1969 Annual Report: Guam to the Secretary of the Interior

Page 1

GUAM

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY,

AmericainAsia

AturidadlnadilantonlkunumihanGuahan

GUAM

TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR

1969 ANNUAL REPORT

Publication materials provided by the Guam Economic Development Authority (GEDA)



1969 Annual Report

Guam to the Secretary of the Interior



1969 Annual Report

Guam to the Secretary of the Interior

·For sale by tho Superint-Ondent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402- Price 35 cents



CONTENTS Page

General Information .................................. •. . . . . . . . . . General Government............................................ Education..................................................... Health, Sanitation and Social Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Community Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Protection and Development of Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Labor.......................................................... Protection of Life and Property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parks and Recreation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selective·Service System... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendices....................................................

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GENERAL INFORMATION Guam, an unincorporated but or- has an area of 209 square miles. It lies ganized territory, is the westernmost in the Westernmost Pacific, 1,500 miles frontier of the United States. Over east of the Philippines, 1,300 miles 100,000 residents, including the mili- southeast of Japan, and 3,000 westtary and aliens, live here, making southwest of Hawaii. Guam the most populated island in The climate is warm and humid, the Marianas chain. Most of the resi- with an average yearly rainfall of 85 dent are U.S. citizens. to 100 inches. Guam is 13° north of The Government of Guam is headed the Equator, and its temperatures vary by the Governor, who is appointed by from 70° to 90°. The dry season exthe President, with the advice and con- tends from December through April, sent of the Senate. However, this ap- with the hottest months in May and pointed status will cease next year. In June. Most of the rain falls from July November 1970, the people of Guam to September. Trade winds bring rewill eleot their first Governor and lief to the island during its hottest Lieutenant Governor by popular ballot. months. The gigantic stride toward full selfThe island's topography varies from government was made possible by the a high rolling plain reaching 400 feet signing of the Elective Governorship above the ocean in the northern half to Act by the President in late 1968. rough mountains rising from 700 to The 21 members of the unicameral 1,334 feet above sea level in .the south. Guam Legislature are elected, at large, The central portion, in which Agana, biennially. The lawmaking body is em- the capital, is situated, is flat to the sea, powered to pass tax laws and to legis- but gently rising hills break the flatness. late on all matters not inconsistent with The highest peak is Mount Lamlam, Federal laws applicable .to Guam. located in the southern part of the The two political parties are the island. Democratic and Republican parties, Ferdinand Magellan and his fleet of and both are affiliated with the na- three ships landed at Umatac Bay in tional organizations. 1521 during his circumnavigating voyA Washington representative, an age. Nearly two centuries later, in elected official, represents the terri- 1665, Spanish missionaries oame to tory in Washington. However, he is not Christianize the islanders. Guam reofficially a member in Congress but mained a protectorate of the Spanish represents Guam in congressional hear- throne from .that date until 1898, when ings on matters pertaining to the it was ceded to the United States- by territory. the Treaty of Paris. The island is 30 miles long and The U.S. Navy administered the ranges from 4 miles at its narrowest island until Japanese forces seized it point to 8½ miles at its widest, and in 1941, shortly after the attack on

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Pearl Harbor. American forces liberated Guam on July 21, 1944, and the island again returned to Naval administration. In 1950, Congress enacted the Organic Act of Guam. This act brought U.S. citizenship to the island residents and also established the territory's civil government comprising the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Present-day Guamanians are a mixture of native Chamorro stock, with English, Spanish, German, Japanese, Filipino, Chinese, Italian, Irish, Mexican, or Portuguese. With few exceptions, Guam is a free port, and products entering the territory are duty free. Under the U.S. Customs Simplification Act, articles manufactured in Guam may enter the U.S. mainland duty free provided foreign materials do not constitute more than 50 percent of the total value of the finished product. The total value is determined by bona fide sale or offer for sale, not including freight charges to Guam. Guam taxes are generally lower than in other U.S. jurisdictions. Residents of the territory· are subject to payment of income tax to the Government of Guam at the same rates and under the same conditions established in the U.S. :mainland for payment of Federal income taxes. There is the usual range of other taxes, such as liquor, gasoline, real property, gross receipts, etc. There is only one taxing authority, however. There are no separate municipal, county, school, district, and improvement district taxes. Col}?pletebanking facilities are provided by local branches of the Bank of America, the Bank of Hawaii, and the Guam Savings & Loan Association. The First National City Bank of New York has also established a branch in the territory, and business operations are scheduled to begin before the year ends.

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Offices of Federal lending institutions, including the Small Business ~dministration and the Federal Housing Administration, are located in Guam. A major step in the development of the economy is the rapid growth of a tourist industry. During the year, Pan Amevican increased its twice-weekly flights to daily flights direct to Tokyo from Guam. Continental/ Air Micronesia now links Guam and the trust territory, Okinawa, and Honolulu and Trans-World Airlines will initiate by August 1969 daily nonstop service between Guam and Honolulu. Westbound, TWA departs daily to Okinawa and other links in the airline's roundthe-world route. A weekly flight to Sydney, linking Tokyo, Guam, and the Australian industrial center, has also been inaugurated. Guam thus becomes a major point in Pacific air travel between Honolulu and the West Coast, Tokyo, Manila, Southeast Asia, and Sydney. Guam is a regular port of call for 11 shipping lines, including American President Lines, Pacific Far East Line, Micronesian Interocean Line, P &. 0 Orient Lines, Dominion Far East Line, and several other Australian and Japanese shipping companies. At least 593 vessels called at Apra Harbor last year. .At least two foreign carriers have expressed interest in servi~g Guam. The territory is adequately served by a highway system comprising 191 miles of road. Guam is the communication hub of the Western Pacific. Modem communication· facilities provide instantaneous contact with virtually all parts of the world. Radio Corporation of America (RCA) and the Australian Cable Communication System have up-todate facilities, including undersea telephone and telegraphic cables linking commercial centers in Asia, North and South America, Europe and the rest of the Pacific. International Telephone


Many historical remnants of the Spanish era, such as the old bridge shown in this photo, provide points of interest for the visitors on a tour around the island. The Guam Tourist Commission reported approximately 18,000 visitors during fiscal year 1969. The influx of tourists, especially from Japan, is continually rising every year.

and Telegraph (ITT) services the military. The territory has one daily newspaper, a radio and television station, and several weekly and monthly publications. Pacific Stars and Stripes which is published in Tokyo also is circulated locally. Associated Press, United Press International and supplemental news and feature services are used by the news media. Guam's educational system compares favorably with many U.S. mainland communities of comparable size.

The curricula, subject matter and achievement goals are essentially the same as those of mainland schools. The island's two senior public high schools-George Was.hi n gt on and John F. Kennedy-are accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. More than 27,000 children of school age attend public and private institutions. The University of Guam had an enrollment of 2,138 in fall 1968 and is accredited by the Western Association

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of Schools and Colleges as a 4-year, degree-granting institution. The University has four undergraduate schools

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( nursing, arts and sciences, education, and continuing education), and has a graduate school in education.


GENERAL GOVERNMENT The enactment of the Guam Elective Governor Bill, the increase of funding authorization under the Rehabilitation Act, the authorization of a $5 million appropriation for economic development, and the reorganization of the executive branch by creating four new departments highlighted fiscal year 1969. The Elective Governor Act, signed by President Johnson late last year, ushers in a new political era on Guam. For the first time since the establishment of civil government 19 years ago, the local electorate is given the right to choose by popular ballot their Gov• ernor and Lieutenant Governor. Previously, the territory's chief executive has been appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. In November of 1970, Guam will achieve a long-standing aspirationthat of having full self-governmentfor on this date, the first gubernatorial election will be held. The Elected Governor Act limits any one Governor from serving more than two consecutive 4-year terms. Among other things, it also calls for the appointment of a U.S. Comptroller for Guam. Named for this post was Floyd W. Fagg, a long-time career Federal employee who was scheduled to begin operation of his office by July 1969. The U.S. Congress also enacted a measure increasing by $30 million, from $45 to $75 million, the authorization of funds under the Guam Rehabilitation Act. This action provided a big boost to the territory's rehabilita-

tion program which began shortly after the island suffered extensive destruc• tion by Typhoon Karen in November 1962. Since then Congress has appropriated approximately $43 million of the original $45 million authorization in loans and grants. To date, 36 projects have been completed ~nd still many others have yet to be accomplished. The island's economic development also received a boost when Congress enacted a law authprizing the appropriation of $5 million to accelerate the economic growth of the territory. A portion of this amount has been earmarked for agricultural development projects and the establishment of industrial parks. At the request of the administration, the Guam Legislature approved several measures relative to reorganizing the executive branch. As a result, four new departments were created while twoexisting ones were revamped and part of their functions transferred to the entities. To effect a more efficient operation, the former Department of Labor and Personnel was reorganized into the Department of Labor and the Pepartment of Administration. All aspects of labor management functions, including the Guam Employment Service, were assumed by the new Labor department. The new Administration department now handles all personnel and administrative functions as well as management, finance, and accounting.

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The latter two functions were formerly held by the Department of Finance which itself has also been reorganized and redesignated as the Department of Revenue and Taxation. Revenue. and Taxation now primarily handles tax regulatory enforcement; development of an effective tax audit, appraisal, assessment, and collection programs; as well as handling registration, licensing, examination, investigation of business establishments and other allied activities. The fourth newly created department is the Department of Corrections. This new department assumes the administration of the Penal Division ( Guam Penitentiary) which was transferred from the Department of Public Safety and the Youth Correctional Facility which was formerly under the Department of Public Health and Social Services. Other reorganization included the establishment of Government of Guam's Civil Service Commission and the consolidation of the Budget and Management sections under the Governor's office into a Bureau of Budget and Management Research. The Civil Service Commission, comprising seven members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Legislature, assumed all functions of the personnel board. Its day-to-day operation is headed by an executive director. • During the year, the director and deputy commissioner of Revenue and Taxation traveled to Washington, D.C., and met with representatives from American Samoa, Virgin Islands, Treasury, Interior, and Internal Revenue Service to discuss income tax problems which affected the various U.S. possessions. Known as a "Tax Task Force," they considered problems arising from the application of the Internal Revenue Code to U.S. territories on a dual law basis and the possible

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resolutions of these problems on administrative or legislative basis. Guam recommended that individual permanent resident taxpayers be required to file only one return with the taxing jurisdiction in which he was a resident on the last day of that year. This would require a reciprocal acceptance of W-2 forms by Guam and IRS. This proposal would require rewriting section 932 of the Internal Revenue Code. It would eliminate the treatment of Organic Act citizens as aliens for Federal income tax purposes and conversely U.S. citizens for Guam income tax purposes. There was a unanimous support for amending the Organic Act to permit U.S. citizens who are permanent residents of Guam to fulfill their U.S. tax obligation by filing a Guam income tax return reporting their entire worldwide income. Approximately $43 million in general fund revenue was realized by the government in fiscal year 1969. This is approximately $9 million more than last year's total of approximately $34 million. The increase is largely seen in the local income _taxrevenue which jumped from $12.1 million in fiscal year 1968 to $17.2 million in fiscal year 1969, an increase of $5.1 million. Revenue increases were also realized in other areas, including $1.7 million in U.S. income tsi.x and $1.3 million in the gross receipt tax. Income tax deficiencies resulting from audit examination were $9,544.32 more than the previous year, for a total of $917,339. A total of 2,952 returns were audited and completed, a decrease of 760 returns compared to last year's. Collection of delinquent accounts totaled a record high of $2,142,603. This is $196,133 more than was collected the previous year. Over 1,500 delinquent returns representing $198,474 in unreported tax, interests and penal-


ties were also secured through the es• tablished delinquent returns program. The Real Property Tax Division reported increases in assessment values and number of land parcels and buildings entered in its tax rolls during the year under review. There were 14,552 land parcels assessed, 943 more than the previous year's total representing an approximately 6 percent increase. This is largely attributed to the establishment of additional subdivisions and the sale or exchange of government land to private individuals. Total assessment on land parcels amounted to $19,663,130, an increase of 5 percent or $927,200 over the previous year, thus increasing land taxes by $27,816. The total land tax for the year was $589,322. A total of 11,612 buildings was assessed during the year, 1,741 more than the previous year. This represents an increase of 19 percent in the number of buildings assessed and $106,248 in tax amount over the preceding year. The total building taxeri for the year amounted to $662,116. The combined taxes for land and buildings totalled $1,251,439, or $134,426 more than the previous year's total. The Department of Administration's Division of Accounts initiated during the-year a complete fiscal management system review. This study was conducted by the local branch office of Peat, Marwick & Mitchell of Los Angeles, a nationally recognized fiscal management firm. It was geared toward the development of a comprehensive fiscal management system that would: ( 1) Provide adequate fiscal control, (2) provide departments and agencies with accurate and timely fiscal information that will ensure fiscal control at the appropriation or other required levels, and (3) support the needs of departments and agencies for detailed statistical data for use in intra-

departmental repofts and reports to outside organizaitions. During the year, the Division also maintained an estimated $51.4 million in receipts and $50.3 million in disbursements. The department's Supply Management Division made arrangements for direct purchases from the Naval Supply Depot, Guam, on common stock items. This procedure is expected to produce savings on stock investment and space utilization in the division's storage warehouse. During the year, purchase commitment amounted to $5,602,794 and 7,307 requisitions were received and processed. Of the total purchases in fiscal year 1969, 81 percent were made through local vendors. Major legislation enacted by the Legislature: -Restores jurisdiction of the Island Court over criminal offenses committed by military personnel. -Permits representation by legal counsel in Juvenile Cour.t hearing. -Redesignates the College of Guam as the University of Guam. -Creates the Public EmployeeManagement Relations Act. -Authorizes special election to ascertain public views on district representation in the Legislature. -Creates the First Constitutional Convention of the territory of Guam. -Establishes the uniform Consumer Credit Code. -Creates the Guam Employee Relations Act. -Increases the jurisdiction of the Island Court, provides trial by jury, changes local jury selection system to conform with the Federal system, and provides grand jury indictment in felony cases. The Constitutional Convention comprises 43 delegates from various districts elected during a special elec-

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tion in May 196~. The Convention was created to review and recommend necessary revisions or changes in the Organic Act of Guam, which serves as the territory's Constitution. The Convention will submit a report of its findings and recommendations to the Legislature by next year. An islandwide census conducted by the district commissioners showed a

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civilian population of 61,283 as of December 31, 1968. This represents an increase of approximately 2,500 compared to the census made in April 1968. Including military personnel and civil service employees and .their dependents plus Government of Guam contract workers and alien workers, the island's overall population is approximately 100,000.


