1968 Annual Report: Guam to the Secretary of the Interior

Page 1

GUAM

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY,

AmericainAsia

AturidadlnadilantonlkunumihanGuahan

GUAM

TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR

1968 ANNUAL REPORT

Publication materials provided by the Guam Economic Development Authority (GEDA)



1968 Annual Report

Guam to the Secretaryof the Interior



1968 Annual Report

Guam to the· Secretaryofthe Interior

For sale by tho Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Otnce Washlneton, D.C. 20402 - Price 30 cents



CONTENTS Page

General Infonnation............................................ General Government. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Education..................................................... Health, Sanitation, and Social Services.•........................... Community Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Protection and Development of Resources..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Labor........................................................ Protection of Life and Property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parks and Recreation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selective Service System... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendices.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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GENERAL INFORMATION Guam is an unincorporated but organized territory of the United States. It is under the administrative jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of the Interior. Its 97,000 residents, including military transients, are predominantly U.S. citizens. The Governor of Guam is the Chief Executive Officer of the government of Guam. He is appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate and serves a term of 4 years. Members of the unicameral, 21member Guam Legislature are elected biennially and at large. The local lawmaking body is vested with taxing powers and is empowered to legislate on all matters not inconsistent with Federal laws applicable to Guam. The judicial system is comprised of a U.S. District Cou;-t, whose judge is a Presidential appointee, and the Island Court of Guam, whose judges arc appointed by the Governor of Guam. The territory is represented in the Nation's capital by a Washington Representative, an elected official. There are lhree political parties, two of which are affiliated, respectively, with the national Democratic and Republican organizations. The third group is the Territorial Party of Guam. Guam is centrally located .in the Western Pacific, 1,300 miles southeast of Japan, 1,500 cast of the Philippines, and 3,000 west-southwest of Hawaii. The territory is the largest and most populated island in the Marianas Archipelago. It is 13° north of the Equator with temperatures ranging

from 70° to 90°. Average yearly precipitation is 85 to 100 inches. Guam is 30 miles long and ranges from 4 miles at its narrowest point to 8½ miles at its broadest, containing an area of 209 square miles. Its climate is warm and humid. Trade winds cool the island during the dry season, December through April. May and June are the hottest months, and most of the rain falls from July to September. The northern half of the island is a high-rolling plain reaching 400 feet above the ocean, with steep cliffs abruptly forming the coastline. The central portion containing Agana, the capital, is Bat to the sea but low hills take form. To the south, rough mountains rise from 700 to 1,334 feet above sea level. The highest peak is Mount Lamlam. While enroute to the Orient during his globe-girdling voyage in 1521, Ferdinand Magellan and his fleet of three ships landed in picturesque Umatac at the southern tip of the island. In 1665, Spanish missionaries came to Christianize the islanders and from then until 1898, Guam was a protectorate of the Spanish throne. Under the Treaty of Paris, Guam was ceded to the United States following the Spanish-American War. The island was placed under the administration of the U.S. Navy. Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, the Japanese seized and held Guam until July 21, 1944, when American forces liberated the island. The present Guamanians are a mix1


Tl11· Bani- (If America is au1"11~ "'''t'tal lt•11ding-111s1i1u1ium serving the' tcrri11,ry. l'hoto w.,~ t:ikcn <lurim: l,11sr h"11r at !1:c i\i;,11nt l,ranrl:.

wrc oi nati,c Chamorro !,tork II ith ,mrne condition~ rs1ablishccl in 1lwU.S. dominant 011t~icl1•~train~. including: mainland for parrncnl of !'eclr1-:llin. .):1pa1ws<•. i·ottw tax. There is the usunl 1~111c:c of tn{(li~lt. Sp:inisli. (;c.:n11:u1 Filipino. Chinese. I t~,!i:rn, Irish. aJHl otl1<'1' lases, such as liquor. gasoline, PorlugucsC'. 1cal proprrty. ~ross rcn•ipls. etc. Thrr<' C:11:imi~ n fn'<' poi l. With f1·w ex- i;; only on1· lnxin~ autltority. l,owc\'cr. l'<·ptions. product.,; cntcrin!'! the tcrriTl11.:n.:aic no srpnr,itf' m1111icipal. torr arc free of dury. coumy. school distrirl. and i111pro\·rL"ncler tlw l.1.S. Custo111s Simplift111rnt distrit'L Lnxc.s. c:1tion . \ct. a1 lidcs n1:1nufar·t11r1•d iu C.:ompli'.lebanking farili1ics arc proC:ua111 Illa\' C.'IHl'I' thl' l' ... m:.iinbnu , ided b,· lorn I bmncl1cs of the lfank frN· or ctmr pro,·idctl !'onii~ll 111,HL•ri:tl~01 Au1c·,:irn.die Bank of f!a\\'aii. :md do 11ot 1·ons1ilult·111orc t!i:in 50 pcrrc-ni tlw ( ,11a111 Sm·ings and Lonn ,1\s:;oriaof till' total ,-alu<· of thr lini~lwd p1odtion. ucr. '1'01:11 \'al11r. is dct<-nnincd ll\' Of!krs of Ftth:ral !1·nding-insIitubona fide ~al<'or offer fo1 snit·. no! i11·- tioos. inrluding tlw Small B11~i11rss ;\ddudi11~ frci~h1 LCl~Ito 1hr C.S. 111ai11- 1uiui,t ration :i.ml rhr F1·dl'ral llousin~ lancl. V:thtr or 1111'dutinlill' fuicign \Jminislrati(ln. arc lo<:atC'clin Guam. matt-riab i, dt·lt'/'Jllillt'd br dwir bon;i \ major cnckan)I' in C11am•~ ccofidl' p11rl'ha~L· pric,·. including frright lHllltiL' tl1·,·clopmrnr is thr dc\'clopm<'lll 1 lmr,c,c•s to < :11:1111. ol a full-flrc!~t·d tourisl i11dustr~.A Ill'\\' \7ll:llll 1ax1·~ arc gc·neralh Im, er than airport tcnninal rnpahlr of h::imlling in 0Llu•1·U.S. j11ri$diction~.Rcsiclrnts the l'xpanding: ra<'ifk air traflil \\as of thl' lC'ITitory:11c·s11hjcl'llo p.tymC'nl oprncd in 1%7 and t\\'iC'CWt'rkl~ dirrrt of in<:OnlC' Lax to the ,![OH'J'll1nrn1 of Oi~h1s 10 Tokyo ,\·rrr in:iugurawtl tlw ( :unm :it 1h1· ,~ll11l' ratt·S and 11nd,'1 ilH' sarnc y<·ar. Fi,·r wec•ld~ "cstbouncl 2


More than 40 commercial sJ1ips dock annually at Guam's Commercial Port. A new port facilit>•,which will cost in excess of $9 million, is under construction.

flights from Honolulu arrive in Guam with two continuing to Manila and three to Southeast Asia. Five weekly eastbound flights reverse the pattern. The Guam-Tokyo flights were increased in April 5, 1968, to a thrice weekly service. A weekly flight to Sydney, linking Tokyo, Guam, and the

Australian industrial center, is expected to commence shortly. Guam thus becomes the focal point in Pacific air travel between Honolulu and the West Coast, Tokyo, Manila, Southeast Asia, and Sydney. Guam is a regular port-of-call for 10 shipping lines, including American

3


The Guam li1tt·rnational Airport 'frnniunl scn·t'cl Jlight operations ,,C t"'' major airlines and one local air taxi service. lt1tcrnatin11al flight~ averaged 26 \\'cckly aml ,rhcdulcd flii;ht~ If')and frnrn tlw Pacific Trust Tcl'l'itorr a1·l•r:ti;c<l23 wl'ckly. Air Micmncsia. partlr owned by Cuntinent,11 :\irlincs, co11111wnrcdscrl'icc to the Tru~l Territory i~l:111dsduring the year.

President Lines, Pacific Far .East Line. of thr. ,,·orld. Radio Corporntion of and several .\ustralian and Japancs<· :\rncrica (RCA) c1nd th<' :\11strnlia11 shipping rompanirs. l\forc Lltan ·tU Cable Communication. ystcrn h,n-c uprommr·r<'ial vessel.~call at . \ pra I laJ'bor to-clalc facilitir~. u1l'lucli1111undcrs<-a trlrphonc and telegraphic cables linkannually. Se,·cral majo1· ;'lirlinrs an: seeking ing co1111ncrcialccntl'rs in Asia. North Pa<'ific air routes ll'it.11s1opo1·e1-sin and So11tli .\mcrica. Europe. and the Cua111.They incluck Trans-World Air- Pacific. I nlcrna tiona I Tc•lcphonc an<l lines, East('l'n .\irlines, I lall'aiian .\ir- Tclcg:raph ( LTr) scr"<irrsthe military. :l Gu:im h:15 11\'0uaily lll.:ll'!>papi.:1-s, lincs. :rncl Continc:nt:tl. \i.rlines.. \t least two foreign carriers have cxprcssccl in- r:1dioand lt•lt·,·isionstation, and sc,·cral Lt'n·sl in sen in~ C:uam. 11·,·ckl~· ancl 111011Lltly p11hlir:11ions. The~ 'l'he territorr is :tdcq11:iti'lr Sl'IYed or subsc:1·ihrto 1hr Associated Press, Unit,1 ltighw:iy sySll'lll ('0111pri~ill)! l~ll 111i1t,~I'd Pn•s<; T11tl'1'11a1ional, and s11pplc111(•1ualnc11 s and fcatu re scr,ir<·s. ut' toads. Pal'ilic S1:irs ;md Stripes al:,o is rirC11:1m is rlll' 1·01111H1111i,;11i(>n hub of lh<' \\'t•stl'l'II Padflr. ~ foclci n com- cub.tcd lorallr, Cu:1m's l'd11cational svslcw comm11nir.1tion f.1l'ilili<'spro, idl' i11s1an1:1ncouscont:ict with \'irt11nllrall parts pares f:11·or.1bly with many U.S. ·I


mainland communities of comparable The College of Guam has an ensize. The curricula, subject matter, rollment of more than 1,700 and is acand achievement goals are essentially credited by the Western Association of the same as those of mainland schools. Sch'Oolsand Colleges as a 4-year, deThe territory's two senior public high gree-granting institution. The college schools are accredited by the Western has three undergraduate schools (arts Association of Schools and Colleges. and sciences,education, and continuing More than 25,000 children of education), and has a graduate school school age attend public and private in education. institutions.

The Fine Arts Builwng of the College of Guam was completed during the year.

5 324-472 0 • 88 • 2

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GENERAL GOVERNMENT Hi~hli!!l1t of tlw yc-:ir was the p:i~the Elrrti\·,· Cm·rrnor Rill by thr l -.S. SrnaLt'. Tf paSSt'cl liy tlt1:lious1• of Rcpn:.;1•1Hati,·l·~. it wo,;ld u,hcr in a nc,,· er:1 for the people of C11:1m"·ho, durim~· n ;;p:in of 300 yc-ar~1mdcr orgm1in•d ~owrn1111·nt.m•q•r had a ,·oice in thi.: selection of their gm·crnor. H the bill becomes law. thr first ('lcction of clw tcrritory·s chief executive will be !tcld in :'\1.wc111bcr.1970. The bill \\'Oukl rrstrirL :1ny !!0\'f'n10r rrnm srr\'ing more• than two ronscruti\'t· Iyear terms. l"hr bill nlso r:illed for the :ippointmrnt of a (!o,·ernmcnt romptrnllcr by the U.S. Scrn:tarv of Interior. Pend in~ bcforr the Feclernl Conirref..~ wns a bill co inn1·M1·h,· S'.-10 n1illion tlH' authori'l.:ition 11nd<'r1i1:·Gunm Rt·ha1,ilitation Art. Thi.: ori~inal :111thorinitio11of S·l.1 111illionin lo:ins and ~rant~ is soon to he-t·xhaustrcl. Still pendint! in the ~on~rc~s ,,·a~ a hill to a11thorii'<'appropriation of .':i111illin11for the purposc-of arrrlrra1in~ tit<' c\'011011dcdc,·clopmcnt nf the tc-rri1ory. /\ pon ion of I he·a mo111H .~011gl I l ,, i11be 1·nnnarkc·cl for n~ric-ult11ral clc-vrlnpnwnt pro_icc-tsnncl the clc,·clopmcnt nf indu~trial parks. Sc,·cral 111a_iorpit:<"esof le~isla1ion wrrr introclurccl in tlw Ninth C11a111 l.c-gisb111rL'during ir• sra,nd rrc,1br session in January and ,l111w. 1%11. ,\n1011gL11t·111 w1·n· :nliui11i~u·atic>11 hill< tn t'l'<'at<'.1 nrw DrpnrllllC'llt nf Lnhor. •, 111-wlkp:1nn1ent of .-\<lministratio11. ,t new Dcpart111c111 of Revenue :ind

i:a1r<" of

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Taxation. and a Department of Corrcl'tions. Other rcor.~anizational lcgislntion \\·a~ tlw c-rc-n I ion of :i go,·cnm1ent of C.mu11Ci,·il Scn·irc Comlllission. The Comm is~ion.comprisi nz of sm·cn members appointed by th~ GO\·cmor and ronfinnrcl by the legislature. assumed all funcrions of the 1,crsonncl board. The rconrnnizationnl studir were prrfor111rd hy thl:' H11r<-auof }vfa11ace111rnt Rrsrnr<'h. a staff office of the Om·<·rno1·.Tht· llurcau al~o prodclrd log-i~tir ~upport to th<• Cid! Service Coll!mission prnding rccrnit111cntof its o\\·11 staff. The Ex<'rmi,·c Br:inrh adoptccl the Fedrr:il (:owrnmrnt·s Planning, Procrnmin!.(, ,111d Bucl_gl'lin{!r PPill syst•,•111. anc.l in linc- \\'ith this conrrpt of long--ran11;1· plnnning. tlw Co,·c-rnor·s Staff Pb11ni11cCounril. rn111priscdof cabi1wt-l<·\'l'I l'<"om,mic and 1to,·crn1m·111alplanrwrs. fonmilatrcl :i :i-~·r:ir eapi1al imprm·c•1111•m prograrn. .\,non({ innorntions during the ~1-nr "·as th,· utiliz:nion of a11toma1il'd:ua pro<Ts,imt in 1hc-pr<'p:iration of 1>ayroll dlt'rk~. Pli111~call for Llw use of tlw rrn11puln sys1c-111i11 other prog-ram area~ in the· near f11nin·. TII<' t!;<'tlC'ral fund rc,·t·1111c stalcmcnl 1t'flc·ctt:dapproxi111atch-S3-I111illion:is li,l\'illg hcc·n n·a I iz<"dI)\· t hr 1t0\·c·rnm1•n L i11 fiscal ,·rnr l~lfiH.This all!ount was S2 1nillio;, II'.s than tlt1· proj,·rn·d fig11n•.Tlw ddil'ic•nn '"" r:111~rrllnrg<'ly b,· ll'H·11111·losses in i111·01nc·lax<'s. liqnid furl taxe~. nnd Fee.feral~r~1nts-in,1id. Tlw arcl'll-ratcd inc-0111ctax rr-


-L ...

