1966 Annual Report: The Governor of Guam to the Secretary of the Interior

Page 1

GUAM

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY,

AmericainAsia

AturidadlnadilantonlkunumihanGuahan

THE GOVERNOR OF

GUAM

TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR

1966 ANNUAL REPORT

Publication materials provided by the Guam Economic Development Authority (GEDA)





1966 ANNUAL REPORT THE GOVERNOR

OF

GUAM TO THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR

For sale by the Superintendent or Documents, U.S. Oovernment Printing Omro WBShlnRton,D.C., 20402• Prloo 60 cents


Contents Pagi

In~oduction_______________________________________________ 1 General Information _________________ ---- ______-···---------

5

JudiciarY--------------·-------····--------·-·------·-----Legislature__________ ··········-·-----------------·-·------·

8

DEPARTMENTS

AND AGENCIES

Agciculture••• -·-----·------···-------------·-·---------Civil Defense------------------·-------------------·--·--College of Guam____·----------· _____-- ---- -- ·- _.. - -- -- - - . CommcrcC----··---------------------------------------·· Commercial Port ________. _____·--_-·_··--- _______- -- -- ___ Commissioners.___. ______________ . - - - _... _..... -. - -- - -- - Economic Development Authority _____-- -·-- ·- ··- _. __-- . ___ Educ~tion-----------·---··-··-·------------·-----·--·--· Employment Service.. _.·- ___··--·-·-··-·--·--··-- -- - . - - Finance••••••••• ·--··------·--·--··------··---·-··----·· Hospital•• ----·--····---··--·--·-···-···-········-····-·· Housing Corporation...... _._._. _____. ______.. _..... - . __.. Labor and Personnel Retirement Division.------··----·---··· Land Manogemcnt.-·-··-··-······-·-·--·---·-----·--·--·Law___________ ····--·-·---·--·---····--·-··-----·-···-·LlbrarY------·--------·----·--·---·--··-·---·-·--·-·---·Passport Office.______.......... __. ________-·- ____. - .. --·. Public Health and Welfare___··---------------------------Public SofctY----···-·-···---·-·-··---------------···---·Public Utility ___·-- .... __.................. __._ .. -- _·-- -Public Works__. ______.·----··---... __·-·. __.. ----·--·-Selective Service____. __. _____. __________.... __·- __-- ·---.. BoA.RDs ANDCor.ru1ssr0Ns Boxing Commission.. _____. __. __________.... __.--· -- . ... . . Parole Board.---··---------···-··---·--··-·--·--·---···-Recreation Commission____..... _...... - .................. Workmen's Compensation____·---_________________________ Engineering and Architectural Examiners. __----···-- - - ..... Jt

24

31 72

43 49

63 71 76 82 97 102

112 120

122 131

134 139 141

142 158 163 166 169 160 171 172

124 173


1966 Annual Report of the Governor of Guam MANUEL

F. L.

GuERRERo,

Governor

INTRODUCTION Guam's pace of progress quickened in n yea1·in which economic and social gains shared the spotlight with Federal nction to lncrense territorial autonomy. Gross roceipts again reached n new high; u total of $130 mlll!on was estlmnted for the fiscal year. A.s in the past 2 yen.rs, construction under the vnst Guam Rehnbllltatlon Program was n major factor in the !slancl's <le,elopment nnd In its economic henlth. Io private construction, 1,541 build• Ing permits were issued for nn estimated value of construction of $0,279,233, nu increase of 4.9 percent over fiscal 1905. Agriculturnl production incrensecl more thnu 100 percent over the Inst fiscal year. One of the year's most significant developments wns the completion of n com1wehensh·e Overall Economic Development Plnu for Guam. This project wns financed under the Relml)l.litntlon Act, ns a joint responsibility of the Secretary of the Jnte.l'ior nncl the Governor of Guam. TJ1e l)asic study was mnde by the Planning Researcl, Corporation of Los Angeles. Its three-pnrt final report, containing sweeping recommendations for i,~ederai,local, nnd private action to speed economic growth of the territory, was forwarded to the President and the Congress. The Secretary of the Interior and the Governor took steps· to implement recommcmlations of the report, and were to 1·eview progress on these recommendations next year. Government of Guam steps Included tho hil'l11gof nn Assistant for Economic Development In the Governor'!! office,nncl a 1·equest for local npproprintlon to estnb· llsh n mnlnlnnd office to tllsseml.nate In·

formntion about, und to promote, economic development of the territory. The Planning Research Corporation's report included recommendations that the Fede1·01Government (1) approve the estal)llsl1ment of national parks on Guam; (2) expand commercial nil" serrJce which is now uoth limited und cxpe.nsh-e; (8) increase the duty-free exemption for tourists to $4-00; ( 4) exempt Guam from constwlse shipping laws; (5) estnblish 1111 ugency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Guam for use of bot11Gurun nud tho trust terl'ltory; (0) through U1e Department of Labor nucl other agencies, nld Gunm In developIng basic comme1·ce,uusiness. lnbor, and cost-of-living statistics. Since the Economic Development Plan was crentcd 011 di.rectlon of tho U.S. Congress, the Gorernor of Guam recommends thnt puulic henrings on the Planning Research Corporntion report be held by the vroper committees of both houses of the U.S. Congress in its 1907 session. Increased air service to Guam took 011 further emphasis with the opening l)y the Civil Aeronautics Board of n sweeping 1·e,-iewof air service throughout the Pacific. Through Washington counsel, Guam entered this cnse with n basic uppeal for increased air service to and from the islnnd to mnlnland nncl other Pncltlc .nrens. Guom's J)Ositlon in the Pnciflcsoruc G,000 miles from the mainlonclmokcs it rely heavily on air scr,·lcc, and nt present It ii: served by only one commercin-1airline. In the U.S. Congress there was action to Increase Guam's uutonomy, upon strong Tecommendation of the Depart-

1


111entof the Interior. The House of Represen tativcs passed without clissent u bill to provide for uu electh•e Governor of Gnum, nml n mensurc to nllow redistrictiug for locul legislatiYe sents, which are now filled by election nt large of all 21 mcmuers of Gtmm'i; unicarnernl legislature. Both meusures we1·e nwniting Senate llllI)rornl ut close of the fiscal rear. Congress n1111ro,·ed u wcnsure p1·oviding that salaries of Iocn.l leglslotors lie paltl from local funds. Heretofore. legislntiyc salaries hnd been r,aid from Federal approprla tlons. Guam continued to heneflt frnm funds and nctiYities connected with the Guam Rellnbllitntion P1·ogrn111to restore dnmnge wrought by Typhoon Kni·en !11 1962. Total projects completed cost $17,818,409. The Federal disaster aid enclell 011 .June 30, 1000, when the disaster period curue to nu eml. All of the 07 project~ covering repnfr 01· rebuilding of fncilities, d11m11geclor clestroyctl, were completed by that dnte. Seventy-seven project.,;; were completed in 196a. In fiscal 1900, the renrn111ing 20 projects were finished, Including construction of n Rehabilitation Center,

Exceptloonl Oblldren's School, Education Warehouse, Dededo Public Safety and Public Health facilities, rcstoratiou of Depnrtmcnt of Agriculture fencing and u brooder house, repair::; to Lbe 110wer and tclephoue systems, 11nd acquisition of equipweut for 1ml>lic schools, public snfety, pulJlic health, and hospital facilities. Under the Rehabilltntlon A.<:tof 1963 (Pul>llc Law 88-170), 18 projects were completed, some were still nuder co11structio11 nt. Jnne 30. :ind ndditional in·ojects were 1111thorizedIJy lhe U.S. Congress. The completed projects included George Washington Scnio1· High School (with exception of gymnasium), George Washington Junior High School, Barrlgadn Elementary School, Ordot-Chalau Pago Elcmentru·y School, Talofofo Elementnry School. Dedcdo Junio1· High School, Agat-Santn Ritn Elementary School, Dedcclo Elementary School, :\Ieri7,0 Nlcmcntnry School. trade and technical school, public works buildings, public utilities builclings, procuTewent n.ncl supply warehouse, peuitentlru·y, Economic De,·elopment Pinn, Islaudwide Water Pinn, contribution to Pitl p0werpla.nt.

New Ge~rge Washington High School, shown he.re with construction nearly compl~te, opened m the fall of 1966, thereby relieving Guam's only other high school plant of the double-session carried on there since Typhoon Karen, in November 1962 destroyed many school facilities. •

2


Pending projects are ns follows: Rchabllllntlon allotment

Percent ccmpleto, Juno 30,

ComploLlon tluLo

1900

CoUucol,llm1ry butt<llng........................•••........... College Fino Arts bullcJlng....................................

.

$5~,000 436,000

56 70

Sewer system-Control

.

3,137,600

48

(pnrl)._ ...............................

Air tcrmlnol ••••••••• -•······-

·-·························-· De<lctlo•'fumon woter wolls••••••• -················-·········· College sclonoobutte.ling..................................... _ Agonu. Croctlonallots. . .. . . ................................. . Juvenllo lnSIILUtlon........................................... . l'ottuncrclnl port {tst lncromont) ••• -·······-·············••·•• Watcrllna replnca£ncnl"5 ...............•.•....... ····-·· ...... . Power substation ............................................ . 1'umon Junlor•sonlor hl~h school, conversion ................... .

Addltlonnl lll'Ojcds nuthorlzccl hy the TT.•. Congress to be conf<trnctecl In !!seal 1007 wet·e : Dedcdo school extension___ Yigo elcmcntury schooL ___ 8ewer system (2d incre• mcnt) ---------------Water 1>1·ojccts __________

$38.i, 000

1,110,000 2, 886, 700 1, 121, 300

During the llscnl yenr, the Emergcnc~· )luuugement Resources Committee, with a wembN· of the Governor's staff acting n:-1 E111c1·gcncrPlanning Director. was torwulntlng n plttu for the mnnngement of the l!COUOlllYof Gnum iu the event of n nuclear uttuck. This work wns carried ou unde1· 11 contract with the Office of Bmergcncy Plnuning, Office of tlie P1·esldent. At year's end, this plnn bnd t1een practlcnlly completed nnu flunl Op• 11r0Yol was expected early in 11::lCnl1067. .\ brontlly bnSL'<.l 13-membet· COllllllll· ulb• Action Agency. known ns the Ecouomlc OPJJortunity C-Ommission. wns estol,Ui,hed lO <lcffeJo11,coorcllnnte, nn<l illlJJle111entlhc ,vn r -\gllinst Poverty pro. grum in Guum. ll'il'St umong the projects a11proved by the Office of F.conom.lc011portuult~• was n t>tcscbool 1n·ogrnm (TTenclStnrt) for the ;;nmmer of 196.5. The amount of Federal gr1111tt·ccei\'ecl 11nde1·thl~ program wns $105.CIGT.l~mollecl in the progrnm were 1.120 chil<lre11 from low-Income families . .\ l•yeiu· Program D!'veJ01>meut Com• i►<ment wn~ nppro,·r<l on Septeml>er 100;:i 1111clerthe Conununltr Action Progrum,

U0,000 9'9,000 1>"25,000 660,000 83,000 f,800,000 236,000

li5,000 226,000

Juno 30, 1007.

Do. Do. 86 Nov .15, 1900. 88 J1111.16, lOOi. 5

SCpt. I, 190i.

5

Jw1c 30, tll6K. Dec. 28, 1000.

6

January 1068.

19

Ml Jan. 15, 1967. 5

Sept, 15, 1907.

tl8 July 31, 1000.

11111.l sa2,aau was allocutell fo1· Lite 111·ojcct. Operation lletlicnre Alert 111·ogrnmwns also fnncled in Jt'ebruru·y 1006, to help Ute eldel'ly 1·eglste1· for Metllcul'c uenelit~. '.l'wo hundred nnd fort;v·clght persons wei·e enrolled. Other programs sup1101·tedu11de1·the Economic Opportnnlty Act, nnd Fedc1·nl fundi; fol' them nre: Upwanl Bound ( to tench 100 }lrecollege stmlents), *111,007; 1966 summer Head $ta1·t, $105,667; Xcigltborhood Yontlt Corps, $87,400. A.ppticutlons pending 1u·e fol': Small Business Dc,·oJopment Centel', $21,005; Homemaker Service, $03,008; Pilot Re• wetllul Rentling, $20,088.lfi: Cotl(lt1ct nncl Acltninistrntion, $35,050. .-uuong the yenr's other blghUgbts were these: -The Go,·erno1· uud two ruen1bc1-sof Lile Guam Leglslntul'e ,·lsited the l'hillp• J)ines, Bong Koug, .Jn11uu,and Taiwan in au economic mission to altrnct new lm·cstors to Guorn. -The Gun.m Economic Development Authority 1111shed ahencl in Its lll'Ob'Tlllll to e:-..l)nnd the territory's commerce. Seven firms were grouted GEDA certlllcn.tes for tux benefits, and. r, watch nssem• bly firms employing 149 workers were In opel'ntlon during the year. 'L'he GEDA nlso sponsored n Guam display nt tht.' Son Frnncisco World Trncle Jt'nir. tl1e llrst ,mc·h representation for the territory. -Ground wns l>l'oken on Gunm's t,enu• I iful Tumon Bn~• for n 21>0-roomGmuu

3


Construction in progress at Guam's new airport terminal, scheduled for opening in January 1977. Saucer-shaped concrete domes cover a bree:.i:ewaybecween arrival and departure buildings. New terminal will replace a quonset hut structure used for many years as civilian airport facility. Hilt.o11 Hotel which will cost nearly $5 lllllllou; plnm< for auotlwr hotel costing sorue ~ ruillio11 were announced ns a Joint venture of intcrconUncntnl hotels uud locnl entrepreneurs. -Pan American ·world Ail'wuys UII· 110\lllceclits intention to begin direct senic:c from Gun.m to ,Jnpnn in lute 1966, and lo Australians soon ns tho Trnns-Paciflc Route case, noted n!Jo,·e, Is resoh·e<l. -A 10-)·eiu· cont.rnct with wo.ter develmeut speciaUsts wns signed by the J.:Overnmeut of Gunm t-0 nssure de,·etor>· ment of water resources nncl to reduce clependence on military owned water sup11lles. Concurrently, one of the Island~ clriest seasons In mnny years eliminated the ri\'er water source for Yono Villngc. und 11ecesslt11tedan cmergeucy airUft of I1ipe to Guum front the ma.inland. A temI1orill'Y Liue was lni<l to the ,·illage and will serrn the nrea from itIterlor wells un111n permnneut line is installed In 1907. -A uew $1.u million nirport terminal. lhe first ciYlllan nir facility on Guam, was nearly completecl and schednle<l for opening in XO\·ember 1906. -,\. Guam link in the British Commonwealth cable system to connect the Island with Australia. Singapore. and Hong

4

Kong wus to go Into overntlou August 1. 1066. A l>eautifully designed terminal ::;tratJonfor the A.ustrnllnu OYersens Telecommun.katlous Comm! slou ruul housin~ for riermnnent stair was completed. A. ~ntiounl Pnrk Set·vicc sun·ey ten111 l'ecommende<l tile crentlon of two mnjot· nntlonal park projects 011 Guam: o Notional Seashore an<l a. 'ntlonul Historical Pllrk lnterJ>l'etlng World Wnr 11 In tlle Pacific. wit11 empbnsis on Gunm's role in the wnr. The Department of tJ1eInterior took action to pursue the reconnnendntions. -A mustei· phw for the islnml wus tOlllJlleted l.)y the goverume11t'R Depart• ment of Laud Management. which also spearheaded plans for recreation nreo <le,·elopment. -All Iutcrlm te1·rito1·inl plllll callecl "Gunlmn Sagan Miungof Sngan Dcscanso" was completed nnd n contract for a. flnnl plan was entered into with a plaui1Ig firm. to l>eflunuced one-half IJy local funds nn<I one-hlllf hr Jt~e<leralfunds under UIc Lnud nncl Water Conserrntion Act. The first two projects under tllls plan ore a 1mbllc swimming pool and de\'elopment of Tnlo· fofo Bny n;; n ;;urflng orea. Signiflcn.nt contributions to the llrst 1>roject by the


Gunm Women's OlulJ and the Fillplno Ladles Association nlcled mnterla.lly In getting It uuderwny. ,The lJnlance for l>oth projects wlll lJe funcled one-half Locn11Y nnd one-half w Federal funds. -The government of Gunm moved to make land n ,n llalJle for purchnse, to fnmllle:; who now owu no lnnd. In the )Inlojloj nren on Gunm's southern rim. -A full-time socinl Security office was estftblished on Guam; the Medicare program rollecl nbeud \\·Ith benefits made arniln,t,1lefor some 1.200 persons eligible on Guam. to Guam's war -Plans for a 111011ument (lentl J>rOCeecled\\'Ith approml of archl· tect's sketches for a memorial by the Amerl<:an Battle :\[onnments Commis,.1011. :\Ieauwhile, Ilrlvnte parties 011 Gnam au11oun<:edtllans in conjunctfo11 \\"Ith .Japanese citizens to establish a memorial on Gunm to Japanese war dead. -ltor thP tlrst time, partlclr,ation of <;uam's youth in the South ruclflc Games "·a:s nssured. with a ~5,000 gran.t Jlrom the uo,·eruor's Committee on Children 1tncl Youth. nnd n community 1>roject by the Juuior Chnm~r of Commerce to 1·:1i:se$2i5.000more. -Flr~t steps were 111>1>1·0,·e<l toward n i:;o-uult pnblle lwm,lng cle,·elopment on C:unm. -Tbe go,·ernment of Guaru 1,rotested an lncrense In !reight rates by Pacific 1''>lr F-n t Line Jue .. the prime shipping lint?' ;;en'ing 011nm. noel hired Wnshingl 011 counsel to represent Urn territory in proee,edlngs before the Federal l\farltlme Cmnmlsslon. -Locnl legl:;hltlon mncle Guam's famed ft-nit hat (Pteropus mnrinnns) nn<l wild pig protected game nnimnls, nncl Gunm's l)epilrtment of Agriculture nl<lecl the ;.:-utue-l,111-r<'n Bonin Isl-nncl~ l>r sWpplng two roung deer. npproprlntely named Ad11m 11 nd E1·e, for l1opecl-for restocking nf Lho deer popnlntion tbere. -Gunm offlcinl'l mnde n short visit to :\fexico City to recrhre historic materials

on the territory from the :\Ie.·dcan National ArchiYes. -l"outh nncl adults in the territory held sllent clemonstn1t1ons In SllllPort of the Nation's effort In Vietnam, nncl n blood clrlrn for Vietnam l>attle wounded clrew so many donors tltat many bad to be tumecl away for lnck of fncllltles. -~!embers of the ti.S. Congress mnde Yisits to Guam. They included U.S. Rep• resentatives Roy Tnylor. Rogers Morton, Charlotte Reid, ~e.iman Oraley, Richard Whlte nnd Commissioner Santiago Polnnco•Abreu of Puerto Rico. -Under Secretnry of the Interior John A. UarYer, Jr., recelYed the first honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from the Col· lege of Gunm nt 1966 graduation exercises nt which he defo,ered tl1e commencement address. Among the year's <llsappolntments "'ere the tempara1•y loss of nccreditaUon for Guam's two high schools, nnd the rejection l>r the Eighth Gunm Legislature of url>nn re11ewnl plans for the vllln~e,1ot Yom1and Si11ajtu1a. Iu ndd1tlon, the Honse of Representn· Uves of the Congress of the Unlted States on October 21. 1065, passecl H.R. 8436 which would remoYe wa,tclles assembled lu Gunw from the <t:nrlf'fJlreference pro,·lded in Genernl Headnote 3(a), TSUS. Thls would eft'ectively ellmlnate the bud· tling watch lndustr~· of the territory. The measure wns pending before tire U.S. Senate at the end of the fiscal yeat'. The gove111ment moved forcefnlly to c.-orrect educational problems with the cxpeotntlon rhnt high sc.llool accreditation would ue renewed for the 1966-67 :;chool rear, ,,.hen a $3.2 mllllon new high $CbOOlfacility wlll opeu. Uroan renewal plans, for which some *16 million would hnve l>eenmade nvnil• able from Fetleral agencies nnd under Guam Rehnbllltation Act. were discontinued 11lltertho adverse action by the local Jeglslntnre.

GENERAL INFORMATION Guuw, the largest island in the -westP.i1cit1cOcC'lln l>etween Bn.waii and the Ph111Pillnes.\\'USdlscoveretl 'by Ferd'!·

l'tn

nnn<l Magellan in 1621. It remained tmder the Spaulsh Ong lUltll It was ceded to th{' United Stntes ll)• the Trenty of

5


Paris in 1898, following the Spanish· .\m<>ricon \Y6r, Gunm was placed under 1"110 uclmlnlstrntlon of the U.S. :\"'nvy. Ou December 10. 1941. nt thr ontset of World War II, the island was occupied by th~ .Japanese. On July 21. 1944, American forces Jnuded and reoccupied the island. Since that date. the story of Gnnm has ooen one ot Teconstmctlon llll(l rehlliblll· tatlon. .\ new frontier opened for Guam with the I nceptlon of tho ch•il goYet'llment ill l!);j(). Following the disaster of Typhoon Karen in 1062, Congress passed the Guam Rt>Mbllltntlon Act. nnd nlloeatcd $40 million to rehnbllitnte public facilities. build new ones. nnd for other purposes. '£Ws ()rogram hns 11trendy resulted ln many new schools nnd other pnblic facilities. Gunm Is nn orgnnlzed but 11nln'CorJ1orated territory of -the United Stn,tes. Tt is n tropicn1 island, tbe most popuiom: nnd tbo southernmost of tbe western Pacific islands known ftS lhe :Un.rl111ins. It is 30 miles long und rouges from 4 miles nt Its unrrowest J)()lnt -to 81/2miles ,nt its broadest. couroinlng an area of 200 squflrc miles. It lies 13° nbo'l'e the Equator; 1,300 miles from Yokohama, Jnpan: 1,uOO miles southeast. of :\lanlla, Philippines; nud 0,000 1i1iles southwest of Sau Francisco, Call!. Its climate is warm and bu.mid. Tem1>Cratnrcs l'nngc Crom 70° •to oo•,with a menn nnnunl teu1vorature of 81°. Tradewinds cool the island during the dry season, December through April. )lay and .Tune nro the hottest montrbs. and most of the min falls from July to September. with nu 11,·c1·nge.,·cu1'1~•precipitation of S.5to 100 inches. The uortbeni huU or the Island Is fl high rolling plain reucblng 400 feet nbo'l'c the occnn, with steep clilTs nbrnptly fonning .U1c·coustllue. The ccntrul portion contni11l11gAgana, the cnpltnl. !,: nut to the ,sea, hut low hills take form; lo Lile south, rongh monn• tains rh<C'from iOO to 1.33<1fcot nbo,·a >'en level. The highest pcnk is Monnl Lnmlam. Gunm l11 n volcanic lglnnd. Jugt to

6

the south are located two of the deepest parts of any ocean, Challenger Dee1>and Ne1·0Deep. cnch G miles lo t.he ocenu bed. The terrltor~, is ndmlnistered under thP Organic ~ct of Guam, 1050, ns amended, which pro,·ltl~ legislative local nutonomy. Guam's rclal1011sblp with the U.S. Government comes 11ntlc1·the general supen·isiou of the Deportment of the Interior. Guarnani!lns nre clt11.e11s of th<' United Srotas, but those who reside In Gnnm do not bn,·e tho right to vote lt1 U.S. elections and ha\'e no reprci:entation In the U.S. Congre.ss. Ju 1005, howe,·er, Guam elected, under locll1 leglslntlon, n representath-o to Woshiugtou who lrns established nn oflice 111 ·wnsblngton, D.C., nnd sc1·res n linlsou and lnformntion function betwceu the Guam J,<>glslaturc und the U.S. Congress. '£he present GurunUJJh111s nre u llllxturc or natiTo Chamorro stock with dominant outside !'trnlns and urc wostly Roman Catholic in rcllgiou. Although English Is the official langauge, the Chumorro Ill· nlect is stUI widely used. The local go,,ernment consists of the executi\'e, leglslath·e, nnd jmlicinl branches. A clvlllru1 Governor bends thr exccuth'e brunch. Ho Is UJlI)Ointcd by the President of the United Stntes, with the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate, to hold office for 4 years nnd until his sac• eesso1·Is UJ)lJOlnte(lnn<l qunllfied. The Go\'eruor Is the cWe! executh·e !lnd ndminlstrator of the ntrnlrl' of the J?O,·ernment of Gnnm. Ho Is ns.~istecl by tho Scc1·elu1·y of Ounm who Is also nppointecl by the President for n .J-ycar term. Tlle Secretflry's positlou ls simllnr to the JlOsitiou in othc1· jurls1llcH011s or Secretary of Sroto or Lieutenant Go,·crnor. In the ul.Js011cc of tho Oo'l'ernor from the island, tlic Secretn ry hns powers of acting GO\'emor. ruder the Go,·cnior urc 10 dc1mrtmcnt" whose directors be oppoints with tho n.d,·lce and COUf:Cllt of the 011nm Leglslntlll'P. Aiding tho Go,·crnor nnll these department heads are several ndmlnlstratl'l'e agencies.


A 21-wemt,er uulcnmernl lcglslnturc, enrollment of nuout ~3,000 u1 196,;, the uieuulull.r elected nt large, Is empowerell lsh111cl,m1n>0rts u 4-ycnr college, 11 trade to 11tH1s luws ou locnl matters, Including 1111d technical ;;cllool, 11,·ocutlouul school t~ation ond a1mroprlutions for the fiscal for the hundlcnpped. nllll u sc.bool tor the operotion of tile ;;o,·ernnu:mt. returded. Guam )Iewowlal Hospital pro,·ltles ex• Till' District Court of Gnum Is prctcnsl\'e services to the clvlllau J>0pulusldecl over hy II jncl~e n1>110iutedt,y tho tlo11au() the Department of Puullc Health 1'1·esldent. with rhl' nd,·ice aud consent of and Welfare maintains 14 ,·lllnge health the r.s. Senate. to holtl office for II term center::1. of 8 years um! until bis successor Is Prlnclpu1 im()Orts to Gurun. primarily chosen nnd ,1utlllfle<l. nnless sooner removell t,y the l'a·cstaent for cause. trow the U.S. mnlnlnnd, luclmlc ·roods, \'Chicles, petroleum J>rotlucts. construcThe District Court of Guam bas jurlstion su1>1>lles.tWtl alcoholic be,·crngcs. rlictlon In all cn!'.esorlslng under tlle laws 'l'be prluclJMll export Is scrap ruetnl. Tbe of Guom. Its cleclslons may he nppealed comwerclnl port occupies 1u1urcu of 24.;; to higher U.S. conrt1:. 11cres on A1)1·a Hn1·bor with wntcrft-onl 0110111contains muuy coutrusu;. ,\IodCncllltie: to berth tour cargo ,·essels, or n cru buildings, flue highways. bus.r store:!, totnl or 2,400 linear feet of frontage for elect rlrlty. rnnnlug water. sewer systems, deepwnter dockJng and 110,400 squn1·c t ht>ntcrs. scrl"ico stations. llllll other modern fncllltles nnd c<m,·euiences arc to be feet of wtu-ebouse s1Jacc. Guam is n port for call for major shipfo1111clIn most pluce1:. But It Is uot u1111lng llue::1. Americnu President, Lines 1•0111monto see n 1,cr::;011riding slow!~· scr\'es the Island with two Yessels per nloni: nlong the cou11t1·.rrmtbs ou a carumonth nnd Paclfic Far Enst Line:,; with l.1110. th<' Guama11l11nbeast of burdeu. In 1111 average of four. The Pncl1lc ~nvlgnthe ,·lllnges, the homes are predomlnnutly tlon System operntes Yessels bctw0<!11 frnml' buildings with O[>enwiuclows and high porche.«. With the co11ti1111al conGuam and tlle west coast as well ns to stmctlon of modern housing, the t>OPU- Fnr East oorts. Pan American World Airways serves Guam with four eastlntccl orens nre rnpldly assmulug the upP<'nrnnce or modern moinlnllll co1111111111l-bound and four westbound jet flights tle;;. "·eekl,r, Unklng the Island with Honolulu nn<l Manila. Pan American also operTb(' 1000 census >1howC<lthnt Gunm had 11 11opulution of more thu11 00,000. ntes from Guam to the trust territory 'l'W:-i l11cludetl both military Jlen1on11el flfl does Guam Airline~, 11 locally owue,l company. 1u1cl Micronesian AJrUnes. 11ntl cl\'!Uuns. Estimated rio1111lntlon In 100.5was 70.m. Radio Corporation ot America ol?cr:,; Cull cable nnd oversens t.elCl)honeserYicc. Gunm Is relatin~ly 11001· in nnlurnl rcumt 1Jl the summer of 1~. greatly ilu:-iources. II is ono of the im11ortn11tmil!l)ro,·ed its operations with Ute opening of tnry bnses of lh<' United States in the n now unclerwuter cable to the U.S. main• l'ncHlc. n11dits economy is supported priland, Jnpan, and tho Philippines. m1ully by the wa.i:eii suppliecl b~•the militnr.r. The go,·ernment of Gunm and the mlUtnry operate jointly n modern locnl t.eleJ.grlcult urc ls the other prh1clpa1 eleJ)hone system. ment 111Ille economy, lmt rencly employment h)· t11emHltary or b~· the ch·il go,·Banking !acilitles m·e lll'OYitletl ur l'rttme11t n L relnth·el~• goo<l wnges had brnnches of the Bank 01' America, the hnnclicnppccl ngrlrnltnrnl clcnilopmcnt nnnk of Hnwnll, ancl the Gnam S1wlngs & nn<l 111·od11ct1011. Lonn AssocluUon. Soclal <'Onditio11s 011 Guum nre good. Xews media for the lslaucl includes the l'ichool nttenclnnC'I' Is ~ompnlsor~· for nil Guam Dally Jliews. the Dnlly Pacific .Tourhetwe!'n the ngl.'l'lof Oflll(J 16, lnrlush·e. In 11111,rndlo nnd televlslou statlou KUAi\J. nclclltlon to Jnthllc nnd prln1te PIPmentary the Guam Tlmcs Weekly antl the mont111~, 1mcl seconclnry schools. which hncl n total Pacific Profile.

7


,.

Newly completed cable station of the Australian Telecommunications Commission and staff housing (right) added an important facility to Guam.

JUDICIARY l:'wt I. titles I to V, of the Code of Civil Procedure of Guam provides that the admlnistratlou of the judlcJary branch of the go,•ernment of Guam be placed in the .Judicial Council of Guam whose member:ihlp shall consist of the judge of the District Court of Gunm, as chairman, the chief judge of the Island Court, the judges of the Island Court, the attorney general of Guam, the chn.lrm.a.n of the .Judiciary Committee of the Guam Legislature, and the president of the Guam Bar Associn.tion, as members. The courts of the territory of Guam consist of the District Court. the Island Court and the Police Court.

in oil c1·lmln11Jcases not iUYOIYlngfelonies, clYII mutters under Public Law 17, marital relations, probate, land registration, nnd special proceedings. The court likewise has n division known as tile Juvenile Court which llns exclusive jurisdiction In nll proceedings Involving any minor under tile age of 18 years, and also the small claims procedure wblcll deals with claims not exceeding $100. The statistics of tile Island Oourt, Ju,·enUe Court cllvlslon and Small Olnlms Court w111 be touncl under enclosure B.

Police Court

The Police Com·t has jurisdiction lu all offenses under the Motor Vehicle Code District Court as well us simple misdemeanors. On The District Court has tbe juriS<llc- April lu, 1965, the rules go,ernlng prot!on of n U.S. Court. nncl jurisdiction in cedure In trnffic cases were amended to local civil cases over $2,000 and felonies implement the new traffic ticket comunder the laws of Guam. It bas e..xclu.sive monly cnlled Uniform Traffic Ticket and jurisdiction ns a tax court in Guam, for Compla.lnt. Tile new rules also vest conincome tax nml business privilege tax trol of the tickets In tile court rather tha11 cases when the amount assessed has been DepnrtmPnt of Public Safety us done In pnid. the past. Since hnplementution of the StatisUcs of t11eDistrict Court of Gurun new tlcl,et, the court has found it very for the yenr will be found on pnge 10. useful in ernluntlng each rlolnto1· and at the same time standardize penalties. Island Court There hos IJeeu n substnntinl increase in Tho Island Court ls ,·ested jurisdiction re,·enue as n result of the new ticket nn<l

8


It 1111s lmproYt-d cfllcleucy on the pu1·t of the enforcement officers. 11 will ue noted 111this year's repon n uew column ·'Closed" cnses has t,een added. This represents ,·Iolutors who hn,·o not 111H:1wercd their tickets within 11 perloll oC00 do~·:i or h,we left the jurls11ictlo11of tbi>' conrt. The judge >'ittlng In thl:i <.-ourtuh;u net,; us judge in the l>'hmd Court. Stntlstlcs covering nctlYlti~ of tbls court will be folWd OU ~e·H.

of which the attorney wus dlsbuned, subJcl·t to appeal.

Probation and Parole The two usslst11nt 11rollat1011officer::;, who nlim net us parole officers, super,·isctl n total of 33 probationers from the Dis• trlct Court, 07 from tJ1e Island Court, nnd 10 trom U.S. courts. A total of 38 paroled l)risoners were su11er\'ised during the yenr, 30 ot' whom ure tcrrltorlul parolees and :; from U.S. prisons. The yacnnt

Attorneys

position or Probation Office1·,,·us filled t,y the appointment ot A.lt,ert H. ~obrign

'.rhere wo>' one attorney admitted to tile pructice of low in Guam und there wos one mnlprnctlc:e complaint as n result

on Decemher 13, 1005. Stn tlsties co,·ering ucl h·ltles of thlx <IIY!slon will be found on page 20.

9


In the District Court of Guam for the Territory of Guam

STATISTICAL REPORT January 1, 1966 lo December 81, 1965 CIVIL: Co.scs pending Jnnuury 1, 1065 ___ --·- __ -·--. _. __. ___ . ___ ... __ . Cnses filed during this pcriod ____·----·-·-----···--·--------···

120

Total cases for this pcriorlL______·- __-·-·. ----· -· ·- ___..... Totnl cases terminated during this period_.-··-·-·····--·-·-··--

139 74

.

65

ToLnl cases pending nt close of this pcriod ... ·--·--·-----·--·· ~nturc of suits or actions filed this period: 1. Account st.ated _____ -··-- _-·-- ·---- .. ·--- .. ·--- ·-·--. 2. Account stated nnd dnmngc.---·--·--·--·------·-·--·· 3. Ass:wlt and battery. __._ .... _...... ___·- -· -·-- .. __.. 4. Breach of cont.ract.: n. Frnud and services rendered __ ··--·-···-·-··-·····-b .• Insurnncc. __ ........ _ ...... _. __. __ ··-····--·--·-· o. Promissory note ___.. __.. ___..... _. ____. __ . __._. __. d. Promissory note und account stntccl _____ ·····-·-··-· c. Promissory note nncl for money lonnc<I___ ···---·-· __ f. Others._._._ . . ..... _. _____ . ____. . _..... _.. _. __ 5. Books account •••••• ··-····-----··-··-··········----0. Cancellation of forged deed. ____. __........... ·- ..... __ 7. Conditional sales contrnet ___.... __ .. _____.... ___.... _. 8. Confession of judgment_. __ . ___.. _____.. ·-· ....... ___ 9. Declaratory judgment. ... _.. -··-_.·--___.. __....... _ l O. Demand possession of personal property. ____.... ___... . 11. Deposition to perpetuate testimony ___ ._ .. _ .. _. ____.. ~. 12. Dissolution of corporation.._.•·---------·--·····----··13. Dissolution of pl\rtncrship, nccounting nnd discovery of ussots•• _•••• _. __····-----····--·--··-········•• 14. Federal Tort Claim Act: n. Personnl injury- .. -- .. ·--· .. _ ............ __... __.. . 15. For bnlnncc due in savings account·-···--·············· 16. F01· clnim n.nd dclivcr.v •• -.-··--···--·-·-·····-·-······ J 7. For rescission, restitution, and damages ..... _.. ___..... . 18. Foreclosure, mechanic's and material man's lieJL....... _. 19. Foreclosure of mortgage_ ... ·- .................. __.. __ 20. Guam tnx·--·····----··-··----·--···-···---··-·-···· 2J. Insurance premiums._ ........... _... _... _ .. _ .. _. ___.. 22. Laud condemnations: a. United States of America •••• _···········-······--·· I.>.Government of Gunm_..... _.. __. _.. --·. ·-·-- __. _.. 23. Mandatory injunction nnd for damages from overflow of surface wntcr_ •••• ·····-··---· --··· •... ·-- .... ~· •• 24. Mone,v had nnrl received ... ___... ···-- ........... _... . 25. Money owed nncl services rcndcrecJ_. __···········-·-··· 26. lVIillor Act.... . . . . . __....

__.......

_... - ... - .. - .....

27. Negligence._.... . . _..... ·--· .... -· ......... ··-· -·28. Pcrm11nonLinjunction .. _ .......... ··- .. -· .... ······-20. Personal injury within business premiscs ....... ·-···-·-·

13

.

1

a 8 l I 3 l

l

1

1 I 1

2 JI I 2 ,I

:.!

J2 11 'l


30. Propei·ty dumugc _________________ . ________. __. __. ___

Rent------·-----·-··-··-·-··········-·--·········-· Services rendered._ ..................... ·-.---· ..... . To set aside deed of gift ......... _... _.. _............ . 'l'ort: 11. Personal injury .................................. . b. Personnl injury (motor vehicle) ............. --·----c. Porsonnl injury and wrongful death ....... _... __.. __. d. Personal injury and property damage._ .. _._ ........ . 35. Voluntary clissolutio1L....... _. _..... _..... _ ......... . 36. Writ of habeas corpus. __ .................. _ .. _...... .

2

31. 32. 33. 34.

Total cases filed_ .......

--· __.....

l 2

__

126

.... .

(i

-··- .. -···.·-·.

BANKRUPTCY: Cases pending January 1, 1065__................. ·-. ·--·Cnscs filed during this periocl•• -········-·············-·····--.

-1

10 1 I

7

Total cases for this period .......... ·- ................ Cases rlisposed of during this period_ ..........................

_.... . .

1:3

Cases pending n.t close of this period .......................

-.

JO

CRIMINAL: Cases pending January 1, 1965- _ .. -· ·-· ·- .... __·- .. _... _. _... Cases filed during this period ••••••••• ·-········----·----------

18

l

. _.

10

___.... _. __

3

Total cases for this period_-· ........ ·-· ................... Cases tcrrnina ted during this period .............. _..... Cases ponding n t close of this period._. __. ____....

3

_.....

1(\

Offense or offenses charged: UNITED STATES CASES

I. Assault with intent to commit murder within maritime and

territorial jurisdiction_.·--_ .. _. __. _____.. _......... __ 2. Burglary and grand lareenY--···--·-·---··----·-··--··3. Kid.napping and assault with u. deadly weapon ..... ·--··-4. Mailing obscene matter_.--· __···---···. __ ·--· __.. __... 5. Petty theft within military reservation ......... _._ ... _.. _ G. Theft and illegal entry .. ·-_._._ ... _.. _ ........ _...... _. Total, U."S.cnscs filed .. _.·-.··GOVERNMENT

....

OF GUAM

·--· .....

__.. ____

1 ,j

1 1 l 2

0

CASES

l. Assault with intent to commit murder, and assault with a

dcndly weapon_ .......... _... ·-···-·. ___··········-· 2. Burglary in the first degreo.. ·--·-······-··-··--·-··-··3. Burglru-y and grand theft ....... __.. __._ .......... _____ 4. Burgln.ry in tho second degree ........ --··--·--···---···

1 1 l

2

11


I"

5. Involuntary manslaughter, and failure to stop motor vc• hicle at scene of accident ............................ . 6. Mayhem·-············-------·-··--·--·········--·--· 7. Murder in the second degree_ .• ··--·-···-------···----8. Robbery in the first degree, and a-ssault by means of force likely to pr~duce great bodily injury .......... _ .. ___ Total, Government of Guam cases filed._ ......

1

___... .

9

_. _

18

Total, all criminal cases filed... _______...........

TRIALS, PRETRIAL CONFERENCES, AND MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITY, BOTH CIVIL, CRIMINAL, AND BANKRUPTCY: Number of trials to court ... _.......... ______......... _____. __ Number of trials to jury _____.... ____.. _---------· .. __·-- .. ___ Total number of trials .......

1 l

_______--·-._ .. ---··-·---·.--·.

13

3 l(j

Number of pretrial conferences .... _.... __.. __________........ _ Number of hearings 011 civil motions, bankruptcy matters and criminal preliminary hearings, arraignments, sentences, dis• barment, and others_ ....... ·- __·---- ___·---···.......... .

306

Tot.al number of proceedings botb in open court and in Chambers.

382

Number of days in trial session: 1. With jury ............... ·-·-·- .. ··--·· .............. 2. Withoutjury ••••• ·-····--··--·-··-···-··········--··· Total. .•••• - ••. - ... - .... - .....

00

.

10 16

- .... ·. · - - . - . -- · · · · · ·

26

PETIT JURY ACTIVITY: Number of trials in civil cnses.. _. __. __.. ~ ....... _...... Number of trials in criminal cases •. ·-----····-·····-·-··------

_. _. _. _

0 3

3

Tota1 number of jury trials.········----------·-······-···-Attendance and service of jury panel members and jurors (in. pcrpcrson•per•day units) : 1. Proscnt •• ·-··--·--··----·-·····-·····-·······-··----· 2. Servjug on juries ........... __. ___.... _... ··--·--·3. Called and cbaUenged. _ ...... ·- -· _................. 4-. In reservo •••••••••••••••••• ·-·-····-·-·-··----···-···

___. _. _

Fee pa.id to members of jury panel by the United States Courts 1. Per diem o.ttendaneo fees .......... ·- .... ·-_·---_ ... ··-. 2. Mileage-paid to nil members reporting for duty ......... _ 3. Meals to be paid to members serving on juries ........... . 4. Per diem attendance foes and mileage to be paid, excluding Federal employccs_. _ ··-·-. ____________·----· _... _ .. Totn,l cost during this period .• ····-----·-----··----

GRAND JURY ACTIVITY-NONE.

12

126 36

30 60 $861. 00 $217. 00

$31. 59 $326. 00 $1,435.50


NATURALIZATION PROCEEDINGS: Petitions pending January 1, 1965_____________________________ Petitions filed during this period_______________________________ Petitions transfered to this court_ - - --- _ _____ _ ___ _ _ _ ___ __ ___ _ __

21 315 10

Total petitions for this period _________ -- ---- __ _ ____ _ _ __ ___ _ _

346

Petitions granted duriug this period __-- - - - - - - - - _ _ _ __ __ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ Petitions withdrawn and denied_______________________________ Petitions transfered from this court_ - - _ _ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _

298 10 4

Total petitions disposed of during this period_________________

312

Total petitions pending at close of this period_________________

34

Declaration of intention issued during this period________ __ _ __ _ __ Fees paid to tho Government of Guam in all Natl!ralization matters du ring this period_ - _- - - - - - - - -_ - _ - - - - - - - - - - - _- - - - - - - ___ - - _ __

11

APPELLATE DIVISION ACTIVITY-APPEALS COURT OF GUAM:

S2, 255. 00

FROM ISLAND

C1v11,: Appeals pending January 1, 1965 _________________________ _ Appeals filed during this period _________________________ . __

0 0

Tot.al appeals for this period._. ___ ... ____ ... _________ . __ Appeals tcrminnted during this period.. ______________________ _

0 0

Appeals pending at close of this period. _________________ _

0

CnunNAL:

Appeals Appeals Total Appeals

pending Jnnun.ry 1, 1965. _______________________ filed during this period ___________________________ appeals for this period _________ -- ________________ terminated during this period _____________________

_ _ _ _

Appeals pending at close of this period .. ________________ _

UNDOCKETED APPEALS DISMISS AND REMANDED ISLAND COURT DURING THIS PERIOD:

-----

-APPEALS PENDING

2

TO

Civil_ ________ -------------_____ ---- ___ ----_ -- -- _-- -- _ - _ _ __ Crlmina-L __ . ______________________________________________ .

