1967 Annual Report: Guam to the Secretary of the Interior

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GUAM

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY,

AmericainAsia

AturidadlnadilantonlkunumihanGuahan

GUAM

TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR

1967 ANNUAL REPORT

Publication materials provided by the Guam Economic Development Authority (GEDA)



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1967 ANNUALREPORT

Guam to the Secretary of the Interior For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30

GUAM ECONOMJC DEVELO"MENT AUTllu P. o. Box 3280 Agana, Guam 96910

For Hie by the Superintendent

of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office Weshlnaton, 0.C. 20•02 • Price •0 cents



Contents Page

General Information . . Judiciary . . . . . . 'inth Guam Legislature Federal Grants and Aids Bureau of the Budget . Bureau of Management Research Department of Agriculture . College of Guam . . . . Department of Commerce . Commercial Port . . . . Office of the Chief Commissioner Economic Opportunity Commission . Department of Education . . . . Department of Finance . . . . . Guam Economic Development Authority . Guam Employment Service Guam Memorial Hospital . . . . Guam Housing Corporation . . . Department of Labor and Personnel Department of Land Management . Department of Law . . . . . . Passport Office . . . . . . . . ieves M. Flores Memorial Library Department of Public Health and Welfare Department of Public Safety . Department of Public Works . Public Utility Agency of Guam U.S. Selective Service System . Urban Renewal Authority . . Alcoholic Beverage Control Board Committee on Children and Youth Cockpit License Board . . . . . Board of Engineering and Architectural Examiners Board of Equalization . Recreation Commission . Territorial Parole Board m

I 4 19

23 32 33 34 39 40 44 46

49 50 52

57 66

67 74

75 79 82 84 85 87 93 99

102 105 106 108

109

110 111 112 113

114



Introduction Guam continued to move ahead in most areas during the year although it experienced several disappointments and some major problems loom heavy on the horizon. Highlight of the year was President Lyndon B. Johnson's historic visit to the island in March for high-level talks on the war in Vietnam. Mr. Johnson was the first President to visit the territory and it became a center of world attention for several days. The President, visibly moved by the warm reception he received, left reassured that despite the thousands of miles separating the territory and the mainland, Guam is a strong and proud part of America. One of the year's most significant development was the sharp increase in construction in the private sector. Total number of building permits issued was 2,142 compared to 1,541 the previous year, and the estimated value of construction was $12,356,813, an increase of 38 percent over the previous year1s$9,279,233. The pace in the private sector compensated for a marked slump in government and military construction. Overall contract construction, lumping private and public together, declined from $42.2 million to $36.3 million, a drop of 13.9 percent. Gross receipts for the year again reached a new high with a total of $145.5 million. Total for the previous year was $136.3 million. This was an increase of 6.8 percent.

Tax collections also were at a record high. Three sources of revenue--income tax, business privilege tax, and licenses-accounted for approximately $17 million. This was an increase of about $3 million over the previous year. Overall government revenue came to $28.5 million. The previous year it was $20.8 million. Government expenditures totaled $26.7 million compared to the previous yeals $20.5 million. Taxes were increased considerably to meet the fast-rising cost of education. The Ninth Guam Legislature upped the gross receipts tax from 2 to 4 percent and also instituted a 4-percent use tax. It is estimated that along with other new tax measures this will boost government revenue by $3.5 million in the coming year. Other highlights of the year: --Guam moved a step closer toward increased autonomy when the U.S. Senate passed a bill to provide for an elective governor. The previous year, the House of Representatives passed an elective governor bill, but it was not acted upon by the Senate. Now, with both Houses having passed bills, it is expected that a compromise bill soon will clear the Congress. -Guam's two senior high schools, George Washington and John F. Kennedy, which lost accreditation in the wake of Typhoon Karen, regained it in the spring from the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The accreditation was made retroactive to the start of the school year. The public school system now has some 18,000 V


students. Its total operating budget for the fiscal year was $11.5 million. -The College of Guam completed plans for reorganization in the fall jnto three schools-arts and sciences, education, and continuing education. The college also plans to open a graduate school in the fall offering a master of arts in education. The college had an enrollment of more than 4,000. It was appropriated almost $1 million for the fiscal year. -Guam's new International Air Terminal, partially financed under the Guam Rehabilitation Act, was opened in March. The long-awaited $1.6 million structure, which replaced an old quonset hut, handles 10 scheduled international Bights weekly, plus 14 to and from Trust Territory of the Pacific. In addition, construction started in December on a new commercial port, which is scheduled to be completed in 1970 at a total cost of $10.5 million. The port also is being built with funds obtained under the Rehabilitation Act. (FuU details on Guam's progress under the act are contained in the section of this report titled "Federal Grants and Aids.") -Pan American World Airways inaugurated twice-weekly direct flights between Tokyo and Guam as an adjunct to its service linking Guam with Honolulu and Manila. At least one other major air carrier is expected to be licensed to serve Guam upon completion of the Civil Aeronautic Board's Transpacific Route Case. -The Eighth Guam Legislature's action in voting down urban renewal was reversed by the Ninth Guam Legislature. The ninth legislature approved an urban renewal plan for the village of Sinajana and authorized planning and surveying for the village of Vona. The Department of Housing and Urban Development has reserved $9.9 million for urban renewal in Sinajana and $3.5 million for Vona. -The Government of Guam's longstanding freight rate dispute with V[

Pacific Far East Lines was settled out of court in January. Under the settlement, freight rates will remain frozen through 1968 at the level set 6 years ago, with additional selected decrease of up to 5 percent on essential items. In return the government agreed to drop all pending litigation and suspend port rate increases for the 2-year freeze period. It is estimated that the agreement will save the people of Guam about $500,000. -Guam's first comprehensive, islandwide master plan was approved, a turning point in the history of planning on Guam. The plan serves as a guide to zoning, subdivision control, and location of public facilities. -The Governor named a Commission on Deljnquency, Crime, and Law Enforcement to make a comprehensive study of crime and law enforcement problems on the island. An interim recommendation urging substantial pay increases for law officers was approved by the legislature and signed into law by the Governor. -Guam officiaUyjoined the British Commonwealth's South East Asia Cable System (SEACOM) in March, linking up with Singapore and Sydney. Guam already was a major landfall in the vast Trans Pacific Cable System, linked to the Philippines, Japan, and the mainland United States via Hawaii. Guam now shares with Hawaii the distinction of having the largest concentration of coaxia.l submarine cables in the world. -The Guam Economic Development Authority pushed ahead with programs to expand the territory's commerce. The agency loaned and promoted funds for a major motel expansion and a commercial air-taxi service. It also provided vitally needed funds for commercial fishing and agricultural projects. -A National Park Service survey team endorsed creation of a War in the Pacific Memorial Park on Guam. No substantial progress came on a second park service recommendation calling


Due mainly to heavy rains, market garden production showed a sharp decrease, dropping to 1.4 million pounds from the previous year's 1.8 million. This was a factor in the large increase in imports. Rabies was discovered in March in the dog population on the island, and On the debit side, Guam still ex- at the close of the fiscal year, 34 cases periences a severe housing sho;rtage of rabies, mainly in dogs and cats, had with no firm solution in sight, and it been confirmed. The Government's also is suffering from inadequate power control of efforts include vaccination and telephone systems. Generating clinics, a continuing program to elimifacilities on the island for the coming nate the large stray dog population, year will be hardly sufficient to meet and an embargo on the entry of all the load requirements. A large capital dogs and cats until adequate quaranoutlay for additional generating fa. tine facilities are constructed. cilities must be made soon and the Financial problems held up construcgovernment has no ready funds for tion of a proposed major resort hotel this purpose. The island's telephone but this is expected to be resolved as a exchanges are overloaded and another result of direct guarantees of loans for large capital outlay is required to bring hotel construction voted by the Ninth the system up to acceptable standards. Guam Legislature.

for creation of a National Seashore Park. -Guam participated for the first time in the South Pacific Games with a $25,000 grant from the Governor's Committee on Children and Youth. Additional funds we.re raised by Guam's Junior Chamber of Commerce.

President Lyndon B. Johnson paid an historic visit to Guam in March for high-leveJ talks concerning the war in Vietnam. He was the first President to visit the territory. To the leh, on platform set up at Guam's lnternarionaJ Air Terminal, are Secretary of Defense McNamara, Secretary of State Rusk, and Governor Guerrero. Those on the right include General Westmoreland, General Wheeler, and Ambassadors Lodge and Bunker.

vn



General Information Guam, the westernmost territory of the United States, has the proud slogan, "Where America's Day Begins." The island is located 3,300 miles west of Honolulu, beyond the international date line, and thus the calendar is a day ahead of the rest of the United States. Guam was discovered by Ferdinand Magellan on March 6, 1521, and remained under the Spanish Aag until it was ceded to the United States by the Treaty of Paris in 1898, following the Spanish-American War. The island was governed by the U.S. Navy until J950 except for the period during the Second World War when it was occupied by the Japanese. The Japanese invaded the island 'On December I0, 1941, just after the attack on Pearl Harbor, and the American liberation came on July 21, 1944. The date is celebrated as Guam's most important holiday-Liberation Day. Civil government was established in 1950 with the passage of Guam's Organic Act by the U.S. Congress. The local government consists of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. The Governor and the Secretary ( equivalent to a lieutenant governor) arc appointed by the President. The incumbents arc Governor Manuel F. L. Guerrero and Secretary Denver Dickerson. The Governor's appointment is subject to the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate. Both terms are for 4 years.

President Johnson nominated Governor Guerrero for a second 4-year term when the President visited Guam in March for high-level talks on the war in Vietnam. The Governor's nomination was confim1ed by the Senate on May 3. The Governor also is serving his second term as a Commissioner of the United States on the South Pacific Commission. The Governor is the chief executive and administrator of the affairs of the Government of Guam. The functions of the various departments and agencies and related boards and commissions under him arc outlined in the main text of this repon. There is essentially just the one level of government, carrying out State, county, city, and village functions plus some Federal responsibilities. The legislature, a 21-member, unicameral house, is elected at large every 2 years. The speaker is Joaquin C. Arriola. Al present all seats arc held by the Democratic Party. The legislature is empowered to pass laws on local matters including taxation and appropriations for the fiscal operation of !he government. In addition there arc 19 district commissioners elected by the people of their respective villages every 4 years. Their p1imary job is to work with various government departments and al{cncics to promote the general welfare of the people. These activilics arc coordinated by a chief commissioner appointed by the Governor.


GW1JD,as America's westernmost outpost, has an acute awareness of the wa.r io Viet.aam. At the writing of this re_port 22 Guamanian servicemen had been killed in the coollicr. Governor Manuel Guerrero, extreme left, and Mrs. Guerrero, on the right, held a dinner nt Government House in June in honor of the parencs and wives of these men who laid down their lives in the defense of freedom.

The District Court of Guam is presided over by a judge appointed by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. The term is for 8 yc.,rs. The office is presently held by Paul D. Shriver. The District Court has jurisdiction in all cases arising under lhe laws of Guam. hs decisions may be appealed to higher courts in the United States. Guam remains an organized but unincorporated territory of the United States. Tts relationship with the U.S. Government comes under the general supervision of the Department of the Tnterior. Guamanians arc citizens of rhe United States but those who reside in Guam do not have the right to vote in national elections and also have no representation in the U.S. Congress. I lowever. under local legislation. Guam has an elected representative with an office in Washington, D.C., who serves a liaison and infonnalion function between the Guam Legisla2

Lure and the U.S. Congress. The office is presently held by A. B. Won Pat. Guam is the southernmost and most populous of the Western Pacific islands called the Marianas (the rest of the Marianas are part of the Trust Territory of the Pacific administered by the United States under a trusteeship agreement with the United Nations). IL lies 13° above the equator, with Japan some 1,500 miles to the north, the Philippines about 1,400 miles to the west. The island is 30 miles long and varies from about 4 to 8 miles in width for a total land area of 2 I 2 square miles. Il is twice the size of the Virgin Islands and one-fifth the size of Rhode Island. The northern half of the island is a high rolling plain marked by small hills and woodlands and embraced by steep cliffs that thrust up to 400 feet from the ocean. To the south most of the island is made up of dense jungled valleys and rough mountains. There


are a large number of reef-protected bays and beaches dotted around the island-especially along the southern shore. The climate is warm and humid. The temperature ranges from 70° to 90°. Tradcwinds cool the island during the dry season of December through April. May and June are the hottest months and most of the rain falls from July to September. In recent years the annual precipitation has ranged from about 75 inches to more than 150 inches. Despite its tropical setting, Guam is in many ways similar to any other small community in the United States, with typical facilities, services and institutions. The island's natural beauty and resources were badly hurt by the war and subsequent typhoons but a massive rehabilitation program started 3 years ago promises a better-than-ever Guam. The island serves both as a vital military bastion aiding in the battle for freedom in Vietnam and as the transportation and communications hub of the Western Pacific. It has a vigorous and growing business community and high hopes of becoming a tourist mecca. However, the economy is still mainly military oriented. The civilian population numbers about 50,000. There are also some 38,500 servicemen and dependents attached to the large bases maintained by the Navy and the Air Force. Agana, the capital, is located on the west side, at the middle or waist section of the island, and there arc some 20 districts or villages spread out around the rest of the island. Andersen Air Force Base, its B-52 bombers pressing the war against Vietnam, is located at the north end of the island, and the bulk of the Navy's

facilities, excepting mainly its air station and communications. are concentrated at the southern end at Apra Harbor. The present Guamanians are a mixture of native Chamorro stock with dominant outside strains. Everyone speaks English. Chamorro, the local dialect, is also widely used, especially in the villages. The local population is predominantly Roman Catholic. Social conditions a.re well advanced on Guam. The island has a modem school system, a 4-year college, a large hospital, and extensive public health and welfare facilities. Fishing, skin diving, golf and bowling are the main recreation. Cockfighting is legal and betting at the pits is spirited. Fauna includes wild deer, pigs, doves, and other birds, the fanihi (or fruit bat), coconut crabs, and a wide variety of fascinating reef fish. There are the usual tropical trees and plants, including bananas, coconuts, palms, poinciana (or flame tree), hibiscus and oleander. Banking facilities arc provided by the Bank of America, the Bank of Hawajj, and the Guam Savings & Loan Association. News media include the Guam Daily News, the Pacific Journal, and KUAM Radio-TV. Guam is a free port with bargains for all shoppers. There are good buys in radios, tape recorders, watches. jewelry, gems, carvings, fabrics, china, crystal, silverware, art objects and many other products. Visitors may take back $200 worth of goods duty free to the mainland United States. All American and most foreign liquors arc available at low prices as they enter duty f rcc and there is only a small local tax. Mainland visitors may ta.ke home 1 gallon of alcoholic beverages both duty and tax free.

3


Judiciary Administration of the judiciary branch is placed in the Judicial Council of Guam whose membership consists of the judge of the U.S. District Court of Guam, as chairman, the judges of the Island Court, the Attorney General, the Chairman of the Judiciary Committee, the Guam Legislature and the president of the Guam Bar Association, as members. The courts of the territory consist of the U ..S. District Court, the Island Court, and the Police Court. All but the Police Court are courts of record. District Court

The District Court has similar jurisdiction of a U.S. Federal district court and by enactment of the Guam Legislature it aJso has vested jurisdiction in civil cases amounting to more than S2,000 as well as felonies committed and punishable under the laws of Guam. It has exclusive jurisdiction as a ta.xcourt in Guam. The appelate division of the District Court, whose membersh.ip consists of the judge of the U.S. District Court, the chief judge of the High Court of the Trust Territory and two designated judges from the Island Court, deterrnines all questions of law, or mixed law and fact emanating from the Island Court of Guam and the High Court of the Trust Territory.

felonies, some civil matters, marital relations, probate, land registration, and special proceedings. It has a division known as the juvenile court which has exclusive jurisdiction in all proceedings involving any minor under the age of 18 years. It aJso bas a small claims court which deals with claims not e,xcecding$100. Police Court

The police Court is vested jurisdiction, concurrent with the Island Court, in simple misdemeanor, as well as offenses arising under the motor vehicle code. Probation and Parole

The probation officer, who is also the parole officer for the Government of Guam, with two assistants, supervised a total of 29 probationers from the U.S. District Court, 82 from the Island Court, and 25 from U.S. district courts localed in the continental United States. A total of 35 paroled prisoners were supervised during the year, 28 of whom were from Guam Penitentiary, and seven from penitentiaries in the United States. Attorneys

Island Court The Island Court is vested jurisdiction in aJl criminal cases not involving

4

Four attorneys were admitted to the practice of law in Guam. There was no report of any malpractice.


IN TH£ DISTRICT COURT OF GUAM FOR THE TERRITORY

OF GUAM

Statistical Report Jan. 1, 1966 to Dec.. 31, 1966 CIVIL: .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . Cases pending.Jan. I, 1966........................ Cases filed during th.is period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • Total cases for this period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total cases terminated during this period......................... . Total cases pending at close or this period ...............•..•..••.. Nature or suits or actions filed this period: I. Account stated. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . •..•..• 2. Assault and battery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................... 3. Breach or contract: a. Failure to convey real property ....................... b. Fraud and services rendered ..................•.•...... c. Promissory note. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...................... d. Others ........................................... 4. Book account ............................................ 5. Check .................................................. 6. Declaratory judgment .................................•.•. 7. Dissolution of partnership and for accounting. . . ............. 8. Federal Tort Claim Act: a. Personal injury. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. 9. Foreclosure and deficiency judgment .....................•...• I 0. Foreclosure of vendor's lien ...........................•.....• 11. Foreclosure of mortgage ................................... 12. Guam tax ............................................•...•

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20.

21.

22. 23.

24.

25. 26. 27. 28. 29.

30. 31. 32. 33.

ADMIRALTY: Cases filed during this period. . . .................................. Cases terminated during this period ................................ Cases pe.nding at close of this period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..........•..

43

. .

I I 7 :J

.

I

.

3

.

I I

.

I 4 2 12

. .

11 I

··· ·································· United States of America. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... . Government of Guam.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Money had and received ................................... . Money owed and services rendered . . . ...................... . M.iller Act. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......................•...•.... Ncgl_i$cncc....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .................•.... Partition of real propc.rty ........................ , .......... . Permanent or temporary injunction and damages ............•.. Personal injury within business premises...... . ............. . Petition to perpetuate testimony ............................. . Property damage ......................................... . Reformation and damages .................................. . Specific performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............. . Subr0$ation to rights or lienholder ........................... . To quite title and damages... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . • . . . . To declare deed as mortgage ............................... Tort: a. Personal injury ...................................•.. b. Personal injury ( motor vehicle) ....................... . c. Personal injury and wrongful death .................... . Unlawful detainer and damages... . . . . . . ................. . Violation or fiduciary duty, etc .............................. . Writ of habeas corpus. . . . . . . . . . . ......................... . Writ of mandamus ........................................ . Total cases filed. . . . ....................................

193 150

I 3

.

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15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

65 128

0 6 3 3 5 6 2 2 I

I 5 I I I

2 I 7 19 I I

I I I

.

128

. .

2 I

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5


IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF GUAM FOR THE TERRITORY OF GUAM

Scatiscical Report-Continued Jan. 1, 1966 co Dec. 31, 19~ntinued BANKRUPTCY: Cases pending Jan. I, 1966......................................... CIISCSfiled during lhis period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cases transferred during this period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total cases for this period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cases disposed during this period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cases pending at close of this period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CRIMINAL: Cases pending Jan. I, 1966......................................... Cases flied durmg this period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total casesfor this period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cases terminated during this period. . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. .. . Cases pending at close of this period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Offense or offenses charged:

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GOVERNMENT

.

13 4 9

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U.S. CASES I. Burglary and grand theft .................................... . 2. Embezzlement by bank employee ............................ . 3. Forging an obligation and security of the United States.... . . . . . 4. Grand theft and entering military reservation .................. . 5. Mail fraud... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........................ . 6. Robbery within the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction, and assault with dangerous weapon. . . . . .................. . 7. Theft of government property ................................ . Total U.S. cases filed .....................................

10 2 I

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3 26 29 23 6

2

I 1 1 1

8

OF GUAM CASES

I. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Assault with a deadly weapon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burglary in the second-degree and attempted grand theft ....... . Burglary in the second-degree and grand theft ................ . Crime against children and rape ............................ . Crime against children and sex perversion..... . . . . .......... . 6. Failure to stop when involved in an accident resulting in injury to a person, and drunk driving causing bodily injury to a penon. 7. First-degree burglary and attempted rape. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. First-degree robbery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... , . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ii: i~~~e2°th~·ft:::::::::.:::

: : : : :. : : : : :: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 11. Involuntary manslaughter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. Involuntary manslaughter, failure to stop motor vehicle at scene of accident, drunk driving causing bodily injury to person...... 13. l\llurder........ . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . .. . 14. Murder in the second degree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15. Rape.................................... . .. .. .. .. ... .. .. 16. Theft of vehicle and involuntary manslaughter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Total Government of Guam cases filed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total all crimfoal cases filed ..............................

.

t I I I I 2 I

18 26

=====

Number of defendants disposed by conviction: U.S. cases .......................................... Government of Guam cases .............................

. .

Total number of defendants disposed by conviction ............

.

14 14 28 =====

6

1 I 2


IN THE DISTRICT

COURT OF GUAM FOR THE TERRITORY

OF GUAM

Statistical Report-Continued Jan. 1, 1966 to Dec. 31, 1966--Contioued CRIMINAL-Continued Offense or offenses charged-Continued Number of defendants disposed by acquittal: U.S. cases .........................................•.. Government of Guam cases. . . . . ....................... Total number of defendants disposed by acquittal .............

0

I

. .

===== I I

Number of defendants undisposcd pending passing of sentence ... . Number of defendants undisposcd pending further proceedings .. . Number of defendants undisposcd pending trial to jury ......... .

-----

Total number of defendants undisposcd at the end of calendar year ........................................ - . - - . -- ..

4

6

=====

TRIALS, PRETRIAL OONFBRENCE, AND MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITY, BOTH CIVIL, CRIMINAL, AND BANKRUPTCY: Number of trials to court. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . Number of trials to jury. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

-----

32 11

Total number of trials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

43

Number of pretrial conferences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Number of hearings on civil motions, bankruptcy matters and criminal preliminary hearings, arraignments, sentences, disbarment and others...

80

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Total number of proceedings both in open court and in chambers....

=====

Number of days in trial session: I. With jury... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 2. Without jury. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Total..................................................... PETIT JURY ACTIVITY: Number of trials in civil cases ...................................... Number of trials in criminal cases ..................................

-----

<149 20 22 42 6 5

. .

II

Total number of jury trials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Attendance and service of jury panel members and jurors (in pcr-pcrsonpcr-day unitS): I. Present..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. . 2. Serving on juries..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...........•.. 3. Called and challenged ..................................... . 4. In reserve ............................................. .

336 96 47 193

Fee raid to members of jury panel by the U.S. courts: . Per diem attendance fees..................... . .... ....... 2. Mileage-paid to all members reporting for duty........... .... 3. Meals paid to members serving onjuric~.... . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . Total cost during this period...............................

326

S4,018.00 SI, 274.20 $109.61

----S5, 401.81

GRAND JURY ACTIVITY-NONE. NATURALIZATION PROCEEDINGS: Petitions pending Jan, I, 1966.................................... Petitions filed dunng this period ........ , .......................... Petitions transferred to this court ...................................

. . .

Total petitions for this period ....................................

.

34 282 10 326 =====

7


IN THE DISTRICT

COURT OF GUAM FOR THE TERRlTORY

OF GUAM

StacisticaJ Report-Continued Jan. l, 1966 to Dec. 31, 1966----Continued NATURALIZATION PROCEEDINGS-Continued Petitions granted during trus period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petitions withdrawn and denied..................................... Petitions transferred from this court. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

265 8 3

Total petitions disposed during this period ..

276

Total petitions pending at close of this pe.riod. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

50

. . .. .. ..... Declaration of intention issued during this period..... . . Fees paid to the Government of Guam in all naturalization matters during this period.... . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

18

APPELLATE DIVISION COURT OF GUAM:

ACTIVITY-APPEALS

FROM

S3, 845.00

ISLAND

Crv1L:

Appeals pending Jan. I, 1966. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appeals filed during this period......... .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . .

0 4

Total appeals for this period.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appeals terminated during this period. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 3

Appeals pending at close of this period ..........................

.

CRIMINAL:

Appeals pending .Jan. I, 1966.................................. Appeals filed during this period ................................. Total appeals for this period... . . . . . ........................ Appeals terminated during trus period .......................... Appeals pending at close of this period ..........................

. .

--------.

. ..

2 I

UNDOCKETEO APPEALS DISMISS ANO REMANDED TO ISLAND COURT DURING THlS PERIOD: Civil....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 4 Criminal........................................................ I UNDOCKETED APPEALS PENDING AT CLOSE OF THIS PERIOD: Civil....... ..................................................... I O Criminal.............. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LAND CONDEMNATION ACTIVITY TH.ROUGH CLERK'S OFFICE: Stipulations and judgments on stipulations, order of advance withdrawal and distribution of funds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Check drawn and money paid to local residents on judgments, stipulated renewal rentals, order for advance withdrawal and order for distributiom or fund for use or land by the United States or America and the Government of Guam...... . . .. . ..... .. .. . .. .. .. S108,457.49 MARRIAGE CEREMONY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

8


~

f... "' ...

l

r

Report of the 1slaod Court, Territory of Guam for the Calendar Year 1966 CRIMTNAL CASES Number ol Number or Number o! CIISllS dctondnnts cases pending Involved filed Jon. I, 1066Jon. 1, 1066 ye11r1900

N

Offense

ASSnUlt... .. ........ . ......... Dottery....................................... .. Contrlbullog to tho delinquency oro mluor...... Disturbing Ulc pellCe. .. ..•...... ...•••••• Disorderly conduct_............. .............. Dmwl11gor cxhlblllng IIdcodly weapon......... Drh•lng motor vchlclo during period of IIUSJ)Cnslon ordrh·cr·s llc1msc... . ... ....... .... .. . . . Druukcnru:ss.... .. . . . . . ... . . FoUurc to lilo uccldcnLrcporL_................. Fnllurc to provide Chlldron with nccesslUes....... Failure to support wile.............. . ........ 'F:ilse prcteflS('. . . . . . .. O0111\Jllng.. . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . lssulng hank check without sumclcnt funds Indecent exposure_. Uavlng sc,.•110oroccident. . . Obstrucllni; Justice. . .\lnllc.fousmischief... . . . .. . .. .. . Occupying u structure without n ccrllRcoto or OCCUl)UOC)'.........

.

. . . . . . .. . . .

.. •

Opemthtit motor ,•chlclo while u11dcrtho tnnucm:o orlntoxtcn.U~ liquor. . . ........ ... . . .. . Opcmth111111oton•ch!clo wllhoutu driver's llccus,Owning n dog without o IIWIS4' PIISSIIIJl o school hus.... .. . .. .. . . . . . Pem11llln~ consumpt101101T thl' promlscofo lfccnso on-silc olcohollc IJ",•emgl.'S. . . .. Petty uierL.. •. .. .. . . .. . . . .. ......... .. Possession of nlcohollc bovemges ns u minor...... Possession of dangerous wcopon.. . . .. . . . . . . .. . Possession oflondcd rlfie... . . . .. ~

0 o 6

0 4 O 8

O

o

Number ol Disposals Number ol Number ol Number ol Number or dotom:lants --------~ defendants CIISeS dclendAnts Involved ConAr,. Disdisposed Involved pending Involved year 1066 vlclcd quilted missed year 1066 year 1900 Dec. 31, Oeo. 31, 1066 1066

7 66 12 25 l 2

7 65 12 20 l 2

6 36 8 24 1 1

0 O o l 0 O

1 18 1 J 0 l

G 49 O 26 1 2

0 66 O 28 l 2

3 I

10 O

0

o

3

13

13 I

1

2

3 1 l I

o O O O

1

4

2 0 I 0

O

2

6 I l t

6 1 1 3

l 0 1 0

O

O

o

o O

o 3 10 12

0 3 10 12

O 2 0

o 2 o 0

4

0

3 l

O

I

0

u

u

O

6

6

O

I I l

I I 3

I 0 I

I

7

7

O

O

1

o

O O I

J

7

4

7

1

t

O

1

I

O 0

O 0

12 12

12 12

0

0

I

I

O

O

I

1

I

O

4

4

20

20

16

I

2

18

18

0

0 O

2 I

2 I

0

I 16 6 I 2

I 20 5 1 5

o

3

0

0

0 0

2 I

0 2 0 0 0

O 2 0 0 o

I 18 6 1

O 0

I

1!

I

3

O

I 13 3 6 0 0

o 3 10 10

o

I

I

1 11 3

a

I

o O o

2 I

I

2 I

O

I 22 6 I 5

I 12

O o 0 O o

1 2

0 O

o 2

O

4

1 O 0

I

I

l

O

0 O 0

1

I

l 0 I 0 I

1

6

0

0 0 0

4

0 0 o

0 O o


0

Report of the Island Court, Territory of Guam for Calendar Year l~n. CRIMINAL

Offense

PossclSJ011or unregisteredfirearm................ Providing lnwxlcatl ng liquor to a minor ..........

r~~~~iiiiv1nc-:-::::::::::::: ::=~~:: ::::::::::: Recltless driving camlnc bodily Injury to person ..

=

Salo or alcohollc bev~

lo II minor .............

Ing .................. ·- ..................... wllh s~t Ilght ................••••• aklng ~e Taking ¥lld BDlma ·················-·········

Tampering with voblelo or eonlellts lhcnior ...... Telephone calls Intent to annoy .................. Unaulhoriled use or oxploslvo.................... Onau1horlt.ed uso or molor voblcle............... Unlawfully driving on roadw11yslllned ror trnffic.. Vagrnncy ..........••••••••••••.•••••••• ••• ••• • •• Totlll. ..................................••.

- -

CASES-Continued

Number of Number of Number or Number of defendants delendan.ts Involved pending lnvolnd rued 1an.1, 190$ 1an. I, 11188 YCIII'19Gll year 1966

0 0 1 0

0

0

1 0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0

0 0 0

0 0

I 0 0 25

0

Cl 3

2 6

2 11

1 ll I

0

2 I I I I I

28

263

0

0

0 1 0

Ao-

qulttoo

0

6

2 10 2

2 I

10 0

l

1

7 l

I

0

II

2

2 1gs

I 0

---

242

0

4

0 0

0

---

4

40

0

I 0 0 0

6 3 2

0

0

1 0 0 I

11188

11166

1 10 I 10 I 2 0 I 2 1 0

0

0

0

---

0

0 1

I

l 0

0 0

0 0 0

3

12

21H

0 0 0

3

4

2 I l I

-

NumbororNumberor NumbcrofNwnberor cases dolcndaots dofnlldanta ndlng lnvolvod Dbdlspo90d Involved ec. 31, Dec. 31, ~ mlslled year 1066 yoar 1906

D~ Coo• vlcled

5 4

2

0 l

u

l lll I 2 0

2 2 1 0

270

I 0 1 1 1 I 0 1 0 0 I 0 0 0

1 0 1 I I 1 0 3 0

0 I

0

I

0 0 I

46

62


Report of the Island Court, Territory of Guam for CalendarYear 1966 CIVIL CASES

Action

Number of cases pending Ian. I, 1966

Bo.slatd>•.................. Breach or controct ......... Collection or account ....... Complaint to annul clootton.-··-·······-······ Contosslon or Judgment .... Domages •••••••• ·-······· Doclanitory Judgment ..... Dissolution or col'J)Oratlon.. Dissolution or partner• sbips ..................... EJoctmont ••••• -·· •••..... ForCeltwo of alcoholic bovera&es .... - ..........

InJunctlon ................. Insumnoo poUc~··· ..•••••• lnwterenoo wit oa.,emont 0 ~~

clal.m).

~riiHmiiati.

Partition .................. Petition for writ ormandato. Potltlon for writ or prohibition. Promlsso=1'note ..••.•••... Reclpr sup~t ........ Removal or nu 00...... Ropossesslon or personal roporty. R Cgbt of wi:fe.............. Scrvloo ren ered ........... Slander .................... Support ................... Termill!ILlon of parental

~!ii::::::::::::::::::: Unlawful detainer ......... Wages.....................

Toto!. ...............

Number orellled year 1966

Numw Number Number Number Number or cases of cases or cases ur cases orcases disposed granted dlsmfssod tro.osrorred dln& year 1000 year 19C!Clyear 1966 to District ~ co. SI. Court 1966

I 175

19'l

103

70

1'8 68

0

I

0

0 2

73 1 18 I 0

0

86 2

0

2 16 0 2

0

0 16

II

0 0

0 0 I

1 20I

0

l I 34

88

0 2

7 0 0

0 1 0 0

I 2

0 0

0 2

l 0

0

0 2 6 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 2 I 0 0

0

I 13

I 3 4 0 I

0 0 0 0

1 3 11 I 14

I 1 0

0 0 3

1 0

1 0 2

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 1 I

0 70 0 1 2

1 08 21 0

ell lG

1

0 0 I I I

0 0 0 0 0

0 76 8 0 I

l 6

1 3 0 I

0

1 2 I

0 0 0 0

8

l

0 5 0 0

0 I I

2 I 2

:?

1

I 2

0

0

I

3

I 2

2

1 0

0 0

2 2

m

,a1

360

311

65

3

461

32

0 2

0 2 0 2

13

1

0

2

1

1 I

8

6

eo 18 0 0

0

l

0

0

0

0

0

I

0 I

0

l 0

I

0

11


Report of the Island Court, Territory of Guam for Calendar Year 1966----Cootinued CIVIL CASES-Continued Number Number Disposals Number OfCIISOS of c:nscs ofeases disposed O1"1U1tl!d Dispending rued yenr 1Q66 yeor 1966 1an. 1, mlssed 1066 Proboto:

Lct.lers of ndmlnlstraUon ..