Portion of automatic data processing equipment utilized by the Government of Guam in the preparation of the payroll.

fund program required a sizable outlay of funds which were charged against collections, the net clfect being a reduction of actual receipts. Liquid fuel tax revenue was below projected figures because of the loss of military sales. Grants-in-aid projections were made on the basis of 75 percent Federal participation. The Federal share was reduced to 50 percent. Income tax deficiencies resulting from audit examinalions exceeded that of the previous year by $308,314.85 for a total of $912,176.17. A total of 3,644 audits were completed, compared to 3,066 the previous year. Delinquent accounts collection totaled a record high of $1,964,644.79, an increase of $683,807.81 over the previous year. The Re.al Property Tax Division of the Department of Finance entered in its rolls assessments involving 13,609 land parcels and 9,871 buildings. There were 98 l more la:nd parcels and 450

more new buildings assessed during fiscal 1968 than in the prev.ious year. In tenns of assessment value, the landed properties represented $18,707,380. Buildings were valued at $18,524,940. The ta..x assessment on the land parcels totaled $561,205.80, an increase of $15,222.30 over the previous year. Assessment on buildings was $555,806. 70. The combined taxes for land and buildings totaled $1,117,012.50. The major development in litigation was the granting of a rehearing in the Sayre case by the Ninth Ci1·cuit Cou1t of Appeals. This involved an interpretation of the Organic Act in determining the tax liability on Guam source income to a corporation not doing business in the territory. The court reversed its previous decision in the Atkins-Kroll case and held that ta..xpayers, both nonresident individuals and corporations not doing business in Guam, were nonresident aliens

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or forriJ.(11ro1 pm at ions for r;u;1111in• num· ta, purpOS<'\. The Dt·pallmrnt or fin:111n· ~ccurccl tlw ,er,1c-<•sof nu In1t·111al Rt•,·cnur Sc·n·irr rn-.; 1na11agc111('tll1rnm \,·hirl1 t'l'\ icwt'd and rernmprd tll(' op1•1ationnl and prna·clurnl S\~ll'llh of tl11t·crritical areas: ( I lnn)lllt' 1.1:- amliting: 2, :1<·ro1111ti111,: and 111·orc~si11g: and (3) ('(11lcrtion l·nforrr11w11t. .\ conrr11rcl rfTort wa~ 111adf'to dimin:i.tr UIIIH'tTs~a1ytiprrations and clup}j. ration of ,,ork a~ wrll as to i111pro,·1· proC"rdure~.Th<' thr<'r-ma11 tax 111an111ad1·a si~nifrcant ron• agrm<'nl tc-a111 tribution lo th.is program nnd co rhr. <l('panmcnt's c:oal of attaining a nu. rrnt stntus in :ill opc-rati<>m.Tax :.tr• 1·011nt5 "hirh had been maintained 111a11uall~\\'ere ,·om·rned to :i ,non·

lislwd ,, hich grc:u I~·facililated the operation. Omin~ 1hr war. the J >i, ision of Prnc·un·111t·:n a11<l Supply maclc· pmrh.,sc w111111i1111l·nts rntalinc $1.922, lll6 1hro11ghoprn 111arkt·1!ll'!!Otiatiom and ~rah·d hid pron:d11r<'~- .\pproximatdv 8.3 pen <'Ill of all purrhasC'\ wt·rc 111aclr thrc,ugh !oral ,·1·11<.lors. For<:i~n purcha~P~ ronstitult·d 2 pen t•nt. TIii' di\ision rcnclrrrcl ronsidcrabk• a,;sisranr<· lo tlw t1 ust tc-rritory subsr• <1ucnt10 thr dc,·aslatio11 inflicted upon . 'aip:in and othrr ncil!hboriul{ islamls in \pril, 1%8. by Typhoon Jran. An i~lanch,·ist· rc1isus conducrccl by the- cli~trin 1·0111111 i~~io11r" i.h«J\\l·cl a ri, ilian pnpulation of .'ill..i()8 as of :\pril 30. I%8 . .\lon· th:in 50 pc·r-rt•nt of the <'i\'ilian populatinn rr~iclrd in t•fficirnt mnrhiiw accou11ti11g s~stt•111. The logging of all i1Kou1c tax retu1 n~. six or the island\ l<'llllltllil ipalitic-,. The prccinn s1rnc111n•, \\(TC n•ot• 1hr111 in :i in addition 10 1<·1·ordi11,g .:anl index. ,,as c•lilllin:itcd as \WI'<' J.!:lllizc·dand ,·ntcrs' rcr01cls \\'ere prcm:im· 01h1·r unncn·.»ar~ 1ctordi11g op• parrcl for the· )')68 l!<'lll'ral clc·rtion. •I lw total n11mh1·rof regr)>tt·n·d, olct s rratiom .. \ nc\, ~,~tc·m for tll!' annual 1c~istration of motor n·hirles was cstab"as 18.923.

II


EDUCATION Expansion of educational facilities and improvements in personnel capability and programs received major emphasis during the year under review. Total appropriations for educational purposes, including support activities and capital improvement projects, amounted to $19,051,344,substantially more than the previous year's allocation for the territory's educational system. In addition, $1,575,800 in Federal 1unds was e."pended for the construction of an J8-classroom elementary school. The College of Guam received $1,608, 177 for its operational expenditure, and the Department of Education $10,678,533. Because of a continuing and acute shortage of teachers and administrative personnel in the public school system, the College of Guam established a separate School of Education during the year to allow greater concentration on and a more proficient direction of the institutic:m'seffort to improve and enlarge its teacher-training program. Among the graduates of J968 were 47 baccalaureate majors in education. The new graduate school offers programs leading to the degree of master of arts in education in the areas of art, biology, English, guidance and counseling, reading specialist, general social sciences, history, and political science. During the year, 289 graduate stu-

dents were registered and three received a master of arts degree in education. The College of Guam adopted its university structure in September, 1967, by establishing three undergraduate schools-arts and sciences, education, and continuing educationand a graduate school. It was granted a maximum 5-year accreditation by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges in the spring of 1968. Two new buildings were completed and occupied in September, 1967, and a third was scheduled for completion by the summer of 1968. They were the Fine Arts Building, the Library Building, and the Science Building. Cost of the three structures was $2,484,000. The new facilities increased the college's space by 76,500 square feet. Construction of three dormitories to accommodate 300 students began in March 1968, and the first increment of a new student center is scheduled to be completed by July 1969. Two other programs of major significance were instituted at the college--a police academy and a nursing education program. Three policy academy clasess were graduated during the year, for which 60 police officers were enrolled; and 18 students graduated from the nursing program. A secretarial in-service training program also was conducted during the year for personnel of the government of Guam. 9


.\ prOt!r:1111 for ;1 111a,k1 vf ,cic·nrc niral hi~h school. fi,·r junior high i11hiolott~ "•'~ ,1pp10"·d a11cl"ill lw school-, nncl 10 dt111c111ary~d1ools. Cl!otgl! \\"aihin,!!Lvna,.d .John J'. Kcni111plc1J11.'lll1'd in lhL·foll or I!ltif!. ThL· r·ollrg1··, •tud1•11Lpo1Jul;i1io11 nrdy 11it.th Schools nrf' arrrrditrd by rhr \\·(·,tnn .\•soci:uion of Scl1uolsand '"·rr fortdal<·d 1.761. oi 1d1on1 -~'.!Cl t·i!!n ·u1d1·11b.i,wluclinc: nw,L Lrrritory Colk·u;cs.The Gtia111Trndc and l'echi,l.u1dc-r,. ·101.il c-nrollnwlll. including nical School is ~1ppron·d for \"('tC'ram, training. p.1n-1:mr ;-wdcnts. was :'i:178. Tlw ~dtool ~,-~ttm had ~omc 700 In June. 1%8. thr h:ichelor ,,r :in< rla~~romm ,l.'n inf! I I .fl15 (·lc-111en1ary dl'l!rt't: ,,a,; cnnf<'rrc-don 81 ,1·11ior,. :\ 1n1:1lof 10:1 hi~h ~rhool ~Ludl'•ih and 7:27'3 sl'condary ~C'hoolstud1·nL<. ,,rre :iclrnill('(I to tl;1. l"pw.ircl Bounci Tot:11 t·nrollnw11L i11ncascd b\' more p1<>!!ra1nad,nini,;lnrd b~ thr C"nllctt<" than I .JOO u1·t·1 the 1xc,·ious· school ~'l'Ul'. duri11tt the >TIii'. J'ifty-onc new cl::i•sroomsat ~ix difTill' colkt;<" :il~o c11h11i11i~11•rc<l the fon·m school f:wilitic~ 11·l'l'C complctccl yr:1r-1·r-111Hl Tlc·ad Stan progran1 which clnrinl{ rhc year. •Pl n·d approxi111a1cl~ ·1no prcsrltool d1ildrL·ll cnrolll'd at , arin11s ('<'11tr1-s Tin: JJcp;irtmrnl of Ed11c:1tionemplo~cd 890 teachers and :1rlmi11istrawrs, throuahouL 1hr r!'rritorl'. me off-i~lanclconTlw public: l'll·111c111a·ry and ,1·r,111cl- about lrnlf of 1\'110111 and clep1·ndrnts of conary school ~rstrm i~ (·ompri,rcl of two tract 1·mplt1)'t'1:s ar:1ch:mir •wninr high :chnob. 011<• tcd1- tract 1·111ployccs.

Th,-

I ti

S1i<'111,• Building

01 tl11•

Colks•· u(

C:11:1111rH'arrcl

romplr1ion

al

tllf' •·nd, f tht-

year.


Youngsters too young to enroll in Head Start classes arc helped by volunteer teachers and staff members of the Economic Opportunity Commission.

Governor Guerrero (at rostrum) is shown addressing police and fire recruits upon completion of training at Police Academy, College of Guam. Thirty police officers took police science courses at the college and 23 others attended training sessions sponsored jointly by the college and the Department of Public Safety.

11


The cl('panmcm rccrivcd $1.108.280 in rcdcr::tl funds durinK d1<•year from l'itle~ L ll. ITL V. :rnd \'J of the El~r Ed11ratio11\ct nwntary and Scl·o11da1 {J-:SL::.\}and fro111Titlc:s 111 ::md \' of tlw :\':,tion:il Ddrm1· Ecl11ratio11.\ct ':'\DE\). This a.-;:,ista11n· \'Hauled the· sdwol system tv expand prP~r:1111s for dis:irh-:intagrd :rnd h:mdir:tppccl chilclrrn. <'xp:mded <'OllllSCli11g am! liura1y scn·iccs, and pro,·ick·cl materials for ke~·subject areas. .\ proi:r:lln for tcarhing F.n!!li~has a ~ccoud l,11t.1!.uag1· fTE L) wns expanded to nwet 1hc· ,wrds nl' (;uam·s bilingual st11clc·nt;;.Sprtial rduration, rr.11wtlial n·ading and pl'(:scl1ool progrnnis were also cxpandc-d lo stn·c morr clrifdrcn with aradrmil'. nilrural. or l'C:onomir.handicaps. Some of the recom11w11d:1tinn~ m:iclr hy a learn nf multimedia sprcialist,

who studied C;uarn's school svstcm ,,·ere impl(•111em1·d during tlw }T~r. includinu: the cnlar_gcnH·mor Ul(' Education.ti .\lt·dia C..:c-11t1·1·, tlw 1·stablishment of :1 r<-nlt'l' for 1·1\'rrronir <·<p1ipmrmrnai11l1·1ianr1·.rn•atirn1 of a rurrirulum matcri:11t(·11tc·r.and an i11-scn·irc centrr 1,·hirli Jffo,·i<lr-dnwdia rr:iinin~ to 130 crac-l1rrs. 'l\, u c·xtcnsion libraries wrrc completed ::indin operation durin!! the yc:tr and plans for a third 1,·1•rc·finalized. The Nic,c ill. Flore~ ~f1·111orialLibrnrr stall' concentrated effort,. on tlir sclcction of hooks and materials for the extension lihrarie~ and rhe 111ai11 librar}' in . \gana .. \ total of 15.268 hooks \\'ere pruccssccl. f.iftt·1·11r<'pri111$and 1hrcc 111icrotilms uf historil·al 11,ntcrinb about ( :11.1111 '"·1,· arquir<'d <1111 ing 1hr yr:ir. .\ l·niort liM of ~<'ri:11~ of du· Culkge

n1•rl1·donrand, l.il,raq· drdil"atinn, :--"o,·rmhcrI 967.