EDUCATION Facilities, programs and enrollment figures continued to expand in the field of education throughout the year, while student demands increased and courses were revised to satisfy local needs. By an Act of the Legislature, on August 12, 1968, the College of Guam was renamed the University of Guam with a five-member board of regents. The University was organized into three undergraduate colleges-the college of letters, arts, and sciences; the college of education; and the college of continuing education-and a graduate school, each under the direction of a dean. On the capital improvements scene, close to $3 million were expended by the Department of Education on the construction of two new elementary schools having a total of 66 classrooms. In the blue-print stage are plans for a new elementary school to be built in the Mongmong-Toto-Maite area, and a much needed junior high school to be constructed in Inarajan to serve students living at the southern end of the island. . The University saw the completion of the new science building early in the year, and is anticipating the completion of a Student Center plus three dormitory buildings by the fall of 1969. The dormitory is designed to accommodate 300 students. By January, 1970, a twostory Health Science Building to house the school of nursing should ~!so have been completed. • The operational budget for the Department of Education reached a rec-

ord high of $15 million for the 1968-69 school year. The budget for the University soared from $1,608,177 for fiscal year 1968, to $3,392,870, of which $302,570 was supplied through Federal grants. Although the construction of new school facilities has finally liberated students from the World War II quonset huts, the expected increase in enrollment of 2,000 students next year will continue to cause an acute classroom shortage with the resultant high ratio of students per class. The anticipated enrollment for 1970 is 22,500, as compared to the 20,500 students enrolled this year. Of the 988 12th graders enrolled, 769 received high school diplomas, compared to 889 graduates the previous year. A record number of 1,000 teachers were employed by the Department of Education to staff the system's two high schools, five junior high schools, the school for handicapped children, and the 21 elementary schools. Enrollment at the University of Guam averaged 2,000 students this year, compared with the previous student body of 1,700. A total of 114 degrees were conferred during May, of which 91 were bachelor of arts degrees, 21 were masters degrees, and two were associate in arts degrees. From the school of nursing 19 students graduated, 17 of whom are now ·employed, and two pursuing baccalaureate degrees on the mainland. From the three police academy classes 9


Cafeteria at the New Piti Elementary School under construction. During the year, additional school facilities were built to meet the demands of the ever-growing enrollment in Guam's public schools.

These youngsters are having a hearty meal provided under the School Lunch Program at various Guam schools.

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held during the year, 45 students graduated. In efforts to cope with the bilingual problem that exists on Guam, the Department of Education instituted two new programs. A preschool program was conducted for 150 children in which major emphasis was placed on the development of language skills. In addition, a major innovative program was begun. This was the pilot project for teaching English via television. The initial project included the schools of U matac and Merizo and was part of the Title III ESEA program. Teaching English via television was also made possible through use of the expanded Learning Resources Center. In addition to a television studio, the LRC had facilities for creating many of the schools' needed media materials. An apult vocational program with the proportions of a technical junior college was also started during the year, and exemplary programs in vocational education were implemented for• 100 special education students.

In line with its objective of improving living conditions through means of education and training vocational skills, the Community Action Agency (CAA) , formerly known as the Economic Opportunity Commission, enrolled 938 4- and 5-year-old children from underprivileged homes in a Headstart program. Unfortunately, the remaining 62 eligible children could not he enrolled for lack of facilities. Also 250 4- and 5-year-olds from more affiuen t families were enrolled in an educational program under Project FIVE, a nonfunded program. On-the-job training was afforded 17 of Guam's youths through the cooperation of the CAA and a number of local business firms. As a direct result of this training, five of these youths were placed on permanent jobs. The agency also offered remedial education and counselling during the summer months to encourage youths to return to school after the long vacation. Under the MDTA program, CAA secured an enrollment of 92 students

The Learning Resources Center of the Department of Education produces a variety of audiovisual materials to aid in classroom teaching. Photo shows a series for educational television presentation being made.

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The Headstart program is making an impact in preparing children from the underprivileged families to adjust to the classroom situation before enrolling in the regular school system. Headstart is under the Guam Community Action Agency but is being implemented by the Department of Education.

who undertook courses in stenography, accounting and welding. At the conclusion of the year, 26 stenographers and six welders were graduated-a total of 32 youths. Considerable reorganization took place at the University of Guam. The Division of Natural Sciences in the college of letters, arts and sciences, was divided into the division of Biosciences and Marine Studies, and the division of Physical Sciences, Mathematics and Home Economics, thus affording greater concentration in the academic preparation and offerings of the respective areas. At the same time, 12 new courses were added to the undergraduate major curriculum in the division of Biosciences and 'Marine

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Studies to include a core of courses with either a botany or a zoology option. At the graduate level, a master of arts degree in history was offered for the first time and the graduate program had a total enrollment of 45 students. Other new graduate programs were offered in elementary education, early childhood educati9n, and in education administration and supervision. Research played a major role in the island's education system during the year. Under one of the title III, ESEA projects, the Department of Education conducted a program entitled the "Needs-Assessment Study for Students and Schools in the School System of Guam." The purpose of the


With the acute shortage of local skilled labor, emphasis is placed on vocational training, especially for young people. Such training is being provided by the Guam Trade School and Technical School, apprenticeship programs of the Navy and Government of Guam, and other similar p{ograms offering on-the-job training.

study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the present school' system and to determine in what areas improvements should be initiated. Surveys associated with the study met with remarkable response and cooperation, and conclusions and recommendations arising from the data gained are expected to provide a solid basis for future reforms designed to gear education more closely in line with Guam's needs. On the university scene, within the Micronesian Area Research Center, a Council for Anthropological Research was established to conduct and coordinate research in anthropology and archaeology within the Micronesian and adjacent culture areas of Oceania, and to maintain contact with other professional anthropological org~nizations. Within the division of Biosciences and Marine Studies, research and reference collections were expanded. Over 2,050 specimen lots were catalogued. The amphibian and reptile collection now numbers more than 1,200

specimens, and a large collection of local bird skins was initiated. The algae herbarium was increased with collections from Rota, Saipan, South Australia, the Philippines, Japan, and Mexico. The same division also made studies of the extensive damage caused by the crown-of-thorns starfish currently destroying the live coral on Guam's surrounding reefs, and has received a $30,000 grant to conduct research on the effect of pollution from the Agana outflow in the Agana Bay. The Union List of Serials, compiled and bound in fiscal year 68 by the Public Library in collaboration with the University of Guam, has been updated, and work on the Union Catalogue is continuing through the cooperation of the two institutions. The catalogue contains all the holdings of the public libraries and the Micronesian Area Research Center of the University of Guam. An additional library in Barrigada

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was due for completion by the end of fiscal year 69, bringing the number of branch libraries up to three, the other two being located at Dededo and Agat. Library services were also extended during the year to the Guam Memorial Hospital, the Guam Penitentiary and the Juvenile House of Corrections. As of February 1969, the Guam

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Museum was, for the first time, designated by law as the "official depository and custodian of the historical artifacts of Guam." The influx of tourists to Guam from Japan has resulted in the Museum becoming one of· the most popular attractions on the island. Visitors to the Museum this year twice exceded the number who visited the previous year.


HEALTH, SANITATION AND SOCIAL SERVICES The period under review witnessed steadily increasing demands upon hospital services, and a broadening of social service functions to cope with all types of human problems hazardous to health. The Guam Memorial Hospital is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals, and is a member of the American Hospital Association, the Association of Western Hospitals and the Hawaii Hospital Association. J. H. Feller & Associates recently concluded a study on the physical fa. cilities of the Guam Memorial Hospital with the recommendation that the Government of Guam establish an Islandwide Health Care Center composed of facilities that would provide every type of health service for its people. The proposed Health Center would be a concentration of all major groups, both public and private, interested in health care, on a common site surrounding a core of shared services. Under such an arrangement, services would be provided by an independent, voluntary, nonprofit corporation. In the belief that such centralization of health services would lead to the best possible heal-th care at rates the patient could afford, the recommendation by Feller & Associates was accepted by the board of trustees of the hospital, and the decision made to seek

legislative support to implement the recommendations . Meanwhile, the "F" wing of the hospital was under modernization and reconstruction to provide 48 beds for tuberculosis patients. The new facility increased the number of hospital beds from 237 to 285. Vacation of the present TB wards will provide room for the much needed extended care facility. Further construction at the hospital took place on the "C" wing to provide for a public health diagnostic and water quality analysis laboratory at a cost of $220,683. Patient services rendered during the fiscal year totaled $2,439,408, an increase of $272,080 over the previous year. Admissions to the hospital, including 1,819 newborn, numbered 7,667, an increase of 338. Outpatient visits totaled 37,246, and 34,363 X-ray examinations were performed as compared to 21,430 last year. Total collection in accounts receivable was $1,581, 222, an increase of $320,853 over the previous year. There was an increase in free services offered to TB patients, to persons seeking Mental Health Services, ALS, NINDB, School Injuries assistance, Public Health services, etc., amounting to $458,059, an amount $92,624 in excess of last year. Eighteen social service cases were approved for abatement, amounting in dollar value to $15,570, a decrease of 207 cases and a decrease in dollar value of $110,212

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health education room, three new denfrom the previous year. New equipment was installed in the tal units, and improved dental X-ray Physical Therapy Department to assist equipment. The number of dental staff in the speedier recovery of the acutely in the clinic was increased, and some ill, the physical restoration of the progress was made in developing a chronically ill and the geriatric· pa- method for long-range relief of the tients. This department now offers chronic dental manpower shortage. The Dental section now trains dental three areas of treatment-hydrotherapy, electrotherapy, and a gymnasium. technicians to provide specific services During the past year, 4,259 patients normally performed bv other dental 'received treatment, which resulted in personnel. A dental training program in conjunction with the University of total billings of $18,696. Magnetic tape selectric typewriters Guam is also scheduled to start in were leased by the hospital and one September 1970. Meanwhile, construcwas installed in the Medical Records tion of a dental training facility at the Department for the transcription of University is scheduled for early fiscal surgical reports, history and physical year 1970. Because of the shortage of profesreports and the minutes of the Medical sional staff, the b~lk of productive time Staff Committee. The greatest advances made by the in the clinic was spent performing Department of Public Health and So- emergency dental treatment on youngcial Services during fiscal year 1969 sters. A total of 5,680 school children were in the area of the decentralization received treatment, including topical of many services to clinics and offices application of fluoride. The Crippled in the outlying villages. There was an Children Services, Maternal Child initiation of new services and programs Health Service, Social Services, the in such areas as legal aid, intensive care Penitentiary and Detention Home for high-risk mothers, water pollution accounted for 6,900 more dental treatcontrol, health education via televi- ments. In addition, dental health edusion, service to older Americans and cation programs were instituted for 810 extensive planning for construction to senior high school students and some further decentralize services in .com- 4,750 students from Catholic schools. The Crippled Children Services prehensive health, medical and social provided assistance to 4,618 children service centers. Plans were approved for construc- during the year, as compared with tion of a typhoon-proof diagnostic and 2,830 last year. An additional 133 chiltreatment center at Inarajan at a cost dren from the· trust territory were also of $551,434. Purpose of the center is assisted. Over 450 new cases were dito provide comprehensive preventive agnosed for speech and hearing servmedical services and diagnostic and ices, and more than 40 persons were therapeutic services to people at the helped in the procurement of hearing southern end of the island. The facility aids. The major emphasis within the will include a dental clinic, laboratory, Hearing and Speech Center during the an X-ray unit, cervical cancer detec- year was on the provision of a compretion facilities, maternity and well-child hensi~e •therapy program designed to facilities, and crippled children and train the more than 60 preschool deaf children who were victims of the 1963tuberculosis clinics. The Dental Clinic in the "C" wing 64 epidemic of German measles. The major emphasis in the tubercuof the Guam Memorial Hospital was renovated with the addition of a dental losis control section has been in the 16


This 4-year-old girl, born deaf because of maternal illness during pregnancy, was one of the 48 children who participated in the first preschool program for youngsters with hearing impairment. The progam was conducted by the Depatment of Public Health and Social Services.

area of disease prevention. The prevention program led to the testing of 5,144 7th- and 12th-grade students. As a result, 111 students were placed on drugs and one child was given therapy. Tests were also conducted on 1,617 school employees. Of these, 114 were found to be infected with tuberculosis and were placed on drugs. The policy of prevention also led to the screening of groups who were considered to have a high incidence of tuberculosis-the alien contract laborers. A large number of TB suspects were identified among this group. Rabies control activities, the responsibility of the Department of Public Safety ( dog pound) and the Department of Agriculture ( predator control) , were to be placed under the jurisdiction of the new Zoonosis Con-

trol Division. A total of 2,046 dogs and cats were vaccinated during the year for rabies, as compared to 1,210 the previous year. The Mental Health Clinic extended services to 268 patients during the year with referrals from the Social Services Division, the Public Health Nurses Division, the hospital, the Department of Education and private doctors and clinics. The program was, however, chronically hampered by the difficulty in recruiting professionally qualified persons. Arrangements were made, nevertheless, for close cooperation between the Juvenile Institution and the Department of Corrections for Mental Health Clinic services. A study was also made of the number of suicides on Guam by year and places of origin. 17


Legislation was passed authorizing Air Quality Control, and improvements were secured on water quality legislation. Involvement in Solid Waste Management activities also resulted in gaining a $70,000 Federal grant for planning, and in the Legislature increasing appropriations for refuse collection from approximately $250,000 in fiscal year 1969 to $500,000 in fiscal year 1970. Steps to reduce surface and ground water pollution were initiated, and all public beaches were monitored. Modernization and construction of the . Public Health Laboratory was scheduled for completion in August 1969. The new facility will provide 2,600 square feet of additional laboratory space to complement the existing 700 square feet. The total number of tests conducted in the laboratory during the year was 50,727. Two laboratory personnel were sent)'or training at NCDC. One employee was trained in the diagnosis of Shigella and Salmonella, and the other technician

18

underwent tl<!,iningin the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The new Vital Statistics Act of Guam gave the Vital Statistics office a legal and enforceable base from which to operate. The U.S. standard certificates for birth, death, and fetal death were adopted during the year; vital statistics procedures were generally improved and conversion to the IBM computer system was effected. Over 5,000 copies of certificates were issued, and 2,512 births were registered. Under the Comprehensive Health Planning program a study of the infant and fetal mortality of the indegenous population of Guam 1965-67 was completed, and a survey was initiated for measuring the impact of ill-health in the entire population. Health education was stimulated by a series of weekly, half-hour television programs by the health educator. An emphasis program for health teaching in the area of drug abuse was also initiated in cooperation with the Attorney General's Office.


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT In fiscal·year 1969, building activities continued on the upswing with an increase of 20 percent over the previous year. A total of 1,900 building and miscellaneous permits was issued by the Department of Public Works for an estimated value on residential and commercial construction of $15.5 million. Of the permits issued, 1,530 were for new residential dwellings. Despite the increase in the building boom, there remains acute housing shortage in the territory. With the continuing annual population increase, boosted in part by newcomers establishing permanent or temporary residency, the problem is likely to remain acute for the next few years. It is estimated that the territory needs approximately 4,000 more homes to satisfy the ever-growing housing requirement, including at least 1,400 to accommodate military families. The Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority in fiscal year 1969 began construction of a 250-unit lowrent housing project. These units will be used primarily to accommodate low-income families who are to be displaced by one of two urban renewal projects the authority is implementing. At an estimated cost of $5.1 million in Federal funds, the low-rent project consists of six sites, all located within a mile of the capital city of Agaria. The units include duplexes and fourplexes,-ranging in size from one bedroom to six bedrooms.

