. McCall scored his third touchdown on the first drive of the third quarter, but the Saluki offense didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t strike again. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After the game, I said â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one guy in this room that should be getting his butt chewed, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mine,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Lennon said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have (the team) prepared and ready to play at the level we needed to. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what is disappointing. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a better team; we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t show it.â&#x20AC;? The Salukis will travel to Miami, Ohio Saturday to face division 1 Bowl Championship Series opponent Miami University. Kickoff is scheduled for noon. Ben Conrady can be reached at bconrady@dailyegyptian.com or 536-3311 ext. 282.

Daily Egyptian  

Daily Egyptian September 4th, 2012

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