12


of Guam and the public library was compiled and bound. Work was begun on the preparation of a Union catalogue containing all the collection of the public libraries and the Micronesian Area Research Center at the College of Guam. A government of Guam publications reference section was opened at the Agana library late in the year. The Guam Museum continued to be

the historical infonnation center for artifacts of Guam. Twenty-three items of historical significance were received from the Bishop Museum in Honolulu and were added to the museum's growing collection of historical artifacts. Library patrons increased by 6,124 during the year, and a total of 106,268 books were circulated. A total of 4,874 people visited the museum during the year.

13 324·472

0 • GG • 3


HEALTH, SANITATION AND SOCIAL SERVICES Th<' 21:i-brcl C11:irn t-Cc111orial I fo,Fisea I ~ car I~G8 \\\lS onr of nccclcrs11b~iantiul111:.ijorirnated expnnsic,n in 0!'!{;1niL:1tion. pro- pit:1I uncl1'1w<·11t year, i11cl11din!! g!'ams :incl ,rr\'in•s in hc-alth. ~:111i1:1-prow111cnt, duri11!! 1111· 1·onsLrnc1ion of a largL· i,ob1io11 d1•1io11:rnclsoc-ial\l'I"\ ires. li\'l'n· room ~uite. insc:illario11oi a radio .\ 11c1, 111et.lic:.tl t li11ic. ~1a!l\:d l.Jv a a11<la complc111~111 pug-ing- ~,·sr!'rn ior c·me11rcm·,· comfull-1i111cphysil'i:'111 of 1111rsc-s. w:1, 1•st:1blislH'dat rlic-,011d1- munication. and d!'n:lop11ll'nt of :1nc,, physi,ul 1hrrnp)' dcp,Hllll<'n t. crn encl of the ll'n-ilor·,. funds 1,·rr1· :11loral<'d for th1· l'l·rhc Dcpar1111c111 of Publil" I ll•,ilth of (he F \\'int:, of c:unin .\k:ind Sori:11Sr1vicr~ \\il) dr,igr1a11·d :1~ 11io11l-li11~ :t< a 1111'~t~Hc•al!t'IH")' for co111pn·lll'mil'C' lllUI inl l lospit:11ro,it~ 111ili~:it1on he.11th pla1111i11~lw~pit.d a11d 111c•di, al 111lwrntfo5i~facility. .\ total of 7,329 palirms were aclfacilities pl:11111ing. and tl1l' at:l'l1l') rrduring 1he year. including 1.915 ion of 111iuc<l ,pon,ihl<· for t lII' implrnw 111;11 the stale \\'atcr Quality Sta11clanl~. newborn :ind 126 rnbrrrnlnr r:1scs. Patient s1•1YiC<'~ rcmkrcd amounted .\[1·dirarc. ~lcdic,1icl. a11d.Iudil"aid. Tlw rcrriro1/s C:om11rrhcnsi1·r 10 S2.1Gi328, an increase of S~IJ0.2-10 Hcalch Plan "·a~ adopt<·d :111d1r:1s!w- o,·cr the 1wc\·iousyear. .\ tot.ii oi $1,26036!) \\';JS c·ollcctccl in!.( implc11n·11tnl Lill ou1.d1tlw lll'll'!I' or~:111i1cdC:oonlinating C.:01111cil co111- in accc,11n1sl'l'ccivablt•, au increase of prisrcl of prof<·s~ionnl nnrl l.1r C'iti,l'm :j,2!.l13211o\'cr the prr,·ious >'t':'\r. Credit~ on :ihatl'lllPnts lolnlrcl ~100,210. of the territory .. \ c·o111rn1·1 11':l, 1wgo1isrn·icl', in the- form :11ccl"'ith the School oi Publit· l kal1l1. .\"011charg<':1blcUni,·cr,ity of I fa\\'aii,. 10 1wo1·iclcc-1,11- of Lube,culosis trcnuncnt. mental sultalio11. recruiting cissi,1:inrr and ,uphcallh ~t·r\in·, .\.L.S .. .\"l:'\J)B. ~rhool poni,·c scn·iccs. injuriPs. puhlir wdf:irc•. c-11.. :1111011ntNI .\11 ill!<'llSi\·I' s:init:1li1m i11s1wctio11 In $36:).-135. prO!!ltllll \\'US r;1n ird 0111:1t :1ll limi11c·s~ The So,·i:il Sl'I'\ icl~ Bo,1nl. whith cs1ublislu11i.:1m.i11dudi111!alil'll labor lw:irs <':tS<'sin 1"11irh p:-ilients :'\re unr;imps. and r<·sult('(Iin suhst:inti,d i111nhlc rn pn>' their hospitnl accounts but pro1·c·mr·111sin ~:lllitarl' forilici<', :incl arc othcr\\'isc cli!!iblc to rccci,·c wclliving nmt.li1ions. • Jsbndwidc- dC'anup and bl·auti/il':1- ian.: bcndils. appro,·c<l aba1cn1cnt of Lo $112.179. Toacrounts a111011111ing t io11progr:1ms wPrr 1111cl1·rt.1k1·n jniml, tal n11mbrr of r:1~<·s consiclcrrcl ,,·:1s368. by lite !{O\'l•r111111·11I :11ulC'i1·ir·org:ini/:itions. during 1d1id1 l11mcl1t:d, of uhun- ;111 incr<·ns,· oi l•l:l o,·c:r the previous yl'ar. cloncd motor 1<•l1id1•~ 1,lTc disptt~cd 1,I ln 1w11ropsyd1iatricsC'n·irc. 228 1x1and ll1011sancl~of tl'<'<'S\\'err pl:1nt(•cl d1rou,1.dwullhl' tc·rri1ory. 1icnts were s!'en. c1·:ilt1:1tecl. :1nrtll"f'atccl.

I+


A Zoonosis Control section was organized and the Nutrition section was reorganized in the Department of Public Health and Social Services. A comprehensive speech and hearing center also was established. Objectives of the new Zoonosis Control section include the surveillance and control of aH animal diseases transmissible to man. As of October 1967, a tota1 of 89 positive rabies cases were reported. The first such case was reported in March 1967, and since that time a total of 18,600 stray dogs and cats have been destroyed. Twenty-seven rabies vaccination clinics were held in all 19 civilian communities for the second year in a row. One thousand and twenty animal bite cases were reported during the year and 98 percent of the animals involved were apprehended and held for 14 days. The antirabies program was 'Overseen by a seven-member Rabies Advisory Board comprising representatives from the Navy, Air Force, and the Departments of Agriculture and Public Health and Social Services. Initial planning and staffing commenced during the year for the implementation of the mental health and mental retardation programs. The Public Health Department, however, continued to experience recruitment difficulties, including a high rate of turnover of professional personnel. A new program to provide intensive medical care, social, nursing and dental services to "high risk" pregnant women was started in February 1968. Tuberculosis incidence remained high during the year. There were 91 admissions for hospitalization, an increase of 15 over the previous year. Forty percent were new active cases. Assistance rendered residents of the Trust Te1Titoryof the Pacific increased substantially, from 26 cases handled during the calendar year 1966, to 82 cases in 1967.

In the area of dental health, the Governor issued an executive order requiring the fluoridation of all public drinking water by the end of 1968. The Ninth Guam Legislature enacted legislation authorizing free dental care to all school children up to the age of 16, but implementation of the program was substantially curtailed because the Department of Public Health and Social Services was unsuccessful in its efforts to recruit the required dentists. The Guam water quality standards was approved by the U.S. Department of the Interior and is ex-pected to facilitate improvements in the territory's sewage and other liquid waste disposal programs. , The Division of Social Services expanded its facilities and programs during the year. A branch office was established at the southern end of the island and additional working space was provided to all programs through the rental of commercial space. Academic and industrial arts classes were provided inmates of the Juvenile Detention Home during the year, and a "half-way house for boys was opened. Under the division's work experience and training program, a total of 76 trainees participated. The Medicaid (Title XIX) program was inaugurated during the year and 977 cases were processed and serviced with monthly referrals averaging approximately 100 cases. A total of 2JO nurses were issued licenses during the year. The Guam Board of Nurse Examiners assisted in the development of an associate degree nursing program at the ColJege of Guam. Twenty-five practical nurses were issued licenses during the year. The Guam Economic Opportunity Commission established seven Area Opportunity Centers during the year. 15


A total of 1,221 potential senior ciprim:11-y function i~ to idrnlify tizen clients from throughout the terthe poor in <·arh di~tri('t. ddcnninc th<:ir lll'Cds. a11d dc,·c!up :rncl i111ple- ritor\' were inte1Yil'wC'd and :>23 of them \\'l'rr rnrolkd in adult basic edu111c11t p1ogrn111s10 lwlp e:i•r the-impart

Their

ra1ivn. The S\'Hior citiiens component rC'fnred 127 for ~lcdicnicl :ind 63 others for social scn·iccs. Twt·h-<' ~t·wing classes \\'ere roncl11c·1ed<.luring the year :111di 1 rlderl>· rcmcclial n:aclin!{ (20). pn•jol; 1 116 L ririz1·ns <·0111plctrd1hl' ba~ic roursc. ;111d~ewi11!{ ( 181' claS$<'~, recreation projccl began in The initi.11\'!ST.\ :incl vmnh ;Kti,·i1ies. :\"o\'emhcr 1967, wirb 15 ,·olumcrr, :\ • work-ori<·nlrd rmnponcnt umlcr llw f.ronm11ir Opponu11i1y (:c,111111i~- irom rlw cominrntal l."nited States participating. The ,·olu11tcc1, \\'orked sion is the Xei!.!hhorhnod Youth Corps. a ,,·ork-s1udy pro~ram for youtJ1s lG doscly wid1 thi: .\iea Opponunity Center staffs in lhe cle\·elopmcnt and to 21 years of age fro111 low-incollle impl<'mcntation of 1hr ,·arious profamilies. :\hout I 00 ,·ount;slC'rs were ,;ratnl(. assisted clurin~ the period. In many of the prol!rnm,. tOC F,oc·s wnior ritizrns component worked jointly wi1h 1hr (;O\•Prnor·s pr<widcs people 50 )t',11, of age and c111 Childrc·n :1tnl Youlh, a older 1\"ith scn·ic1·s i11 1w1. onal _£,"11icl- C:0111111itt<'r l.!r<>upt•s1ablishi>d•I >cars ago to assist :111r..- nnd coun~rlin~. :'ldult basi(' rclucation, lwalth. 1cn-(•a1io11,and in some youn~ people and help comhat j11w·11ilr clC'linq11cncy. c:ues emplO}'IIIClll. of po,·l·rty.

.\ ,·arir1y of pro_icn~ were undertakfn. inrluclin!! r11to1ing ( for which 250 were enrolled\. pil'~rhool (130).

Thr 1-'.c,,nomicOpporlunitr th,· tt·1-ril111').

16

C:rn111His,in11,p,111,nrs ~,•win-: .-1:iss<'srnr M'nior ri1i1.cns of


Among major projects of the Governor's Committee on Children and Youth during the year were the provision of summer employment to high school students, and the sending of a Babe Ruth baseball team to the continental United States where the local athletes competed in the Babe Ruth World Series. The veterans affairs section of the office of cl)ief commissioner consolidated a census of military veterans which showed a population of 2,225. Services performed included the certification of 105 applications for FHAV A loans. Thirty were approved.

Under the Guam Housing Corporation program, 57 veteran applicants were certified with 31 approved and 31 pcmding at the end of the fiscal year. Thirty-eight veterans who qualified under the amended GI Bill of Rights attended the University of Guam, and 12 others attended other educational institutions during the year. The Legislature enacted a law authorizing free tuition for veterans attending the University of Guam. Lump sum payments to veterans amounted to $130,000, and a total of $30,000 was paid to beneficiaries.