Probate or wllL.........

.. .

Total. ................... Marital rolallons: Annulment ................ Dlvon:e.,,_ ................. Legal seporollon, Seforoto malntenan00 1111support ...................

Total .................... Land ~btratlon: L1111regl5tratlon .......... Total .................... Speclol

05

6

203

144

6

6

989

101

299

126

a

16 8-4

70

66

38

22

II

0

162

122

98

94

65

86

IN

65

8G

0

2

2

period ...................

Writ or hobeas corpus ...... Total ....................

149

8

tl'OCOOdlniS:

Aut orlty to oompromlso claim, mortp&e_ ....... Cancellation or validation of mortgage .............. Corrootlon of B lrth Cettlficato, and Aclmowlodg• ment of paternity ........ Ob&ll8eor name ........... Civil inarrla&e............. OuardlMSbls-···· ........ Establish of .eath......... Hospitalisation, medical examination ............. P011cebond ................ Pcrm.lsslon ror minor to many ................... Trust-iup ................ Waiver or statutory waiting

12

972 17

8

= ---

0

0

17

160

0

m

0

0

23

0

., 19

2

03

19

2

83

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0 0 0

0

2

0

I 13 53

I

14

1 14 53 12 0

2

0

I

53 20 0

I

3

3

I

I

0

--=

0 0

8 0

186

0

5

261 I

0

I 0

0

0 I

0

0

0

0

0 0

0

I

0

0

0

0

40

30 0

88 0

I 0

0

0

271

133

133

122

II

0

1

11

l3I

65

0

0

774

65

0

0

149 I

1

0

19

Number of cases ending ~ cc. 31, 1900

27

70

0

6 0 262

=

Number of cases op~oolod to !strict Coun

0 271


Report of the Juvenile Court, Territory of Guam, Calendar Year 1966 JUVENILE CASES

Action

Number otc~e.s ponding Ian. I, 1966

1uvenllo crlminnl: Curlew law ............ Contributing to tho dellnquoncy ot minors .. OollnqucnL minors ..... Toto! ................ Juvenllo sro:;1a1proceedings: Adofct on .............. Cus od y and support .. Ounrdiansblp ......... Permission tor minor to mnrry ............... Acknowlodgomont or

---

Involving minor ..... Tormlnntlon or parental rlghu ................ Toto!. ...............

---

Number or cases disposed Con• year 1-966 vlct.od

Db])osals

Orantod

Dismissed

Number ot cases Ac,ndlng qulLt.od ~ oc. 81, 1966

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 18

0 157

0 126

0 JOii

0 0

0 20

0 0

0 60

0

60

0 0 0

17 7 46

18 10 i

cl::i'~n';~ ·oi ciaim • •

Number of cases Olod year 1966

---

167

=

126

---

IOli

-----

0

---

20

9

---

0 0 0

100 7 5

15

0

13

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

40

110 11 13

109 11 8

0

16

0

0

4 3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

6

0

3

2

0

3

63

167

148

0

128

20

0

n

---

13


-

of>.

Offenses Committed by Juveniles-1966 17

--

Malo

0 0

Anned ____ robbery ··--·-·--·-----·--·-----------Assault ._._____ .. ·- ..•• ___ .. _.. ____.. __.·-·-·. __. ________ . Battery _____--·- ____ ·----·--· ···-·· __••••••• Beyond control of parents............................. -.

3 5

~:f!!..ry ••:::_:: :_:_::::::: :::::.::::_:: :::::::::::::=::

4 4

Disorderly conduct ••••.•••-·················-····-·-·Disturbing tb.e pea.oe..-·---·-····· ··-··-·----·Disturbing the peace by figbtlng ••• - •• ·-··············· Fornication .... ··-- .... ___ . ____. __ .···- ____._. _____. Orand Tbclt- •• ····-···--·-·-···-·-····--······-·· Hunting ••• -···········-·············-·······-··-·· mlscbleL •••••••••••• ---·--·········-···:_:. Manslaughter ••••••••••••• ···-· ••••••••••••• ·-··--· O~tlng motor veblclo during period of sospenslon or driver's llce11Je... ............... , ,... ,. . . . . . . . . ... Possession oCalcobollc beverage ....................... Possession ornreerm without permit.. ,................ The It._............. .. . .. .. ... .. . . . .... , ......... Tnullo. ...

1 1

4

0 0

0

if~~~

~~g •••

2 1 I I 1 I 11

=::::::'.. :::::::.·:::::::.::::::::::::: =:

Total .............................................

l 0

0

16

16 F&-

male 0 0 0 2 0 l 0 0 0 0

0 0

Malo

Fo-

molo

I 0 2 2 3 0 0 0

0 0 0

0 1 2

0 1

0 0 0 0 0 2 0

0

0

4

a

0

0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0

0

0 0

0

0

Male

0

0

0

6

I 0 1

0 0

0 0

I

7

2

0 I

0 0 2

0 0

Fo-

male

Malo

Fe-

malo

0 0 0

0 0 0 2

0 0 0

0 0 0

2

3

6

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 2 0

0

'0

4 0 0 0 0

I

I 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0

0

0

0

0 0

0 0

0 0 0 0

0 6

I 0

0 2 0

0 0

I

0

4

--40 -- 3 --20 -- 5 -- 311 -- 12 -- 111 --

3

Moto

malo 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 0

0 0 0 0

I 0 0 0 0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 I

1

--

F&-

0 0 0 0

0 0 1

0 0

0 3

0

0

0

2 10

2 0 0 0 0 0

)

0

0

Malo

0 0 I

8

0 0 0

Mote

Fo-

0 0 0 I

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0

0 0

0 0 1

Mole

Fomnlc

male

0 0

-- I ---2

10

II

12

13

14

0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Tolt1l F&-

male 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0

0 0

1

0

0

0

0 0

0 0

0 0 0 0

0

0

0 0

0 0

0

0

0 0

I

0

0 0

-------0 3

0

0 0

0

0

I 2

6 31 21 8 I

2 10 1 4

I 2

3

I I I I 20 25 I

8

-- 167


Disposition of Juvenile Offenders-1966 Detained___________________________ 9 Probationed ____________- -- -- --- --- _ 51 22 Warned ___________________________ Declared Dismisseddelinquent_________________ __________________________ II0 Certified___________________________ 5 Foster placement____________________ 8 Released___________________________ for trcatmenL______________ 50I Pending Total _________________________ 157 Number of cases filed________________ Number of juveniles involved _________ Males _____________________________ Females ___________________________

157 157 132 25

Juvenile Delinquents by Distriet-1966 Agana._____________________________ 7 Agana Heights______________________ 4

Agat______________________________ Apra Heights_______________________ Asan______________________________ Barrigada __________________________ Chalan ____________________________ Pago_______________________ Dcdedo

9 2 5 18 4 17

Harmon Village____________________ 2 Inarajan___________________________ I Maina____ _________________________ 2 Mangilao__________________________ 4 Merizo_ ___________________________ 4 Mongmong-Toto-Maite_ _____________ 11 Naval station_______________________ 2 Ordot_____________________________ 7 Piti_______________________________ 5 Santa Rita_________________________ 5 Sinajana_ __________________________ 14 Talofofo ____ -------. ---------_____ 6 Tamuning-Tumon __ . _______________ 18 Yigo______________________________ 7 Vona______________________________ 3 Total _________________________ 157

Statistical Report From Jan.1, 1966, to Dec. 31, 1966, on Island, District, U.S. Probationers, Paroles, Violators, Releases, Presentence, and Active Cases lSLAND COURT PROBATIONERS

U.S. PROBATIONERS

Remained under supervwon, Dec. 31, 41 1965_____________________________ 0

Rt~t1!

Remained under supervision, Dec. 31, 1965•• ·--·-·--·-·-·-·-···-·-··-·· 1 Rtr;:t1!°foo~r_".~i~~.~~~:_ :.~:~~:~

1:~~-~i~~-~~~-•:-~~:~ 41

Total supervued, Year 1966_____ 82 Males _____________________________ 79 Females___________________________ 3 Released (probation expired) _________ 32 Violators___________________________ 2 Terminated________________________ 2 Deported__________________________ I Total------------------·-·····

= Dec. 31,

Remained under supervision 1966•••• -----------·----·-------Prescntencc investigation ____._ .... _._ OtSTRlCT

37 45 22

12 13

Total supervised, Year 1966.. ·-·

25

Malcs ••• ·--····-···-··-·-···-··--· Females __ ··----------·-···-··----Released (probation expired}._··----· Violators_ ... __.·-_ .. -·.-·-·._.-·_.. Transferred to other jurisdiction .... -·. Terminated._-·-· ________--·----·-.

22 3 10 2 I 1

Total-----·--------··-·-·--·-·

14

Remained under supervision Dec. 31,

1966--·-·-·-·-·-------·-·····-·-·

Presentencc investigation ____.. _______

II 5

COURT PROBATIONE.RS

Remained under supervision, Dec. 31, 1965••••••••• ·-·-·--·-·······-··· 21 0 1 ~ ~~ :. •.~~ :~ 8 Rtr;:f 1~

f96L~!~i~~_

Total supervued, year 1966.....

_ 29

Males.·-------·------·-··--·-·---29 Released ( probation expired).________ 11 Remained under supervision Dec. 31, 1966__·--·-·----·-··-·----·-·--·· 18 Prescntencc investigation.-·--··-····13

U.S. PAROLEES

Remained under supervision, Dec. 31, 1965__·--·---····-··-·--·-·-··-·Referred for supervision Jan. 1, 1966 to Dec. 31, 1966___·---·-·--·-----Total supervised, year 1966.-··-· Males-·---·----·-·--·-···-···--··Released (parole expired)_-·-------·Remained under supervision Dec. 31, 1966••• ·----·-·--·---··----·-·-·-

4

3 7 7 I 6

15


Statistical Report from Jan. 1, 1966, ro Dec. 31, 1966, on Island, District, U.S. Probationers, Paroles, Violators, Releases, Presenteoce, and Aetive Cases-Continued Males _____________________________

TERRlTORlAL

PAROLEES

Remained under supervision, Dec. 31, 21 1965_____________________________

28

Released(parole expired)____________ 9 Revoked___________________________5 Deported _____ . ______. __... ____... _

I

R~~c~~- ~~~ f~~~~i~~-!~~-~~-~=~~

7

Total_________________________15

Total supervised, year 1966.__. _.

28

Remained under supervision Dec. 31, 13 1966_____________________________

Report of the Island Court, Territory of Guam, for Calendar Year 1966 SMALL CLAIMS CASES Number of oosos pending

Action

23G

Aocount stated •••• ·-----·--··---····· controct. .............................. Damages .............................. lnsumnco poll11y.....

81 8 63

. ................

Promissory noto .......................

Servlceuondered•••• ·····-··---··· Total .....................

• 16

Number

olcosos

Oled yonr Jnn. 1, 1966 1966

--- ....

60

55

483

Number

Number

Number

Number

disposed year 1000

dlsmlssod year 1960 ycor 1006

of coses

142 22 10 39 II 10

164 41 18

20 39

234

ol CaseJ granted

O(COSM

108 '.!5

II

60 10

ol cases

~

ding 31, 1004

QC.

2U

ro

4

13 28

26

1◄

10 11 11

6 03 22 40

311

107

114

◄OG


Report of Police Court for Calendar Year 1966

-

Number of Number of Number of Number or cases defendants defeod.lUlts pondini: Involved rued Involved ConSan, I, Jan. I, year year vlcted IGGG 111116

OFFEN8£

DISPOSALS

Number or Number or Number or Number or detondants cases detondnnts cases Closed dbpo..wl Involved ndlng Involved f:,ec, 31, year year Dec.SI,

Dis-

Ao-

quilted

missed

19tl6

11166

TkAYYIC VIOI.ATIOS

Lend lug casues or accidents: Speeding ........................... Jin proper turning ................. Disobeyed t.ro1Jlc5J31wl.. .......... Disobeyed s=to sign ____........... lmnroper J) ng Bud lnno usnge... Po lowlng too closely............... Fall uni to yield right or WO)' •..••.•

.Mlscellanoow:

DdllCllve equl~mont ............... Disobo>:edtro. c slfiu and marklJ)ll. Drivers license, w lhoul, cxplrocL. Felled to comply w1u1 police omttr's dlrecUon.................... Falled to depl\lSSbeadllahl ......... Failed to report accident within 24 hours ............................ IDegaJ parking .....................

Illegal use or hom-slttn ........... lmpedtng traffic ................... Improper start or parked veblclo... Improper stopping ................. Imprudent driving ................. Jay Wlllklng ........................

Leaving toy In lgnlUon switch ..... Leaving scene or occident .......... Lending drive.r's llconse lo another. Ll1leruse plate,

W/l>-0,;plrod,

un•

secw-ed.......................... .No lootr~t-han=grl on m/cycle .. No motor-eyclo t ............. No rearvlow mlrrw ................

~:~=~'!~~-~.~:~::::::: Passing school bus .................

-

....,

Pcnnlltlng a vtolallon._ ..........

See footnote nt eml of table.

35 2 3 2

6 2 3

35 2 3

2 6 2 3

2, Oll6 109 Ill 201

L82

'111 274

2,096 109 Ill 201 182 '111

I, 11118

274

512 431 II

15

'lllO

2 II

655

796 663 655

0

0

12

4

4

12

IS 2 II

0

IG

0 0 I 0

0

0 I 0 0

6 0

0

0 2 0 0 I

0

16

0 0

1 0 0 0 I

0

0 6

0 0 0

2 0 0 1

~

«

6

180 6 2 132 4 494

1 23 1

«

6

3 7

78

0

1119

0 0

0

45 6

428 1 22

100

4

10

41>f 1

JOO

m

0

17◄

8

s

7M

76

180 6 2 132

23 1 8

61

70 6 8 8 16 3 24

33

248

0 0 0 0 0 0

IM 108 191 168

6 61

413 3 7 78

6 2 Ill 4

0

6

00 4 55

I 3M 3 7

G3

I

0

0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0

0

0 0 6 1 0

2.lln

no w

:m lll6

2,102

110 111

202

186 '111

29

1 3 1 3 2

273

23 12 18

'/88 M4

ill8

23 ll

IK8

848

18

23 11 18

l 0

0

12 48

12

0 0

0 0

0

0 8

6 191 6 2 126

6 igt 6 2 126

0

0 5

20

9

0 0

Jl

0 211

I

3

0 0

3 0 8

4 465

I

23

0

0

)

0

M4

48

l

465 I

1

I

23

4

5

0 0 8

0 29

0

8

0 0

4

6

106

106

0

0

4

57

57

l 4

408

408

3

n

n

I 7 0 0 2

0

0 0

0 IZ

1 10 0 0

2

•a 3 7

3 7

29

0

8

0

0 0 8 0

0 0

I

I 0 2 I 14 0

0

0

0 0

2

'111 273

0 I

0

29 I 8 I 3

1

0

0

l 4 1 7 0 0 'l


0)

Report of Police Coun for Calendar Year 1966-Coocioued

OFPENS£

-

Number of N•tmhllr or Nu.moor of Number of tlore_udlulL~ dclondanLS cases Rl.cd Involved Con• pcullln& lnvoh•ed JIil\. i, Jon. I, year ycnr vlcted ~

1966

uo

116

To&BI. 1 Mutll!Ued or

·······------······

I

I 0 0 0

mlssod

Closed

1006

1900

I G2

3

3

0 0

3

1 62

0 0 0

0

l

62

10

I

G3

I 03

229 81

229

U2 73

0

us

4 4

231

231

3

3

81

• 6 G

~

7,0GS

I

I

•0

81 4 5 8

0

1 0

0

I

0

I

I

0 0 0

I 0 0

7,030

0, 274

l

671

14$

0

0

0

2

2

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

0 0

0 I

0 0

0 0 0

0

6

l 6

0 1 0 0

0

11

u

.......... .......... ... .-·-· •······ .. --·····. --- --- --- ---

====

6

·--......

6, 1191

0

0

0 0

0 0

16$

165

. ... -....... . .......... ............. 6,11111

(;01111'1'CIIUIINAL CA!ll!S

I

0

6

6

2

2

10

10

spollod trllfile llckec.s tuod ond no cou.rL11eUontaken.

81

0 0

0 0 0

0 2 l

4

3

5 G

1 0 0 0 0

1

0

I

0

0

6

roua: Disturbing tho pesce.. .................. Drlnltlng alcoholic beverages In motor vehicle ........................ J oyrldlng ..........................•... Passing over solid Uno.............•... Passing scllool bus ..................... Rockless driving. ···················-

01&-

Quilled

Number or Number or NumlHlr or Number or cases delcndllllts cases derondAnts Involved cllsposed Involved pondlnii year yeor Occ.31, Oeo. 31,

TllAFl'ICVIOLATJON-COntlnued

.\llscc llnnoou,-Con ll n uod er outaldo moving vehicle .. 0 0 ~ J tlltlood- .................. 0 0 Rlldtlcss driving ................... 2 2 B~'f::{11Uon__cord, __without-ex3 3 Safety helmet, wlthou~uJUOCUl'ed. 0 0 Throwing glass, rubbish, etc. on 0 0 highway •••• -······-···· •••••• 0 U•tun111L11nlntcrsoctlon...... . ... 0 Vchlclo lnt~Ly ... ......... .. ..... 0 0 Tickets vol od during tho year 1... .. .. . ..•.. . ••••••••• ToLOl.................

DT.S~OSALS Ac,-

2

0

1 1

2 I

I

---

I 1 6

u

0 0

---

0

---

0

0

0

---

I I 1

I

I

0 0 0

0


Ninth Guam Legislature Persoooel: 4,4

The legislative power of Guam is vested in a 21-member unicameral legislature as provided in the Organic Act of Guam. Members are elected at large. Elections are held on the Tuesday aiter the first Monday in November biennially on even-numbered years. Regular sessionsare held in January and in June. As there normally is no session in the last half of any year, this report, in line with previous practice, covers the calendar year 1967, rather than fiscalyear 1966-67. In the general election held November 8, 1966, the Democratic Party won all 21 seats for the Ninth Guam Legislature, taking an additional 13 seats previously held by the Territorial Party. Members of the Ninth Legislature arc Speaker Joaquin C. Arriola, Vice Speaker William 0. L. Flores, Legislative Secretary Florencio T. Ramirez, and members Jose M. Acfalle, George M. Bamba, Ricardo J. Bordallo, Earl C. Conway, Antonio C. Cruz, Oscar L. Delfin, Alfred S. N. Flores, Francisco C. Lujan, Manuel U. Lujan, Jesus C. Okiyama, Paul D. Palting, Leonard S. N. Paulino, Ignacio P. Quitugua, Pedro C. Santos, Ralph C. Sgambelluri, Richard F. Taitano, Edward S. Tcrlaje, and Jesus U. Torres. The 12 standing committees and their respective chairmen arc: Rules, George M. Bamba; agriculture, Alfred S. N. Flores; finance and taxation,

Appropriation: $425,000

Florencio T. Ramirez; governmental operations, Jesus C. Okiyama; health, education, -and welfare, Edward S. Terlajc; judiciary, Francisco G. Lujan; labor and industrial relations, Jesus U. Torres; public safety, military and veterans affairs, Jose M. Acfalle; public utilities, commercial port, and air terminal, Antonio C. Cruz; resources and development, Richard F. Taitano; and housing and urban development, Leonard S. N. Paulino. Select committees and their respective chairmen a,re: Parks and monuments, Ricardo J. Bordallo; organized labor, Jesus U. Torres; district representation, George M. Bamba; reintegration, William D. L. Flores; power and telephone, Antonio C. Cruz; Federal problems, Joaquin C. Arriola; ar,d law enforcement, Jose M. Acfalle. The Ninth Guam Legislature introduced a total of 337 bills up until June 1967, in two regular sessions and two special sessionscalled by the Governor. In addition, 324 resolutions were intro• duced. Of this, 131 bills were passed, and 291 resolutions were adopted. Appropriation measures passed and signed into law, at this writing, totaled $32,645,003. They included funds for operational e.xpenscsin three branches of the government, capital improvements, and other purposes. Of this amount, $1,205,377 was in supplemental appropriations. 19


Total appropnations for the 1968 fiscal year stood at $38,680,692. The biggest amount appropriated for fiscal year 1968 was $27,756,758 for the operational budget. The legislature's operational budget for calendar year 1967 was $425,000 or $176,000 less than that of the Eighth Guam Legislature. Under Public Law 9-3, each member, with the exception of the speaker, receives a salary of $6,000 per annum payable in monthly installments. The speaker receives $6,500. The $25 per diem allowanct! for attendance at daily sessions as authorized during the previous legislature was abrogated by the Ninth Guam Legislature. Also included in the appropriation measures enacted into law was $125,000 for the summer youth training proPubl!c Law

9-1 9-2 9-3 !)..4

9-5 9-8

9-9 9-11 9-12 9-13 9-14 9-16

20

Bill

gram. This training is considered to be of great value to high school students during their vacations. The Eighth Guam Legislature voted down urban renewal. The Ninth Guam Legislature reversed this, approving the urban renev;al plan for Sinajana. and authorizing planning and surveying for Yona. In approving these measures, legislators said they would give the people in the communities involved an opportunity to own decent and sanitary homes at the lowest possible cost. Urban renewal, in addition, creates more job opportunities for the local people, they stated. A Guam housing and urban renewal office has been established in the village of Sinajana. The next project will be the development of Yona. Short tUu

17 An act making an appropriation for the operation of the Guam Legislature for the calendar year ending Dec. 31, 1967. 30 An act to make an appropriation for the initial expenses of the Guam Hou.sing and Urban Renewal Authority with respect to low rent public housing and urban renewal programs. 44 An act to amend sec. 1000.5 of the Government Code of Guam to change the annual compensation of members of the legislature from a salary plus per diem allowance to a straight salary. 45 An act to amend Sec. 25519, Ch. 6, Title XXVI, Government Code or Guam, and Sec. 397, Title X, Pt. I, Penal Code of Guam, relative to the selling of alcoholic beverages to a minor. 52 An act to add sec. 8936.1 to the Government Code or Guam to prohibit Lhe use of explosives in such a manner as to disturb the public peace. 39 An act to amend sec. 273a, of Ch. U, Title XI, Penal Code of Guam, relative to contributing to the delinquency of a minor. An act to add new secs. 47061,47062, 47063 and 47064 to Ch. 1, Title XLIV, 23 Government Code of Guam. relative to information furnished the Department of Commerce. 34 An act to amend sec. 4213 of the Govcrnmenl Code or Guam, relating to the return of refunded retirement contributions upon reemployment. 129 An act to amend Sec. 11102, Ch. 2, Title XII, Government Code of Guam, relative to composition of Territori:il Board of Education. 14 An act to add a new sec. 4022 to the Government Code of Guam, relating to the reinstatement of accumulated sick leave to employees returning to Government of Guam employment. 5 An act to repeal secs. 192 and 193 of, and enact new secs. 192 and 193 to, Oh. I, Title VIII, Pt. I, Penni Code of Guam, relative to the offense of manslaughter. 117 An act to reduce the appropriation made by Public Law 8-180 and to provide supplemental appropriation for fiscal year beginning July I, 1967.


Public Lew

BUI

9-17

4

9-18

7

9-19

41

9-20

135

9-25 9-26

II 22

9-31

24

9-32

9-33 9-35 9-39

9-40 9-42

9-47

9-48

46

Short tUlt

An act adding a new sec. 53568 of the Government Code of Guam, limiting the issuance of qualifying certificates under title LIV of said Government Code of Guam to manufacturers of watches, watch movements, and timing apparatus. An act to amendsubsccs. 31 lOO(y)and 31 IOO(z)of ch. 2, subsccs. 32301 (c) ofch. 14, andsubscc. 33500(a) of Ch. 26, all of Title XXXII, Government Code of Guam, relative to standards under the building law of Guam. An act to amend item (a) of sec. 13514, Government Code of Guam, relative to leases of government real property. An act making an appropriation to construct public libraries in Agat and Dededo. An act to renumber sec. 4020, Ch. I, Title V, as enacted by PublicLawS-159. An act to amend sec. 23100(1), Cb. 2, Title XXIV, Government Code of Guam, relative to the expiration of operator's or chauffeur's Licenses. An act to add a new Ch. 5 to the Title XXII, Government Code of Guam, relative to the Water Resources Conservation Act. An act to amend sec. 11837 of the Government Code of Guam to provide the waiver of tuit.ion fees for the first 2 years of colJcgc at the College of Guam. An act to add a new sec. 273d to Ch. II, Title IX, Pt. I, Penal Code of Guam, relative to reporting of physical abuse of children.

121 An act to amend sec. 1300 of the Government Code of Guam, relating to the legislative audit. 116 An act making appropriations for necessary capital improvements and for other purposes. 133 An act to add sec. 11821 to Title Xll, Cb. 9, Subcb. E, Government Code of Guam, to permit off-island scholarships and student loans only if studies arc not available in Guam. 112 An act to amend secs. 21005 and 21103 of the Government Code of Guam to lower the rate for water used for watering livestock and for other purposes and to add a new sec. 23354.1 to the Government Code of Guam to establish an abandoned vehi.clc fund. 114 An act to renumber sec. 14240 of the Government Code of Guam, to be sec. 47140 and to amend the same with respect to reimbursement for services of customs and quarantine officers of the Government of Guam. 47 An act to add Ch. II to Title LIV of the Government Code of Guam to establish a Guam Agricultural Expense Insurance Act.

9-50

26

An act to renumber sec. 11880 of the Government Code of Guam to be sec. 11881, and to add a new sec. 11880 to the Government Code of Guam to authorize schoolteachers in the public schools of Guam who arc residents of Guam to aucnd the College of Guam under an in•se.rvicc training program.

9-51

40

An act to amend sec. 11821, Government Code of Guam, relative to annual scholarships for valedictorians and salutatorians of Guam high schools.

9-57

6 An act to amend secs. 13140 and 13141 of the Government Code of Guam, relative to recording fees.

9-65

211 An act malting an appropriation for summer youth employment undc.r the direct.ion of the Governor's Committee on Children and Youth and for other purposes.

9-66 9-67 9-68

84 An act making an appropriation for community recreation services. 107 An act to add a new title LV to the Government Code of Guam, relative to unfair trade practices and consumer protection. 20

An act to change the status of the employees of the commercial port of Guam from "Temporary" to "Permanent."

21


Public LatD

BIU

9-69

131

9-71

109

9-72

144

9-73

140

9-74

210

9-75

206

9-76

303

9-77

325

9-78

102

9-79

147

9-80

148

9-81

244

22

Short title

An acl to amend secs. 24002 and 24100 of the Govemmcnl Code of Guam, lo add a new sec. 24007 to said Government code, and to add a new ch. 11 to title X){V of said Government code to provide thal all agencies of the Government of Guam follow orderly and equitable procedures in issuing rules and in adjudicating contested Ca.5C$. An act making suprlemental appropriations for the operation of the executive branch o the Government of Guam for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1967. An act making an appropriation for the operation of the executive, judicial, and legislative branches of the Government of Guam for fiscal year ending June 30, 1968, and for the operation of the office of Washington representative for lhe calendar year ending Dec. 31, 1967. An act lo amend sea. 26104, 26207, 26109, and 26110 of the Government Code of Guam lo increase certain fees in connection with cockfighting, and to permit only I Amara franchise. An act to add a new sec. 11008 to the Govcrnmenl Code of Guam to rename the Mcrizo Elementary School "The Mcrizo Martyrs' Memorial School." An act to amend sec. 6610.4 of the Government Code of Guam, relating to per diem allowances for government employees. An act to amend secs. <WOO.I,4000.2, 4012, 11108.1, and 49006 of the Gove.rnmenl Code of Guam to provide that employees of the Guam Memorial Hospital and of the department of education may appeal dismissals lo the personnel board. An act to add a new Ch. 11 to Tille X, Government Code of Guam, relative to water pollution control, and for other purposes. An act to amend Ch. 6, Title X, Government Code of Guam, relative to the control of dogs and other small animals. An act to add a new sec. 23129.1 to Cb. 2, Title XXIV, Government Code of Guam, relative to nashing traffic signals. An act to add sec. 8901.1 to Ch. 10, Title IX, Government Code of Guam, relative to acquisition and possession or firearms. An act to add a new Sec. 650 to Art. III, Ch. X, Div. 111, of the Probate Code, relative to payment of certain sums to decedents' estates without probate. An act to amend Secs. 19374 and 19376 of Ch. 4, Title XX, Government Code of Guam, to extend the delinquent date for real property truces.


Federal Grants and Aids The Governor's Office has a co- dale a total of $36,761,000 has been ordinator for all programs that receive appropriated under the act by the U.S. Federal financial assistance within the Congress. This includes $7,496,000 for Government of Guam. The coordina- the fiscal year 1968. During fiscal year 1967, when tor also implements and controls proj$5,503,000 was appropriated, four ects authorized under Public Law projects were completed, bringing the 88--170, the Guam Rehabilitation Act, total number of projects completed passed by the U.S. Congress following under the act to 24 as of June 30, 1967. Typhoon Karen. The coordinator's po- The last four were the new Internasition was established in order to gain tional Air Terminal, the Dededothe maximum benefit possible from Tumon water projects, the Tumon Federal legislation affecting Guam. Junior-Seruor High School converThe Guam Rehabilitation Act au- sion, and waterline replacements. The following projects were pending thorizes $45 million for rehabilitation and capital improvement projects. To at the close of the fiscalyear: Po~nt R®Abllltllllon Act nllolmtnt complete (dollo.rs) complcto by 1uno 30, 1001

Pro}ect

College Ub1111Y bulldlnc.-···········-··········· Collegefine art.abulldlng ....•••••••• -·····-······ Sewcr~uun-ecntml (i>ort)....•••.•••• _ ••••••••

•G6,642pW.QovOuam ••••• ... ,'68 PW•OovOUllm••••• 3,(67,000Nnvy .••• ·-······

Collegescience building...........................

800,~ Navy ..............

Agnna !nletlonal lous....................

- ........

Iuvenlle Institution odll!tlon___ ........... ....... Comrnorc.lalport (1st Increment>·-··-············ Power aubstntlon ..... -·······-·······-········ Dodcdo Elementary School ndditlon ........•..••.. Vigo Elemo:nt.nrySchooL..--·-········-········· Sewer system (2d phase)••·-······················ Wotor projects 1967.. ... . ......... .....•.•.••..••.•

MO~ ....................

.

.

83,uw Navy ..• ·-··-···· •• 4,668,000Navy ••••••••••••• 176,000PUAO ••••••••••••• 8141 000 N11vy·-············ 1,ll!l,000Nnvy ••••••••••••• 2,868,700NII"}'••••••••••••• 1,121,300 •• ····-·· •••••••••

ComplcUon doto

Au~t 19l>7. 90 Do. 92 113 Soptcmbtr 1967. 8 Mnrcb 19QI.

22.5 Fobmo.ry IO!IS. 31 AUllllcllt1067. 30

Jan. 30l 1968.

30

October 1007. July 1068. Jun2 301 LIIOO. rn plans stage.

10 1 0

Decemoer 1967.

=

23


Programs Receiving Federal Financial Assistance Under Public Law 88-170, the Guam Rehabilitation Act of 1963, Administered by the Federal Progtams Coordinaror, Office of the Governor EDUCATIONAL

FACILITIES Federal funds

Matching

(grnnt)

by OWllll

funds

oUOCMCdprovided

Total allout!on

(loan)

Perc611t Fl5cal ycor provided 11167 bJ Guam expenditure

$882,187 $882,188 $1, 76',375 Ooorgo WllShlngtonSenior Rlgb School.. .... - .... 744,500 744,600 1,489,000 Gcorgo Washington Junior High SGhool......... _ 325,160 162,676 162,676 Bo.rrtgadllElcmont~ Sohool,-················-· 361,760 180,876 180,876 Ordot-Ohal.an Paao lcment11r1School.. .......... 267,670 133,785 133,786 Talolofo Elcmontary Sohool..........•... -···-···· 189,000 04,500 04,500 Tumon Junlor•Sonlor High School conversion ..... 742,500 1,'85,000 742,500 Dcdcdo Junior Bfh Sohool.-·-··················· 481,056 Apt.Santa Rita lementary School............... 240,628 240,628 115,825 1111, 650 116,825 Dededo Element11r1ScllooL.....•...... ---····171,250 Marlzo EIGmcntarJ Scbool.. ... _ .................. &, 625 85,625 600,700 260,350 Ouam Trodo and Technical Sc.hoot ......... -._ 260.~ 48,240 Education administration bolldln&................ '8,250 116,499 4116,642 247,771 247,771 College llbrary building •• ·-·······-············ •• '44,468 222,2211 222,220 ·····College tlno o.rU bolJdlng ••••....•••••...... ISO,200 736,200 866,400 Cou:;o science bulldinlj;-·········-····-········· 167,000 167,000 814,000 Dcd o Elementary Sc ool (addition) ...... --···· 690,500 690,500 1,181,000 Ylgo Elemlllllllt}' SahooL.-··--·-·············· VILLAGE DEVELOPMENT

60

60

60

60 60 60

50 50 60 50 60 60 85 60 60

$820,447.'20 260,896.27 34,829.27 43,630.09 28,216.02 13,637.00 207,082.24 47,367.40 24,103.17 32,710.~ 02,027.60 20,W4.07 1113, 682.00 8], 281.42 2,714.611 0 10,601.31

0

160 660,000

60 60 60

249,618.62

201,116() '°3,900 00, 1175 181,1l60 230,260 400,600 711. 600 159,000 Q(),200 180,400 110,000 220,000 I, 728,800 3,467,600 41,500 83,000 1,443,860 2,88G,700

60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60 60

43. GI 1,880.00 15,042.45 0 2,086.81 171,142.113 I, 470,343.76 31,912.10 760.00

1,334,381.46

2,250 76 276,000

SlnaJanB............. ··············-·--···· Asan.·-·-················-······················· Agana pnrtlal lots.········-·················--···

50 60

2, 260 76 276,000

4,600

8

PUDLIC WORKS 201,1l60 Q(),1176 230,260 711,600

Public worn buildings .................. - ........ Public utUlty buJldlnp_ ....... _ ................. Processing nnd supply warehouse .................. Penitentiary._ .................................... Juvenile lnstltnUon ................................ Sower p!BDS ..•.....•. __ ....•••............•..•..•• Sower systClJll(central) ~base 1).. _................ 1uvenilo Institution (ad Jtlon)..................... Sewer system (phase II) ...........................