Construction began in February 1969 by the Central Mill Supply Co., a South Korean firm which submitted the lowest bid in competition with other • qualified local contractors. Lawrence Johnsrud and Associates of Guam is the architect for the project. Construction schedule calls for 18 months, with the completion of the entire project expected by June of 1970. At this writing, all six sites were cleared and being graded. At one site, where construction first started, the streets have been laid out, building foundations have been poured and hollow block walls were being laid. Federal funds allocated for the project thus far totaled $2,167,000. In conjunction with urban renewal, the development of the nontitle I subdivision adjacent to the Sinajana project area was authorized by the Ninth Guam Legislature and approved by the Governor. It calls for 18 acres of undeveloped land to be developed into 54 residential lots, averaging 6,500 square feet in size. Initially, the sum of $300,883 in Concurrences on acquisition prices for funds was earmarked by the Legislature for the project. Of the amount, $93,075 has been utilized for land purchase, and another $18,000 has been committed to pay for the plans and specifications contracted to Trasen and Associatesof Guam. Bids for site development were announced at the end of the fiscal year, and construction is expected to begin before the end of 1969. Meanwhile, work on the urban re19


s I TE

4 (38·UN1TS) PROJECTGUAMH. AGANA

;-;,ut HOIJS.;s J~

.".£1\!U!.!Ilr«t~rr

The Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority this year began the construction of a 250-unit low-rent public housing project primarily oo accommodate families to be relocated as a result of urban renewal action. The $5.1 million project is federally funded by HUD and consists of six sites all located close oo the capital of Agana. Photo above shows the architecture's sketch of site 4 in Agana Heights.

newal projects continued to progress. Concurrences on acquisition prices for 240 properties to be acquired by the authority in the Sinajana project were received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. A total of 525 parcels are scheduled to be acquired as part of the Sinajana Urban Renewal Plan. For the Yona urban renewal project, the first acquisition appraisal report by the Norman D. Fitzgerald and Associates of California was completed during the year. However, the execution of the Loan and Grant Contract with HUD was held back because the territory's workable program certification which expired in November 1968 has not been recertified by HUD. The Sinajana project consists of 214.9 acres and includes 679 residential and other buildings. Of the 679 structures, 426 are to be cleared, 229 designated for rehabilitation, and 24 to be retained as they are. 20

About half the size of Sinajana, the Yona urban renewal project encompasses 87.14 acres. It includes 237 buildings, of which 156 are to be cleared, 73 designated for rehabilitation, and eight to remain as they are. Both urban renewal projects are financed on a 75/25 percent matching basis. Of the $12,292,040 estimated gross cost for Sinajana, the Federal share amounts to $9,298,436 and the local government's contribution is $2,993,604. For the Yona project, the Federal Government has reserved $3,821,115 and the local share is $1,230,345 for a gross total of $5,051,460. The Guam Housing Corporation approved 72 loan applications for a total value of $986,315 during the fiscal year. This is almost double that of the previous year, when 49 home loans were approved for an estimated value of $661,500.


At the end of fiscal year, 71 applications for loans totaling approximately $1 million were still awaiting availability of funds. The corporation has already sought a legislative appropriation for that amount, which has yet to be approved. In addition, there were approximately 180 more application valued at $2.5 million being processed. To help .alleviate the housing shortage, the Guam Rental Corporation has under construction 115 rental units. This is an FHA multifamily housing project under section 221 ( d) 3, otherwise known as Below Market Interest Rate Program. It is designed for low and moderate income families and for nonhomeowners in the same bracket. Being developed by the Kaiser-Hawaii Kai contractor, work on the project began in December 1968. As of the end of the fiscal year 1969, .57 units

were completed. The rest are expected to be completed by November 1969. The Guam Power Authority, created by law the previous fiscal year, began operation on March 15, 1969 when it took over the assets and facilities of the electric system for the private sector of the territory, formerly operated by the Public Utility Agency of the Government of Guam. Headed by a board of directors, the nucleus of the GPA personnel included 113 employees who were formerly with PUAG engaged in power operation. A general manager also was hired by the Board to direct the day-to-day operations of the authority. • A resolution signed by the Governor on June 16, 1969 authorized the Guam Power Authority to issue revenue bonds in the aggregate principal

A 115-unit low-rent public housing project began construction during the year and is expected to be completed by November 1969. Built by the Guam Housing Corporation for low- and moderate-income families, it is an FHA multifamily housing project federally financed under what is known as Below Market Interest Rate Program.

21 370-503 0 - 70 - 4


amount of $11 million, of which $1,425,000 in series A bonds. Revenue from the series A bonds will be used to purchase and install an 11,000 kilowatts diesel generating equipment. It will be located at the new Tamuning Commercial Industrial Park, a site secured from the Guam Economic Development Authority. The new equipment is expected to arrive on Guam by December 1969, and test operation to begin February 1, 1970. The remaining funds on the bond financing program are to be used for expansions and improvements of the island's power system. The GPA also has finalized plans to build a 33,000 kilowatt steam generating • plant at an estimated cost of $9,575,000. Other plans call for increasing substation capacity and higher voltage transmission system. In fiscal year 1969, the authority's annual gross revenue amounted to $4,563,919. Expansion of the islandwide telephone system continued during the year under the Public Utility Agency of Guam. The $2:5million expansion program included the construction of a new 6,000-line capacity exchange in Tumon and the additions of new lines to the Agana Central Exchange to bring its capacity to 6,000. Also under construction were an 800-line central office in Agat to serve the southwestern portion of the island, and a 400-line central office in Merizo to serve the southern communities. The exchange in Mangilao was being expanded to satisfy the growing demand for telephone services in the central portion of the island, which is also served by the Agana Central Exchange. Extensive preparation was also made during the year to convert the island's dialing system from six to seven digits and bring Guam in line with the inter22

national system. The change-over, scheduled for August 1969, will affect only telephones serviced by the Government of Guam exchanges, exclusive of the military. An increase in telephone rates was approved during the fiscal year but will not become effective until October 1, 1969 after improvements of services have been accomplished. The hike affects both residential and commercial telephones, with an increase of as much as $4 for the co~mercial private line, from $16 to $20 per month. Consumption of water for both commercial and domestic use in fiscal year 1969 was approximately 7.3 million gallons per day. This is an increase of 4.3 percent over the previous year's 7.0 million requirement per day. The increase was attributed to the 848 new water services connected to various consumers during the year. It is anticipated that by 1970, the daily consumption will rise to 8.5 million gallons, and by 1975 the average will be 12.5 million gallons per day. There were 29 deep water wells in operation as the second increment of the water resource development program was completed. The third inc~ment now underway includes six additional reservoirs, two new booster stations, rehabilitation of used springs, and the interconnection of the Central Water System with Talofofo, Malojloj, and Inarajan in the southern part of the island. The island's water supply comes from four major sources-Government of Guam, Layne International, Navy, and the Air Force. Because of its limited w~ter sources, Government of Guam purchases water from Layne International, Navy, and Air Force in order to meet the requirement for the ever-growing civilian community. To help defray the rising cost in operation and services, Public Utility also increased the water rate for com-


mercial and domestic use on April 1, 1969 from 50 cents per thousand gallons to 65 cents. Work on the construction of an islandwide sewer system continued during fiscal year 1969. The Dededo sewer lines in the northern part of the island were completed as well as portions of the Tumon sewer lines and pumping s~tions. There are now 10 sewer pumping stations either in use or under construction. Work was underway in Asan, Piti and the western section of Agana in preparation for linkage to the central sewer system. In Fiscal Year 1969, 147 tie-ins were made to the sewer lines. This number was lower than had been anticipated. One reason was that it cost the homeowner or commercial establishment approximately $300 to make the tie-in from his property to the sewer lines. Another w~. the law which gives the property owner a grace period •of 5 years to make the hookup if his cesspool or septic iank is still in good condition. The Department of Land Management completed two survey projects for subdivisions, One was an agricultural subdivision in Malojloj comprising 95 lots ~nd the other was a 26-lot residential subdivision in Talofofo, both in the southern part of the island. During the year, 200 parcels were surveyed, 383 private maps were processed, and 44 land registration cases were verified. The Department's Land Planning Division received 255 maps, of which 111 were for lot parceling, 19 tracts for residential subdivision, 63 tracts for rural subdivision, and 62 parcels for land registration. The Territorial Land Planning Commission, an

arm of Land Management, approved 46 applications for changes in zone, 4 7 for variances, and also rejected 19 requests for zone changes or variances. During the year, the Department's Land Administration Division acquired 18 parcels of land by exchange and seven parcels by purchase. It also acquired 133 grants of easement for power, 155 grants of easement for water and sewer lines, 17 grants of easement for road rights of way, and 11 parcels for school sites. A total of 91 parcels of land in Malojloj and Talofofo were disposed of by the Land Transfer Board. Building permits for 765 units were also inspected for compliance with the building setback requirement, and 790 business licenses were processed. During the year, 6,210 documents were also recorded and the number of Certificates of Title issued totaled 2,309. Revenues collected included $4,344 for application fees, $21,147 for document tax, $448 for photographic services, $31,059 for registry fees, $22,856 for rental of government land, and under the Agana Revolving Fund, $175,915 was collected for land sales. The Board of Engineering and Architectural Examiners reported an increase in registered engineers from 43 to 47. As part of the antipoverty program, the Guam Economic Opportunity Commission initiated a home improvement project to provide temporary repairs of homes of low-income families as a stopgap measure to health hazards. During the year, the EOG completed repairs on 37 homes throughout the island, while repairs on 26 others were underway.

23


PROTECTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF RESOURCES The Guam Rehabilitation Act, a boon to the territory's capital improvement program, was given . an added boost by Congress early in fiscal year 1969 when its funding authorization of $45 million was raised to $75 million. This increase paved the way for the continuation of rehabilitation projects vitally essential to Guam. Of the original $45 million authorization, $43,061,000 has already been appropriated, with the overall program only partially accomplished. Thus far, a total of 36 projects has been accomplished under the Rehabilitation Act since 1963. Four capital improvement projects under the Rehabilitation Act were completed during the year under review. These included the Science Building at the University of Guam, two elementary schools and a power substation. In addition, that portion of the new $11 million Commercial Port of Guam designed for container operation was completed and opened for operation in May, 1969. Projects contracted for during the year included the Central Area Water Project comprising wells, pipelines and reservoirs; a sewer system 'incl a treat-. ment plant for Agat and Santa Rita villages; construction of additional 32 elementary classrooms at four schools; and the third increment of the new Commercial Port at Cabras Island. 24

A total of 13 projects were also in various stages of construction at the end of the year under review. During fiscal year 1969, a total of $10,078,577 was withdrawn from the U.S. Treasury for construction expenditures under the Rehabilitation Act. This brings the grand total withdrawn as of June 30, 1969 to $35,553,777. Of this sum $21,033.077 represent loans which must be repaid. Repayment of such loans began July 1, 1968 and two payments totaling $986,918 were made during fiscal year 1969. The territory participated in many other grants-in-aid programs and almost all agencies of the government benefited under such programs. The air passenger service on Guam received another boost from a decision handed down by the Civil Aviation Board in the Pacific Route Case. The decision authorized a third major airline, in addition to Pan American and Continental/ Air Micronesia, to operate through Guam. Trans World Airlines, Inc., will commence operations on August 3, 1969 with daily flights east and west connecting Guam with Honolulu, Saipan, Okinawa, Taipei, and Hong Kong in its round-the-world route. The Guam-Tokyo flight by Pan American continued to show an increasing popularity as the number of Japanese tourists went up. To meet the demand for greater accommodation,


Pan Am increased its schedule from four to seven flights per week by the end of the year. April was the peak month for arrivals from Japan with a total of 2,154. Of this number, 1,683 were Japanese, almost double the figure for the same period in fiscal year 1968. Flight activities at the Guam International Air Terminal, the island's only commercial airport, also saw an increase during the year. International flights averaged 36 per week compared to 26 the preceding year, and scheduled flights to and from the neighboring trust territory increased by seven, from 23 to 30 per week. During the year, the terminal serviced 92,469 international passengers and handled 3,931,370 pounds of air cargo and 6,437,991 pounds of mail. Additionally, 60,785 trust territory passengers were serviced, and 2,563,361 pounds of air cargo and 563,701 pounds of mail were handled to and from the trust territory. The terminal's revenue for the fiscal year totalled $248,557, an increase of 25 percent compared to the previous year's total of $188,067. The Air Terminal Master Plan was also completed during the year. It calls for major improvements and expansions of the present facilities in order to meet the demands resulting from the continually increasing air traffic in the Western Pacific. As in the previous years, tourism continued to receive major emphasis. The Guam Tourism Commission, under the Department of Commerce, increased its advertising and tourist promotion campaign in an intensified attempt to "sell" Guam in various places abroad. It placed coupon advertisements in periodicals such as the American Legion Magazine, PAA Clipper, Asia Magazine, Esquire Magazine, Hawaii Business Industry, Holi-

day, Independent Travel Program, Journal of American Chamber of Commerce of Japan, Los Angeles Times, National Observer, New Yorker, New York Times, Pacific, Sunset, TAM, Travel, Travel Agent, Travel Trade, and the Veterans of Foreign Wars magazines. A new poster and a new brochure in Japanese as well as a new information booklet were also produced and distributed by the Commission during the year. According to the Guam Tourist Commission, 18,000 visitors came to Guam during the year. These included thousands who made brief stops on Guam aboard cruise liners destined for other. points in the Pacific and Far East areas. The Guam Economic Development Authority obtained a financial grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration on a 50-percent basis for site development of the Tamuning Commercial-Industrial Park. This grant was for the construction of the first increment of 10 acres at a total cost of $134,100 for the purpose of setting up commercial buildings as part of a shopping center complex. Site development was approximately 75 percent completed. The remaining portion of the Tamuning park consists of 16 acres. It will be developed for light industry under the second increment which is scheduled to begin in next fiscal year. GEDA has another industrial park in the offing. It consists of 32 acres of property located near the new Guam • Commercial Port at Cabras Island. Although GEDA has finn plans for development, the property has not yet been transferred from the Government of Guam which currently owns it. GEDA already has a number of applicants which have submitted proposals for lease. They include ESSO Inter-