UNDOCKETED PERIOD:

1 2 3

1

O

AT CLOSE OF THIS

Civil _______ ------ ____ ---------- - -- -- - - -- - - -- - - - - -- -- - -- _ _ Criminal___________________________________________________

O

o

LAND CONDEMNATION ACTIVITY THROUGH CLERK'S OFFICE: • Stipulations and judgments on stipulations, order of advance 'Withdrawal and distribution of funds_____________________________ 78 Check drawn and money pa.id to local residents on judgments, stipulated renewal rentals, order for advance withdrawal and order for distributions of fund for use of land by the United States of America and the government of Guam _____________________ $185,979.21

MARRIAGE CEREMONY ___________________ . ___.______________

4

13


""'1

....

""'

Report of rhe Island Court, Territory of Guam, for Calendar Year 1965 CRIMINAL

Otfcnsc

Number Number Number Number or cases oldcolcases of do• pending, fcndoots Ried, foodnnu Jt1n. I, lm·ol\'ed, year Involved, 1965 ycor IOOS Jan. 1, 196S 1965 0

0

s

s

I

1 9 0 0 1

0 S7

0 74

Assa ult .........•.•.......... ·-· .. ··-. _ .. _ ............ __ Assonlt nod btll1cry•••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Bult.cry ____ ••• ·-··-·····--···----··-···-··-···•·• Attempted e:ctortlon_ ••••••• - •• ·-···-·-··-···-··-Contributing to the delinquency oro minor_ ......... _. __ Disorderly conduct ••••• -······--······················ Dlslurblllg tho peaco•• -············-·--·-··-··-·········· Drawing or O:thlblllnga deadly woa1l0n........... - ....... Drivin~ motor vehlclo during period or suspension or driver's license.. .........................................

7 0

Drunkennoss.--.·-·····-·--········-·-···-··-······

Failure.to comply with ltlwful rcquost or a pcaco officer.... .f'aUuro to provide children with necessltles •••• --········ False official statement ••••••••• ·-···············-······· Falso prcicnses. ···-·····-······--·-·---·-··-·· Fishing wit.IIpoisonous or lntoxlcotlng substnnco __ , ...... Having nn abandoned refrlgerotor without hinges removed. Importing nlcobollc bovorngcswithout n llccnso........ - .. lssulng bank cheek without su.fficient funds ______ , ....... Leaving samo of nccldent •••••• ·-········--··--·-·-····· Malicious mischief......................................... Obstructing Justice .................................. ·-·-Operating motor vohlclo wbUo under tl10 lnfluenco or Inloxlcotlng liquor ......................................... Occupying n structure without n ccrllficatc or occupancy ... Owning a dog wlUJout a Ucense••..• ·-········-··---·-· Pcrmllting consumption off the promise or a llcenso on•snlo nlcohoUcboverogc••••••••••••• --·-·······-····-······· Petty Lhon.. . __........................ _ ................

CASES

9

0

18 3

18

17 4

2

3 2

3

2

0 0 0 0

I

I

I

3

5 4

I

2 I 1

0 0

1

1

0

2

2

2

1

I 0

2 0

0

I

3

2

2

6

1 62

3

3

2

5

I

6 0

0

2 2

0

2

56

0

M 1 2 0

I

0 0

3{

8

0

4 0

1

0

0 0 0 0

1965

0

0 39

0 0 0 0 0

ms-

mlssctl

2 1

1 3

I

Acquit· Led

0 0

1

0

Con• ,·ictcd

Number Number or coses ordc. disposed, tondonls year in,·olved, 1965 year

8 0 0

2

0

Disposals

I I 1 4 12

3

0

0 0

0

0

1

0

0

t1 3

56 3

6

8

0

0

0

17

17

3

0 0

4 3

4 4

1

3 I

0 0

0

2 I

0 0 0 0

I 2 I

I 1 6

4

0

l

2

13

0

0 2

8

10

8

0

0

0 0

20 l

20

25

I

0

0

2 I

28

0

0

6

I 6

6

0

0

(i

0

0 1

1

I 20

0 0

0

I

23

2

22

I

I

31

0

0

12 13

G

0

1 3

I

{

0

0 0 4

4 0

12 13

2

79

Number Number of coses or de• peodlnc, rendnnts Dec. 31, Involved. Occ.31, lOOS Ul65

B IS 8 1

4 4 I I 5 14 15 10

0 2 0 .I

0

0 0 0

0

2

0 I

0

0

l

I

0 0 0

0

0 0

28 I 0

4

0 0

0 0

I 31

0 2

2

0


..

~

;; 0 ~

..

l'osscsslon or a dangerous wcuJ)()nknown n~ gn1vlty lmlle... Possession or loaded riOol.n vchlcl~..................... _. Possession or urucglslorc<lfirearm._ .•••••••••• ----·-···· Providing lnlox!caUng liquor to minor-·······-······-Prowling ••• --·······-················-·-·······-·-· Reckless driving .....••••..•••••••••• ••············-······ Rcckloss driving causing bodily Injury to person .••••.. ___ !'•• ncruslng Lopay taxi rare.......................••••••••• Remaining present at pince or riot, cte., niter warning to

I

I

0

3

0 0

0

I 4

0

I

I

I

l

3

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

I

l

0 0 I 0

0

Vagmncy ........

···-·

•••••••••

• - • ·····-··-

••••••

---···-····-···········--··············

'l'otal .... ___________ .............

....

0

Snle or alcoholic beverages 10 minor ...... -........••••...••• Speeding •••••••••••• •-·•·······•··•···-···--··-······· -Tnklng game with sp0tllght .•• ----···-············•······ Taking wild nnimuL ••••••••• ---····-····-······•······ Tampering with vehicle or contents thcreor. ......••....••• Unaulhorltcd use or motor veblelo••••• ---····-··-···Using vulgar, prolnne, or Indecent lnngunge through a telephone ... •-· ...............................••••...•••

<llsl)('rsc ..•••••••••••

V,

0

0

- ...............

0 1 0

4

I I

3 0

0 0 1

0

0 0 0 0

l

I 3 4 I 3

0 0

2

I l 4 I 3

0

4

4

0

I I

7 I

7

0

I

0

l

l 5

0

1 8 8 l

0 0 0 0

3

I

I

0 0

0 0

0

0

4

l 4

7 I

6 0

0

0

0 0

2

I 3

l 2 l 4

0

5 1 7

0

3

8

3

0

0 0

0

0 4

l 2

0 0

• 7 1 0 4

0

0

• 1 4.

3

I 0

I 0

C

0

a

3

2

I

L

2

3

3

0 0

35

30

190

G

21

217

• 203

240

0 I

l 3

I

3

3

0

3

4.

200

0 0 0

0 0

0

I

I 0

0 0 0 0 0

0

21

0

0 0

I

2,1


CIVIL CASES Number of cases pending, 111D.l, 11165

Action

Assnult e.nd trespass ................. BllStordy___ ......................... Oreacb or contract .................... Collection of occounL ............... Complnlnl for declaratory Judgment .. Co111plalntfor partition .............. ConJesslon of Judgment. .. --------Damages ............................. Olssolutlon of corporation..··-·· .••• EJectmont ........................... Foreclosuro of mortgage.····-······· Forfeiture nnd disposal of evidence ... Injunction ........................... lnsurnnoo 1,01Joy..................... Interference with OlllieJUOnt ........... Loose agreement ..................... M lsllpproprlntlon o! !unds ............ Motion for new trial (small claim)--. Porontnl ocknowlndgmcnt. ........... PromlMOry note ...................... Reciprocal support ................... Removal of nuisance ................. RepoSSCl!Slon or personal property .... Right or way ......................... Services rendered ..... -·-·····. ·-· Slander ... ·········------------···· Supporl·-··························· Onl11wfuldetainer ... ---·············

--

Wogcs ..

·············--·············

Totnl ..........................

16

Number or cases filed year 1906

Number or eases disposed. year 1965

0 1

3

2

0

0

200 S8

304

0 2 0

120 I 0

6

28

18

0

G 1 0

329 IOS 0 I 4 28 0

Number Number of cases orcases dis· granted, mlssod, year 1906 year 1965

0 0 310

88 0 0

2 0

10 17 0 I 0

Number Number ol cases or casos transanding, ferrod to ~ ec. 31, 013trlct 11166 Court 0 0 0 0 0

1 1 175 73 I

0

I

0 0

I

15

13

0

0 I 0

0

18 0

0 0

z 0

0 I

0 0

0 2 13

1

0

l 1 I

I l

19 0

II

8

0

0

0

0 I 0 I 71

0 0

I 63

20 0 0 0 0 0 84

I 63

0 0 0 0 8

4

16

14

12

2

0 0 I 0 0 0 0

I

0

0

a

0

0

I

I I

2 0 6

1 0 0 0 0 I

0

0 5 1 0

0 I 0

2 I

2 I I 2 12

I 13 I

I

7

0 1 I 0

•os

0 1

0

0

6 0

I 2

0 0 I 1

691

695

620

0 0 1

0

I 13 0

I 0 70 8

n

(I

0 0 0 0 0

7◄

I

390

I I I I


Number

of cases

pending, Jan. I, 1966

Probolc: Lotters ol adinlnlstrnUolL. ...... ProbatG or wilt ..............••

.

Toto.I

Number

Number

orcnses or cases llled, disposed, year

year

1905

1905

Number

Dlsposrus

Oront-ed

or cases

Dis• missed

Number

or coses

appealed pending, to Dis· Dec. 31, trict 1905 court

.. ·-··.---

on

--........

089

936 14

l0l 0

04 6

ti2 6

040

110

70

08

5 115

7

9 81

8

l

3

02

73

8

120

20

18

H

ll

3

33

149

117

104

92

12

162

Si

64

67

st

2

04

6

6

2

-----·-.

-· .......... 2

Ii

~larltol rolntlons: Annulment ..................... . Ulvorcc .........................• Legal separation, sepnrnui moln• tcnaoeo and support .......... . Tolul .

. ..................

J.11ndreglstrollon

.

spcclol pro<:ee<llngs: ,\ uthorlty to compromise claim

mortgage................................

.

Cllllcellotion or validation of mortgngG.. . ... .. . . . . .. . . . . ... I ......... . 3 20 Chongc or numo......... ... • . . . . C'lvll uu1rrlogc... . ............. .... ...... 64 Ou11rdlnnshJp.................... 272 16 Hospltollu1Uon, mcdlcol oxaml• 2 notion.......................... Pcr111lsslonror minor to marr>'..... 'l'rusteeshlp........ ... . . . . . . . . . . . I .............. Waiver or statutory waiting period.......................... .. ........ 27 4 Writ or hnbcns corpus............ . . .... .. . . Wilt ol man<lot.c.......................... . •rota I

279

130

0 .............................

17

16

64

64 ••·•••·•••

26

24

2

2 ••••••••••

I •••.

.

ti

.. ..

••••••••••••••.••••• 1 ..........

262

••••• •••••

. 27 3

147

27 .............................

.

2 I

I .........

.

1◄4

3 .........

.

271

17


JUVENII,B

Action

Juvonllo erlmlnnt: currow law............ Contributing to tho dolinquancy of n minor ............... Ocllquen~ minors- .... Tot..11.. ..............

Special proccodlngs: Adoption.- ........... Custody o.ndsupport .. O118ldlanshlp........ Ponnlsslon for minor to marry ............ .\cknowJcdgmcnt of paternity ............ Compromise of claim Involving minor ... 1'otal._ ............

18

CASES

Number Number Number of cases OfCll5e8 or cases pending filed dis· .Tan.I, yoor 1065 posed, year 1965 1005

u

Disposals Convlctcd

Oranted

Dis· missed

.AC•

Qulticd

Number ore= ending ~ co.31, lOOS

u

0

0

0

0

0

0

8 108

10

0 0

0 42

u

178

10 130

0

28

0

18

30

170

188

146

0

42

0

18

19

92 12 6

0

0 3

0 0 0

10

0

82 6 2

10

0

3'2

89 14 13

0

12

12

0

ll!

0

0

u

0

a

3

0

ll

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

I)

56

131

124

0

100

19

0

OS

2

s

---

; 40


nv JUVENILES-19&

OFFENSES CO.M.M:ITTEO 10

Ii

Molo Assault .... ··-·•••••••••• ··-- ••••••• ·-···· Assnult with n dcodly weapon__···-······-· Dall&Y•••••••••••• • --·-········-·····-Doyond control or pnrcnt ••---··-······-······ Burglary ond thcft ••••••••• -·········-········· Currew __ ........ __ . __ ............... _ ... _ Disturbing tho peace•••••• --•··-··-··-······ Exhibiting a deadly weapon·-·-········-···-· Forgery·······--·-··-·········---··-FomlcotlOD•• -··-·······-··--·-··········· Orond thert. ........... - ...................... Involuntary manslaughter •• ········-··-·Joyriding ••• ·-·-·······-··-··-·········Mollclous mischief •• ···--···--············· Murder .....................•••••• ···-··-Operating motor vehicle during period or suspension or drivers license................... _ Possess.Ionor o deadly weapon ................... POMCSSlon or firearm ..................... - ..... Robbery.-··---········-···--····-··-· Ther, ••• ·-····-· ···-···-···•••••••••••••• Trnffic......... _ ........••• ---· ••••••••• ·····Threatening •••--·-············-··-·-·Truoncy. --···· •••••••• -----··-········ ••••• Vngrnncy••••• ·····-······-·················· Total .... ·······-·····

....

\0

••••••••••.•.•••••

-

t

0

0 I 0 0

0

0 0 0 0 1 19 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0

3 0

3

2

l

0 0

0 1 0

11

10

0

0

2 l 1

4 0 0 0 0

10 0 0

1

0

2 l 0 2

1 0

0 0 1 1

0

l

u

0 0 0

3 2 0

0

0 l

0

2

0

0

1

0

1 0 3

0 0

1 1 0 0 0

0

0

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

0 0

0

38

7

31

6

37

2

8

• l

2 1 I 3 2 0 1 0

0 0 0

3

7 6 0 I 0 0

0 2 0 0 0 1 0

0 0 0

---

0 0 0 2

0 0 0

0 0

f

0 0 2

--- --- ---

---

---

I 0

0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 0

0 0 0

0

0

0 0

0

u

0

0

1

0 0 0 0 0

0

0

0 0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0

0 0 0

0

0

3

3

I

3

0 0

0

0

0 I

0

2 0 1 0

0

0

0

0 l

0

0

0 0 0

0 0

0

0

0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0

3 0

0 0

0 0

5

7

0 0

Female ~folc 0 0 0 I 0

0 0 1 2 I 0 0

0 0

11

12

Female Mole

Fomolc Male

0 0 0 3 6 0 0 0 0 0

1 1

0 1

Female l\falc 0 0 0 2 0 I 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0

0 0

2

---

FcD111lo Malo

Fem11lc l\lnlo

13

H

16

0

0

Totol

Fumulo

---

--

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 2 0 0

3 1 2

33 32 0 2 l 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

0 0

0 0 0 1

---

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0

u 3

1 7

8 l

3 2 l 6 6

34

--

1 2 l

IGS


DISPOSITION

OF JUVENILE

Detained_----------------------22 Probation ________________________ 32 Warned _________________________ 54 Declared delinquent_______________ 8 Foster placement_________________ 5 Dismissed_______________________ 19 Certified ____________-- ___________ 10 l Released to parent for treatment___ Pending_________________________ 17 Toto.L ___ --------------JUVENILE

OFFENDERS-1965

Number of cases filed_____________ 168 Number of juveniles involved ______ 168 Mnles_______ ____________ ______ __ 135 Females_________________________ 33

-- 168

DELINQUENTS

Age.on _________________________ 6 Agnna Heights___________________ 119 Agnt____________________________ Apra Heights-------------------2 Asan____________________________ 4 Barrigacla_______ _________________ 16 Chalan Pago_____________________ 4 Dededo__________________________ 8 Me.inn,___________________________ 2 Mangilao________________________ 7 1 Merizo_ ------------------------Mongmong-Toto-Maitc____________ 14

BY DISTRIOT-1965

Naval Sta.tio1L___________________ 1 Ordot___________________________ 3 Nimjtz HUL _____________________ 1 Piti_____________________________ 7 Santa Rita._______________________ 3 SinajaM _________________________ 21 Talofofo_____ ____________ ________ 5 Tamuning-Tumon_ _ ______________ 24 Yigo____________________________ 8 Yona ____________________________ 11 TotaL. -------------------

168

Statistical Report From January 1, 1965 to St December 1965 on Island, District, United States Probationers, Parolees, Violators, Reuasea, Presemence and Active Cases UNITED STATES PROBATIONERS

ISLAND COURT PROBATIONERS

Remained under supervision, Dec. 31, 1964___ _______ ________ 47 Referred for supervision, Jan. 1, 1965 to Dec. 31, 1965___________ 50

Remained under supervision, Dec. 81, 1964__________________ 14 Referred for supervision Jan. 1, 1965 to Dec. 31, 1965_ _ ___ ______ 5

Total supervised, year 1965__ 97

Total supervised, year 1965__ 10

Male.s___________________________ 94 Females ___________-- ____________ 3

Males ___________________________ 16 Females_________________________ 3

Released (probation expired)_______ 43 Violators __ - _______- _ _______ _____ 10 L Terminated______________________ Terminn.ted (deceased)____________ 2

Released (probation expired) _______ Violator ________--- - - - - - -- --- - - - Trnnsferred to other jurisdiction ____

TotaL __ _ _________________ 56

=

Remained under supervision, Dec. 31, 1965-----------------41 Presentence investigo.tio1L_________ 23

20

TotaL __ - --------

5 l 1

- - - ______

7

Remained under supervision Dec. 31, 1965-----------------Prcsentenco investigation__________

12 3


DISTRICT

Total supervised, year 1965-_.... __

COURrr PROBA'l'!ONERS

8

Remained under supervision, DeL 31, 1964-----------------25 Referred for supervision, Jan. 1, 1965 to Dec. 31, 1965___________ 8

Males___________________________ 7 Females_________________________ 1

Total supervised, year 1965__ 33 Males ___________________________ 32

4

Female__________________________

Released (parole expired)__________ Remained under supervision Dec. 31, 1965-----------------TERRITORIAL

PAROLEES

1

Remained under supervision, Dec. 31, 1964- __ _______________ 19 Referred for supervision Jan. I, 1965 to Dec. 31, 1965________________ 11

Relased (probation expired)________ 10 Violators________________________ 2 TotaL____________________

4

12

Total supervised, yoor 1965-_______ 30 Remained under supervison, Dec. 31, 1965__________________ 21 5 Presentence investigation__________

Males ___________________________ 30 Releai:ed (parole expired)__________ Viola.tors________________________ Terminated (deceased)____________

6 2

3

Total___________________________

9

5

Remained under supervision Dec. 31, 1965------------------

UNITED STATES PAROLEES

Remained under supervision, Dec. 31, 1964-----------------Referred for supervision Jan. 1, 1965 to Dec. 31, 1965-----------

l

21

SMALL CLAIMS CASES Number Number ofcllSCll orcnses pClldlng ruo<1, Jan I, year IO!lli 1965

.\cllon

Dllllll1gcs.. -· ..................•.•••••••• ···- .• lnsur111100 pollcy .......... _ .................... Promissory note.···········-· ••••••.••••••••••• Services ronderod ... ·-· ......................... Total. .................

_.··- .•.•••• ·-· •• --

370 111

48

year

1065

Number Number Number OfOIISCS of CIISOS of enses grlllltod, disendlng, year missed ~ eo. 31, year 1965 1965 1905

---

--AccoUDt stated................................. Contract .......... ·-·- ..........................

Number of cnses dlspoSCd,

313 70

453 100

24

20 71

70 82

i0 30 53

091

572

208

245

230

33

07 10

81 8

32

53

483

56 80

28

30 31 52

780

330

450

25

50 S5

21


Report of Police Court for Calendar Year 1965

N N

OfTcnso

Number Number Number orcaso, of de- Number Olde• PODdlng, foodo.nt.s of cases fondants 1an.1, lnvolvod, tllod, lovolvod, Coo• 1ao.1, year 1965 year 1965 vlctcd 1965 1065

Disposals Ac• qultted

Dis• missed

Closed

Number Number of doof cases rendnnls disposed, lovolvcd, yonr 1965 yo1r 1965

Number or CBSOS ponding, Doc. 31, 1965

Number or do• fondants lovolvod, Dec. 31, 1965

TRAFFIC VIOI.ATION

Loadlng couscs or nccldcots: Speediog ••-·-·················-···-··Improper tumlog ••••••• ----············· Disobeyed t.mllloslgno.l. ••• -·-··-··-· Disobeyed stop &Jgo___ ··············-····· Improper po.sslogond lono usago ............ Following too closcl~•-······-·······-···-· Failure to yield dgbt or way ••• ·-·······l\fisocJJDDcous: DetecUve equtpment .• -.-·-······Disobeyed trllffic slgn _____ ._ .......... Driver's license, without, oxplred ........... Failed to comply with police officer's dJreotiOD---·--·-·-·-·-·-· Fallcd to depress bcadllghls ................. Failed lo dlsplay red tlag OU load __ . ______ Failed to report accident wltblo 24 holllS.-. Dlogal pnrkilli:-·-·····-··-··-·······-·· lllegnl use or horn ........................... Impeding tramc_ ........... -••·-••····Improper start ot puked vehicle .... _._ 1ny wolking_ __ ·-······················· Lcavlog key In Ignition.············--·····Llccnso plBlC,wllbout, expired._ .... _ .. _. No foot.rest,handgrlp oo motorcycle .. _ ..... Overloading.·-·· .......••... ·-·· ...... ·-·. Passing school bus •••• ·····················Peddling oo blgbwny .. - ................ _ PermJttlog II vlolotlon._ .................... Pc.rroltUng passenger outside movlog vehicle. Reckless driving ............................

92

92

2,463

6

6

220

2,453 220

G

6

8 13

8

177 459 612 14( 289

929

2,437 216 108 451 500 140 279

1 0 0 l 0 0 0 0 0

l

l

13 1

9

9

177 459 612 l« 289

10 0 20

16 0 20

929 00 706

706

905 83 433

0 I 0 0 4 0 0 2 0

0 l

11

ll

11

0

103

103 4 3 432 1 1 100 1 50 70 18 7 27 1 124 6 58

100 4 3

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

:? 1 0 0

2 0 2

0 G

0 0

'

0 0 2 0 2 l 0 0

2 0 2 0 6

3 432 l 1

100 1 50 79

13 7 27 1 124 0 58

00

38(

1 1 102 1 49

67 13 7 29 l

110 5 57

0

0 0 0 0

03 7 12

0

3

0 0 3 3 0

14

2

22 2

3 3 10

11

19

272

0 0 0 0 33

2,510 224 180 465 019 143 295

2,510

35

224

2 3 2

930 88 715

180 40S 019

0

6

2 3

2 3

930 88 715

16 2

15 2

It

11

0 4 0 0 10 0

0

us

295

0

11

11

0

0 0 0 3 0

100 4 3 420 1

0 5 0

0

1

0 0

107 1 61 76 18 7

100 4 3 420 1 1 107

2 8

l

51 75 13 7 29

0

l 0 1 6

0

0 0 0

0 0

0 0

0

0

l

l

0 0

0

4

0 0 1

125

0

15 1

125 G 62

1 0 2

0 0 0

29 G

62

35 2 3 2

'

0 0 10 0 0 l 0 I 6

0

0

0

0 0 0

1 0 2


RogislrnUon card, without, o:q>lre<L........ Safety deco!, witl1out, exp,lred. ··---······ Soliciting ride on moln traveled portion of rondwoy .................................. Throwing rubbish on lllghwny ......... -. Vehicle lntcgrlly. -····-···········-·······

2 0

2 0

231)

239

91

215

215

203

0 0

144

0 0 0

0 0

1

1

1

4

4

3

0

1

1

1

0 0 0

0

3 3

238

238

3

3

21~

213

2

2

0

0

1

0 0

1 4 1

l 4

0 0

1

0 0 0

0

7

0

Cllllll:-'AL CASES

DetccUvo brakes ••••• •-··--·-···-··········· Di&turblng the pcnco••••••••• -·······--··· Drlnklng alcohollo boveroges In molor vchlclo... Passing o~cr solid llnc-··-··················· Reckless chiving •• -·-·· ••••••••• ··········-··· Spcoding,.••••••••••• -••·-····-·-·-··-··· Total. •.•• --.-·•··········

1-.)

u.,

••••••••••••••

0

1

1

1

0

0

0

0 l l

2

0 1

0 0

0 1

0 0 l

0 l 1

8

8

7

0

0 1 0 0 1

1

1

1

0

198

198

7,578

7,678

6,964

3

0 0

0

1

1

0

0

3

3

0 1

1

0 0 0 0

8 2

0 l 8 2

1 l 0 0 0

648

4ll

7,058

7,658

118

us


EIGHTH GUAM LEGISLATURE (PERSONNEL:

36)-(APPROPRIATION: ( For calendar year 1066)

As provided in the Orgnnlc Act of Guam, the legislative power of Guam is \'CSted in n 21-member unicameral legislature. The members are elected at large on the Tuesday after the first Monday In November, biennially on even-numbered years. Since the enactment of the Organic Act lu 1950, the Eighth Guam Legislature was the first to have two-party representation. The Territorial Party held the majority with 13 seats compared to 8 hel(l by members of the Democratic Party of Guam. Another general electdou will be belcl in Noven1ber 1966 to tletermine the composition of the Ninth Legislature. Members of the Eighth Legislature: Speaker Carlos P. Taitano. Vice Speaker Vincente 0. Reyes, Legislative Secretary Antonio S. N. Duenas, G. Ricardo Salas, Paul M. Calvo, Frank D. Perez, Tomas R. Santos, Tomas S. Tanaka, Kurt S. Moylan, Carlos G. Camacho, Alberto T. T,amorena, Carlos P. Bordllllo, and Raymond 1~. Underwood, of the Territorial Party; nnd Ricardo J. Bordallo, Florencio T. Ramirez, Juan Munu, Manuel U. Lujan. WlJJlam D. L. Flores, Francisco G. Lujan, and George M. Bamba. Another member of the Democratic minority, A. B. Won Pat, resigned his legislative seat after being elected as Guam's first representative In Washington, D.C., In 1965. The 12 standing committees and their respective cbn.lrmen : Rn.les, G. Ricardo Salas; .finance and taxation, Paul M. Oa1vo; Economic development, Frank D. Perez; education and labor, Tomas R. Santos; municlpal affairs, Tomas S. Tanaka; Public Works, Raymond F. Underwood ; public health and Welfare, Onrlos G. Camacho; military and veterans affairs, Kurt S. MoyInn; governmental operations, Carlos P. Bordallo ; agriculture, fish and wtldlife. Antonio S. N. Duenas; and judiciary, Alberto T. Lamorenn.

24

$501,000)

The year 1966 was a busy one for mem• bers of the legislature. They introduced n total of 354 bills during the two SOday sessions, compared to the ~8 bills in 1965. There were 239 resolutions in· troduced during the 1966 sessions, surpassing by 20 the number introduced in 1965. The legislature passed n total of 247 bills In the 1966 sessions, including 149 in the June meeting, and nclopted 128 resolutions for the year. Appro1>rlat1on measures passed and signed into law, nt this writing, totaled $24,750,045. Tliey Include funds for operational expenses for the three branches of the government, capital improvements and for other purposes. Of this amount, $3,062,440 were supplemental appropriations to cover the second half of fiscal yenr 1966. The total appropriations made thus far for the current 1067 fiscal yenr stand nt $21,687,600. Of the appropriations approved for fiscal year 1967, the biggest amounts were $12,780,818for the operation of the e.'\'.ecutivebranch and $6,915,778 for the operation of the department of education. The operational budget for the judlcln.ry branch for fiscal year 1967 is $194,420. The leglslnture's operational budget for calendar 1966 totalled $501,000, e.'\'.• ceedlng last year's allocation by $202,371. However, the increase is uccounted for by the fact that as of January 1, 1966, the Government of Guam ns.."ltmed the obllgaton of 1>aylngthe snlnries of members of the Guam Legislature. Prior to this, their compensation hnd been paid with Federal money. The tra.nsfer of that obligation to the Territorial government was effected in a Federal legislation enacted by Congress late last year. Accordingly, the Guam Legislature, in its 1066 Janunry session. vassed n bill setting up n snln.ry scale for Its members.


Under Public Law 8-89, each member, with the exception of the speaker, recelves n base salary of $4,500 per annum, payable in monthly instnllments. The iipeaker receives $5,000 n year. In addition, encb member, including the speaker, rcceiYes un allowance of $25 for each day that tbe legislature ls In regular or speciul sesslo11. The Increase in the legislature's 1)1>eratlonal budget also Is attrlbuted to the hiring oi fi,e stuff employees and legal counsel for the minority members. Also included in the overall appropriation measures enacted into law was a $125,000 supplemental fund for the construction of the civilian 1llr terminnl. The terminal, considered n major boon to tbe island's budding tourist industry, is expected to be in operntlon by the encl of 1966. Among tbe enabling legislation enacted was the College of Guam Revenue Bond Act. Considered n primary step i.n the college's expansion program, the net 1mthorizes the boarcl of regents to issue, from time to ti.me, revenue bond.s to raise mone~• for the construction of student dormitories nnd housing facilities, student center, boarding facilities, parking fncllltles, and "any other auxiliary or supplementary facilities for individual llr group accommodation." The net Is initially geared to flnnnciug the construction of 4 dormitories, each ,,·Ith 10O-student capacity, us well ns o new student center through the sale of bonds nuder programs of the Federal Housing nnd Urbnn Development Agency. In other areas of the lslan<l's educn• tionnl de,1elopment, the legislature en• acted laws Ubernllzing the go,·ernment scholnrsbips granted for studies ut tbe College of Guam ns well ns in colleges aud tuu,·ersttles In the coi1ttnental United Stntes. Additional 1m>fessiom1lscholnrshlpl! nre nlso created nncl the amount or student lo1rn grouted to II qunllfletl nppllcnnt wus rnised to $2.500 u yenr. In nn effort to ulle,•lnte houi:l11gshortages, the leglslnture enacted II lnw nutborlzing tile Gnnm Bomilug Corporation, n gorerruuent ngeuc·~·.to gunrnntee J)Oyment of loans not exc.-eedlng75 per-

cent of the total cost for the development of rental housing facilities under all Federal Housing Admlnlstrntlon multi• family housing programs. Gunm's penal code also was amended by the legislature. Public Lnw S-148 abolishes capital punishment for persons conYicted of .first-degree murder or for procuring the execution of an innocent person through willful 1>erjury. The sentence for these offenses is reduced to life imprisonment. However, the net of treason still carries the death penalty. As n result of new local legislation. GoverllDlent of Guam employees are now nble to retire without bnvlng to reacl1 the age of 55 or 60. Public Law S-133 authorizes employees with nt least 20 years of ser,•lce, regardless of age, to YOluntnrlly retire and receive retirement unnulty on pro rata basis. Those with 30 years' service are entitled to full annulty. In A1lril of this year, the North Central Accreditation Association withdrew Its recognition of George Washington and ,John Kennedy High Scbools. The withdrawal of nccredltatlon come ofter two warnlngs had been Issued by the nssocintion. Nine deficiencies were listed by :l\orth Central, among them were shortened class hours due to splltsbift, teacher qunllflcntions, nnd poor conditions of the school facilties. The splltsblft resulted when the George Washington Scbool moved into the John Kennedy School fncllltles following Typhoon Karen ill 1062. The typhoon completely demolished George Washington School. A new Wasbingtou School w!U be ready for occupnncy in the fall of 1066. Because of the grave problemll faced by the two schools, the legislature's com· mittee on education conducted a public l.nqulry in May to explore the situation. During the 4-day public hearing, a host of witnesses, including top education officials and private citizens, testified on the school problems. The education committee studied the testimony and then submitted to the leg• i.slature a 41-page report on Its 11.ndlngs. Among the committee's -recommendations

25


were the Immediate correction of the condition of the school facilities, granting of greater autonomy to the department of education, and election of members of the board of education.

Coples of the report were transmitted to the Governor, Department of the Interior, director of education, chaiTman of the board of education, and to Guam's representative In Washington.

The following are new public laws and their assigned numbers: No.

BiUNo.

8-82

210

8-83

211

8-84

219

8-85

204

8-86

203

8-87

202

8-88

218

8-89

220

8-90

239

8-91

205

8-92

275

8-98

274

8-94

276

8-95

264

8-96

240

8-97

286

8-98

286

26

Shorttitle

An act renaming the Barrigada Elementary School In honor of the late Baltazar P. Carbullido, longtime educator and principal of that school at the time of his retirement from Guam Government service. An act renaming tho Santa Rita Elementary School In honor of the late Joaquin P. Torres, longtime educator and principal of that school at the time of hls retirement from Guam Government service. An act appropriating $50,000 for the initial operation of the legislative branch for calendar year 1966. An act making a $55,763 supplemental appropriation for the operation of the department of law for fiscal year 1966. An act making a $479,369 supplemental appropriation for tho operation of the department of public safety for fiscal year 1966. An act making a $39,592 supplement~! appropriation for the operation of the department of labor and personnel for fiscal year 1966. An act making an Sll,885 supplemental appropriation for the operation of the Guam Recreation Commission for fiscal year 1966. An act providing for salaries of members of the legislature at a base pay of $4,500 per annum for each legislator, except for the speaker who receives $5,000 per annum. In addition, each member, including tho speaker, receives an allowance of S25 for each day that tbe legislature is in regular or special session. An act appropriating $8,500 for tho construction of beach facilities and improvement at Talofofo Bay. An act making a $71,908 supplemental appropriation for tho commissioners of Guam for fisca.l year 1966. An act appropriating $440,500 for capital improvements and fo1· other purposes. An act appropriating $405,000 for ca.pita! improvements and for other purposes, and reappropriating $156,600 to supplement prior funds for the coBstruotion of the civilian air terminal, school for exceptional chlldren, and for the vocational rehabilitation school. An act making a $418,428 supplemental appropriation fo1· the operation of the e..._ecutivebranch for fiscal year 1966. An act making unlawful for any person to operate a motorcycle on any public beaches where appropriate signs have been posted by the director of public safety. An act abolishing the 10-ycar limitation in leasing real property of decedents. An act continuing financial aid to chlldren of families receiving public assista..nce who have passed the age of 18 but not yet 21, provided they arc enrolled as full-time students in Guam's schools. An act appropriating $125,000 for capital fund of the Guam Economic Development Authority for fiscal year 1966 and an additional $309,500 for capital and operating funds for fiscal year 1967.


No.

8-99 8-100

8-101

8-102 8-103 8-104

8-105 8-100

S-107

8-108 8-109 8-110 8-111

8-112

8-113 8-114

8-115

8-116

Bill No.

Short till•

249 An net authorizing the director of land management, with tho approval of the Governor and tho landowner, to exchange government land for private property of equal value located in Agana. 307 An act immediately appropriating $250,000 for tho purchase of schoolbuses and an additional $91,500 for similar purpose, effective July 1, 1966. 242 An s.ct reducing from 5 years to 6 months tho period after the expiration of a probation during which time the court may issue a warrant of arrest to a probationer for violation of probation committed during the probation period. 187 An act authorizing the sale or trade of a portion of government land at tho Ipa.o Beach for construction of a major hotel by a private enterprise. 106 An act giving the District Court of Guam tho jurisdiction to prosecute misdemeanor offenses which are included in a felony. 326 An act reappropriating $125,000 to supplement the funds for tho construction of the civilian air terminal, $18,400 for tho construction of the department of education warehouse, and $22,000 to supplement funds to pay for the rental of private housing for government contract employees. 297 An act eliminating the requirement of oath in the application for registration of motor vehicles with the department of fu1ance. 329 An act reduc.ing the residency qualification for the Guam Economic Development Authority directors from 2 continuous years of domicllc on Guam to 6 months, immediately preceding their appointments. 228 An net appropriating $5,000 effective immediately and $68,900 effective July I, 1966, for the annotated rccodification of tho codes nnd other laws of Gunm. 235 An net establishing a procedure for an orderly turnover of property, records, and flies from an outgoing legislature to an incoming legislature following tho regular election. a11 An act appropriating $225,000 for the operation of the legislature for the period January 1-June 30, 1966. 349 An act appropriating $13,000 immediately and $50,000 effective July 1, 1966, for the Governor's Committee on Children and Youth. 387 An act appropriating $20,000 for the relocation of the Guam penitentiary sewer system in Maugilno. 231 An act requiring motorcycle drivers and their passengers to wear safety helmets, approved by the director of public safety. 309 An act designating the second Saturday of April each ycnt· us the Guam Youth Day, a special holiday in tho territory of Guam. 29!.l An act extending the voter's registration period for local clcctious from 4 to 6 months, commencing on tho first working day of January and continuing through September 30 in even-numbo.red years, It also provides for a 5-day registration period prior to any special election. 265 An net 1·elativc to the survival of tort actions, actions for injury against childrnn, and actions for wrongful death. 241 An act authorizing the director of public safety to erect signs proltibitiog or rnstricting the stopping, standing, or parking of vehicles on any public highway in Guam where, in his opinion, such notion is dangerous 01· may i.nterfere with the free traffic movement, or

27


No.

BUI No.

8-117

300

8-118

306

8-110

342

8-120

263

8-121

221

8-122

272

8-123

355

8-124

281

8-125

302

8-126

247

8-127

262

8-128

354

8-129

189

8-130

344

8-131

346

8-132

396

8-133

285

8-134

345

8-135

385

8-136 8-137

352 416

28

Short tUle

block the access of the public to limited parking facilities near offices or commercial buildings. An act. relative to the statutory procedure for termination of right to redemption of real property. An act appropriating $6,915,778 for the operation of the depnrtmenL of education for fiscal year 1967. An net making a $12,000 supplemental appropriation for tho construction of a public library in Agat. An act regulating the operation of power boats in an area frequented by swimmers. Au act appropriating $10,000 for the development of a public cemetery on government land. An net rewording the captions in all crim.i.nnlactions arising under the laws of Guam, thus making the plaintiff be dominated by "the people of the territory of Guam." An act reappropriating $30,000 to supplement prior funds for real property appraisal. An act charging air and sea carriers for services rendered by tho government's customs and quarantine officers after tho normal working hours. An act adding a new chapter 7 to title XXVI of tho Government Code of Guam prohibiting the military on Guam from importing alcoholic beverages unless upon consignment to o. locally licensed whol<ll!aler. An net authorizing the depo.rtment of public safety to uso unmarked co.rs in tho standard colors they are painted by the manufacturer for sale to the general public. An net renaming a bench in Yona as tho "Tagachang Third Marine Division Beach." An act increasing tho membership of the Commission on tho Chamorro Language from 5 to 0. An act prohibiting the littering of highways, parks, and other public places where appropriate receptacles arc provided and signs posted by the government. An act designating the first Saturday of May each year as "Teacher Appreciation Day," a special holiday to commemorate tho services rendered by the teachers of Guam. An act providing workmen's compensation coverage for volunteer firemen injured in performing services for the government of Guam. An act providing for coverage of tho members of the legislature in the government's retirement system. An act authorizing government employees with at least 20 years of service to retire voluntarily and receive retirement annuity on prorated basis. Those who retired with 30 years of service will receive full annuity. An act upgrading uniformed personnel of the government of Guam l rank grade above tha.t which was held on the date of retirement. An net o.uthorizing tho issuance of a nontransferable, onsale, general alcoholic beverage license to any hotel of not less than 20 rooms, notwithstanding the current procedure of limiting the number of licenses issued according to the population size in each community. An act creating the College of Gua.m Revenue Bond Act of 1966. An net exempting the o.pplication of tho Minimum Wage and Hour Act of Gua.m on students who work during the summer vacation.


No.

BUlNo.

8-138

413

8-139

486

8-140

422

8-141

451

o-142 8-143

453 454

8-144

455

8-145

456

8-146

457

8-147

288

8-148

161

8-149

351

8-150

498

8-151

368

8-152

259

8-153

303

8-154

476

8-155

526

8-156

150

Short llllt

An act authorizing the Guam Housing Corporation to guarantee payment of loans not C.'<ceeding75 percent of the total cost for the development and construction of rental housing facilities under all Federal Housing Administration multifamily housing programs. It also stipulates that any project under this act shall not be more than 10 rental units. An act modifying the date on which the Guam's Washington representative is to make his annual report to the Guam Legislature. It states that the representative shall report any day during each June session of the legislature, instead of on the opening day of the session, ns previously prescribed by law. An act appropriating S70,000 for the salaries of students employed by the government of Guam during the 1966 summer vacation. An a.ct proscribing that students granted loans under the student loan program shall agree to be employed by the government for a period of years equal to the years of education financed by the loan, and that after completing such services the obligation to repay the loan shall be deemed paid in full. An a.ct increasing the amount of student loan per year to $2,500. An act providing additional professional scholarships granted annually by the government. An act modifying a condition to scholarships awarded for college studies, requiring tho recipient to make himself available for employment by the Governor for a period equal to the number or years his education was financed by scholarship. An act including the e>..-pense for clothing in the amount awarded in the form of scholarship. An net amending section 11800 of the Government Code of Guam relative to College of Guam scholarships. An oct providing reimbursement by the government for losses of crops or permanent plant as a. result of eviction of persons occupying government Jn.ndunder a lease or land-use permit. An uct abolishing the death penalty for person convicted of firstdegree murder, or procuring the execution of innocent person through willful perjury. The sentence is reduced to life imprisonment. An act amending section 840 of the Penal Code of Guam relative to arrests. An act appropriating $478,645 for necessary capital improvements and for other purposes. An act increasing from $200 to $1,000 the fine for a malicious mischief offense. An act appropriating $12,730,818 for the operation of the executive branch for fiscal year 1967 and (or other purposes. An act appropriating $194,420 for the operation of the judiciary bra.non for fiscal year 1967. An act appropriating $622,144 for the operation of tho College of of Gun.m for fiscal year 1967 and nlso authorizing the college to collect nnd c.xpcnd fees nnd tuitions not exceeding $275,000 for tho same purpose. An net appropriating $226,000 for the operation of the legislature for calendar yenr 1966. An net making it a misdemeanor to excavate, injure, or destroy any historical ruin or monument, or any object of antiquity without permission of the Governor.

29



Department of Agriculture (PERSONNEL:

60)-(APPROPRIATION:

$381,018)

INTRODUCTION The primary funcUon of the Department of Agriculture is to protect and promote the agricultural resources and economy of Guam by research, quarantine control, conservation, noel extension work. Fiscal year 1066 revealed continuing progress In efl:orts by the Department of .Agricultm·c to bolster agricultural production. Highlighting the yenr·s accomplish-

ments a.re: (1) Over 100-percent increase of local fresh produce, (2) installation of a poultry processing plant to promote bl"oiler industry, (3) app1·ovnland i.nitlat!on of an offshore e..'<ploratory fishing project to develop the fresh fish market potential, (4) discontinuation of the go,• ernment operated farm store, (5) investigative study of the undefined breadfruit cliebnck disease, and (6) development of a plan for fresh milk production.

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION The Department functions through t11e tion and e..xportntlon of animals and animal products, there were 809 fnrm visits office of the clirectot· and four divisions. involving the animals listed:

Professional Training During the period, one student formerly under the 1>rofessional training program retui-ned to take fulltime employment. One employee attended the University of Hawaii under the In-service training program. A student <trainee under the cooperative program with the College of Guam was maintained throughout the period.

Veterinary Service During the past yetu· the veterinury service has beeu engaged In providing medical nnd surgical service to producti,·e nnlmnls belonging to government agencies and prlvnte lndlvlduai.s ,v!th smnH herds of livestock or small flocks of poultry.