Q(),200

110,000 I, 728,800 (1,600

1,443,360

RESOURCES Air tarminlll ....................................... Commerclnl port (phase O.........................

DEVELOPMENT 467,600 2,279.300

(67,600 2,279.300

111&,000 4,MB,600

60 60

l, 786,000 176,000

I, 786,000 17S,OOO

100 100

11{9,000

100 100 100

318,000.68 0

236,000 2,018,300

60

110,449.10

72,000

100

49,766.24

200,000

0

7,3115.24

POWER 0 0

Contribution to Pit! power plant ••• ·-············ Power sub$t11tlon.......... - ......................

0 0

WATER SYSTEMS Dodcdo-Tumon w11terprojects (t.,t phase) ......... Master tlllll ... -··-···· ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Water l no replacomcnt- •• ·········-··--······· Water SY3tem lmprov'emont for contra! Guam (pbaso Il) project No. WS-6-42--0001._...... - ...

0 0 0

8117,000 I, 1.21,300

TELEPHONE SateUlto 01:ohange............................

__ ... ECONO~nc

Economic development plan (lntarlor>--··· .••.... Total ....................

24

.......................

11{9,000 4.1,000 230,000

41,000

85,008.26

SYSTEM 0

72,000

DEVELOPMENT 200,000

-- 13,136,860

0

17.025,160 30,162,000

~A 5, 742,668. IS


~

ta;

Programs Receiving Federal Financial Assistance-Fiscal Year 1967 Program respoll3lbUlly

f

Pedcral

interior Del)llftment.

Oul\m Deportment or Agriculture.

Executive (Omce) Civil Defense, Office or tho of Civil D&fcnse. Cblef Commissioner. Department or Health, Edu• cation, and Wellare.

College or Ouam.

64 Stot. 430; 18 u.s.c.m 11nd7771t;Olngoll.Johuson Act (fish restoration). 50 Stal. 017; 18 U.S.C. 11611 nnd 661ll(wild Illa rcslOm• Lion). l'ubUc Law S!H!OO-Commcrolal Fisheries Rcsearc:h ond Dovolopmcnl Act of

0

0

Wlldlllo Investigations.

10,000

0

0

Ollshoro llshorios research project 1.0 dotcnnlno loaslblllty of commercial Ashing.

20,r,oo

$18, r,oo

Public Law 81-9'l0-Tho Penonnd nod Ad.mlnlstmUon.-ProCivil Oefcnso Aci of 1950as vldes for nnanclal assistance !or omorgency beoltb mCMUN1S;maamended. lerlel; fildlltles; oqulpmonti l'!llntng and edocatlon; and Corsaianes !or penonncl r.nd Bdmlnlstrotlon. Public Law 8&-20&-Tho TIUe ~~ Public Law 8&-21M; Title VIHigher EducaUon Act or A, rubllc Law ~Financial 1063,as amended; and assistance ror odmlnlstrat.lvo OI· Pu.bile Law ~ho penses or the Temtcrial ComIlJgher Education Act or mission. 1085. Pobllc Law 80-m-The TILie I-Community services and Higher Education Act or continuing oducatlon: 1085,as amended. Baste grant ...................... .

10.771

17,229

6,000

0

1064.

oos:

(JI

ltalcblng Pen:e.nt funds of tot.al provld.ed provided by OUllm by Ouom

$10,000

l'lsli Investigations ...

Tltl;r~~Jece·

,,.,

Federal funds ollocalcd

l'rogmm or pro}c(:t

Basic authority for Fcdcrol assistance

2.S,000 I, 702

i:ilini.i-y. iiesour:

Basic grant·-······· ............ Supplemental grant .............

. .

Spcclalgmnt ....................

.

5,000 2, 1184 100,000

Total funds budgeted $11,855, II

Total Cun.ds expended $9,316.

II, OOt.47 11,310.

47. 4

39,000 13,331.83On~olng pro CCI.

61

34,000 34,000.

0

8,333

2$

667

26

5,000 0

60 0

33,338

33~

G,000 1,230.

33,333 13,746Ongoing. 2,2$ 0. 10,000 10,000. 2, 984 Lato oppropriollon. 133,333 Late :Wipropri4t on. Carry ovec t411scalycer 1068.


Programs Receiving Federal Financial Assistance-Fiscal

~

a,

Program respo11.1lb1Uty Ouom

l'odcml

Do.

-···

... do._ ....

Basic 11uthorfty for Fcdemt BSSlstanm

Public L11w88-:?0l-Tbe EU11her Educotlon Act or 11163, as omcmdcd.

Year 1967-Cootioued

Fodcml MolehlJlll Pcroonl or LOtBI fUDds fUDdS ILlloaltcd provided provided by Ouu.m by Ouum

Prognun or proJecl

TIUe lli-Strongthruling developing lnsUtutlons: Teocl1cr rcllowshl~ coo:roratlve { roJcct with olom o ond $102,000 7,600 ~ awoll.

0 0

165,736

$17,304

TILie IV-C-Collcge work study ..... Tille IV-A-Educallon ofportUDllles. Tit.lo Vl-A-Inslrucllona oqu~ment. Tille VT-A-lnstrucllonat eq pment { ror undorgroduato lnstrncllon (cay_ovcr rrom 0-1 year 1966). Tlllo -Provides Fodoml nnonclat nsslltonco ror tho construcllon or uodergradU11torocllltles: Plonnlng tcranl... . ..... Collcgo science,tmlldlng.

.....- .

{

7,897 2.639

3,()15}

7,897

2,639 3,046

Sill

0

21,005

160, 000 } 000.OOO 153,633

0 0 10 60

60 60 {

0 ~

Total funds budgeted

Total funds ~nded

Late approprfa• lion to bo Im· plomcn14<111$co~ear 1008. I73, 040 $78, I !Nl. 16, 194 15,194.

$102,G60 7,600}

6, 278 6, 278.

6,090 o.OIJO. o l'ilotrequested.

21,005 0-LBte opproprlot!oo ear• Medover to fucnl year 1008. 866,633 2,714.W llscol year 1967. 32,0lS.16 Osco!

Department or Justlc.!.

do ..•.

omcoor Economlc Opportu• nlty.

.do .. __

Docentol erce.

Dccontol cnltb, Eduoo• lion, and Wei• lore.

..... do .......

.

..do.·-···•·

Public IAw 89-197-The Lnw Pro!esslonol education progrruu for 11\wonJorcemcnt ond tho prevcnllon En.roroemcnt Asslslllnco Acl or 19G6. or crime. Public Law 8&-462-Tho Eco- Project "IIoodst11rt", n full year pmnomlo Opportunity Acl or school program ror tbo oconomlcolly 196f. as amended. disadvaniagod chlldron or Guam . .do.... ProJect "0 pword Bound", o procoueco program !or high 11choolstu• dent., who ore oduootlonally or llruutcJILILyhnodlcappcd 10 prepare enlranco. them !or COIICIJO State plonnln11gmnt for the developPublic Low 89-182-Tho menl ol a 6-yeor plan tor tho oooSlate Technical Services nomlc development or tho temtory. Act. Public Law 86-804-Tbo Na• tlooal Dcfenso Eduootlon Act or l!ISS,ns nmcndcd.

Tille U provides nnanclal osslstance ror low-Int~ student lo:ln! LOpermlt them to attend college ond pursuo specJtlc counes or study.

-----

33,000

017,71),1

1'8,580

24

111,667

~.300

18

25,000

0

0

3,000

340

10

yenrl966. Ongol.ng pro}cct. . . . . . . To stBrt flsall yoar 1068~2yeargnml.

766,380 4,877.00 flSdl

year 1967.Onl!OlllgproJect. 137,066 l?l,639.

25,000 To be lmpl&men~ nscal year lflGS. Oranl lapsos Dec. 31, 1967. 3, 600 2,844..


NatlOWI! .i,'oundJl• Uon ot Arts and Hwnanl-

ties.

Notloruil Sdcnet' Foundollon.

oofinrtml!nt or l eallh, Educatlon, nnd Weililre.

.do ......... ..... do ______

oeynrtmcnt or o Educollon.

··--··--·-·

Public Ln"· 69-209-Tbo No• St.oto Planning grunt Uoruil Foundotlon or Am Md rTumon.ltlcs Act of 1965. Public r..:i.w81-507-Tho No- SocJal solllJICOlnstltuto grant owllonal ScJcnco Foundation 080t. Act of 1030,os runonded. Oencrol Sclcnco luslltuto OW-1057... Solenco Moll,emotlcs Conrcrenco OW1224. Summer selenco lnstltuto OW-1626 (1ulr-Au1111St11167 proJoot).

-...J

0

0

6.660

0

0

4,200 1,200

0 0

0 0

31,240

0

0

0

0

1,383.006 1,383,000.

50,000

50

100,000 OS,liO.

20,000

50

◄0,000

20,610

60

40,610 40,610.

2'1,942

60

◄6,884

0

0

494,400 0-Efcgndllu_ros ou .oruod In llscol yenr 1008.

0

0

667,390 47'3,700-Es~nd• !Lures OU Or• txod In 05ool )'Cllr IOG8.

0

0

Public Law 81-674-.Fedcml TILlo l-l'rovld.cs Fcdcml l1n11Dclnl 1,383,066 Mal:!lnnco !or cduc:1tlon In nssl$tnnct to local NlucaUonAI ~tin• rcdcmll)' n!Tcclcd lll"OIIS, llS clcs which cll)llrloncosubstnnlla In• IUllllllth:,d.Public L!lw 69-10 creases In nnrollment becouse or 1111Jcnds to !ncludo asslstMcc uoorb)I F•~foml proJoctsorocllv!Ucs. tortho educotlon of cblJ. dren lrom Jow-lnoome lam!• lies. 50,000 Pnbllo Low 8$-804; 20 U.S.C. TILie rn-s1~ll1011 Instruction In "41""'81-486ond 688-Thc 5C!onoo,math, orelgn longu1111cs and Nal!onal Delel\50 AoLof other lk'ICCll'IIPl't'M, I~ OSamended. Tille ur-Stotu supervision oud lld20,000 1nlnlstrollon. TIUo V-Guldnnc:c, oouusollng, ond 20,000 tcslln,it, Tlllo X-Seo. 1000. To hn11rovo 011,t 22,042 lnlLl.1110 and to expand the oollooLlon or oduc.'IUonnl sountcnl dMo; Im1,ro.,.odnLOovnlunllon; bnprovo reoords oud reportS. Pnbllc Lllw SHU~hool Pro"ldos ror oonstruotlon of minimum ◄04,400 Coostru.ct.!on Act, 113 school racWllos In rodorally l\!Jccled nmcnd.cd. Also Public oreas. Lftw ~13, school 0011SLrucUon In dlsas1or are:i.s. Public L:lw S~IO-ElcmcnTltlo [-Provides nnrui.clal asslsl·lll106 ~57.390 till')/ and Secondo.ry F.dUCil• to local ooucoUonl 1111onclos with conlion Act of 1065,o, ClClltnltlOllll of low lnc:omornmlllos lO amended. 0110.blothem l-0~ond and lmprovo Pl'OltffllllSd~n 10 mooHho noeds deprived cibUdren. or cducntlou Tltlo II-School lbmry rosourcu pro66,881 .do •••• ·-··· .. ···-······ \'ldc:s flnanclnl iwlstonce tor procurementor tosLboob llDd otbor prlutod 11nd publlsbod mn1.erl11Itor U30 or studcnis ond tOllCborsIn public ond private elemontory nnd secondory schools.

fi

"'

26,000

25,000 1,036-<>ngolng proJc,ct. 6.660 1,605. ◄.200

2,1146,62.

I, 200 776.

31,3'20 O-On going

40,000.

46,884.

M,881 ~2,0111.


,._, 0:)

Programs Receiving Federal Financial Assistance-Fiscal Year 1967-Continued Program respo11slblllty 'Federal

Department or Agriculture.

D=entot ealth, Educotlooila'i;o and

w

.

Do ...........

Ouom

Ooslcnulhorit'y !or Fc-Ocrolumtance

Program or proJ«t

Fedel'lll runds ollocated

Matching Porcenl funds or total provided provldod !,y Ouam hy Ouam

Tl!.lo lll-Supplemontarycouters lllld suvlcos. Provides for supplementary centers and servicesnot ovalloble In suJllclcnt qunllty or quootlty and for dovelopln! exemplary elementary and secon ory progrv.m!I. Tit.lo V-Oronts to strengthen State educational departments. Flnonlllal assistance for strengthen.Ing leader• sblf reso1111)es, Improving programs on ldentllylng needs at tho State level. Public Law '/G-396The Provides nnanclal asslstanco aml lood supplied under surplus romovnl ond National SchoolLunch Proprice support legislation for the opgram. 42 u.s.O.1751-1780, as amended. oration, liialntonanco, nnd ~on or school lunch programs or chll• dren. . Provides tor nnoncllll BSSlstanco In Public Law 86-ffl......... tl'lllnlng teachers nnd s-peclallsts or handicapped children.

$1114,281

!JO,000

0

Division o! Vo- Publlo Law ~ George Basic grant !or vocational edu.cotlon catlooal trades and Industries program under Banleo .Act, a., amended. Education, Applicable to Guam TIUeJ. through Public Law 84-8116. Decent of ducatloo. '!'Ille I-Ffaheries ............ _ .. Tille n-Proctlcal nunlng ....... TIiie Ill-Technlca.1 oducatlon ... Public Law 8&-210-Voca• Oporatloo or the Ouam trade aod tlooal Education Act or tecbnJca.1 school hlgb scbool pro1111111 ond the adult evening pro11183, as amended. gnun. Iociludes construction o.r 6 classrooms for area trade and loch· nJca.1school. Work study p~ram (NC. 13)........ Public Law 89-7ro-Adult Provld.es nn ult basic edueatloo Education Act or lve8. p~ram In English comprohonslon, r Ing, writing nod math. An svenlng crogmm carried out through 17achoo .

80,000

80,000

Dfcartment o1 ducotlon.

••• do.·-·····•

0

0

ToLGI ruods budgeted

Total funds CXJ)Cndod

$194,281 Expenditure ou thorhedln nscat year 19(;8.

M,471

$1,000

03, 531

21, 14.1

I, 876 .... ...... 13,809

.a.

.........

0

~

0

so . ......... . .........

107,626 15e ··-·-·-· 107,1158 ····-

..

~

22.l!OO

1,666

111,4.10

50

25

46

~. 471 $51,092.

Sf, 672 84,G72.

!JO,000 Expenditures

authorized In ftscalyear 19C!8. 160.000 160,000. Not matched. -----------Do. .-·--------- Do. 214,312 214,332.

6,669 6,111. 42, 010 32,000.


OCJ)Qrtm"ll

IAbor.

of

occntol eallh edncn• tlon ond Welfare.

Lobor ond Personnel, Dortment or ~ du.cation/ Dlvl.slon o Vocotlonnl Education

Dlvi.slon of Vocollonnl llcbobllltalion, Depart• ment of F:dncatlon.

Public Lnw 87--ta-Tho ~1lu!Jr':wcrDovclopmont ond rolnlng Act of 1962, as amended.

Prognun odmlnl.strallon ............. Jnstltntlo1llll tralnlnt projecu: Clork stcnograp or proJect June 3, 1066to M'nr.22, 1967. Clerk stcn project (continued) Apr. 3, 11167 to Oct. 22, UIG7. Welding project, Juno 3, 11166 to JUDO 18, 11167. Mo.sonry proJoct (opprovcd, not funded).

l'ubllc L:i,v 8&-333-Tho Dasie nllocotlon for Ou11.mto support Vocatlo1llllRehabWtll.llon tho vocotlonal rchobUltatl.on proAct, as runcndod, TIUo 45. gram. Includes ass!stonco for tho rcbobllltatlon work:sbop. Public Wcllllrc,ch. rv, pt. 401,subpor. O. Title 46 Publlo Wcllorc Comprehcnslvo statowldo plonnlng forvocatlonnl rdlablll1.allonservlccs. ch. iv, Vocotlonlll Rebablll• tatlon Actbas amended, (Pro~oct year: Apr. I, 11167 to Mor. 31, pt. 401,so pnr. 0, sec. 1068.

2,SOS

10

28.069 27.310.

0

0

10,3711 12,827.

14,620

1,625

10

16,251 6,386.

34,208

0

0

34,208 26,850

6, 0'/8

625

10

146,820

67,014

U.264 10,3711

60,000

•~n)(2)(B),

Tl o uiv Public IYcllllro, Workshop Improvement gront. (Proch. l Vocollolllll Reha. Ject year: Moy I, 1967to Apr. 30, bUJtot on Act, as amended, 1068.) pt. 40'1,subpor. E, sec. 13b. Totnl ...... Decent

of

mmcrce.

omcoEconomic Opportunity.

8,604

·------- 3. 581,5111

EcoPublic L:iw 80-136-The Sito lmprovomcnu for tho Tomunlng nomlc DePublic Works ond Economic Industrial Pork. vclofmcnt Development Act ol 1965. Aul orlty (OEDA). Quam Economic Public Lnw 88-462-The Eco- Tille I-Youll1 Corps ~olghborhood Opportunity. nomlo Opportunity Act or Youth Corps 1uly 12, 1966to Sept. 11164, os omcndc<I. 23, 1QG7. Titlo 11-Urbon o.nd Rurnl Communlty Action l'rogroms.

OUlllll

31..3

6, 703 Expenditures nuthorlu<I In fiscol year 1068. 213,834 2:05,002.

0

0

80,000 2,716-0ngolng

1156

10

0, 5GO 737-0ngolng project.

416,8411

project.

3, 1198,440

38, &00

38,600

50

141,350

16,010

10.1

101,240

16.240

13.8

33,416

3,140

8. 6

li0, 114

58,620

24.0

6, 113

10.6

148,686

19.3

2,962,033

77,000 O-Loto oporoprlatlon to be oxpcndod In Flscol Year 1968. 167,300 84,840-Ongolng project.

Pr09ra,nbreakdown lleadstart (Deportment or £duco• tlon), Jw10 8, 11166 to l\lor. a1 1QG7. Consumer Action (Collogo of 6 uam), Apr. I, 1967to i\lllr. 31, 1968. Area Opftortunl~• Center (EOC), r. I, llG7to i\ nr. 31, 1068. Sc~ or Cltlzans Development (EOC), Apr. 1, 1067to Mor. 81, 1068. llead.slort ~ollogo), Apr. l, 1967 to Mor. 31, I .

"' \0

43.6111 017,ill4

117.480 90,W$. 36,655 To start August lll67. Do.

234,640 48,704

Do.

700,380 4.877-0ngolng project.


Programs Receiving Federal Financial Assistance-Fiscal

<.>J

0

--

Progrom nlSpornslbUlty Fedeml

Ounm

Basic outhorlty for Fcdc.rol RSSlstancc

Program or project

Year 1967-Cootinued

Fcderul runds nlloc:ltcd

llotcblng r1u1cb provldod b>' Owuu

1'11rcent of totol provided by Ouom

Toi.Ill runds hudgclcd

'l'otol runds CXl)llnded

Proqram brtakdown-Conllnucd

D~m.cntol ealtb, Educotlou and Wei• rore-Houslng and U rb!lll De••elopment.

llunm Ilousins; nnd Urbon Renewal Authority.

U.S. Ilouslng ACL or 1937, oppllcoblo runondmcnt, f>liblloL11wS~U7.

Job dovolol)1111mlund prcJob lrtllulng (Dcpnrtmo.nt or Lal>Orlllld Po.r,on. ncl), Apr. I, 1007to Mlll'. 31, 1008. AdmlJ1ISU11tlo11 ond conduct or progroms. Low cost rcnl41 units ror Ounm 10 r.r• cent contlngo.ncy wllhheld (loan .

Advance ror 3 months opcroUou ....... Advonce provided ror odmlnl.!strntlon om! 11Urvoys. Slnojnno Urban lt~nownl Projuct npproved by rnro ll:lnr. 13, 1967: Project csllmoted cost (lo:in).. .. Advnnce ror 3 months operotlon ... Yono Urban Ronowol Project 01>rn11vedb>· DUD Juno 30, 1967: Project osllmt1LCIIIcost (loan) ..... A pprovcd plnnnlnll' ndvnnco noL ycL requested. D~rutmcnt obor.

or

DopartmonL or Lobor tllld Porsounel, Ouom Em• ymcnl ~ Ice.

Wogocr•Poyscr Act or 11133, as Opcrotlon or tho Ou11m Em11loyrocnL ruuended, Ouom P.L. 20, Service. Includes ront, salnrlllll. ◄lh Ouom Lcglslo.tUJ'Oac1rovol purchllSO or equipment and ooflts Act ror tho turUory. supplies ond tclophono Bild telePub c Low 87-tl6 i'\tru1power ~rch service. Dovclopmcnt !llld Trolntng Prov des lor ,·ocnl1011al trolnlng ror Act or lll62, ns nmcnded. tho unem11loyctl ond undor• oroployod. Program 11dmlnl.!sLmt1011... •• ·····-· ... TILlo Il A-On•the-Job t.rOJning ...... TIUo 11 n-In!LltuLIOnol Trotolni P7jceLs: Jork sl1mogrn~hcr, June 3, 11166 to Mar. 22, I 7. Clerk stenoitrophcr (contlnuoo.), A~r. 3, 1967 to Oct. 22, 1008. Wei Ing sirotoct, Juno a, 1966 to Juno 13, I 7. Masonry project (opprovcd) ....

$31,384

$3.034

8.8

49,851

12,!HS

20.6

6, 168,144

93,850

0. 8'JO.i1l8

0

0

0

0 100

1s,m

2,873,4sg}

26

800,135

25

<l2,134

0

0

16,326

0 0

0

07,876

3,476,6'10} 02, G'.>7

19,000

0

$34,~IS To stort AUl!Ust 1967. • 62, m

s-,1,oos.

NA

18,~

}2'l,223.

12,i64, 231 .... "' -..- ...

◄2,134

To go boforo January 1968 SCS31on ol loglslnturo lor nwiroval. 38. 5. ◄ I.

16,326 16,820.09.

19,000

o.

22,762

0

0

22, i62 2'l, 128.00.

18,000

0

0

18,000 7,681.00. 29,IM 20,261.00,

29, 16t

0

0

0,000

0

0

G,000 0.


llllorJor Dcp-jrl• mcnt.

O~mcntof • oallb, EducaUon,11nd Welfare.

Do.

......

Do ...........

Laud ~loun~emcn1.

T'ubllo Low 88-578-Lnnd nnd Woter Conscrvollon ,\ct or 11165BSruncnded. l'nbllo Lnw SS:29-0ntdoor ltccn,atlon Act.

Rctroocllvo cll\lm for Yp(10 Beach pro~. O.<calyear 11165, project No. l. M Totororo Bo>•ncqu!sl11on, project No. M--00003. NlovcsM. Public LllW 84-697-Tho TlUo 1-Admlnlstmtlon end Services. Flores lite. Llbrory Service, .Act BS TlUo ll-Supcrvlslon or constru~lon morllll and construction costs. runonded bil Public Law Llbmry, 8-Hl96; Pub le Law 8&-6711: TIUo nr-Llbrary cooperntlon_. ··--· Publlc Law 87--088;Public Tltlo IV-.A-Stoto Institution scrv• Law SS-2Gll,and Public Ices. T..111v811-611.Rcnnmed tho Tit.lo TV-B-T,tbmry services ror the Library Services ond Con• ph)""lcolly hondle3ppcd. strucllon .Act. 20 U.B.O. ch. 16. Dcrurtm~nt or Publ.lo L6w 84-690--Publlo Sec. 402!-Cancer controL---··-·--·ubUc Ilenlth lienlLh Services Act, as Seo. 314c-Chronlcally UI ond aged._ ontl Wclltlrc Sec. 3lk-Dcntal haalth._ .. _ ....... runcodcd, 42 U.S.C. 241 (Ilcnllh). nn(l 240, See. 8l ◄c-11nd d-Ocimnl heoJlh____ sec.314&-lloart dl$easc control.. ..... .. Sec. 3J4c-Uomo hcolth SttVlces....... J\bo PubJlc Law 8'>--300 Soc. 3l◄c-Mcntol heolLh•• --·---···--Sec. 314c-Rt\dlologlclll heo1U1.--·--· Sec. 3l4b-Tuberculosls control-····Oeponment or Pullllc Lllw 116-940-Tho TIUc I-Old llgC asslswico.. ••. ·---·-TIUo tt-Ald to famlllos with depend• Public Ilenlth Social Sl'Curity .Act, RS and Welfare nmcndcd. cot chlldrcn. {WeUare.) Funded through OEO ... Tltlo V-Work experience lllld Lraln• Ing demonstration. TIUe X-Ald to the blind.. ..... ____ Tlllo XIV-Aid to the pcrmnnenUy and totally dlsublcd. Ttuo XIX-Modlcore program (tt>nta• llve-Stoto plllD submitted). Public Law 80-778omends to TIUc I-McdlOlll DSSlsWICC to the ed. Soclnl Socur1tt Act. Oh~ Id welfare serv leas .. Public l,nw 61>-60 omends Social $tlcurlty Act. Youth sen Icesdnmonstmtlon pre)ttt. SOcbl Security Act, Ullo XI, ICC.1116.

no..

(,;)

. - .. -.

\lBSler 1'1nLL.

Public Uonllh ond Welrnro.

Title XL •• ·---·--·-··--·-·· Socllll Security Act, Public Low 8&-840,pt.. 2J tlllo V, sec. 614, 85 amen cd, 4.2 O.S.C. 712. Soclol Securl~ .\ct. lit.lo V, ...I, sec. d 42 U.B.C. ft02, u amen cd by Public Law 81>-117.

Summor worlcsbop project ..... Crlp~~d c1~•~.~n•s.~lces: Fund n_. Moten1J1Innd child hoollh ~rvlces: Fund A.... Fund n..

31,000

31,000

60

62.000 34,200.

21,913

24,913

60

49,826

15,000

60

30,000 15,000.

105,247 68,707

34

141,200 Hl,200. 117,000 117,900.

16,000

:IS,1162 69, 133 1,n6

1,m,

1),15

17,700 60,000 8,000

7,600 49,700 76,000 65.000 10.700 0, 700 60, 167 90,735 108,6H

............

0 0

0 -·-··--·-0 ••••• ·-·-·· 0 •••••••••

0 17,iOO 60,000 8,000 7,600 49,700 4,441

GS. 000

10,700 0, 700 60,167 90. 735

0 50 60

131.008

131,669

w

7,480

60

7, <ISO

100.184 33,017

2.8:10

17,800 16,000 99,400 44,410 180,000 21,400 19,400 120,314 199,470

60 60 60

0

Do.

J.20,000 :IS,1187. 11.

60

I, 611 10,083

Not matched. Do.

34,000 33, 113.72.

60 60 60 60 60 JO 60

1,611 10.083

'Ill, 820.

8. 682.116. 3,361.37. 34, 797.20. 4 788.91. 63.460.18.

0,617.28. 111,868.36. 107,322.60.

108,6H 6,733.86. 3. OZ! 2, 005.00. 32, 166 20. ~ 85. Fiscal year 1008. 16,000 13.~ 00.

...................

33,3

160,270 1116, ()!)I. 69.

0

0

33,017 31,230.54.

0

0

2.850 4, 7«&00.

60,092

78,780 29,3711

78. 780 0

60

167,G50 126.173.II. 29,379 6,672.60.

40,SOO

40,800 0

60 0

81,012 117,Z711.04. 50,000 30,070.-18.

60,000

0


Bureau of the Budget Personnel: 6

The Bureau of the Budget, a staff office of the Governor, was established as a separate bure"'u, apart from management, by Executive order on December 30, 1966. The bureau's responsibilities include the formulation of budget policies and procedures, review and analysis of budget proposals, and implementation of adopted policies in the execution of the budget. The bureau periodically reviews the status of appropriations and controls the same through the allotment process. It also reviews and makes recommendations on all proposed appropriation measures as well as other proposed legislation having monetary implications. The bureau took steps during the year to adopt a Planning, Programing and Budgeting System ( PPBS) . The initial steps taken were to identify activities that are closely linked and to relate long-range plans with operational programs. These steps will be followed by efforts to assist department.s

32

Budget: $36,000

and agencies in more specifically identifying their objectives and to help establish the means whereby progress can be measured. The bureau continually reviews the financial status of the government and develops plans to insure that resources are adequate to meet governmental responsibilities. During the year, the bureau recommended enactment of tax measu.resdesigned to overcome anticipated deficiencies and to allow for implementation of new programs and expanded programs indicated in longrange plans of the government. Several tax measures were proposed and favorable legislative action resulted in the passage of tax legislation anticipated to yield more than $3 million in additional revenue. The operations budget approved during the year amounted to $21,101,610 in addition to capital improvements and other items amounting to $4,804,372 for a total of $25,905,982.


Bureau of Management Research Personnel: 7

The Bureau of Management Research, a staff office of the Governor, was established as a separate bureau, apart from budget, by Executive order on December 30, 1966. The bureau's responsibilities include the formulation and review of all matters relating to management practice, organization, policies, programs, and operations of the government. It also coordinates and assists in the implementalion of all approved recommendations submitted by independent auditing firms, the internal audit branch of the Department of Finance, and other auditing or management reports submitted by Federal agencies. During the year, the bureau initiated several reorganizaLion studies, including proposals for the consolidation of

Budget: S51,112

the Departments of Commerce, Land Management, and Agriculture into a new Department of Resource Development; abolishment of the Department of Labor and Personnel with the creation of a proposed Department of Labor; creation of a Civil Port Authority to consolidate the Commercial Port and the Air Terminal; and for the establishment of a Vocational Education and Technical Commission. In addition, the bureau initiated steps to mechanize certain operations of the government presently done man·ually. Studies are continually being made to determine project areas for mechanization to promote more eff eclive and economical government operations.

33


Department of Agriculture Personnel: 63

The Department of Agriculture is responsible for the promotion of farming, conservation, and plant and animal quarantine control. It has five divisions: Plant Industry, Animal Industry, Fish and Wildlife, Veterinary Service, and Cooperative Extension Service. Guam had 864 fuU- and part-time farmers this year compared with 736 the previous year. Despite strenuous efforts to increase market garden production, it fell far short of expectations, due mainly to heavy rains and a high rate of breakdown in fann machinery. Five hundred acres were put to cultivation compared to 600 the previous year. Total production of fruits and vegetables amounted to 1,435,214 pounds valued at $257,642. (Of this amount, 233,284 pounds, valued at $30,482, was sold to the military, a drop of about one-third.) Total production the previous year was 1,809,355 pounds valued at $357,537. The drop in production was a factor in the increase of imports. They climbed from 8,302,180 pounds valued at $828,100 to I0,558,109 pounds valued at $1,260,813. Plant fodustry Divisioti The division imported 30,000 pineapple slips from Hawaii to boost production on Guam. (Two thousand 34

Appropriation: S410,516

were sent to the Trust Territory.) Eight varieties of tomatoes and four varieties of sweet potatoes also were brought in from Hawaii for testing and introduction. In addition a number of experiments were carried out in fertilization and plant spacing. In crop pest control, the division was successful in the release and propagation of the opius fletecheri, a predator of the melon fly, with good results. Two species of insect, the uroplata girardi and hypena strigala, were introduced to feed on lantana plants, one of the most noxious weeds on the island. Results are still being evaluated. A survey was started to determine if there is any other species of the Anopheles mosquito present in Guam other than Anopheles srtbpictus indifinitus. To date no other species has been found. Animal lndt1,S#ryDivision Livestock population at the close of the fiscal year included about 7,000 hogs, 6,500 cattle, 1,000 goats, 655 carabao, and 88 horses. Swine development picked up at the fatcst rate. Commercial egg production registered a new high of 80,000 dozen eggs per month compared to last year's average monthly rate of 60,000 dozen. The number of layers increased from -+4,560to 60,325.