25


national, Maritime Services Division of the Dil'lingham Corp., Kaiser Cement and Gypsum Corp., and Mobil Oil. Negotiations are underway with Government of Guam to transfer the park area to GEDA, and the transfer is expected to be made shortly. During the year under re".'iew, GEDA received 11 applications for qualifying certificate. Six of them were approved and issued, two were denied or withdrawn, and three were pending. This brings to 17 the total number of qualifying certificates approved and issued since GEDA was established in 1966. Of these, 12 qualified firms are now in operation or have commenced construction of their facilities. They include four watch assembly plants, four tourist hotel facilities, one watch band plant, a commercial feedmill, a lumber treating plant, and an oil refining company. Because of limited local private capital, GEDA requested the Guam Legislature to authorize the issuance of a $45 million revenue bond. Proceeds from the bond sales would be used solely to purchase mortgages insured by Federal and other government entities. By doing so, this would ease the limitation of funds earmarked for mortgage purchases by FNMA of approximately $11 million for Guam. The revenue bond measure was passed by the Legislature in June 1969, hut has yet to be acted upon by the Governor. If approved with a commitment to purchase by GEDA, local banks would • extend an interim financing for construction of needed facilities. These mortgages would eventually be sold to GEDA, thus easing out the tight money situation. The Guam Legislature approved two appropriations for the benefit of bona fide farmers. One was $100,000 for agricultural loan purposes and the 26

other, for $50,000, was for an agricultural expense insurance fund to cover bona fide farmers in case of disaster. With the tourist industry steadily increasing, four major hotels were un• der construction during the year. They are the Fujita Hotel, Guam Tokyu Hotel, Guam Hilton, and the Continental Hotel. The Fujita Hotel was completed in February 1969 and is now in operation. The Guam Tokyu is scheduled to open its doors by November 1969, the Continental by August 1970, and the Guam Hilton by 1971. Upon completion of these four hotel projects, there will be approximately 1,000 additional rooms available for the visitors. Imports during the year totaled 286,928 tons, 40,072 tons less than in the previous year. Exports totaled 75,105 tons, an increase of 3,603 tons over last year's total. Transshipments of cargo totaled 20,203 tons, a decrease of 6,368 tons compared with the previous year's total. Carriers servicing Guam included the American President Line; Crusader Shipping Co.; Daiwa Navigation Co.; Dominion Far East Line, Ltd.; Micronesian Interocean Line, Inc.; Pacific Far East Line; Pacific Navigation System, Inc.; Saipan Shipping Co.; Maria Dolores Line, Ltd.; Dillingham Shipping Line, Ltd.; and the Indo China Navigation System. The Department of Commerce's Economic Research Center initiated a program of standardization of data gathering, utilizing the latest techniques. Under this program, statistics are compiled on a monthly, quarterly, and annual basis. Computerized methods are used in compiling statistics, including the study of contract workers, income tax returns, and baggage declarations. The Standard International Trade Classification System also has been im-


plemented in recording of imports and exports to and from Guam. The 5-Year Socioeconomic Plan of Guam was completed by the Commerce Department during the year. It is a detailed analysis of business performance and income patterns, population trends, employment, education, and priority assignment of government expenditures .based on cost-output ratios. The department also continued its regular publications of the "Quarterly Review of BusinessConditions," "Facts About Doing Business on Guam," and the annual "Business Directory." The Department of Agriculture reported total local production of fruits and vegetables reached 2,230,493 pounds valued at $404,919. This represents an increase of 452,621 pounds ( valued at $95,249), or 24.1 percent over the previous year's production. Total annual egg production reached 1.3 million dozens for an average of 108,750 dozens a month. This is an increase of 23.6 percent over the 1968 rate of 88,000 dozens per month. The broiler production, however, decreased considerably from 69,000 pounds in fiscal 1968 to 36,000 in fiscal year 1969-a drop of 47.8 percent. The decrease in broiler output was attributed to the rather heavy emphasis in egg production. Up 15 percent over last year, there were an estimated 85,000 layers on Guam during fiscal year 1969. Projections indicate there will be some 100,000 layers by the -end of the 1969 calendar year. • In contrast to the increase in fruits, vegetables and egg production, there was a decline in the number of fulltime commercial and noncommercial farmers during fiscal year 1969. In the two previous years, there were approximately 250 full-time farmers while in the year under review the combined

number dropped to 192. Part-time farmers numbered 428 for this fiscal year, showing also a decrease of 197 compared to the preyious year's total of 625. The Guam Farmers Cooperative Association reported . an increase in business volume, averaging $32,132 a month in calendar year 1968. This was $2,132 a month more than was transacted in the preyious year. The increase was largely attributed to the step-up of sales to the military on contract basis. Major items sold were eggs, vegetables, feeds, fertilizers, and farm chemicals. Subsequent to the enactment of Public Law 9-117 by the Guam Legislature, the Department of Land Management transferred a portion of the Y-Sengsong area in Dededo to the Department of Agriculture for the administration of agricultural leases. Totaling an area of 265 hectares, this tract of land has been apportioned to 71 lease applicants at an average of 3.72 hectares each. The Agriculture's Extension ~ervice Division continued to disseminate proven and up-to-date agricultural information directly to the farmers through a variety of outdoor educational programs. During the year, it placed emphasis on poultry, swine, livestock, fruits, vegetables, and 4-H Club work. The Division cosponsored with the J & G Motor Co. and the local Ford dealer a fann equipment demonstration at a private farm in Talofofo, an agricultural community in the southern part of Guam. The affair was attended by approximately 100 farmers who were given demonstration in the use of attachments such as mold-board, disc-plow, spring toothharrow, digger, rotavator, and others. The Melon Fly Eradication Project assumed full operational status in 27


The Department of Agriculture has, as one of its major tasks, the effective control of crop pests and diseases. Photo shows a group of local farmers visiting the Agriculture's experimental farm to witness demonstration in pest control.

March 1969 with an initial release of 18 million sterile flies. Having gained proficiency in rearing techniques coupled wth improved physical and ecological conditions within the rearing facility, project personnel were able

28

to increase releases from about 18 to nearly 80 million sterile flies per month. Field observations have indicated favorable results, and it is anticipated that by the end of 1969 Guam should be free from the melon fly pest.


LABOR The shortage of manpower remains a chronic problem, particularly in the skilled and semiskilled categories. A total of 9,335 job openings were received by the Guam Employment Service from the Government of Guam, the Navy, Air Force and from private firms. Of the 9,335 job openings, 8,709 were filed for the importation of foreign nationals and for the extension of employment of alien contract workers. The majority of job vacancies occurred in the constructi@n category-a total of 4,656. Service activities were next in demand with a call for 1,682 workers. Professional, technical, and managerial-type job openings numbered 983. Labor clearances were issued to the Immigration and Naturalization Service for 1,606 Civil Service vacancies, and for 1,000 reconstruction and rehabilitation workers. Of the 170 petitions for alien workers, 97 were approved by the U.S. Labor Department's regional office in San Francisco, 38 were denied, and 35 were still pending. Applications for jobs during fiscal year 1969 totaled 1,516, or 199 less than the previous fiscal year. These figures, however, do not include the 1,736 applications for Government of Guam positions. The number of positions filled by job applicants totaled 687, a decrease of 172 compared to last year. It is noted that no placements were made in the farming, fishing, or forestry category, whereas 35 vacanices in agriculture were filled in fiscal year 68.

In the course of the year, 960 youths seeking employment were registered with the Guam Employment Service. These included high school graduates, school dropouts and youths from underprivileged families. GES offered employment counseling, placement services, testing and referrals ,,to federally financed vocational training programs such as the Neighborhood Youth Corps, the Manpower Development and Training Act program, and the local Apprenticeship Training Program. Fifty-seven school dropouts received special counseling services under the Neighborhood Youth Corps program with the objective of either encouraging them to return to school or of increasing their employability. Thirty-eight other youths from low-income families were given counseling services and part-time employment to enable them to remain in school until they graduated. In line with the summer program, 50 students were given financial assistance and training to improve their employment potentials. Some of them received remedial education and counseling in addition to work experience to encourage them to return to school after the summer vacation. During the school summer vacation, 130 students registered with GES for summer employment. Of this number, 55 were placed with Government of Guam, with Federal Government agencies and with private industry. Under the Youth Opportunity Campaign program, 30 students from low-income families were placed with the U.S. Air 29

370-503 0 - 70 - 5


Force and with the Federal Aviation Agency. More than 1,260 job referrals were submitted to the Community Action Agency by the various community centers. Of these, 598 were placed on income-generating jobs. Hmvever, 667 were not placed, due to delays in the recruitment process, the reluctance of some people to accept existing jobs, and in some cases to lack of transportation to and from work. Job applications from veterans totaled 113. Of this number, 12 were successfully placed in employment. Many veterans returned to their former employers while others chose to take up immediate employment. Under the terms of the Work Incentive Program (WIN) during 4 months of operation a total of 60 AFDC welfare recipients were referred by the Department of Public Health

30

and Social Services. Of these, 18 were in training, 15 were employed, and 22 cases remained pending. Five cases were terminated. . An Arts and Crafts program sponsored by the Community Action Agency led to the training of 54 adults who reached production stage. The total gross sales from their products amounted to $3,589 during the period between April l and June 30, 1969. Over 100 women participated in the sewing classes, and 46 were attending classes at the end of the fiscal year. The rehabilitation of substandard horn~ of poor families was another of CAA's major goals during the year. A total of 37 homes under\\'ent major repair, and 26 more were under repair or construction. Still on the list awaiting repairs were 144 homes. This long waiting list was due to the difficulty in obtaining building materials.


PROTECTION OF LIFE AND PROPERTY To provide a more effective and consolidated rehabilitation program for both juvenile and adult offenders, the Department of Corrections was established during the fiscal year under Public· Law 9-208 enacted by the Ninth Guam Legislature. Prior to this, the care and confinement of juvenile and adult offenders were handled by two separate departments-Public Safety and Public Health and Social Services. To effectuate the intent of Public Law 9-208, the Governor issued an executive order transferring the Penal Division (penitentiary) and juvenile institution to the newly created Department of Corrections. The Penal Division had been a part of the Department of Public Safety and the juvenile institution was under the administration of the Department of Public Health and Social Services. In line with the new concept in penalogy, the Department of Corrections places heavy emphasis on care and services conducive to the rehabilitation of the inmates. This may be achieved through a variety of programs for individual education, training in vocational skills and work experience. To carry out these functions, the Department of Corrections is composed of four divisions: Youth Correctional Facility, Clinical and Rehabilitation Services, Guam Penitentiary, and the Administrative Servces. The Youth Correctional Facility provides protective custody, treatment, and care, and programs designed to

assist juvenile offenders, both male and female, to overcome their antisocial attitudes and behaviors an_d return to society as useful citizens. The Guam Penitentiary provides confinement and rehabilitation services to adult offenders remanded to its custody by the District Court or Island Courts of Guam. Federal prisoners are confined in accordance with an agreement between the Government of Guam and the U.S. Department of Justice under a reimbursable cost arrangement. Treatment and rehabilitative programs are provided by the Division of Rehabilitation and Clinical Services for both adult ;md juvenile offenders. In addition to medical, social and psychological services, the Division also has programs designed to upgrade the inmates' educational and vocational capabilities. These programs include work release in which inmates eligible for parole or release within 6 months are allowed to engage in gainful employmenf; and the work furlough for inmates not eligible for release or parole within 6 months in which they are given "on-the-job training" in carpentry, masonry, painting, handicraft, cabinetmaking, etc. In addition, the Division provides vocational and academic instruction programs. At the time of transfer to the Department of Corrections, the penitentiary had 39 inmates in custody. After the transfer in November 1968 to the end of the fiscal year under review, it

31


111,1 I II $. ■

,.

Assistance is provided by personnel of the Department of Public Safety whenever high government or military officials visit the civilian community. Shown above, Secretary of the Interior Walter-J. Hickel is greeted by a police security officer as he arrives to address the Guam Legislature during a·visit to the territory early in May 1969.

received 76 additional inmates. How- totaled 1,617. This brings to 6,871 the ever, 65 of them were released during total number of firearms permanently the year, including 40 who served their registered with the po~ice department. full sentences. Of this number 1,500 are pistols, 1,313 From October 1, 1968 to June 30, revolvers, 1,550 shotguns, 2,348 rifles, 1969, the department's clinical section and 160 carbines. Police clearances processed 94 juvenile cases. Within this processed for other agencies of the local period, 78 were admitted into custody and Federal governments totaled 6,726. for varying length of time. For the first time in 5 years, the The Department of Public Safety numbe;· of traffic accidents decreased handled 10,585 cases during the fiscal but, conversely, the number of traffic year, of whlch 7,556 required specific fatalities continued to rise. Traffic offiinvestigations. There were 1,514 cases cers investigated 1,830 accidents durprocessed and transmitted to proper ing the year. This is 120 or 6 percent authorities for action, including 1,231 less than the previous year's figure of to the Attorney General's Office, 146 . 1,950. to the Juvenile Court, 109 to the miliThe traffic fatalities, however, rose tary authorities, and 28 to the U.S. from 23 in fiscal year l 968 to 36 in fiscal attorney's office. year 1969. The number of persons inFirearms registered during the year jured, however, was 613, a decrease of 32


30 compared to the previous year's total. Patrol officers issued 8,131 citations for moving violations as well as 4,441 for nonhazardous violations and 149 warning citations. The number of driver's licenses issued during the year totaled 11,447, and the Vehicle Safety Inspection Station conducted inspecti.ons of 38,162 vehicles. A slight increase was recorded during the year in the number of criminal offenses as compared to the previous year. A total of 4,262 criminal offenses were recorded in fiscal year 1969, an increase of only two over last year's figure. Of these, 1,596 were major offenses, including murder, manslaughter, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, and theft. Police de.tectives solved 1,661 criminal cases during the year including

401 cases or 24 percent involving juveniles. Civilian adults also figured in 988 cases or 59 percent, and military personnel 272 or 17 percent. Of the 1,521 persons arrested, 369 were juveniles, 903 civilian adults, and 249 military personnel who were referred to the Attorney General's Office, the Juvenile Court, and military authorities for prosecution. Additionally, 415 persons who were involved in criminal offenses but not arrested were similarly referred to proper authorities for prosecution. There was a substantial increase in the number of fires occurring during the year. Of the 914 recorded, 64 were house fires, 622 grass and brush fires, 65 auto fires, four equipment fires, and 159 miscellaneous fires. Fire losses amounted to $346,225 and property saved was valued at $3,510,537.

Fire Division personnel of the Department of Public Safety attended advanced First Aid training course offered by Guam Memorial Hospital, the only civilian hospital on the island.

33


In an effort to stem the rise in marital relations cases ( including 123 crime, the Department of Public divorces, 19 separations and 19 annulSafety established two new police dis- ments), 54 land registration cases, and trict stations, each staffed with a super- 172 special proceedings that. included visor and five officers, and also 78 civil marriages. The Juvenile Court heard 158 embarked on a people-to-people patrol system. Under this system, police offi- juvenile delinquent cases and 141 cers were deployed to various villages juvenile special proceedings, of which and business areas around the clock so 118 were for adoptions. they could respond immediately when During the year, a total of 505 claims were also filed in the Small needed. A closer liaison also has been estab- Claims Court, of which 398 were dislished with the Attorney General's posed of. Of this number, 168 were Office by assigning a detective to work granted and 236 dismissed. During the year under review, the full-time with the Attorney General. Such arrangement has resulted in Territorial Parole Board received 20 expediting many police reports needed parole applications. Eleven paroles were granted and nine denied. There for prosecution. Closer contacts also have been initi- were also three parole violations and ated with school officials for the ex- five parolees received official discharge. In order for Guam to take part in change of information concerning problems of students. Likewise, closer the Federal Omnibus Crime Control cooperation with military and Federal and Safe Streets Act of 1968, the Guam law-enforcement agencies has been Law Enforcement Planning Agency established, with encouraging results. \Vasformed during the year. This agenThe District Court of Guam heard cy functions under the Department of 160 civil cases and five admiralty, three Law and is headed by an administrator. A total of 526 cases were filed in the bankruptcy, and 34 criminal cases. District, Island, and .Police courts by There were 23 trials by jury. Naturalization petitions filed in Dis- the Department of Law. Twenty-nine trict Court during the year totaled 412. of the cases were filed in the District Of these, 368 were granted, 10 with- Court. of which 10 resulted in convicdrawn or denied and five transferred tions by the court, six by the jury, and three \\'ere acquitted by the jury. There from this court. Three appeals--one \\'ere also three dismissals and t\\'0 civil and two criminal cases-were heard by the appellate division of the appeals. In the Island Court, 468 cases were court. The Island Court disposed of 415 filed. Of these, 241 cases resulted in criminal cases during the year. This conviction by the court and 10 by the represents an increase of 81 cases over jury. In addition, 17 were acquitted last year's total of 334. Of the cases and 102 were dismissed. Twenty-nine disposed of this year, 298 resulted in cases \\'ere also filed in the Police Court, convictions, 23 acquittals and 72 dis- of which 15 \1·ereconvictions and four missals. A total of 557 civil cases were dismissals. Other activities during the year infiled during the year, 201 less than the preceding year, and 506 were disposed duded 14 tax cases, several of which of. \\'ere appealed; 46 land registration In other actions, the Island Court cases reviewed; a number of land condisposed of 78 probate cases, 161 demnation cases processed, mostly in 34


Closer cooperation between the Government and milita.ry law-enforcement agencies was seen during the year, with encouraging results. An officer of the Air Force's Office of Special Investigations at Andersen AFB is shown presenting a certificate of appreciation to Captain Henry F. Taitano, commander of the Investigation Division, Department of Public Safety. Taitano was cited for extraordinary service to the Air Force. 0

connection with projects under the Guam Rehabilitation Act; and 67 bills were drafted for submission to the Legislature by the administration. The Port Security, a division under the Department of Commerce, inspected 11,993 aircraft and 563 ships, and processed 205,362 passengers and crew members during the year. They also examined a total of 466,287 pieces of baggage, 5,816 postal packages, 26,820 airway bills and 1,570,776 pounds of fruits and vegetables from foreign ports. Plant and animal cases handled by Port Security inspectors totaled 1,688. They also handled 138 cases involving clru~s and medicine as well as 455 cases

covered under the Foreign Assets Control Regulations. In addition, Port Security officers enforce applicable provisions of Customs, U.S. Tariff Schedule, Federal Contr~band Seizure Act, Foreign Assets Control Regulations of the U.S. Treasury Department, Plant and Animal quarantine Regulations of both Guam and the U.S. Department of Commerce as well as Federal laws concerning arms, ammunition, and implements of war, U.S. Gun Control Act of 1968, Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, Public Health Quarantine Regulations, and Guam Customs Regulations. The Office of Civil Defense located

35


The Office of Civil Defense conducted, among other th.ings, training courses in First Aid, Medical Selfaid, and Radiological Monitoring during the year. A Civil Defense staff instructor explains the techniques of radiological monitoring to a group of police officers during one of the CD training sessions.

approximately 145 resident-type shelters and identified 11 public typhoon shelters during the year. A team of shelter engineers from the U.S. visited Guam to determine the capabilities of several potential fallout shelters for the purpose of stocking them with Federal supp\ies. Report of the survey was forthcoming. Nineteen monitoring stations have been designated in various villages, and radiological defense equipment furnished by the U.S. Civil Defense's regional office have been received.