Besides huudreds of officecalls and telephoned advice to farmers nnd the general public regarding sanitation and lmportn-

Cattle -----------------------Pigs----------------------Coats --------------------Poultry ---------------------Onraboa ___________________ _

160 99 23 lei

3

TotnJ_____________________ 309 No serious outbreak of diseases developed and no new disease lins been introduced to the island. The department is investigating the possibWty of estnbllshing a laboratory for the investigation of animal disea.ses, cspecinlly those which are transmis• sible to humans. This Included an Inquiry to the Chief, Division of Research Grants of the National Institutes of Health, for possible nssistance.

Import Permits The department issued the following import 1>ermits:

31


1. Regulations and licenses for hunting ,vUd pigs. 2. llequlring placement of baggage declaration forms 011 ships, vessels, other surface craft or aircraft engaged in c.-ommerclal enterprises arriving withlu the Goats --------------------8 Birds-------------------14 l>oundaries of Guam. 3. Regulations and licenses for hunting Farm Store and Equipment Ser11ice deer. 4. Regulations nnd licenses for hunting The departruent store was phased out fruit bat. upon the establishment of one by the Guam Farruers Cooperadve Assocla.tion. Participation in Fairs and Exhibit The store received $8,748.10 from purShows chase of Its Inventory by the association. 1. Liberation Day Light and ·he.avy equipment services 2. Navy Relief continued to be provided. The depart3. Mardi Gras (Women's Club) ment's phasing out program, however, gained momentum during the yea•r resultPoultry Processing Plant ing In the elimination of one heavy The equipment for the poultry processequipment operator II position for fiscal ing pilot plant was installed n.nd t.ested year 1007. with a batch of ex1>erlmental birds. During •the year funds were approprlN'ecessary minor adjustments were made a ted for the construction of a public marancl each piece ot machinery was tested ket to replace the e.'Xlstlng Farmer's with good results. Recruitment for five Market. I<,unds were also appropriated women and one man to start plant operafor -the lustallatlon of refrigeration stortion ls underway. These will be initially uge to be used at the fresh 1>roducewholehired under training by the departme.nt l;!lle center located b1 t11e department but wlll be paid out of the plant fund. compound. Cattle -----------------72 Hens ---------------------272 Chicks---------------26,763 Fighting roosters __________ 1, 348 Hogs _______________________ 20

Dairy Project Revc1111cEarned, Fi&cai Year 1966

l<,arm store _______________ $21, 210. 37 Nursery sates____________ 2, 737. 77 Poultry ----------------5, 701. 41 Eggs------------------1,754.64 Hogs------------------1,233.65 Cattle ------------------45. 00 Equipment service________ 0, 656. 25 Trailer and other rental-808. 00 Market fees______________2.378.25 56. 00 Fish welr fees____________ Hunting license fees______ 1, 851. 00 Pasture fees_____________ 351. 80

Others_________________ Total ------------

101.65 47, 885. 00

Regulations Approved and Promulgated The following new regulations or amendments to regulations were a~ proved nnd promulgated during the flseal year:

32

A plan to start fresh milk production

has

bee11

developed which would require

the participation of individual milk producers. Instead of a centralized system of production on a large scale, each farmer is to supply the central processing and marketing agency. The object is to reduce the tabor cost factor, which bl addition to other costs, make it difficult for fresh milk to be priced within the buying range ot the average consumer. In this scheme, the participation of the department, with the exception of technical advice nod assistance, bl the o~ eration is almost nit. The private parties involved will carry the full load.

Agricultural Library The department cooperated with the Flores Memorial Library to provide library services to farmers and department personnel. Technical as well as lay materials were made available.


EXTENSION SERVICE DMSION The extension staff field acth,fties were somewhat curtailed during the period, especially during the early part of the fiscal year when the agents were assigned to the cooperative marketing expansion program. The e.xtension staff made 1,570 farm nnd home visits, 7l 4-H club meetlngs, 60 commissioner ,•lslts, 21 cooperative meetings, 46 dlstrlct meetings ; and 182 market surveys were conclucted. During the latter part of the fiscal year the extensiQll division was handicapped by the death of one of Its e.xtenslon agents. In September 1065, Mr. Jose M. Mnnsnplt, Extension Agent I, well known for his dedlcated services to the Department of Agriculture, passed nwny. Recruitment for vacant positions during the fiscal year presented some difficulties since qualified applicants were not reaclily available. However, on February 24, 1066 the department recruitecl !Ill agricultural aide and assigned him to the division.

After 2 years of inactivity, the clul)s' advisory coU.11cil was rencti\ 1nted on June 29, 1006. Twenty-one members and lenders attended the first meeting. Officers were elected, and plans were outlined for the year.

Cooperative Activities

Direct responsibility for guidance and management of the Guam Farmers Cooperative Association remains with the Exten.slon Service Division. Consequently, the clivisiou's personnel were used during the early part of the fisc.al year. During the latter purt of the fiscal year 1966, however, the cooperative employed two people to carry out routine work and extended n call for additonal office peri;onnel. Contlnulng Its program or Increased service, the cooperatl\ 1 e estaullshed Its own farm store. There nre 34 active members in the association during fiscal year 1006. This Is 11 more than the previous fiscal year. Applications for membership are contin11allyuelng recclved. Memuersbip Is subject to the approval ot the board of cli4-H Club Program reotors. During the period of August 10 through The assooiation continues to show great 22, 1005, the FourU1 All.llunl 4-H Club im1n-ovement In Its business operation. Cnmporee was held at Ipno Ileach. Seven clubs were represented l)y 152 mem- Produc-e sold during fiscal year 1966 totaled 274.549pounds. vnluecl at $43,375.27, bers and 18 lenders. Projects exhibited by members nod demonslrntlons gh•ei1 compared with the total sale of 79,057 11ouncls,vialned at $11,701 for the previous l)y the dUl'erent dlYislons o.f the Department o.f Agriculture highlighted the flscul year. On J~nuary ot fiscal year 1006, the nssociatlon oommencecl the sale events. of eggs. A total of 21,341 clozen eggs, In recognition for outshtndlng services to the 4-H club, citation nwarcli. were \'lllued at $16,Wl were sold. The <.'O· presented to Mr. Ken .Tones and Mr. opernth·e ·nlso imported 284½ tons of Frank Cruz, ~vo local merchants. Gov- lh·estock and poultry feed valued at $37,ernor Guerrero nu1clethe presentation on 210, 20 tous of oommercial fertilizer, ,·aluehalf of the Extension Sen"ice DiY-Jsion. ned at $2,2iil.65, ancl 3,300 Kimuer 137 In conjunction with lpcnl hnslnessmen. 1-day-old chicks, va'lued at $1,570. the division sr)Ousorecl the first Annnnl Cooperating. In the effort to phase out Leaders Recognition Banquet. The bnngovernment nsslstan<.-e, the nssodatlon qnet was held nt Kenny's Cnfe, nnd was attended by over 100 4-H lenders nnd 1mrchased a new delivery rnn lirnck to ~nests from the rnrious business estub- UP used In 1ts expanding l)uslness Ol)erallsbmenti". tlous.

33


AGRICULTURE MARKETING AND PRODUCTION Fresh Produce

Poultry

During the fl.seal year the Division's extension agents worked closely with local producers to increase'tlgrlcultural production, create un orderly marketing system, and increase the sate of fresh fruits and vegetables to the military. The Division worked with military purchasing officers in an effort to promote good relations. Several meetings were held between department representatives of the farmers cooperatives from Rota and Tininn. The two island cooperatives bad lndlCll'ted their desire to join Guam's Farmers Cooperati,e. During the fiscal yea,r, Rota was formally <admitted lnto membershlp. Although Tlnian is still awaiting board approval, the Gu11m cooperative began handling fresh produce from both islands. Local production of fresh frults and vegetables showed an Increase, despite an unusually long dry spell (see table I). Production for the fiscal year showed 1.988,007 1>0unds of tire.shproduce valued at $366,377. Total production for the previous fiscal year was 713,616 pounds, valued at $100,829.72. Tomatoes led crop sales in fiscal year 1966 with a total of 189,679 pounds, n.nd a value of $42,574.45. Cucumbers was second in sales with a total of 114,083 pounds valued at $15,867.89. During the fiscal year 1966, mll:lta.ry purchases showed a tremendous increase over sales of the pervlous year. In fiscal year 1966, the militacy purchased 274,MO pounds valued at $43,375.27, compared with 60,826 J>OUnds,valued at $0,644.12,in fiscal 1965.

The demand for fresh eggs continues to exceed the present ,supply, despite programs initiated by the cooperative association and the department to solve the egg shortage. This is evidenced by the numerous calls the division continues to receive from civilian nnd mllltary consumers. In an attempt to alleviate the situation, the Department of Agriculture, in cooperation with the farmers cooperative imported 1-day-old chicks from the mainland and sold them to members of the association as replacements and stock for new poultry raisers. During the fiscal year Guam had 83 major egg producers. These producers maintained 44,560 layers plus 14,460 replacements with a yeaTly production of 780,000 dozen eggs valued at $634,000. An estimated 4,400,000 pounds of feed was consumed by the poultry industry during the year. The value of transactions in local ngrlculturnl products for fiscal year 1966 totaled $1,000,377.

Land Reclamation The Department of Agrlculiture continues to provide light and heavy equlpment service to farmers. However, with the ultimate objective of phasing out thls government service, the department ls placing major emphasis on private comprulies serving the farmers of Guam. There ls a sharp decline of governmentcleared land In fu;cal year 1966 due to tl1e department's policy of promoting the use of privately owned equlpment nnd

Table I. Average Monthly Rainfall (Inches)-Fiscal Flscalyonr

July

Augusl

SoplClll·

bcr

-Jl)62________ S. JO 106.1______ 14.08 1964........ 11. 2~ 1905________ 7. 07 1966.. ____ 15.fti

34

10.61

16.40 14.12 21.86 11.85 13.47 8.112 10. 30 3.87 22. 27

ociober

-19.17 14.95 18.06 H.62 6.80

NoDe- Jnnu- Feb• vom- cem- ory rubor

--

her

--

--

4.35 2. 24 6.31 13.09 13.09 0.33 G.88 16. 10 1.90 B.05 6.92 10. 29 B.97 3. 13 2. 13

e.ry

Year 1962-66

Mnroh April Moy Juno

Tolnl

-- -9.17 9.47 •. 11 I. 02

1.69

1.66 8. 66 6.68 7.07 10.M 12.66 7. II

2. ◄6

4. 44

.so 1.71

7. ◄8 20.69 . 60 I. 69 1. 31 2.61

7.40 6.36

s.n

!OS.82 152.5a 123.go

82. 02 ra.s7


Poultry processing plant equipment undergoing a test run.

phasing out government equlpment ser,·ices. Only 540 full and part time farmers were sen 1 ed in 1966, compared with 600 iu 106G. Total land area cleared in 1966 was 208 acres, compared with 1,408 acres in 1905. In addl'tion to the 208 acres, the department plowed 112 ncres nnd disced 236 acres. Although there was a sharp decline In farmers sen·ed during 1006, statistics show thllt local agriculturnl production has more than doul.)led during the same period. It ls apparent that private <.'Ompanles are providing more equipment services,

and the ''equipment pllnse out" pollcy is proceeding with less difllcuity than auticlpnted.

Spray Program In attempts to conttol destructive iusect.s and disease, tlle Division continues to provide spray ser, 1lces. In fiscal year 1960, 300 farmers and 192 acres were sen·ecl, compared with 479 farmers and 325 acres in 1065. Tbe dry spell was primarily responsible for the reducec1 deruaud for spray services in l 966. In addltion to crops s1>rayed,154 mango. 672 citrus. ill avocado. and 80 papaya trees were sprayed.

PLANT INDUSTRY DIVISION The Plaut Industry Division was aut:horl7.ed 11 positions for tlle fiscal year 1966 of which 3 were technical, 1 semitechnlcal and 7 uonskilied. In addition, an agrlculturnl extension agent I was transferred from the Extension Service Division to U1e Plant Industry Division. One of the uonskllled personnel, who was temporarily transferred from the Plant Industry Dlvii;:ion to the Ei.'ten.slon Service Division since flscai year 100.5, continued with tlle latter c1ivislon. All the

teclmicnl positions wel'e filled with the hiring of an agronomist on September 17, 1966. During fiscal year 1966. empllasis was given to (1) Resea1-cb nnd development programs in horticulture. agronomy, utH1 crop pest control. (2) promulgation of a more efficient and etiectlve l)lruit qunrtUltlne, (3) eclucatlonnl progr1W1 througll radio. TY. news releases, Jlersonnl contacts tmd publications, (4) training of the plant Industry personnel, (5) sen·-

35


Ices Including the plnnt nursery, propagation nnd distribution of economical plants, and plant quarantine servlcee, (6) purchases of needed equipment, and (7) cooperation with Federal agencies. The division's program on research and development was blghUghted by lnltial studies made of breadfruit diseases in rooperatlon with other agencies. Addi· tlonally, the oriental trult fly eradication program was fiunll.v completed. Cooperative programs among government agencies and the Plant Industry Dh·ision were begun durlng the fiscal year. Three educational bulletins were prepared ond published and other educational mnterlnls were released periodically.

Agronomy l!'ertillzutlon studies to gather basic Information on requirements for vegetable crops are continuing. The program Is being expanded to Include a larger varl· ety of fertilizer mixes. The objective is to establish n correlation between rotes of fertilizer, crop variety, soil type, and climatic conditions i;o growers mny maintain a high level of crop productivity. During the fiscal year ttn agreement between the Soll Testing Laborntory of the Navy t>ubllc Works ttnd the Plant Industry Division to run soil analyses ,vas established. At the end or the fiscal year, some 14 dlll'erent. soil samples were analyzed. The agreement will continue untll the Plant Industry Division has its own equipment. The facllities or n soils laboratory ls necessary to determine the various plant nutrients required by the dlll'erent crops under investigations. Twelve herbicides that are selective and nonselect1ve, both to crops and weeds, hove been ordered nnd will be tested for effectiveness In controlling noxious weeds on crops either as pre-emergence or postemergence treatments. In a test us1ng Telvnr ancl diesel oil In water, good control was ol>tnlued 011 creeping crnb-grnss (Digiaria t)CJJ11tlo-iJJclwcm10n), and parngmss (Pat1ir11111p11rp11rasccmS) but It was lnefl'ecth-<'ngnlnst nut grass (Oypr1111rof11ti<la11). Vegudex herbicides sprayed nt 0 quarts In -10 gntlons ot water llt!r ncre us n 1>ret>111ergeuce to weds on head cob-

36

buge gave good control not to nut grass.

011

omst wewi but

Horticulture Research tor better vegetable ,·arleties for Guam t'Ontinued during the fiscal year. An experiment ui:ilug eight ,,urletles ot tomatoes were completely ruined by stray animals. Currently two new rnrieties together with Young nre being tested both under the corrugated plastic house and field conditions. Eleven varieties of head cabbage, eight ot which are from Japan and 3 Crom the U.S. mainland, are currently being tested. The test under the corrugated plastic contlnued to show good results. Tomatoes and lettuce produce excellent products when grown under the corrugated plastic during the rainy seasons.

Crop Pest Control A major step was taken during the flscnl year to Investigate the breadfruit decline disease which hns plagued both species ot bren<lfrults bollt 1n Gunm 011d the trust territory. Participating in the Investigations were plant pathologists from the trust territories, University ot Mlnmi, Fiji, and the Western Somon and the agronomist of the Pinnt Industry Division. Although the Investigations have

A tree affected by the breadfruit decline disease currently unde.r study, showing the gradual dieback of the tree.


been completed. the team suggested a more comprehensive stucly of the disease hy conducting clifferent experiments to further define the problem. The sug. gested e::\.;,eriments will be carried on during the ensuing fiscal year. Survelllnnce of the oriental and melon fruit rues continued. In the early part of the fiscal ;vear some 13 million sterile oriental fruit flies were released; 210 gallons of spray materials we.re applied both by )lnvy helicopter and on the ground, and 9,100 celotex wafers were dropped in nu area previously infested with the orlentul frult fly. For the last 9 months no wild orleutul fruit tly bas been caught. Some 150 pairs of fruit fly traps are strategically located over the Island and checked weekly. Data are being gathered on popualtion trends of the melon fly for an eventual eradication r>rogram. Table I1 shows the melon fly catch for the fiscal year. Trial test of aramite and mnlatWon on the control of mites on both corn and papaya showed that nrnmlte was very effective while malathion gave poor re• suits. Dursban, a product of Dow Chem• lcal International, Bong Kong, shows great promise on control of flies, mosqui• toes, and roaches. This chemical Is not registered for use in vegetables. In a test using Phosdrin, Diazinon, Malathion. and Oygon on lenfminers, Phosdrin gave the best contorl. Further studies on U1ls aspect of work will be forthcoming in the next fiscal year.

Collection and preservation of Guam's insects is continuing. Presently, some 200 species have been collected and inden• tified with an additional 50 species sent to the University of Hawaii for identitl• cation. This is a cooperative agreement between the Extension Cooperative Depnrtme.nt at the University of Bnwali and the Pinnt Industry Division. Identifica· tion and determination of nematode pop. ulntlons in Guam's soil by the Plant Path• ology Department of the University of Bawa.Ii is another cooperative agreement which has so far resulted in 25 sam• pies sent to Bnwnii. A. reforestation program is underway in a cooperative effort between the Parks and Grounds, Public Works Depnrbnent and the Plant Industry Division. Pres• ently, there are some 5.000 daog, 700 itll, 2,000 Philippine Mahogony and 25 teak wood growing for this purpose. In addi· tion, Cntnlpn and two species of pine seeds were introduced and presently are being gro\Vl1at the nursery until ready for planting. Intensification of plant quarantine in• spections on contrnbnnd materials en• terlng Guam was initiated during the year. The fumigation chamber was put into operRtlon during the fiscal yeRr. This program is stepped up in order to prevent the Introduction of destructive Insects In Guam nnd the reinfestntion of the oriental fruit fly. A TV spot on plant quarantine ls continuing nt the KUAM. The Division was instrumental in the

Table II. Melon fly monthly catch-Guam Month

July_•........ ·- ............ _ ........... ·-

Year

Avcrogo cotch per trap doy

Totlll catch

Trap days

Trops In count

11165 1965 1066

14. ◄

1,349 13,990 56,081

October •• --···················........... November-...............................

JQ65

s.4

28.063

2,951 3,797 3.800 3,407

1965

21. 221

◄,MB

043

December ••••••••-····················-

J96S 1066 1966

4,033 ◄, 173

500

Jnnuory. -··-······-··-··-·······February._.··········-··-············-· Morch-······-·-·························

4.0 1.0 1.2 .53 .31 .18 .15 . 00

August ••••••••••• ·-··-···-·············· Soptembcr.- .. -...........................

April ..................... _................ Moy •••• -···-·-················-·······

June.......................................

1966 1066 1966 1906

0.45 3. G

1,988 ,1,201 2,271 I, 761 810

4,271

6,366 4,407

614

◄,

333

6.287

108

4M 534

449

HO 500 688 746 697 694

747

37


partlc.lpntlon of two plant quarantine inspectors on the Second Plant Quaran• tine Techniques and Procedures Training session at the East West Center of the University of Hawaii. Three educational bullet.Ins were prepared and published during the year. These publications include: 1. Vegetable Insects and Control Guide for Guam Growers. 2. Control of House Flies. 3. Vegetable Gardens. In addltlon, three relases for the Extension Service Division quarterly report were prepared. Other educational

materials were prepared a.nd released through news medln. One person attended the Civil Defense course on Medical Self Help. Cycad nuts continued to be sWpped to NINDB through Dr. Whitlllg. In addi• tion, the division participated in agricultural displays in Liberation Day, Mardi Gras tllld Navy ReUef programs. Other services rendered during the year include the propaga tlon and issuance of plant materials, continual operation of the plant nursery and the plant quarantine. Sales from tbe nursery are shown on table Ill.

ANIMAL INDUSTRY DIVISION The Division of Animal Industry is responsible for implementing expansion and improvement of livestock in the territory. This purpose is accomplished by three means: experimentation, demonstration, and con.sultation. During the year assistance has been given to several farmers on the Island in livestock development with one farmer now raising 180 sows for breeding purposes with plans for further expansion. New blood lines were introduced both in the cattle and hog stud se.rvlces. Also assistance was given to the development of slaughtering fac.llitles, through meat consumption data, livestock survey, etc. It appears at the present ti.me that a slaughter plant will be in operation during the next fiscal yenr. Three individuals interested in feed mill operation were also given assl.stance: Data. on feed consumption for possible increase of poultry and S\\'ine production; and lnfonnatlon on sources of equipment and feed plus some help on rations. One of the potential feed mm operators Is local and two, who are already ln the feed mill business, are off. Island. One of tbe olf-is4and operators ls also Interested in establishing a broiler production plant ou the l.slnnd..

20 head of Angus and 20 head each of Brown Swiss and Holstein. Also included ls a herd of 20 cross-bred cows, the offspring of which can be used for experimental work. Young heifers from the calf crop will be selected to be put in the herd or to replace older cows. No les.~ than four bulls will be maintained for stud servlce. A calf crop of 00 percent was realized n.nd during the next fiscal year n great number of these will be offered for sale. During the perlod 31 lleacl of cows, heifers, bulls, and steers were auctioned off at the department. There nre another 22 head of cows, l1elfers, nnd bulls ready for survey. During the year, 69 farmers com• pared to 47 last year, took advantage of the cattle stud serv1ce. The breakdown is as follows :

Dairy breed: Brown SwJ.ssand Rolstc1n .... - ........ Beer breed: Santa O~rtrudls, Angus, Rerecord,

nnd Bran1111s .........

Fiscal year 1066

Fiscal year 1066

li6

212

36

248

676

328

In• crcnsc

--

Beef and Dairy Herd There has been establlshecl a breed herd goal of 20 head of Santa Gertrudis,

38

A totnl of 265 heifers were U1eproduct of previous years of stud ser,•lce.


Table III. Nursery Daily Sal~l96S-66 Homs

July

August

I Sc11lombu I

Octooor

I No,,embcr \ Deoombor \ January

\February\

I

Mnrch

April

Juno

May

'l'otal

1•·-··-··1··········1 I 332 134

42 620 Cnbbogc, hcad •• •-··-····· 84 30 •••••••••••• •••••••••••• 23S 3SO I, 'i3S Cauliflower................... .......... .......... 30 30 M 12 r, 30 .................... ·····-··· Celery •• - ••••••••••• • •••••• - •••••••••••••••••••• ··-···-·········-···· ~12 ·········•.•••••••• -···-··· ....•.••••....•••••••.••••••••...••••••• 48 30 12 12 Chive •• _ •••••••• - ••••••. -• 36 •••••••••• ········-·· ·········-•.•••••••••• 18 42 Eggptam.s .. _ ........ _ .... 2.070 3,662 1,897 1,708 2,270 1.oao 078 1,870 1,3H b8 802 12 --·...•·--- -······Kale--·-········-·········· •••••••. ····-··· ·-········· ····•··••••• ·········-- .....•.•.••• ·······-· 1,510 112 ----·---·· !,<MO Leltuca.._.·····-·········· 706 24l'> 214 100 036 724 1,430 I 34 I 14 I 10 '6½ Onion, grcen ••• ·-·······-· •••••••••• , ½ ..........•• ······-··· -·····-···· • 6½ 1 22 I, 195 G22 626 338 700 414 738 520 100 780 824 Pepper, hot.................. ), 78t PoPl)Cr,swccL. .............. 4,4.20 734 2,287 2,099 2,192 846 030 U2 5,732 2,308 2,a◄o 1,022 980 3,007 2,953 2,062 G,170 4,074 3.844 70G 1,320 'l'omotocs ....... -·······-·

---·····-

1

48 7,118

12

·--;-•-·-•·

7,078

871 '10 358

I

3,470 302 2l2 240 24,773

1111½

7,335

23,450 31.923

2,224

FIIUIT TRFJl:S

~~:::::::~::::::::::::::: :::::::::: llrcadCrult. ••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••••••

!

Cnshcw ••• ·-·····~········· •••••••••••••••••••• Coconut, dwnrL_.}......... 10 31 Lime, M~lcoo Key.......... 16 10 Mango, Salpao •.••.•.•••.•.•...•.....•. ········Orange, 11lncopplo•.......•.•. ·······-· ........•• l'opoyo .••.. _................ 168 58 Stllr upplc. ..... -•·-······· •••••••.•••.•.•.•.•. Tangorlno.................... 4 9 , Estlm1itc

UJ

\0

:::::::::::: ··········-

·····-·····

:::::::::= ····-····~· ········=~·· ·······~····-··~· ~ : ·······~..I........~. .......•••••....•••.•••. ···-······· ···············..•••••.••..••••••••..•••••••• '

IDS 32

-·········

1 806

•••••••••••• ···-······· •••••••••• •••••••••• .•• •• ······-· 4.23 I •·•·····-·· ............ ···-····· 18 35 16 89 47 37 JO o 12 25 .......... ............ -•·•-·-· ............ 6 30 12 20 G2 67 63 148 10 10 -······-·· 1 25 169 83 ··········............ ............ 2 ·-······· 2· 4 .......... ·-········· ····-······ ····-······ ···-······· ··-······ •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2 41

••••••• 57 33

144

1

114 j 118

182 30 4 26 7 3 25 50 113 ....•.•.•• J6 ···-····· ·····-···

073 82 444

GOL 23 13


The O.E.P. projects we.re completed during the year giving the division two new working corrals and a new concreteblock brooder house. Pasture management programs were successful in providing grass for the cattle during the dry season. Pasture rotation, grass cli1>ping,nnd fertilization were Instrumental In this progrom. Many farmers have observed these practices and have been impressed by its value in good pasture programs.

Swine Herd During the year the swine herd was maintained at 8 Minnesota sows and 2 boars, 12 Hampshire sows and 4 boars, n Berkshire sows and 3 boars, and 5 cross• bred sows and 2 boars. Selected replacement of gilts and l>Oars have been made to give the department a herd of about 50 animals. During the year 160 gilts and boars have been sold to farmers and next year the number will be about doubled. Also 17S farmers used the swine stud service in which 682 sows were bred. Over two-thirds were repeaters from last year and several hundred sows were off• spring of previous stud service progmms. During the year n new swine nm was constructed to house the increased herd nod to give better control over round and kidney worms. A noticeable Improvement has been shown in the last 6 months in round worm control nnd In kidney worms.

·--·._··-· .•.•.•••••••• -............................. -.

The hatchery produced the following number of chicks during the fiscal yenr which were sold to tanners 011 Gualll: Leghorn pullers _____________ 10,398 :--ew B!Ullpshire_____________ 8,524 Broller:c1----------------1. u82 An experiment of producing roasters

40

The poultry program this year bas been reevaluated to have it more nearly become n iself•S11Sta:lniugoperation. Four hundred luyer•foundntlon birds, 100 l>roller•foundatlon birds and 60 New Hampshlres were the main .flock for the year. To augment tl1is ru1d to more nearly meet the demn.ud, 400 more broiler 1111.rentstocks were adcled. These will not come into l)roductlon until next year. These wlll be used to produce broiler off• spring to supply the poultry 1>rocessing plant. Records kept on the operation revealed the following : duct on, percent

L6ylngflock••••••·······-··--·······-·······-······

Total avcrui:c tor entire flock................

Poultry

Egg rcro-

Typc

Broilers................... Now Hampshire .......

A feed trial was run on some division gilt replacement to determine: 1. Cost of raising (feed) from birth to weaning. 2. Maturity rate to 180 pounds versus age. 3. Quality of swine versus known rec• ords from the mainland. The results were as follows: Birth to weaning-M days. Gain in weight average on eight bead 42.4 pounds as compared to mainland average per animal of 45 pounds. Twenty pounds of feed costing $1.40 were used per animal to get this weight. Birth to IG6 days-gain in weight 174 1>0undsaverage. Mainland record Is 180 pounds average. Seven hundred and three pounds of feed were used at a cost ot $45.23 per animal.

Feed cost per doz.on Weigh,

Value

Hntcb• ability, percent

70.6 (5.1 49.3

4.Z'l 8. 5 6. 02

$0. 2'oll

81?

.595 .421

38

54.97

6. 246

.437

M.07

74

from IJroiler stock was completed at 14 weeks resulting in prime poultry meat but nt a cost higher than broilers at nlue or 10 we~ks. At 14 weeks. the experi• mentlll bircls commmed 100 percent more In teecl and lncrensed nnly iiO percent on weight.


FISH AND WILDLIFE DIVISION The Division of l<'ish nnd Wildlife is responsible for the resenrcll, clevelop• ment nnd management of the fish and wildlife resources of Gunm. In order to nccompllsh tlJese major objectives the fol• lowiug dlvlsiounl nctivities ,,,ere cnrrlecl out: A. Research B. Development C. Commercinl fisheries D. Lnw enforcement E. Information aud education

seasons lengths were us follows: Two 30day deer seasons, a 44-clay fruit bat season, one 30-day game bird season and 11 year-long wild pig season. Bunters were successful in taking 25 deer and 1 pigs during the deer seasons and 138 bircls during the bircl season. Only eight frnit bats were checked clnring the open season. Three hundred nncl se,·enty bunting licenses were sold during the 1966 fiscal year. Through the cooperation of the Naval Magazine Explosive Ordinance Disposal Unlt, coral heads obstructing ch1111uels in the Agnt, Merizo, nml Nimit~ Research BenC'h areas were removed. The objecUnder the Federal .lid to l<'lsh aud tl ves were to open the cl1annels to Im\Vilcll!fe program, basic fish and wildll1'.e prove water circulntion. permit llsh to research necessary for a sound managemove in llll.d to provide safe channels for ment program was conducted throughout the passage of small bouts. the year. Numerous wildlife crop dumage re.()Orts These projects entailed collecting and were lnvestlgatecl to determine cause, exanalyzing field data and documenting tent nod solution to 11revent further druufllldlngs In rer>0rt forms. age. A.id was given by Dh•islou personThe research projects condncted were: nel Lo indlvldunls complaining and lu tl l. Survey of Islnnd fish po1mlatio11s few C'ases, equipment was loaned out to nncl fishing methods. capture the birds or animals causing t11e. 2. Compilation of n check-list of tJle dnmage. food nnd game fishes on Gnam. Several changes In the fish and wild· 3. Experimental Introduction of new Ufe laws were prepared and submitted. species of aquatic animals. These changes were based on illfonnntlon 4.. Study of the cloves of Guam. gathered through the research effort. 5. Study of the Guam deer. O. Qunll and mil life history studr. Commercial Fisheries 7. Study of the fruit bnt. 8. Habitat apr>rnlsnl and study of ex'.l.'he comlllerclal fisheries 11rogram in the Federal Aicl to Commercial ll'isberies otics for Guam. Research aud Development Act (Public Lnw 88-309) was lnltlatecl during the Development year with the submission and approval of Guzzler development to i,rovlde the project proposals, nncl the 11laus. watering areas for "•Udlife species specltlcatlons, ftncl estimates for the prowere constructetl and main talued <lurgram hy Federal nncl local go,,ernment lug the year. Jfooclplautlugs were set 0111 agencies. to increase or attract wildlife species to Bids were sent out for n fishing ves~el nreas where Il0Pt1latiou numbers were in the 3~G feet length range equipped low. Assistance In the development of with fishing gear. Recru!bnent for n these programs wns obtained from youth 11111ster-flshermanwa~ in process. und sr>0rtsruen's groups. A regnlntirm wns passed making rhe Law En/orcement fruit bnt and wild pig n game anlmnl. Patrols and stakeouts uy the officers, During pre,·ious years thei:e si1ecles wen• both in the island aTeas and along t11e unprotected. li~our hnnHng senson,; were <:Ondnctecl coastnl ureus. were routinely performed for the gnme nnlmnl1, nnd birds. The clurlllg this period. These enforcement

41


nctivltles resulted ln the apprehension IUld arrest of 20 groupg of violators. Sixteen of the 20 groups ot violators were found guilty; three court cases nre pending IUld one case was dismissed. The ma.nmum fine during the year ,vas $250 along with confiscation of equJpment used In the violation.

42

foformalion and Education Reseaxcb findings, actlv!Ues, changes In regulations, etc., were made public through the rndlo, newspaper, television, and personal talks to civic organizations, classrooms, and milltary unlt.s by members of the division.


College of Guam GENERAL ADMINISTRATION The College of Gunm is lbe only American im~titution of higher educntion in the Western Pacitlc. It ls gornrned by n board of regents created by Public Lnw 766, Seventh Gunm Legislature. The board consists of five members appointe<l by the Governor with the aclvice and consent of the legislature. The chief executive ancl administrative officer of the college is the president who is responsible to the board of regents. The president nlso serves as executive secretary of the bonxd.

Organizational Changes Dea1t of St11de11ts.-The office of dean of students was assumed t,y the former coordinator of student all'airs. This change was made in conjunction with n reorganization of the student affairs section to Improve services for students, especially In counseling and in planning and supervision of student activities. With further increases in enrollment, more personnel will be aclcled during the next academic year. Direeto,- of Pt£blic Relations a11ciPul>accordance with a recomlieations.-In

mendation of the accreditatron team of the Western Association of Schools ancl Colleges, the office of publlc re.Jations ancl publications was established nnd filled at the beginning of the fiscal year. This ofllcer also is director of the college press and assists the president in administrative matters. Program Direeto,-_:.._A. program director wns eppoiuted to coordinate Federal programs in <:0011erntlon with c.-ollegeofflclnl;; responsible tor their implementation nnd supen·lslon. He also took cn·er the clnties 011d responsibilities of the coordlnntor of plant development. n position that bas been abolished. This

fnnctiou includes projects fuudecl by both the territorial and Federal go,·ermnents. Oomptrollcr.-To,vnrd the encl of tJ1e academic ye11r,a comptroller·s office was estaibllshed to handle the increasingly complex l)usiue:.-snud fiscal n.ff'nirsof U1e college, including those pertaining to Feclernl u1locatlons fo1· academic nncl physical development. Thi::1 vositiou, filled in April 1966, replaced that of tl11> coorcli11atorof l>usiness affairs.

Administrative Services l"lt1a11ec.-For the fiscal year lOOr;-66. the total at)llroprintlon for the operation of the college ,,11s $i64,887, expended as follO'\,·S:Snh1rles, 77.1 percent; local t:rn,·el aml contractual services, 5.1 percent; supplies and. materials, 5.2 percent; equipment, 8 percent, and teacher training stipend, 4.6 percent. The full-time personnel totnled 88, as follows: Ex0C'Utlve aclmiuistration ( presicleut and staff)_____________ .:\dm1nlstrative ser,·ices ( division chairmen, librarians, etc.)______ Instructional staff___________ Secretarial and clericnL_________ Maintenance aucl custodlnL_____

O

15 41 11 10

Enrollment increase required the em11loyment of 78 1»1-rt-timeinstructors for both on-campus autl off-campus classes. Plant Do11olop111c11t.-Originally sche<lulecl tor completion by the fall of 1066. the language and 1ine arts and the new Uhrary buildings are now expected to bP. ready In early spring, 1967. Shortage of fnnds dehiyefl the start of construction ou the science l,uilcliug. This problem was alle,·iated late In the year with approvnl of nn acldltlonnl $11>0.· 000. Work on this structure is expc-ctecl tn hegin next fh;cal ~•ear.

43


'l'he college press does not accept order:; from private enterprises.

Plans were n1iprovecl for a $2 million expansion project, whkh includes con• struction of two dormitory buildings, u field house, nnd a new student center. Development Fo1mdation-.-The board of regents authorized the establishment of a college development foundation to encourage phllilllthroplc contributions for future academic: nnd physlcul devel• opment. Although no Intensive drive has been conducted, voluntary donations to the fund buve nmonnted to $6,000. College Press.-Productlon increased substantially with the employment of a fnll•tlwe pressman. A total of 106 job orders was filled, grossing $9,834.70. A 20 percent surcbarge Is added to each order for the cost of muterinls and ser,·• Ices. Jobs during the yeru- included: College student 1>ubllcatloos; a high school newspaper: brochures for recruitment of col• lege faculty, the development foundation, s1>eelal Institutes and other projects; of• flclal college forms, Invitations and programs; and the r,rintil1g needs of various government of Guam agencies.

A.dmissio118 all(l

Rcuistrat-io11s.-The

grand totnl enrollment for the fiscal year showed u 6.3 percent increase o,·er the previous year. Significant enrollment factors Included selective n.nd voluntnry military service inductions, departure of trunsient students. voluntary withdrawals, dismissals for ucndemic failure, and other causes. 'l'he total number of students ill each ncademic term is sllown in the table below: 19~

1905

Malo•••••• ·--····-··· Pomolc....... ___..... Toto!.. .........

Spring

Fall

Sumtllllr

Sex

292 2615 647

1966

65!i 631

M7 «7

1,186

99f

'l'he following tables retlect distribution of students per term according 10 ndmission status, class levels, academic majors, degree and nondcgree, and citizenship:

On-campus

Summer, 1965... __. ___. ___. _-·. _. _-·. _. Fa.ll, 1965. ___________ ·- --· ·--·---·--· Spring, 1966 ... ·-·· -· _·-·-·--·. ________

Total

Part lime

Full time

T"m

385 593 498

162

547

496

1,186 994

496

Off-campus (Andersen Air Force Dase)

F11Utime

Term

Term Term Term Term Term

Fart time

0 0 0 0 0

V, 1965__. _______ --·-·--·-·--· -· I, 1965-·-·······-·-·-··-·-····-·· II, 1965 ••• ·-··---··--·-···-··-··· III, 1966._ -·. _ --·. _. __ .. _. __. __ .. IV, 1966--·---···-·--··---······-

Tola/

129

129 240 200 185 195

240 200

185 195

Cl<18s Levels C/aa,

Freshmen.·-··-·-·-·-······ Sophomorc_····-····--·--Junior .................... . Senior .................. __ _ Graduatc •••••••• ·--·--·-·(High school)*_._._ .... _...

Summer 1066

749

58 52

73

559 164 102 105

80

64

2

2

0

168 114

•Undor ccrt.olncondlllons, high Ji<:hool sLudonts ore nllowed to toke collogoco11r.1es,

44

Total

Spring 196G

J'aU 1966

256 88 91

1,564 420 307 236 119 4


Academic Majors Summtr l/l66

Mqjor fidd

Agriculture ________________________ Business ___________________________ Education and psychology ___________ Fine arts __________ -- ----- __-- _--- _ Home economics _________________ ._ Language and litemture _____________ Science and mathematics ____________ Social science. _____________________ Others· ___________________________ Undeclared __ . __ . ________________..

2 85 147

18 4

34 75 72 0 106

FaU

1006

4

247 221 18 8 37

Sprino /1/(JQ

7'otiJI

2 237 206

8

56!)

560

19

56 24 112

12 41

0

18

298 307 18

426

223

755

90 131

130 , 104

Degreea.nd N ondegree Sum=r 1/l66

Claa,ijiwU011

Degree candidate. __________________ Nondegrcc _________________________

452 95

Fall 1006

996 190

Spring 1966

807 187

~al

2,255 472

Citizenship Summer Statu,

United States, local residents _________ United States, off-islanders. _________ Aliens (trust territory)-------------Aliens (others) _____________________ Schola·rsh•ifJ8 and, Stttdc11t Loans.-A

total of 72 scholarships and loans was granted last year, as follows: 16 tor teacher training, 23 professional, 28 govermnent of Gnrun student loans, and 5 National Defense Education Act Joans. Tests Admi1iistered.-The ad.missions office administered several entrance and qualifying examinations and other tests required of student.:;, government employees, and by U.S. rolleges and universities and others. These examinations included the American College Test (ACT), College Entrance Ex-nminatlon Board (CEEB), Grnduate Recore! Elxnmination ( GRE), Test of EngUsb ns a Foreign Language (TOEFL), General Educationnl Development (GED), Miller•~ Ann1ogy Test (MAT), Government of Gunru Competitive In-Service Trnining F,xruuination, nnd the Selective Service College Qunllfication •.rest. C011,uscli11g.-A. personnel shortage nnd increased enrollment restricted counselIng to student~ with mojor personal ond

1906

255 161 107 24

Falt

Sprino /9(JQ

Total

150

446 371 144

30

33

1,224 I, 000 407 96

1906

523

468

academic problems. All students, howe,·cr, hnd nt least one conference with n member of the counsellug staff'. AdcUtional counselors have been recruited !oinext school year. Work-Study Progra111.-Federal funds for th.ls program amounted to $33,988. A totnJ of 148 students were processed nud nccepted; 00 of U1em were employed throughout the year. Because of ncndemic deficiencies nnd other causes. tho remaining 44 were ter111iJ1ated. For the next fiscal yenr, the college hn!' been nllottec1 $105.736. An additionnl allotment of $7,ii97 has been llJ>pronid for Educntlonnl Opportunity Grants for stnclents under Title IV, Port A, Higher Edncation Act of 1005. This snm is to be av11ilnblc b~• September 1. 1966. T,ibra1·JJ a111f A1ulin-Fis11uT.-Tl1c

11-

brnry's book holding;, incrensed to 86,158 ,·olumes. About 1.200 other hooks are 011 nrcler. Pnmphlets numbered 4,000 (au increase of 1,300), nnd periodicals totaled 41)2 (nn Increase of 80).

45


Uircultltlon h1<:re11t!ed consldernbly, trom 20,062 last year to 41,438. A major factor 111tlJis Ln<:rensewns the adoption t,y the cntnloglng deportment ot the Librarr of Congress card system. The new

,;y;;tem au;o expedited the processing of Incoming ,·olume-s. In the audlo-visunl sectlou, more movie Ill.Ins, film strips. slides. nod phonograph records were added.

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

Ne-w Academic Divisions The new Di\·ision of Nursing Elducatiou wns csluullshed In the fall !:emester of 196.3. A planned 2-year associate degree proi:--ram hns been endorsed by the Gunm ~urse License Board nncl the Nil• tionnl Lengne of Nursing. ~ew York. '.l'he progrnm will be Implemented In September 1060, in cooperation with local bospltnls, medical centers. and health ngencies. The Dl\'lslon or Lnngunge and Fine A.rts was spilt into two new divisions: Language and Literature, which also absorbed the DI,! Ions of Lluguistlcs n.nd l+'lne Arts.

Special Projects Co11tt1111111u Bcl11catio11.-Tbe college was granted a $26,072 Federal grant to set up the nclmlnlstrath-e structure for u program of continuing education under Title I, Higher Education Act of 1065. In thi.s connection, n three-phase islandwide survey was undertaken to obtain data for formulating objectives of the program. Intenrfewed were the parents of Wgh school seniors and elghth grade students, nod local employers. Results of the survc~• will be used to determine new vocational and technical training curricula under applicable Feclnrnl assistance programs. Upwarci Bo111td, Prooram.-This progrnru, funcled by a $111,007 Federal allotment from the Office ot Economic Opportunity. was launched at the college In the summer ot 1900. Special conr;,cs in English and mathematlc1i were ofl'erecl to 100 selected blgb school juniors und seniors to help them prepare for admission to college. 1''01lowl11gnre the highUghts In each divisiou's ucth•lties durlug the yeur:

)

46

Dwision of Agriculture and Home Economics Auric11Zt11,·o.-Euroll111cnt In this deportment continued to be tllsnppalntingly low during the past year. llomc Eco11omics.-An upward tr1?11d was noted In this area. Tw1?11ty-fourstudents enrolled during the year, compared ro nine the previous year.

Business Administration Dcorec Prourama.-'l'he boccaluureate and assoolate degree programs contlnued to attract many students. There was only one signlftcnnt clIange ln the curriculum: A course in business statistics, J)reviously ottered ns n sophomore suuject, was reclassified to upper division leYel. Ma11aoe111cnt ltistitutc.-In cooperation with the local office ot the Smn!L Business Administration, the dh-islon sp0nsorecl a :\Ianagement Instltute on April 30, 1900. Some 80 managers, assistant managers, und other aclministratl,·e employes ot local firms attended. Subjects cOYcrecl were: Financing the Profit and Growth Objecth-es of a Firm, Adrertlsi.ng :.\Ianngement nnd Effective Selling. aucl Control of Cost and Cash in the Small Busl11es.s.Business executlves served on the panels. ancl discussions were concluctecl by lenders in the various management fie Ills.