Fi-sh and Wildlife

Dwision

This division is responsible for the research and development and proper management of the island's fish and wildlife resources. Guam began participation in the Federal Aid to Commercial Fisheries Research and Development Program during the fiscal year with the purchase of IIawaiian-type sampan, fishing equipment, and the recruitment of an experienced fishing captain. Exploratory fishing for dccpwater fish such as snappers and groupers, night light fishing for mackerel, and tuna fishing by the live-bait method commenced in January. The project's objective is to determjne the commercial importance of the various species of fish that can be caught in the vicinjty of Guam. Early indications are that several species of snappers, jacks, and mackerel arc available in commercial quantities that can be readily sold in the local fresh fish market. The Fish and Wildlife Division is working in close cooperation with the Guam Economic Development Authority to promote a viitble fishing industry on the island. (Details are in the annual report of the Guam Economic Development Authority.) An estimated 248,000 pounds of fish were harvested frorn Guam waters during the fiscal year. Good runs of seasonal fish such as the mackerel and rabbitfish produced an estimated 61,000 pounds and 22,000 pounds respectively. Deep sea trolling by small sport fishing boats accounted for 114.000 pounds and reef fishing by a combination sport-subsistence fishermen produced approximately 51,000 pounds of miscellaneous reef fish. pproximatcly 1,700 fingerling channel catfish werc> imported from Montana and released into the 175acrc Fcna Reservoir to determine the

possibility of developing thjs species as a game fish in the fresh water habitats of the island. The largemouth and smallmouth bass previously released have shown excellent growth but to date no evidence of local reproduction have been observed. The collection and identification of the various species of fish found in Guam waters has progressed LO the stage where we now have recorded 491 species comprised of 81 families. Wildllie research and development work was continued in order to accumulate more life rustory data of wildlife species such as deer, fruit bat, doves, feral pigs, and rail. Two deer and fruit bat hunting seasons, one bird season, and a yearlong feral pig hunting season were conducted during the past fiscal year. A total of 470 hunting licenses was sold. The legal hunting kills are as follows: 73 deer, 40 fruit bats, 140 wild pigs, and an estimated 350 doves. The most popular hunting area was Northwest Field. Red-winged and spotted tinamous were imported from Argentina through the cooperation of the Foreign Game Introduction Program. These birds were brought into Guam in an effort to enhance the island's wildlife resource. Palau pigeons will also be introduced shortly.

Veterinary Ser-vice This division provided veterinary service for any government agency requiring it and also provided free service for the food-producing animals of the farmers of Guam. It made a total of 216 farm visits. The division also assisted in the Guam's anti rabies vaccination program and assisted in the control of an outbreak of cattle disease ( Piroplasmosis}

35


r

_,I

The "Panglau Oro," a 37-foot Hawaiian-type commercial fishing sampan, rece.ndy started exploratory fishing in Guam waters unde.r the Federal Aid to Commercial Fisheries Research Development Program.

or, the island of Tinian in the Trust Territory.

Cooper11JweExtension Ser-vice This division provides an out-ofschool system of education in which both adults and young people learn by doing. During the fiscal year it made a total of 1,784 fann and home visits and conducted 62 4-H Club meetings, 40 district meetings, and 24 cooperative meetings. The staff also attended 50 various conferences, held 30 guided tours for school children, and conducted more than 200 market surveys. During the year the division's direct supeivision of the Guam Farmers Cooperative Association was taken

36

over by private management. However the division continued to provide technical assistance. The volume of fresh produce handled by the cooperative increased from last year's 274,549 pounds valued at $43,375 to 440,219 pounds valued at $64,792. In the latter part of the year the cooperative signed a contract to provide the military with more than I00,000 pounds of fresh produce. The proposed new Farmers Market is expected to be completed and in operation in January of 1968. More rigid quality control will be instituted at that time. (Note: See the Guam Economic Development Authority's report regarding a new joint program called the Agricultural Development Fund.)


Departmeot of Agriculture, Statistical Repons, Fiscal Year 1967 FRUITS AND VEGETABLES: LOCAL PRODUCTION AND lMPORTATIONFISCAL YEAR 1965 TO FISCAL YEAR 1967 lmportotlon

Locol production Pounds IGtlS..................••........

1960................... 1067..................

- ...... - ........

MISCELLANEOUS

-· ... ··-· .••••

-·· .•........... - ...... -· .....

.

Pounds

Value $112,492 3~7.637 U7,042

712,264 1,800,866 1,436,214

Pull·Umo ...... -·· ............................................................ Par1.•Llmo........................ ·- ..........................................

I. 260,813

YEAR

1966 AND

P'~&Jeor

Flsco.lyeor

••••••••

.

0

POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK:

. . .