36

Training of local residents in various medical self-help and first aid techniques continued during the year. Thirty-nine Public Safety officers al.so completed a course of instruction given by the local CD in Radiological Monitoring. The Civil Defense office went on alert 20 times during the year as the territory was threatened by high winds. Most of the storms, ho·wever, veered away from the island and caused no damage or injury.


PARKS AND RECREATION Fiscal year 1969 marked another major development in the area of outdoor recreation with the beginning of construction of a recreational park in Agana, the Island's capital. The overall plan includes the building of a $250,000 olympic-size swimming pool, boating facilities, tennis, and basketball courts, baseball fields, bath house, and other 'recreational facilities. The bepartment of Land Management, under its Parks and Recreation Resources Dh,ision, developed and maintained 43 sites. These include a Botanical Garden, as well as parks in Dededo, Agat-Sumay, and Merizo Bay. It also includes the Guam Memorial Hospital Park, Government House Park, Skinner Plaza, Paseo De Susana ( a major recreational and sports facilities), Talofofo Beach, Nimitz Beach, Ipao Beach and Park, and the historic Plaza De Espana in Agana. During the year, Land Management maintained 294.4 acres of public grounds used for parks and recreational purposes at an average cost of $393 per· acre. A total of 470 hunting licenses was issued by the Fish and Wildlife Division, Department of Agriculture, during the year. The hunters were provided with one bird, a year-long feral pig, and two deer hunting seasons. The Air Force boosted the hunting activities by allowing both civilians and military personnel to participate in special regulated deer hunts within

the Andersen base limits, where the deer thrived all year long. Initiated in August 1968, the weekend hunts provided the hunters with over 3,000-man hours of recreation in which 118 deer were bagged by the end of the fiscal year. These special hunts, held on the last Saturday and Sunday of each month, were scheduled to continue. The monthly deer counts conducted in the base area indicated a large deer population near the runways. Water-oriented recreational activities increased steadily, with 355 power boats registered during the year with the U.S. Coast Guard on Guam. A South American fresh water game fish called Tucunare, introduced into the 175-acre Fena Lake in F~ruary 1968, have spawned and appeared to be firmly established in the lake. By November 1968, at least three distinct sizesof Tucunare were seen in the lake and spillway catchment basin. To develop the fresh water game fishing potential of the island, young Tucunare were also transplanted into one of the large stream systems in the southcentral part of the island. The Guam Recreation Commission, the island's major sports activity organizer for the civilian community, sponsored 14 leagues during the year. These activities attracted 4,046 participants, of which about 70 percent were males and females between the ages of 13 and 17. The leagues included baseball, softball, volleyball, tennis, and basketball. They were conducted at 37


certain intervals to provide the partici- provement Club, a nonprofit organizapants and spectators a year-round tion which holds a franchise from the schedule of activities. National Little League Association. The majority of the sports events The league is conducted in the civilian were held at the Paseo De Susana, a community, exclusive of the military recreation complex developed by the which have their own organized little government more than a decade ago. leagues. • It consists of a baseball diamond with For the third consecutive year, the bleachers that can accommodate an Sinajana CIC sent a team to Japan estimated 3,000 fans, a softball field, to compete in the Far East Little a basketball court, a tennis court and League Regional Tournament. The a building to accommodate ping pong winner of this tournament went on to tables and other similar indoor sports. compete in the Little League World All of these facilities are equipped with Series held annually at Williamsport, lights for nighttime activities. A park- Pa. ing area with a capacity of about 3,000 Under the supervision of the Guam cars is also provided. Boxing Commission, a part of the Chief In addition to the Paseo, the ComCommissioner's Office, 11 professional mission maintained 13 other basketball courts and five ballparks scattered boxing contests ,-vereheld -in the territhroughout the island. These facilities tory during the year. Most of the were also used for activities sponsored boxers, some with the world ratings, by the Commission and individual were imported from various places such as Japan, Korea, the Philippines, Mexcommunities. The island's little league is sponsored ico, and the United States by local annually by the Sinajana Civic Im- promoters.

38


SELECTIVESERVICE SYSTEM Estab~ished on Guam in 1951, the local Selective Service System's primary function is the procurement of manpower for the Armed Forces. It has an administration staff of six and two boards responsible for the registration, classification, selection, and delivery of registrants for induction. In addition, the local boards assist in recruiting services for both Regular and Reserve, grant deferments to persons attending colleges, universities, and apprenticeship programs, maintain an inventory of manpower resources and report to the Reserve Components on the availability of Standby Reservists. During fiscal year 1969, the local Selective Service System processed and delivered 171 registrants for induction into the Armed Forces. This brings to 2,364 the total number of registrants who have been inducted into the Army,

Navy, and Marine Corps since January 1952. As of June 1969, the territory has a total of 17,022 Selective Service registrants. These include 2,790 presently serving in the Armed Forces, 621 in classes I-A and I-A-O, 1,166 qualified for military service only in time of war or national emergency, and 5,088 who were over the age of liability for military service. There were also three college statutory deferments, 307 high school statutory deferments, 29 occupational deferments other than agriculture and student, 191 deferments for apprenticeship programs, 185 students deferments, and 731 deferments due to extreme hardships or because the registrants have children. Registrants not qualified for any military service totaled 1,169.

39



APPENDIX

A GOVERNMENT OF GUAM-GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT FISCAL YEAR 1969 General Government: Legislature ................................................. Washington Representative ................................... Judiciary .................................................. Governor's Office ........................................... Bureau of Budget. .......................................... Bureau of Management ...................................... Commissioners of Guam ...................................... Civil Service Commission ................................. Boards and Commission ...................................... Department of Finance ....................................... Department of Law ......................................... Labor and Personnel . . ...................................... Department of Public Works .................................. Department of Land Management ............................. Department of Administration ................................ Department of Revenue and Taxation ......................... Contribution to Retirement Fund ............................. Hospital Insurance .......................................... Off island Travel and Transportation ........................... Local Transportation (P.W. Support) .......................... Employee Housing (P.W. Support) ............................ Maintenance of Buildings (P.W. Support) ...................... Group Life Insurance ........................................

. . . . . . . ,., .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$914,362.87 81,503. 76 318,728.35 216, 780. 55 60,546.23 70,086. 15 248,555.99 27, 912. 14 2,083.25 257,063.54 207,298.06 32,089.34 649,314. 53 159,938.79 672,440.01 543,881. 20 339,978.87 15,810. 82 116, 718. 00 95,577.40 29,776.96 254,955.70 12, 722. 91

Total General Government .................................

.

5,328,125.42

Public Safety: Department of Public Safety .................................. Department of Correction .................................... Juvenile Correctional Institution .............................. Probation and Parole ........................................ Civil Defense ............................................... Building Permit and Inspection (P.W. Support) ................. Weights and Measure-Commerce ............................. Insurance and Securities ..................................... Contribution to Retirement Fund ............................. Hospital Insurance .......................................... Offisland Travel and Transportation ........................... Local Transportation (P.W. Support) .......................... Maintenance of Building (P.W. Support) .......................

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

2, 227, 800. 18 462,729.25 48,828.02 40,837. 16 36,229.36 100,243.33 I, 198. 15 704. 75 214,961. 63 8,648.17 12, 323. 10 68,439.45 24,990.60

Total Public Safety.........................................

3,247,933. 15

41


GOVERNMENT OF GUAM-GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT FISCAL YEAR 1969-Continued Highways: Highways, Streets Maintenance and Drainage Control. .......... Street Lighting ............................................. Contribution to Retirement Fund ... •.......................... Hospital Insurance .......................................... Local Transportation ........................................ Total Highways ............................................ Sanitation and Waste Removal: Garbage and Trash Collection ................................ Contribution to Retirement Fund ............................. Hospital Insurance .......................................... Local Transportation ........................................ Total Sanitation and Waste Removal. .......................

$ 394, 314. 96

. . . . .

57, 694. 51 31, 4-06.22 l, 454. 94 163,950. 19

.

648,820.82

. . . .

213, 796. 86 16,882. 12 2,108.88 32,009.99

.

264,797.85

Hospital: General Administration ...................................... Professional Services ......................................... Housekeeping and Maintenance ............................... Contribution to Retirement Fund ............................. Hospital Insurance .......................................... Offisland Travel and Transportation ........................... Local Transportation (P.W. Support) .......................... Employee Housing (P.W. Support) ............................

. . . . . . . .

Total Hospital ............................................

.

4, 166,864. 27

. . . . . . . . .

149,298.74 96,982.55 I, 14-0,072. 57 46,345.92 2,001.28 50,728.90 15,868.33 5,048.67 4,581.56

.

l, 510,928.52

. . . . . . . . .

78,415.38 I, 268,457. 50 116,074.22 17,132.74 20,016.91 I, 079. 70 15,216.45 4,092.07 59,235.39

.

I, 579, 756. 36

Conservation of Health: General Administration ....... '. .............................. Regulation and Inspection .................................... Public Health Services ....................................... Contribution to Retirement Fund ............................. Hospital Insurance .......................................... Offisland Travel and Transportation ........................... Local Transportation (P.W. Support) .......................... Employee Housing (P.W. Support) ............................ Maintenance of Building (P.W. Support) ....................... Total Conservation of Health ..................... Social Services : General Supervision ................... : ..................... Public Assistance ............................................ Community Services ......................................... Judicare ................................................... Contribution to Retirement Fund ............................. Hospital Insurance .......................................... Offisland Travel and Transportation ........................... Local T~a:nsportati~n (P.W. S1;1ppcrt).................. Economic Opportumty Comm1SS1on ............................ Total Social Services .......................................

42

.' .........

, .......

392,796.55 2,891,310. 16 680,563.93 151,555.62 7,505.57 29, 84-0.87 3,495.84 9,795.73

------


GOVERNMENT OF GUAM-GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT FISCAL· YEAR 1969---Continued Public Schools: Central Administration ...................................... Elementary Schools .......................................... Secondary Schools........................................... Vocational Rehabilitation .................................... Vocational Education ........................................ University of Guam ......................................... Contribution to Retirement Fund ............................. Hospital Insurance .......................................... Offisland Travel and Transportation ........................... School Lunch Fund ......................................... Scholarship and Student Loan Fund ........................... Local Transportation (P.W. Support) .......................... Employee Housing (P.W. Support) ............................ Maintenance of Building (P.W. Support) .......................

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sl, 119,347.82 5,437, 118. 21 3, 989, 588. 20 367,620.76 623,620.52 2,283,220.35 467,566.97 27,630.74 l, 111, 156. 99 126,427.00 180,105.00 885,352.97 747,663.83 294,612.06

Total Public Schools ........................................

17,661,031.42

Public Library: Guam Public Library......................................... Contribution to Retirement Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hospital Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Offisland Travel and Transportation... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local Transportation (P.W. Support)........................... Maintenance of Building (P.W. Support)........................ Total Public Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Recreation: Recreation Commission ...................................... Museum.: ................................................. Parks and Grounds .......................................... Contribution to Retirement Fund .............................. Hospital Insurance .......................................... Local Transportation (P.W. Support) .......................... Maintenance of Building (P.W. Support) ....................... , Total Recreation .......................................... Protection and Development of Resources: Department of Agriculture .................................... Department of Commerce .................................... Land Administration and Survey .............................. Department of Labor ........................................ Contribution to Retirement Fund .............................. Hospital Insurance .......................................... Offisland Travel and Transportation ........................... Local Transportation (P.W. Support) .......................... Employee Housing (P.W. Support) ............................ Maintenance of Building (P.W. Support) ....................... Total Protection and Development of Resources ...............

160,814.27 5, 722. 52 220. 66 I, 100. 30 99. 19 6,598.65

------

174, 555. 59

. . . . . . .

40,451.42 5,411.14 121,357.02 8,850.68 448.40 1,007.78 6,625.42

.

184, 151. 86

. . . . . . . . . .

499,515.35 349,566.27 • 170,500.19 77,673.96 64,596.31 3,174.20 23,998.52 36,546.42 6,909.48 6,488.38

.

I, 238,969.08

43


GOVERNMENT OF GUAM-GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT FISCAL YEAR 1969-Continued Utilities and Other Enterprises: Airport Terminal. ........................................... Contribution to Retirement Fund .............................. Hospital Insurance .......................................... Offisland Travel and Transportation ........................... Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority .................. Guam Economic Development Authority ....................... Guam Housing Corporation .................................. Total Utilities and other Enterprises .......................... Debt Service: Installment Payments-Guam

Rehabilitation Project. ...........

. . . . . . .

S!42,020. 19 6,523.06 332. 76 I, 097. 10 I, 072. 00 64,800.45 200,000.00

.

415,845.56 986,918.09

.

Others: ESEA-Title I .............................................. . ESEA-Title III. ........................................... . ESEA-Title VI-A .......................................... . Public Law 85-926-Professional Personnel-Education of Handicapped Children .......................................... . Vocational Rehabilitation-Statewide Planning .................. . Public Law 88--452-Follow thru State Technical Assistance. , .... . HEA-1965-Title I ........................................ . II-A ..................................... . HEA-1965-Title HEA-1965-Title 11-B..................................... . HEA-1965-Titl~ III. ...................................... . HEA-1965-Title V, Part (s)D .............................. . EOA-1964---'-Title II ....................................... . State Technical Services ...................................... . Federal Agricultural Extension Services ........................ . Total Others ............................................. Capital Improvements and Other Projects .. : .......................... Grand Total. ..............................................