17


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT TIH' building hoom rontinm·d durThe Loan and Grant ,·ontract \\'a ing ll1t' ~·c-arallllou.!!h a1 :, slowl'r p:H'c cxct1nrd in \pril. 1968. It allocalccl than clurin1rfiscal ~·car Hl67 .~!).208.136 as a capital ~rant lo aicl in Hnildin~ permits issued by the Dc- the Jinancii1,!!of the Si..imjana urban repann,cnc of Public ,, orks tntalc-d nr\\'al project. \\'hose total cost is esti1,829 for u11 .:~1i1na1cd\'Jluc 011 resi- mated at $11.971.-1·15. The Federal dential and ,·011111w1-rinl ronslrnrlion ~!tan· i~ S9,298.+36. of $ I2.%·1.712. n. dr<·n·a,r nf 1-1perl'lw Loan :ind ( .;rant Part TI for the Cl'lll frn111 lilt• pn·\·ious }'l'Hr. Yona projrrl \\':lS:t\\'aiting approval by l l is i-s1iu1atcd that thl' territory till' San Franrisco t<·gional office al Lhe nrccls ·1.000 1nc>1Thomes 10 satisfy ItOtL,- end of th<· fiscal y<'ar. !'his project is inl! 11cc·d~. including- at least J, ,onlO l'Slimawcl to ros1 $·1.92J.3H2. or \\'ltid, thl' Federal shan• is $'.U\'.l1.115. n.1·crn11111Nlatr· mi Iitar~ fmnilics. Pinn, on :'I ~.">0-11ni1 Im, -n'nt housin~ !'he Sinaj:·111:1 mb:111 rl'new:il project 1,roj1·cLto acco111111od,11r low-i11t·mrn· rnn,ist, of 21·l.9 arrrs. induclin(! 679 famili,·s "ho \\ ill hr clisplacctl al building.,: and the 1·011Ln11platcd lrcaton<· of two 11rhan n·rH'\\'al prnjens tll<'lll uf 1hc-s1· buildin~~ arr: -126 tu be to h<' rchabi liwere finalin·d during- tile· year and rl<':trrcl, 22() cl1•~ign/\t<'CI 10 co111111cnccLatl'cl. and 2·1 w IA: n·tainrd 1\'iLhoul actual \\'Ork is <'XJ>C'Ctcd hr.fore Ihf' P11<lnf 1968. Cost of 1hc 1rra11ncnt. projcd is S:">.697.936. Tlw 'Vona proj,·ct is aho11t half thr The lo\, -rent housing prnjcct is bc- ~in· or Sinajana. Tt consists of 87.1 I in~ 11ndcrtahn by 1h1~( :11,1111 ·1lousing acres. 237 building:.. 15Gof \\ hjch arc and L"1banR<'IH'\\':'11.\mhorir\.assist,·d to be dearcd. 73 clesil'!natecl for reby 1cclrnicians of Ilir Renc,,:::iI :\s,isth:thilit:uion. :md right to hr rl'lainrcl :1.11crOffin·, JJc·parlmc11l of I lousing l\'ithoul Lrl'alnwnt. and L"rhan Dr\'rlopment. Lcp;isla1io11crcatiug- a C 11am Po\\'Pr('paration of applirn1io11 for P:1rr rr !\111l,ority\\:ts 1·11nc1ed h)' llit• inllt 11 Loan and Gran! for LhC' Sinaj:tna Guam I .1•gi$l:1111rrd11ring lh<' )'<•ar. :md Yon::i urban rcnc,,·.tl projects \\'as Onct· organized, tlw authority will :1~comp!Ncd. Thr :n11hori1~·concr:wt<'d ~11111<' operation vf dtl' cidli:111 pow:-l'on11a11D. Fitzgerald & .\ssorinrrs to rr distribution systc·111and \\'ill conprrfo1 m the first and ~1•ronclacquisition tinue 10 purcha ·c elertric pmrcr apprais:ds for the L\\'O romnrnnitics. as the: fro111tl1t· Xal'y until sucli 1i111c fiotl, of 1l1rsrappr:iis:ils 111·arNI rnmplra11lllmil) b :1lilc·le) f11rni~h1his sc·1,Lion ::it tlw t·rlll or the )~·ar. fn addition. i1·1' to tilt' ('()llllllllllity. E~ro l111..rnational \\'as contrat·tl·d lll .\ pm,·1·1 .111tliorily n·,·1·11111• bond perform tlw ,ur,·cT. and Titlr ( ;1,:i1·a11ty an :1lsc,\\':\~ 1·11ac·t('(I to 1Jro1idl' funclnf Guam J)L'rfornu:dLirelid<' ~rarrh fnr in~ for fu111r<' cxpan~ion of rhr both projects. JJCl\\'Cr S)'$tC111. Ill


Hotel, motel, and apartment construction continued at an accelerated pace as the demand for housing accommodations remained acute.

19


Powe1· peak loads h;wc rearhrtl 30.000 kilm,·atls in the ci\'ilian community. an incrt•asc of more than 100 pc-rcenL in 5 years. Po\,·cr consumption a,·eraged 300,000 kilo\\'alt-hours per day. Expansion o( the isbnd\\'idc telephone system continued cluring the year. The S2.500,000 t'.xpansion program included the conslrnction of a 2,800-line cc-ntr:.'11office at Tumon Heights which ,,·ill scn·c the norrlircntral section of the territory. Also under conscrnction \\'as an 800-line crntral offic:e at 1\!!at lo SCJ'\'C the south\l'estcrn portion of the island. and a -100-line central offirc- in 1\fc-ri;:o to sc-1Ycthe outhrrn rommunitics. The r<·ntral t\!!ana office:and the :.\tfangilao exchanl!'c also will be expanded lo saris(~· the gro\\'ing demand for telephone scn·ice. Consumption of \\'aler \\':IS approximately seven million gallons pc:r dar, or a prr <"apila dailr a\'Cra!!e of 110 ,!!allons. It is anticipated lime hr 1970, the clailr consumption will rise lo 8.5 million gallm1s. and by 1975 the :wcragc ll'ill be 12.5 million {f<\llonsper clay. There we-re 21 drc-p water wells in operation \\'ith eight more in reserve. The !alter will be placed in operation upon completion of the second inncmenL of the water resource <lc\'elopmcnL program. The third increment \\'as schcd11led to get under\\'ay late in 1968 and \\':IS to inrl11dc-six additional rescr\'oirs. L\\'o nc\\' booster sLations, rehabiliL.Hiou of used spring~, and the imerconnection of rhe C:enrral Wa1rr Srstcn1 \\'ith T:ilofofo, \falojloj. and Tnarnjan. The Declcdo se\\'erlines were reach· to be connected lo the C"entral scwe·r 1,y~te111 a11d ll'ill rclie,·c Ilic portable srstcm installed '.l ~-cars:igo :-1s:-1tcmpor:i1y 111eas11n·.Work "·as 1111<ler\\':t}' al .\san, Piti, '1'11111011. and ,,·t·Stl'l'l1 Agana i11prl'par:Hio11for li11k:ll.!L' to thl' Cl'111r:i I ~ystcn1.

20

,\ fre schcdt1lf' for the use ot the sr,,·er systc-m ,,·as in tirutcd April I. I ()68, to co,·er the t·ost o( operation. 111aintc11ance. and depreciation. The Housing Di,·ision of the Dcp:i rtmc-nt of Public Works operated j 18 liousin,g unils, of "hirh 171 \\'ercgo,·rrnmcnt-o\\'necl. I 03 \\'C'rc gO\·crnmrnt-c-ontrollc-d, and 27-1 ,1·t•rc lcasctl fron1 pri,·atc O\\'llcrs. This acti,·ity sho\\·cd an increase in private lc,1sesby 176 percent. The Guam Housing Corporation rccciwd 108 loan applications of \\'hich 75 totaling $9B9. I00 Wt'rc approved. By ·comparison. 26 loans totaling $323. 725 \\'Cr<:au thorizc:d in fiscal rca1· I 967. There "'ere 35 low-rost housing loan applications totaling ~ ~72,500 a\\'aiting appro\·al action by the corporation· s board of direc-tors. ,\n additional 76 :ipplirat.ions tolaliut! !;,1,003,150 \\l:rc in \'ario11sstal."!C'~ or processing. The rorporntion had $3.233.2-18.66 in loans rccci,·ablc al the end of the fis('al )'C31'. Tn an eITort t:o allc-\·iatc-the housing shor(agc- to some degree:, the Guam Rl'11tal Corporation \\'as incorporated in September. 1967. to sponsor rental to be li11a11ccd housing projens throu~h fl'<ltral assistaucc a\'a.ilablc t:11dc:rscrtio11 221 (cl) o( the ~ational Tfousin~ .\ct. An initial proj1·r1 of 11:i clrrarh<'d :md s<'micl<'tad1cdunits an: pbn11ecl fur co111plctionbr the encl of lisral year I969. This initial project is expc-rtcd to cost $1,ll69.800 and will i111'111d1· on-site-and de, clopmem cosL~. l."pdatin!{ or the territory's master plan for co11111111nity drvelopmc-nt was prrfnntwd hy rlH' l)c-pantnrnc of LmHI )-fan:1~1•11w111. l t i1wludC'dformulation d,,,·elnpmenl pl:m for of :t prcli111i11ar\' ~:•hools. an int(·ri111hi~hwa~· swcl~·- a ~1111111rnn· of t·xistinl! ro11di1ions cxprl'sscd in the 111::istt-r plan, and cont inu:nion or the n<'ir~hhorhood,malysis ~111dy.


Workmen lower sewer pipe as work continued on the installation of an islandwide sewer system.

The department provided assistance to the urban renewal program and other projects, including outdoor recreation and park development. The year's activity included updat• ing of the maintenance and supple• menting the land scale.plane system,

the triangulation network, and the islandwide vertical control system. Eighteen displaced or disturbed con• trol stations were replaced for map• ping, and 30 new stations were added to the Geodetic Triangulation Net• work. Sixty percent of all established

21


stntiom \\'l'l'C tied in fo1 :,ccondar~ control. nnd 50 pc-rcenLof .1 mnp indt:x system for cad:ISlral 111appinir \\'a~ ar• lOmpli~hed.. e\\ maps \\'ere bMt:d 011 mpoenphic.tl features ohtnincd by :1trial phowgraph and .C!roundsur\'c·~-~ Onc hundred ~ul>divisio11~u1'\'1·~ \H'l'C' romplclc-d i11 Ikcl1•clo . .\ fn1 hananno, Tnarajan. and Tnlofofo and a pcritt1elt·1·~un 1•\' fo1 lite· Tu111011Ba~ and I la1111011 Field areas to idemify propc·rt~·li1ws nnd ,uhmf'n:?;f'rl !:ind also ,rn,, pcr(onncd. :\ssistanc<: \\'as r<'n-

i 11spectccl and rc11<'1,·<·d.Jnspe1:1io11and imt'sti!{ations were: pl·rfonu<:d 011 131

applications to :icquirr gon:•rnmenc land. Thr. Land Transfrr Board nppro, eel 30. Appliralions for zonin~ clcar:1ncc th.it wC'rc· pror·rssNI tot:1lcd l.:i87. of ll'hirh

111v \\'l'l'l·

di~:1ppro, ed. There

wC'n· l ,0.1:l applir:i t inns for build in.~ prn11it~. :101 for b11sinrs~license~, nncl '.~I fo1 liquor law Iic<'llSC's. Du1in!! LIH·rear. J.()83 dotumrnts were rcrordcJ in the !!C'nrr;ilinclc-x.J-1.5

dcred to the L".S. ( :c:olo~iral Sun<·,· in

titlt' sr:,rdws

C'diring the llP\\ topoC!raphir 111:ip ,1·1·i<·~ of G11c1111. 0111·lt1111d11'd s111 \'1•y~1q•n· 111atlt:fm road rclnt;"1tin11.,tttd land l'C'!!i<;trntio11. oi lots in :\g-a11:1 to rrsoln· th<' multiplr ownership prohlt:111.Tl1rct· ltu11drtd :ind sixty s111vry nraps 1, NC rr1 LC\\'Ccl

l:rnd rcgi~1rntion rasrs. and 182 legnl in,1rumc11b 1,erc prcpan·d .. \ total of $26 I .O/n.90

\\Tr<'

w;\S

arromplished

for

n•rt•i,·rd for npplicn-

tion ff-,~~. i11swlh1w111 pa}1111·nts on rontrads n·n·il'ablt·. and l.111d ~al1·~. Code c-11fnrc1·111c111 im·n·:t~nl 10 a \\'l'l'kly lond of 12 ~11hdi1·i•io11• nnrf :i:i for nd<·quatc- standnrds :md acrnrary. 1011ing rlra r:in,•c•nppli1•n1i11ns. D11ri11gtlw y1·ar uml1·r 1t·1 i1·1,·.the '-11·1·c-11 nr" pa I k~ \\'ere tic, doped I kp.11 (llt('lll <>fI ..111d.\ 1,111:l!!l.'lllt'nl ,ll· .lilt! 111ai11l,1i111•d du1 in!{ tlil' yt·ar. Th<•y q11irPcl21 p:irrels of l.1nd by c"cltnn~r. i11d11d1·d tlw K:1isc-1Opt·n Sp:1n• P:trk. 2·1 parr<·ls b~ purrh:ist·. l ~ .~r~1111• of tlw Dt·dc•cloPark. the' llo1a11ir.1I(;:u·C':l,r111cnt (ur 1>01,er. 21 fo1 waler. I '.1G <lt'n. tl1t' .\c;n-S11111ayPad,. tl,c ;\[crim for righ1-of-\\'ay for ro:1cls,nnd 2-l p:1rP:1rk. the <:ua111.\lt·111orial I lo~pitnl ccls for publir liousin(J site,.