NUMBER BY REGION-AS

264 000

00. 000

600

........... --80,000 30

33 100

176 138

00

OF JUNE 30, 1967

Northern region

llcm

11167

620 600

~~~ ~nfa~':!~rt"r?~3~lvestock produ~r: .......•••••••••••• ···-····•••••••• Poultry ........ -·-·· ..... ·- .. ___ ._ ........................................ Cottle ....................................... ·- ............................... Hogs.............. -·· .............. ·-·· ......................................

828,110

210

. _

Acre.seultlvotcd. ··-·-························· ••••••••••••••••••• ····-· Number or tractors used ror form ope_ratlon........................................

$647,477

6,177,218 8,302,180 10, MS, 109

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS-FISCAL FISCAL YEAR 1967

Number or !annl!J'S:

Vtllue

Southern reiJon

Tol.01

POULTRY

Chlokens

~~ft~ ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::===:::::::::::

Chien .......••• _ ••••••••••••• ··-· •••••••••••••• ·-· •• ···-··· Ducks .......... _ ............................... ··-·· ......•....... Pigeons............................................................. .

20, ◄M

10,800 2,600 20

200

30,920 7,000 10,CIW 120 410

60,3~

17,800 13,160

uo

610

LIVESTOCK

CarabDOS •••••••••• -······.

·········--·····

63

••••••••••••••••••••••••

Cattle .............................. ·-· ....... __ ... ··- ....•.....•. ll<>r ·············································-·············-··

Horses.... _ ........•••••• ··-··· ••••••••••••••••••••••• ·-··-·····. OoolJI.... ··-··

.......•..........•••..•••••••••

-· ••••••••••••.••

1,3Gb 4, 0"..5 14

-·.

80

(j()'l

6,186 2,07.'I 74

m

OM 6,600 7,000

88 1,000

37


~

C0

Table I. 1lmage M1mlhlvRainfall (Tncliu)-Fi,cal Year, /SOt-61 Fiscel ycnr 1002.. 196:L 1004.

. •••

IDM..... ::::: 1066 1967.........

July S. 10 14.118 LL26 1.rn 16. 67 a.74

August 111.UI 14.1.:?

U.86 8.0'.I 3.67 11.39

September 16. 40 21.80 13.47 10.30

22.27

22.28

October

November

111.17 14.0b

6.31 13.00

18.00 14. G2 O.Sll 0.00

~

December 4.U 13.~

G.88 G.Ob

IG.ID G.9'l

0. 97 i. 26

3.13 4. 70

Jonwuy 2. 24

9.33

1.00 10.29 2. 13

6.20

--Fcbrunry 0.17 0.47 4. ll 1.02 l.ll!l 4. 35

.\!nrch 1.00 2. 46 4.'44 0,69 I. 71 11.28

April 8.00 10.55

i."8

0.50 1.31 8.07

Moy G.GS 12.60 20,00 1.00 2. 51

3. 70

Juno 7.07 i. II 7.4D

6.U 6. 72

8.37

'l'ot.111 105.32 162. 60 123. 90 82. O'l 73.87 101.38


College of Guam Personnel: 104

The College of Guam is the only American institution of higher learning in the Western Pacific. The college is governed by a board of regents composed of five members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the legislature. The president of Lhecollege is responsible to the board and also serves as executive secretary of the board. Total enrollment during the fiscal year was 4,083, including students in on-campus and e.xtension classes, special institutes and training courses. The college conferred bachelor of arts degrees on 43 seniors and an associate in arts degree on four other students. Those graduating majored mainly in social science ( J5), educa tjon ( 12). language and literature (7), and business administration ( 6). The college had 100 high school students enrolled in Upward Bound and some 500 preschool students in Operation Headstart. The college also

Appropriation: $989,045

organized the insular arts councils under a Federal grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. A new fine arts building and library arc scheduled for completion when the fall term opens. Construction is underway on a science building with completion expected in the spring. Projects awaiting approval include a student center and four dormitory buildings. The college is to be reorganized in the fall into three schools: Arts and Sciences, Education, and Continuing Education. Each will be headed by a clean. The college also plans to open a graduate school in the fall offering a master of arts in education. The Governor gave the college authority to recruit its own professional personnel and procure its equipment and supplies. This was formerly the function of other government departments.

39


Department of Commerce Personnel: 38

The Department of Commerce is composed of five divisions-Industrial Development, Tourist Development, Air Terminal, Port Security, and Weights and Measures. Its overall objectives include the promotion of business, compilation and distribution of information on business conditions, and analyzing and publishing a periodic census of business and industry. Its duties also include enforcement of Customs and certain Federal regulations applicable to Guam.

Appropriation: $290,614

being implemented. Two specific surveys are in process, one involving a census of private and government employment, the other a study of consumer expenditures. It is hoped the latter will provide meaningful cost of living data for the territory. The division handles queries from firms and individuals concerning business activity on Guam. Its regular publications include the Quarterly Review of Business, "Facts About Doing Business on Guam," and an annual Business Directory.

Industrial Dwelopmem The division concentrated this year on establishing a standardized system of gathering and reporting statistics in accordance with methods used by Federal agencies. Modern keypunch machinery was installed for use with a computer. Statistics now on file are being recorded on punchcards and this will be done as far as possible with aU statistics gathered in the future. It is anticipated that by the end of fiscal year 1968 there will be a standardized system of reporting, storing, and retrieving the most essential economic and statistical data required for any relevant inquiry. The Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics provided a consultant to assist in developing a regular program of labor force, wage, and consumer price studies. He submitted three reports now 40

Tourist Division There were several important developments in tourism during the year. Pan American Airways inaugurated twice-weekly direct Bights between Tokyo and Guam. American Express, the world's largest travel organization, established an office on the island. P & 0 Orient Lines announced plans to boost its cruise ship calls from one to two annually. These developments came after extended efforts by the division which has stepped up its advertising in various media to take advantage of the increased visitor potential-especially from Japan. There also was an important breakthrough in efforts to promote the island as a movie location site. The Shochiku Film Co. of Japan shot a major portion of a feature fiJm on the island with


assistance from the department. Officials of a second Japanese film company looked over the island as a possible location. Meanwhile the hole) situation on the island continued to improve wilh 50 additional rooms constructed. Financial problems held up construction of a proposed major resort hotel but this is expected to be resolved shortly. Afr Terminal

Guam's new International Air Terminal was opened in March at the northeast end of the Naval Air Station. The long-awaited terminal was constructed with $850,000 from the Guam Rehabilitation Act and $735,000 in local funds. Engineering and architeclUral work was prepared by Alfred A. Yee & Associates, Inc .. Honolulu and the main contractor was Cris Berg Construction Co. The two main structures arc arrival and departure buildings of almost lS,000 square feet each. They arc

linked by a large latte stone-motif covered courtyard. There is also an aircraft maintenance shop and a petroleum storage lank farm on the 24-acre site. It has a duty-free shop, car rental booths, vending machines, and porter and baggage cart service. Restaurant and bar concessions are to be let out shortly. The terminal handles 10 scheduled international flights weekly plus 14 to and from the Trust Territory.

Port Security The division enforces applicable provisions of Customs. the U.S. Tariff Schedule, the Federal Contraband Seizure Act. the foreign asset'>control regulations of the U.S. Treasury Department, plant and animal quaranljnc regulations of both the territory and U.S. Department of Agriculture, export control regulations of the U.S. Department of Commerce, Federal laws concerning anns, ammunition, and

Guam's new fn1ernnrionnl Air Terminal, parcinlly tinnnced under the Guam Rehabilitation Act. was opened fo March. The arrival a.ad depnnure buildiogs arc sepnrnrcd b>• covered courtyard witb piUnrs tha1 resemble the island's famous larte sroncs. The longawnitcd S 1.6 million srrucrure, which replaced no old quonset hut, handles IO scheduled international ftightS weekly, plus 14 co and from the Trust Territory of the Pacific. 278--633 O-OS----4

41


Shipper's export declaration authenticated and forwarded to Bureau of Foreign Com• mercc, Washington, D.c ___ _ Appropriate certificates of origin examined and forwarded to Foreign Assets Control De• pa.rtmcnt, Washington, D.CExport of taxable commodities supervised and tax drawback certificates certified ___ _ Issuance of certificates of origin, CF-3229, U.S. Tari.ff Schcd• ule, Headnote 3(a) _____ _

implements of war, Federal laws of concern to the Atomic Energy Commission, and public health quarantine regulations. This is done in the absence of established federal agencies in Guam. During the period of this report the following activities were executed: l ,uputions

529 Vessel inspection and clearance-Aircraft inspection_ ______ _ 13, 451 Baggage inspected ______ _ 488,559 Passenger and crew members processed __________ _ 162,853 Cargo boxes or packages 55,693 examined Postal packages inspected (foreign) ________ _ 1, 752 Fruits and vegetables examined 1,349,411 (foreign) ----Jnterccptions 859 Plant and animal casCS---Dru11;sand medicine.- ___ _ 23 Fore1gn Assets Control Regu• 359 lations -------Others lmport certificates (livestock and marine life) received and examined 389

Africa- .................... American SBI11011.. ........... Argontlnn ................... Austmlhi .................

. . . .

Ilolglum..................

.

C!llllldn ..............•.......

Chichi Jlma. ................ Donmnrk ................... Englnnll ....................

. . .

Franco......................

.

Oennnny ................... Tiollnnd................... Hongkong..................

. . .

Do ......................

.

Indio•••••• ·········-····· Indone5lll.................... Italy .......................

. .

J11pan_················-···· Do .....................

.

llfolBysln. . . . . . . . ..........

41.2 133.2 8,867. l 254.1

1.2

37.G

9.3 746.0 80.0 2,898.1 656.4 2,213.1 .4 1.6 20.6 79,585.4

Export5

28,823

7,707

{,$GS

838,711 74,096 053,665 04,400 450,392

Soo footnote

42

11t

.

.

. .. .

20:1

.09

• ·,i:i:o·

8.0

..

2.6

I

6,636.0 76. 3

.05 37.8 62.2

0.233.8

end of tnblc.

•• 6,.700 18 10

7,400 27,473 751,42'.!

.I

... .. •l

Itovonuo ton

Country

6.5 T111$tTerritory. 620

• ·34, 846

100.1 807.0

········40 . .... "i"i

... ------5.5

·······210 300 213 13,030,691

364,140

..

66. 2

.2

Transshipments

Dollnr vnluo

2.6

• ··20, 799 l,"80,900 60.820 239

..

.

Mexico..............••....... New Hobrldcs.. . ......... . Now Oulnca ............... . New Zoalnnd. ... . •........ ~onvoy .. . .. . ......... . Oklnt1wn................... .

... ...

989

The Governor signed an executive order requiring installation of meters in all taxicabs operating on the island. The division was given responsibility to oversee instaJlation of the meters and check their accuracy quarterly. The division's work through the year included the inspection and approval of 272 scales, 76 gas pumps, and 48 measuring devices.

novonno ton

Dollar valuo

no..... ·•••••••••••••. Do- ....................

Do.....

1,021

W ei.ghJs and Measures

lmport5 Revenue ton

P~ru- ......................

3, 195

of Commerce, Statistical Report, Fiscal Year 1967

Department

PllUl_pplncs................

I, 861

1, 101

2.0

Do. Do.

6,316

4.0

Do. Do.

. --. i;~

i;ni;'oio 20,686

7.6

27. 7 Kwll)llklln. 378.6 Trust Terrltory.

.. ··894:oFIJI.

14.3 Oldnnwa. 68.7 Trust Tnrrltory. 10. 7 United suites.

--. - ... jg ...

Do. Do.

40 ----

.14

II,7ro

1 SM.3 1380.0

714,684 104, Off

oS:sTrust

Territory.

···.s,;i:2 United Stotos.

6.0 Trmt Territory. 1.2 KwnJololn. 270.4 Trust Terri Lory.


Department of Commerce, Statistical Report, Fiscal Year 1967-Coorinued Import.a

Rc\·cnuc Ion

Portupl. .....•.............. Sahnh... . . .............. Soollnnd.

Swedon..

. ••...•.........

'l'lllwon. .....................

l)Q______

.. .

807

IJ.4 3. 707. 7

Rcvenuo Ion

Tmnsshlpmenls

Revenue

u,n

Onll.Od KJngdom . :.:::: Unltoo Stlltos. ............... Do ........... Vietnam ..................... Wako lslond ..............

o.m,001

0. 7

1,070

.6.6

2, 180

687,263

io:2i,o

2.2

0.1110.0

········--

"ii,620 &i:6 169,6811.2 38.036,400 i~&00.8

190.G

IU.8

.. .. 285,860.04

2-1.8 03, tlS2,432

C<>unLry

.... ·-.... ...........

180

200,400

Oollnr voluc

••••• $139

..

0.876 .8,600

..

·wo.1

U nllod SlfllOS. M.6 Trust TcrTftory.

I, l21. 400

140.1 Japan. 210. 7 Tmst TorrllOry.

3,767,000 SI, 67'2

17,034.-7 Trust Terrilory.

• •••••

Oo·-········

'l'oLlll. ...

~

I.I 8,149.1 2. 2 10.0

II, 003.8

Do_ .. Thllll11nd..... Trust Tmltory:.: ... ::::::::.

voluo

16.2

.o

:~~~~:: ::::::::::: :::::.

'R11-Exports

Dollllr

3S,SR44

◄0.

6,780 600

7,016, 788

I

UnJlod SLlll.llS.

.. 20,611.3

1 Scrop.

• All ro-cxporls, oJCccpt ror exports or wnlcb movements, wntch bnndJ, scrnp aod pcrsonnl cllccta lo lh~ United SUllos.

43


Commercial Port Personnel: 977 (Permane.nt, 78; casual, 899)

The Commercial Port is a nonprofit, sci.f-supporting agency of the government, handling all commercial harbor operations. The port presently uses U.S. naval station property on a 90day revocable permit under a joint Navy-Interior Department agreement of 1950. It is adjacent to Navy berthing areas in the southeastern part of Apra Harbor. There is room to berth four cargo vessels. Overflow is taken by the ravy. Construction started in December on a new Commercial Port to be located on Cabras Island adjacent to the U.S. Coast Guard depot on property obtained from the Navy. It is expected to be completed in 1970 at a total cost of $10,500,000. Funds were obtained under the Guam Rehabilitation Act passed by Congress after Typhoon Karen. D. R. Kincaid, Inc., of Honolulu, has a $3,488,423 contract for the first inct'emc.nt. This includes installation of

wharves and a fender system, dredging to provide proper depth for ships, and filling in of submerged land behind the wharves. The new site will provide more than one-hat f mile of wharf space, large warehouse and open storage areas, and cold storage facilities. An adjacent area has been set aside for an industrial park.

Port ChtZrges Commercial vessels berthed at the Commercial Port are charged dockage fees similar to those of the Navy. Tug and pilot services are presently available only through the Navy. The use of harbor pilots is not mandatory except when the tugs are desired. Charges for each tug approximate $125 per hour or fraction thereof, and the pilot fee is approximately $8.50 per hour during normal working hours plus 30-percent surcharge. Stevedoring H&ndlloa

DIISIC •...••••.......................................................•

I

$2. 12 z.76

$2,80

1

U.S. llfnll. .................................... ····-- ................ Ooprofrrochus • ...............................•.....................

.

~::m~~..::.·..•:::::::::·::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Rollhlf. vchlclo to ¾'toru 1•.•••••.•••.••••••••••..•••••••.•.••....•.•

IIousc 1old "oods • In vnn.. .. . . . . . . ... . . ................... Ot.horhouschold.11oods- ..................................... Othor contoluorlrod COl'iOCS ......................................... tlnltlr.o corgo ond llv0$tocl,: (llvo,st011lc$1.00 per hood)........ 1 Jn\/ound. I Minimum Is SI pc.r bill ol lndlng, • Outbound. 1 Cosl plll5 16 percent.

44

...

. . . .

• Noaotloble. •Minimum. 'Eocl1. 1 Per

<•~

1. 2.05 . 76 0 2.05 2.12 2.05 2.12

ton or ◄O cubic root.

2.80 0 2.•o 1.00

20.00 . 70 2,80 1.80 1.00

Transsblpmnnt '$3.20

••••••o··· 2.20 3.20

0 20.00 .00

3.20

2.•o

......... .....


Other Ch11rges Overtime.-An overtime charge is levied for work performed on regular nonworking days, plus an additional 10 percent. Hazard pay.-These rates range from 5 to 10 cents per hour, per member of the work crew, and arc levied upon: frozen or chilled cargo; bagged cement; scrap metal cargo; line cargo; and ammunition or explosive cargo. Special serviccs.-Cost of personnel, plus 15 percent, plus cost of materials. Dockage.-Fee for dockage shall be l ½ cents per net registered ton of the vessel per day or fraction of a day, for the first 10 days, and I cent per net registered ton of the vessel for each day, or fraction of day, thereafter. No dockage shall be charged against vessels berthed outboard of other vessels at the dock when this situation arises from a shortage of dock space, or for the convenience of the Commercial Port. The Commercial Port is not required to provide berths for vessels in an idle status. Line handling.-The charge for line handling is $ 1.25 per man-hour or

fraction of an hour. The number of men required shall be at the option of the vessel's agent. Watcr.-The charge for water is 25 cents per metered ton or fraction of a ton. The fee for each meter connection and removal is $5. Storage.-Import cargoes are given free storage for 5 days, e.xclusive of weekends and holidays as well as nonworking weather days. Export cargoes arc given free storage for 7 days, exclusive of first available vessel ma.king earliest arrival destination. Otherwise storage charges will accrue as of the date of departure of such vessel. Warehouse storage.-The rate is 50 cents per day per revenue ton for the first 15 days after the free period and SI per day per revenue ton for each day thereafter. Charges for private storage range between $2 and $3.20 per cubic ton per month. Outsi.de storage.-Paved areas, 25 cents per day per revenue ton for each day after the free period, except weekends, holidays, and nonworking weather days. Unpaved areas, l cent per square foot per month.

45


Office of the Chief Commissioner Personnel: 27

The Office of the Chief Commissioner coordinates the activities of the 19 district commissioners elected by the people of their respective villages every 4 years. The 'Officeis also responsjble for civil defense, veterans affairs, the election commission, and the boxing commission. The chief commissioner is appointed to a 4-year term by the Governor with the advice and consent of the legislature.

The Commissioners The commissioners are charged with keeping peace and order in the villages, administering and enforcing laws within their jurisdiction, and cooperating with various agencies and departments to promote the general welfare of the people. The chief commissioner meets regularly with the commissioners lo coordinate government programs that require district participation. Programs this year included beautification, elimination of abandoned vehicles, dog control and the eradication of rabies. Final fi~res for the continuing census arc shown in table I.

Cwil Defense The civil defense program includes various training courses, fallout and

46

Appropriation: $197,004

typhoon shelter development, establishing effective warning and communication systems, improving and e,"panding rescue services, organization of district civil defense units, and public information and education. Training in medical self-help was q-ivento 320 students in the public and private high schools. The same course was conducted for 22 personnel in the Department of Public Safety. Eighteen personnel at Public Health and Welfare received a course in radiological ir.onitoring. A shelter survey was completed. It determined that the island has more than adequate space for protection against typhoons. There are some 93,000 spaces in government buildings in the various villages for a combined civilian population of about 53,000. A joint civilian/military disaster control exercise was held and a disaster drill was conducted at the Guam Memorial Hospital.

Y eterans A flairs This office processed applications for for lump sum payments totaling $110,000 under the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act. It also paid out $22,066 in pension and compensation and $25,115 for edurational assistance. Several representatives from the re-


gional office visited the island to help establish new programs.

Party held 13 seats, the Democrats eight. There were 18,723 registered voters and 17,125 cast ballots.

Blectio11 Commission Bo.\-ing Commission The five-member election commision administered the regular general clccLion for members of the inth Guam Legislature, held November 8, 1966. The Democratic Party won all 21 seats in the unicameral House. In the previous legislature, the Territorial

The Guam Boxing Commission was admitted during the year as a member of the ational Boxing Association. Four boxing cards were held, with boxers being brought in from t.he Philippines, Japan, and Thailand.

47


a;

Table A. Population of Guam As of April 1967 (E1clud.lug tmnslcnLs rcsld.lugIn mllllt1ry rcscrvnLlons) OuomllJII0n UlslricL

Mnle

Agllllo..... . ....... AgnM nclghlS. .......... AgnL............. Ason......... ... . Barrtgndn........ .. Cholon Pogo-On!ot. ...... Dedcdo ... - .. -. .• Inaro~an.................. Man lllo ..........

-.

Merlto .................. Mongn1ong-Toto-Malte... Petl'...........

630 1,242 1,040 930 2,299 030 1,000 l,Ol5 1,m 860 040 ◄91

Total .... - .......

676 1,271

1, 6811 1,043 2,355 1,005 1,626 llDt 1,072 776 81)()

uo

616 1,052 2,181 787 1,426 446

660 1,300

1,331

.

SAnta nna .. _ ........... SlnnJnna••••• -. ·-····· • Talolofo._.. .......... Tamunlng ................ Umolac ..............•.. _ Vigo..................... Yona. ... -·· ..........•

:Female

983

2,319 826 1,660

G20

Row11ll1111

Stalceldor

Male LIO 134 103 3S 41

20 182

32

269

31 81 30

Ill

62 31 616

ll 69 68

Female IOI 112 1~

41l 31

Ii

180 12 262 28 78

Ill

16 a6 21 210 12

53

52

Male

Female

37

40

44 20 33 23 ◄

25 0 0 0 21 7 0 16

0

237

0

II

1

--- -- ---1,384 -- (85 --22,0'26 21,072 1,801

--

◄7

22

40 22 2 30 0 0 0 19 8 9 11 0 178 2 8 0 (38

F!Uplno

Others

Male Female 365

212 400

r,o 80

35

385

10 32 II 140 62 163

84

24 371l 0 164 43

IOS

07 175 56

64

16 220 2 16 I :,0

15 7ll 24 10 270 0 104 2ll

Male

Total

Female

76 10'2 67 33 78

02 ll7

46

f8

so 3

67 16 97

2◄

1 53 18 (53

2 2 38

--1,2112 ---1, 2112 --1, Ul3 ---

◄O

38 74 12 0 20 10 98 20 6

as

22

173

2

Maltl Female

1,694 2,040 1,226 2,636 1, 03ll 2,003 1,008 1,370 816 I, 135

684

GOt

1,172 2,624

8811

3, 2:10 421

886

14

38

1183

1,217 1, 73◄ 2,220 1.~1 2,630 1,019 2,237 1,090 1,698 917 1,28$

1,440

--

826 28,133

I, 101 2,289 840 2,238 1.461

7ll9 1,470

Numboror Tolnl rammes Votf:UIB• on Oua• Others

Allens

manlllllS

2,200 3,328 4,200 2,307 6,066 2.~ 4,240

2.098 2,968

I, 732 2.420 1,188 2,333 4,813

I, 739

m

391 625 319 742 376 fi85

332 387

2113

329

244 300

636

30

183 10 20 0 8 185 0 185 0 67 8 0

33

201

20

6,608 882

002

425

1,685

200

166

3 94

2.lllll

363

23

---28,011 ---53,744 ---7,319 ---1,290 ---

120 ◄2

20 16

44

12

◄0

2 8 10 40 9

27

32 7 173 0 0 22 023


Economic Opportunity Commission Personnel: 73

The Economic Opporlunity Commission, a broadly based community action agency, has the responsibility for the administration and coordination of the Economic Opportunity Program on Guam. There are 21 members on the commission, one-third elected by the program participants, one-third representing community organizations, and one-third appointed by the Governor. It has a four-man permanent professional staff. The commission had 50 enrollees in a Neighborhood Youth Corps project under title I of Lhe Economic Opporlunily Act. This on-going project received $141,350 in Federal funds and

Total Appropriation: Sl,340,856

$16,010 from the Government of Guam. The commission also had seven projects under title II covering urban and rural community action programs. They included conducl and administration of programs, two headstart programs, consumer action work program, area opportunily center, senior citizens development, and job development and prejob training. Federal funds allocated totaled $1,053,389. The Government of Guam's share was $247,587. A breakdown of funding and the status of the various programs is listed in the tables on programs receiving Federal financial assistance.

49


Department of Education Personnel: 1,229

Appropriation: $7,602,494

The Department of Education is ad- This alleviated the critical classroom ministered by a seven-man board of shortage caused by Typhoon Karen. education appointed by the Governor George Washington and John F. with the consent of the legislature. Kennedy senior high schools, which Board members represent all major had lost their accreditation with North segments of the community including Central, won accreditation in the the military. The Governor has overall spring from the Western Association of responsibility for education on Guam Schools and College. The College of under terms of the Organic Act. Guam is accredited by the same The director of education is the chief association. officer of the department, which is Teachers staffing the schools at all divided into two divisions, public levels are recruited in large measure schools and vocational rehabilitation. from the mainland. Two-year contracts Other officers are the superintendent are offered and provisions for transof schools; the assistant superintendents portation, housing, and shipment of for instruction, personnel, business af- household goods arc made by the Govfairs, building and grounds, and voca- ernment of Guam. The proportion of mainland teachers to local teachers is tional education; and the coordinator of research, development, and in a ratio of 5 to 3. Communications. Guam's public schools offer the The Organir Act provides that all same curriculum that is found in public children between the ages of 6 and 16 and private schools on the mainland. must attend school. There are two Secondary graduates are offered the senior high schools, four junior high same services a,nd opportunities by schools, a trade and technical voca- certified counselors in planning their tional school, 20 elementary schools, a educational and vocational careers. Consultants are active at all levels school for handicapped children, and a vocational rehabilitation center. The of education serving the needs of system has more than 400 classroom students and teachers alike in numerous to service the needs of some 11,000 areas of instruction. Standardized elementary and 7,000 secondai-d stu- tests for college admission, as well as dents. The parochial and private sys- other tests of aptitude and intelligence, tems service an additional 7,000 are administered periodically to assure students of a complete understanding students. One new elementary school and of their individual potentialities. Federally sponsored programs have three new secondary schools were completed and occupied during the year. enhanced the growth of the curriculum 50


George Wasbfogron Senior High School is rypical of the new public school conuruction that has taken place on Guam under the Rehabilitation Act passed b)• the U.S. Congress following Typhoon Karen. le was opened in the falJ of 1966.

and services of Guam's public schools. During the fiscal year funds were received under titles I, II, III, V, and VI of the Elementary and Secondary School (ESEA) and under title III, V, and X of the National Defense Education Act ( ffiEA). These are detailed in tables listing programs receiving Federal financial assistance. From the first grade until the third, all studenLS arc placed in ungraded classes, and advancement is characterized by eight attained reading levels. It is ex-pected Lhat an average child will attain this level by the completion of rhe third grade. Intermediate grades of four through six arc self-contained classes and progression is based on graded levels of achievements in all areas taught. ludents either walk or are bussed lo school depending on the Physical fitness is suessed in the public school syscem. Here youths in o senior high location of their living area and their school class nrc puc chrough their paces school grade level. on the drill field.

51


Department of Finance Personae!: 177

Tbe Department of Finance is charged with the management of government revenues and the administration of regulatory measures relative to ta.xes, licenses, insurance, securities, procurement and akoholic beverage control. The·re are seven divisions: the Office of the Director, Revenue and Taxation, Accounts, Inspection, Treasury, Real Property Tax, and Procurement and Supply. The department was reorganized during the year. A Real Property Tax Division was established and Licenses and Registration was made a branch of the Division of Revenue and Taxation. The department also recruited a top-level administrator for the Revenue and taxation division. The Director of Finance headed a tax study committee that made a study of possible new tax sources. One of the committee's proposals was approved by the legislature. This was the use tax law. The legislature also enacted a law increasing the gross receipts tax from 2 to 4 percent. This was a substitute for the committee's retail sales tax proposal. The 4-pcrcent gross receipts ta.x law was put in to effect immediately upon approval of the Governor. The 4-percent use tax became effective July 1, 1967. The following tax rate increases also became effective in May 1967: 52

Appropriation: $968,339

I. Alcoholic beverage. Malted fermented-I½ to 2 cents per 12 fluid ounces. Distilled-$6 to $9 per gallon. Vinous-$1.50 to $2.25 per gallon. 2. Cigarettes-15 to 30 cents per 100. 3. Licenses-Banks $150 to $500 annually. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals rendered a decision during the year that will have an adverse effect on revenue from corporate income taxes. The court held that a U.S. corporation doing business in Guam could not be held liable for taxes in Guam as a foreign corporation but only as a domestic corporation. In no instance will the combined ta.x liability for Guam and the United States be in excess of the U.S. income tax liability if the income of such corporation is reportable to the United States only. The U.S. Supreme Court refused to review the case. Tax collections were at a record high. Three sources of revenue-in~ome tax, business privilege tax, and licenses-accounted for approximately $17 milJion of the government's overall revenues. This was an increase of more than $3 million over the previous year's total. Despite the substantial collection record, the receivables inventory remained high, mainly because of the concentration of collection efforts on


trust accounts. With an increased staff, and the establishment of a much firmer collection policy, the next fiscal year should reAect a considerable reduction in the overall inventory. In employee development, five revenue officers received extensive training at U.S. internal revenue training centers on the mainland, and a basic internal revenue agent course was conducted by one of our own officers for nine agents. Forty of the clerical staff took a course in remedial English under the auspices of the College of Guam. Other employees are enrolled in correspondence programs in accounting courses and related subjects. The department entered into an agreement with an appraisal firm to conduct the triennial evaluation of all real properties in Guam as required by statute. The appraisal was completed during the fiscal year. A total of 22,049 real property units ( land and buildings) were appraised and entered into the 1966 assessment roll with assessed Government

of Guam-General

values totaling $34,112,610. The board of equalization certified in the 1966 roll tax assessments totaling $1,023,378.30. By the close of the fiscal year, $821,808.50 had been realized in collections. The number of protests or appeals made against the appraiser's valuations in the 1966 roll hit a reord high. There were 684 protests filed and 580 valuations were adjusted resulting in a net decrease of $40,860 in the overall tax assessment. The board also made upward adjustments in cases involving 200 assessments. One of the conditions to the appraisal contract was the training of the department's enumerators and appraisers to become more proficient in the appraisal phase of their work. Most of the technical employees of the Real Property Tax Division participated in this training. Another condition of the contract called for revision of the existing real estate manual. The appraiser provided an entirely new manual.

Fuod Balance Sheet as of June 30, 1967

Assets: Cash on hand and in bank _____________________________________ _ S8, 136,947.00 Deposit with fiscal agents. _____________________________________ _ 20, 131.17 Accounts receivable: Income tax. ______ . ______________ . __ . ______ _ SI, 537,355.08 Business privilege tax ________________________ _ 308,289.81 Real property tax .... __._ .. _. ______________ _ 572,911.66 Medical services __________________________ ._. 2,112,555.29 Less: Reserve for uncollected accounts_____________

4,531, 111.84 4,531, 111.84

Others __·_. ___________________ . ____ .___________ Less: Reserve for uncollcctible accounts____________

0 163, 796. 70 52,882.66

Due from Treasurer of the United States. ______ . ______ . ________ . __ Due from other funds ________________ . __ . _________ . ____________ _ Inventory of supplies (include inventory in ~ransit S39,362.86)... __... Tnvestment-U.S. Treasury bond (at amoruzed cost) ______________ _ Total assets_________________________________________________ Liabilities, reserves, appropriatioru, and surplus: Liabilities: Accounts and claims payable .. _._._. _____ . __ ._ Accrued salaries and wages .. ________________ _ Other deposits_. __ . _________ . ____ . _________ . Due to other funds __________________________ _

110,914.04 647,592.93 I, 850,914.13 398,826.24 2,343,024.91 13,508,350.42

496,936.70 439,326.38 89,742.74 342, 708.11 I, 368,713.93

53


Government of Guam-General Fund Balance Sheet as of June 30, 1967-Continued Liabilities, reserves, appropriations, ::ind surplus-Continued Reserves: SI, 314,400.00 For tax refund ___••••• ···-·-·-···---··-··-····· 9,500.00 For imprest fund·-··········-·-····--·-----214, 761. l(j For decline in market value of investment ...... . 359,463.88 For inventory ........ _.-·-· ................ . 3,819,359.60 For encumbrances ... __.-· ............. - -- .. . Continuing appropriations._ ....... _ ....... ·- .................. . Unappropriated surplus .. _.. _........................ ·--· .. ·-·-. Total liabilities, reserves, appropriations, and surplus ............. Taxes, local: Income ...................................................... Grossrcccipts •••••••• -·-······························-·----·Alcoholic beverages ..................................

_ ........

.

$5,717,484.64 I, 673, 125.36 4,749,026.49 13, 508, 350. 42

. SI I, 138,087.67 2,547,883.15 423,096.27 . I, 624, 286. 06 105,921. 11 . 89,330.45 98,9-19. 72 861,568.93 14,573.90

ilu;!:c1·.::: :::::::::::::::::::::::: ::::::::::::::::::::::: Exercise and admission ............. ___.... _._ ................. Vehicle transfcr •••••••• ·--··-·----·-··-·-····-·-··-··-···----· Real property·-···-·········--···········-·······-··-·····---Others._ •• _ •••• __._. ______··--··-·-··········--····-··-····-· Licenses and permits: Vehicle registration_. ______________·-. __._._.·-·.. ·-.-· ... -·-_ Vehicle operators ..... ___... __-·-·-·- __·-·-·_·-.·-·_-·-·-·._-·· Busincss••• --·-·-····························-·-·-·--··-······ Othcrs •••• ·-·---·------····-----···-····-···-···-··--·····--· Fines and forfeits.. _.... -···· .•.•• -· ••••••••••• ·-·--· ••• -- •••• ··-- Use of money and property: Interest •••• --------------········-·-····--·-···-·····--·-·-·· Rcnts •••• ·--·---·--·---·--·--···-······----···---·---········ Revenue from other agency: Taxes and fees: Income tax collection by U.S. agency_.···-····....... ···-··· Immigration fees_.•••••••.••••• -·-· •• -·_ ••• -·-·-···•• -···· Grants•in•aid: School operation and maintcnance ••• ·-··-··-···-······-·-···· Expansion and improvements ofeducation·-···········-··-·--Elcmcntary, Secondary and Education Act.·-·-·······--······· Fish and wildlife rcstoration •• -······················-···----· Vocational rehabilitation_ .................................. . Maternal and child health service •• ·-··-·----·······---·-----· Public assistance ... ____ . _ .......... ___... _. _ . ___.......... . Public health service ................ __............. ____... __ Llbrnryscrvicc _____···-·-····-·--·-·----·------·-··-------Child welfare service .. ______.. _._._ ...... ____...... ____.... . Civil defense-·-·····-·-·-······-··---·----·-·--··----·--·Crippled children scrvice_ .... ___.. ____________..... _. __.. -·· Charges for current services: General government. ______._·--. __. __.. _______.. ·--· ________._. Public safety_ •• -· ••••• -·.·--·_.·-·-·_--·· ___-·-·--·-·------ - • Public ,vorks·-·-·---·--------···---·-·-··---·--·------·---··-· Medical services .. _ ... __._ .. _ ............. _._ .. _ ....... _ ..... _. Education ....... _._ .... _ ..... ____.... _ .... __.... ·- .. _._···--~~:U\turc ____ ··--···

-· - - -- - • - • - • - ·-- ---· • • -· • • • •• -· -· --· ••••

506,351. 27 65, 151. 50 119,605.98 48,632.00 133,212. 77 100,516.82 256,707.47 7, 144,497.07 26,044. 75 I, 365, 303. 00 173,668.30 359,666.72 21, 108. 15 123, 151. 12 115,029.08 198,248.31 170, 111. 12 35,501.05 95,049.34 16,001.44 76,653.78 40,328.03 27,574.93 3,033.80 I 90,481.06 245,268.41 805.50 31,635. 36 17,113.87 2,622. 2'1·

~im~~~~~~.~~:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Other revenues: S:ilcs :ind compensation ____.. ··-······-·-··_ .... -·-·--._. ___··-. Contribution and surplus ••• _··--·---·--·-·-··-···--·-··-·--·--Miscellaneous. ____·----· ____·--· _ ···--. --·- __. _ -· ....••• ··-. - •

!J, 231. ,..., 172,616.20 30, 979. 8!J

28,525,599.03 1

U00,287.00In rovonncs Crom Ounm ~l11morlnlHosplull tnmslorrcd lo u11proprlntlo11.

• SllH,010.00In revenues from Collego or Ounm 1n111sforrcdto opproprlot on.

54


Government of Guam-Geoe.ral Fund Expenditure Statement for Fiscal Year 1967 Department or project: Office of lhe Governor __________________________---- ___- -- _______ Department of Finance _____________----- ________________-------_ Department of Law ____________________-- ______- _______- ________ Department of Labor and Personnel_ ______________________________ Depnrtrncnt of Public Safety ____________ - _______-- ______- --- _____ Department of Public Works ______________________ -------- _______ Civil Defense _________________-- - -- - - - ---- - --- - -- -- ---- ---- ---- Commissioners of Guam _____________ ------ _____--- .. __- -·· __--·. Boards and Commissions ________. - . _____. _. ____. ______. _... __. __ Guam Memorial Hospital ____________. _________________- - - - - _-- - . Department of Public Hcallh and Welfare _______________. _________ Department of Education __. _______. __________________. __________ College of Guam ______________________________________________ _ Public 1;-ibraryan~ ~useum _____________________________________ Rccrcauon Com1TUss1on._ .... ___________________________. ___ . -_ Department of Agriculture ... __.. __.. _._ .. _._ .. _______.... _. ____ Department of Land Man.igcmcnt ... ___________________-- . ----- -. Department of Commerce __________.... _______________.......... _ Travel and Transportation .... _. ______. _________________________.

$232,201.42 956,886.54 127,828.54 115, 831. 52 I, 321, 194.01 2, 704, 896. 66 35,539. 27 196,953.39 2,765.00 2,757,450.14 I , 383, 795. 05 7,316,225.98 839,086.14 68,612.99 33,098.93 334,469.22 366,934.03 216,156.31 963,367.85

Total executive branch ________________________________________ 19,973,292.99

175,473. 73 "4:~(::Jrc ____________------------------------·----==------=--= 516,666.48 Washmgton representative_ .. _________..... ______________________ 70,823.52 ScholOl'!lhipand student Joan funds. _______.. ___.. _··-- .... ________ 155,000.00 Contribution to retirement fund __ ... _____. ____.... ________... ____ 994, 785. 14 Guam &:onomic Development Authority ___________________________ 375,000.00 Contribution 10 Urban Renewal Housing Authority Revolving Fund ... 18,927.00 Contribution to workmen's compensation fund ____.... _________ ._._ 18,500.00 Guam air terminal Op<'rations. __________ ... ________. _____________ 73,813.40 Manpower development and training program ______________________ 41,128.39 Adult basic education-OEO. ____________________________________ 11,034.00 ESEA-Titlc I projects __________________.. _____- ---- _-·-- ______ _ 389,233.35 ESEA-T!tle II projects ____________________________._. - - - ___. ___ 45,850.16 ES EA-Title V projects. ______ -·-·· ______.. ________.. ____. __. __. 3,226.70 Professional personnel in the education of handicapped children ______ _ 21,600.00 Statewide planning-Vocational rehabilitation ___ . ______. _____. _____ 2,367.71 Capital improvement and other projects._ ... __... _. __._._._ .. ____. 3,818,909.61 Total ________________________________________________________ 6,732,339.19 Grand total. _. _____.. __... ___. ______. _____.. ____.... ____. _ _ __ 26. 705, 632. 18

Department of Finance, Statistical Report, Fiscal Year 1967 Collection of taxes: Income taxes __________ _ SI I, 138,087 Business privilege taxes._. _ 4,805,091 License ________________ 880,330 Tax reccivablcs: Individual income- .. ____ 823,866 497,553 Corporation income ..... . Income withholding ______ 84.279 Business privilege and ex-_ cise _________________ 308,438 Tax returns filed: Income tax ____________ _ Business privilege tax _____ Tax returns audited: Income tax returns------Busincss privilege tax re-_ turns ________________

58, 713 15,999 3,206 2,340

Tax assessments per audit: Income tax ____________ . Business privilege tax .. ___ Tax refunds: Lncomc tax .. ___________ Business privilege tax _____

608,862 103,538 I, 290,886

217,249

=====

Motor vehicle license: Private passenger cars .. ___. - . Taxicabs_. ______________ .. __ Cargo vehicles. __ ... _._ .. _- .. Trailers __ ._. ___.... -- -- - - - - Motorcycles ______... --- __. -- . Dealers' license plates __ ... -. - Buses. _ .. __.... _ .... _. __. __ . Special equipment ____________ Registration, Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act.. ____. _

21,767 169 2,550 338 2,065 106 24 38 2,080

55


Department of Finance, Statistical Report, Fiscal Year 1967-Continued Drivers licenses: Operator ................... Chauffeur .................. Taxi driver ................. Instructional permits ......... Business licenses: Wholesale .................. Retail ...................... Service ..................... Manufacturing .............. Co.in•vcnding ............... Securities licenses: Agents ..................... Brokcr•deaJers ............... Other licenses: Bingo ...................... Cockpit franchises ........... Firearms: F~carms rcgis~ered.......... Firearm pcrrmts ............. Real estate: Land ..... -· .......... Buildings ••••• ---··-·-·-

.

. 12,014 891 . 17!) . . I, 576 . . . . .

68 699 I, 477 74 299

. .

34 5

. .

13

. .

918

2

11

Pared,

Auu,td

~'OIIUI

Approlltd r,aluu

12,628 9,421

$18,199,970 15,912,640

S52,001, 230 45,464,690

Procurement and supply: Purchases ...... -- .................. Sales (inventory items) ••• --··--··--·Annual inventory value .... _.... _....

56

/\muscmcnt devices and recreation facilities ...................... . 531 Sundry licenses: 34 Physician ................... . I Dentist ...... __._ ...... -· ... . 15 Notary Public .............. __ 298 Liquor licenses .. _ ........... . 38 Boxing licenses. __ .......... __ 58!) Marriage licenses .. _·- .. _ .... . Dog licenses ................ . 3,703 Insurance licenses: 43 Certificate of authority .. _ .... . 40 General agents ....... _...... . 59 Subagcnts •.. ··-·- --·· ..••••• 48 Solicitors ... _ ...... _.. _..... 10 Brokers..................... . 5 Adjusters .............. ·-· .. .

Amount

$4,183,585 425,320 _ 263,763 .

U.S. purc/lo,u (pucenl)

92

Tozauumenu

$545,999 477,379 J,'qrt/gn purcha,u (pmtnt)

II


Guam Economic Development Authority Pe.rsonnel:10

The Guam Economic Development Authority is under the direction of a board of directors composed of seven members, six appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the legislature, and the seventh the Secretary of Guam, who is ipso facto chairman of the board. The day-to-day operations oI the authority and the administration of its program and policies arc under the direction of an administrator.

Financial Assistance Program During the fiscal year detailed forms and procedures for analyzing and presenting financial data relative to both applications for qualifying certificates for tax rebates and financial assistance were designed and installed. The authority worked closely in this with local lending institutions and the Guam office of the Small Business Administration. Because of the limitation of capital funds available for financial assistance, it has been necessary for the authority to attempt to "package" a majority of such requests, with local lending institutions and the Small Business Administration as participants. On this basis, after many months of negotiation, a $245,000 loan to Guamerica,

Appropriation: S600,000

Inc., for a SO-percent expansion of motel facilities was successfully concluded late in June 1966. Of the total amount, the authority will provide $100,000, with the Bank of America and the Small Business Administration carh providing $72,500. A similar financing plan is in process of final review and approval with reference to the construction of Guam's first modern slaughterhouse and meat processing facility. This program will involve the Bank of Hawaii and the Small Business Administration. The total financing required is $220,000. The authority will supply up to $85,000. During the fiscal year the authority also advanced $48.000 to Micronesian Airlines, Inc., a certified commercial air-taxi and charter scrvire, believed to be essential for the orderly development of tourism in the territory. The authority also provided vitally needed funds for commercial fishing and agricultural projects. A summary listing the status of all formal requests for financial assistance is attached as exhibit A.

Industrial Parks Of three planned industrial park sites, two already have been placed under the control of the authority 57


through long-term leases with the Government of Guam. These are the Tamuning Commercial-Industrial Park (23 acres) and the Harmon Industrial Park (approximately 15.7 acres). The third industrial park, to be located at the old Coast Guard site in the port area (32 acres), is currently in process of being transferred to the Government of Guam. after which it will be placed under control of the authority through a long-term lease. Twenty old quonset huts were removed from the Tamuning Commercial-Industrial Park and the balance are scheduled for removal shortly. Negotiations with the Economic Development Administration culminated in June 1966, with the receipt of a $38,500 grant to the authority to assist in site development of a portion of the Tamuning Commercial-Industrial Park. The authority is required to match these funds and has budgeted $50,000 for the project. The work ~s scheduled for completion in February of 1968. Inquiries from interested lessees desiring to negotiate long-term leases for sites located in the industrial parks contemplate such activities as a refinery, a branch bank, a ship repair facility, a commercial feed mill, a liquified petroleum gas facility, a fish cannery, and bonded warehouses.

Commercial Fishing The authority, recognizing the need for developing basic industry, devoted a great deal of effort to a study of ways in which commercial fishing could be stimulated. Two commercial fishing projects were due to start at the close of the fiscal year. One involves a joint project between private interests in Okina,va and Guam organizing a company to engage in lobster and reef fishing in and around Guam. The authority is financially 58