44

23,710.03 232,045.60 19,433.91 13,883.50 46,876.95 4, 223. 11 8,229.75 2,655.25 22,586.04 56,526.10 10,000.00 10,679.23 16,630.25 8, 781. 82

.

476,261. 54

.

5, 763, I 75. 02 43,648, 134. 55


GOVERNMENT OF GUAM-GENERAL FUND REVENUE STATEMENT FISCAL YEAR 1969 Taxes-Local: Income Tax .................................................. . $17,195,746 Gross Receipts ................................................ . 6,414,680 Alcoholic Beverages ........................................... . 556,395 Liquid Fuel. ................................................. . 1,326,987 Tobacco ..................................................... . 250,866 Excise and Admission .......................................... . 150,339 Vehicle Transfer .............................................. . 129, 135 Used Tax .................................................... . 59, 108 Real l?roperty ................................................ . I, 058, 614 Others ....................................................... . 21, 574 Licenses and Permits: Vehicle Registration ........................................... . 633, 798 Vehicle Operators ............................................. . 66,812 Business...................................................... . 352,457 Others ....................................................... . 57,695 Fines and Forfeits ............................................. . 207,021 Used of Money and Property: 186,587 Interest ......................... ••• •. •••••• •••••· •· •· · · • · · · · · · Rents ........................................................ . 621, 519 Revenues From Other Agency: . Income Tax Collected by U.S. Agency ........................... . 8,874,476 31, 292 Immigration Fees ............................................. . Charges for Current Services: General Government .......................................... . 47,816 Public Safety ................................................. . 43,148 3,159 Public Works ................................................. . I, 555,378 Hospital ..................................................... . Public Health ................................................. . 5,794 228,518 Education .................................................... . 1,325 Library .................................................. , ... . 25, 317 Agriculture ................................................... . 37,284 Land Management ............................................ . Commerce ................................................... . 13, 151 Other Revenues: 14,356 Sales and Compensation . . . . ................................... . 98,400 Miscellaneous ................................................. . Grants-in-Aid: I, 233,824 School Operation and Maintenance .............................. . 24,914 Expansion and Development of Education ........................ . 114,605 Vocational Education .......................................... . 238,920 Crippled Children Services ..................................... . 95,550 Vocational Rehabilitation ...................................... . Public Health Services ......................................... . 6IO, 981 39,302 Professional Personnel in the Education of Handicapped Children .... . 155,018 Maternal Aid Child Health Services ............................. . 559,325 Public Assistance .............................................. . 22,256 Fish and Wildlife Restoration ................................... . 19,056 Civil Defense ................................................. . 302,565 Elementary and Secondary Education ............................ . 22,348 Manpower Training and Development Program ................... . 26,379 Basic Adult Education ......................................... . 45,730 Upward Bound ............................................... . 46, 187 Work Study Program .......................................... . Subtotal ...............................................

, ... - 43,825,707

45


GOVERNMENT OF GUAM-GENERAL FUND REVENUE STATEMENT FISCAL YEAR 1969-Continued Appropriated Receipts: MDTA-Stenographer ......................................... . . ESEA-Title I.. .............................................. ESEA-Title III ............................................. .. ESEA-Title VI-A ............................................ . . Public Law 88-452-Follow through State Technical Assistance ..... . Appropriated receipts: Public Law 85-926-Education of Handicapped Children .......... . VEA-1963 ............. : .................................... . Public Law 81-815-SChool Construction ......................... . I. ......................................... . HEA-1965-Title HEA-1965-Title III ......................................... . HEA-1965-Title V, Part (s)D ................................ . . HEFA-Title I. .............................................. NDEA-English for Speakers of Other Languages ................. . EOA-1964-Title II ......................................... . Nurses Training Act-1964 ..................................... . State Technical Services Act-1965 .............................. . National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities .............. . National Endowment for the Arts ............................... . Library Services and Construction Act-Title II ................... . Commercial Fisheries Research and Development Act. ............. , Federal Agriculture Extension Services ........................... . P.H.S. Act-Title VI-Hospital and Medical Facilities ............. . Older Americans .............................................. . Private Sources ............................................... . Total ...................•.

·. · • • · · · • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Grand Total. ...............................................

46

.

$17,847 28,876 229,932 60,000 4,927 50,000 54,000 903, 710 33,534 150,000 10,000 21,005 3,960 48,374 318, 179 25,000 4,400 30,909 58,324 20,500 15,000 328,942 73,000 17, 856 2,508,275 46,333,982


APPENDIX B GENERAL TAXES DIVISION STATISTICAL INFORMATION [Figures ln parentheses notes decrease] Total

Fiscal Year 1068

Total

Fiscal Year 1960

Increase or dccreaso

A. Taxpayer assistance and processing branch: I . Tax assessed: a. Income tax .............. . $14,245,577. 93 $18,585,740.24 $4,340, 162. 31 9,095,646.74 I, 041, 107. 05 b. Business privilege tax ..... . 8,054,539.69 c. Use tax ................. . 47,692.81 55,552. 71 7,859.90 54, 103. 19 (8, 529. 28) d. Admission and excise tax .. . 62,632.47 Total. .................

22,410,442. 90

2. Tax collected: a. Income tax ............... b. Business privilege tax ...... c. Use tax .................. d.Excise and admission tax ....

13,755,491.46 7,996,440. 77 45,699. 79 65,928. 16

17,341,463.00 8, 539, 133. 00 67,578.00 215,353.00

3, 585, 972. 00 542,692.00 21,878.00 149,425. 00

Total. .................

21,863,560. 18

26, 163, 527. 00

4, 299, 967. 00

3. Delinquent tax assessed: a. Income tax ............... b. Business privilege tax ....... c. Use tax .................. d. Admission and excise tax ...

110, 282. 21 34,930.31 0 0

254,608.01 54,368.22 369. 24 0

144,325.80 19,437.91 369. 24 0

Total. .................

145,212.52

309,245.47

164, 132. 95

4. Refunds paid: a. Income tax ............... b. Business privilege tax ...... c. Use tax .................. d. Admission and exicse tax ... Total. .................. c. Number of checks issued ... 5. Abatement: a. Income tax ............... b. Business privilege tax ....... c. Use tax .................. d. Admission and excise tax ... Total ..................

27, 791, 042. 88 5, 380, 599. 98

2, 081, 708. 65 250,958.27 0 0

2, 101, 196. 20 292,743.78 28. 50 0

29,487.55 41,785.51 28.50 0

2,332,666.92

2, 393, 968. 48

71, 301. 56

16,648

12, 900

(3,748)

$554, 182. 76 67,635.54 0 0

$400,184.61 90,871.05 8. 15 I. 00

$(153,998. 15) 23,235.51 8. 15 I. 00

621, 818. 30

491,064. 81

(130,753.49)

• 47


GENERAL TAXES DIVISION STATISTICAL INFORMATION-Continued [Figures in parentheses notes decrease] Total Fiscal Year 1968

A. Taxpayer assistance and processing branch-Continued 6. Inactivation: a. Income tax ............... b. Business privilege tax ...... c. Use tax ................... d. Admission and excise tax ... Total ..................

Sl 15,568. 94 0 0 0 115,568. 94

Total Fiscal Year 1960

Increase or decrease

$75,220.65 122. 91 0 0

S( 40, 348. 29) 122. 91 0 0

75,343.56

( 40, 225. 38)

7. Receivable balance: a. FICA ................... b. Income tax ............... c. Business privilege tax ...... d. Use tax .................. c. Admission and excise tax ...

242,036.33 1,515,415. 64 257,980.38 5,661.59 298.50

277,829.27 1, 556, 392. 20 397,366.40 1,741.45 368. 70

35,792.94 40,976.56 139,386.02 (3,920.14) 70. 20

Total. .................

2, 021, 392. 44

2,233,698.02

212,305.58

5, 194 $1, 922, 283. 65

543 $50,987.09

I, 534 $748,543.42

16 $71,840.08

8. Delinquent taxes referred to DAR branch: a. Income: Accounts .............. Tax ................... b. Business Privilege: Accounts ...............

Tax ...................

4,651 $1,871,296.56 1,550 $676, 703. 34

9. Delinquent returns refen-cd: a. Income tax ............... b. Business privilege tax ...... c. Use tax .................. d. Admission and excise tax ...

0 0 45 0

2,843 I, 968 708 0

2,843 1,968 663 0

Total. .................

45

5,519

5,474

B. Delinquent accounts and returns branch: I. Documents processed ......... • 2. Collections .................. 3. Delinquent receivable balance .................. C. Tax Audit Branch: 1. Returns inventory ... 2. Returns audited ............. 3. Other documents processed ... 4. Audit assessments....... 5. Less refunds ................ 6. Net assessment ..............

48

9, 530· $1,946,469. 61

11, 587 $2, 142,603. 27

2,057 $196,133.66

970,502. 71

1,464,351. 12

493,848.41

8,780 3, 712 3,751 $907, 815. 66 119, 762. 91

8,495 2,952 I, 809 $917,339.98 73, 026. 13

(285) (760) ( I, 942) $9,524. 32 (46,736.78)

788,052.75

844,313.85

56, 261. JO


NUMBER OF LAND AND BUILDINGS ASSESSED FOR THE YEARS 1966 1967 AND 1968 ' '

Municipality

1966

1967

1968

Number of land and buildings assessed

Number of land and buildings assessed

Number of land and buildings assessed

Land

Agana ........... Agat ............ Asan ... , ........ Barrigada ........ Dededo .......... Inarajan ......... Machanao ....... Merizo .......... Piti ............. Sinajana ......... Sumay ........... Talofofo ......... Umatac .......... Yigo ............ Yona ............ Total. .....

Buildings

Total

Land

Buildings

I, 762 400 2,072 1,477 437 1,261 I, 012 2,273 I, 398 I, 071 464 827 477 393 363 I, 518 I, 349 2,867 I, 728 I, 457 2,631 2,275 4,906 3,025 2,366 517 283 800 564 305 47 43 30 73 30 460 268 728 468 275 298 257 555 312 280 2,369 2, 144 4,513 2,538 2, 159 5 7 12 5 7 327 253 308 234 542 171 114 170 115 285 525 317 394 294 688 518 390 908 547 407 12, 628

9,421 22,049 13, 609

Total

I, 914 2,469 870 3, 185 5,391 869 77 743 592 4,697 12 580 285 842 954

Land

Buildings

1,466 1,530 483 I, 785 3,451 563 131 480 330 2,663 4 335 171 567 593

444 I, 281 583 I, 686 2,990 317 47 • 285 290 2,487 7 319 117 336 423

Total

I, 910 2,811 1,066 3,471 6,441 880 178 765 620 5, 150 11 654 288 903 I, 016

9,871 23,480 14,552 11, 612 26,164

49


DISTRIBUTION OF REAL ESTATE ASSESSMENTS AND TAXES BY MUNICIPALITY Municipality Agana ....... Agat........ Asan........ Barrigada.... Dededo .. :... Inarajan.. . . . Machanao... Merizo...... Piti. . . . . . . . . Sinajana. . . . . Sumay . . . . . . Talofofo. . . . . Umatac..... Yigo........ Yona... . . . . . Total..

1

Assessments

Taxes

$6,254,630 2,443,870 I, 241,480 4,543, 110 13,656, 160 849, 160 1 229, 710 374,200 I, 082, 300 7,441,090 25, 480 842, 500 119,480 I, 163,570 I, 466, 940

$187,203.70 73,316. lO 37,244.40 136,293.30 409,684.80 25,474.80 6,755.50 11,226.00 32,469.00 223,232.70 764.40 25,275.00 3,584.40 34,907.10 44,008.20

41,733,680

l, 251,439.40

1 $41,705,130 is computed at 3 percent tax rate and $28,550 is computed at only l percent tax rate for the years 1961 or prior which are escaped assessments.

COMPARATIVE INCREASE OF LAND PARCEL AND BUILDING ASSESSMENTS1967 AND 1968

Land parcels ......................... Number of buildings ................... Land assessments...................... Building assessments...................

50

. . . .

1967

Increase

1968

13,609 9,871 $18,707,380 18,528,940

943 l, 741 $955,750 3,541, 610

14,552 11,612 $19,663, 130 22,070,550


APPENDIX C. FISCAL YEAR 1969 EXPENDITURE Departments

REPORT..LGRANTS FederaV

AND AIDS

Local

Total

/

Agriculture ........................... Civil Defense ......................... Economic Opportunity Commission ...... Education ............................ Guam Employment Service ............. Public Library ........................ Public Health and Social Services ....... Land Management .................... Guam Economic Development Authority Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority .......................... Attorney General's Office .............. Totall .......................... Rehabilitation Act Projects .............. Grand total. .................... 1

. $62,796.32 . 19, 111. 00 . 962,448.38 . 4, 751, 550. 00 99,491.00 . 55,499.00 . . I, 580, 340. 02 91,253.00 . 25,500.00 .. . .

342,218.47 4,280.00

$63,548.90 21, 611. 00 261,608.69 2,013,807.00 0 69,906.00 I, 277, 646. 57 91,253. 00 25,697.00 378,457.68 0

$7,994,487. 19 4,203,535. 84 4,590,479. 34

7, 364, 531. 78

12, 584,966. 53 11,568,067.62

$126,345.22 40,722.00 I, 224,057. 07 6,765,357.00 99,491. 00 125,405.00 2, 857, 986. 59 182,506.00 51, 197. 00 720,676. 15 4,280.00 12, 198,023.03 11,955,011. 12 24, 153,034. 15

Excluding expenditures under University of Guam.

51


APPENDIX

D STATISTICS

OF HOSPITAL

Admissions: General. ................... Newborn .................. Tuberculosis .............

. . .

Total excluding newborn ....

OPERATIONS-F,SCAL

5,763 I, 819 85 5,848

Discharges: General. ................... . Newborn .................. . Tuberculosis ................ . Deaths excluding newborn ... . Newbotn deaths ............ .

5,529 I, 791 116 148 23

Total excluding newborn ... .

5,793

Average daily admissions: General excluding newborn ... . General and tuberculosis ..... . Newborn .................. . Average daily discharges: General excluding newborn ... . General and tuberculosis ..... . Newborn .............. . Average daily census: General service excluding newborn ................. . General and tuberculosis ..... . Newborn .................. . Percentage of occupancy: General services (based on 202 beds) .................. . Tuberculosis (based on 35 beds) .................. . General and tuberculosis . (based on 237 beds) ....... Newborn (based on 32 bassinets) ................... . Premature ..................... . Stillbirth ....................... . 1

52

15.54 16.02 4.98 15. 15 15.87 4.96

YEAR 1969

Twins (sets) .................... Gross death rate ................ Maternal death rate ............. Infant death rate ................ Postoperative death rate ......... Autopsies (121 cases) ............ Tissue committee report .......... Sterilizations ................... Cesarean sections ( I 32 cases) ...... Outpatient visits: Cardiac .................... Dermatology ............... Diabetes ................... EENT ..................... Genitourinary .............. Gynecology ................ Medical ..... : ............. Neuropsychiatry ............ Orthopedic ................ Pediatric ................... Surgical ................... Plastic ..................... Dental. ....................

. 11 . 2.24 . . 04 . 1.3 . . 32 . 70. 76 . 100.00 . I . 7.26 . 486 . 42 . I, 349 . 137 620 . . I, 798 . 13, 100 . 31 . 27 . 6,089 . 13,555 8 . 4 .