Division of Education and Psychology Teacher Ed11catio11.-The clh·lslon continned to emphaslze elfecth·e teacher crluc11llou. Moro personnel were assignecl to supervise student tea<'hers nncl lntcrmi. A weekly seminar suI>pie111entecl the periodic ,·!sits by lhe super,·isor.s. Tlle number of ncl,·isor11 also was augmented to meet the programing neccls of educ11t1011 mujors ( 150 studen.ts in elementary ctlu-


cation, 09 in secondary education, 8 in psyc.bology, and 2 in physical education. Thirty-five other students had no declared majors). Ot1ida11ceand, Co1m8eUng.-A guidnnce course and a course in ('Ommunity recreational leadership was introduc:ed. Libra111 Science.-Addltional oft'erings in this area Included minors in education with emphasis on library science for positions in eiU1er elementary or secondary school, or In a public library. Physical Bd1tcation.-lntroductory courses In Japanese Combruti,e Arts and Sword Fighting were added to Ul.eactivity and health curriculum. Inetltntes.-During the spring semester, 1066, the division offered Esaeutials of Geography to 24 elementnry teachers. This was the forerunner to flye institutes for elementary teaehers Utls summer in which these courses were offered : Administration and Supervision. Teaching Rending, Teaching English as a Second Language, Recognition and Placement of Exceptional Ohlldren, and Science Through Discovery.

Division of Fine Arts Major Dcpartments.-Three academic departments comprise t,he new Division of Fine Arts. These are Art" Music, and Speech and Drama. The division offers major concen•tratlons In English-Speech ( in conjunction with tJ1eDivision of Language and Literature), Art, and Art Education. Minors are m·allal)le in Art and Speech. State Program.-Plans for a State Program in Fine Arts were initiated. Federlll assistance amounting to $25,000 bns been approved.

Division of Langttage and Literature Majo1· Departments.-Tbe separation of the Fine Arts area from this division left four major departments In Language and Llteratnre. These are IDngllsh, literature, foreign languages, and linguistics. The major i.n English was strengthened <luring ithe pa.st year. A new com~e, Publications Laboratory, was ndded. This insured tl1e bh11ontl1Jyproduction of The

Triton, n student newspaper, and the Xanadu, nn extracurricular semestral literary maga~ine. Li11g·1iistics.-This deparbnent continued to function nlmost exclusively for the teaching of English us u. forelgu language. Testing 1>,-ogmm.-One of the continuing functions of the dh'lsion Is the administering of English nnd Innguage tests. During the year, such tests were given to students in the extension program in Salpan, the Upward Bound program, and the Navy Apprentice Program (NAP). Fo1·ei{J11.Lat1g1tagea.-Frcnch, Russian, nnd ,Japanese were offered during the year. The college presently is considering foreign lllnguuge as part of its genem I education requirements.

Division of Nursing Ed1'cation Accrcditatiott.-Following n stucly by its two-member accreditation team, the National League of Nursing granted' the college's nursing education program "reasonable assurance of accreditation." The league's action qualifies the college to apply for Federal funds for building and eguipment. Full accreditation by the :-.."LNwill he considered rluring or nfter the implementation of the nursing program. Twenty-five students, selected irom among 64 applicants for admission, ore expected to enroll in the 1966 fall semeste.r.

Division of Science atzd Mathematics New Co1wscs.-Two new courses (Buma.u Anatomy and Physiology, nud MJcroblology) were added In conjunction with the implementatlou next year of the associate degree nursing curriculum. Also approved for next year were two new courses lu physics and one in biology. The new mathematics courses and one In chemistry were aclded during the year. 11istitrttcs.-In cooperation with the Division of Education and Psychology. this division conducted an in-service institute for 26 secondary science teach• ers under 11 $6,070 National Science Foundation fnncl. A Rimllnr Institute for 25 elementary science teachers has been approved for next year.

47


A proposal has been made to the NSF for a 2-day secondary science teacher orientation program and an all-island science teachers conference. This project would cost $1,200. B-iologicai .Statio11.-Plans for next year include 11 biological station which will be n unit of the division. This unit wlll serve as the headquarters for science teaching and research materials. Land Re8CMiGS.-Tbree pieces of land have been reserved for the college by the Department of Land Management for biological conservation and field teaching. These are (a) a 12-acre site adjacent to the college campus in 2r1angllao, (b) Anne Island (6 acres) In Agat for a bird sanctuary, and (c) 26 acres in Agana Springs tor a tropical freshwater reserve. The need for a seaside laboratory facility hru; also been discussed with Land Management officials. l!]quipme-nt,.-A $42,800 fund was made avallnble for purchase of science laboratory equipment and library reference material. Half of this sum was allotted by the National Science Foundation. Special Projects.-Members of the division stall' have been engaged in certain special projects, runong which are: (a) A Biology Teachers' Handbook for Gurun, which will be printed by the College Press. (b) A guide to the shallo\v-water invertebrates of Hawaii, entitled "Edmondson's Reef and Shore Fauna of BawaU," to be published by the Bishop Museum in Honolulu. (c) Contributions to the Marlana Islands bibliography. (d) Articles for "Mlcroneslca," a college publication. (e) Four hundred new plant specimens from Yap and Guam were collected and ndded to the college herbnrlum. These and others in the collection are being permanently treated against predatory insects nnd fungus nttack. (f) Invertebrate specimens Increased an<l some were sent to specialists for i<lentiflcntion and reference purpose:-.

48

(g) Numerous origl.nal research re• ports pertaining to the western Pacific were added to the college library through the 1Uvlslon. These include old publications of the Smithsonian Institution, back Issues of "Pacific Science," and a complete set of reports of the Gunm Agricultural Experiment Station. 1902-32.

Division of Social Sciences Instittttes

a,ul

Work8hops.-Under

n

National Science Foundation grant of $4,!Y'vO the division conducted an In-Service Institute for Social Science during the academic year, September 25, 1965, to June 4, 1966. Twenty-one secondary school teachers and counselors from public and private schools completed the course. During July and August, 196(), a summer workshop on social work was conducted in collaboration with the wel• fare division, Territorial clepartment of public health and welfare. Similar projects have been approved for next rear. Ba1tc11Bi<mProora-111.-Wlth the Implementation this summer of the College's Extension Program In Saipan, tbe Division offered a social science institute for secondary school teachers of the Trust Territory.

Dwision of Extension Services ..111ulerscnA..FB Oa1117m,s.-Activity at this airbase continued to be the primary extension actiYity. Enrollment varied from 200 to 250 each term. Navy Apprc11tice Progra111.-Academlc courses are offered to enrollees In this program. More than 40 students were enrolled during the year. Sali,pati Ea,tcnS"ion.-A. new activity was implemented in Saipan, capital of the Trust Territory government, for teachers and students who may eventually continue their college education in Guam. Ne10 Program.-l'rellmlnnry plans were made to establish nn extension cen• ter for U.S. Navy personnel. Tbis would be set up at the Oonsolirtnted Tnclnstrlal Relations Office area near the nnw1l station. Approximately 150 students nre ex• pected to register for college course~.


Department of Commerce (PERSONNEL:

28)-(APl'ROPRIATION:

(Regulnr, 26; contract

The Department of Commerce is composed of ,the Office of the Director nnd divisions o-f Industrial Development, Tourist Development. Air Terminal and Port Security. Its duties are to help established businesses and to encourage new ones, t.o compile Information on current business conditions and make such information avo.ilnble, and to compile, analyze nnd publish periodically a census of business and Industry on Guam. The department is also charged wi-th the enforcement of local Customs and Public Health Regulations and certain Fed.era! regulnUons applicable to Guam ; with the Inspection and certification of all equipment of weights and measures used commercl'nlly by the civilian community; und, under the Governor's memorandum dated l\Iay 14, 1964, with the management of the new nlr terminal.

Office of the Director The Office of the Director conferred with a total of 75 buslness pro-sp~ts dur-

ing the year, and furnished replies to over 200 general Inquiries on types of husiness operllti<>n, volume of sales, opportunity for new lmslness, communication n.nd sbopplng facilities, taxes, dutytree Imports. labor and employment, and related matters. At the requ('JSt of the Governor, the U.S. Commissioner of Customs nsslgned a U.S. Customs official to study and evaluate procedures to in'snre proper ad• herence to regnla tlons controlllng the processing of watch nssemblles from materials imported into Grrnm and ex• 1>orted t.o the U.S. malnland and other areas. The appro,·ed procedure has been hnple-mentcd. The department provided pertinent stnt.isticnl nnd economic data for n Civil

(consuttnnt)

$271,806) 2)

Aeronautics Board team that conducted n sui-vey of air transportation requirements of the American territories of the Pacific. In addition, a team from Hawaiian Airlines conducted their own survey filghts for projected air TOutes through the Trust Territory. A mainland air terminnl consultant was hired to help establish a sound man• agement program for the new air terminal. This office, llbrough its weights nnd mensures inspector, inspected. and approYed 103 SO/lies, 37 gasoline sel."Vlce pumps, 22 yardsticks, 5 rope measures, 4 fabric machine$, 4 wire ,screen, 2 oilcloth, and 2 diesel pumps and collected um.I turned in to the Treasury ot Guam services fees in t11e amount of $166.25.

Industrial Development Dwisio1J This division works closely with the Industrial and business community. It publishes n quarterly review of business conditions on Guam wblcb contains nu annlysls of business conditions and trends, the economy by sector, Imports by commodity nnd volume, and highlights of commercial acth•itles abroad of lnterest to Guam. The division continued Its work of offering advice nnd assistance to new industries consiclerecl suitable for location in the territory. Five new industries were estnlilfshe<l cluring the yenr, with total employment of approximately 1Ci5 nnd n combinecl weekly 1>11:vroU of over $10,288. A totnl of 257,274 wntcll movements were ex110rted to the U.S. mainland coming nn<ler the purview of g1mcruI henclnote 3(n), United Stntes Tariff Schedule. The program of the division wns hnmJterecl by prolonged dcluy in recruitment of n clh·ision chief and of an economist.

49


The stntisticnl and nnalytical branch is a new section established In the division for the collection, compilation, analysis, and dissemination of nil statistics pertaining to the economy of the territory. It issues a brochure entitled "Facts About Doiug Business On Guam," which highlights nrens of Interest to prospective enterpreneurs. This booklet has been widely distributed to U.S. mainland and foreign addressees.

Tourist Development Division The tourist division initiated new advertising in various media. A coupon type advertisement was placed In Sunset magazine, Holiday, and the New York Times, with excellent response; 1,207 requests for information have been received. Hiring of an additional clerk made possible more speedy distribution of Hnfa Adal Packets to travel agents, carriers, and media producers as well ns a more rnpid and complete distribution of other promotional material such as brochures nnd posters. Distribution of promotional mnterlnl Included approximately 6,000 posters, 1,112 photos, 45,000 4-color brochures in English nnd 7,000 4-color brochures in Japanese. Visitor's accommodations increased with the addition of some 80 rooms at the Guamericn Motel and the return to private enterprise of Hotel Micronesia with an additional room count of about 30. A major step forward. for the island was realized, with groundbreaking for a 250-room hotel to be operated by the Hilton chnin on Tnmon Bay, with opening scheduled in late 1967. Completion of the clvllinn nJr terminal in August 1966 will be another vital improvement for the island generally, and a vast improvement in comfort and service for visitors. A local firm line announced plans to project and operate n fleet of commercial sport fishing bonts. The first two hulls were delivered. A new poster depicting a beach scene nt Ypao with Pnntan Amnntes In the bncl<ground was printed and cllstribution hn.'l begun. A nrnp will soon he ready ror

50

dlstribution ; new Illuminated photos of Guru.n were received and are ready for display: publicntiom; of the Hafn Ad:1i newsletter continued. Another visit by the SS H,imaloya represented the biggest single activity In tourism with the arrival of some 1,250 passl!l1gers In l\farch. The Himalaya or a ship of her clni;.,;,will continue to visit Gurun annually. One of the year's biggest forward steps wns the commitment of money for estnbllshment of a downtown tourist office which will be opened in early fiscal year 1967.

Chances of better nir service to and from Guam seemed promisµig. A Civil Aeronautics Bonrd survey team visited Gunm nnd the trust territory to investigate the need for increased ancl varied nir service. Following this Ci~il Aeronautics Boa.rd visit, Pnn American announced Its intention to institute GunmTokyo service In the futu·re. The tourist consultant nccompanied an Hawaiian Airlines team on an intensive imrvey flight throughout l\licronesla. The commission continued membership in the Pacllic Aren Travel Association nnd the American Society of Travel Agents, nnd joined the International Union of Official Travel Organizations. The tourist consultant attended the conferences of the American Society ot Travel Agents In Hong Kong, the Pacific Area Travel Association in New Delhi, nnd accompanied the Governor to the Western Governor•~ Conference in Nevada. To and from these conferences, the tourist consultant made many calls on trnvel agents, carriers, nncl media representatives throughout the Orient, mid-Pacific, and western United Stntes and obser'l"ed a growing awareness on the part of the travel industry of Guam's future role In Orient aml Western Pacific tourism.

Port Security Division The port security division enforces llJl· pllcable provisions of general headnote 8 ( n), United States Tu riff Schedule: 1i'edernl Contr111Jan<lSel.zure Act; the foreign n!lsets control regulation of tbe


U.S. Treasury Depurtmeut; plnut nnd animal quo.rll.lltine regulations or both the territory and U.S. Depnrtiuent of Agriculture; export control regulation c.,f the U.S. Department of Commerce; laws concerulng arms, runmunition, nnd im· plements of war; U.S. laws of concern to the Atomic Energy Commission; public health quarantine regulations; and fhe Guam customs regulations.

In the absence of established Federul ugeuclei, in Guam to administer these Federal laws, the Governor has been dele• gated and Is empowered to do so by secUon 6(b) of the Organic Act of Guam. During the period of this report, the following summa.rlzes activities of the pr,rt security division !11e.xecution of en• roreement functions:

522 Vessel inspection and clearance _________- - - - - --- - - - - - - -- - - - - - • - - - - - - - -9,935 Aircraft inspection _________- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - -- -- - - -- - - - - -- - - - Passenger baggages uxamined_ - -- __- - ---- - - - - ---- -------- -- - -- -- ---- -- 267,855 Cargo boxes or packages examined _____________________________________ 51,568 U.S. mail packages (foreign) examined_ - - - --- ----- -- - --- - - - - - ---- - - --- - 2,156 Fruits and vegetables examined ________ - - ------ - - -- ---- -- ----- - ----- -- 041, 238 264 Imports certificaws (livestocks n.nd marine life) received and examined ____ Interception cases (plant and animal) __________________________________ l, 602 Interception cases (drugs nnd medicine) ________________________________ 45 Appropriate certificnt.cs of origin examined and forwarded to "Foreign Asset.s Control Office, New. York, N.Y __________________- ____.... _________. _ 2,576 Shipper's export declaration authenticated und forwarded to Bureau of 11 89:i Foreign Commerce, Washington, D.C.- ---- ---------- - - - --- - - -- --- -Export of taxable commodities supervised nnd tax drawback certificates certified __________________________________________________________ 727 Vnlidnted export licenses endorsed and forwarded to Bureau of Foreign 23 Commerce, Washington, D.C_. _____. ---- ... --------__-- --- - -- -- --Passenger and crewmembers processed ... ______--- -- ---- __--- --- --- ---- 123,629 Issuance of certificate of origin, CF-3220, United States To.riff Schedule, headnote 3(n) _____________________________________________________ 205 Two 1>ort security inspectors took 90 days of !nservice training in plant quarantine techniques and procedure sponsored by the Institute of Technical In· tercha.nge, East-West Center, Honolulu, and 2 weeks on-the-job training with the U.S. plant quarantine division in Hawaii.

Air Terminal Di-vision A new Gunm air terminal, which will be owned and operated by the government of Guam but wlll continue to use the U.S. NaYal air statlon airstrip, ls scheddled to open for business in mid-November 1966. The new terminal, on a 24-acre site, consists of several structnres dominated by an arrival lmildlng of 14,700 square feet and a departure building of 14,700 square feet separated by a covered bTeezewny concourse with a total floor area of 12,0.'33squnre feet. It includes a maintenance shop with a total floor nren. of 11.025 square feet. Guam Re-

babilltntion A.ct funds provided $850,000 for the terminal, $425,000 ns a loan and $425,000 ns u grant; $735,000 was np• uroprlated from local funds. Completion of the major construction Is scheduled for August 15, 1966. Space for al.rune offices and several concession areas are provided in the arrival and departure buildings. An agreement is being negotiated with :\:Iobil Petroleum Co., Inc., for land 'OU the east boundary of the terminal site for n fuel storage tank farm. Five fuel tanks with total capacity of 76,800 gallons a.re to be installed in this nrea in the first increment. 'l'he air terminal consultant visited Guam three times and held con!erences with officials of Navy public works, the government of Guaru, privnte aJrllnes, nnd with prospective concession operators. The nsslstant air terminal 1mrnagcr ~mpleted 7 weeks of airport operation stncly nnd observntion in Hawaii autl the

51


V\

N

Annual Report, Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce, Government of Guam Imports Rovenue

tons

Arr1ca•••••••••••••••••••• ·-·················· Argentina_ .. _ ... _ ............ - ...... -.... Australlo...................................... Oh!chi Jinm.·-······· ....... ................. Denmark ••••••••••••• ·····-·······-··-···· Englnnd......................................

Revcnuo

dollars

Tmnsshlprncnt.s

Rcoxport.s •

1

Rovenua tons

Rovcnuo dollars

1.0 35. 2 8,312.8

699.59 -····-········ ··········-·S,400. « ······-···············-1,168,509.32 1. 2 21,000.f7 J3. 0 2, GGl56 ······-·-··•••••••••••••••• 6. S 1,341.00 ··········-···· ·-············· 181.8 41,692.76 12.1 2,422.44 Fmncc •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• - •• •. 6.3 1,969.48 ·······················-··· Onrlll8Dy............. -······················ 6,668.01 267,016.20 .9 1,100.00 Greece •••••••••• ····················-··-········-··-··· ·····-·--··· 2. 4 1,074.00 Uolland...•.. _ .....•.•.•...••.••.•• -··-···· I, Z14.8 30,966.00 •• ········-···· ····-··-····· Hongkong..................................... 18,152.9 786,49'2.43 14.7 1,000.00 Do ........................................................ ··········-···· ................ ............•••• Japao ............. -················-·-··46,136.2 2,375,6al..37 346.0 81,736.56 Do.................... •·········-··-···· •...•••..•.••••• ·-···-········ • 1,177.8 ·····-·-····· New Guinea •.••..•.•.•••.•••••• _ •••••• - •••• ······-·········-············· .3 150.00 Now Hcbrides.-·-··························· •••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••• •5 195.00 New ZcaiMd.......... ........................ 1, 23t. 0 1,097,765.95 .... ························Okina"''ll··············-·······-············· ··-·······-···········-···· 3. 3 4,812.00

Peru.··················-······-······-··14.2 7,98t. 90 Philippines ... ····-············-······-···· 5, s~.2 531,222.60 Singnporo...•.•.•.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ·-············· ·····-········ Spain .••.............. ·-···········-····-·· •2 144.99 Taiwan ...... ·-······························ 13,610.0 240,654.30 Thailand •••••••••• ······-······-············ •••••••••••••• - ······-····-·· Trust Tcrrtlory... .. .. . . .. . .. . . . . ........ ... .. S, 246.0 234,386.20 1 so.4 ....•.........•. oo ............................ •·····-···· Do ......• ·-·······························-···-··············-···-·············-····................ Do ................... : .. ·····-···-······ .•.•.•••••••••••••.•••••••••••••• Do ................ ·- ..................... ······-···-···· ··-············ Do ••••••• ·-··-···--·················-··-···-·······

United States.-............................. 166,021.9 Do ........................................................................

··-··-········

Colllltl'Y

Rovenuo

tons

·-•·••···-···········-··· -·······-·· ·-·······-···-··········-·

~-• 1 Argentina 1'/S Trust

Terri tor)•. 61. 5 AustrnllB T/S 'J'rust Territory. •• ••

• 71 ·····-··-· •••• •••••••••••••••• .2 56. 3 9'8.7 2. 2 ·-·-······················20. 8 ••••••••••••••••

Ocnnony'r/S1'rustTorrltory. Bong Kong T/S PhlllpplnllS. Hong Kong T/S 'l'rust Tl'rrltory. IopnnT/S'I'rustTcrr!tory. Jnpnn T/S United Stoles,

I Now Zooland T/S Trust Territory.

••••••••••••••••

I

262,201. 77 208.3 .Phillpplnos T/S Trust T(lJTltory. 34,800.00 ·-············· ·-···-········ •••••••••••••••• 1,2 t,500.00 101.2 TnlwttnT/STrust•rcrrilory.

3,83L 7 5.8 ···--····-··

560.0

19,7'11.1

13,200.00 ··········-····

2,578, 145.J7

•6

·-··-···-··

··-·-····-···

•6

·······-······· ....•.....•••.•.

·•-··•······· ••• •••••.•..•.••.••

352.9 62.'.i. 6

3, 69'2,233. 65

35. 6 32,606.3 • 462.8

16.3

•••••••••••••••• ······-········-···-······· 33,616, 6S3. 05 58,820.6

·······-·-···

•...•.•.•.•.•.••

Trust Territory T/S Austrnlia. Trust Territory 'l'/S Ocnnony. Trust Territory T/S Hong Kong. Trust Territory T/S Japan. Trust Territory T/S Trust Territory. Trust Territory T/S United States. Unit-0<1Stoles T/S Trust Territory. United States T/S KwaJnleln.


l

V.cnlce•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 49.3 Vlelrulm •...•.•.................. _ .....•. _ •• ·--·-·-········ W11kolslnnd ..........•...........••..•...•.••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

•••

Trust Territory........................... United St.ot~ ••••••••••••••• -........... 'l'ot.ol. ••••••• •-······

11,000.251················1···········-··1················1

·····-·-······ ······-········

808,s21. &1 I 40,422, 11uo

'l'ot.oL ••• ··················-·······-·· MU~:~~~.:_

I

••• •••••• •••••••••

93. 7 395.8

84,984.1

1· .............. ·1······ ........ ··1 228.6 ··-···-··-··· 6,382.6 ··-······-···· 6,611.2

···········-·· ···········-···

81. 0

34,097. so •••••••••••••••• 10,614.00 ··-···-··-···

0, 741,682.65

35,46.U

1········..... ···1······......... . ·······-······· ·······-··--··

81. 0 1................

•.••....•....... ·······-·······

1...............

.

, Not lncludlng Imports ol petroleum products lor Ibo clvlllan C!COnomy and ror sale at l.bo post exchanges, or $5,0'22,720. OBSOllnoImports 229,924 barrels, $2,123,574 rrom Otbc1 petroleum products: From Iran. 149,016barrels, $1,221,967;Japan, 47,055 barrels, $360,130;Phlllpplncs, 31,764barrels, $266,818; UnJted States, 6,861 barre.lsand 40,664lbs. grease, $179,400. Fuel rcqulromoo.ts ol Island•wldo power system do not appror among commcroilll lmp0rl$. • In Oscal 1000,Ouam had commercial exports to tho United States or $1,489,005,ol which $1,386,035represented watch movements and tho remainder scrap metal.

Iran and 93,263 barrels, $1!61,750rrom Japan.

I

VI U.)

5ertl!),


mainland. During l:he survey he visited 14 airports in O States on the west coast and ended his airport study in Seattle,

Wnsh., where he attended the annual convention of the American Association or Airport Executives (AAAE).

Annual Report Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce, Government of Guam Summary of Imports (See footnote (1) page 53) commodities

Quantity

Unit

ImporU, Africa

Commodities

<~unntity

Unit

Import,, Chichi Jlma

Fish, C4Dned................ Foodstuff, mlsccllrulcous.....

2,345 1,830

Cases. Pounds.

Fish, froien .................

12, OOf Pounds

Impor/4, Denmark Jmporu, ArgrnUna

Foodstuff, mtsccllaneous, Cror.on .....................

72,371

Do.

Jmport1, A1utralla.

Bakery products and candy .. Beef, !rozon.................. Coffee/tea......... ______... Dairy products .............. Fish, canned ................ Fish, frozen................. Flour ........................ Foodstnff, mJscellaacous--. Foodstuff, mlseollaneous !ror.on•••••••••• ·-·····. -· Fruit, canned ............... Iutco, connecJ___ ·--·-··· Milk ••• ·····-·----·---·-

•••

Rice. .. - .................... Sugar.... ___ .. _____.. ·- ... Appllonccs.................. Batteries .................... Electrical supplies ........... Furniture ................... Homo fumJshtngs •••• ·-··· Housohold effects, clvlllan ... Mtlsoolte.................... Officeequ.ipmont.......... _ .. Palnt, thinner, vnmtsh, lacquer.................... Plumbing suppllos .......... Steel, struoturol/rolnrorclng.. Vehicles................ _._ Vehicle ports ............ - .. Building materials .. _ ....... Deer-·-- ___ ·--··-···-·. Chemicals and Insecticide ... OJgnrettcs.__....... __. __ .. Dry goods................... Mlscollnncous mcrctwnd!so.. Poper products .............. Petroleum products .... ___ Solt drinks .................. 'l'obacco..................... 'l'olhltrles and cosmetics. ___

54

105,560 M,603 1,650 i4, 066 I, 711 048 25,150 203,470

Do, Do. Do. Do. Casas. Pounds. Do. Do.

Do. Do. Cnsos. Do. Pounds. Do. 4 Encl,. 3 Do. 633,tlOi Pounds. 31,530 Do. 760,450 Do. 47, 191 Do. 18,108 Board rcot. 4 Each.

13, i02 476 876 3,168 3,070,014 1,412,000

Gallons. Pounds. Do. Ench. Pounds. Do. Coses. 65,081 Pounds. 226 Coses. 286,177 Pounds. Do. ◄•◄.81,650 Do. 1.654 2,400 Onllons. 7 Coses. 518 Pounds. 260 Oo. 100 538,010 76,337 101 35,MS 13,689 1,700

Feed, tllllmal. ............... Foodstuff, mJscollaacous..... Household offcots, clvlllan ... Lumber ••••••••••••••• ··-·· Motor boat, blke, cycle, scooter. Motors/parts.··----······ Beer......................... Liquor ...................... Medlcln11lproporotlons and

Do. Do. 529 Do. 5l,ot8 Board feet. 68 Each. 30

9,127

12.5 Pounds. 496 Cases. 3,621 Do. 270 Pounds.

drugs.

Mlscollllnoousmcrchandlse ..

14,638

Do.

Import,, England

Eleclrlcal supplies ........... Household effects civilian .... Lumbar··-··--····-··-·· Motor boot, bike, cyclo scooter. Motors/ports ................ Deer ......................... Liquor ••• ·---·--·-·-·Medicinal prepnrotions nod drugs. Miscellaneous mcrclinndisc ..

3,061 4,319 51,048 68

Do, Do, Board reet. Ench.

125 Pounds. 4.96 Cases. 3,521 Do. 14,270 Pounds.

14,638

Do.

lmporu, l<'ranc~

Liquor •• ··-·-·-············

210

Cases.

lmporu, Germnav

Household effects, clvlllan_. Musle11lLnstrumcnts .... - .. Vohlclcs................ ·- .. Vehicle parts ................ BuUdLDgmatcrlBls-.-··-··

Beer....... ___ .···---······ Dry goods ....... - .......... Liquor •• ···-·······-··-·· Mtscellaneous morcbandlso... Poper products ........... _.

Pounds. Each. Do. Pounds. Do. ◄07 Cases. 1,000 Pounds. 110 Oo.scs. 2,834 Pounds. 17,636 Oo. 1,007 10 106 9,419 1,481


AonuaJ Report Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce, Government of Guam-Continued Summary of Imports-Continued ConunodlUos

Quantity

Unit

omco equipment- ........... Beer.. _ ..................... Liquor ••• ······-·---··· M lseclloneo·usmerchandise .. Paper products ____ .......

114

4,154 81 18,217 2,240

Each. Oases. Do. Pounds. Do.

lmportl, H1111g K1111g 38,318 Bakery products and candy. 2,364 Fish , Clllliled................ 048 FISl1,froun. ········-··-·· 69,469 FoodstutJ, mlscollnneou.s.... Foodstuff, mtsccllnneous, 11,482 frozen. 2 Julee, conned ................ Sulillr.·····-··· ••• ·-·-·· ••• 28,318,105 165,100 Vegetables.•... __ .. ·-·.-· 0 Appllnnccs.................. 40, 81i7 Eloctrlcnl suppllos.•.. -·-·· Fumlture ................... 633 53,002 Uomo tumtshlngs .... -·-· Household effects, civilian-. 30,500 Motor boot, bike, cycle,

scooter.

3 4

Office equJpment ............ omco nnd school supplies. __ Plywood •• ·--······-·-·· Steel, structurnVrelnforclng.. Tires.·-·····-·-········-· Vehteles..................... Beer.... -··· .. ·-·· _______ Chemicals nnd ln.sccLlclde ... Cigarettes................... Dry goods••••••• ·-·········· Liquor •• ·················-. Mcdlclnnl prcpnrntlons and drugs. Mlscellnneous mcrcb11t1d1Sc .. Poper products .•••••• ···-·Sort drlllls .................. ToboCCO-••••• ---········· Toiletries and cosmetics..... Botlcrlcs, veblelc- ........ -

0,000 26,898 1,000 30 36 1,700

65, ($] 50 324,398 1,000

63,086

Do. Cases. Pounds. Do. Do. Cases. Pounds. Do. Each. Pounds. Cartons. Pounds. Do. Each. Do. Pounds. Board rcet. Pounds. Encl1. Do. Cnsl'S. Pounds. Cnscs. Pounds. Cnses. Pounds.

Do. Do. 600 Cases. 61.8 Pounds. 1,050 Do. 8 Each.

405,426 6,654

Import,, Ja1xm

Eggs ••••••• ·-··············

Flsl1,conned ................ Fish, !roun ................. Fish, salted... _ ............. Foodstuff, mlscellnncou.,.. _, Foodstuff. mlsccllnncous, lroun. Fruit, cnnnc<I....... _ ......

Quantity

-Unit

Import,, Japan-Con.

Import,, Holland

Bakery products and candy. Beer, rro•cn.- .............. Dairy products ..............

Commodities

.

74, IG6 Pounds.

a.no

Do.

9,440 Do. 20 Coses. 1,528 Do. 221,360 Pounds. 4, TT6 Do. 80!,6118 Do. 19,686 Do.

766 Oosos.

Spices.-·· .................. Vegetables, fresh ............ Appllnnccs.. -·-· .....•.•• Batteries, vehicle............ C=cnt •••• ····-·· •••••••• Cement, blocks.............. Elcctrlcnl supplles-·······~· Furniture ................... llardwarc •• ···--·-·-···Ueavy equipment.. ......... Heavy equJpment parts ..... Jlome rurn!Shlngs........... Houscl1oldoffoct~,clvlllnn ... nowebold effects, military .. Machinery pnrt.s.••. ······MnsonJto. ...... _ .. __ ...... Motorboat, bike, cyclo scooter. Mot.ors/parts.·······-······ Musi en! Instruments ........ OO!cooqulpmcnt ............ Office nnd school supplies .... Phonogrnpl1................. Plywood ••• -·····-········· RodJo....................... Steel, structurnl/romlorclng .. Tape recorder.······-··-· Do ...................... Tires ••••••••••••••• ·-·····. Tcle\•ISIOD set •••• ••••••••••• Vclllclos..................... Vehicle parts ••• ·-·········· Building 11111tcrlols ........... Beer- ....................... Chemlcnls nnd lnsecLlcldo... Dry goods................... Liquor •••• ··- •••••• -··· ••• Mcdlclunl prcparntlons nnd drugs, M ISccllnneousmcrchnndlsc.. Poper products .............. Petroleum products ......... Solt drinks •• -······-····· •rollctrlcs nnd cosmetics..... Moll, parcc.lpost ............ Boer, lrOZ(l[l..-.............. Dairy products .............. Fish, canned.········-····· Fish, rrouin ................. FoodstutJ, mlscollaneous..... f'ood$lU fl, mlscelillncous, rro1.cn. Onions, dry ........... - ..... Pork, frozen_____ ·········· Potatoes ..................... Spices....................... Vcgct.ablcs, rrcsh••• ·-·····

866 Pounds. 5 Do. 185 Enoh. 112 Do. 030, 748 Pounds. 9,540 Encb. 13,923 Pounds. 1,080 Cnrt.ons. 232,131 Pounds. 13 Ench. 74-5 Pounds. 87,342 Do. 100,90S Do. 12,103 Do. 4,898 Do. :U, 196 Board !cot. 1.,665 Each. Pounds. 20 Ench. 76 Do. 24,303 Pounds. 00 Each. 16,40 Board feet. 326 Each. 1,738,710 Pounds. 201 Each. 3 Cartons. 374 Each. 87 Do. 207 Do. 74,420 Pounds. 400,306 Do. 251 Cases. 68, l16 Pounds, 249,072 Do. 36,822

323 Cases. 3.127

l'ounds.

1,636,068 Do. 8,686 Pounds, 4,381 361 14,325 103 3,876,0!3 2,620

Onllons.

Cusos. Pounds. Do. Pounds, Pounds. 904 Cases. 3.300 Pounds. 152,412 Do. 680,707 Do. 40, 705 133,470 189,605 1,274

8,225

Do. Do. Do. Do. Do.

55


Annual Report Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce, Government of Guam-Continued Summary of Imports-Continued Commodities

Quantlt-y

Unit

Beer, troien..______________ 3,876,043 Pounds. Dairy products .............. 2,620 Do. 994 Cases. Fish, canned ••• - •• ·-···-·· Fish, lroz.cn................. 3,360 Pounds. 152,412 Do. Foodstuff, mlscoUancous..... Foodstuff, m.lscollancous, 580. 707 Do. Croz.cn. 40, 705 Do. Onions, dry •• ···········-·· Pork, !rozen................. 133,470 Do. Potatoes ...... __ ............ 189,605 Do. Spices.. ____________....... 1,274 Do. Vcgotablo..•,fresh ............ 8,225 Do. Import,, P,ru 705

Cases.

Import,, Phlllppln~

Bakery products nnd candy. Dnlry products .............. Foodstuff, m!sccllnncous~-Foodstuff, m!soollnncous, Croz.cn. Snlad oil/shortening ......... Electrical suppUes..... _____ Fumlturo ........... ___ .... Do •••••••••••••• •-·····

Hardware.············-····

llomo rurnlsblngs ........... Household effects, clvlllnn... Household effects, military .. Lumber •••• ·--·-········· Masonlte_ .................. Motors/parts ................ omco equipment ....•. - .• -omco and scbool suppUcs..Plumbing supplies.-······Plywood •.• ---··· ..•••..••• Sewing machlno............. Steel, structural/rolnCorolng.. Tires·-----················ Beer ....................... ChemJcalslllld Jnsecttcldo... Dry goods................... Miscellaneous mercband lsc.. Pnpcr products .............. Liquor ••..••••.••••. ---···· sort drinks.········-······· Tobncco.... - .. - ........... Toiletries and cosmetics..... Mall, parcel post............

56,289 Pounds. 4,656 Do. 43,600 Do. 3,700 Do. 122

6.382 360 41 7,660 33,661 63,603

8,170 1311,701 8,624

6S5 0 3,207

200 27,640 91

220 41 30,600

3,633 5,930 102,195 6,303 100 105 1,240 11,107

D~. Do. Cottons. Boxes. Pounds. Do. Do. Do. Board Ceot. Do. Pounds. Each. Pounds. Do. Boord feet. Enoh. Pounds. Each. Cnscs. Pounds. Do. Do. Do. Cases.

Do. Pounds. Do. Do. 680

Import,, Spain

Miscellaneous mcrchancllsc..

56

Qunntlty

Unit

Import,, Taiwan

Import,, New Zlaland

Fish, canned ................

Commodlllcs

4M

Do.

Bakery products and candy. 8,800 2 Eggs.···········-·········· Foodstul?, miscellaneous.. _. 14,608 FruJt, canned ........ ______ 261 Sug11t.___________ ····---· 16,338,155 Vcgctablcs, fresh ............ 15,7U Vegetables, canned .......... 6 6,9'23,960 Cement •• ······----·-····· Cement, blooks...... - ...... 5,700 Electrical supplles. ..... ___ 3,326 478 Furniture ................... Ilome lu.rnlshlngs.. ________ Z.400 4,618 Household etrects, clvlllon. .. Lumber ......... _________ 19,634 Plumbing supplies .......... 0.24S 23,724 Plywood ••• ··-··········· Steel, structuml/rctnCorclng.. 2,326,794 Building matcruils. .......... 265,112 2,205 Obomlcols and lnsectlctdc.... MedJclnlll prcpnratlons and 1,181 drugs. 172,997 Mlsccllaucous mcrchnndlso.. Paper products- ............ 4. 905

Pounds.

Coses. Pounds. Cases. Pounds. Do. Cases. Pounds. Ench. Pounds. Cartons. Pounds. Do. Boord rcct. Pounds. Board Ceet. Pounds. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do.

Imporu, Tru.,t Tenllorv

Bakery products and candy. Boer, frozen_ ................ Ooffcc/tco................... Com •••.•.••••••••• ---······ Dair)' products... ............ Egg3 ••••••

·--······~-

Food, animal .............. Fish, froltCII..•............ ,. Fish, salted--·-····-······ Foodstuff, mtscollaJJcous..... Foodstua, mJscollnncous Croz.cn. Fruit, fresh.................. M.Ulc................. ______ Onions, dry.············-Pork, Crou.n•••• --······-·· Potatoes.- .................. Poultry produc!S Crou.n..... -Rice................. ______ Salad o!Vshortenlng. ··--·-· Salt •••••••• ·····--········· Vegetables. Cresh............ Livestock •• --·--•········· AppUcances.·············-· Comcnt, blocks.. _________ Electrical supplies........... l'umlturo .... _________.... Hnrdwnro: •••• ·--·-··-·· Heavy equlp.ment.. _______ If envy equipment par!S.....

Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. CIISOS. 486 Pounds, 143,807 Do. 291 Do. 132,270 Do. Do. 2,073 M2

27,Mtl 25 115 70 3

Do. 5 Cases. 3,876 Pounds. 216 Do. Do. H,340 314 Do. 12,600 Do. Do. 160 (6 Do. 113,030 Do. 64 Each. Do. 5 7,066 Do. 3,128 Pounds. S2 Cnrtoos. 5,617 Pounds. 23 Each. 2,832 Pounds. 108,895

'


Annual Report Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce, Government of Guam-Continued Summary of Imports-Continued Commodities

Qunntlty

UnlL

Commod!Lles

Quantity

UnlL

JmporU, U11/UdStatt.1-Con.

Import,, Trllft Ttrrltorv-

Oont1oued Home tnmlsblngs .... --· ... Household effects, civilian... llonscbold effects, mllltory .. Machinery.···········-···· Motot boot, bike, cycle, SCOOL-Or. Motors/plU'ts................ Musical Instruments ........ Officeequipment.. ........... Officeand school supplies .... Paint, thinner, varnlsb lacquer. Plumbing supplies... ··-·· Plywood ......... _ ......... Sowing mncblnc ... _. ___ .. Steel, structural/rcln!orclng .. Tires ........................ Vehicles•••••••••• •••••••• ••• Vehicle ports ................ Building mntcrlnls. .......... Bccr•• -··-······-······· Chemlcnls llDdlnsccLlcldc... Dry goods......... _ ....... Laundry supplies ... - .. - .. Liquor •• ··-·-······· ••••••• Medlclnnl prepomtlons and d.rugs. MLscelln.noous merchaodlso.. Poper products.............. Petroleum 11roducts.........

ScraJ>.~---·-···-·-·· Soft drlnks ••••• - •• ····-··· ToUotrlesand cosmetics..... Ons bULBIIC, rrccn, helium. .. Moll, parcel post.·······-·· Imporu, Unittd State,

Dnkery products and candy. Beel, froZC11._. _____ ···-·· Coffee/tea................... Com ••••• ·-················ Dairy products •••••• -·•·-··· Eggs ••• ····-······-······· Eggs, powdorcd. •••• ---··· Eggs.•............ ··-·· .... Feed, nnlmol. ............... Fish, con.nod................ Fish, frozen. ................ Fish, snltcd ••••••••• ·-····· Flour ........................ Foodstuff, mlscollonoous.. _. Food~tuff, mlsccllnnoous, frozen. FTD!t, canned ••••• ···-·····

FruJt, frosh.................

Juice, canned ................ 55,936 76,729 MUk.............. - ....... 1,340,608 Milk, powdercd..·-········ 146,438 Onions, dry ................. 296,860 Pork, trozcn....... ------·· 824,051 Potatoes •• - ••• -··-·.·-··· Poultry products, fl'OWI.- .. 1,854,476 20,070 Pounds. Rico•• ····-·.--· ••••••••••• 16,983,083 1,010,477 l Each. Solad oll/sbortonJog.... - ... Solt .......... _ ............. 343,246 8 Do. 84,817 Sausage, frozen.............. 10,164 Pounds. Soup, canned ................ 2, 194 5 Oalloos. Spices................. __ .. 69,620 301,120 Sugar .. _ .................... 1,320 Pounds. 6,946 lll2 Bonrd lccL. Vegetables, canoed .......... 1,064,309 7 Each. Vegr.tablcs, fresh•• ·····-·· 4 32,230 Pounds. Livestock•••.•......•. ··-· Appl!BIICOS .................. 3,030 4 Eoch. 6,072 Dnttorlcs, vehicle............ 20 Do. 26,887 Pounds. Do.·······-· .••.•••••• 36 4,743 Do ...................... Do. 61,647,134 CcmcnL..................... 3,000 Cnscs. 379 Cement, blocks.............. II, 879 Pounds. 1,446 Do. Elcctrlcnl suppUcs...... - ... 2,786,636 10,007 160 Do. Furniture ••••••• ··-······· Ilnrd wore ...... _ .......... I, 667,003 991 Cases. ,98 Pounds. 643 Bcavy equipment ........... Heavy equipment p1Uts..... 335,667 780,497 I, 3711,603 Do. Homo furnishings ........... Household ofTccts,civilian ... 2,220,940 622 Do. Ilouscbold effects, mllltnry •. 2,030,ffi 14,003 Ollllons. 334,168 Pounds. Lumber··-····-···-···· •• 3,062,BOf 1,438 Mocblnery .................. 20 Coses. Mocblnery parts ............ 151,783 20 Pounds. Mnscnltc .................... 66,890 JO Cylinders. Motor boat, bike, cycle, 30,661 Pounds. 800 .scooter. 29,726 Motors/ports ................ Musical Instruments ... ____ 1(2 omcooqulpmom ............ 3,901 1,170,017 Do. 9 Do ...................... 948,871 Do. I, 027, 274 Do. omconnd school suppllos ... ), 097, 06'1 163,026 606,573 Do. Point, thinner, "amlsh, locqucr. 718,286 Do. 126 12, illO Cnscs. Phon.ogmph............. - .. 10 600 Pounds. Plano •••• ·•··••-·····-·-· 2 Vans. Plumbing supplies . ........... 6, 4113,MO 1,272,268 8,620,135 Pounds. Plywood ••••• -··-·······-· 3,276 124,928 Coses. Rndlo. -·-······-······•• Sowing machine ............. 207,616 Pounds. 69 1,730 Do. Steel, structurnl/relnforclng .. 8,620,018 19 •• 670,317 Do. 'l'npo l'CCllrdor ............... 12,606 Tires ... __ ................ 8,070,317 Do. I I, 316,097 Do. Do.····-············-·· 378 'l'clovlslon set. ••• ····-····· 760 0, 101 Oases. Vehicles••••• -.-····· ••••• 684,366 I, 229,167 Pounds. Vehicle parts ................ 5. 562 810,786 1,316 12 24

Pounds. Do. Do. Eacli. Do.