Park. and dw Talofofo P:11k. Somr. I 0.000 lr<'('S :11ul ~hrnhs 1,·c·n• plantNI d11r16fl propcny 01,ners Till' dPp:trtnwnt in~ the ,rar. apprais<·d 21 p:nrcls of 1'.!01·<·1 nnwnt :i11d l'lw Board of Enc.iuccri11~ nm! pril':llc rn1l 11101wrl~and l(i pri1·au·l~ .\n l1ilectural Exa1ui11c1sl'l'Jl<HWdan O\\'ncd buildings. ri fty•'W\'('11 land US(' :,s~i~nmr Ill<; i11ncase 111 n·!!i~11·n·dl'llgi1w,·r.,, nrchi,,·en· pro('('. <'<I. nnd !fl:~ pr1111its,,·1•1·<· tc.:rt.,,:rncl su n·1·vors from 29 10 -13. :\fc!{OLiatio11s

22

im oln:d

co111ra1·L

ll'ith


PROTECTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF RESOURCES Five capital improvement projects under the Guam Rehabilitation Act were completed during the year. The}' were a College of Guam Library Building, a Fine Arts Building, an addition to the Dedcdo Elementary School, a new Juvenile Institution, and the first phase of a planned islandwide sewer system, bringing the total to 31 projects constructed with funds allocated under the Rehabilitation Act. The Rehabilitation Act authorized an expenditure of $45 million for rehabilitation and capital improvement projects. As of the end of the fiscal year, $36,761,000 had been appropriated by the U.S. Congress for projects in education, community development, public works, resources development, and public utility rehabilitation and expansion. The territory participated in many other grants-in-aid programs and almost all agencies of the government benefited under such programs. Among major highlights of the year was commencement of service by a second airline - Air Micronesia which offers regularly scheduled service between Guam and the major islands of the Pacific Trust Territory. Au· Micronesia is partly owned by Continental Airlines. Construction started on a new commerical port facility which will, when completed, cost in excess of $10 million. The new facility, located at Cabras Island across from the present

port site, will provide more than half a mile of wharf space, large warehouse and open storage areas, and contiguously, an industrial park for the de-. velopment of commercial facilities. Both breakbulk and containerized cargo will be handled. As of May 31, 1968, a total of $4,104,744.70 had been expended for the design and construction of the new port complex. The Guam-Tokyo direct air flight, inaugurated in May 1967,continued to show increasing popularity. Pan American World Airways increased its fl_ight frequency from two to three times weekly in April 1968, and plans call for 4 weekly flights by late 1968. International flights served by the Guam international airport terminal averaged 26 weekly and scheduled flights to and from the Trust Territory averaged 23 weekly, an increase 'Of 16 and nine, respectively, over the previous year. The Guam Economic Development Authority cosponsored an exploratory tuna fishing survey with the Taiwan Ocean Fishery Development Administration. A 350-ton fishing clipper with a complement of 35 men conducted a 4-month exploratory survey on fishing grounds south of Guam. The survey indicated that there are potentially good fishing grounds in the waters around Guam. The authority disbursed $24,000 to five applicants for agricultural devel23


,-.

f,s

.. ~-,

-:~•.. •-:;-:.

:-'

··:· ·7 Construction of nc"· Ylig bridge ,,·as complcwd during tlw rear.

------

.-

-~~ :t;f ..~~ 41'-=~~•r-~,;.,_

···~

...

___ .:-

Coostrnc11011of the new Comm<'rcinl J'ort fncilit)', lucntcd :icross from its pn:scnt site. was well undcrw:ir. The new port complex will h:1w :1 h:11f-milcof wh:irf ~p:1r,•.

2+


opment loans and was in the process of reviewing eleven Joan applications amounting to $227,296. The Legislature enacted an Agricultural Expense Insurance Act and appropriated $50,000 as initial funding. The program provides insurance to bona fide fanners against loss resulting from natural disaster such as typhoon,

GEDA allocated $105,000 as its share in the construction of the territory's first modern slaughterhouse and meat processing facility. During the year, six applications for tax exemption qualifying certificates were received, reviewed, and processed by the authority's board of directors. One was approved; three were denied;

Woman assembles watch components in one of several watch assembly plants operating in the territory.

rain, flood, and drought. Coverage is limited to labor and land preparation costs. The authority participated in a $200,000 loan for the construction of an 18-unit motel expansion. Its share was 50 percent of the loan. The facility was completed in July 1968. The authority also participated in a $125,000 loan for the constrnction and operation of an auxiliary food service. Its share was $25,000.

and three were being processed as of the end of the year. The approved application was authori.zed during the previous year. Eleven qualifying certificates were in full force. They were companies engaged in watch assembling, tourist hotel fac.ility, manufacture of tobacco products, manufactu1-e of alcoholic beverages, lumber mill and furniture manufacturing, candy production, and commercial feed mill. 25


lmpons du1ing Lit<'y<':trtotaled '.327.- ;un!rcssi,·r tomi::t promotion campai~. 000 tons with a 111oncrnryrnlur of $79.- Co11ponath-crtis<'mcnts ,,·rrr pbrrd in 921.000. l·'.xporb 1nr:tl1•cl7 l.'i02 rems :t 1111mherof 11ewspapcr~and 111:igaand l1~1n~;hiprnc11I; totall·d 26 ..i i I 1011s. ,-i,ws ,, ith 11:i1ionaI and international •I ht Ikpan m1·m of Co111111t•H"C concl11ru·<I :m I'll! ploymrnt $111...-ryrn\'f'ring alt l'lll[lloyt•is. inrluding 1111•mili1.11-y. It also rn11d11ctcdstudil's 011 c:onsumc!' spending and rn~L of Ii, ini:r. A new ~Lalisti<'al pro!!ratn for the c-ol• lcnion and compilation uf ~tatistical d:1ta on nwrrhandi<r i111ports was introduced. \Vorkirn.~ in conjunction \\'itlt :1 ~l'll· ior rconomist (If tltt· Ftclcral ·1rndt• Commis~ion. thc- drp:irtment completed a sun·cr on rrtail prier~. !'<'· tailin.~ qrunurc, and opcratill~ rr~11lt~. The s11n·ry c-on·rccl food, general mcrchan<li~<·.automobiles. buildin!! m:urrials. :i ml other retail areas. Thr drpa!'tmcnt conducted a more

..'

c:irculatio11~. i11cl11dini:rTfolid;l\", Xew

Yorkt'r.

Tr.,, el :\Iaca1.ine. • Tra\·cl Suns<'t. and thr :-,;c,, York lnq11iri<·s lotnlrd 12.iOI.!, or

Tradt·.

'l

i111L'S.

.'i.:3+2 more- tha11 during- thr ous

prt·\'i-

\'f'al'.

T;mri.-;m continurd ro develop at an :iccelcratcd pal;('. from 1.00() ,-i~itor,; in 196+ lo 111.000expcCLcdliy the end of 1968. _-\,; many as i5.000 nn1111:ill~ an· expected b,· 1972.

P&O Shippin!.! Li111·i11crl'ascd it call irorn one- to two ships with a c-0H1bincdpa~srngrr totnl of 3.000. Thc1{1l.\lS Queen Fredericka of the Chandris I .ines made her maiden ,·isit cluri11!!the vcar. Thi:' nc'partmenl •

of

Agriculture·

I

I

Thrs,· bn;,• h,·.1cl,·.,lol,ai:,· \".ll il'ti,•s ,n·re a p,,rl "f ., fi~l<I1·csc:irrh t'Xprrim<·ntal progr:un , onllm tel h> tlu· Pl.1111 Di1isil'n nf th,· Drp:irtmcnt ,11. \cri, uh 111,• dnrin.c: dw rc,~r

26


reported an increase in the total production of fruits and vegetables by some 400,000 pounds-valued at $64,000-over the previous year. Total production was 1,877,872 pounds. Importations of fresh fruits and vegetables decreased by 700,000 pounds but remained in the I 0-millionpound level.

A monthly increase of about 10,000 dozen eggs was recorded dwfog the year. About 45,000 pounds of broilers were produced locally, or about 2.5 percent of the total annual importation of ready-to-cook chicken. A new Farmers' Market was completed and ready for occupancy at the end of the fiscal year. Consideration

Fanner discusses corn crop wilh Joseph Barcinas, acting chief of the Department of Agriculture's Extension Division.

27


was being giwn to lease of the facility to the Cua111Fa1111ersC.:ooperati,·e ,\s. sociation. ·\ total fish catch or 3-13.500 pounds ,·alurd at $171,i:'i0 ,ras recorded during till' real'. The cconorniC' impact from all fishing ac1i,·irirs w;is C'~timatrd at

S57+.000.

The Dcpa.-t111l'11t of :\~riculturc condueled \'arious training programs during the rear. Staff members attended training programs tonclutttcl locally and abroad, incluclui~ trainini:r in plant and ru1i111alquarnntinc, fi~hrry. rodc·nt control. romm11nity cln·rlopmc•nt, ch irk sc·xing, and import rncat inspc:c1ion. . \ l\\'O•\\'cck work<chopfor !oral farmers "'as held. Department rqwrsrntati,·c$ also paniripated in the Pacific Fishery Confcn:nce. the Pacific Rre-ional Cooprrntivc F.xtrnsion Sn·vicr C:onfrrc·nrr. ancl tlit· Fl'dC'ral Pro.[{ra111 Coordinator Confc-rencc. I mpll'.mentation of the· . \grir11 lt11raI T!'rhnical Scr..-in·s \!'L of I !)6,J ,,·as

28

rralized II ith the signing of a memorandum of understanding hrh\'ecn the Frclrral Extrnsion Scr\'icc of the U.S. DL·partmcnt of .\gricultw·c and the go,T1111T1cnt of Guam. Under this program, a staff member of the Federal Extension Scr\'icc was as~i!,'llcd Lo Cuam as an extension ad\'iser. Other signilicant developments in!'h1decl :1Utho1ization :rnd funding for a 1ndon ny cradic:ation program, construction of an anirnal quarantine station, pro\'ision of dirrrt loans to the Guam 'Farmers Coopc:rati,·c .-\ssociation, comrnl of feral cats and dogs, implementation and enforcement of the Wholesome \feat .\cc of 1%7. rrrr11itm!'nt of kr.y staff pt:rsonncl. promulgation of rules and regulations pertaining Lo the l,ar\'esring of t rochus shl'lls and pinr lohstr1~, and the ob~c-rvance of ''fanrn.:rs' Day". The territory had 877 rull and pnrttimc f:lrmc·1-:-,11 more than in fiscal yt:ar 1967.


LABOR As of June 30, 1968, the territory had a labor force of 21,316, 57 percent of whom were employed either by the Federal government or the government of Guam. Twenty percent of the labor force were Philippine nationals utilized primarily in consb·uction projects. There was no known unemployment. All employable persons willing to work could find jobs. There was, however, a continuing demand for skilled workers and efforts were being exerted to upgrade the skills of local workers through expanded and improved curricula and facilities of the Guam Trade and TeclmicaJ School, the Navy Apprenticeship Program, and other governmental in-service training programs. The Guam Employment Service completed plans for the establishment of a State Manpower Development Planning System under which the GES is responsible for developing an annual state training plan in con~ultatio11with other agencies. Three Manpower Development and Training Act projects were completed with 51 trainees graduating. They involved two clerk-stenographer projects and one block-layer mason. Of the 51 graduates, 48 were placed with private industry or government service. The programs were sponsored jointly by the Guam Employment Service, the Department of Labor and Personnel, and the Guam Trade and Technical School. Another training program for waiters and waitresses was started in

May 1968. Seven enrollees completed the 8-week course. Fourteen young workers participated in the Apprenticeship Ti:aining Program, a joint venture between the government of Guam and the Guam Contractors Association. Seven employers participated in the program. During the year, 738 youths seeking employment were registered with the Guam Employment Service. These youngsters included dropouts, disadvantaged, and high school graduates. Services rendered included employment counseling, placement, testing, and referral to federally financed vocational training such as the Neighborhood Youth Corps and the MDTA program. Approximately 250 students registered with the Guam Employment Service for summer jobs, of whom 150 were placed either with the local or Federal government or with private industry. The GES conducted a survey of high school graduating seniors to ascertain their immediate plans. Of the 995 graduating seniors from public and private schools, 653 responded. Two hundred and nineteen indicated they wished to attend college on a full-time basis; the same number planned to seek full-time employment; 51 want-.::dto join the armed forces; 57 planned to attend college on a part-time basis; and 107 were undecided. The GES offer.:edassistance to the 219 who wanted immediate employment. 29