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 246

129.50 151.53 19. 13 64. IO

62.96 63.94 59. 78 99 24

Medical Laboratory 1 Examinations performed during were as follows: Hematology ................ Biochemistry ................ Bacteriology ................ Parasitology ................ Urinalysis .................. Blood bank ................. Surgical pathology .......... Bone marrow ............... ECG ...................... Autopsy .................... Exfoliative cytology ..........

The Laboratory is directed by a Board Certified Pathologist.

the year . . . . . . . . . . .

35,391 16,500 33,724 2,516 11,027 21,324 I, 815 24 I, 869 187 562


APPENDIX E UNIVERSITY OF GUAM TABLE !.-ENROLLMENT

BREAKDOWN

[According to sex, class level, academic division, citizenship, admission status] Summer Classification

1968

Spring Fall 1968--69 1968--69

Sex: Male ............................... Female ............................. Class level: Freshman ........................... Sophomore .......................... Junior .............................. Senior .............................. Graduates ........... •................ Graduate schoQI..................... Academic division: Business administration ............... Education-P.E ...................... Fine arts ........................... Language and literature ............... Nursing program ..................... Science, math, and home economics .... Social sciences ....................... Others and undeclared ................ Citizenship: U.S. citizens ......................... Aliens .............................. Residents ........................... Nonresidents ........................ 1-20 students i ....................... Admission status: New enrollees (nontransfer) ............ Transferees .......................... 1

Total

268 375

689 785

615 698

I, 581 I, 858

241 91 113 94 17 87

745 191 147 151 94 145

595 200 135 139 195 49

I, 581 482 405 384 306 281

120 187 22 27 28 45 72 142

283 367 32 56 112 155 387

231 261 34 35 31 90 138 271

654 815 88 118 103 247 365 800

532 I JO 386 164 93

I, 228 279 691 534 219

I, 051 233 528 523 222

2,811 622 I, 605 I, 221 534

241 57

431 193

595 123

I, 267 373

44

Foreign students (including trust territory islanders).

53


TABLE IL-ENROLLMENT Summer 1968

BREAKDOWN

Fall 1968--69

Spring 1968--69 Grand total Full- Part- Total time time

Fulltime

Part- Total time

Grand Total. ..

806

434 I, 240

947 I, 191 2, 138 832 I, 120 1,942 5,320

On campus enrollment total. .......

648

212

894

Full- Part- Total time time

860

761 I, 655 766

676 I, 442 3,957

On campus: General. 466 177. 643 893 547 I, 440 756 High school group.... 2 2 4 8 8 • I Workshops-seminars: Special education. . . . . 15 15 ................................... Library .... : . . . . '38 38 TESL.......... 40 40 NDEA English ...... . 22 22 Bilingual elementary teachers....... 51 . . . . . . 51 ................................... Bilingµal.....:administrators and teachers... 28 28 ................................... Continuing education. 8 9 37 38 6 Navy apprentice program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 169 Police science ........................................... . 3

567 1, 323 3,406 3 4 16

Off campus enrollment: AAFA I III ...................... VII IV.... 21 133 CIRO., ......................... Palau..... . . . . . . 70 5 Ponape......... 8 38 Saipan................ 46 Truk. . . . . . . . . . . . 59 . . . . . . Off campus total. . . . . . . .

54

158

222

.

15 38 40 22

.

51

.

28 72

28 56 31

56 34

225 34

207 ·255 23 201 142 167 22 184 53 3 . 63 38 75 . ''.' ............................. 46 .................................... 46 28 28 8 21 59 ....................................

224 206 41

449 373 104 75 46 103 59

18 25 10

.

154

'.

380

53

430

483

56

444

29

500 I, 363


Degree A.A. B.A.

M.A. M.S.

TABLE III.-GRADUATES-MAY

31, 1969

Major areas

Male

Police science .......................... . Accounting ............................ . Art. .................................. . Business ................................ . Education-elementary .................. . Elementary-exceptional children ......... . • Education-secondary: Art ......................... ······· Business ......... •.................. . Science and math ................... . Social science ...................... . Language and literature ............. . Science and mathematics ................ . Social science .......................... . Language and literature ................ .'. History ................................ . Biology................................ . Total. .......................... .

Female

Total

I 0 0 13 10 0

17 2

0 0 0 I 0 8 9 3 2 I 48

0 5 0 3 4 0 5 I 0 0 45

0 I I

6

I I I 19 27 2

0 5 0 4 4 8 14 4 2 l

92

55


APPENDIX F COMPARA'FIVE

SUMMARY OF MAJOR STATISTICAL

EVENTS, 1967-68

Number .

Rate

Events 1967 1968

Percent 1967 1968 Percent of change of change•

Live birth ............................. 2, 509 2,512 +o. 12 Death . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 356 +4. 7 Neonatal death 1....................... 46 41 -10. 8 Infant death 1......................... 57 51 -10. 5 Maternal death 1.......... -. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 I -50.0 Marriage ........ , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 I 596 -0.8 Divorce. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 !i6 +16. 7 Illegitimate birth 1. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 25 I 262 +4.3

28.5 26.4 -7.4 3.8 3. 7 -2.6 18.3 16.3 -1. I 23.5 20. 3 -1. 4 0. 79 0.39 -50.6 3.9 6. 8 +74.4 0.5 0.6 .... ' .... 100. 0 104. 3 +1. 0

1

Per I ,000 live births. All other rates were based on the estimated island-wide population for 1967 and 1968 which were 88,128 and 95,000 respectively.

THE IO LEADING CAUSES OF DEATH-GUAM, Order

Cause

1st. . . . . . . . . . Diseases of the heart and blood vessels (420456)..................................... 2nd. . . . . . . . . Motor vehicle and all other accidental causes (E-800-962)............................... 3rd . . . . . . . . . Pneumonia, all types (49G-493) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4th. . . . . . . . . Malignant neoplasm, all sites ( 140-205). . . . . . . . 5th. . . . . . . . . Ill-defined diseases peculiar to early infancy and immaturity unqualified (773-776). . . . . . . . 6th. . . . . . . . . Other diseases of central nervous system ALS and Parkinson (350-356).. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7th ......... Cirrhosis of liver (581)... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8th. . . . . . . . . Vascular lesions affecting central nervous system (330-334)............................. 9th. . . . . . . . . Birth injuries, postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis (760-762)... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10th ........ Congenital malformation (750-759)........... All other causes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total.................................

1968 Number

Percent

94

2~.4

49 25 25

13. 8 7.0 7.0

16

4.5

16 13

4.5 3. 7

13

3. 7

12 10 83 356

3. 3 2.8 23. 3 100.0

NoTE.-Coding of diseases was based on the 7th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases.

56


TABLE 1.-DEATH--GUAM.

1968

Total death recorded. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

356

Death locally. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Death elsewhere and recorded here..

354

TABLE IL-TOTAL DEATH BY ·sEX AND PERCENT-GUAM, 1968 Sex

Number

Male ............ Female .......... Total. .....

TABLE III.-TOTAL

DEATH BY SEX, PLACE OF DEATH REPORTING-GUAM, 1968 Male

Place

..

. . . . . . . . . . . . ................. U.S.N.H G.M.H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. Other. Total ....

.

Percent

2

.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .........

Female

219 137

62.0 25.0

356

100.0

AND AGENCY

Total

Percent

67 130 22

22 101 14

89 231 36

25. 0 64.9 10. 1

219

137

356

100.0

NUMBER AND PERCENT OF TOTAL DEATHS BY AGE AND SEX-GUAM, Both sexes

Male

1968

Female

Age (years) Number Under 1 ............

1-4 ................ 5-9 ................ 10-14 .............. 15-19.............. 20-24 .............. 25-29 .............. 30-34 .............. 35-39 .............. 4o-44 .............. 45-49 .............. 50-54 .............. 55-59 .............. 60-64 .............. 6.'.>-69 .............. 70-74 .............. 75-79 .............. 80-84 .............. 85 and over ......... Unknown ......

: ....

Total all ages ..

51 8 6 2 15 25 13 9 13 16 21 28 22 28 31· 25 13 14 14 2 356

Percent

Number

Percent

Number

25 5 3 1 3 4 3 0 3 4 8 12 6 14 12 15 4 4 9 2 137

14.2 2.2 I. 7 .6 4.2 7.0 3. 7 2.5 3. 7 4.5 5.9 7.9 6. 2 7.9 8. 7 7.0 3. 7 3.9 3.9 .6

26 3 3

10 5 0

11.7 I. 4 I. 4 .4 5. 5 9.6 4.6 4. 1 4.6 5.5 5.9 7. 3 7.3 6.4 8. 7 4.6 4. 1 4.6 2. 3 ..........

100.0

219

61. 5

l

12 21 10 9 10 12 13 16 16 14 19 10 9

Percent

18. 3 3.6 3.2 .7 2. 2 2.9 2.2

..........

2.2 2.9 5.8 8.8 4.4 10.2 8.8 10.9 2.9 2.9 6.5 I. 5 38.5

57


APPENDIX G GOVERNMENT OF GUAM Office of the Chief Commissioner, Agana ISLAND-WIDE CENSUS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1968 [Excluding transients residing in rrulitary reservations) Guamanian

Statesiders

Filipinos

Municipality or district Male Agana .......................... Agana Heights ................... Agat. .......................... Asan ........................... Barrigada ....................... Chalan Pago-Ordot ........ •...... Dededo ......................... Inarajan ........................ Mangilao ....................... Merizo ......................... Mongmong-Toto-Maite ........... Piti ............................ Santa Rita ...................... Sinajana ........................ Talofofo ........................ Taxnuning ...................... Umatac ......................... Yigo ........................... Yona ........................... Total. ....................

58

692 I, 347 1, 790 985 2,425 996 2,090 1, 121 I, 535 . 918 998 545 I, 035. 2,433 858 2,034 443 792 I, 367 24,404

Female 753 I, 399 I, 856 I, 115 2,492 I, 106 I, 988 1,045 1, 198 827 946 575 I, 123 2,281 826 I, 623 485 724 I, 435 23, 798

Male 165 223 168 85 95 67 337 46 281 36 114 43 39 112 37 894 11 116 60 2,929

Female 156 187 182 122 70 29 351 19 289 30 106 30 38 72 27 472 20 30 53 2,283

Male 383 253 529 67 104 42 500 10 59 II

158 56 192 151 30 534 4

Female 115 .85 230 74 • 64 18 319 2 34 I 60 17 90 38 13 395 15

277 45

162

3,405

I, 763

31


ISLAND-WIDE CENSUS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1968-Continued [Excluding transients residing in military reservation) Others

Total

Municipality or district Male Agana ........................... Agana Heights ................... Agat ........................... Asan ........ : .................. Barrigada ....................... Chalan Pago-Ordot .............. Dededo ......................... Inarajan ........................ Mangilao ....................... Merizo ......................... Mongmong-Toto-Maite ........... Piti ............................ Santa Rita ...................... Sinajana ........................ Talofofo ........................ Tamuning ...................... Umatac ......................... Yigo ........................... Yona ........................... Total. ....................

Female

86 122 82 45 93 58 81 7

92 18 111 26 2 126 23 568 2 12 50 1,604

69 113 67 52 88 24 83 2 30 II II I 30 6 70 26 228 2 37 48 I, 097

Male I, 326 I, 945 2,569 I, 182 2, 717 I, 163 3,008 1, 184 I, 967 983 I, 381 670 I, 268 2,822 948 4,030 460 1, 197 1,522 32,342

Female I, 093 I, 784 ·2, 335 I, 363 2,714 I, 177 2, 741 I, 069 I, 551 869 I, 223 6.52 1,257 2,461 892 2, 718 5,522 953 1,567 28,941

Number of persons 2,419 3,729 4,904 2,545 • 5,431 2,340 5,749 2,253 3,518 1,852 2,604 1,322 2,525 5,283 I, 840 6,748 982 2,150 3,089 61,283

Consolidated from village commissioners reports.

59


APPENDIX

H EOG PROGRAMS-1969-70 Total CAP programs 2.....•.....•.....• Headstart 1...............•..•..• VISTA I ....................•. NYC1 ......................... Summer NYC .................. Job corps• ..................... Day care ....................... Surplus ........................ OJTI.. ................... •..... Total ....................

. . . . . .

$562,776 441,615 75,532 232,709 48,300 358,350 61,257 18,500 32,000

.

I, 831,039

• Federal

In-kind

Local

32,000

$83,437 IOI, 635 0 0 5,000 0 19,968 2,400 0

$215,570 0 33,532 60, 159 0 8,350 41,289 16,000 0

I, 243,599

212,440

375,000

$263,769 ·339, 980 42,000 172,550 43,300 350,000 0 0

Already federally funded. Already federally funded (includes commodity food distribution.) Over $1,000,000 in food is distributed to more than 1,700 welfare clients in conjunction with Public Health and Social Services. 1

2

60


APPENDIX

I COMMERCIAL

PORT RATES AND CHARGES-FISCAL

Types Basic ................................

Stevedoring .

I

Handling

$2. 12 2. 75 (•) ....... 1.05 2.05 . 75 2. 12 2.05 2. 12 2.05

3

U.S. Mail ..... : .......... ·............ . Copra(I'rochus ' ...................... . Empty vans 6 . ..............•.......... Metal drums ......................... . Rolling vehicle to ¾ tons 7 .......•...... Household goods s. . . . . . . . . . . . ........ . Other household goods in vau .......... . Other containerized cargoes ............ . Unitize cargo and livestock (livestock $1 per head) .......................... . 1

Inbound. Minimum is $1 per bill of lading. 3 Outbound. • Cost plus 15 percent. 2

YEAR 1968

2. 12

'

Transshipment

$2. 80 2.80 .............. 0 2.40 I. 00 20.00 . 70 2.80 I. 60

2

$3. 20 0

. 2.20 3.20 0

20. 00 . 90 3. 20 2.40

1.00

6

Negotiable. Minimum. 7 Each. 8 Per ton as freighted. 6

Other Charges

Overtime-An overtime •charge is levied for work performed on regular nonworking days, plus an additional 10 percent. Hazard pay rate-These rates range from lO to 25 cents per hour, per member of the work crew, and are levied upon: • a. Frozen or chilled cargo b. Bagged cement c. Scrap metal cargo d. Line cargo e. Ammunition or explosive cargo Special services-Cost of personnel, plus 15 percent, plus cost of materials. Dockage charge-Fee for dockage shall be 1½ cents per net registered

ton of the vessel per day or fraction of a day, for the first 10 days, and 1 cent per net registered ton of the vessel for each day, or fraction of a day thereafter. No dockage shall· be charged against vessels berthed outboard of other' vessels at the dock when this situation arises from a shortage of dock ~pace, or for the convenience of the Commercial Port. The Commercial Port is not required to provide berths for vessels in an idle status. Line handling charges-The charge for line handling is $1.25 per man-hour of fraction of an hour. The number of men required shall be at the option of the vessel's agent. 61


Water charge-The charge for Warehouse storage charges-The water is 25 cents per metered ton or rate is 50 cents per day per revenue fraction of a ton. The fee for each ton for the first 15 days after the free meter connection and removal is $5. period and $1 per day per revenue ton Storage charges-Import cargoes are for each day thereafter. Charges for given free storage for 5 days, exclusive private storage range between $2 and of weekends and holidays as well as $3.20 per cubic ton per month. • nonworking weather days. Export Outside storage charge-Paved cargoes are given free storage for 7 areas-25 cents per day per revenue days, exclusive of first available vessel ton for each day after the free period, making earliest arrival destination, except weekends, holidays, and nonotherwise storage charges will accrue working weather days. Unpaved as of the date of departure of such areas-! cent per square foot per vessel. month. SUMMARY OF IMPORT, AND TRANSSHIPMENT FISCAL YEAR I969 Carrier lines