.

Oo.scs. Do. Pounds. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Cases. Pounds. Do. Cases. Pounds. Each. Do, Do. Vans . Plates. Pounds. Each. Pounds. Cartcns. Pounds. Each. Poun.ds. Do. Do. Do. Board feet. Each. Pounds. Donni lcct. Encl1. Pounds. Encl!. Do. Cartons. Pounds. Oallons, Eacll, Do. Pounds. Board lcct. Encb. Do. Pounds. Each. Do. Carton. Each, Do. Pounds,

57


Annual Report Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce, Government of Guam-Continued Summary of Imports-Continued Commodlt.les

Quantity

Unit

Quantity

Unit

&port Unlled Statu-Con.

Import,, Unittd State,-Oon.

BulldJng mnterlals---······ Dccr,---·····-········Obcmlcols and lnscctlcido ... Cignrctws ................... Dry goods................... Laundry supplies............ Liquor.·············-··-· Medlclnlll preparations and drugs. Miscellaneous mcrohnndlsc,

CommodlUcs

Pounds. 368,400 C=. 1,264,881 Pounds. 12,196 Cases. 304,808 Pounds. Do. 1,508,690 17,952 CI\SCS. 105,280 Pounds.

6,191,788

398,7tl8

Do.

Paper products .............. Petroleum products ......... Soft drinks.·-···········Do .................... Tobacco ............... - .. Tollotrles and cosmetics ..... Oas, but.o.ne,Creon,hellum .. Mall, parcel post.·-·-····

2,694,661 Pounds. 809,383 Gallons. 123,708 O=. 3 16,816

783,398 37,032 1,448,663

VllllS.

Pounds. Do. Cylinders: Pounds.

Import., Vtnlu

mUltary.

Miscellaneous mcrchondlso,

7,322,229

Do.

Gl\'Jllnn.

Motor boot, bike, ayclo scooter.

985

Each.

Annual Report Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce Government of Guam, Summary of Re-Exports (see footnote (2) page 53) Commodities

Quantity

Unit

30 Pounds. Do. 160 Do. 705

Exporl4, Ji)no/and

Heavy equipment pnrts ..... Motor/parts .................

Quantity

Unit

&port, Japan-Coullnucd

&port,, Au1tralia

Dry goods............. _ .... Mt.soollnncousmcrcl1Bndlli0_ Pal)llr products .•..... ·-·····

Commodities

10, 762

298

Do. Do.

Tolovlslon set ............... Vehicle...................... Ohemlco!Sand Insecticide... Mtscclloncous mcrchandlso.. Paper products .............. Scrop._············-······· Toiletries nod cosmetics .....

E11ch. Do. Pounds. 91,182 Do. 205 Do. 1,229,936 Do. 822 Do. 4

1 42

Erpor", Ntw Orilnta Ez,porl4, Omnanv

Mlscellonoous mcrchond.tso... HouliOhOldcllcots, clvlllrul...

308

660

Do.

25

Do.

876 2,656

Do. Do.

Do. Ezporta, New Herbrldu

ErpDru, GrttU

M lscelloneous merchandise .. Household e.trocts,clvlUan...

1,610

Do. Ezporu, Okinawa

Ezporu, H&no Kono

Ilousebold cfiocts, clvUJan_.. Mlscclloneous merchandise ..

2,813 6,226

Do. Do.

Household ellccts, clvlllon. .. Miscellaneous morchandlsc... Etporl4, Phfl/pplne3

Erporu, Japan

Batteries, ,,cJ1lcle............ Elcctrlcnl supplies-····-··· Heavy oqulpmcnt.-···-·· Ilome Curnlshlngs........... 1:louscl1oldcllcots, rnllliA1ry .. Rousohold eJfccts, clvlllan ... Mnohlncry .................. Mncblncry parts ............

58

1 Each. 840 Pounds. 2 Each.

Pounds. 3,632 Do. 2,6M Do. I Encll. 240 Pounds. 260

Appliances .................. Bnttcrlcs, vehicle. ... - ...... Elcct.rloolsupplies..·-··-·· Hardware ••• ·-· ••• ··-· •••••• Heavy equipment ........... licavy equipment parts .. -· llomc Curnlshlngs•••. ····-· Household otTccls,clvlllnn_. llouscbold e.trects,millt.ory..

95 Each.

39 6,160 ◄ ,600

88

410,948 3,880 278,001

~08

Do. Pounds. Do. Each, 'Pounds. Do. Do. Do.


Annual Report Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce Government of Guam, Summary of Exports-Continued commodities

Quantity

UnlL

ScraP-·-················Solt drl.nks. ·····-········· Steel, structural/rCIDrorelDg .. Surplus. ......... - .........

29 Each. 18,3-04 Pounds.

64

Encb.

Pounds. 3 Each. 4 Do. 2,140 Pounds. 2 Each. 6 Do. 7 Do. 179 Do. 258,585 Pounds. Do. 6.5,081 39,672 Do. 800 Do. 42,(00 Do. 43,144 Do. 40,852

Do. 170 Do. 1,416 Oallons. 2,288,208 Pounds. 33,919 Cases. 3,060 Pounds. 06, 126 Do. 096,622

Erp4rt,, Singapor~

Bakery products and candy_ 'Household effoot.s,clvlllan._

280 2, 72f

Do. Do.

Er:port,, Taiwan 2

Appliances.·--------····-···

Ench.

E.tporu, Thailand

Pounds. Each. Pounds. Each. Do. 092 Pounrls. 68 II 460 10 3

l-'oodstufI..................... lloavy equipment ......... _ Romo lumtshlngs_ •.• -·-··· Machinery •• ·-··-·······Vehicle...................... M Jscollanoousmercbandlse... Erporll, Tnut Tur/lorv

Bakery products and candy. noor, rro1m.................. Cotlooftoo••• -···-····-···· Com ............. _ ......... Dairy products ............... Eggs........................ Do ...................... Feed, anlmnl. _____________ Fish, canncd---·--·--·--··· Fish, frozen... ··-··--··Flour ....... _____________ Foodstuff, mlscclhmeous___

Quantity

Unit

.ElrporuTrU$C TmUorv-Oon.

Erporta Philipp/nu-Con.

Machinery ________ ... ______ Machinery parts •••• --··--· Motor boat, bike, cycle, scooter. Motors/parts ................ Officeequipment.............. Phonograph ....... _._ ...... Plumbing supp.lies._........ Radlo •• ····--···· •••• ···-Sewtog machloc. _________ Tclovlslon sot •••• ···-····· Vehicles.··--·· .... ___ .... Vchlclo parts ................ Building malorlols.... ______ Obemlcals and IDsectlolde... Dry goods....... ________ Laundry supp.lies.,_______ Medicinal prcparaUons and drugs. MISCCUaneous merchan.dlse.. Poper products .. ________ Petroloum products .........

Commodities

.

83,999 44,669

30,0U 3,058 35,693 297 I 02,359

Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Cases. Dozcu. Pounds.

1,029 Cases. Pounds. 733,546 Do. 007,690 Do. 14,478

379,231 1-'oodsluff,mfsccllaneous, frozen. 271 .Fruit, canned ............... 12,819 Fruit, frosh.. _ .............. l,667 lulco, canned. ••••••• ·--·-·· JO,391 Milk.-·--··-····-·-----40,667 Onions, dry •• ·······-····· PorJ.:,rrozcn................. 2,436 13,100 Potatoes ..................... 62,476 Poultry products frozen..... Rice.......•...• ··-·-· •••• 4,241,080 115,238 Salnd oll/shortcnlog ......... 74,170 SaIL •• -·--·--- ••• ··-·· •••• 307 sausage, frozen.............. 22 Soup, cauned.-·-···-····· Spices...... _ .............. 675 1,4;0,0'28 Sugar••·-········-·······-·· 82 voeotables, C8IID.ed .......•.. Vegetables, frosh............ 6,630 I Livestock ................... 8 Live poultry ••• ·-·········· Appliances ... ___________ 200 Batteries ....... __ ...... ___ 203 31 Do.·-·················658,«2 OomOJlt•• ••••••••••••••••••• 76,200 OcmOJlt,blocks.......... -·Eloctrlcnl supplies ___._ ...... 60,COI 282 Fumlture .•. ----- ---· .•••••• 236,837 Hardwaro ....... _ ........ 103 Heavy nqulpmont ........... Heavy equipment ports ..... u.•oo 63,092 Homo rumlshlngs .••. --···· Housohold effects, civilian.•. 76,900 92,&6 Household effects, mJUtnry.. 232,358 Lumber_-···············863 Machinery .................. Machinery parts ......... 2,189 Masonite _______________.. 36,605 Motor boat, bike, cycle 205 scooter. 10,476 Motors/parts ................ omcoequipment _________ 367 43,044 omcoond school supplies .. 3, i73 PalDt, thinner, Vlll'lllSh lacquer. 9 Musical IDStrumcnt......... 3 Phonograph ................. 2 Plano •••• ···-······· ••••••• Phunblng supplies ... ______ ~'6.027 63,132 Plywood •.• ·-·-·· •.•.•••• 20 Radio•• ·-·-··········-··GI Snwing machlnc ............. 164,106 Stool. structurnl/rolnrorclng.. 4 'l'opo rocor<ler............... 486 1'1rcs....... __..... -......... 2 Tclovlslon set .• ___---······· 67 Vl.'11lcles ............... _ .. _ 33,7M Vohlcloparts.---··--····214,065 Building mnterlnls.-·-····

Pounds. Cases. Pounds. Cases. Do. Pounds. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Cases. PoUDdS. Do.

Cases. Pounds. Each. Do. Do. Do. Plates. Pounds. lfach. Pounds. Cartons. Pounds. Encll. Pounds. Do. Do. Do, Board reet. Each. Pounds. Board feet. Each. Pounds. Ench. Pounds. Oollons. Each. Do. Do. Pounds. Bonrd root. Each. Do. Pounds. Each. Do. Do. Do. Pollnds. Do.

59


Annual Report Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce Government of Guam, Summary of Exports-Continued Commodities

Quantity

Unit

Ezport,, Trutt 1'trrllorv-Con.

&port,,

Beer ....... _______ ······72,838 Obcmle11lsnnd insectlcJde... 350,860 Cigarettes ................... 3,9-16 Dry goods................... 68,489 Laundry supplies ....... ____ 174,186 7,Zl7 Liquor •• ····-··········-··· Modlolnal propnmtlon nnd 49,618 drugs. Mlscclillnoous mcrcbnndlse .. 3,033,956 Paper products .............. 46,776 Petroleum products ......... 469,916 Sort drinks .................. 16,600 Surplus __________________ 26,610 Tobacco. __________________ 6,469 Toiletcrlosand cosmotlcs..... 29,633 Oas, butane, freon, helium.. 618 Mall, pnrccl post ............ 264,WS

CBSCS. Pounds. Cnscs. Pounds. Do. Oases. Pounds. Do. Do. OBIJons. Cases. Pounds. Do. Do. Cylinders. Pounds.

&port,, Un/ltd Slate,

Coffee/ten............... -·. Foodstuff, mlscollonoous..... Fruit, frcsb----············ Julco, connoo. __________ Vegetables, fresh•• ·······-· Appllnnces.................. Eloctrlcal supplies ........... Ilnrdware ............... __ . Heavy equipment.. ......... Heavy equipment, parts.- .. Borne fumlshlngs ........... Household ottccts, clvlllnn. .. Household ottccts, mllltary .. Machinery •• ··-······-·· Machinery parts ....... - ... Motor boat, bike, cycle, scooter. Motors/ports ....... _ ....... omco equipment...- ....... Officeand school supptfcs .... Paint, thinner, vnrnJsb, lacquer. Phonograph ............ ____ Plumbing supplles .......... Radio ....................... Topo rccordor...............

60

Commodities

2 25,676

8,384 1 184 3 72,882 11,624 14 67,442

1,0IO 121,419 6,673,612

11 126 68

Do. Do. Do.

Oases. Pounds. E11cb. Pounds. Do. Each Pounds. Do. Do. Do. Each. Pounds. Each.

I, 917 Pounds. 2 Eocb. 20, 2-01 Pounds.

634 Onllons. Eoch. Pounds. 1 Each. 12 Do. 0

4,246

Quantity

Unit

Un/ltd Stau1-Con.

6 Tires.--········-···--··112 Vchlcles. -- . -- •............. Vohlcloparts ................ 3,260 DuildJng materials.- ......... 21,006 Chemicals nnd Insecticide ... 61' Olgaretle.s................... 28 Dry goods........... ______ 260 25 Liquor •••••••• ··········-·· Mcdlelnal preparations and 3 drugs. Ml.scelloncousmorcbnndfso... I, 766,840 $crap ______________________2,196,816 Surplus .............. _ ..... 260,996 Oas, butane, freon, helium .. 30 Mall, parcel post ............ 479,OOI

Each. Do. Pounds. Do. Do. Oases.

Pounds. Oases. Pounds. Do. Do. Do. Cylinders. Pounds.

Ezporu, Vldnam

Dairy products.. ___________ Household effects, clvlllnn ... Machinery.--·············· Machinery parts .. _________

33,220

Vo.

Do. 20 E110b. 25 Pounds.

3,887

&por/1, Wake 11/and

Dakcry products and candy. Cottec/toa................... Flour ... ____________________ 1ufco,canned- .............. Milk.·-············-······ Electrical supplies_ ......... IJardwnro ...... __________ Homo rumlshlng;s........... Paint, thinner, vomlsb, !(lcquor. Plumbing suppllos .......... Tires ........................ Chemicals lllld Insecticide... Miscellaneous mcrchandlso .. Cigarettes ... -·- ........... Lnundry suppllcs ..... _____ Med1clnal prepamtlons nnd drugs. Petroleum products ......... Tolletrlcs and cosmetics.....

2

Do. Do. Do. Cases. Do. Pounds. Do. Do. Gallons.

3,344

Pounds.

2,460 190 25

3 10

36 468 110

46 Each. 200 Pounds.

312 Do. 2 Casos. 25 Pounds. 827 Pounds. 3 Gallons. ISO Pounds.


Annual Report Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce Government of Guam, Summary of Transshipments Commodities

Quantity

Unit

Quantity

Commodities

Unit

New 7.ealandTIS 7ru.il Ttrrltorv

Argmltna T/S Trmt Terrltorv

Foodstu.Cf,miscellaneous.....

60,n1

Pounds.

,;tu,tralia T/S Tru,t Ttrrltorv

.

2,060

Do. 4,977 Do. 1,881 Do. Do. 16,160 Do. 05 Do. 210 600 Onllons.

Bnkcry products and candy .. Beef, frozen·-·-·······-·· Do.fry products·-·-··--· Foodstuff, miscellaneous.. __ Mnchlnory ports •••. -······ MlscollBllCOUS mercbandlse .. Paint, thinner, varnish, lncqucr. Poper products ..... _ ......

1,060

Pounds.

Gtrmanv TIS Truat Ttn'ltorv

Household effects, clvlllan ... Dry goods...................

301

295

Do. Do.

Bakery products and candy .. Boor, rroicn. •••·-··········· Foodstuff, miscellaneous. frozen. Onions, dry ................. Potatoes ..................... Splccs••••••••••• -··-·······

2,769 26,100 6,001

Pounds. Do. Do.

2,312 0,304

Do. Do. Do.

8S6

Phlllpplntl T{S Truat Terrltorv

Dnlry products •••• ·-······· AppUances.................. Uousehold effects, clvlllan ... Plywood .................... Liquor ...................... Modlclnal prcpnmtlons and drugs. M lscel!nncous mcrchnnd lso..

Do. Eo.ch. i8,0ll'l Pounds. 8,616 Bonrd foot. 2,070 1

24.2 Co.sos.

62,800 Pounds. 3,080

Do.

66,440 3 1,246 1,236

Do. Cartons. Pounds. Gallons.

1,076

Pounds.

Taiwan T{S Trtul Terrltorv

Hong Kong T'lS Phlllpplnea

M!SCellnncousmorchnndlse..

IH

Do.

Sugnr_____ ···---······ Fumlture •• ·········-······

HoI1gKong TJS Tru,t Tmltorv

Sug11r ........................ Fumlturo ................... Mlscellnneous mcrchnndlso..

U,660 Do. 43 Cartons. 2,000 Pounds.

Ilouschold effects, cJvlllnn-. Pnlnt, tblDDcr, vnm!Sh, lncqucr. Dry goodS.----··-······ Trml Tmltorv TIS Auatralla

Japan TIS Trual Ttrrltorv

M lscellancous mcrchnndlse .. Do. Foodstuff, mlscellnncous..... 13,614 Do. 33,030 Sugor•••••• ·-----·-········ Batteries ... ___ , ........... 17 Each. I, 214,018 Pounds. Cement ••••••• -······-· Do. 12,650 Homo furnishings ••••• ··-·· Ilouschold effects, civilian __ Do. 600 3,357 Boord reet. Lumbcr ••••••• ·-·······-·· Motor boot, blko, cycle, 26 Eoch. scooter. J,(22 Officeond school supplies .... Pounds. Do. Plumbing supplies ___....... 1,080 8 E11ch. Radio.·····-···-·-··-·· Stool,structurnl/rclnforclng_. l42,298 ·pounds. Tires ........................ 130 Each. Velllclc_ ................... I Do. Vel1lcloparts ......... ______ 090 Pounds. Dulldlng moterlol.L ......... 38,89~ Do. 0,865 Do. Ory goods•• ·-······--·Liquor ...................... 25 Cases. 4,817 Pounds. Medlclnnl prcparnllons ond drullS. Ml.sccllnneou.smerchnndlse .. 60,092 Do. Po1>c:rproducts ... - ......... 676 Do. Petroleum produot.s......... 4,465 Oollons.

.

600

Do.

Trmt Ttrrltorv TIS Hong Kong

BatLorles, vehicle............ ElectTlcalsupplies ........... Bcovy equipment parts ..... Machinery .................. Muslcol lnstrument.s ........

I

Each. Pounds. Do. Encb. Do.

~.124 128

Pounds. Do.

7 2,368

I I

rru,t TtrrllOT/1T{S Japan

Foodstuff, miscellaneous..... Miscellaneous mcrchnndlsc .. Tru,t Terrilor11TIS Truat Terrllor/1

Do. Do. Do. ft Ca.sos. 60 Pounds. Do. 300

1,262 Bakery products and cnndy. 3,000 Fish, frozen••• ··-······-· :Foodstuff,miscellaneous..... Ill, 981,307

MIik. -·····---···-··-····

Onions, dl'Y•-·········-···· Pork, frozen._ ............

-

61


Annual Report Fiscal Year 1966, Department of Commerce Government of Guam, Summary of Transshipments-Continued Oommodttlcs

Quantity

Unit

Trwt Tmitorv T/S Trwt Ttrrftorv-Contlnued Poultry products, rro:r.en..... Sugar ···-·······--····---Bottorlcs, vehlclo........... . Cement •••••••• ····-··· •••• Dry goods.................. . BCBVY Equipment ......... . Household effects, clv1llan.. . Medlolnal prt'paratlons and drui;s-

••• ·····-·-·······

Office and school supplies_. Vehicle ..................... . Veb!clo parts ............... . Building materials- ........ . M!scollancous merchandise .. Soft drinks ................. . Mall, parcel post ........... .

drugs.·-······-·········

Miscellaneous mcrchand!se_

Pounds. Do. 0 Ellch. 18,800 Pounds. Do. 355 2 Each. w Pounds.

21 34,136

I, 100 l,667 1

190 1,830 34,630 10

200

Do. Do. Eaoh. Pounds. Do. Do. Cases. Pounds.

2,854

Do. Do. Do. Do. Do.

ll&I 1,000

Do. Do.

37,636 1,832

300 26,600

Unlttd Stole, T/S Tru1t Ttrrllorv

342 Each. Appliances ................. . Bottorlcs, vcl11clo ........... . 4.85 Do. lS,174 Pounds. Comont.................... . 110,684 Do. Elcctrlcol supplies·-········ 606 Cartons. Furniture.··-······ •••••••• 11,000,242 Pounds. Rardwara •• ···-············ 12.5,6.56 Do. l!cavy equipment, parts .... . 81,975 Do. l!omo Cumlshlngs.......... . 174,367 Do. Household effects, clvilllUl.. . 627,301 Board feet. Lumber .................... . M2 Each. Macblne.ry ................. . 18,100 Pounds. Machinery parts ........... . ss, m Board !cot. Masonite ..... _ ............ . Motor boat, bike, cycle, 1,937 Each. scooter ••• ···-············ l, 6.S8 Pounds. Motors/parts ............... . I Each. Muslcnl Instruments ....... . 1,600 Do. Office equipment ........ . 218,629 Poundi. Office tmd school supplies ... . 33. 012 Oollons. Pnlnt-, thinner, varnish lacquer. 8 Each. Phonograph .............. . Plumping suppllrs .... -· 10,097,300 Pounds. 113,846 Board foot. Plywood ... . ....... . Radio .................... . 0 Enoh.

62

Unit

United Sl4lu T/S Tru,t TtrrUorv-ContlnuCd

2'ru.tl Ttrrilorv T/S Unlltd Statu

Foodstuff, miscellaneous.... . Vegetables, fresh........... . Electrlcol suppltcs .......... . Household o!Tocts,civilian_. Dry goods.................. . Medicinal prcpnmllons nnd

Quantity

Oommod!Ucs

669 Sowing machine_••·-•····· 28,373,391 Steel, sLructural/reln• rorelng. 2 Tape recorder•• ·····-··-·· 1,402 Tires ••••••••••• ·-······-·· 2 Television set .............. . 3 Vehicles................... . Vehicle parts ............... . 76,609 197, 157 Building materials .......... . 393,258 Bakery prodUClLs and candy. 92,(~ Dcof, rroien.·-···-······-· 148,156 CofToo/Lca ..... ···-· .••••••• 2, 16ti Corn ....................... . 48,019 Dnlry product.a............. . 777 Eggs ... ·-········· ••••••••• 131,OOli Feed, nnlmal. .............. . 4,008 Fish, canned. .............. . 3,2'2 Fish, frozen. ..... - ........ . Flour ....................... . 4,169,853 FoodstufT, miscellaneous .... . 2,090,087 47,038 Foo<lsLufT,mlscollrutcous, Croton. 2,618 Fruit, CIUlned............ 47,878 Fruit, Crosh.................• I, 166 1 utce, canned ............... . 17,710 Milk ••••••••• •••••••••• ••••• MJJlc,powdnrcd............. . 2,605 OnlollB,dry ................ . 50.386 6,034 . Pork, froun ................ Potatoes .. _ ................ . 36, 706 I~, 26$ Poullry products, rrozon... . Rico •• ····-·········· •••••• 4,688,630 451,152 Salad oil/shortening ........ . Salt ......

- ................

.

Sausage, frozon••••• -··-··· Soup, conned ............... . Spices........••••••••• ·-··· Sugar ....................... . Vegetables, cannod ......... . Vegetables, fresh ..... - ..... . Beer.·-············-·· •••• Chemicals and lnsecllcldo ... Olgarottcs ......

·-· ..•••••••

Dry goods ............... -. Laundry supplies .....•. ··-· Liquor ..................... . Mcdlclnal preparations and drugs. Po1mr products ............. . Petroleum producu ....... . Sort drinks ................ . 'l'obacco._ ...... - ....... . Tolletl1cs nnd cosmetics.. . Heavy equipment ....• Miscellaneousmorchru1dlso.

310,940 6,799 6,SI

16,369

Each Pounds.

Each. Do. Do. Do. Pounds. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Ce.sos. Pounds. Ce.sos. Pounds. Do. Do. Do. Cases. Pounds. Cases. Do. Pow1ds. Do. Oo. Do, Oo. Do. Do. Oo. Do. Cases. Pounds. Do. Cases. Pounds.

415,060 16.1 53,602 Oasos. 20,~ 149,848 Pounds. 7,86i CIISt'S. 110,2M Pounds. Do. 331,357 6,045 Casos. 16.1,191 Poun<ls. 432,266 8,740

ro,020

Do. Gallons.

Cnsos.

12,082 Pow1ds. Do. 135,142 10 Each. 1, 105,78'.! Pounds.


Commercial Port of Guam (PERSONNEL: (Permanent,

1,010)

05; Cnsunl, 015)

INTRODUCTION Tile conuncrclu.: oort of Guam is n nonprofit, self-supl)Ortlng agency of tile government of Guam ndruinistered l>y n port mru1ager responsiule for all operational oncl ndministratlve functions, includlng harbor operations and tile regulation of tariff rates, but excluding security. 'l'he !)Ort protecU,·e unit Is under tJ1e cognizance of the department of public safety. Tn accordance with the 1963 survey re11ort of Tudor Engineering, west coast port design consultants, n site on Cabrns Jslnnd adjacent to the fonner U.S. Const Guard depot has been selected for the new commercln.1 Port. The Navy wlll make the site rn-ailable, vacate tlte Coast Guard from its present location, and remoYe the nU1JDunitionwharf to the outer end of the breakwn.ter. Iu contrast with the congested are11 nud inadequate facilities of the present port. the uew site will provide more thnn one-half mile of wharf space, In.rge warel1ousc and open storage areas, cold storage facilities and contiguously, an industrial park for the development of industries. Design of the new port, assigned to .Tohn A. Blume & Associates, began in the spring of 1065. Terms of the land transfer from the i'in,ry to the gO\'ernment of Guam n.re still being negotiated and at present it is not known when construct ion will uctun.lly uegin. The Governor, 011 .Tanuary o,1066, executed a supplement to llbe BuDocks re,·<icublepermit granting permission to the itovemment of Guam to occupy aud use the present port site. The supplement

vro,·ides that a special account be estahLished for funds to be used to correct 111ai11t.enruK-e doflclencies ut the ])Ort, total cost being estimated at $91,10-::i. This ucc:ount was uc.'cordiugly set up May 10, 1966, with an initial deposit of $24,741. By terms of the supplement, funds will t.,e uccumulut~l monthly t.,y setting aside all dockage fees and 40 percent of ttll storage fees. Repairs tl-re to be nc.-com1,llshed011 or before September 80, 1068. In view of the very large expense lucurred 1n buying, malntrunlng, and operating materials handling equipment at the port, a decision was made to lease cargo-handling equipment services from a private ftrm. An imrltatlon to bid had been extended to all interested parties but as of June 30, 1066, no award had been made. The Governor promulgated on April 26, 106G, Executive Order No. 6!">-1) which ei-tabllshed an nd\'isory committee to review port cos~ and ~peratlng procedure::: noel to assist tile commercial ()Ort manager to establish policies, procedures, methods, and practkes to mnlntnln UJl(I promote the efficient operation of the port. In October 1965, n thorough review was made of the existing uccountlng .systew . ancl accounting procedures lu the entry nncl billing sections were revise<l to exJleClite the processing of :tll entry documentation and the preparation of ln,·oices. A new accounting li.vstem was Installed nnd made effectiYe January 1, 1966. Overtime wns suustru1tln.lly reduced. All in au, costs have Ileen reduc.-ed umJ or>erutiom: speeded to n signi11cant clegree.

63 14S•515 0 • 67 - 5


Ad-ministration Division '!'his division is responsible tor accounting and collection ot revenues. It takes en.re ot all fiscal matters pertaining to entry documentation, claims. stntJstics, time nnd pnyroll, 1111dbiUing. The division Is audited annually by an independent auditing firm uuder contract with the government of Gunm.

Operations Division This dhrlsion has control over the stevedoring and terminal operations, and the n1alntenn11ceand repair of all rolling stock and equipment, including the manufacture and repnlr of ste,·edore gear tor vessels operation. It is headed by t:he chief of oper1ltions whose snborclinates Include sr>eeiallsts from the stevedoring and terminal sections and n maintenance foreman 1'rom the maintenance and repair shop.

Facilities The present port site is II port ot the naval SllJ)plydepot ot the U.S. nllval station used by the commercial port on a 90day revocable permit under a joint NavyInterior agreement o! 1050. The port occupies 24.u acres with sufflcieut waterfront facilities to berth three cargo vessels, or a totnl 01' 1.000 linear feet of trontnge for deepwater docking, and 110,400 squa•re feet of warehouse spnce, with an agency office, consistlng <Yt9,520 square feet of floorspace, building housing the offices of the three principal stenmsWp companies. In addition, there are three Butler-type lmlldlngs providing 12,000 square feet of area for the maintenance and repair shop nnd supply room, and a mn shed contnlnlng 12,000 square feet for vans nnd contalnerlzed cargo.

Port Charges Section 14101 of the Government Code of GU1lmstipulates th11trates charged for 1>0rt ser\'ICes shall be reviewed periodically. It wns necessary to revise such rates and charges effective March 1, 1965, to meet an Increase ln salaries creuted by Public Lnw 7-117 of March 14, 1964. Xormnlly. nil prh·otely owned and com-

64

merclal vessels are berthed at the commercial port area, adjacent to the ~avy berthing areas In the southeastern part of Apra Bart,or. Vessels utilizing commercial p0rt berths are subject to cJ1arges und fees in accordance with our e,dsting tariff schedule. When necessary for commercial or pri,·ate vessels 01' 00 tons or more to utilize the Navy berths, a charge of $0.015 per day per net registered ton for the first 10 days, thence 1 cent per day per net registered ton is le,·ied, payable to Navy authorities. Vessels of lesser tonnage are charged correspondingly less berthing fees. Commercial vessels berthed at the commercial por-t are charged dockage fees similar to those of the Navy. Water is charged at $0.25 per ton (240 gallons) and $5 1'or lustallation 01' meter service per vessel. 1.'ug aud pilot ~ervlces are presently nvalla•ble only through the Navy. The use of hnrbor pilots Is not mandatory except when the tugs nre desired. Charges for each tug appro~1ma,te $125 per hour or fraction tl1ereof, and the pilot fee is approxlma-tely $8.l'i0per hour during norm.al working hours plus 80 percent surcharge.

Other Charges Overtimc.-An o,·ertlme charge Ii. levied for work performed on regular nonworking days, plus an additional 10 percent. Ha::m·a Pa11Ratc.-'l'hese rates mnge from u to 10 c.-entsper hour, per member of the work crew, ancl are levied upoua. frozen or cWlled cargo, b. bagged cement, :·. scrap metal cnrgo, ct. lime cargo, c. ammunition or explosive cargo. Spaciai Sarvice8.-Cost ot personnel, pl\lll lu percent, plus cost ot materials. Docka.ge Oliargc.-Fee for <locknge shall be llh cents per net registered ton. of the vessel r,er day or frartlon of a clay. 1'or the first 10 days, and 1 cent per net registered ton of the ve:-;i-eltor each day. or frnction 01'a day thereafter. No dock· age shall Uc 1:hnrged ugainst vessels


Rates and Charges Types

Stovodorlng

·-· ...•.•••••••.•.••••• _.. 1 S2. 12 Do •• ·············································-······ s 2. 76 IJ,S. mall...,.. .. _ ....... -................................. (') Copl'll/lrochns •············-································· l. 05 .Empty vnns •. ··-··-············-························ 2.05 Mctol drums ••• ·-··································-······ •76 Rolling voh!clo t-0 ¼tons'·········-·······-······-······· •••••••••••••••• I 2. 05 nousohold goods In van.·-·······-··-·················-· Other ho~hold goods-···········-··-··-·······-··-·· 2. 12 Other containerized cargoos.·················-······-···· ••• 2.05 Unltlto cargo and livestock (livestock, $1 {lcr head) ...•••• -.. 2. 12

Bo.sic .........•...................

1

Handling

Transshipment

$2.80 2.80 ··-··--······

2. 20

2.40

3.20

1.00 20.00 . 70

20.00 .90

2.80 1. 00 1.00

3.20 2. 40

Inbound.

: Mlnlmum Is $1 per bUI of lodlng.

, Outbound. • Cost, plus 16 percent. I NegoUablo. •Minimum. 1 Each. 1 Per ton or 40 cubic Ccot.

l>erthed outbonrtl of other vessels nt the clock when this sltunUon arises from a shortage of dock space, or for the con• ,·1>nienceof the commercial port. The commerclnl port ls uot required to pro1·ide herths for ,·essels in nn idle status. tine Ilandlinu Charuca.-Tbe charge for line handling Is $1.25 per lllllll•hour or frnctlon of an hour. The number of men required shall be nt the option of the ,essel's agent. Sto1·auc Charues.-lmport cargoes are given free storage for G dnyi;, exclusive of weekends nnd hollcla·ys ns well as non• working weather days. Export cargoes nre given free storage for 7 clays, exclu• sh·e of first nvailnble vessel making earll•

est arrival destination, othe1·wlse 1:1tor• age cblll'ges wlll accrue as of the date of departure of such vessel. lVarchouse Stomuc 011aryc8.-The mte i1:150 cents per day per revenue ton for tbe first 15 days after Ute free period and $1 11er day per revenue ton for each day thereafter. Charges for private storage range between $2 ancl $a.2O per cubic ton per month. Oha,·uc.-Paved 01itaida Storage nreas-2.'i cents per day per revenue ton for eaeh day after the free period, e."{cept weekends, l10Udays, and nonworking weather days. Unpaved nreas-1 cent per squnre loot per month.

65


~

Summaryoflmport, Expon and Transshipment By Carrier Lines (Fiscal Year 1966) Domestic revenue, Lon Carrier llnes

Import

Reexport

Foreign revenue, ton

Transshipment

Import

Roo.xport

Totnl revouuc, ton

Transship• ment

Pncl.llc Fnr Enst Linc.-...................... 17,114 5,382 1,051 ···-········· ·····-······· ·······-····· Crusader Shipping Co ••.••.•.•.•.•••••••.•••••••••••...•• ····-··············-··-·· 2,037 617 17 Daiwa Novlgotlon Co-··-·················-··········· •••••••••••••• ······-······ 7,091 l 60'l Dominion For East Line Pty. Ltd •••••••••• ··-··-··-·········-···········--·· 21,417 348 404 Korea Shipping Corp, Ltd •••••••••••• ·-················· •••••••••••••• •••••••••••••• 6,731 ········-··· ···········-· Mlcroneslnn Linc. ··-··-······-········ ··········•-· ••·••···-···· ·····-··-·· 6,490 23,641 ··········-·· Nippon Ynscn Ka lsha Lt<l••••••••••••••• - ······-······ •.••••••••••••...••.•.•••••. ·······-···· 47 ............•.... Nlssbo Kalun Kabushlkl Knlsho •••••••••••••••.•••••••••• ········-···· ······-·-··· 1,272 ..........................•• Paci.lie i;·or Ee.st Lino....................... 121,018 22,489 16,&0 ···-········· 6,632 ............•. Poclflc MlcroncSllln Linc. .... ·-············ ....•.......•• •••••••••••••• ....•...•...•. 1,479 5,520 5 Poclflc Novlgatlon System Jue ...........................• ····-······... ........... 8,150 4,392 668 Salpan Shipping Co .......................••.......••.•.•• -·····-····.............. 1,050 389 ······-······ Total

138,132

27,871

17,701

M,63S

41,587

1,696

Import

17,114

1,528 7,091 21,417 6,731 5,499

I Trnpsshlp•

Reexport

mcnt

1,051 17 002 40f

5,382

1)17 1

348 23,00 47

i~212l- ------ ··------------

121,018 1,470

8,150 1,960 1112,767

~~

~~

~~

~m

5 ~

380 ··-·········· 02,826

19,397


Recapitulation of Domestic and Foreign Arrivals of Vessels, American and Foreign-Flag Registry, Fiscal Year 1966 Carrier line

Domestic-I u.s ..11ng registry

American registry

vessel

Foreign• flag vessels

American l'residcn~ Lino.···-················· 13 ···---····· -·········· Crusader ShJpping Co.......................... .. . . . .. .. . . . .. . . .. ...... Daiwn Nnvlgallon Co.......................... ............ ............ l)o,rlnlon Far £ost Linc Pty. Ltd .......................... ·····-····· ··-········ ·····-····· Korea Shipping Corp. Lld ••••••••••• ·-········ Mtcroueslon Linc................................ ....•....... 51 -·········· Nippon Yuson Ka lsha Ltd ... - ·-··-··-··· •••....•.•••••••••••••••

~

Foreign

Foreign

6 12 17 2

iDomcstlc-1 u.s ..oag

Carrier line

I

I

rog(stry

American registry vessel

Nissho Knium Knbushikl Kolsbo••••••••••••••• Poomc Fnr Eost Lluc ••• -····-·····-········

··········-

Forolgn• flag

vessels

······-···· 33 -····-···

12 •••••••••••• PoclOcMicronesianLine.................... - .. ······-··· PaclficNavJgaUon System, Inc_ ......................•..•.• ······-·-· 23 Salpnn Shlp)llng Co. . ...................... .... .... .... ... . 45 2 Total._···--

••• ···-··········

••• ···-··

46

101

65


~

Financial Statement (Comparative Years) 1966 11163

1962

Revenues:

Handllng_. __

$567,770.60 18,670.06 1,110,6<8.53 4.86,377.41 134,0Dt.61 66,4J6. 07

$269,378. 07 9,925.83 761,971.25 173,003.00 76,062. l2 34,490.67

$282,60'l. 86 16,442.71 623,006. 91 216,214.17 92,411.93 104,224.00

$541,880.03 26,368.M I, 286,638.16 388,307.17 167,474..06 133, 72(). 67

1, 699, 529. 13

2, 132,127.34

2, 383, 836. ~

J, 313,926.94

I, 233,462.68

2, M7, 389. 62

.

l,~.314.00 49,964.U 19,25&.70 16,717.31 33,779.46 43,134.92 67,892.18

J, 226,836.13 44,604.28 27,108. 4.0 15,928.02 30,739.37 62,456.32 50,518.88

1, 635,974. 9G 78,363.75 37,760.37 21,433.38 42,~.l3 U,224.22 79,602.05

2, 193, 121.44 109,480.43 39,074..36 25,780.40 47,0W. 13 383,650.81 90,529.61

I, 237, ~. 66 -·---...••..•.•••••••••••• 31, UU.48 16,662.20 ----15,931.94 --27,290.30 ------------33,061.44 ···------...--. 43,327.76 -··--·••·• .....

__. _. ··- ·- ··- __ .. _.. _··- ... _

I, 321,800. 73

I, 476,191.40

I, 960,332.86

2, 889, 693. 08

1,404,514. 74

··-··----·--·---

·-1-·· ........ •·-1· •··· • • •··· • ·· -1··· ··· ··· · · · ··-1- · ·-· · · · · ···· -·············· -··········· ••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••• -···-·······•·······.······•···············

300,870.05 82,149.35 21,431.35 81,787.81

Spccl11Iservices .... _ ......................... Equipment rlllltnl. - ..................................

Toi.Ill. •• _ •• ·-·-·_

.

···-·

- .......

•••• ·-··-·······

. .

••• __

.1

•••••• ···- ••.•• -···_ ..•. ··-·_.-·

Expenses: S41Brles•• _••• _-· •• -·--·- •• -•••• - • -· ··- -·· ·- -··. -.. -

-··-··-··-1

-.......

·-·· ........

ReUrcm.ent CODU-lbutton.... _. _.. _............ MISccllllJICOUS_ •••• ····-···

•••••.•••••.•.•.•.•.•.

D01-1reciatlonand amortization ........ 1.'olllL_........

-.......

··-·· ···--

_...............

$318,295. M U,228.M 695,314.11 14.8,226.31 47,479.03 36,606.60

$412,565. 39 19,090,27 837, 124..49 185,063.72 107,261.77 37,$33.40

1, 2.56,050. 29

I

SuppUes. •••• -·····-······-····-· • • Oas and olL•••••••••••• ·-·····--·-···················

UtJIIUcs_...•.•.•.•...•....

ssro. 864. oa

Jan. I, 1900Julyl, 1~ Dec. 31, 1116.~ June 30, 1000

Totnl fiscal year l?00

18,320.69 1,073,929.37 2713,097.17 149,179.48 66, lll5. 70

·-- ·--·-. ·-· - •. ·-. -·· .................

Storage ••. -··-. - . -· .... - ... _..... _ ....... -· ·- _... . Sl.ovcdoring ... -··· ...... ·- .......... ·- ............. .

Miscellaneous •••••••••••

1005

1964

.. ; ... .

- .•.••

I

--·-------·--·-····-·--------- ----------------·--- - ---------·-···------....--·-----···----------------·-···-·------·-·-1,404,514. 74

Sl<l\'cdorlng section expenses:

Oencrol stevedoring.·- •••• - - •• ·-··. - ··- ·- ••• ·-1· ............ Speclolsorvloos ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• -·············· -·············· Equlpmlllll used ID spcellll scrv1oos••••••••••••••••••••• MIScellaneous. ·····················-·-···-·····-·····

-··············

-·-····-·······

'l'otal stevedoring section expenses._···············•-l••·······--····1-·•·········•-I••·······

-···-·········

-··········-···

····•-I••····

·-·--··-········

•······•-I••···········-·

:176,238.50

676,238.56


Tromc sccllon expcnscs: Ocncrol hlll:ldllng............................................................................... Special scrvl=·····

·····-·•-····-··-····

········-··

···-·

·-·· .. ··-··

•••••••••••••

-···········

•••...••••••••••••

183,031.22

-·····

134,739.85 as.~.11 3,221.96 14, 66\l.«

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

E:E:~:=d scrvl~···:::::=.~:·:::::·:: ::···::··::::::: :·::::::::: ...::···::···:::::···~::·::·:·:···::·:::········.···I In •peclnl

Total, traffic !'Ntlon ciponses_ •••••• -··

•• ····-

••• 1.··---·

... ••I••-·-····

I

··•I•-.

A<lmln\stmLlonsect101111JCpcnses: 1\fAJ1agement and staff •••••••••••• - ••••••••••••••••••••••• ············1·······-·-Controller's department •••••••••• ··········-·········· ••••••••• ···-·· ••••• ·······-··

·····-··••I••···

•.••• ·-··

.1•...••.•

···-·

•• ,

·1···········-··1············ ····1···-···········1 ••••••• ·····-·

···-······-···

••••••••••••••••

~=~!':~:tlllt..: ·:::·:··:·::·::::·: :·:·::::::·:·:::· ··::::··::: ·:::·::::··::::·:: ••••• ··::::···::::: :::···:: ·:•••• ...:::::···-··..I Dcprcclnllon of pro])Crt)' not assigned to opemtlng

3i0, 7li0. tl8

370,7li0.68

Z1,U3.M 04, SSll.32 2.5,732.36

IU,220.32

SCC•

t!on ... -· .... ··-· ....................................... Total lllhnlnlstrnt!on O:<(ICnSClS.-•••••••••••••••••

- •. -···· ••I-

.........

.. 1......•.... ···•

I••·· .. ·-

·-•l• ... --I•

... ····-·-

9,279.12

••• 1•••••••••••••••• 1•••••• • ••···· •· •

... ····-··-··

1· ••••• ---·

••••• , ••• - ••••••••••••

,

Mnlntcnnncc and repair: Suppr,rt lo stevodorlng •••••••••••••• - ••••••••••• -·· -, •••••••••••••••• , ••••••• -··· •• ,•••• •··- ••••• -,-··-· •·· •• • ••• , •• - ••· ••·•••···I ·-·-· •••••••• ·--········· -···· . • •• ··-·•········· ...... --····-·· Support lo traffic•••• ·-·· •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Support to ndmln\strot!on ••••• _ •••••••••••••••••••••••

Total mnlntcnonce nnd repair eipcnscs •••• ····-··

-···········-

-··-······-·

-·-··········

·····-·········

···········•-·I

••• 1················1· ····-·········1·-·············1··· ······-·····1····· ..........• , ·····-·······························-·-· ········-····-

Allocated and Included In nllove sections •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

1·-·. -·-·-·· ..,.......(6,327.00) . ...·1··· .....·····-1-......... ·-·. .••••••••••••••• $6,721.81

Unnl!ocntcd hnlnncc•• -·. __ ••••••••••••••••••••••••• , ••••• -··. _ ••• • (Onln) or loss on surveyed property ....•...•..• ·-· ...•••. ······-··· .•••• ·-·············

-···-··········-···•1 ·····-··••I Excess or revenue over expenses.....•••......... Toto! oxpcnscs•.•••••.••••••••

1,321,860.73 I

1,476,191.40

1,963,005.86

(65,810.44)I

123,337.73

160,121.38

NOTF..-1'ho monthly statement for .lone 1966Is estimated nod Is subject to nudlt :ldJostmcnt.