Joh openint!'s receiq?d from both l{O,·c·1·m11rntand pri,·::ile finns totaled 9.667. 111orc by 806 th:in durin~ the predous year. Of the tot;il, 8,82-1-were iilc-d by alien petitioning e1nplO}'Cr,. A total of 118 rC<.Jueslsfor alien employment certification were received. These \\'ere rc-,·ic\\·1•d:111dtransmitted to th!' U.S. c111ploy1ncnl regional office i11San Francisco for final disposition. Of tl1(' l lll requests, 78 \,·err appro,·c-cl. 2i "·rrr denied. and I ::l were pending at the end of the year . .\ lOtal of l.715 nc,,· applications for employment wen: rc:tcin·d durinl! the year. This "·as 502 less th::in during the prc,·ious year. Also. a total of 1.967 applic,uions were recei,·ecl for gm·emnwnl ()f Guam job ,·aranries. :'\ona.~ricultural placements numbered 859, a decrease of 7--1-8 compared to t hr prr,·ious year· s ro1m l. Coruinuing- assistance during die fiscal ~,ear was 1·cndered to Selecti,·c Scr.·irc n·habilitants. Rcjrrtrcs repor1i11,I!to the local office were counselled and rdern:d lo job vnrancies in line with thrir !raining and rxperirncr. ,\ssisla11n.' also was I emlered to rct11111i 11gvrlt'rans. Veterans discharged front thr military scr.·irc- undrr ronditions other tha11 disho11orable were 1:rivcn preference in selection and referral to training nnd;,r the ~fDTA pro1.m11n as \\'di n~ sdcrtion and rrfc1nd to joh openi11.1tswith pril'ate industry or go\'crn1ncn1al agencies . .-\ total of 111 military ,·<'tcrans were assisted. of whom 30 ,,·rrc successfully placed. The .\li11i111u111 ,rac-e and Hour .\ct of Cuani \\':1~ amrndrd hy Puhlic Lnw 9 139 and brranw c·ffrni,·e J111w I. I !l6B. Till' a11w1uln1c11trxtcndC'd rovt-rag-<·uf tlw :\ct aucl inrrr:isC'd dt<' mini11111m11':l_!!C' from $1.25 10 ,$1.·IO per hour. :\notlwr l'llllt"lmc1ll by 1lw Ninth {;unm l.rl.{isl:ihm· :imrndrd 1hc Cuam

Workmen's Comp<•nsation Law by inn-casing- maxim11111\\'eckly co1111x·11sation for disability from $3:i to $56: funeral cxpcnsrs from ,$-WO 10 $60(): and 111axi111umco111pcnsatiou for i11_iurics not resulting in death from Sl0.000 to $20.000. At the end of the y<•ar. the numlwr of c111ploy(•t·$of Llw C:o,·1·rn11H·11! of Cuarn totaled 5,·l•fl'.{,of "·horn ~,682 wrn· rc·1rular 1·mploy1•c·s.A total of l+i aliens ,,·ere employed by 111<'!oral !{o,·crnmem aml the 11u111bcrof off-island (United Stares) cmplo~·ccs was :mt. The Dcpartnwnr of L;ihor and P,·rsonnel rcportrd that d11rinrr the year 86!) u·iln:l rcqursts a11d aulhorizatioos ,,·cr-c processed for the ,·arious depart111ents:ind :igt'nric·s of tht· go\'rmmrn1. Of th<.'t0taJ. 99 \\'('re for tra\'cl bet \\'l'CII contract periods, 288 for initial recruit· m<'llt~. 10 for i1M<'1Yirr tr:iining. 101 for ro111pll'tio11of c-o111rans. ancl 371 for conferences a11d other oflicial businrss abrond. Total cost for tr:i,·el :ind transportation ,,·as c•stimatrd at S 1.559.228. Oi this amount. $876.513 \\'H • expended for personnel transportation. shirrnrnt of prr~on:11 aocl ho11~dwld 1:ITc:rls.nus. and for JH·rdi1·111and q111dtY items. The board of I n1.stee.sof 1hr Government of Guam recircml'nl fund 1·111ployed lite scn·iccs of 1hc Public Scn·ire a\dministr:ition of Chica.~o to rnnd11rt :rn :ictu:iry study of the fund :rnd determine its so11nd1ws.~:rnd slalll~. New le~islation also a11thori1.ecl the Board to i11,·cst in corporal<· bo11ds. morcgages. and storks. all under rontrolled conditions. l frrrt0forr. invl'srmcnts \\'rrl' rc-~trined tn L1.S. ~1·1·11riti1·, and bank deposits. Tltr Job D<'\'l'loprnt'lll ancl Pn•-Joh Training- c·omporwnt of 1lw l·:ronon,i,· Opport1111ity C.:m11111is~io11 pr<wiclt-cl:is10 Ll11: sistanc<' i11~t•c11ri11c e111plm·111t·11L fim111ciall~·disad,·a11tn1n·d. 011ri11g 1lw yrar. a rota! of '.{0+rasr rl'frrr:ils ,,·1·n·


Youngsters enrolled in the Neighborhood Youth Corps program learn skills through on-the-job training.

submitted by EOC's Community Action Project centers, 138 of whom were placed in jobs. Of those placed, 89 were in permanent positions and 49 on temporary or part-time employment. The component also conducted an eight-week pre-job traini11gcourse during which clients were instructed on bow to conduct themselves during job inte1views, the filling out of application fom1s, and the advantages of better work habits. Completing the course were 114 clients.

The component also conducted a pre-selection summer camp for 27 young men, 16 to 21 years of age, from which 12 were chosen to undergo Job Corps training in Honolulu. Another work-oriented component of EOG is the Neighborhood Youth Corps, a work-study program for youths 16 to 2 l years of age from lowincome families. A total of 103 youngsters were assisted under programs of the Neighborhood Youth CorJ?s.

31


PROTECTION OF LIFE AND PROPERTY :\ tot:-iI of -1.260 crimi11nl off cn~i:s se1im1s11css uf jll\l'11ilc dc·li11quc·11cy. ,,·rrc:: rrronlc-d hy 1hc lkp:-iruncnt of .\filitan· pc-l'sonncl "''r(' i,woll·rd in Puhlir Safety. an i11nc•nsr of 22.9 p<'r- 22r1c·asrs. or I n.2 pc-rcc-ntof tlw total. c:cnt 0\ er 1hc )JI\'\ ioll~ p·at. or tla: to. \ total of I. 160 1wr,011s\l'l'l'l' artnl, 1,-~51 "·rrc C'omid1·rrd nrnjor of- 1 c~tt·d durin.l(' the ,ear .. \rnnm~ 1hc111 fenses. i11tluding homidcl1·. mhhrry. '"'1'1· 22~1 j111enilrs. :ind n!!'.gran1tt'd a,,;ault. Thr- I )c•p;ll'trnrnt nf Public Sflfely l11:m rffoJt to ,ll n·,1 till· 11cnd. ,1·,n·n•i11·d and n·ro1llnl a total uf 11.28/1 ernl ~tq>s \\t'r<· 1:-ikc·11 hy 1he ~n,·c-111- ,·a<;(•~. of "hil'11 i.52i required sprc·ific mrnl. indudinl!' implc1111•mn1ionof i1n·c·sli!.?'ali,·c·:inio11. ·1lwn· 11cre 1.381 rr1·0111111rncl:1tin11s rnadc h,· tlw C:o,ca,,·, prtw1•:,.wd a11d Lrans111i11t-cl to 1·rnor·~ C:0111111iu1·1· on Crime·. J11H·11il1· prop,·r n111hn1iii,·~. incl11di11{!<)~'.I to tlw .utor·nc•r ~,•nc•r-;ll'.~ offin•, 12'.Ito LIH· I)1·li11qul't1l'~and I ..I\, E11fnr1·1•11w111. "I lir romrnit In·. n·1nc~r-11ti11~ a r, o~~ .)1t1l·t1ill· Cm11I. 22!l lo rnilil.tl") a11•·1·1·1io11 of Liu·rrn11111111111, i11rluclim1tlw thnri1i,·~-:111cl :m 10 tlu· L1.S. :ltlCll'llC~·s 111ilitarv.~(Jl'lll ,,., c·ral 1r'1rn11li, probirn.! offin•. into thr ('[Ill~(•, or rri111c·nncl \\:\\~ and 'l'r:-iflic olliccrs in,·cstigawd 1,950 111l·amof 1·11rhi11gi1. lrallic- :1ccidcn1s, nn inn-i-nsr of I 10 J11,·cnill- Cn11f1·rt·1111·Co1111ni11i·1·,or 7. 7 1wrr<·nt o,·c·r rhc pn·, iou, yca1. ,1·rrr or~:rni,<·d in .di IlJ ri, ilian rn111- Tr;1fTic-faLalities lutalcd 23. LI\o more 11111ni1i1•s. Tlwi1 p11rpo,c·ll'ns to cll'l<'<r 1lt;111in li~c;1l)'l":lr 1!'.lni. a111i~odal hdia, ior :11111,ngthe· ~mmgTilt· traAw ~crtion of tlw T1epartmrnt peoplt· and 10 1\·rrn111rn·nd111c·thodsi11 of ruhlil' Snil'l\' iss11l'd9.99!'1 dril'CI ·s 1n·:uin~ 1hC'lll lwfo1P 1hc) lic1·01111· lieciiscs during ;he yl'nr and a total of \\';irds of the .Jun·11ilr C.011n. J·l.965 moLM l'C·hidrs ,,en· insprcwd. I )ming 1hc ye:i.r. 1.076 lirrann~ Li:l!i~l:itirn, \\'as i111roduc-NIin clu· '.\inth ( ;11:-imLi:l(islaL11n·10 nratc· a "·ere rc.l!isu:rcd. 111akiui,:-a wt.il of I >q>.1nrnc·nLof Corn·11ions. It "·mdd 5.23·1 "capons pc111iancmh· rc!(istcrcd plan• 1lw (;11,1111 1w11i1r111i:ir~ nncl the ,,ith 1hc poliri:. including l.1'.13pistols. 9.l'.1 n•1·nll-,•1-s.1.2::17sholt,'1111~.l .ll'.12 illl c11ill'dl'll·11tio11ho11w1111cl1·r t Ii,· pmriflt·,, :ind I(') carhirw~. po~ecl dq1atl111ern·l>1c~po11~ibili1~. 1'111· (:mr·rnn,·~ C.:011111,iucr· nn L:liil!'here \\Crc a total uf 5i5 fire·~clurdn·11 and Youth rn11lin1wd to prm iclc· ill!! tlw ~1•;11•, i11cl11clintr 15 home firC'S. ;,s,ist.mu· '" qfft•1in!.(l'\'(1'1':I lion a I ,11HI :'II I gra•~ ,IIHI hr11~h111'1'~, a11tomo·, rch1C';t1in11,1l outl,·t~ 111tht· lt'I I i1111~ l,ill' lltl'~. four vq11ip1111·111 fin•<.. 111tl13.i 101111\.! l'iliYC'II\. 111i,c1·IL111<·11m lirc·s. Fire losses Of tlw l.'.198 rr i111inalC'aM·ssokcd :tlll0\1111('(1 lO ~:n5.H9:>. l'ropen~ lw pnlin· i111'1·,1i,!.(alnr<. ju,·l·nik~ \H'I\' ,,I\L'd \\:lS\:thll'cl rn$536.2n2. n·,11111hihlc· i11··11>1·:1,PS. nr :-16.<! (lf'l'n·nt \pp10:-.i111,1tch 9.000 trallit· tiek,,r tlw loial ,I dt•,u i,ulil':llj()II of Lill' ('b wc·rc· i~s11edduring- 1hc vt>:ir. c-oni-

·n


pared to 7,095 during the previous ta1 relations ( 113 divorces and 17 annulments), 30 land registration cases, year. The District Court of Guam heard and 150 special proceedings, includ101 civil cases and three admiralty, ing 75 civil marriages. The Juvenile Court heard 166 cases, six bankruptcy and 30 criminal cases. There were 15 trials by jury. Two hun- of which 129 were convictions and 37 dred and seventy-one naturalization acquittals. A total of 697 claims were filed in petitions were filed during Lheyear, of

The new courthouse was completed and dedicated in February 1968. The struclUre houses the District Court, the Island Court, the Juvenile Court and the Tra.ffic Court.

which 215 were granted and four were denied or withdrawn. Fow· appeal cases were heard by the appellate division of the court. The Island Court disposed of 334 criminal cases during the year, of which 246 were convictions, 16 were acquittals and 72 were dismissals. A total of 758 civil cases were filed during the year and 447 were disp-osedof. In other actions, the Island Court disposed of 63 probate cases, 158 mari-

the Small Claims Court during the year. Disposed of were 330 cases. The Territo1ial Parole Board granted IO paroles and denied 13 during the year. There were three violations of parole and five parolees received official discharge. Bill drafting was a major activity of the Department of Law. During the year, a total of 71 bills were prepared for submission to the Ninth Guam Legislatw·c. 33


The clcp:-mment coordinnted with 1hc territor~:., lrgnl counsel in Washin)!lon, n.c.. in lh1; prcparntion of the gov1·rn11wllt\ cnsc- bcfon· tlw Ci,·il Ac-ro11.'.\111ic~ Board ,·oncrrning thr T1':l11spacificRoule case· n11d tlw Pacific 1,l«nds l.ornl Scn·icc- c;i~c. Both ,,·c•1·epending at tlw 1·1111 of thr fiscal Year.