BY CARRIER LINES

Domestic revenue ton Import

0

Reexport

Tons shipment

15, 563. 860 15, 832. 48 Pa;ific F~r E~t Lines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177, ll I. 860 Micronesian Lme .................................. , ............................ . Pacific Navigation System ........................................................ . Daiwa Nav. Co. Ltd ............................................................. . Crusader Shipping Co ......................... , ................................. . South Pac. Mems Commission .................................................... . Everett Steamship Corp .......................................................... . Saipan Shipping Co ..................................................... •......... . Dominion Far East Lines ......... ' ................................................ . Micronesian Interocean Lines ..................................................... . : ................... . Central Mills & Supply ...................................... Prudencio Manglona ............................................................ . Guam Scrapping Metal Co ....................................................... . F. L. Moylan Co ................... : ............................................ . Island Equipment Co ............................................................ . Getz Bros. & Co ................................................................ . D. R. Kincaid ....... : .......................................................... . Overseas Lines, Inc .............................................................. . Atkins Kroll (Guam)'Ltd ........................................................ . Waterman's Steamship Corp ...................................................... . Grand total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

62

I 77, 111. 860

15,653.860

15,832.48


SUMMARY OF IMPORT, AND TRANSSHIPMENT • FISCAL YEAR 1969-Continued Carrier lines

Foreign revenue ton Import

Pacific Far East Lines ................ Micronesian Line .................... Pacific Navigation System ............ Daiwa Nav. Co. Ltd ................. Crusader Shipping Co ............... South Pac. Mems Commission ........ Everett Steamship Corp .............. Saipan Shipping Co .................. Dominion Far East Lines ............. Micronesian Interocean Lines ......... Central Mills & Supply .............. Prudencio Manglona ................. Guam Scrapping Metal Co ........... F. L. Moylan Co .................... Island Equipment Co ................ Getz Bros. & Co .................... D. R. Kincaid ...................... Overseas Lines, Inc .................. Atkins Kroll (Guam) Ltd ............ Waterman's Steamship Corp .......... Grand total.....

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

13,852.489 3,349.5296 28,810. 22, 981. 3, ll4. ll2. 3,330. l, 957. 5,662. l, 382. 330. IO.07 2,959. 6,510. 1. 2,096. 3,029. 2,204. 3,418. 4, 710.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109,817. 0886

Import

Grand total. ..................

Tons shipment

Reexport 3; 318. 0915 10,588.9245 15,437. 145. 7.

I, 238. 1,297.5355 l, 366. 24. 70.

13,542. 214. 3,300.

I, 957. 299. 71.

148. 7,578. 308. 525. 782. 24. 3,535.

5. 4,370.5355

59, 452. 0160

Total revenue ton

Carrier lines

Pacific Far East Lines ................ Micronesian Line .................... Pacific Navigation System ............ Daiwa Nav. Co. Ltd ................. Crusader Shipping Co ............... South Pac. Mems Commission ........ Everett Steamship Corp .............. Saipan Shipping Co ................. Dominion Far East Lines ............. Micronesian Interocean Line .......... Central Mills & Supply .............. Prudencio Manglona ................ Guam Scrapping Metal Co ........... F. L. Moylan Co: .... ............... Island Equipment Co ................ Getz Bros. & Co .................... D. R. Kincaid ...................... Overseas Lines, Inc .................. Atkins Kroll (Guam) Ltd ............. Waterman's Steamship Corp ..........

BY CARRIER LINES

Reexport

. 190, 964. 3490 3,349.5296 . . 28,810. 0000 . 22,981. 3, 114. . 112. . 3,330. . . 13,542. . 5,662. 1,382. . . 330. . 10.07 2,959. . 6,510. . . I. 2,096. . 3,029. . 2,204. . 3,418. . . 4,710.

18, 971. 9515 10, 588. 9245 15, 437. 0000 145. 7.

286, 928. 9486

75, 105. 8760

214. 3,300.

Tons sl)ipment 17,070.4800 I, 297. 5355 1,366.0000 24. 70.

299. 71.

148. 7, 5.78. 308. 525. 782. 24. 3,535.

5.

20, 203. 0155

63


CARRIER

LINES SERVING

Lines American President Line. 1

Port of call United States east and west coast Kwajalein, Wake Island, Philippine, and Orient. New Zealand and Japan. Japan.

Crusader Shipping Co.3 Daiwa Navigation Co.3 Dominion Far East ·Pty. Ltd.3 Micronesia Interocean Line, Inc. 3 . Pacific Far East Line

1.

Pacific Navigation System Inc. 2 . Saipan Shipping Co. 4 .. Maria Dolores Line, Ltd. 3 Dillingham Shipping Line, Ltd. 3 Indo China Navigation System.3

GUAM

Australia, Manila, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, and Nev, Guinea. Japan and trust territories of the Pacific Island. United States west coast, Kwajalein, Honolulu and Wake Island. Philippines, Formosa, Hong Kong, Taipei, Manila. • Saipan, Rota, and Tinian. Manila, Hong Kong, Kaoshuing, Japan. West coast, Honolulu. Japan, trust territory.

1 Wholly owned shipping companies in west coast, United States Pacific Far East Line (Guam) Ltd., agent for PFEL, and Getz Bros. & Co., agent for APL. 2 Wholly owned local shipping companysubsidiary of Jones and Guerrero Co., Inc. Guam. 3 Foreign-owned shipping companies, Atkins, Kroll (Guam) Ltd., and Pacific Navigation System, Inc., Micronesia Interocean Line, Inc. agents for Guam. 4 Wholly owned shipping company of Saipanese Corp. and Pacific Far East Lines (Guam) Ltd. as agents.

64


APPENDIX !.-SELECTED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES: AREA/NUMBER OF TREES HARVESTED AND PRODUCTION, FISCAL YEAR 1965 THROUGH FISCAL YEAR 1969 1966

1965 Crops

Avocados, .............................. Bananas, eating and cooking ............... Beans, green (all types) ................... Bittermelon ............................. Breadfruit ............................... Cabbage, Chinese and head ............... Corn, sweet and local variety .............. Cucumbers .............................. Eggplant, long and round ................. Ginger, root. ............................ Lemons ................................. Limes .................................. l\1angoes, carabao and saipan .............. Melons: Cantaloupe, etc .................. Okra ................................... Onions, green (bunch) .................... Oranges ................................ Papayas ................................ Peppers, hot and sweet. ................... Potatoes, sweet ............................ Pumpkins, including tips .................. Radish ................................. Squash, yellow and white ................. Tangerines .............................. Taro, including tips ...................... Tomatoes ............................... Watermelons ............................ Yams ................................... All other crops ...........................

• Total 2...•.•...........•....•....

.1

Pounds

Pounds

Acres/ trees

I

58 16. 8 11. 8 2.4 I 18 11. 2 3. 8 64. 9 7. 9 I. 5 I 10 I 70 I 40 91. 2 3. 3 7.0 1 12 102 3. 2 3.4 3. I 6.0 3. 3 I 20 I. 6 19. 2 100. 3 I. I l l. 6

5,788 70,435 54,410 6, 126 2,684 22,032 13,024 116,257 34,320 584 713 2, 717 16, 736 68,387 I, 947 12,028 2,326 8,991 13,534 15,876 9,600 4,787 10, 146 I, f52 5,398 50,032 131, 569 9,859 20,796

78 90. I 25.9 6. 8 I 25 19. 8 13.9 56. 2 9. 3 4.8 1 30 I 117 1 52 31. 9 20. 9 I I. 0 1 104 l 240 6. I 6. 7 2. 5 4.5 4.8 1 327 4. 2 91. 6 133. I 3. 8 15.5

7, 737 408,015 I 18, 282 20,404 3,874 59,327 32,881 200,375 74,599 2, 183 4,546 12,830 41,723 114,749 14,694 25,202 31,097 24,862 29,589 I 7,094 10,586 9, 137 22,246 39,229 11, 754 182, 727 168, 722 75,607 45,284

374.6

712,254

563.4

I, 809, 355

Acres/ trees

I

See footnotes nt end of table.

65


APPENDIX 1.-SELECTED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES: AREA/NUMBER OF TREES HARVESTED AND PRODUCTION, FISCAL YEAR 1965 THROUGH FISCAL YEAR 196<}-Continued 1967

1968

1969

Crops Acre;/ trees Avocados ................ . Bananas, eating and cook62.3 ing .................... . Beans, green ( all types) . . . . . 16.4 Bittermelon .............. . 5. 2 Breadfruit ................ . I 44 Cabbage, Chinese and head .................. . 21.4 Corn, sweet and iocal variety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. 7 Cucumbers................ 37. 9 Eggplant, long and round. . . 10. 3 Ginger, root.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25. 7 Lemons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 138 1 30 Limes .................... Mangoes, carabao and 1 14 saipan.................. Melons: Cantaloupe, etc.... 26. 6 Okra..................... 17. 6 Onions, green (bunch)...... 10. I Oranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 1 65 1 141 Papayas .................. Peppers, hot and sweet...... 6. 3 Potatoes, sweet ............. • 8. 3 Pumpkins, including tips. . . . 3. 6 Radish................... 4. 5 Squash, yellow and white. . . 4. 3 1 212 Tangerines ................ Taro, including tips. . . . . . . . I0. 9. Tomatoes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. I Watermelons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32. 5 Yams..................... 4. 9 All other crops. . . . . . . . . . . . . IO. I Total............... 1

2

66

Pounds

9, 126

Acres/ trees 1

86

1

116

Pounds

11,531 339,909 109,208 14,699 7,784

69,716

13.3

34,519

10.·2 78. 7 12.4 0.9 63 43

25,900 278,765 70,133 500 8,277 3,578

12. 1 54.0 4.5 J03 114

30,646 191,234 25,482 1,407 13,534 9,474

22 121. I 9.4 3.8 Nil I 72 14.3 11. 6 3.9 5.2

7,609 223,532 6,933 8,540 175 7,236 61,932 35,282 15,249 7,919 15,525 I, 500 25,525 363,693 354,779 24,202 44, 911

37 111. 0 31. 4 JO.9 1 59 I 183 12. 7 11. 2 4.9 7.2 4.8 1 209 11. 4 .J20. 2 179. 8 4. I 23.5

21,824 205,190 23,135 24,387 16, 961 18,083 54,819 34,033 19,288 10, 928 20,312 24,290 28, 186 504,581 313, 015 61, 742 60,292

28.2 14.9 0. 5 1 42

53,434

27.3

11, 025 246,445 46,395 13,884 18;049 2,449

334. 7 I, 435,319

8, 513

Acres/ trees•

72.6 131,832 24.0 67,690 4. 5 2, JOO 6,326 t 51

311,472 73, 810 16,.692 6,694

8,633 93, 157 14,087 25,299 18,803 14,005 24,379 22,798 15,672 8,966 20,199 24,618 23,877 46,480 162, 711 61, 787 40, 373

Pounds

I I I

3. 7 13 10. 3 158. 7 203.8 I. 6 18. I

I

738. 6 I, 877,872

Number of bearing trees harvested. Except for bananas, acreage of fruit trees not included.

2. 7 I

I

I

820. 8 2,230,493


APPENDIX

J APPENDIX IL-FRUITS IMPORTATION,

AND VEGETABLES-LOCAL PRODUCTION AND FISCAL 1965 THROUGH FISCAL YEAR 1969

Production

Importation

Fiscal year Pounds

Dollars

Pounds

Amount of impoi:ted items producible locally

Dollars Pounds

1965......... 1966......... 1967......... 1968......... 1969.........

712,254 1,809, 355 1,435,319 I, 877,872 2,230,493

$112,492 6,177,218 $647,427 357,537 8,302, 180 828, 110 257,642 10,558, 109 I, 260, 813 309,670 9,851, 783 1,117,851 404,919 I 5,058, J9J I 483,033

3,278, 108 4,225,024 5,221,813 5,000,470 I, 188, 349

Dollars $351,509 452,033 752,940 636,057 136,426

1 Figures represent only military (N.S.D.) imports from the United States. Import data for private commercial sector not available.

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES-ANNUAL MARKET APPENDIX 111.-LOCAL DISTRIBUTION, FISCAL YEAR 1965 THROUGH FISQAL YEAR 1969

1965......... 1966......... 1967......... 1968.......... !969 ..........

Pounds ........... Dollars ........... Pounds ........... Dollars ........... Pounds ........... Dollars ........... Pounds ........... Dollars ........... Pounds ........... Dollars ...........

Retail stores

Farmers market

228,208 39,152 571, 320 118, 968 419,990 72, 176 640,653 99,576 828,223 151,494

427,673 66,595 I, 089, 473 216, 734 782,045 154,984 I, 026, 689 180,633 I, 230,573 220,672

Military

56,373 6,745 148,562 21,835 233,284 30,482 210,530 29,461 I 71, 697 32, 753

All outlets

712,254 112,492 I, 809, 355 357,537 1,435,319 257,642 I, 877,872 309,670 2,230,493 404,919

67


APPENDIX IV.-IMPORTS

OF LIVE FOWLS AND ANIMALS, FISCAL YEAR 1967 THROUGH FISCAL YEAR 1969

Type

Broilers (baby chicks) .................. Pullets (baby chicks) ................... Fighting roosters ...................... Hens ................................ Birds ................................ Goats ................................ Hogs ................................ Cattle ............................... Fish (pet) ............................ White mice (experiment) ............... Coconut crab ......................... Rabbit. ............................. Fruit bat ............................. Skunks and geckos (experiment) .........

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Fiscal year 1967

Fiscal year 1968

0 31,342 2,331 40 176 0 12 129 12,987 0 0 0 0 0

16,000 77,500 2,470 84 100 123 82 172 6,210 0 0 0 0 0

APPENDIX V.-REVENUE

Total ..........................

68

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •... • • .

0 66,818 3,954 70 739 0 59 17 57,821 2 I, 060 10 55 20

EARNED

Fiscal year 1967 Farm store supplies .................... Nursery sales ......................... Poultry .............................. Eggs ................................. Hogs ................................ Cattle ............................... Equipment service ..................... Trailer and other rentals ............... Market fees........................... Fish weir fees ......................... Fish, fresh ............................ Hunting license fees .................... Pasture fees ........................... Branding ..... •........................ Fumigation fees ....................... Spraying ............................. Others ..... , .....................

Fiscal year 1969

$275. 21 4,218.99 6,105.82 549.25 5,292.85 520.00 6,699.05 219. 25 I, 533. 15 53.00 I, 141. 87 2,424.85 236.25 7.00 10.45 393.40 13.45 29,693.84

Fiscal year 1968 $763.04 5,277.84 3,961.22 392.00 4,160.00 5,958.72 6, 127. 00 233. 50 I, 637. 30 61. 00 4,652.53 2,359.00 5.00 4.00 7.00 345. 70 . 68 35,945.53

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTINGOfl'JCE: 1970

Fiscal year 1969 $305. 90 4, 351. 14 I, 922. 84 289.05 6,825.00 845.00 5,594.00 262. 50 413. 10 ' 50.00 2,642.22 2,553.00 0 0 2.50 333.50 0 26,389.75

0-370-503




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