supporting the Guam entrepreneurs involved up to $30,000 and bas participated in all of the negotiations both on Guam and in Okinawa. Actual fishing operations will be performed by 20 Okinawans who have been cleared for this purpose by Lhc U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Services. The other fishing project involves a joint venture with Lhe Taiwan Ocean Fishery Development Administration. A 350-ton Taiwanese lUna clipper with 35 crewmembers is to carry out a 90day exploratory tuna fishing program. It is believed this program will indicate the economic feasibility for tuna fishing in and around Guam and the eventual practicality or a tuna fish cannery on Guam. The project is being jointly financed by the authority and the Taiwan Ocean Fishery Development Administration. Principal tuna fish canning companies in the United States have been advised of the project and invited to participate in the survey.

Agriculture In an effort to stimulate agriculture, the authority formulated legislation to create an agricultural development fund, to be established originally on the basis of a $100,000 revolving fund. The purpose is to stimulate agriculture through offering financial assistan'ce to qualified farmers. The program contemplates joint administration with the Guam Department of Agriculture. An interim fund of $25,000 to process the more urgent and deserving applications has already been committed and other applications totaling in c.xcessof $100,000 arc pending enactment of the lcgislaLion.

Management Assistance The authority was called upon to assist local business enterprises, both


The "Yu Au," arrived in Guam in July for an exploratory runa fishing survey as pan of a project conducted jointly by the Guam Economic Development Authority and Taiwan's Ocean fishery Devclopmenc Administration. The 368-con "Yu Au" has a complement of 35 men.

existing and proposed, in a variety of ways including assistance in financial analyses and forecasts. organizing and planning new ventures, reorganizing and managing existing operations, etc. ).1ost of this work can be classified as being in the area of managemenl consulting. It has been the policy of the authority to perform such services only when they arc not readily available in the private sector.

Industrial Development Corporation The authority has proposed enabling legislation that would permit the formation of an industrial development corporation to function both as a State development corporation and a local development corporation with reference to funding possible under the Small Business Administration procedures. The proposed legislation has been approved by the Small Business

Administration and is expected to be acted upon by the 1inth Guam Legislature. Such legislation would make it possible for a privately organized industrial development corporation, composed of authorized lending institutions and other interested equity participants, to function on a more liberal basis with reference to Small Business Administration funcling. Preliminary approval has been received from the major lending institutions serving Guam. The authority is recognized by the Small Business Administration as an approved lending institution and could, thus, become a member, as well as an equity participant, in the proposed industrial development corporation. If/ 11rld.lf/ heat

A consumer preference study for a product known at WURLD Wheat is

59


scheduled to commence at the start of fiscal year 1968. This special wheat product was developed as a result of research by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It is hoped iL may prove to be a supplement and/or a substitute in certain instances for rice. The project is jointly sponsored by the authority and a large private company. If the results warrant further development it could lead to the establishment of a pilot plant on Guam. Mainland. Office

Early in the fiscal ye.ar a mainland office in San Francisco was activated under the adminisLrative direction of fonner Governor Carlton E. Skinner. The facilities and services of this office, although financed by the authority, have been made available to all Gov. crnment of Guam agencies, and the value of the office has been demonstrated many times. The mainland office is kept informed of all negotiations, correspondence, discussions, etc., with various mainland-based entities, both private and governmental. In several instances, this has eliminated the necessity for travel and resulted in more acceptable and rapid settlement of ne~otiations.

Trust Te"itor-y The authority is continuing to attempt to establish a firm basis for coordination and cooperation in the field of economic development with the Trust Territory. Discussions arc continuing and it is hoped that some definitive program will be possible in the near future. Feasibility Studies

The authority is seeking some $30,000 in additional operating budgeL 60

funds to prepare a series of detailed feasibility studies that can be made available to specific industries for consideration and evaluation with reference to establishing operations on Guam. Among the feasibility studies proposed arc the following: Small commercial dairy, textile plant, microscope and instrument assembly, public transportation system, electronics as• scmbly, cattle feed lots, sport fishing, tennis shoe manufacturing, perfume processing, chemical processing, refinery, fishing rod and reel manufacture, broiler growing and processing, fish cannery, and specialized agricultural products, such as citrus, cassavas, avocados, mangoes. QUillifying Certificates

Attempts of the authority to attract light industry to Guam, such as watch manufacturing, bracelet manufacturing, photographic equipment, etc., were adversely affected by the imposition of quotas on watch manuf acturing and substantial reductions in tariffs. The imposition of quotas on watch production resulted in a 58 percent reduction from peak employment in the industry in December 1966, of 249 to a level of 103 in June 1967. Reductions in tariff rates also have had a definite impact on prospective investors in that the advantages of headnote 3A have been substantially diluted. This further emphasizes the authority's need for a continuing program of income tax exemptions and a readily available source of substantial long-tenn capital. Since inception of the authority in August 1965, and through June 30, 1967, 40 applications for qualifying certificates have been reviewed and processed in varying degrees. A re-


capitulation of the status of these is as follows:

board has authorized the following allocations:

Approved and issued___________ Denied ·---________ Withdrawn ________________ Precluded by public law_________ Pending -------------

Total Appropriate

Total ----------------

13 5 5 5 12

40

A detailed listing of each of the applications is attached hereto as exhibit B.

Budget The authority was orginally provided with $100,000 for operating costs through June 30, 1966. The board of directors has adopted the policy of considering all amounts appropriated in excess of operating needs as capital funds. Of the total appropriated through June 30, 1967, the

from l ncep------$600,000 Less Actual Operating Costs tion

through June 30, 1967____

Balance

106,527

493,473

_____________

Less interim allocation for 196768 operating costs..______ Capital fund balance_____

27,433 466, 040

Financial ReporJ

An unaudited financial report prepared as of June 30, 1967, by the staff of the authority in the format established by Peat, Marwick, Mitchell, & Co. is attached as exhibit C. Activities of the authority have been audited and certified through June 30, 1966, and activities for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1967, were under audit as this report was prepared.

EXHIBIT A

Financial Assistance ApproxiC1$8

number

Name ol applicant.

6001 Marlnnas Sen l,"ood Corp ...

Commorcl4l fWIJng....... Slaughterhouse operntlon ..

5004 Ouom lntercontiJlental Hotel. &006 Micronesian Alt Llnos, Inc. 5006 Ouom Rodtffuslon, Inc .... 6007 K. Heck Toun, lno ........ 5()(lCl Ouomcrtco, Inc ............ 6000 Antonio R. TerlAJc....

.... do ... - ................

6002 Ovcneas Development Corp. 6003 llotolsoflhoM11rtnnas, Inc.

...

FJords Sm:aotto... •...•... 0011 Paclfh1Br casting Corp. A-JOl-100 Vortous 1••...••..••....••.• 5010

1 Coaulsb

mate

amount of funds required

Nnture of bllSlnCM

Tourist. hotel.....

.

$35,000 $30,000approved. 86,000 $75,000approved.

--.....

240,000 Precluded by Public Lnw Ma . Do.

2-40,000

Air mi and charter service. CATV ..................... Commctclnl bw system .... Mo1ru(111panslon) ....... Poultry raising...... Food M?rvlce.. TV and mdlo .............. Agrlcultuml products....

SlBlW!

.

00,000 SM,000opprovcd.

50,000 Pending. Do. 06,000 100.000 $100,000a~rovcd. 30.000 Tmnsrerr • to ngrlcul· 1uml program. 160,000 Wlthdmwn. 200,000 Pending. 250,000 $~,500 opprovcd.

ol 37 l11m1er oppllcnnb (6 applicants approved for SU,600, 4 pending, ond 28 1101 yet submitted).

61


O'I

l\j

EXHLBIT B

Qualifying Certificates Cose number

1004 1005 1000 1007 1008 100'.l JOJO 1011 )012 1013 1014 1016 I0ltl 101, 1018 I0IU 1000 JO'll

Nnmo ol 111>Plltnnl

Nnturo of buslnl!Ss

Stmllon Wntuh Corp.. . ...... . Wolch mo,•cmcnu o.nd wnleltcs... , ..... Watch bnnds, strops, etc..... . .......•• Ucnson Rnnd II rnet!lbl Corp .. Motel. .... _ ..... ....... - , ... Oua:mcrlca, rnu... ••• ···-·•········ Shernlon Tbno Corp. __ __ ...... . Wnlelt movements nnd watches .. ___ do .... WcsL•mlnlstcr•rime Corp ··········-···· N & I Liquor Cori>- .......•......... hovcmiiei .... : ~innufocturo of ·n1coiicit1e S & 0 Tobnc«> C'orr> . . ....... . i\fnnufllci.u~ of lollooco products .... llo.llmork WnL~h ~·riuof)', Ct,.. . ..... . WMrh 1\8.'KlmbUcs..... .••. ····-····. l'h0t1nbc lndusvi(':<, Inc. Wntc '• ,novomenlS and woi.chos... _ Pm:tnc Wnlch Corp ... Wotcl '" nnd wntch oocossorlcs....... :::: Prc,clslon hutnmwnt •, Inc ll'ntc.h movcrncuui nnd watel1cs. .. ...... Mo.rlnnns Stnr Pr~, J;., Prluth•~. 1•hotogrnphy ... __ __....... Mo.rlJJO&I Corp .. Rentnl un LS... ••• •. • •...... -··· Moro Wolell C-n., Inc (Ult} wo.tohos. Wolch lllOVOllltOlllS Uou-L~ol llw MurlllnllS, rue ... Tourist botol ifocllfLy). ... . .. :::::: . ....• ·-···· .. Tourist hotrl munrigQmont).. Tillton l11L◄·t1111ll(>nill r11rp... 01111111 l11wroo11U11~nlltl lfOl~I- ........... . •rourlst hotel foulllty). ....... -1111 .... Tourist ltl)tcl (mw1011cment).... ······Commcrolnl fccd mill.... _____ ... um ll11111& H~h~n,, Inc ..... 10'.!3 F.._-.gr<,. £DC-. Eloctronl<"S, pho1ogrn11hfc (l(Julpmcnt, bln01:ulo.rs,etc. t:orp. .. ........ __ 1024 Jun-1,nu W1111:h Wntoh monuloeturlng.. ..... . ... ltm Cromwt•ll ln1cm0Llol\Jll, Inc .......... -- do...... ... ... . . .......... . Woldt ossombllcs ..... 1020 SolhJnrlly, fnc ... um York, luc. . . . ....... ......... . Watch rnru111roo1url11g ...•. • ···--·-··· tcl'lS Unlvers:il A.mcrlcuu £irp0rl-.. •••······ Ql)llr muchlncry ll.'ISOJUblics..... ····-· l(Y.!IJ Tmns-\Vorh.l lustrumonts ... Watch movwnent.:111ntlwo101tcs•. -·-···· __ ........... . ApllrtmenlS.... 1030 Casn dl' 1"lorcs.. ....... ... . ... 1031 ~UIUI Wlllch Co., lno.. ... . . Wntch 6SS4rnbllcs ......... -·-·--·• .. 1032 Gunm OlvQrSlflcd l11dW1lrlCS-- ........ . f'l!l.!ltlcmru1uIU1,Lurcr ... woods, hie ..... 1033 0 wun 11.nl'\I Luml><'r mill nnd !umfturc nmnulflCturIng. t

Nol yet known.

Totnl pro~ pa d-ln CIIPltol

~9.000 50,000 380,000 60,000 60,000 100,000

100,000 60.000 00,000 60,000 60,000 51,000 :!S,000 18,000

760,000 (11 ~:)

50,000 60,000

20,000 (1)

60,000

t:1 5,000 2li,000

U,000 21i,000 100,000

---

'l'olol ProJ)QS(lll number of pro~lld mn1 mum omplo)·ocs lnvl!SLmenL

$100,000 61,000 200,000 ~.000 400,000 2,000,000 2,000,000

311 lssue<I Nov. 2t, 1965, 22 tssulld Apr. 22, 1000. 9 Wlthdmwn Juno 23, 1006. 411 D1mlcd Fob. 28, 1007. 6 lssucd :\!Or, 7 1000, 150 lsStll'd Moy I 0, 1000. 160 Oo.

◄00,000

10 2 60 30 10 2 60 200

600,000 100,000 300,000

118,000 300,000

300.000

3,000,000

m

1,000,000 I, J00,000 300,000 100,000 60,000

c•i (1

300,000 600,000 50,000 100,000 300,000

StnlU.S

(1)

Do. Do. wucd Fob. 20, 1001. 300 Issued AUJl.31, 1000.

~'00 (')

Issued i\lny 10, 1!16&. Issued Mur. 7 1900, Denied Juno 23,1006. Donllld Aug. 12, 1000. Withdrawn Juno 14, 1900. WfLhdrnwn Aug, 0, tQOG, nenllld Aug. 2. 1900. Jssucd July I, 1067. l'endln~.

o

22

l'rocludlld by Public Lnw 9-17.

2.S

Do. Do. Pcndln~. l'reclut cd by Public Lnw 0-17. Denied Aug. 3 JOG(). Withdrawn Feb. 3, U167. wued Jun. 20, 1007. ll!sued Mny !!O,1907.

◄O

~:J

41 26 33 2S 50

Oo.

---~---


EXHIBIT C

Guam Economic Developmeoc Authority-Balance

Sheet, June 30, 1967

AssKTS

Cash------···-·-·-······ ······--·-·········-····-····---····-·-Timc cc.rtificntes of deposit. __ .......... ·---.-·-_--· .. --· ____ ....... _ Notes receivable* ..... ____........... _ ...... _____....... --· ........ . Ac..countsreceivable ... _ ................. _ ......................... . .\ccrucd interest receivable._ ....... __ ._··--- .. _ .................... . J\cc.rucd rental receivable ........ ·--··- .. ····--................... . Prepaid insurance ..... _···-· __-· .... --··-· ........................ . Suspense ......................................................... . Prepaid rent ..... - ............................................... . Equipment at cost: Office furniture nnd equipment........................ $7, 305. 46 /\utomobilc ... _ ........... _. _. _ .. _ .. _............... 3, 030. 00 10, 335. 4(i 2,890.66

Less accumulated depreciation •• ··--············--···· Total assets....... ___........ ·---_ ... ··--·-or$12,646.00oxccutod July o, 1007.

.................

.

$756.41 420,000.00 63,545.00 2,409.36 8,970.77 50.00 159. 70 l. 301. 19 27.00

7,444.80 504,664.23

•Kole for tho omounL

LIADIU11ES

Accounts payable .. _ .................................... Accrued expenses payable ..... _ ..... _.................... Accrued payroll payable .............. _.................. Unearned income ..................... ·--······ •.•••••••• Reserved for contingencies ................................ Reserved for purchase of equipment and supplies ...........

. . . . .

$2,637.81 2,917.83 2,485.64 360.00 I. 500. 00 I, 290. 31

-----

.\ppropriation from Government of Guam: Allocated to operating capital-Fiscal year ending June 30, 1967............................................. . Less excess of expenditures over income for fiscal year 1967 (Schedule A).·-·········-···········-··············

78,895. 73 71,463.09

I mcrim balance allocated to operating capital fiscal year beginning July I, 1967.............................. . Interim allocation of capital fund to operating Capitalliscal year beginning July I, 1967.................... .

:.10,000. 00

Total interim allocation to operating capital-Fiscal beginning July I, 1967..............................

year .

'1.7,432. 64

_ ... .

600,000.00

Total appropriation

10

date ....

_. _.. _.... _........

Less: Operating capital: Ncl expenditures to.June 30, 1966. Reserved for fiscal year 1966--67.... Interim allocat.ion for fiscal yc;ir I 967-68 ..

$35,064.27 78,895.73 20,000.00

----

Capital fund (Schedule 8) •• ·····-·--Total liabilities and capital.. •• ·-·-···---··-·-··-·············

SI I, 191. 59

7,432.64

S133,%0.00 466,04-0.00

493,472.64 504,664.23

63


SCHEDULE A

Analysis of Nee Expendicures From July 1, 1966 to June 30, 1967 Income: Interest on time certificates o( deposit _____________________ -- __ -- _- - - _ $22,818.30 Interest on notes receivable ______________ . ____________ .. ---- ________ 1,420.42 l~cntals. ________________________________________________________ .\pplicatjon nnd surveillance fees. _________ .. ___._ .. ___ . ____________ _ Other income ________________________ -------··--·-__ - ---- -- --- . -

9,440.00 1,300.00 4,926.09

39,904.81 Expend iturcs: Salaries ..... ______. ____________________. _________.. . $64,072.76 Professional services_. ___. __.. __.. ____.. _... _......... _ I, 684. 75 Rent and utilities ... _ .. _. __ .... -- _. - ... - ... ___.. _- - . _. 6,092.06 Telephone and cables ___ .. ___._ .... - .. __... - -- .... ·--. _ 2,580.37 Insurance ___________________________________________ 415.54 Office supplies ___... _________________ ._ ...... __ ...... . 799.63 Printing, pubHcation, and advertisement_ . _ ... __........ . 2,993.87 Maintenance_________________________________________ and repairs .... _ ........ __ ---- __- - .. -- ___ 121.29 Automobile Travel nnd per diem_. ____.. _______ ... ___. __ . - -- -- --- . Dues and subscriptions_ .. ______ .. ________ ---- __ . ______ Emplo~ccs' bc!"efits...... _........................... . .Jam tonal service .................. ----- ... ---- __.... . Miscellaneous. __ . ______________ .. __------------ ... __ Board •:nc~rfogs..... __ . ____ -- --·· ___... - .. __ . - .... - . -Dcprcc1auon. __.. __ .. __ . _. _. __ ... __. _ . __. ___..... ___ . Postagc ---------------·-·---------------·-------accounts. _________________---- -- - ___------ --Expcnsc•••• Relocation and moving expenses._. ________ ._. _____ . ____ Mainland office•-_--------------------------·--------

190.70 8,707.45 293. 70 2,590.99 650.00

807.82

I, 640. 00

2,050.63

402. 71

423.01 1,091. 52 13,759. 10

Net c.xccssof expenditures over income for ftSCalyear 1967_________________

•Aelu11Iexpense., trom August 1006through Mny 1967and est1m11tedror :June 11167.

64

111,367.90

71.463. 09


SCHEDULE B

Analysis of Capital Fund, June 30, 1967 Dl1bur1td CommUUd

7'otal

Rutrttd

Balance available_._ .. ________________ ._ Agriculture: Direct assistance to farmers 1 .•• ____________ Agricultural expense insurance fund 2 ________ Slaughterhouse .. _________________________

$466,040

--S3,000 $22,500 0 0 10,000 0 0 75,000 S10,000

25,500 10,000 85,000

3,000

107,500

10,000

120,500

0 12.545 0

6,250 17,455 0

3,750 5,000 20,000

10,000 35,000 20,000

12,545

23,705

28,750

65,000

0

38,500 0

11,500 4,000

50,000 4,000

0

38,500

15,500

54,000

Tourism and commercial development: Hotel-motel projects ____________________._. 0 IO'l,000 W RLD Whrat project ____________________ 0 2,000 Other projects __________. ____ ...... _______ 411,000 7,000

61. 000

Total. __. _. __. _ ... _ - - __. - - . - _ . - - - - - _. _Commercial fishing: Tuna fishing evaluation project._._ .. _. ____ . Lobster and reef fishing projects. _ . _ . _. ____ . Other commercial fishing projects ___________ Total. __. _______________________ . ______ Industrial park_______________________________ site development: Tamuning llarmon _________________________________ Total.. ___._ .... _ .... _ .....

- .. ____ . _ ...

=

=

=

161,000 2,000 5,COO (J(.1,000 0

---

Total. .... _________ .. ___. ___. __________ 48,000

109,000

Grand total. ________ .. __. _____ . ____ . ___ 63,545

278,705 120.250

---

Balance available .. _. ___._. __. ______ . ___

=

66,000

223,000 462,500

3,540

, 'l'Clmpornry rulocatlon pending pMSngo or prol)()$C(lll'l!'.lslnUonfor creation ol on n~rlculturnl dovclopmcn~ fund (bllJJ Nos. 270 ond 271). 'Tempornry rulocotlon ponding ptl5Sngoor appropr1Mlon lcgW01ton (bill No. 40).

65


Guam Employment Service Personnel: 8

The Guam Employment Service is affiliated with the U.S. Employment Service and is federally funded both as to its operating budget (above) and the cost of its various training programs. The employment service handled a total of 2,217 job applications during the fiscal year ( compared to 2,40 I the previous year) plus 2,096 (compared to 1,271) applications for positions with the Government of Guam. Placements for the fiscal year totalled 1,607 compared to the previous year's 811. Most of the increase may be attributed to vacationjng students placed in temporary employment for the summer months. There were 8,861 openings listed with the service compared to the previous year's 8,010. Of the total, 6,723

66

Federal Budget: S58,460

were clearances on petitions submitted by employers for temporary alien workers to fill skilled or technical positions, with private finns asking for 4,700, the Federal Government requesting 1,991, and the local government seeking 32. The employment service has the responsibility of screening these petitions, considered to be local job orders, to ascertain whether the needs can be supplied locally by avrulable and qualified citizens. Three training projects were completed during the fiscal year under the Manpower Development and Training Act in cooperation with Guam's Department of Education. Classes were held for stenographers, welders, and bricklayer-masons. Of the 75 trainees, 59 graduated, and, by the end of the fiscal year, 38 had been placed.


Guam Memorial Hospital Personnel: 396

Guam Memorial Hospital is governed by a seven-member board of trustees appointed by the Governor with the consent of the legislature. The hospital administrator is responsible to the board. He is appointed by the board with the approval of the Governor. The fiscal year started with the inLroduction on July 1 of Federal medicare benefits from Health, Education, and WeUare for all patients in Guam Memorial Hospital over 65 years of age. Guam Memorial Hospital had the honor and distinction of having the first patient on the medicare program in the United States because of its position west of the international dateline. The medicare benefits have proven a great financial blessing to the elderly patients of Guam. Many major improvements were made in the physical plant of the hospital during the year. The administration offices, the business office, the admitting office and main lobby, the medical records library, the medical laboratory, and the employees dining room were remodeled. A new pathologist office, medical staff lounge, and medical staff library were built, the latter being stocked with books and periodicals. Most of these new and remodeled sections now have air conditioning. Other new constructions with air conditioning included a large isolation delivery room suite in the

Appropriation: $2,806,287.00

obstetrical department and a new interdenominational patients chapel. An accelerated collection process was initiated for the collection of delinquent patients accounts. The Guam Bar Association entered into a contract to act as the collection agent for the hospital. Building plans were submitted to Health, Education, and Welfare for Federal assistance on the new tuberculosis facilities. When this project materializes the present tuberculosis wing will be remodeled to accommodate approximately 80 beds for longterm care patients.

Admitiistratioti The business office controls all business activities and prepares annual budget requests. Service rendered during the fiscal year amounted to Sl,787,088.22. an increase of $255,914.22 over Lhe previous year. A total of $969,0+1. 72 was collected in accounts receivable, an increase of $244,859.72 over the previous year. Credits on abatements totaled $427,585.11, a decrease of $35,718.89 over lhe previous year. Accounts turned over to the Guam Bar Association for collections amounted to $449,287.26. The personnel and timekeeping unit processed 652 personnel actions, which included 161 appointments, 324 re67


classifications and promotions, I 31 separations, and 36 other miscellaneous personnel actions.

Social Service The Social Service Office investigates cases in which patients are unable to pay their hospital accounts, but arc otherwise not eligible to receive welfare benefits, and also assists in the neuropsychiatric service. During the year, 225 cases were presented to the Social Service Board, which approved abatement of accounts amounting to $125,782, a decrease of 170 cases but an increase in dollar value by $9,331.00 over the previous year. In the neuropsychiatric service, 253 patients were seen, evaluated and treated. Medical Staff

Contract physicians on the medical staff at the close of the fiscal year induded four general practitioners, two pediatricians, two internists, one pathologist, one radiologist, one surgeon, and one obstetrician-gynecologist. All but the general practitioners were American Board Certified or eligible. One anesthesiologist, one urologist, one thoracic surgeon and two general practitioners were under recruitment. Noncontract physicians who had staff privileges to practice in Guam Memorial Hospital included six general practitioners, two general sur~eons, two dentists, an anesthesiologist, a thoracic surgeon, a pediatrician, an ophthalmologist, a neurologist, and a neuropsychiatrist. Most were American Board Certified apart from the general practitioners and the dentists. Consultation services from physicians at the U.S. naval hospital are available to the Guam Memorial Hospital. 68

Nursittg Service

There were 196 positiom in the nursing service with five vacant. The service includes 18 supervisory personnel, 95 staff nurses, and 74 hospital attendants. The nursing school at the College of Guam officially started in October. Guam Memorial Hospital and U.S. naval hospital were used as the clinical areas. Twenty-six students were in the original class. Revision of the Nursing Procedure Manual was completed. The Policy Manual was revised and brought up-to-date. Medical Records

The MedicaJ Records Department is responsible for developing a system of records for the analysis, study, and evaluation of the quality of medical care rendered. This department is supervised by a registered record librarian. During the fiscal year, a Nyematic dictation system was installed, enabling the physicians at the hospital to dictate all surgery reports, history and physicals, X-ray reports, pathology reports and many others. There are 30 dictating stations throughout chc hospital with three medical transcribers completing the dictation. This has been a great asset to the hospital in better patient care. A data processing system for collecting medical statistics was inaugurated in October. This has given the hospital far more statistics and more accurate statistics than the old manner of handposting. Statistics of hospital operations show: Ad missions: General. __ ...... __.......... Newborn____________________ Tuberculosis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Totnl ......

____ .....

___... .

4, 783 I, 856 70 6, 709


Discharges: 4, 704 General ___ -----------------Newborn _______________.____ I, 827 Tuberculosis_________________ 74 Death_______________________ 139 Total______________________ 6,744 Average daily admissions: General_____________________ General and tuberculosis______ Average daily discharges: General_____________________ General and tuberculosis_______ Average daily census: General services ______________ General and tuberculosis _______ Percentage of occupancy: General services (based on 189 beds) ______________________

18.19 18.38 18.27 18.48 113.10 149.43 59.84

Tuberculosis (based on 79 beds)_ 46. 00 General and tuberculosis (based on 268 beds).______________ 55. 76 General services (exclude newborn and tuberculosis) (based on 156 beds) _______________ 60.05 Premature._____________________ 155 Stillbirth ________- - ------ -- - --- -31 18 Twins {sets)_____________________ Autopsies_______________________ 108

Medical Laboratory The laboratory, directed by a certified pathologist, was remodeled, expanding it to almost twice its original size.

ing, and dispensing of aJI phannaceutical preparations. During the fiscal year, this department filled 44,070 new prescriptions, plu,s approximately 379 "refills" for outpatient service. The dollar value amounted to $117,254.

X-Ray Department This department, under the direction of a certified radiologist, has eight employees. During the fiscal year, l 7,437 X-ray examinations were performed.

Physical Therapy The newly organized Physical Therapy Department was officiaJiy opened for patient treatment in February. It is under the direction of a registered physical therapist who presently operates the department alone. Treatments are given both to Guam Memorial Hospital patients and out-patients. Since its opening a total of 592 treatments have been given.

Laboratory examinations: Hematology ........ . lliochemistry .............. . Bacteriology ............... . Parasitology .............. . Urinalysis . . . . . . .......... . Blood Bank ................ . Surgical pathology Bone marrow ............... . ECG ..................... . Autopsy ................... . Exfoliative cytology (papanicolaou) ................. .

29, 190 12,296 28,440 I, 848 7,944 14,038 I, 359

22 1,239 172 I, 518

Pharm4cy The pharmacy, staffed by two registered pharmacists and two aides, is responsible for the procuring, compound-

Dietary Department The Dietary Department provides regular and special diets for inpatients under the supervision of a registered dietitian. It also provides meals to hospital employees, members of the medical staff, and the staff of the Department of Public Health and Welfare. The dietitian visits inpatients daily to get their food preferences and selective menu is used for all patients on regular diet. There were a total of 180,164 meals served to patients and staff during the year and 52,000 of these meals were modified diets to patients.

69


-Guam's dvil defense program includes various trainfog courses. Here a class is practicing in the use of radioactivity monitoring equipment.

MEDICAL RECORDS

Table I. Statistics for Year by Month, for all Services, Fiscal Year 1966-67 Totnl

~lonth

Admissions

Total ...............

0, 700

196/J July ....................... Augll.!11..... - ............

Avcmgcs

Olschnrgcs 0, 744

64,643

18.38

605

S, 124 4,820

19.00 18.87 21.20 10.74 10.00 17 .87

llSO

M6

L07

012

616

664

5IJS

J1111unry ...................

618 405

◄ OS

Morch....................

520 400

Soptombor................. Octobor.................... November.......... Dcoombor......... .

.. .. -··--

600

63G

59G

688

/007 Fobru11ry..................

Aforl!••••• ~ oy. •••••

··-····--·------

Juno. ......................

CcJ15US Admissions

48G 549 400 MO Ml

~

MO

◄,004

6.126 4,800 4,591 4, 80'J 3,061 4,W 4,017 4,2M 4,317

10.il 17.GS 10.07

lG.03

18.10 18.00

l>lsclllll'gCS

Con.sus

18.4

140.◄S

10.61 10.u

165.29 166.48 103 .47 166.3'! 163.00 148.10

20.30 10.87 19.SG 10.29

lG.00 17.30 17 .71 16.33 17.01 I .40

138.TT 141.◄ G 130.36 133.00 137 .68 143.00

Table 11. Statistical Guides Perta.ining to Hospital Medical Care, Fiscal Year 1966-67 l'trtenl

I. Gross death rate ............ . :.1. M atcrnal death rmc .... _ .... . :t Infant death rntc .. _. . ..... . 4. ;\nesthcsin death rate._ .... . :i. Postoperative dcmh r:11c...... .

70

2.06 I)

1.74 IJ

u..u

P(fctnl

77. 6ft fi. Gross autopsy rate... . ..... . 7. l'issuc commiurc rcpon ..... . 100 0 II. Stcriliution.... .. . 11.4!.I !J. Consultation. • ••• ···-··· ;, . :1!i 10. Ccsnrcan section ratc •• ·-······


Table III. Consultation Report, Fiscal Year 1966-67 -Percent.age 11.49•••• ······-·

-

••••••••••••

Tollll

July

August

776

62

64

Sop uimber

October

November

n

28

68

Oecember

January

February

73

68

66

Morcl1 88

April

i\111y

68

65

April

Mlly

11.!llC

01

Table W. Operations, Fiscal Year 1966-67 Rote or Total opcniLlons.............

ToLIIIcesareansections Pill'· formed .....................

Cesareansection rote. ........

.... -.J

1,636

IOI 6.35

luly 131

10 6. 06

August

Sop~bcr

142

2. 61

October

Novt-mber December

Jnnunry

Fcbrunry

Morcl1

134

128

133

100

IO'l

128

125

120

128

2 1.2

0 3.8

9 6. I

10 6. 6

8

12

II

10

2. 3

6. 7

s.0

8.0

10. 0

June 15'J 9

0. 12


......

1-.:>

Table V. Patient Flow by Month, Admission and Discharge by Services, Fiscal Year 1966-67 Tot.al Bdmissions

Toll\l

.......................

1966 July ........ ···- ......••••••••• August ......................... September.··-· .............. Oct0bcr ........................ Novomw ..................... Doocmbcr ...................... 1967 January ........................ FobruAr)' ..................... Mnrch..........................

~~L=::::::::::::::::::::::

June ...........................

6,709

689

Podlalrlc Tu.borculosls Toi.al dJs. DisAdmlsDlsch1ugcs Adm.lscbargcs slons ChBrgllS slons G,005/131>

70

74/9

695/10

u

6 II 7

--

585 636 616 S88 554

W4/3

SIB

481>/0 474/12 631/18 470/11 631/15 643/11

495

626 4119 663 640

001/8 tlOI/IS 581/16 586/12

s

7 4

8

6

'lfl

4

7/2

4 6 g 2

8 0/1 10/2 4/1 2/1 6

3

8

838

820/12

6S 87 76 115 82 67

89 80/1 71/1 89/1 85/2 66/1

66

67 43/2 70/1 61/1

49 GI

64 116 80

62/2 86

Admlsslons Im

GG

Dbcharges

00/G

Wl 't/1/2 55/8

58

49/4

48

64 73 63

Admlsslons

69$100

4S 6S 65 72 45

41

Obswlrtc

Surgtcnl

Mcdlcol

~

44/7 34/S 40/0 40/S

68/6 62/7

NOTE: Subflgurcs on dlschergcd columns roprcsenL tho number or "Death Dlsch11rges". Olsohorgo+subfigurcs•total

O1.scharges

l, 202 1,232/16 103 Ill 117 91 104 76

114/1 IJS 111/1 100/3 08/2 94

85 111 96 106 110 92

107/1 98/1 112/2 107 104f2

7'2/2

discharges.

Admlssl.ons 2,048

Obsorvallon

Dls-

chorgcs 2. 048/1

180 170 UNI 188 165 1118

173 195 183 174 201

163 164 163 148 163 151

159 l.s2 164 143 159/1 155

Jg()

Admts&Ion., 1,856

Dis-

ch11111cs 1,827/33

164 168 176

166/3 160 IM/4

157 174

167/1 174/2

152 IM 149

144/S 132/3 140/5 U0/2 143/5 141/2

173

l2S

148 140

168/3


f\)

f ~

f

Table VI. Outpatie.nt Visits, Fiscal Year 1966-67 Clinics TotaL .................. Clll'dlac ........................

Dermatology_ ................. Dlllbotes....................... EENT ......................... Oonltourlnary ................. 0 ynecology.................... Modlcal.. ···-·· .. _ ........... Neuro=chlalr}' ............... Ortho le. .................... Ped.latriCI_ .....................

Plastic .........................

Surgical ........................

Dental .........................

--.J (J,)

Tola! 38,023

---

184

66 1,343 l80 553 I, 766 Ll,«I 97 79 7,220 2 14,493 10

Inly

August

Sclplcmber Octooor

Novembor ncoombtr

3,14.7

3,440

3,565

3,692

3,338

m

89

Q7

81

IID

117 10 47 104 1,027

00

00 7 162

lO 49 123 8711

« 146 841

---

2 105 19 75 126

8e8 6

10 4112 0

1,301 5

5

125 16 63 149 1,010 0 2

626 I 1,465 0

6 1113 12 36 liO 1,0'18 7 7 7~

0

1.,2112 0

z

2l

2

1123 l 1,248 0

2

'41 8 606 0

I, 209 2

3,207

13

l

II 604

0 1,332 0

Ionuary 3, 1.2.s 70 0 IM 16 46 140 1,038 14 4 671

0

,. 103 I

February

2.838 37

3 67 13 39 154 033 0 6 692

0

1,005

0

March 2,721

---

30 6

GS 12

i7

166 1,020 2 11 460

0

900 I

AprU 2,81◄

---

17 3

77 18

~

l37

rm 3 0

521 0 I, 106 I

May 3,104

---

49

2 114 17 39

Ul5

006

3

12 565 0 ,. 152

0

June

---

3,132 78 0 162 16 31 168

06◄

0 I

~

0 I, 281 0


Guam Housing Corporation Personnel: 6

The Guam Housing Corporation was established to promote and finance low-cost housing. It is governed by a board of directors of seven members composed of the Secretary of Guam, the Director of Finance, the Attorney General, and four experienced businessmen appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the legislature. The housing corporation operates on a revolving fund of $2,520,000 appropriated by the legislature from which all corporate obligations and e.xpenditures are incurred and paid. Interest on loans is the corporation's main source of revenue. Other revenues are derived from miscellaneous sources such as application and commitment fees and interest on bank deposjts. All housing loans bear interest at a rate not exceeding 6 percent annually. During the fiscal year, the corporation reccived 41 loan applications, of which 26 were approved totaling $323,725. By comparison, 43 loans were authorized in the amount of $543,885 in fiscal year 1966. Disbursements during the year on loans approved in fiscal years 1967 and 1966, plus other loans disbursements, totaled $273,895.50. The amounts of $358,450.54 in principal repayments and $159,234.22 in interest were received during the period.

74

OperatiJlg Budget: S61,380.00

As of June 30, 1967, the balance of loans authorized but not disbursed was $128,737.50. The corporation paid on a reimbursable basis $4 575.59 for insurance premiums covering properties mortgaged to the Guam Housing Corporation as loan collaterals. Balance outstanding as of the start of fiscal year 1966 was $930.20. Amount collected for repayment of insurance was $4,487.30. There arc 15 low-cost housing loan applications totaling $277,000 awaiting availability of funds. In addition, 63 others, totaling an estimated $799,250, are under various stages of processing. The corporation has been unsuccessful in several bids to obtain additional funds for housing loans from the legislature. Funds were not available due to other requests ronsidered more urgent. As an alternative, the corporation has explored other sources of financial assistance from Federal agencies. Section 221 ( d) 3 of the National Housing Act is being explored as a prospective source. Public Law 9-63, enacted on May 5, 1967, repealed in its entirety Publjc Law8-81 which empowered the Guam Housing Corporation to gu,arantee payment of loans for hotel construction.


Department of Labor and Personnel Personnel: 31

The Department of Labor and Personnel is charged with the implementation and administration of personnel rules and regulations within the government and all labor laws and regulations of the territory. The department recruits personnel for most of the government's departments and agencies and also provides a central service with respect to their other personnel needs. In the public sector, the department is concerned with reducing unemployment, promoting apprenticeship and job training, improving working conditions and pay standards, and seeking employment preference for local available workers over alien and other off-island labor. The Guam labor n1arket is still experiencing a persistent shortage of competent local labor to meet the demand for skilled workers. There is a continuing need for recruitment of off-island labor to fill these occupations. Replacement efforts in private industries and the Federal agencies are reported separately by the Guam Employment Service, an affiliate of the U.S. Employment Service, U.S. Department of Labor.

Staff Services Division This division is responsible for the technical aspects of personnel adrninis-

Appropriation: $128,420

tration, the chief functions of which are position classification, administration of the pay plan, and recruitment and examination of applicants for certification to departments and agencies.

Records Division This division, as a central personnel records and processing unit, is responsible for processing and maintaining all personnel transactions ( exclusive of two autonomous departments) of the various departments and agencies of the government. Such transactions include appointments, promotions, transfers, salary increments, and separations.

Minimu11JWage a,uJ Hour Division This division is charged with the enforcement of the Minimum Wage and Hour Act of Guam. During the fiscal year 58 firms were investigated, and 37 were found to be affected by provisions of the law, resulting in a total payment of $1,402.18. The division also received 21 complaints for nonpayment of back wages. Seventeen cases were completed and the sum of $658.65 was collected. The Minimum Wage and Hour Act was amended by Public Law 8-162, clTective July 29. 1966 to increase the

75


minimum wage law from $1.00 to $1.25 per hour.

Oversea Processing tmd Travel Unit The functions and responsibiilties of this unit include the initiaJ recruitment processing of off-island personnel, contract renewals and extensions, and handling of transportation arrangements for government officials traveling abroad on official business. During the fiscal year, 631 travel requests and authorizations were processed for the various departments and agencies of the government. Of the total, 76 were for travel between contracts, 207 for initial recruitments, 8 for recruitment of resident citizens within the provision of locaJ law, 17 for in-service training, 76 for completion of contracts, and 247 for conferences and other official businessabroad. The total cost for such travel arrangements was estimated at $1,147,000.00. Of this, $649,202.51 was expended for personnel transportation, $221,306.93 for shipment of personal and household effects and cars, and $45,745.49 for per diem and other sundry items.

Workmen's Compenslllion Commission The Guam Workmen's Compensation Law applies to some 190 employers in the territory including the Government of Guam. A supplemental appropriation bill to the workmen's compensation fund was passed by the legislature and this enabled the commission to achieve lump-sum settlement in the case of Patrolman John Mafnas Santos, who was slain while on duty, July 22, 1966. His widow and minor children received death benefits totaling $18,675.27. 76

The Governor's directive calling upon nonappropriated agencies of the government to assume and absorb, as operating cost, payments of income and related benefits under the law to their employees, was put into effect July 1, 1966. During the year Commercial Port of Guam paid $1,435.00 in disability compensation and $17,526.31 in death benefits, or a total of $18,961.31. A lump sum death benefit was paid to the widow and minor children of Carmelo C. San Nicolas, a stevedore from Agat, who was fataJly injured at work on December 17, 1966. The other nonappropriated agencies named in the directive experienced no accidental injury during the year and had no expense of this nature.

Retirement Pund The Government of Guam Retirement Fund is administered by a fiveman board of trustees. Staffing is by the Department of Labor and Personnel. Receipts for the year totalled $2,376, l 58.00. Employees contributed $825,498.32, the government paid in $1,099,090.18 and interest on investments came to $451,569.50. Disbursements totaJed $2,397,980.18. Balance in the fund was $215,438.57. There were 3,286 participants in the fund at the close of the fisc.alyear compared to 2,897 at the close of the previous year. During the year 754 joined the fund and 365 withdrew and collected refunds totaling $288,946.18. Another 44 left upon retirement and eight died while in the service of the government. There were 245 retired annuitants who received total payment of $423,556.62. In addition 86 survivors of annuitants received $76,590.58 and four of these survivors received $2,985.03 as deferred beneficiaries. Nine retired annuitants died.


Department of Labor and Personnel, Statistical Repon, Fiscal Year 1967 The following is a breakdown of its activities during the fucal year: Staff Services Division: Classification and/or evaluation study ........................... _ Pay range reassignments ....................................... . Classes of positions created •• ·-···········-·····-··-·-······-·-·· Class specifications written or revised ••••••• ·-·······---··-······· Job announcements (open and promotional) ....... -·· ......... ··Applications received ....... -···- .. _ ............... _.......... . Assembled examinations._ ........ ·-···· ... ·---. ___............ . Unassembled examinations .............. _...................... . Eligibles placed on eligibility list ................................ . Number of eligibles selected ....... ·- •••• -·· ..•. ···-·· .•........• Records Division: Total number of employees._ ..... _.......................... _. Regular ...................... Temporary or limited term •••••

-............................... ······················-·-·······

======

U.S. citizens ....... -·· ......................... ___............ Male .................... -·-·-··.......................... Female................................................... Guamanians ••••••••• ·-··············-························ Others •• ·-·--··-············································· Graded ..................................... ···-·......... Ungraded................................................. Local hire (alien) ..................................... ····-·... Local hire (U.S. citizens)....................................... Off-island hire (alien) ••••••••••••• ·-··························· Off-island hire (U.S.) ••••• ••·······················-··········· Classificd•••••• -························-·················· Unclassified •••••• _.·-··········-··························· Number entered service during fiscal year......................... Number left service during fiscal year •••••••• ·-·················· Promotions made during fiscal year •••••• ·-······················· Local hire................................................. Off.island hire ............................ _._.............. Total personnel actions for fiscal year .......................

39 8 20

67

275

2,668

173 231 I, 205

612

5, 134 3,047 2,087 2,979 I, 948 1,099 2,490 264 2, 994 53 32 264

36 298 2,994 53 I, 044 588 203 2,714 333 .

3,335 ======

Oversea Processing and Travel Unit: Number of travel request and authorizations processed: Department of Agriculture ............... __....... _ ............ . . Civil Defense and Veterans' Affairs .............................. College of Guam ... - .......................................... . Department of Commerce ........................ ·- .......... ··Department of Education._ .................................... . Department of Finance ........................................ . Guam Memorial Hospital .............. ·- ...................... . Island Court ................................................. . Department of Labor and Personnel. ................. _ .......... . Department of Land Management .. _ ........................... . Department of Law ... ·- ............................... _...... . N. M. Flores Memorial Library ................................. . Office of the Governor ......................................... _ Department of Public Health and Welfare ......... _ .............. . Department of Public Safety .... _. ___............... _._ ......... . Public Utility Agency ... _ .... _._ ..... _ ............. __......... _ Department of Public Works __ .-· .... ·- .. ·- ... ·- ... -· .......... . Commercial Port of Guam •• ·•··················-··············· Total ...............

- ......................................

.

11 3

64 7 325 14

97

4 3 7 10 2 32 37 7

4 I 3

631

77


Department

of labor a.ad Personnel, Statistical Report, Fiscal Year 1967-Continued

Personnel Board: Number of classes created __ ._ .... _ .. __._. - . - - ... - .... - ... -- . - . _ Appointment.s above the minimum step .•.••••••• ·--·-·-·-·-······ Pay range reassignments ............. _ .......... -·-········ ••••• . Appeal CMCS heard ........................................... Applications considered for in•scrvice training .................... . Pay differential for acting capacity .............................. .

20 27 8 0 13 2

FiscolJtors 1966

Workmen's Compcrua1ion Commission: Involving no loss of time and only minor medical at1ention ......... Involving less than 7 days loss of time 0 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Involving more than 7 days loss of time .......................... Resulting in death ............................................ ACTIVE

1967

. .

514 215 252 3

460 164 185

. . . .

119 470 509 80

80 352 343 8!)

.

;j

CASES

Pending at beginning ofyenr ................................... Opened during the year ....................................... Closed during 1hc year ....................................... Pending at end of year ........................................ Of the cases closed, compensation payments involved were: For temporary total disability ............................... For permanent partial disability ............................. For head or facial disfigurements ............................ For death benefits .........................................

S26, 874. 67

. . . .

42, 110.46

1, 100.00 47,091.25 Sl17, 176.38

Government of Guam Retirement Fund-Operating Receipts and Disburse• meats and Balance in the Fund, Fiscal Years 1952 to 1967 Plscnl yenr e1Hlcd June 30 1052................ 1063.............. 1954·-·-··········· 1955................ 1956................ 1067............... 1058 1959. ··--··-······• 1960................ 1961................ 1962•• - •• ····- •••• 1063................ 1004. -······-··-··· 10&................ ·······-······ 1900 1067................

Totnl.. ......

Employees conlrlbullons $t77, 038. i8

3$5,383. 1.8

357,724.65 200,006.61 330,036.23 339.616. 38

380,754.63

808, iOI. 10 422,022.27 403, 7611.44 472, 118,43 507,873.05

653,405.85 677,421.44 iflJ, 705. fl.> 8"~.498.82