@

I

l,i!J, 236.55

(li05, 156. M>I

91, 309.51

2,~9, 693.a3

2.S'l,034.76

282,034.76

44,883.86

61,685.!!8 897.a! 97,416.22 97,416.22 0

0

6,721.81 l, 229, O'l4.00 4,438.~

2, 640,260.65 (92,871.03)


Carrier Lines Serving Guam Port of caU

Lf1m

American President Line

1__

U.S. east and west coast, Kwajalein, Wake Island, Philippines, and Orient. New Zealand and Japan. Japan, Hong Kong, Formosa, and Manila. Australia, Manila, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Jnpan.

Crusader Shipping Co. 2 ___ _ Daiwa Navigation Co.2 ____ _ Dominion Far East Linc Pty. Ltd.' Micronesian Line: _________ Japan and Trust Territory of the Pa~ific Islands. Pacific Far East Linc 1____ _ U.S. west coast, Kwajalein, Honolulu, and Wake Island. Pacific Micronesian Line 3__ Japan and Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. Paci.fie Navigation System, Philippines, Formosa., Saipa.n, and Tinian. Inc.• Saipan Shipping Co.5______ _ Saipan, Rota, and Tinian. 1 Wholly owned shipping com1nmles In west coast, United Stalels Pncllio Far East Line (Ouam) Ltd., ngont !or PFEL, nnd Gott Dros. & Co., agent !or APL. t Foreign-owned shipping companies, A.tkllll!,Kroll (Guam) Lt.d., ond Pacific Nnviga\lon System, In~., ogcnt..~ for Gmun. J Wholly owned subsldlo.ry ot PFEL, and contractor to the U.S. Oopnrtmonl of tho Interior, Wosblngton, D.O., Atkins, Kroll (Quam) Ud., agent In Guam. • Wholly owned local slilpplng company, subsidiary of Jones 1111d Ouorroro Co., Inc., 01111111. • Wholly ow nod shipping company of Snlpancso Corp.

70


Office of the Chief Commissioner (PBRSONNET,:

8Z)-(APPROPRIATION:

(30 I'ermanent.

$208,a04)

2 Tempornry)

Offices of th(! Chief Commissioner and Commissioners

n11Luin.l:stl'lltln• ucti\·itlc:s 11ml proc.-edmes hot h within the offlce:s of the chief commissioner nud thc ,·Ulugc co1111nissione1·s. There ore 10 district collllllislllouer>', 3 n;:sl.stllllt COllllllissiouerll und ll (•hief <:Om- 1-::xnwplesurc: l. Admlnlstrutlnl,'llidellnes were dcllll:, ·1011er. The co11111L1s::1iouel':; nllll n.s,·elo))ecl to l'llmpllfy and clelincntl' liutles slstaut commissioners Ul'C ell:!cted t,y tho iltHl nuthorlt le:; of the 1·01llllii:,;sio111'1'"'· people or the resucctl re ,·Wnge:; cn•r~· 4 :t A :-y:;tem or I·eIiortlng rccommendnyears; the <:We! eomwL.-<Siouer l:, uptlous tor community lm1,rovements wns polutecl by I he Gon?ruo1· wilh Lile nth·icc de,·i:sed to regulurize re1>orti11gand to co1111d co11se11t or the Gunw Leglslnturc for ordinate wlUI IJudget perlotls. n ter111or 4 yeilrs. 3. Monthly submittal of po11ulnt1011 nud Durlug tWs fiscul ~-l!u1·,the tlcput~· direlated datu wus clluugcd to seminnnunl. rector of ch·ll defense, designated t,y the l're,·Ious reporting wns lmprnctlcnl from Gol'ernor 1u; uctlug chief commissioner, the i:;tanclpolnt of colleclion us well ns wus UllPOlnted ns chief COlll1Uh1slo11cr of l11utlllty to othfil• agencies. A bnf<ic cenOuuw 111111 lnter confirmed t,~• the Guam sus rule wa:; formulated to proYlde n Legislature. srstem of collection, clnssiflcntlon, nnd The chief commissioner sen·cs ns the 111·ocedurcsns they pertain to populntlon lilrect ndministrnU,·c represcntatll'e of chltn nnd growth. the Governor in coordinating the activiOther rules nucl procedtu·es estnbllshecl I ies of the l'illngc commisslonN·s. He holds regular monthly meeting;: with U1e durl.ug UIls rrportlng period were stnnd1Irtl offl<.-cpolicies to gO\·ern operations, commiss;loners to discuss commnnlty c•I11ployeeconlluct, nnd acU,·ities; a polic~· problems, disseminates Information, as,:ro,·ornin~ h1"entory nntl 11ccountabllity sists nnd cooperates with other ofi1clnlll of the go\'ernment of Guam and sul.Jmlt:; or gcn·ernmImt equipment nnd 0UIer utll'ndunt mutter;: wns Instituted in nil 10 n monthly report to the Go,·ernor conI·omrnissio11E>rs'offices; files of the chief cerning conditions ot the communities. tom111lsslo11er were reorgnnlzecl, nncl n Ille The commissioners of Gnnm nrP the s.n1tew wai,i also organized In the district direct ndminlstrnth·e ,•epresentnth·es ot l'Ommissioner's office.<:. the people or each district and, ns such, Coordinntorf< nmon~ the commissioners they 11erfor111the following clutle~: Co• we,·e assigned to the followlug: operate with meml.Jersof the depRrtmeut t. l'ro]cc1 llc<111Stm·t.-Commissiouer:, of I1ul.Jlic snfety ancl other law enforcea,;;:lstecl In registration. rf'!errnls, and 111 ment agencies in the mnintcmnnce of Jleaet>. order. and trnn.qulllty: E>nforce s11ppl~·ingothe1· neecled clntn. t .. ldult EI/11<·11tio11.-C'ou11nis,;io11ers nshellllh a111l~flnltntlon htm; 1111<1 regttlll· i-lsted in t Ile regl,<;trntlou. rcferrnl of e11Iio11s; rnnlntnin n c•f'nsn:-; m11komonthlr 1·ollees, nnll followup In cooperntion with written n•1>urts to the chief connnlssiouer project officials. concerning conditions In the communities with their recommendations; admln· 3. Xcigltborh00(l YoutlL Corps.-Comi:;ter law:s of Guam In their jurisdiction. ml:,;sioners llSSisted In referrals, public This 1·eporting period was <:hlcfly lnfonnntlon. nod other needs of project lllllrked l>y revisions and lmr>rovemeuts in officluls.

71


Olose coordination was affected be•tween the commissioners and other departments of the government in such specific areas us health ancl sanitation; cleanup and beautlflcation; ancl dog control. The chief commissioner held 18 regular and G special commissioners' meetings; attended 6 village mass and 18 cabinet meetings. At the beginning of the reporting period, 238 students were hired for the summer to work on beautification projects. census. a.nd collection of economlc data for antipoverty programs. In October, 1965, 95 members of the U.S. Peace Corps were temporarily de• layed for 19 days in the territory due to hostilities In t:he Far East. The chief commissioners' office made arrange.ments for lodging of volunteers within the communities. The Peace Corps. through its office in Manila, made token payments amountlng to $2,468 to some 63 hosting families.

Office of the Electron Commission The election law of Guam created a five-member election commission. The chief commissioner chairs the commission. The commission Is charged with the execution and administration of elec· tlon laws and election operations. To guide election officials on the sequence of activities, an election work outline was drawn, and election manual was drafted and Is currently being re,,1ewed by the commission before submission to the Governor. Indexes of ,,oters for 46 precincts containing 16,138 YOters ,vere prepared for the forthcomiJ1g election. Other election statistics at the close of the fiscal year are presented below : 1. New precincts created-----10 2. New t>reclnct boards organized ------------------10 3. Voter notice::1distributed---- 16, 188 4. New registrants----------128 5. Deceased ,·oters___________ 80 6. Canceled registrations due to death and nonvoting___ 920 7. New voters anticipated for 1966 general election_____ 2, 751

72

8. Total number of voters anticipated for 1066 general election ______________ 20, 090 The Go,·enior signed bill Ko. 299 Into l'ubllc Law 8-lH which liberalized the voters registration period. Registration Is now open from .January 1 to Septembe.r 30 In an election year.

Office of Cwil Defense Title 9, chapter 6, Government Code of Guam, established the office of cinl defense for tbe territory of Guam. '!'he chief commissioner is director ex-officio of oivil defense. This office Is charged with the protection of lives and properties by preparing for aµd carrying out nomullltary defense to pre,•ent, to mlnimlze and to recover from ma.nmade or natural disaster. 'l'hese broad objecth·es a.re to be accomplished through the clevel· opment of work programs In such areas as: shelter development (fallout and typhoon shelters) ; warning and communication; training, Information and public education; rescue services; logistical supparts; updating of operational plans; rndlologlcal defense, testing of emergency plans; and the administration of personnel and administrative expense, equipment, and emergency operating center programs. Since tbe territory Is eligible for Federal financial assistance on a ~50 matchlng basis for personnel and admh1lstrath·e expenses, the emergency operating ce.nter training, and technical assistance programs In addition to 100 percent financial help for fallout shelter survey, licensing, marking, and stocking, Its administration of civil defense Is governed by U.S. Publlc Lnw &,-606. Four fallout shelters have been stocked with IA-day emergency supplies of food and medical items. Sixteen new facilities, offering protection from typhoons and fallout were recorded ns potential shelters. Trah1lng on medical f't>lf-help wns concentrated In tho two puhlic high schools, and two cycles of se'l'en classes were completecl. Each of the 19 ,·mages now has residents trained in this program; a total of 575 persons have been trained.


Trnlnlog ln ruedlcnl sel!-help was also conducted by the Federal Aviation Agency; n total of 46 completed the course. Initial efforts were made to estabUsb u training program at the Col· lege of Guam. Arrangements were made with the Nnvy to provide an Instructor lu monitoring procedure and Instrument readJng; a class wns organized, and 46 employees of the government of Guam completed the course of Instruction. The Governor appointed the director of civil defense ns a project officer in n joint dvll• Inn military civil defense dJsa11ter exer• else conducted on December 10. 1965. In• stnllatlons continued on the territory's warning network. In this flscnl year: 12 additional sirens were installed. ~1tbough 19 sirens are presently operated by lndhidual control points, the network plans can for connecting nil 10 points with controls at the deparbnent of pub• ltc safety at Agana, which is manned 24 hours. Another addition to the wnrnlng and commWllcntlon networks during the year was tbe Installation of n direct corumunl• cation line between the Gol"ernor's office and Commander, NR\'al Forces Mnrlnnas. The local radio stnUon, KUAM, Im• proved Its lmlldlng to provide the neces• sary fallout protection : nn emergency generator was installed. KU,U,I Is designated as the territory's emergency broadcasting station (EBS). A direct emergency line is connected between KUA.lt nnd the Governor's office. An allocntlon of $j(),000 wns made by the local legislature for initial expense In the construction of the territory's civil defense emergency operating center. Booklets nnd technical manunls for l)Ublic Information and training as well ns training amt operational equipment were procured from the Federnl Gm·emment and dlstrlbnted. Stocked tn11ont shelters were lnSJ)eCted. The deputy director attended tile Nn• tlon11l Association of Stnte Civil Defense

Directors' Conference In Wa.slllngtou, D.C., oil April 24 through 80, 1006. The conference Is held annually for th.e purJX>Seor re\·lewlng, adopting, and provld• Logsolutions to problems or ch·U defense. In April 1000, Col. Edounrd R. L. Doty, uperations officer for civil defense, Paclflc urea, visited the territory to review operations and l)rogrnmmlng.

Veterans Affairs Office The administration of veterans all'nJrs Is delegated to the deputy director of civil defense assisted by a vet.erans service coordJnator. The veterans ntfairs office operates within the framework of Public Lnw 85-81,7, Title 38, United States Code. The responsibility of this office was e."t• panded by the enactment of Public Law 7..31 by the Se,·enth Gunm Legislature. This office hnndles activities relating to the relief (tutl benefits provided by law for veterans, their tlependents, nnd their beneficiaries. The office advised and asRlsted In the processing and filing of apJlllcntlons covering a wide range of benefits, annuities, soctnl security, pension, compensation, educntlonnl allowance, and burial allownnce. During the yenr tile veterans service coordinator processed now cases Involving lump sum payments nmounting to $36,000 and annual pay. ments amounting to $10,789.60. It proc• essed 117 applications for FHA-VA loans; 88 for educatlonnl assistance; 126 for disnbled veterans Insurance; 10 for compensation ; 10 for pensions; and 3 for medlcnl treatment. In addJtJon, rt conducted 80 ftelll trips (Involving nil types of VA problems) : attended 16 district and 3 orgnnlzatloual meetings; and testified In the legislature's public llcnr• lugs on certain bills and resolutions af• fectlng veterans. M:r. Richard K. Okamoto, chief, contact division, Honolulu VA Regional Office, visited Guam to In• forn1 veterans and dependents of new benefits under the laws that were l'OOently enacted.

73


~

Population Data 1 Ouamanlan Oistrlcl

Mnlc Fomntc

---Agnnn ..........•.

-····

•••

Agnnn Heights. ...... - .... Agllt ..................

____

Asnn ••••••• ·-·······-··· 13111Ti~'lldlL .................

2,269

Chalno Pngo-Ord.ot........ Oededo ...... _______ ... lnnraJan ................... ~fnngllno .................

-

Mcrlio ....... _ ............ Mongmo11g-To!C1-Mnftt> ____ l'itl.. ••••• -----· -• --- •• -• --

Santa Rlln ....... _ ....... SlnoJona ................... Talororo ......... _______ . Tarnw1lng ................. Umll!IIG.................... Ylgo_ ..................... Yonn. ··-···· ·······•••• Tol!ll. ............. 1 ThL,

010 I, 136 1,690 918 895 1,400 1,024 1,120 812 016 481 l, ()Of 2,199 744 l, 000 301 637 l, 164

---

20,805

States!der

FUlp!no

Hawaiian

Male Female

Malo Fcmnte

--- ,_

--644 l, 168 1,689 1,028 2,330

100 88 83 27 41

930

32

1,397 975

68 IS

039

84

746

23 72

869 500 1,010 2,047 718 l,:!95 432 5911 I, 200

Male Female

28 22

87 81 88 31 31 0 90 10

41 20 67 16

36

34

35

(0 22 33 22 8 16 0 0 0

20 28

23 ()

17 0 0 0 19 6

I

12 9 I 171 5 2 0

449

395

23

13

25 40

14

504 9 57

200

229

17

0

t,6

4.9

42

38

~;1~

47

080

lG 6

0

327 89 295

44

93 30 350 10

28 12 181 45 121

77 26 359 0 124

04

2. 281

Mille J,'cmnle

--72 52 ill 42

48 10 104 2 13 4 67 10

og

58

70

70

68

(6

31

18 27

32 74 0

36

38

3

0

0'.!

28

15 97

10 98 16 21 32 27 194 0

20

18

9 250

440

0 04 43

0 2 52

I.On

---

---

11 45

64

30

I, 163

Number ol CamIlles Total munMilitary borol ~IB!e Fcmnlo persons Ouama- Ol11ors Allen! In civilian commun!ntans ties Tollll

Others

l, 141 1,427 2,040 1,048 2, 6()( 990 1,870 1,052 1,303 8(12 1,285

579 1,171 2,377

895 l,4ll 1,850 l, 166 2,505

963 1,713 987 I, 021

780 1,ll7 545 1,130 2,131 795 2,110

2,030

2,838 3,902 2,214 6,009 1.953 3.583 2,039

2,32'.I l,Ot2 2,402 1,124 2,301

,,ros

400

454

39

824 1,337

716 1,330

1,633 5. 19i 860 1,539 2,007

791

20,147

23,024

49,771

rcpor~ dt>CSnol lncludc mllltnry pcrsonn~I and !belt dependcnl-s residing In Lhc mllltnrl' r=r,,nt-lons.

838 3,0'!7

---

--- ---

---

2(5 379 491 308 732

270 167

95 20

35

6

20

20

12

44

9 8

4 30 4 9 10 44 Jl

3 21 7 30 19 10 12

(75 326

21 0 8 93 11

342

S8

284

0 55 6 80

330

324 235

290 625 250

29

165 180 355

12 395 3 95 14

0,9Ul

1,320

590

14

5

G

21 7 180

16 6 30 5

I)

0 21

23

543

287

0


Guam Economic Development Authority (PERSO:0,XEL:

0)-(APPROPRIATION:

S534,G00)

ORGANIZATION AND STAFFING The Guum Economic De\"elopmeut Auyears, unless sooner tenninated in ncthority wns created l>y ennl>llng leglslucordnnce with the procedures estnbllshed. tion on August 21, 1965, under Pnlillc Lnw 8-80, and vested nu functions and powers Objectives of tho authority under the direction ot a Tho authorlt.r, under Public Law S-SO, board or directors, compo. erl of seYeu members; six of the memhers to be n11- hns been given rather 1.Jroutlresponsil.Jllit.r relnth-e to tlJe centralized illrection, conpolnted by the Go,emor with tho nd,ice trol, uml supervision of an l11tegrated nnd consent of the leglslntnre, nnd tho se\"onth to l>e the secretary of Guam 11i; J}rogram for the economic de,·elopwcuL of Guam. lt Is intended that the authorthe rc1ncscntntivo of the GO\·ernor, who ity be n catalyst In economic de,relopIi; ipso fncto chnlrm1111of the bonrcl. ment, seeking the /lid of r>rimte cupltnl As II result or the first organl?.ntionnl without com11etlng with It. Its prlnclpnl mectlug hci<I September 23, 1005, 11 decifunctions are, thus. to plnn, initiate. orgusion wus mude to employ u uegin11i11g stafl' nize, control nnd 1llrect nn integrntecl c.-ouslstingof 1111 udminJstrator, controllerprogram to attract, promote, encourage office manager, udminJstrntfre secretary, nntl de,·clop desirable commerce ngrinnd clerk-typist. By .June 80, 1966, ull of culture, ludnsh'y and tourism• In the terthese positions were filled with two udcllritory of Gunru. Thi! authority ha~ been tlonal employees udded to tlle stall', thnt empowe1·ed through IL l>C!rlesof tnx Inor uccountunt und clerk-stenographer. centives, outlined In sections j.3577, 08ti7 , Thirty-two n1>p1lcutlo11sfor the position ii3G70, und 58Ci80of c>ul>llcLuw 8-80, to of udmJnlstruor were receh·ed and evale.ucourage investment sJ)CCUlcnlly deteruated by the board of directors. The mined by the board of directors to be position w11sfinally filled on Febn111ry28, boneflclnl, desh-nble, and necessary to 1000, when :lir .. J. S. Warshauer wus ofthe economic development of Guum. 111 fered aud accepted the position after being appro,·ed by tbe board 1111dsubse- 11ddltI011,the autho1·lty muy frou1 time to time assist qualified enterprise in obquently appointed IJy tho Governor. tolnlng nud/or In providing necessary tlConfirmation by the legislature. as renunclal support. In this connection, Lhe c1uircd by section u355r. of Public Lnw 8lluthorlty will work closely with the 0, occurred tlurfog the second portion of Small Buslne."S A.tlmluistrntlou 1111<1with the 1066 regular session of the Eighth Guam Legislature. As set forth 1t1SCC'· the Economic De,elopment Admlnlstrutlon. The authority W3.8 1leslguntecl us tion Gaw.;, the ndmit1lstrntor is directly the ngency to undertake the ec.-onomk responsible to the l>oanl for the clny-toplanning for Gnnm nncl, ns s1wh, Is <11dny 011ernt1011s of the nutllorlty u11d for rc.-ctl)' im·ol\'e!I with pros-rnms of the F~ondmlnhstering it,: progr11m 111111 policies. 1101111(: De,·ctopmrnt Admlnlstrnrlon. ~c,·The udminl,:trntor Is an c,,xofficio 1111.'mber ernl of which /Ire 1111der current conslderof the bou1·d but ,,·lthout the right to ntlon. It Is nh;o becoming inrreaslngly ,·otc, and the stated term of office Is 4 nppn.rent, Lhat lhe authority must be pre-

75


pared to offer substantial organizational and management assistance to new business ventures, and its function is, therefore, threefold In tbnt It must be prepared to offer tax Incentives, tlnanctal asslstn11ce.nnd management aids. In many

~

instances, prospective entrepreneurs, having the necessary funds, do not qualify for tax incentives, but still need assistance In the area of organization, management, etc. The authority must be prepared to fill this need.

Activities (1) Qualif11ing Certificates

During the through June the issuance were received

period of August Zl, 1965, 80, 1906, applications for of qnalifylng certttlcates from the following:

Qualifying Certlficates Notmo or business

Nome or oppllc1mt

Case

No.

Total ProspecUvc Tot.al number or pro~ p~o ma, mum employees d-in C11plu1l Investment

Board oction

Action by Governor

---

-100' 1()05

1000 1007 1()08 1009

1010 1011 1012 1013 IOlf

1016

Stratton Watch Corp _______________Watch movements and watches. Watch bands, straps, etc .... Benson Rand Bmcclet COrJl--·····-· OW1mcrlca,Inc .... _________________Real est.ate dovclopmcnt .... Wot.ell mo,•cmenls and Sheraton Time Corp .......... ---wutcltes. WcsLmlDSter'J'lmo Corp ...... _ ..... . --·.do _____ .······-..... N & J Liquor Corp .............. ··- Me.nuracturo or alcobollc beverages. Manulacturo or tobocco S & 0 Tobacco Corp ................ product.s. llollmork Watch .factory, Inc _______Watch assembly ..... _. __ Phoenix Industries, Inc. (Formerly Watch mo"omcnts and watches. Fl~x Industries, Inc.). Watch and wotcb accesPnclRc Watc11Corp.····-·······-·· sorles. Watch movements and f'rrelslon lnstrumrnt.s, Inc .......... watches. Mnrloruls St.or Pr=, Inc ............ Printing •••••••• ·-··-·· •••••

1016 Mnrlposu Corp ...................... 1017

Moro Wotcl1 Company, lDc.........

·1018 I lotcls or (ho Morlonos, Inc ..

. ....

Factory and opart.mcnL rental. Watch movements and w11tcbes. Tourist bot.cl (Coclllt.y)......

$59,000 50,000 380,000

50,000

$400,000

38 Approved Nov. 9, 1965.. ___ Approved Nov. 24, 1065.

61,000

____ Appro,•cd A11r. 22, 1966. 10 Approved Apr. l, 10013.. Not yet submitted. 0 Pending __________ ........ Do. f3 ••••• do •••••••••••• ---·······

2,000,000 50,000

100,000

2,000,000

38 Approved Feb. 23, 1966...... Approvod Mar. 7, 1966. 160 Approved Mar. II, 1966.. _. Appro"cd May 10, IOGG.

100,000

2,000,000

150 ••••• dO·-·········-···········

50.000

400,000

Approved Apr. I, 1906.......

60,000 60,000

400,000

42

500,000

38 Approved Feb. 23, 1966......

50,000

100,000

50

50,000

300,000

ao ••••• do.·-·················-

51,000

118,000

$,000

300,000

10 Appllcotlon wJtbdrown JUDO 14, 1966. 2 Pcml.lng______..............

18,000

300,000

60

50,000

4,000,000

226

Do. Approved May 16, 1900. Approved Mnr. 7, 1966.

Approved Moy 4, 1966... ___ Pending approval. Do.

Not yet submlltcd.

Approved Moy 23, 1000 ....

Pending opprovot.

Not yet submJttcd. .........

NoL yet submitted.


I lllllon

Intcmntlonnl Corp _________ Tourist hotel (man.agement). •1020 Ouam lnttrconllncntol Hotel ..... - Tourist hotel (Cocillty)...... '1021 Ouom Intcrcontlnentnl Hotel ...... - Tourist hotel (mnnngoment). Food mill opcrotlon ......... ·1022 llunt & Behrens, Inc.-······-···· 0 Electronics, photogmphlc 1023 Esgro, Inc .. - ...................•.•. cQulpment, binoculars, •1010

(')

(')

(')

(') (')

(1) (')

(1)

(1) 60,000

(1) 1,100,000

20,000 (1) 50,000 (1) (1) (1)

300,000 (1) 50,000 (1) (1) (•)

225 ••••• do ••••••••• ····-····

(1)

Do.

..... do....................... ••••

..... do ....................... l·····do ••••••••••••• _ •••••••• l 300 ..... do .......................

Do. Do. Do. Do.

et().

·1m "1026

"1026 "1027

"10'18 "1029

JUN-LAO Watch Corp ............ Cromwell lntcmatlonol, Inc. ........

Watch manuracturlng ....... ••••• do •• ·-·-··············· Watch assembly.··········· SoUdorlty, lnC·-·•·················\Vatch manufacturing ______ York, Inc •• ···················-···· Universal Amorlcan El'l)Ort Corp .... Ocor machinery assembly __ Wotch movement., and 'l'rons-World Instruments ........... watches.

22 ..... do .......................

..... do ....................... 25 ..... do .................. (1) ••••• dO---·················· (1) ••••• dO·-··········-········

(1)

(1)

••••• dO·--·--····-··········

___

Do. Do. Do. Do. Do. Do.

• Formal nppUcollons not yet received comploto In oll rcspcc.ts. NOTE.-On Nov. 24, 1965,tho Stratton Wotch Corp. was granted tho first Qualifying ccrtltlcotc, nnd It ls currently In Cull-scaleoporoUon. OU1crcompanies who wcro gmnkd itunllCylngcertificates nn<lnrc now In operation nrc Westminster Tlmo Corp., Bollmnrk Wotch F110tory,Inc., and Phoenix Industries, Inc. 1 Not yet known .

..... .....


(2) Finanoia,l A.sai.8ta1Ice

Requests for financial assistance under Caso No.

Name or applicant

5001 Mnrllln!ISFishing Develop15002

6003 : 6004 5005

t

6006 a 5007 '5008

ll009

ment. Ovlll'SOasDovolopment Corp. (formerly Pe.clfloIslands Land & Llvostock Corp.). Hotels or the MBtlanns, Inc ... Ouam InlerconUnontRI Hotel. Micronesian Airllncs ....... _. Ounm Redlffuslon Inc ....... K. Heck Tours, tnc. (Chumalan, lno.). Ouamerlro, Inc ............... Poultry (Antonio Reyes Terlalc).

consideration as of June 30, 1966, are as follows:

Nature or business

Approximate Potential nmountor number of funds employees required

Commorclnl llsltlng.

$30,000

Slaughterhouse oporation.

04, 200

Tourist hotel.. ...... ..... do ... - .......... Air laxl ............. CATV .............. Prlvnte bus •• ·····•-

240.000

Motel (expansion) ... Poultry raising ......

10 Approved June 16, 1906. 6 Do. 225 Not yet submitted. 225 Do. 8 Do. 8 Pen.ding. 22 Do.

240,000 125,000

llO,000 65,000

110 Not yot submitted.

188,000 (•)

Board ncUon

(')

Do.

• Total =ount required Is $210,000, of which $181,220 Is proposed to ho guaranteed by SBA. Hotels or the MarlnnM, Inc. hllSalready submitted nn nppllcaUon to ED.>\. under PubUo Lnw 89-130, nnd the funds Uslcd nre those required ns our plll'tlclpallon II tho EDA loan Is granted. Guam lntercont.lnontnl Hotel hos not yocsubmitted Its appllcntl.on, but tho am.ounts involved nro npproxlmatcly thosnmo. H Is not known at U1lstlme whether EDA will consider nnnnclng 2 such hotel projects concurrently. Ounmerlcn, Inc. ls also preparing nn application for subm.lsslon to EDA In the approxlmnto amount o!S2,700,000, for which our pnrtlclpatlng share wlll ho $138,000. a The board requested that tho nmount or the loan be raduood lo $30,000tor 2 buses only. • Not yet known. t

U.S. w01·1,a 7'raclo Fair • $210,800to cover 85 percent of the cost of development of a llght industrlal-comThe Boord of Directors authorized the mercla'l park situate(! In Tamuning. The authority's participation in the U.S. park would provide n location for new World Trade Fair held in Snn Francisco from May 12 through May 22. A booth industrinl-comroerclal enterprises ai. set forth in the master plan of Guam, ancl sponsored by the authority contained would contain necessary utilities and pictures and literature describing Guam, nod speo.iflc data outlining the economic parking areas. The laml, about 24 acres, advantages for new industry nnd busi- ls lensed from tbe Government of Gunm for n term of 50 years, to promote econess in Guam. nomic development. The estimated proj( 4) R1tlc11and Rc01~laU0118 ect cost is $246,000 for construction, nnd During this period, the board also took ${:i,000for architectural and enlgneerlng nction nnd approved part I of the rules services. and regulations applicable to the issunnce of quaJifylng certlftcates, which were npprovecl nncl promulgated by the Gov- Budget ernor of Guam on .June 24, 1960. Public Law 8--80 provided the author(5) Applicall01i for the grant11 <111tl/or ity with $100,000 for operating expenses Loans for P1tblic Wo,·1,8 mH'I ne,,cT- through June 80, 1006. Capital funds of $125.000 were provicle<l by the legisla01111Ic11t Fae/Titles ture in Jauunry 1906, nncl thei;,efnnlls nre The Bonrd of Directors n1>prove11the currently on deposit ennling ·Interest at submission of an npplicntlon for grnnts the 1·ate of -.1:.75percent. The legislaand/or loons for public workii and de- ture also provided 1111adclltlonul $300,600 velopment faclllties in the amount of whJch wa,s to be a,,allnble Jnly l, 1966. (8)

78


Financial Report ll'ollowing is an unaudited financial report prepared as of ,Tune 30, 1966, by the authority's stuff in the fonnat estabUsbecl by Peat, Mnrwick, 'Mitchell & Co.

The first flnanclnl report for the period ending December 31, 1965, hos been nud• ited by the above accounting firm prior to the changing of our reporting period from calendar yenr ending December 31, to flscnl year endlng June 80.

Balance Sheet June 30, 1966 ASSETS Current assets: ·-- ....... CllJlhin bank _________ .............. Time certificate on deposit ••••••• ·---··-········· Petty cash ···-·······------·······--········· Accrued interest reeeivable ......... - ........... Suspense.·-··-···-·-··-----···············--·· Total current assets ................................. Fixed assets: Furniture and equipment (cost) ................. Automobile (cost) ... ···-···· ..................

. .

$36,495.08 150,000.00 50. 00 1,288.36 1,107.50 - .... .

. .

5,670.93 3,030.00

Total fixed assets ........................................ Total assets ................................

Total current liabilities .. - ................... Capita.I: Fund balance._ .......................

0 • 07 • 0

. . .

···--······

8,700.93 197,641.87

4,757.02 290. 50 58. 74 77. 50

··-··-·····

Total liabilities and capital. ..............................

20·515

. ·-············

LIABILITIES Current liabili tics : Accounts payable ____.......................... Withheld income tax pa.yable ........ ~········-·· Withheld retirement payable .................... Withheld U.S. bond payable ....................

$188,940.94

.. .

5,183.76 192,458. 11

......•••• .

197,641.87

79


STATEMENT

OF EXPENDITURES

Period of August 25, 1965 to June 30, 1966 Salaries _________________________________________________________$21, 808. 81 Professional services______________________________________________ 429. 25 Rent and utilities________________________________________________ 2,250.00 Telephone and cable______________________________________________ 1, 4ll. 32 Insurance and bonding____________________________________________ 245. 12 Office supplies____________________________________________________ 1, 199. 69 Printing, publication, and advertisement____________________________ 3,230.13 Automotive expense______________________________________________ 62. 32 Travel and per diem______________________________________________ 2, 980. 74 Dueit and subscriptions _______________________________________ .____ 264. 63 Employees' be.nofits-retirement contribution _______________------___ 1, 020. 81 Jlll1.itorial__________________________________________________ .. ____ 200. 00 Miscellaneous____________________________________________________ 188. 53 Board meeting expenses. _________.. _______________________________ 720. 00 Postage and post office box rental expenses__________________________ 141. 88 Expense allowances-entertainment __________-------------------____ 57. 72 Total expenditures _________________________________________ _ 36,210.95 STATEMENT

OF REVENUE

Period of August 25, 1965 to June 30, 1966 Interest received on time certificate of deposit Nos. 31572, 1306, nnd 1309. St, 330. 30 Interest earned on time certificates or deposit: No. 31572, May 15 to June 30 ________________________ $299. 32 Nos. 1306 and 1309, Apr. 15 to June 30________________ 989. 04 1,288.36 Total revenue____________________________________________________ 2,618.66 Rental income: Building and lot No. 2108-Rem., Tamuning, Guam, SK No. 990____ 1, 050. 40 Total revenue______________________________________________ 3,669. 06 STATEMENT

OF FUND BALANCE

June 30, 1966 Revenues from certificate or deposits and rental_____________________ $3,669.06 Appropriations: Aug. 25, 1965-Public Law 8-80_________________ $100,000. 00 Feb. 18, 1966-Public LawS-98-----------------125,000.00 225,00~ 00 Total fund available. ___.. _________________________________ 228, 669. 06 Less: Operating expenditures _________________. _________________. ___ 36,210.95 Fund balance, June 30, 1966________________________________ 192,458.11

80


Recommendatiom The nutborlty recollllllended that all go,·ernment-owned land currently designated tor lndustrlal use be transferred to it ~"O thnt de,·elopment <.•<Htld proceec1 in accordance with n definitive economic program. The intention or tJ1e authority wa:,1 based on the theory that such hmd, l>elng Umited In o.rea. should be de.eloped to runke It ea.sler for prosnectfre lnvestori! to proceed efficiently with reference to loud and building re1111lrementi:.keeping as a basic Poi1cy nt nil time· the iwoldancc or competing with t)rh 1 ate lndugbry. On April 2;;, 1906, the Det)llrl:meut <YfLand Manngement, acting upon the request or the nuthorlty and with the GoYernor's approYnl, transferred by lease two sites known ns the Old Public Works Site lmd the lltu"mon Industrial Site, comprising 41 totn.1 or a1>1>roxlmotely31 gross ncres with approximately 70 acres to be ndded when certain Harmon Industrial Pork Site acquisitions hove been com1>leted. Jt l:S the Intention or the authority to de,elop these areas In accordnnce with n master plan and to elther lease the land or to construct raclllties on U1e land ~nd lease both land and building to qualified Investors, keeping In mind the necessity !or turtherlng the economic development or the territory and the avoidance of competlng with private Industries both as to price and avail11blllty. The Bank o! ..\..mericn has alreacly leased temporary facJUties on the Old Public Works Site and has been negotiating with the government !or the construction of a permanent faclllty In the nren. T11cauthority proposes to rename this site ns the "TnmunJng CommerclalIndnstrlnl Park" and to rename the ITarmon area as the "Harmon Commerclal-Jndnstrlal Park." lu ))ti.rt I or the PRC report (p. 35), a recommendadou was made that the estnbllshment of n promotion nnd Unison

office in tlle mnlnlnnd United States would be highly deslmble. Consideration IJus already been gi,·en to tl)e establlshmeut of such au office in the San Francisco area. n11d the recommendation of the PRC report lends weight to the ad,·li::nbiUtr for taking such action. Tbls office would be used ns the focal point for contmctlng pros1>ecti,e investors ' throughout tho westeni pnrt of the Unitoo State11 reluth·e to lho Industrial adrnntages nud 1,ot:entl11lsof Guam. It ls felt that U1is office can also be used to further tourism nnd as n go,-ernmentnl office adjunct for such uses as contact with prospec~h·e em1>loyees,information required b~· the Washington office, etc. The cost of 01>emting tllls office has been includec.l lu the proposed budget !or 1007 and 1968 ou the basis that the office would bo operable by October 1, 1006, at an annual estimated cost of S29,000, tho net estimated annual cosl being only $2-0,000, bectl.useor the PoSslblllty of restrictIng olf-!sland travel when such nn office 111nctivnted. use of this proposed maln• Jund office by other tlepartments of the ,:overnmeut should also substantially reduce off-lsklud travel expense tor these departments. It is •tlle opinion of the authority thnt some form of tangible coordination and c.-ooperntion l11 the field of economic dc,·elopment with tbe trust territories Is deslru.ble. Accordingly, the admlnlstrn1or visited Snlpnn daring tlle month <Yf March and discussed the practical menus whereby some form of joint commJtt:ee conId be estnhllshecl. The necc-sslty !or a more cornpreheush·e stntlstlcul dam wltb reference to the n,-allnblc lnlx>r pool, categories of employment, unerur>loyiuent stntlstlcs, l'tc .. is lu process of study, and a re• 11uest hos been mode of U1e Department or Commerce tor the establishment of pertinent tlntn.

81


Department of Education (PERSON?."EL:

Administration

033)-(APPROPitlATIOI\:

$5,304,024)

A..ssi8ta11t S11pcri11tc11dc11tof

Buai-

iicsa.-The nuslness Services Division Is The Deportment of Educntlon under under the aclmlnlstroUve i:ml)enislon of the genernl jul'iSdictlon of the Governol' the nssistant superintendent who ls ,11. ls administered through the Boord of EdrP<:tlr responsible to the Superintendent ucation. The bonrd consists of five memo! Schools; It Is organized to perform and bers appointed by t11c Go\·ernor with the supervise such services ns budget prepandvice nnd consent of the Guam Legislaration and control, liaison with Deportture, nnd hns two advisory membel'il from ment of Finance and Public Works, the Armed Forces of the United States. purchasing coordination, school lancb The odmlnistrotivc nnd e.."1.ecutlve funcprogram, and building maintenance. tions of the depnrtment nre ,·ested In the ,t.~sista11t S11perinfcll(lC'11t of Pcrso11Dil·ector of Education who as executive 11cl.-The Personnel Division Is under the officer ot the bonrd ndvlse.s the bonrd on 11dm1nistrntlve su1wr,lslon of the Supernil matters of educntionnl policies lllld intendent of Schools and is organized to procedures. The director c-oordlnntes the handle all personnel rccorcls, placement, work out of the t,vo di ,•isions of lhe De- nnd plays n vital function in the recruitpnrlment of Educntlou, the Division of ment of both 011-islnnd nnd off-island 1·eVocntionnl Rehabllltntlon and the Dh-1- crnltment. slon ot Public Schools. A88l8ta11t S11pcrintc11tlc11tof Vocationai The Depnrtnient of Educntlon's central Vocnllonal Di\'lslon E<lucati,m.-The office Is orgnnlzed ns follows : works speclllcnlly with vocational eduDit•ector of .E<lucation.-Cblef territocation nncl U1c many l!~cdernl laws pcrrial school officer, executl,e officer of the tnining to U1ls area. Senrlces are proboard of education nod vested wlth over\'lded through the Guam Trade and all administrative power nncl nuthority Technical School, the go\·ernment of for school policies nnd procedures. G11n111 apprenticeship vrognun and the S1ipc1·inte11dc11t of Scl1ool8.-Actlng for mnnpower development training classes. the director and 1n charge of the Division During the llCrlOll from .July to Xoof Public Schools. .He hos general nd,·cmber 1, 106;;, Mr. Rlcharcl Tennes:sen minlstrn tive and supervising nuthority woi:: uctlug director of educntlon, nnd to execute policy through the division Mrs. Teresltn Solos \\'llS nctlng superbends of Instruction, business, pel'Sonnel, intendent of schools. On November 1. Yocntlono.l education, and tbe schools' Mr. Irnu Wnrcl Lasher joined the dennrt1lrincJpals. ment as Director of Education nnd '.\Ir. A88iBtant .S11perlntc11de11tof ln8tr11.c- 'l'ennes. en nnd '.\lrs. RnIns ret11rnctl to tio11.-Actlng as administrative head of 1heir respecth·e )}Osittoni::. The yea1· wns cb:1ructrrl1A>cl hy n lnrge nil Instructional servlces-<11recUy renumber of ntttYIHe;; oYrr nnd ah,wr tho,;e i::ponsiblo to the Superintendent of Schools. The cllvlslon of instruction per- normally cnrrlecl on. An rxtensh·e 11111111forms se1·vlces for elementary nnd sec- i 11gprO!!'r11mn ncl the ordering of colln t· ernl equJpment was aceompllshed. Plans ondary ischools with n stnfl' of professional consultants. This nren ronducts were fo.rwnloted fo1· nn nddition to Destaff advisory and coordinated services cledo Elementnry School nnd for n new in areas of carrlculum, pupil personnel 28-classroom elementary school In the Ylgo area. Working drawings arc now statistics, and guidance sel'vices.

82


being prcpured by the m·cbl1tects for these two fncilltles. There wns n tremeudous lnc:rease In t11eamount of money a,·ailuble to Guam nud Its Depnrtwent of Education pnrticulo1·ly through the Ellementnry and Secoudary Educatiounl Act. Se'l'eral projects were developecl and tlnanced under title I of this net. Tbls lnclucled l.11servlcetraining for teachers of English us the second language. 11 floe arts enricllmeut 1>rogram wlllcl1 w11s conducted on Saturdays for over -l,000 yonngsters from l>oth 11rivate and parochial schools. an audiovisual development project. u library resources project. uncl .the Bend Start program. Under title II of the snme uct cxpnuued mnterlols for libraries were made uvnil• able; under title V llPJlro,,ed projetts IJ1cludecl the inservice training for elemeulary principals ut Colorado Stnte Collt•ge ancl n cnn·lculmu guide de,·elopment project. Accreditation of the two high schools wns discontinued by the North Centrnl Assoclatlou for reasons which centered around pbysicnl facilities um! malulennnce. The Board of Eclncutlon has ap)llled to the \Vestcr11 Association for ncc1·eclitat1011and It ls expected thut this will be accom11UsheclduriJ1g school ,venr 1006--07 when the new George Wushington High School will opC.11.

Adclltionnl cousultaut se1·vices were available to the schools of Guam, pnrtlcnlnrly In the tu-en of speech correction nn<l thera1w, nncl audioYisunl and library services in elementary education. During the year the personnel office of the Department of Eduentlon absorbed many of the fnnctlous pre,•iousl,v pe1·formecl by the Department of Labor and Personnel. Ail fuuctlous huve now been nssumed that nre provided for in the Education Autouowy Act for personnel. The buslue~ office ot the Department of Bducn tiou ilssnmecl mru1y functions 1:reviously 11e1-formedb,v tlie Deportment of Procurement ancl Su1mly. 'l'bese lrn'l'e now be<-11 com)lletely absorbed in accord• nuce with the lerms Of law. Both the personnel Hncl hu.·iness office were sernrel~• bnndlcupped by n. shortage of perso1111elto nccomplish tbese edncat1011al ta!oks. '.l'hls has been corrected in the budget fo1· fiscal yeilr 1067. It is u creclit to the 1>e1· ·onnel of botll clepnrhuents that the functions were absorbed an<l perforrued ns smoothly 11!' they were. '.l'he Department of Flclncatlon will be able to proYidc more efficient service in nil area.· during the 1006-67 school yenr bet-uuse of n greater continuity of JWrfiOnueJ,the ncldltiou of neecletl personnel, nn<l the e....:perlenceof the past yenr.

Talofofo's new elementary school, built with Rehabilitation Program funds, was barely completed when teachers, parents, and staff membe.rs began bringing to the school plants and shrubs which will eventually give the school beautiful tropical surroundings.