• Narcotics and other dnngrrous druas ,,·err• b(•ginnin~ to pose- n prohlrrn in 1l1c tl:rriwn-. .\t IL-a~t011c ane·t ,ms madc and a·substamial amount of c.!nngc-rous drugs nncl pbnts we-re confiscated uy m1rcotks agent•. One in,·rstigatio11 led LOLIw 1101-.rtnc11·al of ;111 employcc·s c111plo~·nwn1 agrccrncnt bcca11,f!of his inl'<Jll'(·1ncntwith mnrihmma. Two complian('c officers of tit<:Dcpnrlnwm of Finnncc· ,,rre $ent nbro:1cl for ohst-r,·ation and training in tlw lidds of narcotics and alcol1olil' be,·c1air1·rontrol. Port S('i·urily officinl~ insprcH•cl I t.102 aircrnft and 5!)'.\ ~hips. and pror,·,srd IC)0.6!l+ passen/!t·rs :incl new mc111ber;during 1lw yc:ir.. \ ror::il of :\6 l.·1·'.11pir1·c·~of h:H!!.!U~c and 67.408 cargo boxes and p;wkagcs ,, ere inspc-ctcd. Plant ,rnd a11i1nal1·as1·shandlrcl by Por1 Srcurity inspectors lolrdcd 86:i. CasP, irwoking drn~., nml mrdicirw totaled ·I I a11d those co,·f'r<'d u11cll'1 rorei!!n .\sscts Control Rei,:111:ition,lo:t t:il!'cl'.\-1 Port s~•<·11rity. all :rn11of rh1•I kp:ir1Jll1•nlof C:011uncrc1·.1·nforn·, applir:1ahl1• f)rn1·i~ion~of C.:11.lom~. ti II' U.S. 1 nrirf Sdwrl11lr-. tlrL· fl'<kral Co11Ll,l-

band Seizure Act, the Foreign .\ssets Control R,·g-111:itions of the l.-.s. Trea~ury Dcpan111cnt. plant :rnd animal quarnntinc regulation~ of both the tcrrimry and the l:.S. Drpartment of Comnwrn·. f1•d('r,1l law~ l'oncf'rning arms. auununitio11. and i111pl1·111cnls of \\':-tr. Federal l:i\\'s of co11cf'rn to th<' ,\comic F.nc-rc:rComllli~sion. nnci puhlic health quar:111ti11crcg11latio11s. Se,·en J>ort Scrnritl' inspectors partiripatrd in a11 :inin1al-pl:rnt ci11~1ranti_nc se1nu1ar sponsored by the Eai>t\\'c.st C1·nt1·r. l"ni,·crsitv of Jlawaii. nnd hrlcl at the l"niwr.sit,· of Uunn1. The Oflk<• oi Civil Drfrnsr continued its faltout aml typhoon sheller s111·..-cy.impro,·cd the warning and communications systems, organi71•d and furnbhrd with cmcrl!cncy gear~ tlw district ci,·il clcf,•ns<·units. inlcnsilit·d public info1111n1ion::ind rclucational pro_!!.ramsthrough Ilic 111•ws mrdi:i :ind at mass 1nrctings. Fifty-tlm·r polici· officers wen· trained on 111<-dkalscli-lwlp and 17 orhrr adults on radiolog-icalmonitoring. \\'as .\ hriding- on shrlrrr 111a11ai;:<·111cnl giw11 lo 60 public ~c-11001principals nnd ,·icl' principals ll'ho ,,·en•d<'signatcd as shc-lrcr manag-rrs. . \bout 7.000 civil drfcn~r posters proddi11~ \'ilal information on ,,·arnin!? :11\cl su1Yival i11 Limes of f'lllPrgrnry ,,·rrr cli~trilmlf•cl1lirou,(!houl the tcrritorv. ilw "T~ pl1oon Emrrg-rncy Control l'l:111"\\:-IS revised a11dcopie~ \\'Crr clis1rih11t<'cl to opc-rating clcpnr111w11ts an<l kt·1·l!m 1·rnmr·11toffki:ils it'i..~iQncd cmc1-~1·11c1· n·~pon~ihilitil's.


PARKS AND RECREATION The Department of Land Management developed and maintained seven new parks, including the Botanical Garden in Dededo. About 10,000 trees and shrubs were planted during the year. The department also completed plans for the constTuction of the territory's first civilian public swimming pool in Agana. Construction is scheduled to commence before the end of 1968. An estimated 10,000 man-days of legal licensed hunting was recorded by the Fish and Wildlife Division of the Department of Agriculture. A total of 470 licensed hunters participated in a year-round pig hunting, one bi1·dhunting, two fruit bat and two deer hunting seasons. The reported legal kills were 43 deer, 300 doves, 169 pigs and 60 fruit bats. The economic impact from hunting activities was estimated at $90,000. An estimated minimum of 10,000 man-days of fishing was recorded. Total fish catch was estimated at 343,500 pounds valued at $171,750.

A total of 505 species of fish from 84 families have been identified from Guam waters. The Guam Recreation Commission maintained 14 basketball courts, eight ball parks and 10 bleachers. A total of 3,821 persons participated in sports and other recreational activities supervised by personnel of the Guam Recreation Commission. About 70 percent of the participants were youngsters between the ages of 13 and 17. Sports activities included baseball, softball, volleyball, basketball, tennis, and pingpong. Nine professional boxing promotions were held during the year. The Guam Boxing Commission was accepted as a member of the World Boxing Association early in the year. For the second consecutive year, the Sinajana Civic Improvement Club sent a Little League baseball team to Japan to compete in the Far East Little League Regional Tournament with the winner (Japan) proceeding to Williamsport, Pa., to compete in the Little League World Series.

35


SELECTIVESERVICE SYSTEM J'hc trrritory li:-,s :'\ tot::il of I5.996 Sl'lrni\'\' Scrl'i,·L· rc!.!i~trants. i11ch1cling2.387 \\·ho .in:: pn•scntly ~erving in tlw :\rmcd Forn·,. and l..+'.17"hn :1rr m·rr the ngc nf li:ihility for 1uilitary ~c•1Yin·. Cndcr tlw 1mmpow,'1 nrnsc1vation prO!.!!'i1111. 3 l rt•jectcc$ 'H'l'l' gin~n com-

.Hi

plctc l·uunsl'linl{ and guid::inc-esr1...-irr, nnd nf the· '.H yrn111.~ tn<'n. 20 were n·frrrrcl to ot!wr roop<·rati11ga!!c11cirsf01 jnh pla;T111c:11t .incl l'dll!·alion. ::111d 1-l \\'1•n· prO\·ided medic.ii H·rviccs. Of thr 1 I. ,ix were rchnhilitatc·cl :111cl :1.rrnm,· ~<'tYingin the :1r11wdfon'Cs.


APPENDICES

STATISTICS OF HOSPITAL OPERATIONSFISCAL YEAR 1968 Admissions: General .................... Nmvborn .................. Tuberculosis ................

. . .

5,288 I, 915 126

Total ......................

.

7,329

Discharges: General. ................... Newborn .................. Tuberculosis ................ Death .....................

. . . .

5,094 I, 873 115 184

Total ......................

.

7,266

Average Daily Admissions: General .................... . General and tuberculosis ..... . Average Daily Discharges: General .................... . General and tuberculosis ..... . Average Daily Census: General services ............. . General and tuberculosis ..... . Percentage of occupa.ncy : General services (based on 189 beds) .................... . Tuberculosis (based on79 beds). General and tuberculosis (based on 268 beds) ............. . General services (exclude newborn and tuberculosis) (based on 156 beds) ............. . Newborn {based on 33 beds) Premature births ................ . Stillbirth ...................... . Twin (sets) ..................... . Triplets (set) ................... . Gross Death Rate (percent) ...... . Maternal Death Rate (percent) ... .

19. 65 20.00 19. 51 19. 88 125.08 166.44

Infant Death Rate (pe.rcent). . . . . . . I. 77 Anesthesia Death Rate .................. . Post-operative Death Rate (percent). . 98 Autopsies ( 149 cases) (percent).... . 80. 98 Tiss~~ Q_>mmitteeReport (percent). 100 Sterilizations .......................... . Consultations (934 cases) (percent) . 12. 85 Caesarean Sections ( 133 cases) (percent)......................... 6. 86 Outpatient Visits: 626 Cardiac .................... . 83 Dermatology ............... . Diabetes ................... . I, 577 302 EENT ..................... . 698 Genitourinary .............. . Gynecology ................ . 2,093 Medical ................... . 13,558 Neuropsychiatry ............ . 52 101 Orthopedic ................. . Pediatric ................... . 7,102 Plastic ..................... . 6 Surgical ................... . 13,649 3 Dental. .................... . Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39, 850

66. 18 52.36 62. 11 68.06 57.30 142 24 9

I 2.53 . 088

Examinations performed during were as follows: Hematology ................ Biochemistry ............... Bacteriology ................ PnrasitaJogy ................ Urinalysis .................. Blood Bank ................ Surgical Pathology .......... Bone Marrow ..............

the year . . . . . . . .

32,509 12,300 31,262 2,051 18,939 18, 939 I, 516

ECG ......................

.

Autopsy ................... Exfoliativc cytology (Papa.nicolaou) ...........

I, 326 224

.

1,249

9

37


.SL.:1'1:\1.\RY OF :\l.\jOR

<..:0:\11'.\R.\11VE

TERIUTORY

T.\TlSTIC.\I.

Pcrc-cnt of Chanti:C

\'cnr and .'.'lo.

!:,vents

( I -)

1%7 Li\'ehirth .... ' Death .............. I 11fa11t,.k:uh ......... :\ L,rring,·. Dh·orcc ........... ltlt-giti111atr-birth. 1 Tuf.111t

csti mated

....

..

:.?.:;oc; 3+3

:2152j

7!"1 .lfl:?

(i.i .t)O h:!

I:I :.107

3G3 (())

196'.H!>G7

IWE!'iTS,

OF Gt.:.\:\I

~. 5:l:J

3JG

82 +71 t>O 227

:.?.G-18

I 9Gfi-l 9(;7

:.?,50'1

-:1.2

-+.o

327

'.HO

:1-I :iOfi

.i7 CiOI

-.i.fi - Ill. 7

J:l

·IU :!51

<J.•I -10.O

27()

Tk.ith .111dllkgi1i111,1tc Bini, per 1,000 li\'ebirth; OU,I W.

:vi

0 . .i 100. ()

10 LE \DI>l"C C:.\USF.S OF IJF..\TH-Gl'.\~I,

1!.!67 l'crccnt

.

2cl .......

.

:id ........

.

·Ith ........

.

5th ........ Gth ........ 7th .. 8th .......

. . .

Dis.,:rn,·<of tht• ht•.,rt :ind blond ,·c•s.,l'l<(•l'.W •l:16) :\f.1lig11alll :-S,·opl.,sm, .,ti <it<·~.( 1-«l-W;i),. . . . . . . . . . . \1010,· Vchid,· .incl all other ::iccidcnrnl cw1s(·s ( 1-:uoo I·. !lt'i2). 111-dclincd discns.:s ixculiar 10 early infancy and i111mnrnrity 11nq11:1lilitd(7n-771i). l'nc11111onia.:ill types (·l<J0-1-<JJ)........................ Disc:iscs of the nervous system :ind sense orga11s (J 11 -:l!J8).. . .. . ............. Tub..-rculosis :di foruis (tlOHJl!J).. Other di~,•a_c;c~ or tlig('Sli\'C system inc:ludiug gastro-cnccriti.> .,ml rnliti~, ,·scrpt di:irrh,·:1 of tlw n..-,vborn (;11<i-.'iA7). Vnsculnr ksions affccti11'l"central ucn·ou.s ~ystc,,, (330 .l.l·J) ... C:irrh<,,i, of lin-r (,1fll) . . .. .. .. .. . .. . . . .. .. . .\II other causes..................................... Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3U

:t n 2'.!.7

nil other per 1,000 population

Or<lcr

<Jth... 10th .....

2H. ."",

;it

THE

Isl. .

Rates 1 1967

Uh ·11

:!li. :!

J;'>

I'..!.0 JU.. l

:!7

7.h

1H

5. :J

17

1-1 JJ

7 H:! 340

:;. 0 I. I

:ui

J ,, :?. I '..!O.U

100.00


GOVERNMENT

OF GUAM-GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURE FISCAL YEAR 1968

STATEMENT

General Government: Legislature.................................................... Washington Representative...................................... Judiciary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Governor's Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bureau of Budget. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bureau of Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Governor's Committee on Children and Youth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commissioners of Guam......................................... Boards and Commission......................................... Department of Finance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Department of Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Department of Land Management................................ Department of Labor and Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Department of Public Works..................................... Contribution to Retirement Fund................................ Local Transportation (P.W. support). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Employee Housing (P.W. support)................................ Maintenance of Buildings (P.W. support).......................... Rabies Control (P.W. support)................................... Off-Island Travel and Transportation............................. Total general government....

........ ......... ..............

Public Safety: Department of Public Safety. . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . Juvenile Co.rcctional Institution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Probation and Parole........................................... Rabies Control (Public Safety Support}. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Civil Defense. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Typhoon Jean Relief........................................... Building Permit and Inspection (P.W. Support). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weights and Measure (Commerce)............................... Contribution to Retirement Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local Transportation (P.W. Support)............................. Maintenance of Building (P.W. Support).. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off-Island Travel and Transportation............................. Total Public Safety......................................... Highways: Highways, Streets Maintenance and Drainage Control. ............. Street Lighting ............................................... Contribution to Retirement Fund ............................... Local Transportation (P.W. Support) ............................ Total Highways ...........................................

$574,891.51 86,859. 11 214, 151. 03 225, 976. 35 50, 503. 11 114, 209. 92 23, 729. 76 204,523.38 I, 329. 14 I, 113,603.83 206, 736. 35 161,439. 14 136, 844. 61 391,968. 60 222,318.14 42,094. 77 15,482.49 348,327.45 34,922.00 97,951.24

-----4,267,861.93 =====

2, I07, 519. 12 153, 742. 15 33,397.90 34, 863. 99 34, 975. 99 24,041.13 61,400. 15 4,286.32 195, 376. 42 101,291. 77 45, 637. 30 3,449. 10

------

2,799,981.34

===== . . . .

328,229.93 47,508.57 28,734.99 193,023.54 597,497.03

.