;, 620,681. 70

Oovernment contrlbuUona 0 ~15,838.14 1)-14,883. 27 627,831.80 6',li!,303.70 645,Htl.89 574,910.10 98,628.80 I, 16S,737.60

!mereston Totnl receipts Invest man ls $3,837.60 18,006.z.'I 45,130.94

S4SO, 876. 28 889,827.57 I.OH, 738. 70 882.920.91 1184,20& i4 osn.293.62 I, 097,869. 73

Totnl dJs. bursements ${13, 253. 76

006,057.O,~

Dntance In fund, June 30 567,62'!.63 201,393.05

1l'24,861.76 I, 038,751. 23 974,501.93 000,685.60 1,079,844.3; 846,727.67

228,449.74 238.166. 65 U7,S04. 57

840,361.01 3,S7,211, 60

368,019.42 41o.61>'9. 73 4bl, 660.50

1,328,00'2.10 I, 444,000. ll'l 1,148,083.87 ".!,Ol8, 460. 12 1,003.830.20 2,217,334.31 2,370, 158.00

2,004,107.05 1,653,736.42 2, 223, 380. Z2 2,397, 080. 18

118.8611.81 103,212. 243,300. GO 237,200.76 215,438.57

10,542, IZZ.20 3, 140,060, 10

21,303, 754. 16

21, <MiS, 316.68

040,000.74

i00,2M.42 300, i4 41 I, 137,842, 67 9411,389.34 I, OIO,ON. OS I, 000,000. 18

68,482.60

M,O'l8,j6 gs_301.25 130,205.00 142,070.00 153.273. 76 ?.!5,220.01

:m,633,07

040,269.00 I, 741,033.63

I, ,JS., 633.3.6 l, ISO,63.$.00 I, 672,606.23 I, 113,SOUYl

.\nlllfsls or cnsh bnlonCI' on hond, Juno 30, 1007: Cash In Bonk or Amcrlc,.1,Ouom Brunch (retirement rund cash) .. _.............................. Cnsh In Bonk. Son Frnnelsco Uronch (cuslodhlll IICOOlllll)••••••• ········-·····················

384,280.00

276,889.03 G0,422.~6 71, 22.64 211,278. 77

113.680.40

·-· ... ·-· Stli,430.41

107,0ll!.13 216,438.67

78


Department of Land Management Personnel: 65

The Department of Land Management is charged with the administration, use and disposition of all government land within the territory. It provides staff_assistance to the Territorial Planning Commission, the Land Transfer Board, and the Parks and Monuments Committee. The department approves land surveys, enforces zoning laws and subdivision regulations on private and public lands, procures land required by other government departments and agencies, and serves as the government's land broker. The department's major divisions are Land Administration. Land Records, Land Planning, Land Survey, and Parks and Grounds. The director supervises and coordinates all activities of the department and serves as executive secretary of the Territorial Planning Commission, chairman of the Parks and Monuments Committee, and chairman of the Land Utilization Committee.

Appropriation: $308,101

transaclions. In addition, appraisals were made on IO residential structures, 83 land use assignments were processed, and 336 were renewed and inspected. Investigations were made on 265 applications to acquire interest in government land which were referred to the Land Transfer Board. Of this total, J 25 applications were approved, 27 disapproved, and 112 remain under consideration. Negotiations were carried out with 274 individual owners for casements for utilities; 216 building permits were processed for ioning clearance; 374 applications for business licenses and 39 liquor license sites were approved; and 585 inspections were made on ,wning applications.

Land Records The Guam Legislature enacted an amendmenl to the Government Code of Guam relative to recording fees. The fees now range from $1 to $10.

Land Administra#o,i During the year the division acquired 62 parcels by purchase and c.xchange and 25 parcels by perpetual easement. Sixty parcels of government and private land were appraised for the purpose of determining market value in relation to acquisition and/or exchange

Planning

Guam's first comprehensive, islandwide master plan was approved, a turning point in the history of planning on Guam. The plan serves as a guide to islandwide zoning, subdivi79


sion control, and location of public facilities. An islandwide detailed land use and housing condition study also was completed. The land-use atlas has been used to refine and detail master plans for the heavily urbanized and rapidJy growing portions of the island. It was used, along with the future l¥d use studies in the master plan, to develop an islandwide zoning pattern for all portions of the island. A definitive neighborhood analysis is under way wherein the island will be divided into logical neighborhoods and the conditions and type of all structures in the neighborhood will be examined and analyzed. The recreation element of the master plan has been expanded into a design action program covering the ne.xt 5 years within a considerably detailed general program to be undertaken over the next 20 years. Significant progress was made in extending the coverage of the zoning law over a major portion of Guam. Preliminary zoning maps were completed by the Planning Division and the Territorial Planning Commission held public hearings covering all the villages in order to discuss proposed zoning with the people. The Planning Corrurussion adopted the zoning maps as modified by the views expressed at the public hearings. The maps covering the northern half of the island including Agana, Sinajana, Agana Heights, Maina, Chalan Pago, Mangilao, Barrigada, Mongmong-Toto-Maite, Tamuning, Dededo, and Yigo were approved by the rules committee and signed by the Governor. In the field of subdivision administration, and a considerable tightening of administrative controls was accomplished. Detailed subdivision design 80

standards were adopted and mandatory referral lo the Departments of Public Works, Public Health and Welfare, and the Public Utility Agency was effected on all subdivisions over five lots. Survey

A major project underway is the compilation of a new series of topographic maps of the Island of Guam by the U.S. Geological Survey with the assistance of the Survey Division. These wilJ be the most accurate maps yet compiled of Guam. Completion of this project is expected within another year. Further effort has been expended on the islandwide vertical and horizontal control system (G.G.T.N.). Half of the computations necessary to complete the system have been accomplished. All existing control systems are integrated with the Government of Guam Triangulation Net and this control is used as a basis of cadastral mapping started this year. The cadastral maps will eventually show every parcel of land i.n Guam. The drafting of survey standards was a milestone in the improvement of surveys on Guam. The division is compiling a "Manual of Surveying Practice" to establish poHcyand aid private surveyors as well as its own staff. The division improved lines of communication between the military, the Trust Territory, and Government of Guam agencies interested in mapping and surveying. One immediate result is a program of further cartographic photography underway that will be most beneficial. The division is providing the Trust Territory with an in-service training program for their surveyors and also gives technical assistance where requested.


Parks and Grounds

The division is responsible for the development, upkeep, and general maintenance of public parks, the Government House complex, Plaza de Espana, Pasco de Susana, school campuses, playgrounds, and other government-owned land.

During the year, the division developed and planted the Pasco de Susana Strand Garden, e.'<pandedthe planting in the Plaza de Espana, developed and planted the grounds at George Washington High School, initiated development of the Dedcdo Botanical Garden, and assisted in landscaping various public school sites.

Depanment of Land Management, Statistical Report, Fiscal Year 1967 I. Collection of Monies: (a) Application fees __________________-------- ___ ··-·-· ... ___.·-··· (b) Docum.enl tax ........ _._ .................. ···---- .... _....... . (c) Photostaticfces----·-----···--··--···-··-··--·-----·--··--·-·-(d) .Rcgutryfees ••••••••••••• --······-····-·····-····-·····---··-· (e) Rent government lands .•. ·--·_ ••. --·_·-· .•• _••. ·-·-··· ..•..•... (() Master plan copies .. -· ..... -··· ....... __.. ____.·- __ ... ··-·- ... . (g) Contracts receivable: (I) Agana revolving fund: a. l115taUmentson contracts receivable.--···--··-·-····--·--b. Interest earned on contracts rcceivablc •• -----····-········· ,. Initial payment ••• -·-·-·--·-····-·-···-·····-·--··-·-·-· d. Land sold for cash_·-- ... _ .. _. ___.... _........ ·-· .. __.. _ (2) Land transfer fund: a. Installments on contracts receivable .. __---·· ........ _. __.. b. Int.crest earned •••• ·-·--··--··-··-·-·-··--·-·--········· c. Land sold for cash __ - ·---·- ·---. ·-· _ .. -· ____·-. __... _ ...

2.

S2, 102.00 14,457.50 I, 050.37 2,112.00 9,328.55 50.00 14,399.92 578.29 35,121.57 55,072.93 8,800.28 2,149.96 461.68

Afajc!~~~;~n~i~~3~----·-··-·········-···-··-·--·····-·-··-··---====8 (b) Contracts closed·--··-·-·-·-·-··---·---·-··---·--··---·-·---··· (c) Accrued interest as or June 30, 1967.-··-·-··-·------·-·--·-·-··-(d) Outstanding balance as of June 30, 1967••• ---·--··--------------

5 S479.25 36,370.53

3. Land Transfer Fund: 4 (a) Contracts opened ... ·--·· .... ·-· ....... ·-· ...... __..... ··- ....... __··(b) Contracts closed _____ . ________________ .. ____________ ... _____ . 12 S684.49 (c) Accrued interest as of June 30, 1966••• --------·-···---------·--28,239.93 (d) Outstanding balance as of.June 30, 1966_. __ ·-·----------·-------

====

4. Recording or Documents: (a) Documents received and recorded ____ . _____________ .. ___units ___ _ 4,297 4,297 (b) Documents posted on numerical index_·····---·-----------do .. __ (c) Documents posted on general !ndex (Grantor-land) b\nder. _________ _ (742-796) (d) Documents posted on general mdcx (Grantee-land) binder. ______ . __ _ (801-832) (c) Documents posted on general index (Grantor-misccllaneous) binder ___ (743-824) (f) Documents posted on general index (Grantee-miscellaneous) binder __ _ (741-783) g) Issuance of lost certificate of title ___________ . ______ . _____ units_. __ 69 1,473 h) Changes of property listin~ (real estate i;ection). __···----···-do .. _. 1,880 ~i) Number of certificates of titles issued.. ___ .. _._. _______ ... __do ___ _ (j) Number of certificates or titles canceled_ .. __ . _________ . ____do ___ _ 959 5. Search or Records: (a) Record search (land registration case or private owners and others). __ _ 86 6. Instruments Prepared: a) Agreements to exchange real property __ . __. ___ . __ . ___ . _______ ._. 3 b) Abstracts of titles.. ____ .. _ ... __ .... __ ._ .. _____________ -· __ . __ . 52 11 ~c) Contract to deeds .... ____ ... __.. __ .. _ .. __ ---· _______ ..... __ . (d) Deeds of conveyance __. ____________ .... ____________ .. ____ . ___ _ 41 (e) Deeds of exchange_ .. ___ . _______ ._._. ___________ . _______ .. ___ _ 46 (f) Quitclaim deeds .. ____ ... _. ___ . ___ ... __ . __ ._ .. _ .. __.. __ .... _._ 2 (g) Utility casements __ ... _... ____ .. ___ . ___________ .. _. __ . __ .. __ _ 97 (h) Warranty deeds .. ___ ._._._. __ ._. ___ . ____ .-•·. _______ .. ____ ... _ 23

81


Department of Law The Department of Law has cognizance over all legal matters of concern to the Government of Guam. This includes civil and criminal cases as well as actions involving government officials or employees. The department is administered by the Attorney General with a staff composed of the Deputy Attorney General, the Island Attorney, and five Assistant Attorneys General. The office also has a Special Investigator utilized particularly in internal government matters.

Tax Matters Tax litigation declined from J l cases filed last year to five this year. Seven cases were closed, leaving four pending. Two of the pending cases are actions by the government to collect taxes owing. Land The department examines each private land registration case filed to determine if any government interest is involved. Seventy-seven such cases were reviewed and waivers of interest filed in 44. Land condemnation was a major activity with eight new cases filed involving some 240 tracts of land. Appeals to the inth Circuit Court of Appeals were taken in two cases. The condemnation artions concerned land for 82

school sites, parks, public housing and necessary easements.

Claims Against the Govenmient Under the Government Claims Act all daim against the govenuncnl arc reviewed by the attorney general. Eleven such claims were examined and payment was recommended in 10 cases in the total amount of $2,488.32. The denied claim was in the amount of $558.92. Under the law aJJ cargo claims against the Commercial Port are subject to lhc attorney general's review. One hundred twenty-seven claims were received and payment approved in a total of $5,670.12. Claims totaling $16.587.96 were denied.

Claims Owing the Government Miscellaneous debts due the government were collected by suit and otherwise in the total a.mount of $7,170.93. This is a marked increase over the previous fiscal year.

General Civil Litigatioti Civil litigation covered a wide variety of fields from simple representation in receivership matters to tort claims. One interesting case arose out of President Lyndon B. Johnson's visit to


Guam in March. A young man displaying a placard at the airport claimed he was forced to remove the sign by the Guam police in violation of his constitutional rights. Wu.sstigv. Sablan and Gouemment of Guam, D.C. 2867. was pending at year's end.

Legislation The department performs the bill drafting services for the executive branch and during the year 101 such bills were submitted to the legislature. This represents over a 100-percent increase over last year and continued

heavy activity an!icipated.

CasosRlod. ...................................................

this

field

1s

Criminal Matte1's The department is responsible for the prosecution of aU criminal offenses within the jurisdiction of the Government of Guam. Offenses involving servicemen are generally handled by military authorities with U1e exception of those cases within the jurisdiction of the Police Court. The following is a summary of criminal cases handled during the year: District Court

COSC$ponding beginning ofyoar ..............................

in

lllland Court.

. ...... iii

.

Convictions by court....... ••••• ····-······· ······- •.••••• Con,•lctlol\JIby Jury ...... - ................................... . Acqultto.Js by court ••••-······································ Acquittals by Jury •••• ·······-·······························Dlsmlssnls•• -.......... • ••••••• ·- ···-····· •• ·········-··· ..... . .......... . Pending ot ond of yeor..................... Convictions oppcoled (9th Circuit) ••••••.•• -······-········ Ap~ls Blllrmcd (0th Circuit) ................................ . Convictions appcoled (oppcllnto dlvlslon D.C.l. ............ . Appcals nffinnod (oppolloto division D.C.) ................... . Appeals rovcrsod or dismissed (0th Circuit)............. . ... . Appe:1lsrovcrsod or dlsmi!lsed (oppollnto dlvflilo11D.C.) ....... . Appools dlsmlssod on motion or Govemm~ni ol Gunm ........ . Appcols pending ntend of Fflicol Year ........................ .

10

6 294

(218) 198

Police Court

JuvcnUo Court I

31 (26) 2•

I

(I) I

• (23). 21

···<a>·2 (I)

I

3 I

(68) 34 62

(Nolt: Brookctod oumbcrs roprcseot oumbets of defendants.)

The most noteworthy case that occurred during the fiscal year, The People of the Territory of Guam v. Rabo11,Salas and Palomo, D.C. Criminal Case 11-66, rose out of the brutal murder of a police officer. The three youths charged were convicted of murder in the second degree and each sentenced to serve 30 years imprisonment.

Additional Activities Routine functions

included

the

drafting of proclamations and execu• live orders, the preparation of opinions, and the day-to-day advice furnished various agencies as needed. Other services included special in• vestigations; drafting or review of rules or regulations for various departments, agenc-ies, commissions and boards: drafting or review of various contracts. deeds, laws or other legal documents of concern to government; and the review of Federal laws applicable locally.

83


Passport Office The Passport Office is operated as a division of the Governor's Office. It has a staff of two clerks. During the fiscal year a total of 3,173 passports were processed. Of the total, 2,606 were for new passports, 400 for renewals, 155 for amendments, and 12 for extensions.

84


Nieves M. Flores Memorial Library Personnel: 9

The Nieves M. Flores Memorial Library, an agency of the Government of Guam, is the public library of Guam and serves the entire population of the island. The library is administered by a seven-member board appointed by the Governor with the consent of the legislature. The chief librarian is also executive secretary to the board. The library has concentrated on collection development and extension of facilities the past year. Two district libraries are under construction at Dededo and Agat. Each will have a floor space of 3,500 square feet and a collection of approximately 6,500 volumes. A total of $89,000 was budgeted for acquisition of library materials with $60,000 of this earmarked for books and equipment for the community libraries. Approximately 7,700 books were processed, 3,000 for the main library, and 4,700 for the community libraries. Significant additions to the juvenile collection were made to offer the best of dlildren's materials for the everwidening interest of the library's young users. The reference collection has been expanded to permit further services to the government, business, and the pro-

Appropriation: $141,209

fessional community. The library is now designated as the depository library for Federal Government documents. Library services for the blind are also performed. This is made possible through an agreement with the Library of Hawaii wherein the Guam library may request records and Braille materials free of charge. The library program has been strengthened by participation in the Library Services and Construction Act. The State Plan is being amended to cover titles III and IV to be used for a union catalog showing the holdings of all the libraries on Guam and interisland library cooperation with the Trust Territory libraries. Step •are being taken to use title IV-A t.o start a library collection at the Guam Penitentiary and Guam Memorial Hospital. Extension services arc presently provided to the Department of Agriculture and the Juvenile Detention Home.

Guam Museum During the fiscal year the Guam Museum underwent complete renovation and the appearance of the historic building has been greatly improved. Spanish tiles now dress the roof. 85


Nieves M. Flores MemoriaJ Library (Guam Public Llbrary)-Statiscics, Fiscal Year 1967 Books circulated ___________ . __ ----. ______________________________________ _ 69,933 :-lcw members registered _______ - --- -- - -- ----. _____________________________ _ 3,051 New phonorccords added __ . - - - --- ------ ------ ____________________________ _ 305 Pamphlet collection ___ - _________ -- ---- __________________________________ _ 5,359 cw pnmphlcts added ____________________________________________________________ _ 270 Government documents collection __ ---- ___________________________________ _ 5,109 :-lcw documents added ____ ------ - --- - -- --------__________________________ _ 2.387 Book collection ______ . - __ . ___ - - - - - --- --- _________________________________ _ 51, 748 cw books received and processed -----------------------------------------Main library___________________________________________________ Branch Hbrary-- __- - -- - -- - - - - - - - - - - ---- -- - -- -- -- - ___ _ _____ __ ___ _ Bound pcriodtcnls. _____ -- -------- - - - - ---- -- ------ _____ __ ______

3,740 3, 000 240

6,980

6,980 Items recorded in Accession Book_ ----------------------------------------Visitors recorded in Guest Book_ - - - - -- - - -- - --- - - -- _________________________ _ Conducted tours __ -- -- -- ----- - - -- - --- - - -- --------------_________________ _

86

4, 176 4.624

58


Department of Public Health and Welfare Personnel: 130

The Department of Public Health and Welfare is divided into two djvisions, one for public health, the other for welfaro. The department has been in existence only 3 }'Carsand continues to have a number of administrative problems. One of its main difficulties lies in recruiting and keeping top personnel. One major improvement during the year came with the reorganization of the fiscal section to better serve the department as a whole. The department also was able to obtain additional working space in the Guam Memorial Hospital.

Appropriation: $1,563,611

rabies control efforts by various departments of the government. Islandwide vaccination clinics were held, a continuing program was set up to eliminate the large stray dog population, and an embargo was placed on the entry of all dogs and cats until adequate quarantine facilities can be constructed. The ational Communicable Disease Center has since sent a rabies expert to the island to direct the various control efforts over an e1-'tendcd period.

Dwisum of Public Hea/.lh

Pr,blic Health Nursing, Maternal, Child Hea/.1h,find Crippled Children Sections

This division is responsible for maintaining adequate health standards in the territory. This is accomplished mainly through immuni7.ation pro~rams, contagious disease control, and sanitary inspections. The work is primarily preventive. One of the main concerns of the division during the year was rabies control. Rabies was discoveerd in March in the dog population on the island. As of the writing of this report, 34 cases of rabies, mainly in dogs and cats, had been confinned by laboratory tests in Hawaii. The Governor appointed the department director to coordinate all

Public Health nursing continued to be the major health seivice rendered locally to the village people. The recruitment of nurse personnel was satisfactory with an average of 33 out of a possible 36 positions filled for the year. The staff was supplemented on a parttime basis by student nurses from the College of Guam. There were 4,319 prenatal and 573 post partum clinic visits. All patients attending the prenatal clinic had smears for detection of cancer. Assistance in family planning was made available during the postpartum clinic. A minimum of eight well child clinics were held each week throughout the 87


island. Physicians saw 5,908 children at first-visit conferences and 2,160 on revisits. There were 5,966 nursing firstvisit conferences and 18,096 revisits. As a special project, a mass measles vaccination program was conducted, with more than 18,000 children aged I to 12vaccinated. The school health program was extended to include weekly visits to each school by the village nurse. Physical examinations were offered to parochial as well as public school children in the sixth grade. The Crippled Children's Unit continued its efforts to locate crippled children and to provide them with diagnostic and therapeutic services. Visits to clinics "totaled 3,480. There were 126crippled children admitted to hospital locally and 12 were sent to Hawaii. Under a new, federally funded program, crippled children are referred to Guam for diagnostic and treatment services not available in the Trust Territory.

Health Education, Accident Prevention, and Nttt-rition Section This section was formed in September when a public health educator was assigned to Guam in lieu of funds by the U.S. Public Health Service. The section contributed significantJy to increased community awareness. understanding, and participation in the mass measles vaccination program and the rabies control program. Both activities attracted greater community participation than experienced on similar occasions in the past.

Tuberculosis ConJrol SecJion The U.S. Public Health Service awarded a special project grant to the 88

department to attempt to control tuberculosis which is 100 times more frequent in Guam than in the continental United States. This included the assignment of a USPHS medical officer to Guam to supervise the TB control program that got under way in November. Outpatient visits increased by 30 percent over the previous fiscal year. Bacteriological specimens submitted for examination showed a similar increase.

Sanitatioti Section The section had to concentrate most of its efforts in the areas of sewage disposal, food sanitation, school sanitation, insect and rodent control, housing hygiene, general sanitation, rabies and dog control, and related health matters. There was a need for greater activity in other environmental health areas that received limited attention, these included garbage and refuse disposal, public water supply, swimming pool and bathing beach sanitation, water pollution control, radiological health, milk sanitation, occupational health, industrial hygiene and foreign quarantine. The need for adequate sewage and other liquid waste disposal facilities undoubtedly represent the island's most significant enviornmental health problems. The sanitary engineer position was filled by a Public Health Service officer assigned in lieu of formula grant funds. Most of the professional staff has definite limitations due to a lack of adequate educational and professional backgrounds. It is unable to adequately cope with problems of a complex technical nature. The section has requested that sanitarian positions be upgraded to permit recruitment of college. graduates.


Dental Sectiot1, Patient health education and preventive oral disease measures continued to be the main concern of this section. The staff was increased and treatment services were expanded considerably.

Public Health Laboratory The laboratory handled all animals in the civilian sector suspected of having rabies. Brain samples were sent to the Communicable Disease Center, Atlanta, Ga. By the end of the fiscal year, 20 dogs, six cats, and two rats had been sent, all of which were reported negative. (Military commands ~cnt their samples to an Army laboratory in Hawaii. This laboratory confirmed 34 cases.) Examinations performed by the Public Health Laboratory arc listed in the accompanying statistical tables.

Division of Public ll1/el/are This agency continued efforts to develop and implement a comprehensive c;ystemof public social services. The Family Services Sectio11 expended $345,949.66 in assistance pay111entsduring the fiscal year. The average monthly caseload was 416. At the close of the year il was 433. Bulk of the payments was made under four public assistance titles of the Social Security Act which provide for grants-in-aid to Guam. (See statistical tables.) •The Child W elf arc Services spent $28,070 on foster care. There were 26

278-0Hll~7

children placed with families throughout the island. Much assistance was received from the Guam Foster Parents Association. The Communif)' Services Section operated community centers throughout the year in the villages of Sinajana, Jnarajan, and Talofofo. Centers in Vona, Agat, and Dededo were operated only a portion of the year due to lack of staff. The centers open after school and dose at curfew. Services arc directed primarily toward children and youths aged 7 to 21. This age segment represents 45 percent of the total island population. The Juveriilc Institution had an average daily ward population of 23 and this rose at times to as high as 38. This caused numerous problems as the dormitory was designed for a capacity of 20. Construction is well under way on a new building and it is hoped it will be ready for occupancy shortly. A clinical psychologist conducted weekly group therapy sessions in addition to psychological testing and diagnosis of the wards. The Neighborhood Youth Corp . Vocational Rehabilitation, and neighboring schools were all utilized to augment the institution's program. A Work Experience and Training Program was set up under title V of the Office of Economic Opportunity Act to participate in the nationwide "War Against Poverty." The program is designed lo help train and find employment for the needy. The U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare approved the local program in April and it commenced May 1. The total budget is $108,514.

89


DIVISION

OF PUBLIC HEALTH, STATISTICAL REPORT, YEAR 1967

FISCAL

Comparative Summary of Statistical Events 1963, 1964, 1965, and 1966Guam Yeors nnll Namlk!r IOO<I

1003

1,lvobirth .. l>ruih ... Inlunt demh :.1urrlng~ ... Divorce

2,Mlll

3-13 iO 361 43

1065

1000

2.626 303

2,623 330

300 H1

471

o.~

12,048 • 327

82

M

6()1

6.1

GO

• 1,-0gltlmot~.2.300; 1lleglmntc, 2711. L•ft.I. : l)coth ruto per 1,000 flO(lUIOll<JII

Death-Guam, 1966 Total death recorded.. .......................... Death locally...................................... Death elsewhere and recorded here...... . . . .. . . . . . . .

327 324 3

Total Death by Sex and Percent-Guam, 1966 ,Yumbtr

Male ......................... Female ....................... Total ........ __ . __ ...........

. . .

Ptrttnl

57.5 42.5 100.00

188 139

327

Total Death by Sex, Place of Death and Agency Reporting-Guam, Malo Uunm :\lomorlnl l!ospltol. -············-··-········-······ U.S. Nnvnl nosµ11.n1............. ___ ........................

Othnr•.•••••••••••• ···-··-·

···············-···········

Tolnl. .............................

- ...................

.

••••

t·cmnlc

187

67,:!

71l 01

!!-1.1

1311

3Zi

30 29

40 32

The Ten (10) Leading Causes of Death-Guam,

Number

Isl ............. . Discuses ortho honrt. nnd blood vcll5cl5(420-450)............. . Motor vehicle nnll oll other nccldentol cnu:1es(g oo-g962)...... . . '.!d ·-······ , ......... . 3<l............. . :\lnllgnonl IIOOl)IB!lm,oil Sites (140-200) .................. lll·d~nncd dlsooscs pl'Cullnnoenrly lnlnnoy nnd l11111111lllrity 111111unll• 4th. ........ .

.

111.h. • ··-···· 7th. .. th. . ...... . Uth............. 10th. . ........

. .

..~i~rri:i-::ioo-.08) .....·-··-··················· .... .

01!!00$('5or th~ llt'fVOllSsyst(llll Ullll l!<!l\50 Ol'gU11$ (a-11--30$)........ Vo.!ICulorlMlons offcctl111trcntrnl nervo11uys1rm (330-334)••....... T11bon:ulosls1111 lor111s(001-019)............. ····--······ SulcJdo uud ~ll-h10lclod Injury (£063-£070). . .......... • ······-···················· Clrrhosl5 ol llv~r (Nil) ••• ····-· All Olhl'I' COll!CS... .....

..

. ...............••••.........•..

Totnl nll causes.·····-···············-······················

90

I .O 100.0

1966

On:l~r

5th ............

Pcrcnnt

so

107

.

Totnl

1966

.

Percent

00

◄I ◄0

2"I Z1 21 14

.

10 ~

20.:! 12.6

12.:!

.u

S.3 0. ◄

4.3 3.1

~-• 1.5

6i

!!O.h

3Z1

100.0


Total Disease Reported for the Year, l965 and l966 Yoar and number

OlsC351l

1065

ChoncrohL_....... • ··········-··················································· Chickenpox........................................................................... ConJunctlvltl5, ocuto Infectious (pink oyo)••••••• ··-···-················-·········· Dlnrrhca lnfnntl!o (lnfcctlous). .......... .... . ......................... ....... Dysentery (nmooblv) ..............• • .....••••••••••••••••••••••••• -··········· 1Jysc111cry(bnclllt1ryund other Infective tYl)(!S)... ...............•••••••••.••....••••• ""YSCPOIOS ••••••••••••••••••••••••••

.•

294

II 0'2

~

4 !I

I Ill

.... .. ...... .. .

µi~:rr!r t!i~~~:: •:: :=:::: ::::

i

;1:i~;g~tds...... .. -· ._..:····················································

~

=··=

=:=:: =:~==: :: :: :::===: =====: :: =:===:====:=::: :

rnWucnu (epidemic)._..... ....................................................•..... Intestinal pnrosltos oscar!s. .. ....... .. ...... .... ...... .. ... .. . ... . .. .. . . . . . . ... . .. .. . . Uookwon11(Mclt)•lostomlosL,)••••••••••• ····-·······································

10 186

Tncnln (sollum, soglr11110) .......• - ..•.... ·····-······. -····· •• -·· ••• ••••••••••••••• Emcroblus (pin woi:m)••••••••••••••••••••••• ·-······································ Leprosy (htm5Cn'sdlscnso) ···············-···-···················· )1olorlo........... ... ..•• ·-···...... ................................................. )Jaas.11111 (roboolo). . .. . . . . .................................................. _...... Mnnlnglt!s carobrosplnnl {mcnlngococclc).............................................. \lumps .......................... ·-·•-········-···················--················· Pneumonia 1nrcct1ous.................... .. ............................ ............. Rhoumntlc fever ncuto phn.~o............ ..••••••••••••. ••• ••• ·-········ Rlngwonn ortho scolp (linen cnpli!s)..... .................... ... ............. ······················-··-··-············ Ringworm or tho body oUwr thon Scalp

"coblcs....... ··- ··-. ·---· .. _. ·- ........••••.......•....•..... Scnrlci rcvcr••• ••·························································-············ Septic sore tnoot (stroptococclc)•••• - ••••••••••••••••••••••

···········-···············.

Ston1nt.lt..is (inICCLlou.s) ...... _. ·- _....... -· .. _.... _. _.. _............_............ _. _. ~ - --· .............

Syphilis .......••••••••.••.•..•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••-················· Tetnnus ............................. ··-· .... ·-· .............................................. Tubcreulos!S (other thon !ulmonnry) ••••••••••••••• -····················-·······-·· Tuberculosis (pulmonary ·················--·····-······-························· Whooping cough (pcrtuss s) .. ..••••••••••••••••• ···············-··········-············

.5Cl 20

201i 5 112 168 II II

&-~ 4

u 38

-· ·- ......•. -··

4

0

JI I I 10 158

58

124 182 744 129

6

o.16

I

8:1 6

M 62

12

247 28 4 .,

6ii 22

<H7 . 8

I 20

2 4

• ······-·

0

I 110 7

a

--- ...

2

I 611 12

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Food polsonlni (bnctcr!ol Infection).................................................... German mcoslcs (rubol!B)... .. . ........ ... . . . ... .... ... ....... .. .......

11100

64

6

120 3

91


1.0 ,-.:,

Public Assistance Expenditures and Caseload by Month and Program 1967

1000

Aui;ust

July AFOC ........................ AUoUCII ($180,304.00). Antuol cxp('ntlltures ($_198,1.S.74).. .

OAA ......................... Allotted ($118,452.00). Actual expenditures ($118?15.96)•••• ·---·. Al''l'l ................... Allotted ($26,096.00). Actual ox1iondllun.-s

.

.....

• •••

.

.

Allotted ($30,000.00)... ........ . Actual expenditures ($10,781.40), Totnl c:ISl!loatl-......... 'l'otol ollott~l ($300,47:!.00). Totol octuol cxpantllturo ($345,940.66) ... llalo,,~~.522.00.

143 148 160 1st m (767 Rcclp) (794 llcclp) (79S ltcclJ>) (502 Rccip) (71l2Jlooip)

•·cbruory

Jonuary

160 160 Rccip) (787 Rcclp)

cm

.

n.484.oo

6,515.43 45

12,841.52 47

0,689.82 47

6,514.85 47

6,400.70

1,002.1~ 6

I,

60'l.88

'.!,156.67 0

1,621. li 0

I, 820.00

1,041.55

6

6

170.05 21

1.9.05

863.37

l'i9. 05 22 I 27 I, 70I. 6!l

867.38

• 28

27 862. 71

4,00!. 40

0

0

2,223.00

40'.I

40'.l

46

1711. Q,\ 23 '211 871.89

0

l'i0.05

20

I 25 A71.37

0

0

300

403

:!I, 16,S,02

21, 6,3. 15

AFIJC-Ald to FomUies ol OcpcndcnL Children. OAA-Old Ago A!Ssistnnce. Al'TO-Ald to Pcrmonenllr ond 'l'oUllly Dlsollled. ' Persons~

:-Jovcmbor December

Moy

.April

Mllrch

Tuno

m

150 156 101 102 Rccl1>)(7W Roolp) (784 nccip) (820 llccip) (840 Rcclp)

cno

. $12,030.24 $12,503.30 Sl.8,347.52 $13,315.21 $14,944.36 ~14.400.00 $14,013.4.4. S13,ll04,ZI $16,868.05 $15,984.10 531,330.49 181 184 184 183 183 181 1811 1811 189 IOI 107 .

($23,0S0.73)...... --AU ............. . Allollcd ($2,376,00). Act uni expenditures ($2,210.28). OA.. .. . ............ . Allotted ($C!,l84.00)- ...... . Act uni c.~pcndltures ($13,◄ 15.M). MAA

Sc1ll.cmbcr October

I 2(1

4~

38,397.13

'.!3,410.54

22

24,347.13

i, 242. 47

◄.Ii

I.SO.as 21 I

40I 26, 159.2i

◄6

l,Gn.6$

l.80.36

o.812.05

13,-182.~ 40

s. Iii.

1,665.85 6

1,673.01 6

3,269.09 0

'!,421.88 0

I.SO. 35 26

180.3$ 27

205. (Al 20 I 37 '.!,125.4i

204.59 29 I 37 I, 20.~.47

10, lit. 85 46

0,907.01

I, 727.00 6

180.35

$20,403.21 201

◄G

46

66 45

21 2i 71

26 3'! I, C1l7.76

l,O'li.70

I, IOI. 4~

0

2,381.00

2,169.00

0

0

0

•U~

us

417

426

430

443

20,483.10

'.!i,SOS.6:!

~5,iM. 00

50,413.32

I

8t)2.

:l4,8i0.62

I

All-Aid lo mind. OA-Oeneml Asslslllnce. ~IAA-llcdicttl Assistance to Ai:cd.

132

I

33

3?, ◄66.81


Department of Public Safety Personnel: 311

The Department of Public Safety is responsible for both police and fire protection and a penal program for territorial and Federal prisoners. The department is composed of the Director's Office, General Administration Division, Technical Services Division, Police Division, Investigation Division, ·Penal Division, Fire Division, and Security Division. During the year, a tragic incident underscored the lethal hazards under which the officers of the department labor in pursuit of their duties. This was the brutal murder of Officer John M. Santos. His loss serves to remind the citizenry that sudden and violent mayhem or death arc an eternal part of the c.xpectation which must confront each officer, his loved ones, and his department. Administf'atioti The department was reorganized during the fiscal year. Two new divisions were created-the Technical Services Division and the Investigation Division, the latter being an expansion of the detective section. The Technical Services Division consists of four branches and is responsible for the training program of the department, the police cadet and the police reserve programs, communications, and transportation. Improvement of dog control functions also was accomplished with 278---0330---68-S

Appropriation: S1,387,597.00

the employment of four men assigned as animal control officers. In addition, the construction of a dog pound, with adequate facilities, was completed. Technical Services Four supervisory officers completed inservice training courses abroad in delinquency control, traffic control, advanced identification, and command level police management. Thirty-eight public safety officers, most of them recruits, completed a course in basic police and fire training. Forty-two of• ficers in supervisory positions attended a supervisory course administered by the College of Guam. A number of personnel also attended an 8-week course in introduction to law enforcement at the college. Two police officers from the Trust Territory spent 6 and 2 weeks respectively observing operations and procedures within the department. Recof'ds and Identification The records and identification section received and recorded 9,819 cases of which 6,236 required specific investigative action. Of the total, 3,029 cases were processed and transmitted to proper authorities for action or infonnation, including 2,269 to the Attorney General's Office, 480 to the 93


Juvenile Court, 230 to military authorities, and 50 to the U.S. Attorney's Office. A total of 2,356 persons were fingerprinted in connection with criminal offenses, the loyalty program and the issuance of identification cards, taxi cab driver's licenses, and firearm registrations. During the year, 826 firearms were registered, making a total of 4, 178 firearms permanently registered with this department including 833 pistols, 705 revolvers, 1,050 shotguns, 1,495 rifles and 95 carbines. The photographic laborato1·y developed 4,792 exposures and printed 7,779 photographs of which 1,971 were developed and 3,426 printed for other departments of the Government of Guam. A total of 9,973 police clearances were processed for agencies of the territorial and Federal governments.

Investigation Dwision Criminal offenses increased 15.7 percent over the previous fiscal year. Actual crimes reported to the police in fiscal year 1967 totaled 3,464, an increase of 4 72 .There were 1,590 criminal offenses cleared in 1967, or 46 percent of the total cases actually known. Of this total. there were 492 cases wherein juveniles were involved or 31 percent; adult civilians 868 or 54.6 percent; and military personnel 230 or H.4 percent. There were 1,488 persons arrested, including 479 juveniles and 129 females. In addition, 765 persons, involved in criminal offenses but not arrested. were referred to the Attorney General's Office, the Juvenile Court, and military authorities for prosecution.

Police Divisio,i, Patrol officers issued 5,428 citatiom. for moving traffic violations, 1,898 for 94

nonhazardous violations, and 180 warning citations, while rendering 2,526 miscellaneous services to the public. Traffic officers investigated 1,810 traffic accidents, an increase of 379 accidents over fiscal year 1966. The number of persons injured as a result of such accidents increased from 614 to 702. There were 21 fa tali tics, the same number as in the previous fiscal year. Some 332 additional vehicular accidents occurring on private property and classified as nontraffic were also investigated. The traffic section processed 13,008 applications for driver's licenses, handled 134 citizen's complaints of traffic violations, and, in conjunction with the Department of Public Works, disposed of 135 vehicles abandoned on public highways and other government-owned lands. The vehicle safety inspection station made safety inspections of 26,959 vehicles, 5,556 of which were rejected for not meeting the requirements of the vehicle code. Operation of the station during the year produced $21,103 in revenue. In compliance with a new law, relative to demonstration of ability to exercise control in the operation of a motorcycle, 1,465 persons were examined. The major event of the fiscal year was the visit of the President of the United States to Guam. This required the recall and assignment of all available on-duty and off-duty officers in all divisions to perform security duties.

Penal Division The total prison population for the fiscal year 1967 was 448, of which an . average of 15.8 percent were held for Federal agencies. The monthly population averaged 37.3 percent inmates. Sentences ranged from 2 days to life.


Continued progress was made in the rehabilitation program for inmates. during the year. Four inmates progressed rapidly in cooking, menu preparation, and supplies control in the prison galley. One of the four, who was serving a 60-year term, was paroled and is working as chief baker at a private establishment. He acquired all his knowledge and skill in baki_ngat the penitentiary. Three inmates completed a course in furniture refinishing at the Vocational Rehabilitation Center. Following this they refinished about 200 school desks for the Depa1tment of Education. The only charge was for materials. The prison operations produced revenues in the amount of $6,304.25. Thi_s came for the confinement and care of Federal prisoners plus the sale, redemption, and care of impounded animals. The animal control unit intensified its drive against stray and unlicensed

dogs as part of the government's rabies control program. A total of 5,817 stray and unlicensed clogswere disposed of.

Fire Division There was a marked reduction in the number of fires experienced. The total for this year was 279. The previous year it was 874. This was a decrease of 595. This year's total included 40 house fires. 45 grass and brush fires, 61 auto fires, and 133 miscellaneous. Fire losses amounted to $221,627.00 and property saved was valued at $574,479.00. Fire prevention personnel conducted fire safety i_nspectionsof 567 government buildings, 330 business establishments. and 792 private homes. During Fire Prevention Week, they disLribured 1,875 posters, which were placed in conspicuous locations throughout the island. The three ambulance units rendered 1,448 services to the public.

95


1.0 0)

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY, STATISTICAL REPORT, FISCAL YEAR 1967 Crime Statistics ommses

July

August

Non negligent mn115hmghter.... Negligent monslnugbtcr .......

I 0

0 I

~~rbery:.:: :.:::~ ::::::::··::: Aggmvotod ~ult...........

0

0 I

Ourglllr}'...................... Lnrwny: Urnnd llrell ................ l'ony tholl. ................ AUIO Urch ................... Other ussaults .................. Arson .... Forgery nnd couutmeltlng .... t'roud___ .................. Embcul~ment ................. Stolen 8:.ropeny. p()SSjlSSlon, etc. Vondu sm.................... Wenl)OIIS, carTylng, otc. ......... Prostitution nnd ,•lc:o........... Sex ofTen.'ICS .................... Narcotic drug lnws............. U1u11hllng...................... OITcnsosversus fomlly ond Children ...................... l)runk driving ................ Liquor laws .................... Drunlrnnnl'Si!.................. l)lsorderly conducl.- .......... VBj!mncy...................... Cnrrew nnd loitering ........... Rurmwuy ................... All Olher olTurn,es.... . . •...•. Total ....................

0 2 32

29

13 40

48

14

33 0 0 6

0

0

111

14 14

38 0

0 I l 0

36

4

4

0 8 0 0

0 6 0 0

0 3

0

6 0

as 0

2

7

---

0

4 2

2 37

I 3 2

Novcmber

October

So~ tern • 0

0 2 3 6 28 10 37

Jg

41

0 0 4

I 0

35 2 0

4

I I 0 I 2

26 12 37 17

35 0

0

4

0

0 34 10 0

4

0 0

0 I

0 3 2 0

0 3 I

17 4 4 2

0

I 0 I I 25

4 42

al 40 I 0 17 0 0

33 3 0 8

II

10 37

200

23

201

285

240

268

0

I 0 I 2

14

0 4

4

I 0

I 0 64 I 0 2 0 0

40 4

0 G

I 6 I 7 67 0 16 8 47

0

JanuBty

LI 40 15 28 0 0

10 64 17 48 0

I 2 2

7

34

0 I I 37

0 I

26

4 31

0 0

0 I

2 32 3

42

Oecombcr

376

0 6

0

March

Fobru• ary 0 2 I I 4 24

14

36 0 0

0

0 0 0

2 21

3 0

2 0 I 2

35

35

44

10 30

14

0 I 0

37 0 0 6 0

46

38

6 0 I

0 3

5 0 I

0

I

0

0

6 0 2

I I

2

4

4

5

51

42

0 l8

0 7 8

31:'l

303

0

0

0 6

40

0

0

47 7

16

43 0

3 0 0 32 0 0

39

1 14

---

Juno

0

10

10

May

0

3

4-S

56

April

I

0

4

2

44

67

28$

---

316

0

0 I 0 I 4 17

Totnl

2

D 3 17

u

323

g

33

128

30

403

18

0

181 434 I

9

29 0 0 5 0

3'J 0

0 40 2 0 2 0 I

0 I 0 0 36 I 0 2 0 0

0 7 I

0 5 0

0 33

3 6 3 4-S

3

34

I 0 4

35

0 M 4 0 461 4G 0 51

0 0

2 62 17

33 4$3 13 103 61 4VI

--- 276 --- 237 ---3,464


Arrests Statistics oaenses

July

Alll(u.st

So~

tem Nonnegllgent OUllls!BughlA!r .... Negligent manslnughter ........

0

0 0 0 I

trbery ....................... Auravated assault ............. B~ln.ry. ··- ................. Larceny: Onu1d tboft ................ Potty theft ................. Auto theft ..................... Other IISSllults____... . . . .....

t·orgery Bnd countorfoltlnst .... f"raud.... . ............... Emoouloment ................. Stolen property, possosslon_ ... V'nndoll!m .................... Weapons r)05$eSS!on. oie ....... Prosi Itut 1on and comme.rehillzod vlco ..................... Sex o!Tenses............ . ...... Nurcol!o drug lows............. Gambling. .. . ............. Offenses versus lamlly and children .................... Drunk driving ................. Liquor lnws.................... Drunkenness ................... Dl!onlorly conduct .. __ ........ Vogroney ...................... Curlew and loltMlng ........... RUDllWlly...................... All othllr orTenMis ............... Totol. .....

(t)

-..J

·--······--

0 0

0

2 16

22

I 4 I

4 0 0 II

0

0 0

0 3 0

I

0

0 3

0 3 4

6

0 2 0 0

0 2

0 0

0 3 7 0 'El 0

0 4

3 2

10

0 8 94

0

I 1

0

0

9 6 17

8

0 0

3

0 0 7 1 0 2 0 0 0 3 l 0 8 4 0

3 19 0 0 3

0

0 4

8

0

1 0

0 0

0 1 8

10

10 t 0

4 0 0 8 3

4

0 6

0

0

0 4

3

0

0 2

3 I

6

0

1 0 I

2

4

11 8 1 20 0 0

120

4

.Fobru•

March

April

0

2

0 0

0 0

0 2

0 0 0 7

0

14 0 0 I

0 0 0 0

6 3

0 2

6

0 0

1 6

0

2

0

S3

0

11

I

0 7 0

3

6 3

0

0 7 4

0

21 0

3

2al

13

111

1

3

0 23

0 0 0

9 0

6

fonullr)'

ary

8

02

0

bor

02

6

2

Docorn•

4

2 20

112

2

----

1 0

I 1 0

Novambc.r

2' 0 14 0 8

I

5

---

0 I 0 0

7

II

Ar.son...

October

r

6

0

4

17 1 23 0

0 1

I

0 I 2

0 2

0 0 0 10 2

11

7

2

0

19 0 0

June

10 0 0

Total

7

0 I

10 I 4

0 0 6

14

88

6 0 13 0 14 I

23

126

'El 188 2 0

0 0 I

0

2 0

0

0 0

0 9

0

0

0

5

2

0 7

0

3

6

2

1

Gt

0 G 0

0 1 0 0

0 1 0

0 2 0 1

0

0 6 3

0 I

0 6 0 2 26 2 12

0

0

2

6

7 27

36

6 21

~

16

2

20

1 10

23

160

123

0

0

May

I)

0

2

1 2t

3

I

23

7

4 0

16 4 9

4

26

--- 163 --- 128 --- 1111---

22

0

0

4◄

0 42 0

2

0 0

18

0 3

1 61 31 43

18

302

6

1 7 I

19

20 167 12 183

---1.488

1111


\.0

co

Juvenile Offenses Offtt15e$

July

Murder nnd nonncgllgcnt mo11!<111ughlcr _••.. ------ ··--. N~tgcnl mnnsloughtcr ........ Forcl lo n•llL---· ............. Robber:; •. ·-·-·--········-···Aggrovntcd u.ssnull. .. - ••••• ·-· Burglary·---·--·-··-·--·--·-· Larceny: 0 mud lhnft ................ reny lhl!fl__ --····--··-· Aulo lhell ••• ·-··-··--·-·-·--·Other 11SS8ults._•••••• ·-····-

August

6

0 0 0 0 0 7

a

3

I

0 0 0 0

Al'$011 ••

Forgery nnd counlerfC!illng..... Fraud.... ... .. .. . ... Embeulemclll. __. ·- _______ -· ..