83


Much of Federal funding under Gwun Rebabili1aiion Act has gone f~r new schools. Pictured above, Barrigada :Elementary School just after opening.

I. INSTRUCTION Elemsntar,y S&hools During the 1965-66 scltool year, the elementary school program, ungraded l)rimnry lllld grades 4 through 6, were conducted in 18 schools. The new Dededo Elementary School was added to the list of elementary schools. Dededo, Or• dot-Ohnlan Pago, Baltazar P. Carbullldo, nnd Merlzo Schools were completed and were occupied during this yenr, replacing the temporary structures which housed them since Typhoon Karen In 1962. Two schools were renamed after deceased Guamanian educat.ors-Bnrrlga.da. Elementary School now Is Baltn.zar P. Cnr• bulUdo School and Santa Rita Elemen· tary School Is Joaquln P. Torres School.

Special Education Three hundred students were enrolled in special education classes for the educable In 14 elementary schools and 2 ~uulor high schools. A class for the deaf was l1el(l nt Dededo Elemei1tary School with nn enrollment of nlue from ,·arlous parts of the Island.

84

Brodie School for exceptional children occupied its new permanent facilities. A statr of 7 teachers taught 108 severely retarded or multiple-handicapped children. The speech section of the division of Instruction \Vas reorganized with three theraplsts wbo screened au students ht Uie ungrn.ded primary levels six through nine and grade four, and 111ey students from any other grade levels referred by teachers or principals. A therapy program was established which handled 174 cases. Medical and dental referrals were made to public health officials on students who demomtrat.ed hearing deficiencies and organ.le speech disorders or where dental problems contributed t.o their speech problems. Conferences were held with teachers ancl parents to ruake them aware of the t>rol>lemsinvolve1l ancl to solicit their co· operation in helping the children.

Testing and. Guidance Program The testing nnd gnlclance consultnnt met witll cow1selors nt regularly scbecl-


This aerial view shows Dededo Elementary School, first of several new schools financed under the Guam Rehabilitation Act. Io the background, part of Dededo village.

.

.,,.

-

~

.. .

~--~-

Guam's physically handicapped are taught skills and useful occupations at th.is Rehabilitation and Workshop Center, another faciliry made possible by Fede.ral aid to the territory.

85


M

JI

-r~.--•~~

,-

Good facilities for schooling and care of retarded children was one of the territory's needs answered by Federal financial aid. .Above,new Brodie Memorial School designed to help about 150 youn~ers, named for a Navy chief who helped volunteers to build the island's original school for exceptional children.

uled meetings to discllSS pertinent problems und developments in Ute field a.nd stn.ndard guidance problems. Conferences with cowiselors, administrators, students, and parents were bold for various reasons relating to child behavior. A total of 60,586 tests were purchased, distributed, scored, and tallled for present and future studies. Jo.int meetings ,vlth other officials in the department were held to seek application of new programs to guidance and academic problems.

\"iding teacher workshOI)S In the use of materials und e<1uipment.

Curri~ulum Materials Center

12.

The Curriculum Materials Center was established last summer and operated throughout the yeur under the general direction of the Assistant Superintendent for 'Instruction. The library services section of the center provided professional books, textbooks from various companies, periodicals, and pamphlets to teachers and adminlstrators.

Audio-Visual A new audio-visual consultant joined the Instructional staff U1ls year. Improvements were made ln U1isdivision by ac.,qulrlng new 1naterlnls nnd equipment, evaluating available materials, Initiating descriptive catalogs of materials, and pro-

86

Secondary Schools The secondary school program (grades 7 through 12) was conducted in 8 schools. Four of the schools bad independent junior high school programs, grades 7 through 9 ; 1 school had upper elementary nnd junior high; 2 schools operated on a double-session basis, grades 7 through 12, nnd the Guam Trade and Technical School operated from grades 10 through The junior high school program was conducted for 3,680 students, grades seven, eight and n1ne, wiUl a full program of course offerings in academic subjects, fine arts, nnd practical arts areas. The senior high school program was conducted for 3,318 students in 11 comprehensive senior high school curriculum offering 81 units of credit ln nine fields of study.

Secondary Language Arts and Modern Foreign l.Anguages The addition of 11 consultant in the ttelcl of :-:econda1·y lnngnnge m·ts n.ncl modern foreign languages enabled the central staff to be of service to 11 foreign language and 59 secondary lnuguage arts


imd English teachers from grades 7 through 12. Teacher ,isitations were macle in the classrooms and were fol• lowed up utter obsen·aHons were macle. )iewsletters, language arts notehooks, ancl recommended books lists were published and distributed to these teachers as aids 111their classroom work.

p1·0,·ided by the Department of Publlc Works. Free lunch was available to the 1>n1·ticipa11tsIn the 1,roject. A -total of $103.ii38 was ex-pe_nded, $174.147 firom Federal gl'ant nncl $10,301 from local con• tribntion. Community members, through the help of the village commissioners. aided in the project, also.

Curriculum Activities

School Health

\York .ou de,·eloping nod l'ensrng the curriculum from the ungraded primary tlirongh grade 12 continued tllroughout the year by teacl1ers under the leadership of the consultnnt staff. A sum.mer proj• ect will consolidate the work done nnd publish curriculum g,uldcs.

Tl1e Depurtment of Public Health nnd the public schools continued a coopern• th·e p1·ograru to give school chi'ldreu needed health protection and health edu• cation. The !:.-enrlcesrendered by pul>llc health to t'he school$ are as follows: gxaminntion by pbysicinns____ 400 i:!creening by mmses: Vision --------------------053 Pedlcnlosis ----------------2, 603 $kin lnfectiOnf'____________ 1. 606 Draining ears______________ 386 Hen ring (watch•tick) _______ 467 Nurse conferences with : Principal ___________________ 389

Project Head Start Guam participated ln the first 1,rojeet Head Start whieh wns implemented throughout the Nation. An 8-week program which had -o.total enrollment of 1,129 students was conducted in 74 class• rooms in 14 centers. Publie Helllth and Welfare provided medical and social work sen1ces and bus transportation was Immunlutlollli nnd tests

Basicseries..................................... Boosteror rovacclnat1011. .......................

DTadult

. .

Total PPD tests read······················--··1

Teacher-------------------Parents at schooL___________ Typhoid

Cholera

68

01

203

1,676 11,338

I, 634

I, 700

Smallpox 32 I, 271

469 lS

Oral polio

................ 659

......····-·- ........____ ·-·------·-· --··--·-· ...

or which 116wore positive.

II. VOCATIONAL EDUCATION Persons Attending High School Tra,lcs a11<L l11<l11stry.--Gunm bas one area vocational f'chool which 1)rovldes ,·o• catlonstl educaHon nncl ,·ocatlonal tech• nlcal training for students in the 10th, 11th. •and 12th grades. The dun! func• tlon of the school Is to •pro,·ide the stn• dent with terminal training in a sulnble trade an<l also to 1>ermit him to earn n high school diploma. The accent h; 011 occnpationnl competency whereby the student wlll be prepared to enter Industry upou graduation from high school. Students attend academic classes one• half day In English. mathematics, social

.·ciences, nncl no tu rat sciences. nnd the re· malnder of the clay ls de,·oted to the study and tlrnctlce of specific vocationnl occupations which during fiscal year 19GG were cnrpenh-r. painting. welding, ma• sonry, electricity, electronics, mechanicnl drn wing, refrigeration. nir conditioning. and auto mechanics. During flscnl year 1966, 196 students enrolled iu the urea Yocatlonal school and 1:;4 student;; completed their courses. ~Osl of the dropouts Pither entered mill• turr ser,•lce 01·obtulned jobs in indust1-y. Aqr/c11lt·11rc.-I11 ndditiou to courses in trades and Industry offered at the area

87


George Washington Junior High School, another of the much-needed educational facilities for Guam erected with the help of Federal funds under the Guam Rehabilitation .Act. vocational school, courses in vocational agriculture were offered to 283 high school students at George Washington and John F. Kennedy High Schools. Home Economics.-Durlng fiscal year 1966, 603 students were trained at the two high schools for useful employment ln home economics. The Department of Education plans to offer high school level courses during 1967 In vocational home economics for galnfnl employment. Work Ba:perie11ce.-The area vocational sobool implemented a pilot program in diversified occupations in fiscal year 1966, ,yhereby students attended school onehalf day and worked in Industry one-half day. The program started with 16 students. Seven graduated, seven are still in the program on a contlnuing 'basis and one entered mllltary service. Students were trained In 13 dlfferent vocational areas.

High School GrmJ.uates, Dropouts, and Adults All persons 16 years ot age and over are eligible for Instruction and training In the adult evening school at the o.rea vocational school. During fiscal year 1966, 1,739 students entered the various pro-

88

grams oll'ered at night at the area vocational school and 1,107 of these students completed the courses. Students were trained in 10 dl.fferent occupational areas which included : Auto mecha.uics, dic.'Wl mechanics, auto body and fender, air conditioning, refriger11tion, architectural drafting, engineering drafting, electronics, electricity, carpentry and cabinetmaking, masonry and block la;ving, plumbing, welding, sheetmetal work, pa.inting, and tile setting. Shop mathematics, electronic mathematics, and blueprint reading courses were also offered. ~ineteen instructors were employed ln the adult evening program. All Instructors in the shops were journeymen In their occupational fields and many were highly trained and highly skilled technicians.

Persons With Special Needs Included in this category are the bar1Jcore unemployed wbo urc bigb i;cbool dropouts and junior high school dropouts ns well ll!.1 tboi;e who have never nttended school Also included are the persons who are In special programs fl. nanced by Federal und government of


Gunm matching fund!:! twd implemented by the Department of Education. Manpower

Dcvclopmc1it

aml

Train-

ino.-Guam's l\Iaupower De,•elopment and Training program has been carried out through a series of Yocational training projects, planned and coordinated with the Guam Employment Service, nnd totally funded by the Federal Government under the Manpower DeYelopment and Training Act of 1962, as amended. Due to the Federal requirement that projects must be initiated Olerk-Typi8t Project

The clerk-typist project was designed to provide vocational training for youth between the ages of 17 through 21 to equip them for immediate employment in the clerical field upon completion of training. Two training .sessions were conducted, each 22 weeks in duration and each with an initial enrollment of SO. A $20 per week training allowance was paid to each student during the training period by the Guam Employment Se.rvice. The fust session was completed prior to the beginning of the 1066 fiscal year. The second session begnn on July 26, 1900, with an initial enrollment of 30 young unemployed women in the same rented facilities which had been occupiod during the first session. Courses of study included typing, math, English comprehension.the use of office machines nnd office practices and filing. The project reached completion on December 24, 1065, at the end of the second session .

within 60 days after notification of fund• ing Is received, MDTA projects overlap both the academic and fiscal years and do nqt nece~sarily coincide with either. At the beginning of the 1966 ftscnl year, the Deparbnent of Education had two :\IDTA. projects In operation and a thi.rd l1ad been approved ancl funded for implementation. The two in operation both began in January 1965 and were completed in December of the snme yea.r encompassing half of each of the fiscal and academic years. ( G-1ta1n Y/5001)

The following statistics relative to the project:

HEW grant award to Guam Depar~t of Education ____________ $72,114.00 Actual Department of Education ex1>enditure on the project_ ___________ $40,897.00 Enrollment per session (2 sessions conducted) _____ 80 Cost per trainee _______ _ ~678. 20 Personnel statisbics for the first session were Included In the fiscal rear 1965 report. 'l'he following Information Is furnished on the second se!lsion only : Enrolled ---------------Completed train.Ing_________ Reason for noncompletlon : Entered College of Guamdropped -------------------Accompanied family to maluland-dropped ____________

.d.1itomotive Mcchandc Project

The Automotive mechanic project wblch extended over the fnll year. began on .January 4, 1965, and was completed on December 24 ot the same year. rt, too, was v.youth program designecl tn provide vocational training In the nutomot1Yemechanlcs field for 2G young men to equip them with the skills required for entry Into this field. A $20 per week training allowauce was paid to each trainee whUe in attendance based upon attendance record.s furnished by the

are furnished

30 28

1 1

( Gtuz,m,Y /5002)

MDTA coordinator. The project wns conducted through faciiities provided br the Guam Trade and Technical School In 1Congmong. When compared to the clerktypist project, the project achieved only relatfre success and many problems in attendance and attitudes of the young men were encountered wh.ich were not e.xperlenced in the training of the young women enrolled in the clerk-typist project.

89


The following statistics are furmsbed relatiYe to the entire project: HEW grant award ______ $74, 343. 00 Actual Department of Education expenditure _____ $42, 377. 22 Number enrolled_______ 25 Number completed train13 ing ---------------Reasons for noncompletion : Obtained employment--G Joined military serY4ce2 Departed for main1 land _____________ Dropped-no reason given (poor attitude 4 and attendance)_____ Cost per pupil___________ $1,696.00 Cost of equipment purchased---------------$25,416.00 Statistics obtained from the Guam Employment Service indicate that only 7 of the 18 who completed training are currently employed. T11estatus of the other six is not known. The equipment purchased for this project is in the custody of the Guam Tracle and Technical School and may be used by them until such time as It is again needed for 1\·IDTAinstruction. A similar project bas been planned and forwnrde<l for approval. If funded, the equipment wm again be used within the MDTA. progro.m. The carpentry project was plannecl to provide vocational training to 30 unemployed or underemployed males to equip them with the basic skills which would quaUty them for employme.nt at the entry level in the construction field. Two sepnrnte sessions of training were conducted, each 22 weeks ln dumtlon and Ma8<nl!1'1/Project

The masonry project was planned for implementation in two separate sessions wl,th training to he conducted in tile Guam Trade nnd Technical Scb·ooJ. Each ses• slon will b-nin 15 men for n period of 20 weeks to provide them with skills as hlock-masons so that they may he employed nt the entry level in the construction field. The first session had an initial enrollment of 15 and began operation on Jan-

90

with an ini:tlal enrollment of 16 men in ea<:h session. Training wus provided not only In the basic carpentry skills and blueprint readlug hut in basic math and English comprehension as well. The first session ·llegau on August 80, 1006, and finished on Jununry 26, 1066. The second session was initiated on February 1, 1066, and w41scompleted on Juue 30. 1966. The following statistics are oll'erecl relative to the project: HEW Grant Award ______ ,$26.456. 00 Actual Department of Eduention e:\.l)endltures ( esthua tc) _____________ $18,0'>..8.00 Cost per trainee__________ $434. 20 ~umoor of trainee com10 pleted 1st session_______ Dropped out: To 11ccept employruent__ 8 l!"or poor attendance and 1 attitude ____________ Lack of transportation to training facility_____ 1 Completed tmining and are 10 now employed_________ Statistics on the second session are llmi,ted to enrollment and dropouts since the project terminates on the due date of tWs report. 10 Number comple~ training____ Dropped out: Jnsuflicieut allowances_________ l To.acceptemployment..________ 1 Poor attendance and attitude__ 4 One tminee who was dropped from •the project wns replaced ,by a suhstitute. Trainees were paid $88 per week while attending training. (G'lla,m R/6001)

nary 3, 1066, an<l terminntecl May 25, 1066. Trainees received nn alowance of $38 per week whHe enrolled which was !)llid to them through the Gtmm Employment Service. Project statistics nre as follows: BEW grant ,award to Department of Educatlou ________ $20, 500 ~umber completed first session _____________ . __ 10 Number currently employed-8


Dro1)ped out : Poor attitude and attendance ______________ _ Secured employment.. ___ _ Joined Armed Forces _______

2 .I 2

Since th:ls project is continuing into the 1967 fiscal year, the total project cost will not t,e a,railable until project completlon.

Olcrk-Stenogra,phcr Project

.Although the clerk-stenographer project had been approved early In the fiscal year, Federal funding hacl been wlthhelcl due to a.n overall shortage of MDTA. project funds. Notification of funding was not received until the latter part of l\Iay 1966. The project was initiated on June 20, 1966, in rented facilities iu Auigun and equipment purchased for the clerk-typist projects is now in use in the stenography I1roject. The utilization of this equipment consideral.Jly reduces the o,·erall cost of the new project. The project plan authorizes vocatlonai Wezainu Pro feet

( <Jtwm Y/6008)

training for 30 young men or women between the ages of 17 and 21 and provides for the payment of $20 per week to each trainee as a training nllowanc-e while In nttendance. The course of instruction will Inst 30 weeks and will provide training in shorthand, business math, Engllsb comprebensiou, office practices, ancl the use of office machines. The Department of Health, Eclncatlon, and Welfare, U.S. Government, has nuthorlzecl the e."<Pendlture of $10,370 for the actual training portion of the project. Thirty young women were enrolled on ,June 20, 1966. CG11an~R,/6002)

The welding project bas now been approved for implementation and training will begin 011 July 1, 1966. A. complete report of the project will be lnclucled in the next annual report.

College of Guam conducted u similar program for persons npprenticed by the U.S. Navy Olvll Service. This pilot course of tile College of Guam. offered 1 class of 16 stude11ts n C'Ourse In trade Govcrnme1it of Gu.a11i.Apprc11ticeahip.- clrnwlug and blueprint rending. The The government of Guam, in cooperation college used the fnclliti~s. staff, and curwith the Guam Contractors Association, riculum of the area Yocatlonnl school. tralned 105 apprentices In 9 different ocU.S. Navy S..~ltolarahiJ).-The U.S. cupational fields. These included carpenXavy established a new program In fiscal try, diesel mechanics, electricity, ma- ~•ear 1066 grnntlug scholarships to emsonry, painting, plumbing. sheetmetal ployees of the U.S. Navy ClVll Service work, tile-setting, and welding. Tllei;e who hu,·e been out of school for l yenr apprentices received on-the-job trnlulng 01· more. These scholarships entitled during the day In a regularly established the students to attend the are11,·ocational apprenticeship program and they were school at no expense to the students. taught related subjects In the.Ir respec- Twenty-five r-uch students received traintive trades at night by the Department Ing at the area vocational school during of Education at U1e area vocntlonnl fiscal yenr 1006. school. TJ.S. Na1>11 SIIOJ' Learncrs.-0.S. Novy U.S. Navy .Appre11ticeahip.-The U.S. ~hop learners were persons who were Navy Initiated a pilot conrse In fiscnl year employed by the U.S. :\'avy Cidl Servl<.-e 1966 wherehy the area vocatlonnl school by day anu who uttended classes at night trab1s apprentices for the U.S. Nn,·y. nt the ureu Yocatlonul school. At night Two students were f.m,olved in this 1>ilot lhe~· receh·e<l tJ•nlnlug 1u1d Instruction b1 program. It is tmticipated thut tbis pro- tlleil· 1·especthe fields of cluytlme employgram will lie coasiclernbly expanded durment for the purpose of achieving staing fiscal year 1067. bility or ndrnncement in their employIn addition to this pilot program, tbe ment. The aren vo<>ntlonnl r-chool

91


trained 208 U.S. Navy shop learners dur• ing fiscal year 1966. .ild11U B<Ufc Bduoa.ti-On.-Adult basic education ls a community action program implemented by the U.S. Office of Educa• tlon and, locally, by the Guam Depart• ment of Education. This is a literacy program which Is designed to assist tllose adults whose inabiUty to rend and write the Engllsh language constitutes a substantial impairment of their abll1ty to get or to retain employment commensn· rate with ,their real ability. The Adult Basic Education program was a pilot program for fiscal year 1966. The pro-

gram was late in starting and it didn't get off the ground until January 1906. Por the o-montb period ending ,June 2, 1966, 24.8 persons completed the first yeur of adult basic English. Initially enrolled were 321, and enrollment in• creased as the program developed. The program was taken to eight attendance areas Including six village schools, the U.S. Na,al Hospital fire station, u.nd the government of Guam central police sta• tlon. Twenty•one qualified instructors attended a l•month workshop conducted at the administration bulldl.ng of the Department of Education before starting the program.

Table I. Federal Funds Available to Guam Under the Various Vocational Education Acts Funds available, fiscal year

Act

Government orouam, matching

1966

Oeorgo-Bardcn, Utle I (Public Low i'l>--686) ........... Supplemental acts (Publlc.Liiw 84-896).............. VocatlOlllllEducation A.ct or 1963,Seo. 3 (Public Law 88-210)••••••••••••••••

·······-·

••••••• ···-··

••••

Pen:ent matching

Total

$1,876 80,000

Sl,876 80,000

60 60

$3,760 160,000

126,007

126,007

50

262,0U

10,&0i

0

0

10,60f

247,099

0

0

247,099

28,(80

,o

0

28,480

403,966

207,882

Vocational Edu.cation Actor 1963,800. 13(Publlc Law 88-210)•••••••• ··-·

•••• ··-·· ·-···-·

••••••••••••••

Manpower Dovelopment and Training Act (Publlo lew 87-416) ........................................ Adult Baste Education (Public 1.4w 88-452, title 11-B) .............................................. Total ..•...

·-·-···

••••.....•.•••••••••••

·- ••

I

.................

701,847

1 In addition to tho above ftrure, SlV0,738wns allotted to Guam for training allowances to the students through the DepartIDODtor EmploY1DeDtSecurity.

I

JOpercent Dlllldling "In Kind."

Dwisum of Vo~ationa/. Rehahuila#t>n V-ocatlonal rehabilitation ls the process of restoring disabled persons of a work• lng age to the fullest vocntlonaJ, economic, and social ndjustment of which they are capable. The program ls a joint effort of the Guam and Federal government. To 'be eligible for service, a person must bo 16 years old or older, must have a physical or mental lmpatnuent that Jn• terferes with obtaining or retainlng suit• able employment, and there must be a reasonable expectation that the services provi<led will result in sultable employ•

92

ment. The services Include counseling and guidance, diagnostic services to per• mit full evaluation of the client's medical, social, psychological and vocational needs, medical, surgical, dental and related services, including hospitalization, to correct or reduce the dlsabllng condl· tion and enhance employablllty, prosthetic appliances Including but 11ot lim• ited to artifictal limbs and a wide range of sight, speech, hearing and mobility a.Ids, tralulng and education to the full degree req11lred by the vocational objec• tlve, maintenance and transportation during treatment, training or any other phase of the rehabllitatit>n process, tools,


Table II. Summary of Vocational Education Programs and Projects Number or Number or Number or oc:cupaUonol qualllled students compleUng lnstruct-0rs areas

Program Trodes and Industry-high school.. ..... _ ........... Trades and Industry-adults.--··-···········--Work~perlonce ............. - ....••• --·· •••••••••• Manpower davelopmont and trolnlng •• ·····-······· Government or Ouam apprenticeship ................ U.s. Navy apprentlcesblp .•••••••••• ······-········ U.S. Navy scholarships ................. - .........•• U.S. Navy shop fearncrs........... - ................ Vocational agriculture ..•••••••••••••••• ·········-··· Adult basic ...• ···············••• -· ••••••••••••••• Total •• ···-·

••••• ······-··········

•••••••••••

lM I, 107

14 180 106 2 25

Im 280 243 2,138

8 10 13 6 10 1

10 I 1 170

13 19 1 6 11 l

6

Number or training raclllt1es 1 I 13 2 I I I

12

I

2

21

2 8

91

t 31

Nou.-ln addition to tho 2,138persons trelned In vocational, technical, and adult education, tho College or Ouam conducted 1 class or 16 students ln trade drawing and blueprint reading. 1 Somo areas are duplicated. • Somo rec1ut1esare dupllcatod.

equipment, licenses or in1tial stocks and supplies I! these are necessary in the rehabilitation process, and business enterprise assistance including financial or other assistance to establish the selected disabled person in a small business enterprise. Many ot the needed rehabllltatlon services are not available on Guam or are very limited. It Is necessary in some se• lected. cases to obtain the needed services from Hawaii and other States but this Is limited because of case cireumstances and the great financial cost. Facilities and resources that are available on Guam are used whenever possible. We estl.mnte that there are 2,000 disabled Individuals on Guam. Each year brings an addltlon group ot. disabled. as

a result ot acclde.nts, diseases, the process of aging, and congenital defects. During fiscal year 1966, 118 d.lsabled pel'sons were served. Of this number, 39 received vocational training in schools or on the job, a.nd 6 received physical restoration services including surgery and fitting ot prosthetic appliances, which resulted. in 2:1people being returned to satisfactory re.munerative occupations. A physlcnl plant was constructed and equipped with tunds totaling $144,440-obtalned thTough the Office of Emergency Planning. This plant Includes a rehabilitation workshop capable of serving over 50 individuals at a time, and offices now being utlllzed by the Division ot Vocational Rehabilitation. The tacllltles were ·occupied In January 1966.

93


III. BUSINESS AFFAIRS The status of requisitions of supplies 11.ndequipment Department of Education, and supply section, in our follows:

Total

Direct purchase orders .............

Open

for purchases submitted to procurement records is as

Pnrtlnl plete

3,660 I, 971

Com•

com• pleted

--

106

1,670

Over-thHOWlter

receipts.·-.---·· .. Requisitions sent to procurement nnd supply ............. Formal bid .......... Informal bid •• ·-···· Telephone quota!Ions..............

1,166

17

-·-·----

I, 149

401 14

81 1

44

·------·

276 13

18

--·--· --·------

114 -·---·-

·-- ·-··-

18

type of lunch served at the mo.ximum rate of $0.15 depending on the amount entitlement. Presently the cafeteria ls staffed with 86 people, 73 permanent and 13 limited term employees, with approximately $183,467.20 paid in salary. Maintenance of school plants and fa. cilitles is a joint responsibility of the Department of Public Works and maintenance section, Department of Education. The status of the total number of maintenance requests in our records is as follows: Department of Education: Completed .. _. __ . ______________ 416 Pcnding •••••• ·-··-··-··-··-·-136

U4

The for.mill bids that were completed cost 11.pproximAtely$110,491.34.. A total of 410 requests for field trips from various schools were arranged with the transportation division, Department of Public Works. Cafeterias, operated on a self-sustain• Ing basis, serviced schools with hot lunches. Guam schools participated in the national sch~ol lunch program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Through this participation, the government of Guam is eligible to receive both surplus commodities and cash reim.bureement pel'.

Total ____ . _. _____.....

___. _ . 552

Public works: Completed.. .. _. __-··-·Pending_·······-···-·······--·

__ .. _._. 149 128

'TotaL·----··-············-·-

277

Property utilization: Completed. ___._ .. __ ·- .. ____.. _ Pcnding_····-·-············-·Totnl __·····--···---··-·--··Totnl number, maintenance requests ..... _~.. _._._ .....

14 0 23 852

IV. PERSONNEL The personnel division operates under the administrative supervision of the as• si&tant superintendent-1>ersonnel who is directly responsible to the superintendent of schools. The primary function of this office is the employment of all personnel for the Department of Education. Sec• ondary functions, all of which relate to the primary function, nre teacher certification, increment issuance, employ. ment processing, reclassification, evalua• tion, handling probational reports, a.ud various other functJons as required of the J)ersonncl office.

94

As a result of Public Law 8-71, various other responsibilities have been assumed by this division. These udditioual duties involve the announcing and advertising of positions, receiving upplications, interviewing, evaluation and screening, appointments. issulng and proeessl.ng of contracts, the procel:!sing of ali new em• ployees. and bundling perforruunce reports for increments. This division maJn• tnins Ua.ison with tbe Department of La• bor and Personnel regarding travel all(l transportation ancl with the Department of Public Works concerning housing.


Replacements-Total number o( Preparation of XotUlcatlon of Personnel teacher replacements during Action FON-2-0--1 is now handled di• school year 1965-66 to keep rectly by this department, as well. allocated positions filled: The statistical rep()rt of the 1>ersonnel Elementary-·· ..... __.... _. division follows: SecondarY---··-···-···-·-· I. TOTAL PERSONNEL, 933 IJ.

CERTIFICATED

PERSONNEL

IN

THE

ScaooL, 663 Se..xa.nd marital status: Male teachers--··--·····----· Female·teacher~- _.. _·- _.. --··

201 462

Total •• ·-·····-········-

663

Married teache.rs ... _....... Unmarried teachers-----·····-

=

__

538 125

Total...................

Ill.

CERTIFICATED CENTRAL

TotnL . _. __.... __.....

PERSONNEir-

20 31

Contract administrative staff __... Local hire counselor staff_._. __._

3

DIVISION

01'' VOCATIONAL

REHABILITATION

. .

36 274

_.

310

25 328

_____.. . .

353

Grand total..._........ Employment status: Regular contract teachers.··- .. Dependent contra.ct teachers .. _ Military dependents, etc ...... . Guamanians (local hire) ...... .

663

I

___...

Training: M.S. degree ......... :........ B.S. degree ............ ···-.. 3 years' college............. -2 years' college_____......... _ Less than 2 years' college...... Total. __ ····-...........

194 60 161 248 663 61 376 73 83 70

1

4

Total-·--·--····--··----

V. NoNCERTIFICATEO PERSONNEL Clerical personnel: Clcricnl personnel (central office)..................... Clerical personnel (secondary).. Clerical personnel (elementary). Clerical personnel (vocational rehabilitation) ........... __. Total ••• --····----···--·

28 21 22 2

73

Maintenance and custodial per• sonnet: Maintenance and custodial personnel (maintenance shop)---···-··-··--···-··Custodial personnel (secondary) ...... __ .. ----·. Custodial personnel (elementary) ......... - ...•• Custodial personnel (vocational rehnbilitntion) .. __....

13 31 44

663 Total. - _ ... - ...........

1

11

__

Total ... _·- .. _--·----IV.

Elementary: Administrative and supervisory_ ....... __ .. _. Elementary teachers .... _. _.

Total. ............

59

ADMUIISTRATION

Contract administrative staff (central office)-.. -·._ .. ______. Local hire administrative staff (central office)....... -----·-··

663

Assignment status: Secondary: Administrative and supervisory_ ............ Secondary teachers ........

TotaL .......

Total. . _ . ___. _... _. __.. _

38 21

.

89

Plus U rontrnct employees In centrol office.

95 243·51ft O • 67 • 7


Lunchroom personnel: Cafeteria managers ___ . _______ Cooks----------------------Kitchen helpers (permnnen t) ___ Total ___________________

=

9 10 54 73

Number who withdrew application __-- ________. ____________ Applications on file.. ___________

18 160

Total .. _________________

504

=

Number of contracts offered.. ___

VI. PERSONNEL ACTIONS Requests for personnel actions (GG-1) processed __________ 2,200

239

Accepted____________________ Declined or withdrawn________ Pending_____________________

138 93 8

Number of contracts offered: Elementary ___________.______ Secondary___________________ Administrative .. _____________

32 96 10

Total___________________

138

Positions offered: Elementary .. __._. __.________ Secondary___________________ Administrative .. _________.___

51 122 10

Total. ___ . _______. ______

183

Recruitment Statistics As of June 30, 1966 Inquiries ______________________ 2, 109 Applications._.________________

504

Secondary___________________ Elementary. ______________.. _ Administrative _____________- _

=

383 105 16

Applicants and wives under contract________________________ 183 Substitute applications .. ________ 8 Number ineligible_______________ 36 Number declined.______________ 99

96


Guam Employment Service (PERSONNEL:

7)-(BUDOET:

$48,887)

Because of added responsibilities under the selective service rehabtlltnnt program, an additional position of employment service interviewer was granted cluring the fiscal year. The new position of assistant employment service ndministrntor was also approved. This position will be utilized on labor clearance activities and to assist the admirustrator on technical aspects of employment service functions and related matters. Operational activities of the Guam Employment Service for fiscal year 1966 are shown in the tables below. Table I shows the Manpower Development and Training .Actprogress. Total pla<.'ements are as of the close of the fiscal year. The 10 carpenter tra.inees that graduated on June 80 are expected to be placed in jobs without difficulty. The first section of ,the clerk-typist project completed in fiscal year 1065 is also shown as a comparison with projects completed during the reporting fiscal year.

One of the outstanding developments of the fiscal year was the completion of training by 76 youths and adults under u Manpower Development and Training Act program of the Guam Employment Service and the Trade and Technical School of the Department of Education. The classes were for clerk-typi11ts, auto mechanlcs, carpenters, and blocklayerconcrete-masons. Jobs were found for most graduates. More detalled information on this program will be found on table I of this report. The apprenticeship training program, n joint efl'ort of the government of Guam nnd the Guam Contracto~ Association, included 85 apprentices at the year's entl. The service assisted the Economic Op. portunlty Commission, local sponsor of the Economic Opportwtlty .Act of 1964, in recruiting nnd counseling enrollees tor the neighborhood youth corp!! program. A total of 100 youths were needed for this program.

Table I. MDTA Progress Report, Fiscal Year 1965-66 Numbor Numbor or weeks of traintraining C!CS

SecUon

Project number and title

Dato

Date started

Numbor gradunted

com-

plated

Number placed

Projects completed In ftsclll year 1966 OUAM(Y)SOOl, OUAM(Y)5002, OUAM(R)6003, OUAM(R)6001,

cl&k-typlst ....... auto mechanic ....

Zd......... 1st. .......

carpcnt-Of'_______

1st ......

.

bricklayerconcrete-blook mason •••.•• ·-···· GUAM(R), 6003,carpenter ........

22

51 22

-

20

1st ........ 2L-----

22

30 25 16

7-26-& 1- ~05 ~30-65

15 15

1- 3-66 2- 1-66

12-24-& 12-24-65 1-28-66

20

20

13 14

10 12

6-2S-66

10 10

6-3~

6

····-··-

Projeets completed In llscal year 1965 OUAM(Y)M.01, aterk-typlst .......

1st.. ••••••

1

22

I

30

I

1-H&

I

6- 4-65

I I 20

28

97


('reased by about 361 compared to last yenr. Pl11ceme11tof student:, during the i1111umerafter <:lo:se of tilt' fiscal yem· li1rgely attrll>ute<l to the clecrensc. The following stntlstlcn I :,ummarles. 110th by occnpatlonal group and industry. for 19(il'i und 1966 nre presented for comparison and to reflect the distrilmtiYe ll!>tlng of thl' placement efforts:

Also shown on tables II, III. IV, V, nncl

,·r are

figure,; from the l!l6'i nnnunl re• 1K>rt to allow comparl;;on of the locnl office actlvlti1>;; for the pnst 2 yenrs.

New Applications .\ total of 2.401 uew appllcatlons were l'eceh·ecl during the fiscal re1Lr. This was 260 less than Inst ye1Lr·sannnnl count.

Clearance Orders for Alien Labo1·

Openings Received

During the fiscal year, resulting from n ruling by the U.S. Department of Labor. the Guam Employment Service ceased issuing lahor clearance iu connection with l)etitlons submitted by employers for tempor:u·y alien workers to fill skilled or technical position:,. All petitions for uUen lul>or. howeYer, nre submitted to the senice to uscertuiu whether the need!:!c1u1 l>e supplied locally. Requests snbmltted b~•ullen petitloulug employer!; were considered locnl job orders. In nil. there were about 6,420 petition-eo11uecte<l job orders rc(-eived. Additlo11al clenrnnces were issued bv the Director of Lnbor nnd Pel'sonnel t~ the Immigration Service for ~.2 civil :,en·ice rncancles for tbe npproprinterl fund netivlty nncl for 800 diSflstcr. recon• :,tructlon. nnll rebnbllltntlon workers. These 11renot includccl in the table below. The amendment of the Inunlgrntlou un<l Xnttonnllty Act ou December 1, lOOii. created n new proceclure of clearing re-

.Jou openings received from both goverrunent tllld prirnte industries decrea.secl h~• uoont 1.201 us compared to last year. 'l'hL« de<:rense wa,; caused by rhe cowplet Ion of 11roject.s hy some of the wujor 1•011tractor,;. Of the reported :S.010 openings. 6.420

\\'!'re filed hy nllen petlt1011i11gemployers !11to111pHn11ce with Depurnueut of Labor 1111(1l'er::iou11PI. gm·er1m1e11t of GutLUI, l'lenrnnct' l"C'ftnlrcment. which obligates nil contractors und J!:Overi11111mt ngencle,; to file joh nnler:, with thnt (lepnrtment nffe<•ttnJ!:thl' positions inYoh·ed.

Tl1e Ouam F,mployment Service, n ell· \·lslon of the De11i1rtme11tof Labor nncl Pl'l'i;{)lllll'I MIil llll llffllin,te of the U.S. Employment Service h11sbeen assigned the l'l'!.[)Onslbilltr or screening this type of request. considered to lie lo<:u.lJoh request or Joi>order.

Placements l'lncement

nctl\"ity

fol'

the ~·ear de-

Table II. New Applications Fomalo

Total

1066. •• • ••••••••••••••••

·····-··-··--······

JOGS ............................................

.

Veteran

2,401

871

2,667

960

Under 22

SI 40

45 and

over

88 82

1,680 2,033

Table III. Openings Received by Occupational Group Total

1000..

.................... 8,010

lOOS .......................

98

0, 211

Profes• slonaland kindred

f,01 013

Clerical and sales 502 423

Agrl·

SCrvtco

culture

1,368

i

1,071

185

Skilled

f, 493 6,6'1i

Som!-

sklUod

5M ◄~3

Un· skilled

404

m


Table IV. Placements by Occupational Gr<;>up Group

I

Total

Fem.ale

I

Vetoron

Under 22 45 and over

11160

Pn,lossionnl and mnnagctiol... . . ........ Clerical and sales ........................... Service•• ····································Sklllcd •••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••• Scmlsklllod.. . ................................. Unskilled. , .................................

. .. . ••••• . .

ti

2

85

,5.5

a

120 128

~'I)

4 -l 7

0

1

0

49 77 40

0 13 18

302

52 0 3

11

44 '..'87

to

811

141

20

507

40

HM

6

1965

l'ro.lcsslonoland kindred ..... ·-·· ............. Clcrtcul and soles.................... - ........ Service...................•.................... SkUlcd........................................ Semlsklllcd .............•.................... Unsklllcd. . ................................. 'l'oloL

.................................

.

4 102 45 i'1I 136 800

.

1. 172

. . .

qucsti,: for <:h1rngeof statm, of 11lie11labol' 'from nonhmulgrunt to l.t11111lgr1111t. 'l'hi,; ptoceclme reqItires the em1iluYN' to com• plete Form ES-575, A 11nd B (Appllcntion fol' Allen l•,u11lloy111c11t Certlflcntlon) nncl to i,:ubmlt It to the i,:e1·,·1<:e for 1·e,·iew nucl tr1111smittal to the reglouul 11fflt'(• for ll<:tiO.ll. In thir- co1111ect1011, there were :iu re• quests submitted. Tlnu; far. 12 hnni Ileen ap1)l'o,·ed, nud the re,;t ure 11emli11g. Table vr shows the ,·olume of tbe nlien lnhor r~ruitment proce~.

0

1

0

a

0

3

0

i9

~I I

319

5 3 0

00 14 2 700

4

410

13

856

34

85

5

:en-ice Vll<:llllcies. Alien workers are dli;placecl 11:,;local c1tuuitted np11licants become nYnilubl<'. ~uv~• nnd Air :i,~orcenc• tiYitle1-1l.111\·e ulso regul11rlr l>een ntilir.lng th<' scn·ices of thi:, oflicc. Gorer11111r11t of G1111111.-The SE't·,·ice,lUl aflilintc of th1• U.S. Bmploymeut :Serrlc1• 1111da <11vlsio11of thP Depnrtmeut of I.ubor and Pe1·s01111el, seI·vps ns the perso1111clrcci:nitment center for the go,·e11Ime11t of Gunm.

Coordination with Govermnental Agencies

During tbe tl:;cal ~·eu1·,1.i11 nppllcu• tlo11,; for gm·ernment of Guum vncnucies were receh·ed. 'l'bi:s figure is uot iucl111lecllu thP a11plication,; shown 011 table II.

Fcdcmf .·lf!C11cics.-A close working 1·e• latlomshl1J co11ti1111ecl betwet>tt the service t111d b'cderal 11i;c11cleson Gmuu. Tbls 11tT1111gcmc•11t wus p11rticJlln1·l~•pvident In lhc cootll'ratln! eliorr.· of th<' loc::al Board of 1·.s. Cl\'1I Service Examiners to recruit 1111ullflc1l re:,;ldent n1111lil'a11tsfor civil

,Scl<:cti1a.:s,,rvi('(' .s,1,~tr111.-Asslst1uIc:e is I.Jeiugrendered to SeleetlYe Service rehubilituuts lllHler :U'rangement betwee11 the Selecth·e Sen-lee System nncl the U.S. Departu1e11t of Lnuor. Rejectees repo1·ti11g wt>re couuseled uml referred to joh \"UC;IIIIClesIn lhte with thi>il· l'llpnbllltiei-.

99


Table V. Placements by Industry Industry

I

Total

l

Female

Veteran

I

Under 22 I •sand over

1900

Forestry aod tl!hery ............................. Contrnct construction ........................... Food and kindred products •••••• ·-············ Stone, clay, and glass products .... - ............ Printing, publishing, ond allied.................. Instruments_ •......... ---·· .................... Fumlture and flxturos...••••• _. __ ······-···· Other public utllltles ............. _ ....... - ... Who.lesaleand retail trade ....................... Finance and Insurance... _ ...................... Service, excluding private household. ............ Private household.......................... _ ... Tmru,portattou._ •••• ··-··· ·-··-·· •••.•••••.. Fodera! Oovon1mont ••...•••.• ····-····· ....... Local govemmont .......................... - ... TotaL ...••• ·-···-······

................

l

0 4

U4 6 32 l

46 I 20 23 20

0 0

2

I

2

I

2

10

1 45

0 0

I 27

0

0 3

5

0 0

133 3 10 178

8 t2 28 1 8 20

83

0

811

141

3

0 0 7

0

0 143

10 0 3 0 0

0

0 0

9 16 16 go 2 10

0 0

8 I

0

4

Ill 72

13 2

29

&IT

46

0 9

2 180 1 0

1066

Forestry and flahory............................. Contract construction ... ·····-· ................ Food and klndred products ...................... Printing, publishing, and allied ................. Stone, clay, and glass produets ....... ·-········ Wholesaleand rer.alltrodo ........... ··-- ---Finance, Insurance, and real estate .............. Service, oxoludlng prlvato household............ Pr!vato hoU!ehold.. _ ........................... Federal Oovemmont .................... ---·-Local govon1mont...............................

---

Total.. ....................................

:? 323 2 2 16

2 11 1 1

0

0 0

I

0 2:! 0 0 0

32

4

17

2

s

0

I

I

33

0 0

I I I

0

14 3

6

16 2

92 669

22 356

0

'

649

7 0

I, 172

410

13

866

34

0

38

Table VI. Petitions (local job orders) Private busl.ness

I

Government Federnl or Oulllll Government

I

I

Total

1966

Number or firms petitioning ......................... Number olpetltldns processed••••••••• ·-·······-·· Number or workeni potltloned for....................

M

I

6

61

204

3

33

240

4.636

'

1,889

6,429

1065

Number of tlnns potlttonlng. ·······-····-·········· Number of petitions processed.. --···· .............. Number otworkeni petitioned tor .....•.• ·-·······-

100

64 197 5,843

I 17 79

4 35

1.064

60

240 7,380


Fiscal Report Summary Statement of Disbursements, Unliquidated Encumbrances and Balances, by Categories Dlsbursoments and oncumbronccs Cntogory

Budget allotments

Pcrsoruil sor\!.lccs............ ·····-·· ...••...... Pcrsonnlll services............................. Supplies_.······-··········· .•••.••.••••••••••• Communication services..- ..................... Tmvcl..- •• ·-···········-····· •••••••••••••••• l'rlnllng and binding ............. _ ............. Rent-premises .. _ .... -·- ....... _ ............. Equipment purohnsos. ········-········ ••••••• MISCOllaneous ................................... Tot.Ill......................................

Disburse•

ments

Unllqul• dated OD· cumbranccs

$23,143

$10,47'l

S2,60'l

2,070 565

1,679 363 360

221

4Q2

2,000

200 5,112 80

933 84,694

98 72 1,604 ..................._ 101 11 4,686 426 67 725 172 28,937

Total oncum•

Unancum• brance balances

broncos S22,074 1, llOO 451 432

1,504

$1,000 170

104 60 406

88

112

----·--·----

5,112 67 897

3,002

32,630

---♦----- ....