Sanitation and Waste Removal: Garbage and Trash Collection. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . Contribution to Retirement Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local Transportation (P.W. support).............................. Total Sanitation and Waste Removal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

====== 195, 421. 40 17, 096. 31 29,995.95

------

242,513.66

Hospital: General Administration ........................................ Professional Services ........................................... Housekeeping and Maintenance ................................. Contribution to Reitrcmcnt Fund ............................... Local Transpor~ation (P.W. support), ........................... Employee Housing (P.W. support) ............................... Off-Island Travel and Transportation ............................

. . . . . . .

251,274.41 2,414,257.58 629,071. 23 148,831.61 2, 129. 90 13,742.57 60,883.30

Total Hospital ............................................

.

3,520,190.60

39


c;ovrR:-.,rr-::--T

()f'

CL' \\1-C[~ER.\L 11,C:.\L

YL.\R

JT:-Sn F.XPE:-mrrL·ru-. lf!Gll

Consrr\':1tion of l lrahh: Ccncn1l .\dminis11·atio11 ................ . R1'1?ub1ion<:rnd I nsprrtio11 l'ublic I lcallJl .St·nicc~ Rabil'< Cu11lrnl C:onn-ihmion 1c, Rl'tirc-mcm htnrl . ... ... I uc:.11Tr,111<p11rl,11io11 ( P. \\', ,uppu11) ......... , 1:mploycc- I lomini:: (I'.\\'. ,11ppc,r1l . . . .. .. . . .. ,\ lai111<•11,1111•c· ul Ll11ihli111!, ( P. \\', ,uppltrl.l .. , ................ Off-hl.,nd T1'.l\c·I .11,d Tr;1n~porl.1tio11 ...•... 1'01,1!Comrrn,tion

~

l.\ 1.E:-..1.Ei'\'l 0

C:ontiuul'd S J,J I, 701. 55 :,7,GjO.llO 717, !HII. 21 !), 0 I:.!.6U l'l. 2'l·I •Vi I:.!.J-12. '>.I

.... .. ....•........

.. . .

.

.

,.

or I lc>,1lth

\ .1R:t47

1:.1, 110:1. :!5 22. :.!tlI. '.!.7

I, OJll, 7·Hl. 0 I

Socinl SC'r\'ice<: Gcncr:11 Supcr\'ision. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Puhl ii' ,\<si,1t1111·1·. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... ,. Co111111uni1" /;cn·irc-~ ..................................... . Judic::11°1! . . .......•................... ,\111i-Pmc·11y Proi.:r;,n, . . ... , ... . w t<.1•1ir1·mL•nt F11nd. . . ................. . Co111ril1111io11 f.or:il Tr.111~port.11ic,11 (I'.\\'. <11pp111·1). 011-hl;,n<l lr.1\'C'I ;111d'1r.111.<portation fm:il 8ori~I Sc-n-iccs.

1;2,•1·1-tf,3 592. 12 122. 23H.211

l)(iJ,

571. 38 !JO,G-12.6G 17, Ifl~l.'JH ·,, .lH'I. 11 t,, Ol)I. CJ<I I. IGIJ.727. 13

Public Schools: l:<'11tr;il.\d111inistra1ion ............................... 1:11•1111·111.11·y Srhuuls.. .. .. .•. .. l'ublic I liith Schools. . . \',1<•,11i1111al Rc·h,1hili1.11iua C:ollt·i:1:of (;u:1111. Sd1Uol l.11111 Ii Fund . . Srhol.1r,hi11 .,ml Stucknl l.n.1111'1111d ( :0111rihu1ion10 l<.,·1in·ml'IH Fund L,x-al Tr,,11,pnr1.,1ion ( I'.\\'. supponj .. l·.111p!u) ,.,. Housing (I'.\\. suppOl'IJ . :-..l,1in1rn;rncT oi fi11ildin,c:s\ P.\ ,· s11pporlJ UII-Isl.111cl l'r.,vcl .111dl"ra11spon,11ion ..

. . •..•.....

2, .ISO,!110.111, 'I, !JU~,Jl>:!.·I 7

'.I, 7·,o:2fl I fl7 2:,1, 51 ~- ;i•l I , 11:,,I, •l!lll h 7 17'), !):17.00 7>,IJIJ0.00 'lllU.07-1. 7u ')2·1.·lf.i2. o2 527. :no.-1,:; 1:!2. 1151.ID I. IOO,ll!l.i, 511

I:,, hO.\ HIJ•I.hll

I otal J'ul>lic ~cliools

Public l.ibr:irr: (:11.1111 l'11hlic l.illl',11')'... C:ontrib111io11ll> Rrtin•111r II 1'1111cl l .,wal Trampc,r1.11ion (I'.\\. ,upporl_l . \l.1i1111·11a11«· or l\11ilcli111:~ ( P ,,. ,11pp<,rt)

I IB,·II!!. ·111 ',. 'lit!. 5'1 22,;, .1S IO, 'l·IH. () I

rm,il P11hli,~T.,l,rar" RC"nr.,1io11: Rccrc:11io11Con1111ission. ).J USCUIII.

. . . .

:II,. i.J I. ·lli

• •.

P.1rk~ .,nd (,round. Cu11trih11tio11to Rc1irc1111:ntrund . 1.,wal Tra11,prn1,1tio11(I'.\\' "11ppoot) t I'.\\. 'iuppon \ laintcn.inn· of U11ildin1.."lTot.ii R1·("rc·.11ion .......

·I0

.

+,IHI. :l!J IOi, 'lY2. Iii ,,, .!80.11.i 7, 77+. fl'I h, liG3. 7'1


GOVERNMENT

OF GUAM-GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURE FISCAL YEAR 1968-Continucd

Protection and Development of Resources: Department of AgTiculturc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Department of Commerce....................................... Land Administration and Survey................ .......... Rabies Control (AgTiculturc-Support)... . .... .. .......... Contribution to Retirement Rund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local Transportation (P.W. Support)............................. Employee Housing (P.W. Support)............................... Maintenance of Buildings (P. W. Support). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Off-Island Travel and Transportation... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

STATEMENT

....... ....... ....... ..... .. ....... .......

Total Protection and Development Resources.................. Utilities and Other Enterprises: Air Port Terminal.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority. . . . . . . . . . . . Contribution to Retirement Fund. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Employee Housing (P.W. Support)............................... Off-Island Travel and Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

------

1,059,718.88

====== ......... ......... ......... .........

Total Utilities and Other Enterprises.......................... Contribution to Other Funds: Guam Economic Development Authority Fund .................... Guam Housing Corporation Fund ............................... Commercial Port of Guam Fund ................................ Guam Farmers Cooperative Fund ............................... Farmers Small Loan Revolving Fund ............................ Workmen's Compensation Fund ................................. Land Survey Fund ...... , ..................................... College of Guam Dormitory Construction Fund ................... Land Acquisition Fund ........................................

$389, 704. 72 311,041.07 169,578.29 63,512. 18 60, 040. 36 28,682.49 795. 27 12, 267. 08 24, 097. 42

128, 272. 50 290. 00 5, 867. 07 I, 641. 65 904. 30

-----136,975.52 =====

. . . . . . . . .

339,893.00 275,000.00 500,000.00 75,000.00 75,000.00 15,000.00 10,000.00 340,000.00 400,000.00

.

2, 029, 8!13.00

Others: Manpower Development and Training Program.................... ESEA-Title I................................................. ESEA-Titlc II................................................ ESEA-Tit.lc III............................................... ESEA-Titlc V.. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . ESEA-Title VI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HEA-Titlc 11-B.............................................. Statewide Planning-Vocational Rehabilitation.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

601. 53 38,026.83 I, 040. 94 141, 162. 75 34, 034. 88 9, 734. 35 24,781.29 49,301. 22

Total Contribution to Other Funds ..........................

Total Others. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Capital Improvements and Other Projects ............................

.

------

298, 683. 79 5,910,910.63

Grand total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38, 983, 567. 33

41


GOV.ER~~IF:'.'lT

OF

Gll,\~1-GE:-;"ER.\T, Tlll\7) RF.\"F.:-;"UES ST.\TEt-.lEK'T FrSC' \T. YL\R f<)Gi'l

Tnxcs-Lo!'.il: loeome..... .... .. .. ... . .. .. . .. ...... Gros• Recciµt~.. . . . ...... , . . ..........•......•.............. .-\lcohol ic lkn·rag:rs. . . . . . . ..... , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Liquid F11d. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ . Toli.,c1·0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............ . Excise an<l .\<lmission... . , ................................ . ~ •••• , •••••••••••••••••••••• , ••••••• , ••• Vehicle Tr:t11~fl·I' ..... U£c<lTax......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . R,•:,J Propt·rty ............................. , ................ . Others... ..... ... . , ........................... . Licenses and Permits: \'chide- Registration ......... , ............................... . Vehicle Opcrntors... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............... . nmine:;.~... .. ......................................... .. Ot!Jcrs,........... . . . ....................... , ........... . . .. , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Fine, n11dF orfcits . . Use of l\loney nnd Proprr<y: Interest... . ................................. , . , ... , Rents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................. . R1.:vc11ucsFrom Ot!Jcr 1\i;cncr: Tncomc Tax Collc-nio11 by L·.s.. \gcncy Immigr:ition Fees. . . . . . . . . . . . . , , Chnrgc, For Current Scl'\·iccs: General GO\·crnnwnt. . ........ ... .. . . . . . , ........ . Public Safctr •••••..•..•• , , , , .. , , , , • , , , • • • • • · • · · · · • • · · · · • · · · · · Public \Voi·ks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... . f::lospit;!I and Public I le.11th..... . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Educ;itaon

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , .............

Lib~ary............. . ....................... /\gncuh 111·,· • . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...•.•.. , .....•..•. Land l\iunag,·mrnt.. . . . . . . . . ... , . . . . .. , . . . . . . . ........ . Co1111n,·rr" . . .

... . . . .. .

Educatio11...

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , , ............

42

563,fJ0B (;3,021:l

119.. 519 .1,1.:w3 161, lGG

IGI. 7+'.I 531, 3•17 7, 11+. 092 :10,4!.Hi 60. 062 41. !)'U :{,%U I, :10J,7ti8 .,,,.,

,(l,j')

-- ,: t7i

:!6,G:32

. .

. .

Elementary and .Secondary f:clucation. . . . ..................... . l\fanpowcr Trainin~ :ind Dcvclop:ncnt ........................... . . ............... , ....... . /\dull n:isic F.d11C"atio11... . Public: I lc'alth Services ....................................... . l\l:itcru.,I a11d Child Heallh Services ........ , . , .... , ..... , , .... . Crippkcl Chilclrm Scrvin:s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . Public /\ssistancc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Child \Vclf;m: Scr\'iccs.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , ................... . Work .l:'.:-.pcricnccPro~r:\111.................................... . Civil D,·fcnsc....... . . . . .................................... . 1:ish nncl \ \'ilcllifc Rcstorntion. . . ...... , ....................... . Sul,lotal ................................................

~2. 537 99·1, 9G7 IG, 528

:13, 509 28,006

. ••..............

Other Revenues: Sales :iml Co1111.x:nsaliun. Contribution nnd S11rplus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , ..... , ......... Misecllnncott~.. . ........ . Grams-in-Aids: School Operation :ind .\laintcnancc ............................. Expnnsion nnrl T111p1·m·e111cnt of F.dncntion......... . . . .. , Vocational Rchabilitntion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....... Vocational

.

.

$12, 120, :.!IU :i. 166, :HO 5+3 663 I, an1'. G8U '..MO, 03G 13•1,!J6fi 117. 44.i

.

:1,~191 23;\ 825 23,900 I. 5·1-5,94G 65. !i63 182, (i9:l 191, l(lJ 26!',, 361 28,llfi4 36, 708 229, •127 96, 2:1n IO•I !i% '.lllB'.fi3'\

!JU,·113 50. f.lll 10, 1.H l!J, :.156


GOVERNMENT

OF GUAM-GENERAL FUND REVENUES FLSCAL YEAR 1968-Continued

App~t~rcd,/.~f~clrt ............................................ ESEA-Titlc VI-A ............................................ VEA-1963 .................................................. Vocational Rehabilitation-Section 2 ............................ Vocational Rehabilitation-Statewide Planning ................... REA-Title I ................................................ HEA-Titlc II-A ............................................. HEA-Title 11-B ............................................. REA-Title III .............................................. HEA-Titlc VI-A ............................................ EOA-1964-Collegc Work Study ............................... HEFA-Comprch_ensiv<: Facilities Planning Grant ................. LEAA-1965-Pohcc Science and Law Enforcement. ............... NSF-Instructional Scientific Equipment ......................... ND EA-English for Speakers of Other Language .................. State Technical Services Act-1965 .............................. Insular Arts Grant ............................................ Library Services and Construction Act-Title III .................. Library Services and Construction Act-Title IV-A ................ Commercial Fisheries Research and Development Act .............. Outdoor Recreation Grant .................................. Total............................................ Grand total ...............................................

STATEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

S209, 149.00 30,000.00 55,910.00 104,633.19 43,428.00 26,856.00 107,984.00 64,786.00 135,160.00 3,045.00 39,690.00 8,360.00 13,950.00 21,400.00 61,514.00 25,000.00 39,383.00 10,050.00 9,500.00 11,515.45 132,414.85

.... .....

I, 153,728.49 36,508, 141.49

43 U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTINGOfl'ICE:11169 0-324-~72




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