~~~~~';':f.~~:~-~~~~~:-~~::: Wenpons; col'T)'lng, possession,

October

Novamber

Dooomber

Jonunry

Fobruory

Morch

April

Moy

0 0 0 0 0

0 I 0 I 0 I

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0

0 6

0 I 0 0 0 I

0 0

0

I

10

I

0

0 2 4 I

I

0

0 0

0 0 2

0 0 0 2

0 0 0 2

0 0 0 2

Sci>t-Omber

0 0 0 0

4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2

3

0 1

8 0

6 0

3 0 0 0 0 0

7 0

0 l I

6 I

I

0 0 0

6

I

I

4

0

1 2 I 10 I 3

0 0

0 0 2 0

2 I 3

0 0 0

0

0 4

0

I

6

8 0

I 3 0 0 0 0 0 I

4

0 0 0

0

0 0 I

0 4

Juno

Toi.al

0

0 0

0

0 I 3

0

0 3 0 I 0 0

I

2 0 3 0 0

0

0

0

0 2

0 0 2

I 2 0 I

2 "8 11

ll 68 37 I

0 I

I

0 24

elO._ •• _ ---------------···Prostitution 11nd conunerclallied vice. .. __·- ___ Sex offcrllK'S._.... Nnn:otlc drug lnws •••• -·-····Onmbling .......... ____________ Offenses VlltllU8 !omlly nod

I

0

I

I

I

0

0

I

0

0

I

0

6

0 I 0 0

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0 2

0

0

0

0

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

I 0 0

7

I

0 0 0

Driving under tho in0uooco... __ Liquor laws___________________ Drunkcnness •••••..• -•-······-Olsorderly contluc:t•••• ---·····

0 0 0 0 2 0 2

0 0 0 0

0

0 0 0 0 3 0 8

0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0

3

6 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 18 12 2

I I 31 2 Ill

6

IOt 32

cbUdren__________________

YUl(r1\IIC)' ____ . ___ .. ---·-··.

____

Curfew nnd loitering ______. ·-·Runnwoy ·····---··-·-·--··-All other olTcnS-OS. -·-· ·-····· Totnl. ••• ·-··-··········

---

33

0 0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0 0

0 0

3

0 4

3

0

7 I

4

0

30

I

0

0

1

6 47

I

0 7 10 0 31

I 0

0 0 0 I 2 0 11 10

0

43

0

0 0 0 4 0 16

8 0 43

0

52

0

14 0

--37

I

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

I

0

0

0 2

3

0

4 0 16

9 2

M

0

---

9 8 7

as ---

0

0

0 6 6

I t)

11 0

40

---

--32

0 I

<l92


Department of Public Works Personnel: 485

The Department of Public Works performs essential public services in the maintenance of public facilities, planning and supervision of public construction, transporting school children, collection and disposal of waste, administration of a housing program for off-island contract employees, building and the maintenance of roads and bridges, and the operation of transportation services for government activities. These functions arc distributed among eight major divisions.

General Administration This section plans, supervises, and coordinates the work of the department. It is also responsible for the rccordi ng of payroll, costs data, and the procurement and warehousing of materials and equipment. Additionally the section provides logistic support to the Board of Engineering and Architectural Examiners, which regulates licensing of architects, engineers, and surveyors.

Engin-eering This division provides engineering services for all other departments of the government, which includes design, cost estimates, preliminary studies, and technical advice in engineering problems. The division has responsibility

Appropriation: $2,876,316

for design and administration of all capital improvement projects whether through private contracts or government forces. Administering the building code of Guam is another function. The total number of building pennits issued this year was 2.142 for an estimated value of construction of $12,356,813 ( an increase of 38.5 percent over fiscal year 1966) . Public B11ilding Maintena,ice The division is responsible for maintenance of all public buildings and government housing. Maintenance work includes structural, plumbing, electrical, refrigeration, and air conditioning. Janitorial services are also provided by this division for the government administration buildings, library, and public works.

Highway This division is responsible for the construction and maintenance of all public roads and village streets. Primary roads jointly utilized by the military are maintained jointly by the government and the military on a 70-pcrccnt - governmcnt/30 - percent - Navy basis. The highway division presently maintains 140 miles of roads and 58 miles of village streets. 99


Housing

This activity adminjsters the housing program for Government of Guam offisland contract employees and other authorized personnel. During the past fiscal year the housing division operated 430 housing units, of which I 71 were government owned, 104 were government controlled, and 155 were leased from private owners. Garbage Collection

This division is responsible for the collection of garbage and trash throughout the civilian community. Tbis includes residential and commercial establishments, s c h o o I s, churches, government offices, government housing areas, and the Guam Memorial Hospital. The service is provided at normal cost to commercial establishments and is free to others. Revenue realized during the year was

$1,677.60. Over 8,000 pickups per week were made. Transportation

This activity provides bus transportatjon to schools and handles the repair and maintenance of automotive and construction equipment for the Government of Guam (excluding equipment operated by the Commercial Port and the Public Utility Agency). A total of 543 different pieces of equipment were maintained and operated by the division, including 102 school buses. Conslruclio,z

This division is responsible for the construction of capital improvement projects. There was a concentrated effort during the fiscal year to rehabilitate the 17 pre-Typhoon Karen schools at an estimated cost of $1.4 million. Additional men for this special project were reassigned from the maintenance djvisjon.

Department of Public Works, Statistical Report, Fiscal Year 1967 I. Public Works Construction Program:

FucaJ uear PROJECT

Pacenl ~mpldt

IIJ67

nilue of con,trudlon

A. Highway:

I. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Dcdedo school accus road ___________ ·----- ___ ·----·-Agat-Santa Rita school access road-------·--·---------Yscngsong-NCS road ______..... _...... ·-·_ .. _ ..... -·. Dcdcdo subdivillion. __ .. ·- .... __--·- ·- ·--····-. __--· Merizo school access road ... __... -· ....... -·-· ... __-·_ Ipao-Tumon loop road·-···----·-·-·-------·-·-···-·Dairy-Leyang road. __ •••• -··-·--·····-······-·-·-•• Tract 85 aCCCS$ road.·---·--------···-·---·-··----···

100 100 100 30 100 70 10 10

203,803

Total_····-·····-··-·······--·-····--·····-···--·-···--

B. Structural: I. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Restoration of museum building •••••••• ·---···--····-· Tumon Senior High School conversion·--·-··-···--···College of Guam Library_. __ ......... ·-··-·.... -·--· College of Guam Fine Arts Building·-···-····-···--·-·· GMH storage building_···-······-······--···----·--Sisters quarters ___ . __·- .. ______·-·_ .... -·--- .... ____. Dog pound_···--···············-·········-··-····-· Agat and Dedc:do librarics_. __ ._·---······-··-········ Education warehouse partitioning and fencing_ . _. __ ..... Administration building alteration •• ··-·······-········ Recreation facilities .. _.. _ ... -· ___................... . Public school rehabilirntion_ ••••.• --·--·----------···· Total.-·····-·--···-·················-·-···-···········

100

SI I, 211 11, 196 2, 719 32,194 73,494 57,999 2,824 12,166

100 100 !)2

90 100 100 100 50 100 100 97 85

7,909 20,770 146,935 157,612 I, 370 25, 199 16,230 47,560 25,790 2,278 I, 158 793,818 I, 246,629


Department of Public Works, Statistical Report, Fiscal Year 1967-Con. 1. Public Works Corutruction Program-Continued

C. Miscellomous: I. Agana boat basin ................................... 2. New Agat drainage ................................. 3. Old Agat drainage .................................. 4. Culvert and guard rail replacement ................... 5. Penitentiary sewer system ....................... 6. Agat Elemcmary School Drainage ..................... 7. "Public Cemetery .................................... 8. CW Junior High Parking Lot ........................ 9. GW Junior High Sewer System ....................... 10. Ocdedojunior High Parking Lot .....................

Total ..................................................... II. Public Construction: Building permits issued ......................... Value of l'Cllidenlial construction ................. Value of misccllancou.s construction .............. Value of commercial/industrial construction ....... Total ........................................

Fucol v•ar 1961 taule of

Percenl

PIIOT&CT

ronmualon

compltte

. . . . _.... _ . . . . .

$16,938 0 764 I, 202 4,002 17,500 9,004 20,894 10, 917 13,485

100 67 67 95 100 100 100 100 100 100 .

. . . .

94,706

2,081 $8,863,037 1,693,882 1,799,894 12,356,813

lOJ


Public Utility Agency of Guam Personnel: 217

The Public Utility Agency of Guam is a self-sustaining agency providing power, water, telephone, and sewer services to the civilian community. The agency purchases all of its power and a portion of its ,vater supply from the Navy. The telephone service is a joint operation of the agency and the avy. Revenue for the fiscal year totalled $4,836,920.46. Operating expenses were $4,971,794.24. The $134,873.78 operating loss was covered by depreciation. Power

The rapid growth in Guam in the past year is indicated by the upsurge in use of electric power. Generating facilities on the island for the coming year will be hardly sufficient to meet the load requirements. New permanent generation, reliable and economical, must be installed within the next few years by either the Govemment of Guam or a wholesale power generating company to meet the demand for power on Guam. Qualified personnel to operate and maintain a modern steam generating plant do not, at present, exist here, due to the long training time required before one is capable of taking the responsibility for the operation of such a system. A minimum of 12-15 years is required for obtaining proper licenses for such a job. Because of this prob102

Operating Expense: $4,971,794.24

!em, it may of necessity be more economical to install equipment for the present that may have a higher fuel cost but which is more reliable, requires less training time, and can be easily overhauled when repairs are necessary. Electric power load growth in the civilian community can be partly attributed to the many new houses being constructed on Guam with built-in facilities for an all-electric home including year-round air conditioning. Older homes are also being converted to allow for greater use of appliances and thus become bigger power consumers. The residential consumers have, over the past year, used 66,199,419 kilowatthours of electriral energy. This represents a growth over the previous year of 25 percent. However, the number of residentiaJ consumers has only increased from 9, I 24 in fiscal year I966 to 9,894 in this year. or approximately 8.34 percent, indicating a marked increase of power requirement in individual homes. Commercial enterprises are increasing and stores are becoming bigger to fill the needs of the growing and more affluent society. The power growth curve reflects these requirements for power and the need for fi,111capital for construction of generating stations well in advance of demand becomes more evident each day. Although the total clecLrical energy consumption used by the commercial


enterprises has yet to reach t~e to~I energy consumption by the rcs1dent1al consumers, the increase of the commercial usage exceeds the increase of the residential consumption by 1,496,875 kilowatt hours. The commercial consumption increased 31.5 percent over the consumption in fiscal year 1966. The entire civilian community used a total of 127,877,808 kilowatt-hours of electrical energy with peak demand of 26,604 kilowatts this year. Ia May the peak demand exceeded the firm power allocation of 26,400 kilowatts by 200 kilowatts. The Power Division, to accommodate the power requirement in fiscal year 1967, constructed 38,07 I circuit feet of high-voltage powerlines, 83,720 circuit feet of low voltage, and installed a total transformer capacity of 4,500 kilovolt-amperes.

Wale,. New sources of water are continually being developed in advance of the new scheduled trunk water lines and reservoirs for above-ground storage. Wells are the principal new sources relied upon to provide the first big increment of water supply. Each new well developed must be capable of producing 200 galJons of water per minute or approximately 250,000 gallons per day year around. Eight new wells have been developed this past year to make available a potential of two million gallons per day in different areas of Guam. With the new wells connected to the water system, production from the wells has doubled from 40 million monthly in the early pa1"tof this fiscal year to 80 million in lauer part. Correspondingly, the amount of water

being purchased from the Navy has gone down from 110 million gallons monthly to 87 mmion. Because the year was exceptionally wet, annual water consumption went up only 6.3 percent, or 9 l ,829,276 gallons over last year's consumption of 1,450,507,265 gallons. Residential users increased consumption by 39,299,896 gallons or 3.8 percent. Commercial enterprises showed an increased consumption of 52,529,380 gallons or 12.5 percent. Surface water from rivers and springs soon will be made the subject of a more thorough study for future economic water sources. Guam has many small water courses that begin near the mountain areas and flow through lush valleys to the lowlands and then to the sea. Some of these rivers, because of the nature of the ground they pass th.rough, become loaded with sediment during the rainy season, and soon would fill up with mud any large reservoir constructed to store the water. However, the largest river on Guam suitable for a water source appears to be quite free from sediment and is presently under study as a water source for the southern areas of the island. Eventually, the individual village water supplies will be linked together in an islandwide water system, with numerous water sources, both surface and underground, ready to meet the needs of the growing population and commercial developments.

Telephone Telephone exchanges on Guam are presently overloaded and the placin.g of calls is frequently delayed. Engineering studies indicate an investment

103


of approximately $2,200,000 is required to bring the system up to the condition acceptable for normal telephone practice. New central office e..xchanges will have to be built in Agat, Tamuning, Talofofo, and Dededo. The Agana and Barrigada exchanges will need double the present capacity. The need for telephone service always has been far behind the number of families requiring power and water in their homes. Now, without any encouragement, the request for phone service has increased considerably in one year and the telephone system is inadequate to meet these demands.

Sewers The first increment of the new Guam central sewer system is almost completed and should be operational in September. It consists mostly of trunk lines, a new outfall line over the reef, and a new pumping station at the Pasco. The areas feeding into the new system will be Agana, Tamuning, Agana Heights and Naval Air Station. The second increment is under contract and construction should start by September. This phase of the development program will include the villages of Dededo, Tamuning, East Agana, and Agana Heigh ts, portion of Mongmong-Maite, and a portion of Ordot.

PUBLIC UTILITY AGENCY OF GUAM, STATISTICAL REPORT, FISCAL YEAR 1967 Power, Water and Telephone Usage Commnrclal

Descrlpt.lon

Rca!dontlol usngc

Ull8g6

Power:

KllowaU•hours sold ...........

···-· .......................

.

:--umber or customer • -·····-······· ··············-···· Amow1L.................................................. Avrrog~ prr CUSlOmermonLhly (lcw•hr.) .................. Wot.er:

. .

Oollons sold .............................................

01, 678,389 66, lllll. 10 96.40 I, 167 SI. 6ill, ITT.711 SI. 717.144. O!I 6. 78 •.~o

.

I, 643. 3S6, Ml 0,487 S820,122.21 17, 797

.

681 $344.866. 62

6,374 Ql),274.30

0.05~ $634,139.02

.

••••••••••••••

1,1()'2

I, 068,086, 601 ,i36 $561, 6i0. 16 10,197

Tnlcphone:

Number or customers•• -···-················ Amount..···-·· ..........................................

127,877,808 10,697

sa.3111,:m.,s

473,360,010 702 $258,662.05 56, 124

.

Number or cust.omers................... _ ................ AmounL. •••••••••••••••• ·-·························-··· AverBge per cu5tomer monthly (guls.)... _ ...............

Total

Cost of Operation

Revenue...

~~\>;:~:••••:·.:: .:::: :: ..: .. ::.·.::.. . Los.,. ....-.-.... -·-..........

Capital improvement

Water

Tolephono

S3, 370, ~7. 97

$749,995. 41

$660,008.95 024.642.82

I, 2:IQ,08{. 18. 2.~MS.02 , 024.85

. ....... -. --

4119, 088.77

2.M,633.87

Sower

Tot41

$47,338. l3 $4, 836. 920. 46 21,018.62 4, 971, 794.24 ~. 724.61 134,873.78 . ...

. - ------

Projects (Not Rehabilitation) Financed from Plant and Equipment Depreciation Fund Power

$434,641.~

104

Power

Waler $382.0llll.211

To!ophone $220.4~.43

Total $1,037,0M.80


U.S. Selective Service System Personnel: 7

Federal Appropriation: $S6,970

The Selective Service System's main function is to procure military man. power for the Armed Forces of the United States. During the fiscal year, the two local boards on Guam delivered 211 registrants for induction. Of the number forwarded, 191 were actually inducted, one was rejected, two had

induction postponed, seven had their induction orders canceled, and 10 en• listed while under orders to report for induction. Since the original delivery, dating back to January 1952, a total of 1,853 have been inducted into the Anny, Navy, and the Marine Corps.

SECTION

II

Report of Availability and Summary of Classification for Guam as of June 30, 1967 Total living classified registrants ............................................. Total living unclassified registrants...........................................

11,117 51

Total living registrants ................................................ Registrations canceled_ ............ _..... __.·--- ____ .. _____ ................ Registrants deceased ___-·--·---·.•......................... ·-··--·--·-·...

11,168

3,660 95

Total all registrations ................................................. Classes I-A and l-A-0-Singlc or married after Aug. 26, 1965................. Classes I-A and I-A-O-Marricd before Aug. 26, 1965....................... 26 Years of age and older with liability extended (single or married) ............ Under 19 years of age (single or married) .................................... Total classes 1-A and l-A-O .........................................

14, 923

671

. . . .

7 25 218

.

921

1-Y-Rcgistrant qualified for military service only in time ofwar on national emer• gcncy ................................................................. . 1-C-Membcrs of the Armed Forces of the United States (inducted) ............ . I-C-Mcmbcrs of the Armed Forces of the United States (enlisted or commissioned and on extended active duty). ___ ................... __................... . 1-0-Qualificd member of reserve component or student taking military training, including ROTC and accepted aviation cadet applicant. ....... _......... _ ... . 1-S-Statutory deferment- high school. ............ __... _ .... _._ .......... -·. 1-S-Statutory deferment-college ............. _. ____ .. _. ____ ._ .......... -- . U-A- Occupational deferment other than agriculture and student._ .. ___._. __.. . 11-A-Apprcniicc .... _ -·-- ----· ........ __. _ .............................. . I [-S-Student dcfennent ...... __.............. ·-·· ··-·-- ........ _ ·-·--- ... . 111-J\- Extreme hardship deferment or registrant with a child or children ....... . lV-A-Reg~trant with sufficient prior active service or who is a sole surviving son. IV-B-Offit1al deferred by law ....... ·---·-_ ........... _.................. . IV-C-Alicn not currently Hable for military service ......................... . I V-0- Minister of religion or divinity student ... _._ .. ___... __............... . IV-F-Rc~strnnt not qualified fo~ a~}'. military ;!Crvice•• -:·······-······---·-··V-A- Registrant over the age of hab11ity for mlhtary service .. _ .. _. __..... _ .. _..

535 377 2,024 14 221 I 24

73

165 569 646

2 20 24 I, 693

3,808

105


Urban Renewal Authority Personnel: 10

Government of Guam Advance: $18.927

The Guam Housing and Urban of Housing and Urban Development Renewal Authority was created by the Administration. Sinajana was apSixth Guam Legislature in 1962 in the proved on March 13, 1967, and Vona wake of Typhoon Karen. The authorwas approved June 30, 1967. ity subsequently drew up urban renewal The Sinajana project has been estiprojects for the hard-hit villages of mated to cost $12,764,231, of which Vona and Sinajana. However these the Federal share is $9,890,798. The projects were twice voted down by the Vona project has been estimated to cost Eighth Guam Legislature. The Gov- $4,345,675, of which the Federal share ernor then permitted the authority to is $3,476,540. continue operations with a reduced The authority, with the assistance of staff for an indefinite period. technicians of the Renewal Assistance Urban renewal was a major issue Office, Department of Housing and in the general election of November Urban Development, completed prep1966, and then-minority Democratic aration of the application for loan and Party, which supported urban renewal, grant contract, part I, for Sinajana. took all 21 seats in the unicameral Vona will be prepared for submission house. In view of the election results and approval by the legislature in the the authority again submitted survey and planning applications for the same January of 1968. urban renewal areas in Vona and Sinajana. Public Housing Due to the lapse of time since the The authority executed an annual disaster, the applications were submitted under section 1l0C of the Hous- contribution contract in March with ing Act of 1949, as amended, instead the Federal Government amounting to of Section III, Diaster. $5,697,936 for the construction of 250 All the factors necessitating urban low-rent housing units to be located on renewal treatment still remain in the six scattered sites throughout the area. Damage and problems wrought inctropolitan area of the territory. Conby the disastrous typhoon still exist, struction of these low-rent housing and, with the passage of time, the de- units will be on land donated by the gree of deterioration in the area is Government of Guam. Lawrence C. becoming worse. Johnsrud & Associates has been seOn January 25, 1967, the authority lected from among 12 architects to profiled survey and planning applications vide the planning and design of the for both villages with the Department 250 units. 106


Fina,1cial StaJemenl The sum of $18,927 was advanced in February by the Government of Guam to cover the cost of administration and planning for low-rent housing and the preparation of survey and planning application for Sinajana and Vona urban renewal programs until such time as Federal funds become available. Since then, $93,850 was advanced by the Housing Assistance Office, Department of Housing and Urban Development, to cover the cost

of surveys and planning of the 250 lowrent housing project, and $97,875 was advanced by the Renewal Assistance Office, Department of Housing and Urban Development, to cover the cost of survey and planning for the Sinajana urban renewal project. The total urban renewal survey and planning expenditures and contract commitments to the end of the fiscal year: Payroll, $11,287; operations, $9,273; fumiturc, $1,300; contractual services, $363. This totals $22,223.

107


Alcoholic Beverage Control Board The Alcoholic Beverage Control Board is authorized to license the importation, manufacture, and sale of alcoholic beverages, and also has the power to suspend, revoke, or reinstate such licenses. It makes regulations and controls the number of licenses within a municipality as it deems consistent with the public interest. The board is made up of five members appointed by the Governor with the consent of the legislature.

108

A total of 246 licensed establishments were in operation during the fiscalyear. Thirty-seven new licenses were issued. Fees for continuation of licenses totaled $57,450 and fees for new licenses totaled $4,962.50. Other charges boosted total revenue to $67,338.50. There were 88 bartenders and 162 waitresses registered to work in general on-sale liquor establishments. Twenty-three violation reports were presented to the board. Letters of warning were issued in each case.


Committee on Children and Youth Appropriation: $100,000

The Governor's Committee on Children and Youth was set up to establish various programs for young people and to help combat juvenile delinquency. The committee is composed of nine members appotnted by the Governor. The chairman is the chief judge of the Island Court. In the 3 years since it was established the committee has fostered the creation or youth dubs in the various villages and continues to work closely with the clubs' All-Island Youth Association. One or its major efforts during the

fiscal year was the summer training program for high school students. It also lent support to the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts and played a role in senior and junior nigh school track and field meets, the Girls' Play Day, and the All-Island Youth Track and Field Meet. The committee provided the major portion of the funds needed to send Guam's contigent to the second South Pacific Games in New Caledonia. Thjs was the first time Guam was represented in the South Pacific Games.

109


Cockpit License Board The Cockpit License Board is composed of three members appointed by the Governor with the consent of the legislature. The board controls alJ aspects of the operation of cockpits on the island. Seven cockpits were in operation during the fiscal year-in the villages of Agat, Asan, Dededo, Merizo, Yigo, and Vona. Government revenue for

110

the year totaled $13,340.70. Trus was made up of $10,124.05 in admission tax, $2,638.42 in gross receipts tax, $552.23 in cockpit license fees, and $26 in referees' license fees. The board heard three appeals of decisions by referees. In each case the board ruled that the cockfight in question was a draw.


Board of Engineering and Architectural Examiners The board consists of the director of public works, ex-officio, as chairman, and three members-an architect, an engineer, and an engineer-surveyorappointed by the Governor. The board is a member of the National Council of State Boards of Engineering Examiners and the 1ational Council of Architectural Registration Boards. The Board makes full use of the services provided by both councils, including the use of national standard examinations and grading services. Land surveyor examinations are prepared and graded by the board itself.

During the year, registration was granted to 12 engineers, three architects, and three land surveyors. o registrations were denied. There were no violations reported. Guam now has a roster of 57 engineers (plus three engineers-in-training), LOland surveyors, and nine architects authorized to practice in Guam. The majority in each category arc not actual residents of Guam. The Department of Public Works provided a budget of $500 for the board. Revenue from fees totaled $899. Expenditures came to $721.68.

111


Board of Equalization The Board of Equalization is composed of five members appointed by the Governor with the consent of the legislature. The board held 46 meetings to hear a record number of 684 protests concerning the 1966 real properly tax roll. It found I04 to be without cause for change and adjusted 580, lowering 380, increasing 200.

112

The overall result was as follows: The appraised value of real property units was lowered from $101,356,030 to $97,464,600. The assessed value was lowered from $35,474,610 to $34,112,610. The 1966 tax roll assessment was c-ertified at $1,023,378.30 instead of Sl,064,238.30-a reduction of $40,860.


Recreation Commission Pe.rsoonel: 4

The Recreation Commission is charged with the responsibility of organizing and promoting year-round recreational activities for the residents of Guam. During the fiscal year various sports activities were programed with the aid of volunteer managers and coaches from districts around the island. Equipment was supplied by the government.

Appropriation: $34,147

The main sports were softball, basketball, tennis, and volleyball. In all, a total of 154 teams were organized, with 2,766 individual players participating. Military personnel took part in most of these activities. The commission also maintained various fields for Little League baseball and refurbished a number of school fields.

113


Territorial Parole Board The Territorial Parole Board is composed of five members appointed by the Governor with the consent of the legislature. Its activities for the fiscal year included: 18

Parole applications received. Paroles granted. Paroles denied Applieatiom pending .. Violation of parole. . . . . Certificates of Discharge issued

7 11

0 3 6

l l4 U.S. GOVOINMENT PRIKllNG Ofl'ICE: 19158 0--278--i!Sl


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