23 36

2.~

Status of MOTA Administration Financial Conditions as of June 30, 1966 Budgot Liquidated allotments obligations

Cnt-0gory

Total Unllqul• obllptlons datod obligations

Bnlancos

$12,934 $12,034 $2,017 $15,031 +$2,097 Perso110lservlces.................... -.......... Personnel bencfl~............................... 1,122 1,122 171 I, m +171 Supr,llcs......................................... 137 24 ··-········ 24 -113 Communication servlcca........................................••.......••..•••••••• ·-········· ··-········ Tmvcl ........................... -······-····........................................••................•. Printing and binding............................ 100 . .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . .. .... -100 Rent-premises- .............. ·-······· ..............................................••.......••........... Equipment purchnsos................................................... ·······-·· .................•.•••.. M.tscollaneous.•.•••.•••••••••••••.••••••••.••••• -·········· ···-······ •••••••••••• ···-······· ••••••••••••

Total. ....................................

.

H,293

14,080

2,268

16,348

• Allotment Is received through obligational authority. 'Those reports are subject to audit. Symbol: + Ovor, - Snvlngs.

101


1966 Annual Report Department of Finance (PERSONNEL:

100)-(APPROPRIATION:

As a fiscal and regnlntory !ustruwentnllty, the DeJ)artment of Finance performs its toncUons through the following cllvlsions whlcl1 constitute Its organir.atioual framework :

(1) Office of the DirectOI': Division Division Divls!ou Dlvisiou tlon: (6) Dh·lslou tmtiou; ( T) Dh·ls!on ply. (2) (3) (4) (;:i)

Of ACCOlUltS:

of Iuspectlou : of 'l'remnu·y : of Reveuue 0111.i Tnxn• of

Licenses null Regis-

or Procm·e111e11t nncl Sup-

$1,072,404)

Basically, the department's responsiui!IUes emurace budget and management work (J>rior to the transfer of the httclget and mn.uagement hrancb to the Governor's Office) ; accounting and payroll ftmctlons; lnlemnl auditing nnd hni<I· uess llceuse and Alcoholic Beverage Con• trol enforcement; receipt, disbursement nnd hwestment of public frmcl.c:; enforce-

ment of the tnx laws of Gnnm; nclmlnh,• trnt!on of statutes covering sundry JI. censes. insurance. securities, 1111<1 other mntt1>rs: nnd 11roct1re111ent and wnrebous• ing acti\·ltie!<.

REPORT OF ACCOMPLISHMENT OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR Administration The Dfrector'!I Office expuuded the !11• tel'llal audit program with u ,·few of hn,·lng uu g0\'Cl'llUIEtllt llCCO\IDt.-;iwd flscul uctivities re,·lewed encb year.

Prior to

lcgnl C0IIIIUltnnt WllS nlso contt·nctecl Cl\11'• ing the !utter purt of the yenr to help nuc,·inte the deportment's lei:al problem>< uud other tochuicnl matter:<.

Division of Accounts the trun:,,-fer of uudget and management, This division is responsible for thP th.is offlc.-eln1tlated u data processing sys• mulntenunce nnd 1111mngeuwnt of Govtem designed to simplify many manual ernment of G1111Jll nccouuts. It records functions. The most drastic developUJI() couti-ols revenues nncl expe11clit11res ment Instituted was the reorgllnization of of the government. the department which W'OUldresult in perThe controlle1· bends this <1i,·isio11 :,;011nellosses to Procuremcut ru1cl Supply, 'l'rcosury. uud Licenses und Registration. whk-b e:onslsts of two hr1u1chel!. nnmely: payroll brnnch. 'l'hls would nlli0 lm·olve t.be absorption • ACcou11tlng l>rnncb 1111{1 'Ille records or the clh·isiou reflect for of Ll<:ense:,;and Registration by the Di• llscu! year 1006 gcncrnl funll re,·euuei; 11>< 1·!1,l011 of Revenue uncl '1'11xu,tio11 which. in turn. would lose Ille real est11te pro1wrty nmmwtlng to $20,807,014. This Hgurc• hruuch hecunse the !utter would be mncle exceeds the re,·enue N•t!mote of $10.SOO.· 000 hy J::1,0<)7 .OH 11d!vlslou In it:,; own right. A pnrt-tlme 102


t)endllure.s, as the table below reflects, The estimate for income taxes, it mar be noted, wns shy of the uctunl collection nmountecl to $20,479,431.56ns nt the ell(] of fiscal yenr 1066. A. considerable Por• by $1,000,020, which uwouut accounts prlocipally for the overall general fund tion of this tlgure accounts for expendilne1·e11se. It way be added that this o,•er- ture:- m11<l1• on encumbrances effected in nge ln income tax collection is nttributthe previous years. Of the $20.4 million, 11ble mninty to corpornte tnxes. The government's yenren<l 1111upp1·opri- <:apltal expeudltures 1111d othe1· project,; 11-te<l surplus totaled $1,fi81.SU.20. Ex- tonsti toted $l ,83l ,ij20,5u.

Government of Guam GENERAL

FUND BALANCE SHEET AS OF JUNE 30, 1066

Assets: Cash ou hand and in bao.k•••••• •-···········-··---····-··Deposit with fiscal agents ................................. . Accounts receivables: Income tax ...................... _. _. $1, 078, 213. 18 217,163.90 Business privilege tax .............. ·-· 389,963. 20 Real property tax .•. ··-·--·····-··-·. 2, 264, 251. 09 Medical services ..................... . Less: Reserve for uncollected nocounts .. . Total accounts receivable ........... . Others ........................... . Loss: Reserve for uncollectible accounts.

$3,218,060.81 78,155.96

3, 949, 591. 37 (3, 949, 591. 37) 0 164,782. 97 (61,127.41) 103,655.56

Duo from Treasurer of Unit.ed States- ............... ·- .. ·- .• Due from other funds-··-····· ........•••••••••••••••••• -• Inventory of supplies (include inventory in transit $27, 132.65) .. Investment-U.S. TTcnsury Bond (at amortized cost) ........ .

468,850.37 2, 334, 432. 5 5 10,636,679.32

Total asscts.·-············-······-··-·················· Liabilities, reserves, tippropril\tions and surplus: Liabilities: Accounts and clnims po.ynblo........ _.. Accrued salaries nnd wages ..... ·- .... . Deposit-Federal gmnts-in•nid ..... ·- .. Other deposits .. _ ................... . Duo to other funds .................. .

1, 430, 026. 07 2, 094, 497. LO

873,903. 31 455,077.04 123, 544. 11 119,463.30 91,313.43 1, 663, 302. 18

Reserves: For tax refund ... _.................. . For tuition refund ................... . For imprest fund_ ................... . For inventory ..................... ·-· For decline in market vnluo of invcstmont ............... - ............. . For encumbrances ................... . Continuing appropriation .............................. Unnpproprintcd surplus ................. _ .....

I, 240, 000. 00 347. 75 9,500.00 441, 717. 72 177, 866. 92 2,278,588.18

·- .•• _.......... .

Totnl linbilitics, reserves, appropriations, and surplus ........

.

4,148,020.57 3,243,515.28 l, 581, 841. 29 10, 636, 070. 32

103


GENERAL FUND REVENUE STATEMENT FROM JULY 1, 1965 THROUGH JUNE 30, 11)66 Truces, local: Income _____________________________________________________ $7,500,026 Gross receipts _______________________________________________ 2,014,889 Alcoholic beverages __________________________________________ 339,859 Liquid fuel ____________________________________________ ----l, 177,598 Tobacco ____________________________________________________ 186, 163 Excise and admission _______________________________________ _ 91,219 Vehicle transfer ____________________________________________ _ 83,721 Real property ______________. ________________________________ 765,694 Others ____________________________________________________ _ 12,214 Licenses and permits: Vehicle registration _________________________ . ________________ 467,601 Vehicle operators ____________________________________________ 47,086 Business ____________________________________________________ 121,309 Others ____________________________________________________ _ 38,152 Fines and forfeits_ -- _________________________________________ 141,802 Use of money___________________________________________________ and property: Interest _ (21,760) 167,099 Rents------------------------~----------------------------Revenue from other agency: Tax and fees: Income tax collected by U.S. agency _______________________ 4,133,068 Immigration fees. ______________________________________ _ 26,120 Grant-in-aid: School operation and maintenance _________________________ 1,215,331 Expansion and improvement of education _________________ _ (20,696) Fish and wildlife restoration _____________________________ _ 13,693 Vocational education _______------ __________________-- - - __ 89,807 77,794 Vocational rehabilitation_ -- _- ________ --- - ----- _---- --- --Maternal and child health service __________________________ 98,512 Crippled children service ____________________________ - - -- _ 72,976 Public assistance _____________________ - - - - ____- _- - - - - - - - 211, 734 245,537 Public health service _______________--- -- - ----- ----- ---- - Library service __________________________________________ 31,098 Child welfare service _______________________________- - - - __ 125,666 14,818 Civil defense ____________________------ - - -- - -- --- ----- -- Grant-in-aid, NINDB ___________________________________ _ (691) Urban planning ________________________________________ _ 61, 324 Charges for current services: General government _________________________________________ 37,874 25,170 Public safety ______________- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Public works ________________________________________________ 2,789 815,660 Medical services. _________________------- - --- - _-- - - -- -- ---- - Education __________________________________________________ 157,882 Library ___________________________________________________ _ 1,502 Agriculture __________________________________________ -- -- - __ 37,748 Land management ___________________________________________ 12,432 Commerce __________________________________________________ 568 Other revenues: 7,006 Sales and compensation_· _________________ - - - - - ____- - - - - - - - - - 160,238 Contribution and surplus. _____________- - - - - -- - - - - - - -- -- - - - - - 19,382 Miscellaneous _________________ . _______- - . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Grand total _______________________________________________ 20, 807, 014

104


GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURE

STATEMENT FOR FISCAL YEAR 1966

Department or project: Office of the Governor _________ ._ ..... _ ................... . Department of Finance..-··-·· .. ·- .•.••...••• --··-·--···---· Department of Lo.w............... ····-· ·- ................ . Department of Labor o.nd Personncl ....... --•·-·····-··--·-Department of Public Safety_···-··························· Department of Public Works.·-··············--··-·--··-··-Civil Defense ........ _... _......... - ..................... . Commissioners of Guam.. ....• ···-···· •• ·-- •• --·--·····-··-· Boo.rds and Commissions.- .. ·- ........ _ ...... ·- .... _...... . Guam Memorial Hospital .... _ ...... ·---·--·-----·... __·-Department of Public Health and Welfare .......... _........ . Department of Education .... -·····- ••.• ·- •• ·- .••• -····-·-· College of Guam ..... _····-··· .. -· ... _..... ··-· ..... ·-· ... Public Library and Museum.·-······-·····-····---·······-· Recreation Commission ..... --·· ...... _................... . Department of Agriculture ....................... ·--····-··· Department of Land Management.- ........................ . Department of Commerce ... ·- .................. -· .... -· .. . Travel and Transportation.·-·-··· ....... ···- •......... ·---Toto.ls Executive Branch ..............

·-···-······---·-··

8201,253. 30 983,597.47 132,713.84 105,073.15 1, 138, 387. 61 2, 399, 195. 26 41, 746. 03 177,900.60 1, 651. 20 2, 544, 098. 86 1, 242, 044. 40 5, 043, 187. 16 720,398. 00 60,932. 03 34,740.34 365,683.63 351,763.61 233,394.37 695,676. 40 16,473,437.26

169,449.54 Judiciary ••• --·······-·-···-·-··-···----·-··-·-··········· 378,690.02 Legislature-··················-····················-······ . Washington representative. __.. _.............. _ ............ 64,101.46 38,583.29 l11J1ervice training ....................... ·-.·-- .. ··-·-· .... . Urban Renewal and Housing Administration .......... _..... _. 410.74 18,809.63 Operation of Guo.m air termino.L .......... •-·····--········· 66,000.00 Scholarship and student loan funds.·····-····-·········--··· 30,000.00 Workmen's compensation fund ............ ···-···--· ...... . Contribution to retirement fund ........ _........... _...... __ 870,109.34 2,000.00 JFK Memorial fund •••••• -·--·· ••• ·-· •• ·--·--··---··.-··-· 50,000.00 Loan guarantee fund .. - ............... -·---····------.. ··Guan Economic Development Authority ________.... _... ____. 225,000.00 67,986.96 Manpower development and training program·-····-·········· 80,164.81 Head Start program-OEC ......... ·-- ·--· - ..... ·-· ... -···· 16,111.20 Adult basic education-OEC ........ ·-·-·· ......... ·- ..... ·902. 14 Vocational education-Work study ... ---·.·-·---··-·-··· ••••• 71,420.24 ·--·· ...... . ESEA-Title I projects .. _·--· ................. 24,725.38 -···--··-····--··-·-··· ESEA-Title V projects ......•.....• Professional personnel in education of handicapped children ..... 0 1, 831, 529. 55 Capital improvement and other projects ..... ---···-····-····· Grand total •••••••••

·--·-·······························

20,470,431.56

105


Division of lnspectioti This dlvlsiou was created by I~xecutive Order Xo. 63-H, on Jul~• 1, 1963. Dlrec• tor's Order No. 12, Su1mlement Xo. 12, !lated July 2G, 1063, Instituted two hrancheis in the <livlslo11: (1) internal audit branch !tlld (2) co111pllancelmmcll. The division head Is an auditor Y. fnteniaZ A.udft Branch.-The work of this branch was broadened 1md wais well programed so that a systematic audit activity could be effected throughout the eourse of n yenr. The major nhn of tl1i1, 11rogrnuli11gis to assure that nil funds n11d nccounts nre examined every year pursun.nt to stntutory nnd regulatory ret1uireme11ts. This is n preventive measure actually. 'rhls branch pnrtici[)lltes with Depnrt111entof Lnbor and Personnel ill lnvesti· gating personnel conduct nnd behn\•ior. Co111plia11cc R1·011ch.-A.s s11eclfled In F.xecutln• Order ~o. 03-14, this hrancll participate!< with the Ucense office in the enforcement of laws rebttlng to business licenses, motor vehicle registrations, excise nud 1U11u,;ementtnxes, et cetern. Its AB<; unit works ill conjunction with the Depnrtment of l'nullc . nfety 1111d, In some Instances. with the Armed Services Police, in carrying out the p1·0\·lsions uud re<1uirenw11t!< of the Alcoholic Ilevernge Control Act. As many us 7,241 field inspections were mude by the officer,; of this brand1. This

106

im·oh·ed not only Lhe nightly ,·isits to liquor and bnr establishments to check for compllru1ce, but also luspectlon of business premises to ascertnln conformitr with the demands of the Dusine8S Llceuse Law.

One compliance officer is slated to uu()ergo insen·lce training In October 1066 ht the tleltl of nnrcotlc-s nucl A.BOenfo1·ce• U!Cllt.

The l>rnneh supen·isor uuthori:e.ed two book.lets entitled "Conduct of an omcer iu Court" 1md •'Elfecth·e Report Writing" uud distrll>uted them to Ills inspectors uud the officers of J>tll>Jicsafety for theh· gulchmce nud use.

Division of Treasur,, This dh·li,;lou Is chnrged with receh·ing nll revenues and receipts <lue the i;overnment. It nlso disburses nil pul>lic funds Ulld mnlutalus cusb ac• counts for snch funds. It likewise has tusto<lr of rwcurltles deposited by lnsm· :mce <·ompnnie,; pnrsunnt to the requirements of the Insurance Jaw of Guam. Duriug rhe fiscal year, the 'l'rensurer 011ened :;Ix letter of credit for Federal grants for educntlonal, public health, and other services. This system proYl<lesfor withdrawul of cash when nud m; ueede<l for the cllfrerent progrnms by ,·ouche1· presentation to the bimks. The tultle uelow Is II statement or fun<l 11ccou11ts: 1111d collecting


Statement of Fund Accounts Receipts, July l, 1965-

Juno 30, I 000

D!sbursomonts, July I, 1965-June 30, 196G

$211. 758,825.23 $29,360,348.36 General 1''uod (Dunk or Amcr!C11)-•• ····--··-·······-········--·······-···· General l,'und (Bank or Huwolll ...... _............... _ ...................... . 1,221,241.80 I, OH, 184. 44 4,839,438.00 4, OH, 427. i8 Public UUl!ty •••••••••••••••••••••••••• -· •••••••••••••••••• • • ••• • • •• •• • • • • • • • • 2, 6()9, 028.21 1,300, J13.81 Conunerclol Port.. ••••••••••••••••••••••• •······-·················-············ 1,800,744.00 J,810,607.10 RcUrcmcul •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • •••••••• ••• • ••• •• •• •• •• ·- •• •· • •• • ••• • 13,589,637. S2 Puyroll. •••••••••••••• ·-·· •· • • •- • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •• •• •• • • • • •••• •• • • • • •• • • •• ••• 13. 589,123.65 1.an. 549.oo I, a8l, 640.00 •rax-Rcruntl_ ·-··. ···-··· ····--· ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •······ • •····· 40. 200.63 48,973.64 •· •······-·· •···· Employment Scr,•lcc•.. _ .. _ ...•••..........................

lslund Court 'T'rus~Fund •••••••••• ·-·············-·························· Public Ass!stunoc_ •••••••••• ·········-····· •••••••••••• •····-··· •····· •·-·· Collogu AuxlUru-y Serv!ccs ••••••••••••••••••• -··························-··•· Guam llouslng Cor))Omtlon,spco!ol revolving_ .•.•.•.•..... - .. ········-··· MDT A Special Fund .......................................................

OEP }'und (Koren) .......................................................... GIUUllUcl1oblllt.ol!on(Bonk or America) .....................................

•· ··

. .

"'OC (CAP) •• ·········--········· .......................... ••••••••••••••••• Guom RcbabllltaUon (Donkor Uuwnll) ........... _ ......................... . Commcrcllll Port MolDtCDllOCO •••••• -·•····-··-··························

lnnctlve Account No. 2800••• _ ..........•.............•..... •· •·····-···· ••• · '!'DOA No. 3, Guam Momorlal Uosp!tol Fund .......................... -·•· '!'DOA No. 11, Retirement •••••••••....•• ····-·············· •.•.••••••••• ••• '!'DOA No. 17, Workmen's Compcmsnt1on.-········•···········-············ TDOA No. 28, Oenurut 'Fune!. ...................................... _ ..... _ .. 'l'DOA No. 29, RcUrcmcnt ................................................... . Savings accounts: Ouo.m Momoriol .llos1>lt111. ............................................... SuSlllln llospllnl- ........................................................

.

.

O.ll.C. Building Fund ••..........•.•............. ·•· .• ·····-· .•......... Snvlngs & Lonn Associ!\tions ......... _ .. _ ............ - ...............

Division of Reventte and Taxation The 111·evio11:i eCfort of lcglsltltion to tux 111<:oholicL>e\'Crugesimported br military iustollutious, 111;described In last year's re1>0rt, wru; nulUfied by court decision. In thh, ycm·, new l~gislation ( Public Laiw S-125) \\'1ts e1111ctecl IYith the ::1nmetarget. It has fulled to vroduce tllc nnticlpatecl re,·euue bcc:au::;c of oppo:,itlou from the military uutho1·itics. Unclcr direction of lhe Depurtmcut of Defense in Washing• ton, the new lnw a1>p11re11tly is to be subjl><:ted to court testing of its tax appli· cntion to military imports and Its penalty prorlsiou fo1·blddlng imports except through n denier. 111,Tub·. n decision hr the Vtb Circuit (;onrt of Appeals held GlllUJI ill<:OlllC tnx I·c1,'t1l11t-Jons 1111111ber,; l and 3, to IJe in• ,·alld. '!'hey hn ,·e been in cfft><:t since .\llll'Ch 1i}:i2. Rules e:,tllbllshed by the o,·ertnrnP<l rl'b'11lntions were tbnl onlr

16,163.37 240,918.07 157, 90S.65 838,~.31

SS.000.00 79,981.14

11.no,717. oo 19,200.00 1,062,847.0i 24,741.00 40,8.5tl.44 112.22

73,26Ul8

44.09 807,057.60

838,262.ll5 60,IIH.OO 671,437. ;5 8, 7'22,744.i8 13,009,03 9i8, 612.70 0

40,856.44

0 I, OlS, 077. 34

0 807,057, 60

I, 055,851.82

0

1(1.12

0

i94.

so

30,160.00

.

14,193.45 250,134.00 U0,677.47

•oo.oo

0 0

400.00

income ft-om sources In Gmuu is taxnlJlc uml thnt only exrlenclitures or losses of :-ltnil111·unturn wPre tlednchtble. The in• n1lldntiou presmunbly result:, ill taxing inconw from c,·ery source nud si.J.uilur ex• l)Cll~S and losses 11re deductnble. The full imp11ct of the declslou Is st;ill sub• Jc<:t to legal e,·11h1ntion of its i;cope, but it will Jlrobnbly ht>fnr•reachlug nntl likely \\'Onld produce some larger collectl'ons. or eoul'se. the taxpnyer•lltigaut expected w benctit IJY larger clednctions, otherwise be woulcl not have l>een lntcl'csted in an incren.se of gross income. The account nf nil litigation fa covered In the report of the nftorney general. The advent of G·U11UI Economic Devel• 0I1ment Act Public Lflw ~80, hns not produced 11ur difficult tax prolJlem up to th1• end m! this yciI1·. Certni11 exempt1O11:n re prm·ltled there ro ll() hn ndled ns re• hates 11ml 11l.mle111e11ts. bnt onl)· In limited respect hn,·c>tht>y rnlsc.'<-1 qnPst;!ons. 'l'ho

107


first tax years of the beneficiaries htwe not ended yet. Total tax collections for the year, based on the branch repor.ts, amount to $13,4~,166. All three classes. income, business privilege, and real property taxes, produced Increases over In.st year's revenue, which l.ncreases aggregated $1,690,· 745. The income tax predominated. On the refnnd side, the Government returned $1,308,863 in Income tax, $850,· 100 in business ·privilege tax, and $1,807 in real property tnx. By coincidence, the total refunds are close to the increase in all taxes : $1,660,770compared to $1.690,745, thus missing the whole increase by $29,975. ContributJng to the collections was the liquidation of delinquent Items by the collection enforcement unit to the extent of $1.005,54-2. This Is slightly less than last year's result, but more etrort was exerted In this year by service of more levies -nnd more diligent enforcement generally. This leads to the ac.--countsreceivable nrea, particularly ,vith respect to the income and business privllege tax Items as sllown below. Real property tax liabilities are excluded because ·the same enforcement Is not lnvoh'ed there ; there the taxpayer ha~ no personal liability. 1066

Income tax ....... Buslnessprlvllege tax .............

Total..-

..

1966

$995,800 $1,080,376 233,884

214,123

1, 2:!Q, 1113 1. 294,fW

Increa.'IO

$84,667 (UI,261)

05, 306

RegaTdlng the income tax Increase, it pertains partly to withholding tax and r>rlncipally to tax -on corporation (approximately $68,000). The corporation items are not generally delinquencies. But the withholding tax items are and they are under close scrutiny to reduce. The fluctuations In the withholding ta.x during the year cannot be reflected In the annual report without excessive detail. For example, the delinquent withholding tax on April 1. 1966. of $121.832 wns re-

108

duced by collections of $71,785 by tbe end of the year; but additional delinquencies occurred during the same period so that by the end of June the delinquent balance was up to $96,604. The division has suffered from lack of personnel, particularly ln the tax audit branch from where two experienced revenue agents left at the termination of their contracts 1n early February. Replacements by rec.rultment from the States has been authorized in the absence of qualified local applicants. But etro-rts in that direction have not been successful. The collection enforcement unit bas been Impeded by turnovers and loan of perijonnel to other activities. The situation in the audit branch ls serious from the standpoint of the branch's inability to handle large cases and refunds which are unpaid for lack of verification. Much has been previously written I.Ji regard to insen•lce training of personnel. In this year, something extra was done about It. Three selected employees took Income tax courses at Van Nuys, Calif .. under the guidance of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service training center. The first part of the courses has been completed and it ls expected that the second and final part will be ta.ken during the second quarter· of the succeeding fiscal year. In conjunction with otr-lsland training program, a local tralnlng program was Initiated and nine selected employees are participating In the Basic Internal Revenue Agent Course. This was started lu April of this fiscal year and Is expected to continue until September of the succeedIng fiscal year. This course also Includes techniques of audit report writing and public relation aspects. The Division of Revenue and Taxation Is aware of Its deficiencies In the area of administration and enforcement. For this reason. It 1~ ronten1plated to continue emphasizing Inservice training not only for Internal re,·enue agents but also for other emuloreei; nsslgned to the Division of Re,·enue and Taxation In lower grade. Information needed b;v the pub'llc during filing perlocl for returmi wns conveyed hr radio brondcasts twice weekly for n


period of 6 weeks. The regulnr tax cal• endar was Issued monthly during this year to all news medla.

Dwision of Licenses and Registration In the reorganization plan. licenses and registration would be relie'l'ed of its di• ,·lslonal status and would be absorbed br the Division ot Revenue and Taxation and made a section therein. The position of commissioner of licenses and registration would consequently be abolished. Of course, this transition was to be made effeetlve July 1, 1006. The division reached Its highest 1>eak in revenue production in fiscal year 1966. It realized this year a total of $708.190.97 from registry tees, licenses, taxes. etc. The commissioner of licenses and reg• istrntion, who was also deputy insurance commissioner. completed bis contract

and left Guam just before the end of the year. Elarly In the year, the deputy commissioner was authorized to go to the Phil· lppine Islands to examlne the Capital In• surance and Surety Co., Inc., an alien Insurance company authorized to do busi• ness here. As a result of bis e.xamlnatlon and bis persistence, many of the com• pany's deficiencies were rectified. In other lnsuran<'e matters, the deputy com· missioner approved an increase in earth· quake Insurance rates. 1.'hls was nccolll• plished after much research and lnYestl· gatlon. The license commissioner also presented to the tax committee his proposal for Increase in business license fees. This proposal was Incorporated Into Bill ~o. 007 which tailed passa.ge. Here are some statistics on the dlvl• sion's accomplishments:

Motor Vehicle Licenses Number

Deurlptio1~

Amount

20,088 $334,765.60 Private •••• ·-··-·------·-·--·--·--··-·--·--·--·---·--·161 3,088.35 Taxicab-··-······-·--·--·-···-·--·--··-··-·--·--··---82,343.16 2,397 Cargo ••••• -----·-----··----·--·--·--·--·--····--···--· 325 22,184.30 TraHer-·-·-··--·--·--·--·····-·---·----··-···---·----21,770.41 2,635 Motorcyclc/scooter ... _. __. ___. _.. ___- . _. - . - . - - .. _. _. - _86 l, 720. 00 Dealcr •••• --·-··------·-··-·-----··----·--··--·------15 083.87 Bus.·-·--·--·--·--·-----·---·----·--·--·---·--·-----·83 835. 50 Specinlequipment-··-----··-·--·--·--·--·------·-·----1,947 ----------Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act ..... _. _- - . - - . - .. - .. Special plates .. ·-·----· __.·- ____.-·._·- .. __.. ·-·-----·_ ----------27,737

Total.····-··-----·-··----··-··--··-·--·--·--·--

Businus Licenses Wholesale __ .--·- __ ·--·--.·-.·-·--· •• ·--· -- ---- - ----- •-- • R.etail·--··-·-----··---·-·--·--·--·-··--··----·-----··-··~.>rvice.-----·----·------·-----·----··-·---·----··-·---·-Manufacturer's .. _. _. ___. _ .... __ ·- .. __ ·--- __ . _ -· ·- - ·--· - ·-Coin-vending machines ... _. __. __.. -· __ ·--·_-· .... -··---. --TotnJ _____________ · ---- ·--·- - · -· ·· ---- -- - - -·-----·Driver Licenses Operator.·-----·--··--··-·-----------·------·--·--··--· Chauffeur ••••• -----------·--··--·-··--·-··-··--··--·--· Taxi driver ... ·--·----· .. _..... __ ·--·_.·--·._. __.. --· __ . Instrttctionnl permit._·--·-----·--·--·--. __ ·--. __.. __ . __ _

Tot.nt. _______ ·--·····-·--·--·--··-· Non:

--·-··-·-·-··

467,601.19

92 $8,683.00 670 24,404.25 1,479 8,593.75 97 1,732.25 355 1,790.00

2,693

45,203.25

8,845 $44,225.00 451 2,255.00 173 605. 50 1,559 Li,

028

47,085.50

Prlvnto nutomobllo roglstratlons lncrcnsod by 19.71pcrcont In 1900:motorcycles by 145.65percent.

109


Sundry Licenses and Permiis Ducrlplio11

,hnoullt

Numtxr

Marriage_________________________________________________ 561 Sl, 122.00 Firearms_________________________________________________ 646 3,259.00 Dog _____________________________________________________ 2,472 2,472.00 Notary public __________________________________ ... ________ 16 240.00 Healing art ______________________ . _______________ .________ 28 1,400.00 24.50 Boxing___________________________________________________ 10 Liquor___________________________________________________ 295 66,710.00 TotuJ ______________________________________________

4,028 75,227.50

Insurance Licenses

Subagent ___________________________________________________ _

62 Solicitor____________________________________________________ _ 60 General ngent ______________.. _______________________________ _ 36 Broker _____________________________________________________ _ 8 Certificate of authority _______________________________________ _ 42 Adjuster. ___________________________________________________ _

4

$620.00 600.00 360.00 80.00 I, 762. 00 40.00

Total ________________________________________________ _ 212 3,462.00 Secttrities Licenses

Agent_. ______________________________________________________ _

$380.00 175. 00 150.00 2

38

Broker-dealer_________________________________________________ _ 7 Registration of securities ______ ... ______________________________ _

Total __________________________________________________ _ 47

705.00

11ntclwi,. <·onrt :,:pecl:~I proceedings, and bidder's protests. The Division is charged with rile ad4-. Transferred supply persounel to the ministration of the central 11rocureiuent hospltul and education departments to nnd warehousing law except those at?ecthanclle such departments' procurement iug the antonomous departments. :l!HI wnrehonslng functions. This !11The workload accomplishments are em<:htdell the specialized item::1Into the c:11,;ho,lied in the statlstlcal section. tucly of these two agencies. 0/fi,Ce of th<' CJ,icf.-The office of the ii. Sturtecl )Jrevaring the division's <·hief prepared ancl coorclinate<l se,·eral worklng munuul which ::1bo11lclbe co111><peciflcprograms: plt>ted IJr tllc eud of fiscal ~-cur 1007. l. Supen•h,;ed the preparntlon nncl Proo11remc11t scctio11.-The procureformulation of government standard spe• ment section purcbnsed supplies and cilic1ltions of certa-lu automotive ,·ehicles equlJ,nieut amouuting to $4,463,096.14 and :m))Jllr inventory items fo1· presentathrough Ol)CII market negotiations nncl/or tion to aucl upproval b~· the committee sea'1edbid methods for use by departments on stn.ndardizntion. nncl agencies of au branches of the go,·2. Directed the mass movement of the ernment. Out of snicl nmount. 89 per><t1J>ply i<tock items to the new warebonse cent was procured through Gunm busiHt Piti 1111<1tbe instnllntlon of the new, nesses and a small percentage tltrongh ~11lrn11izecl. nngic Iron shelving!; !;t1Chns (Generul SerYices Administrntion) rmd hins. rack!;, nnd bulk storage facilities for other mnintancl sources. Sllt>J)ly nud Public Utility Agency of Tll.ls section has l.ncreu.sed its 1mi-Guam (PUAG) inventory item.,;. 8. Conductecl the reply noel responsei:;. cb11secommibnents in c.-omparlson to last year's purchnses In spite of the sepnrnto t1JlJ1roxlmntet:v 2,000 pieces of lncom· Ing N1rre!;)')()nclence,1111<1ltors report. ell!;- tlon of the autonomous <1epart111enti<.

Division of Proci,,·ement and Suppl,y

110


Stock Control Seotio11.-Tbe stock sales government of Guam. The supply cen· for fiscal year 1906 011 miscellaneous in• tral wnrebonse issued npproximntel:r ventory items wns $4.97,190.62. In com• 1,140 tons of miscellaneous supply nncl PUAG inYentory items for use by the> pnrlson to Inst year's snlc, this section various departments nnd pnrticulnrly bas decreased its sale in money value. PUAG. This can be ubtrlbuted to the transfer Property Utilization Sectio11.-The of• of the PUA.G stock ledger in the middle part of 1965 nnd the partial transfer of. flee machine repair unit repaired 1,062 different types of office mnchlnes nt U1c the hospital and education specialized supply shop or at departmental offices. Items in l\·Iarcb and June of 1066. The annual physical Inventory Yalue It responded to 2,069 emergency repair for flscar year 1060 is $340,578.06. Sales calls from various governmental agen· for fiscal year 106::i totaled $680,007.57. cies including the legislative ancl judi· ciary brunches. These $ervlce."!exclnde The decrease is assignable to the surrey office machines on contracts. There flre of obsolete and spoiled stock items. Pro• abont 738 piecei. of new persomll property ceeds derived from goYernment surplus recorcled nnd taggecl with government sales of personal property for fiscal year code numbers. The work proclnctlon htlll 1900 amounted to $6,716.14. Receipt OontroZ Beot-ion..-The receipt reduced tremendously in comparison to control section paid the amount of $3,· Inst year's nccomplishment. 703,351.18 to Guam supplie.rs nnd other The government•~ personal propert)· Yenclorsfor supplies nnd services received acquisition vnlue as reflected in the fiscal yenr 1965 inventory was n1)proximately by the government. Less money was paid $4,340,400.:17. A substnotfol lllOlleyvnlae this yenr than iu the prior yenr, most increase during the 1066 nscnl year in• likely because of the autonomy law. 1Vareh.01t8e Bection.-The warehouse ventory Is nntlcipnted as n result of the :section cleured, irn,pected, !:!tored, und recent purchase of collateral furniture delivered about 466 tons of mlscellanennd equir,ment for the new schools in Guam. ons cn.rgoes which are con.signecl to the

WORKLOAD ACCOMPLISHMENTS A. 8. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L.

Purchases (annual) ••••••• ·-·······-·--------·------·--·--·-$4,463,006.14 Local business (percentagewise) --· ·- ____·- ___-·- __·-·- __ ... .,._ 80 Sales (inventory items)····--- ____._.·--·-· ... ·-_ .. _··--·-·-. $497, 190. 02 Annual inventory vnluc_ •• --·-----·-··--·--··-·-········-··· $340,578.66 Sales (surplus items) .... _... ··-.-·-_ .. _-· .. ·- .. ··--·-··-···$6, 716. 14 Payment (service and supply) .... ·-·-·-··-·-···-·-·······-··· $3,753,351.18 Tonnage received, inspected, stored, and delivered ............ __ 466 Wholl'sn.le stock issues (tonnage-supplies and PUAG) __. ___-· _. _ 1, 146 Number of machines repaired .. _.. _.......................... 1,062 Number of daily emergency repair cnlls .... __ ··-··--·········· 2,569 Number of personal properties taggcd ........... ·-·······-···· 738 Government personal property value •••••• ·-···-···-·····-···-······--·-·-··

HJ·515

0 • 67 • 8

111


Guam Memorial Hospital (PERSONNEL:

375)-(APPROPRIATION:

Fiscal year 1966 started with the of· tlclal acceptance on July 3, 1965, or the completion or the renovation or the Guam :\lemorial Hospital from the officer in charge or construction of the U.S. Navy. During the year the business office con1·entrated on •J)repnrations to engage In the :Medlca,reprogram. Upon being ad,·lsed l>y the regional representative of nureAu of Health Insurance 1lhnt <thehos• plthll met the requ'lrements tar pnrt1cl1mtion under health insurance benefits program for the uged, an agreement ,vas i;lgned on June 4. 1060, and i'arwarded to the Secretary of Health. Education, and Welt-are. The services of Pent, Marwick, Mitchell & Co.. a consnltlt1g firm. were engaged to make a study in reorganJzlng nnd !'!trengthenlng of the business office functions to better collect the patients accounts receivable, and to conform to the standarlls required by the Medicare r>rogram In h~-pltal cost accounting. This lStudy was completed in June 1966 and lmtllementatlou was started Immediately.

Administration Secti.011. '.rhe 1>e.rsonneland timekeeping unit processed 69G personnel actions, which included 122 appointments, 468 reclassl.flc-ations and promotions, 81 sepnru tlons. and 24 other miscellaneous personnel actlous. The l>uslness office controls all business nctlvitles and prepares nmmal budget requests. Services rendered dul'lng the fiscal yenr amounted to $1,531,174,an incrense of $119,803 over the previous )·ear. A total of $724,182 was collected iu at'('Otmts receivable, au increase of $lr».33G over the previous year. Cred-

112

$2,648,453)

its on abatements totaled $463,304, nn Increase of $57,092over the previous year. Public Law 8-12 authorized the hospital to purchase and warehouse its own supplles and equipment. During the year :;10 1>urchase orders amounting to $196,· 082 were Issued. :\fajor Iterns were a 7G-horsepower automatic electric generator, and an e,-.-ploslon proof portable X-ray machine. The admissions office processed 44,927 patients during the fiscal year; 7,376 hos1>it,allzed,and 37,551 a.s outpatients. In .January 1066, an a1>pointment system in the m1tpatlent depnrtment was established. The results proved to ·be satisfactory, In that the patients did not have to "·nit for long periods uunecessnrily, nud that the clinics were no<tovercrowded.

Social Ser11ice The social service office Investigates t·ases iu which patients are unable to pay their hospital accounts, but are otherwise not ellgible to receive welfare benefits, nnd 11.lso assists in the neuropsychlntr!c service. During the year, 895 cases were presented to the sociaJ service t,onrd. which approved aba,f:ement of accounts amounting to $116.451,an increase <>f283 cases. and $82,083 over the previous year. In the neuropsychiatric service. 313 patients were seen, evoaluated, and treated.

Medical Staff At the close of the fiscal yenr, contract physicians for the medical staff' Included : 1 Anesthesiologist

certified),

( American 'Ronr<l


1 Pathologist (American Board certified), 2 Pedlatrlclnns (American Board certl.fted)' • 1 Radiologist (American Board certified), 2 Obstetrlclan-gynecologh;ts ( American Board eligible), 3 Internists (American Board eligible), 1 General surgeon (American Boord eligible), 1 Urologist (American Board eligible), 1 General practitioner.

One thoracic surgeon and two general practitioners are under recruitment. ~oncontract physicians who ha ,·e staff' privileges to practice 1n the Guam Memorial Hospital Included: 1 Plastic surgeon ( American Boarcl certified), 1 General surgeon (American Boord certified), 1 Neurosurgeon (American Boord certified) t 1 Ophthabuologist (American Board certlfled), 1 Pediatrician (Amerlca.r1 Board certlfled) t 1 Pediatrician (American Boord eligible), 1 Obstetrtclnn-gynecologist ( American Boord eligible), 1 Orthopedic surgeon ( American Board eligible). 1 Neuror,sychlntrlst, 1 Neurologist, 4 General 1>rnctltloners.

Consultation $enlces from Ilhysicinns ut the U.S. naval hospltn'l ore available to the Guam Memorial Hospital. The medical staff' holds regular monU1ly meetings as well as the special committee meetin~ in uccorda.nce with its bylaw:,i and the requirement.-; of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hos11ltals.

Nursing Service There ore 202 positions In nursing st!n·• Ice dnsslfled as follows:

PQf/l/011

Director of nurses ....... . Assistant director of nurses .... . Head nurse .... . Nurse supervisor. Staff nurse ...... . Hospital attend• ant ......... . 0. R. technician. Nurse anesthe• tist ......... . Social service worker ...... . Clerk IL ...... . Totnl ... .

1l11thori:ed Work/no Vaca111

0

1 1

1

0

12 4 102

8

4

3 04

8

75 3

75. 2

0 1

1

L

0

2

2

l

l

0 0

202

188

14

The meetings with the head nur,;es continue to be held weekly. Much emphnsls has been placed on the Importance of communications. There bas been n great effort mode to Impress upon the hca'<lnurses the Importance of their position, und their reSl)OnSibilityIn improving patient care w.lthln each nursing department. The pntl('nt Is ti .e most Important l)erson In t!· ~ hospital, and this hafi been stressed t11rougbout the year to mnke each nurse more conscientious of her duty. A uurl:llng policy manual consisting of n totul of 275 pages in tile general book wo,.; completed In June 1966. A book specifically for each word is now avallnl.aleus II handbook for nil the nurses and 11hysicinns. This mnuunl shoultl make orientation of new employees much more ctrectlve, m; well m; serving a$ n useful tool for all persons employed In nursing i-:er,•icc. Sc,·eral mcetini;,,gnn<l dii::cussions were held throughout the yenr regarding t.he lleglnuing of an associate degree program in nursing at the College of Guam in the fall of 1066. l11 relation to this, on June l, 1066, an accreditation visit to the Guu111Memorlnl Hospital wn.s conducted h~• representatives from the National Le11g11c for Nursing. The Gunm )temorinl Hospital Voluntet•rs progrnm wns formed nnd they offl1·lally began their ,·ol11nteer duties 011 Septeu1ber 1, 1005. Their untiring etrortl:I

113


resulted lu 1Uauy improvements throughout the host,>ital. The Euster ch1trlty I.mil wns n big success nnd netted nearly $3,000 which is being used to purchase furniture, drupes, nncl otber needed equipment for Guam 1\lemoriul Hos11itnl. A weekly "luservlce training program" wns startt>d .July l, 1965. Tbe duties of the lnservke instructor nre to tench and demonstrate ne,v techniques and procedures, review existing ones, and give specinl Instruction to the attendants. Indueled nh;o are an orlentutiou program for all new employees in the Nursing SP1·viceDepartment, the v11111ning ot programs with other departments. and nrr:mglng for the showing of films to the nursing peri;onnel. With the inservlce program !J1 pro1:,-ress,nursing care bas, ancl will continue to improve. Due to the extremely crowded coud.itlous aml lnaclequate facilities 011 the thlrct floor. i~ Wing, to meet the demnucls of the t>e<l!utrk service, the pedJntric cle1.iartment wni- transferrecl to the sixth floor, C Wing. This provides enough floor space for 46 to G4 patients, if the need arises. The Rervlce areas, stornge space, plus II re<:rentlon 1111'1wa!tlug room comhinntlou 111111<111 ro the hetterment of patient care. On the TB wnrds, n dlul11g room has heen oveued. All nmbul11tory pntle.nui. hoth mule nml female, go to the clinlng room where their food Is served on trays, nnd they ni·e 1wrmltted to sit nt large tallies tu ent. A uew dishwasher was lustnlleil to ste!'llize all the dishes on tht• w1trtl This room is nlso IJeing usecl lly the tudies 011 the TB floor for occupntio1111I therapy, indoor games. uml for wntchlng television. The worksho11 t·oomou the fourth floor bus heeu pnrtinlly fixed to (lermit tlH' 11111le JUltient:<to do carvings nncl 0U1er 11·oo()woi·k. A 11001 table hns beeu donnted b~· the TB A.sso~iation and bus he<•uplncP<lIn n coruer of this workroom. 'L'wowoshing 11111cllines were nlso clonatecl hy the TR Associution, nnd Installed on the th Irel ll nd fourth floors of the TH Wing. The llflJIOlntmeut l:lYStem in the outpatient· department wns lnltintecl on .Jun· nnry 1, 1.001$. Pntlents nre l':q,ected tu

114

mnke an appointment in nclvnnce, wheu!fft'r 1iossil>le. Emergencies will l>e seen ut auy time without pre,·ious nppolnt1ue11t. An 11ddltlonnl rbargc of $1 is made for '·wnlk-lm1," uot conslderecl to be emergcncit>Safter 0 JJ.ll1. This system hns resuttecl in better oatie.nt care und more <:>fficlent flow of patients through the out• 110tlen r department.

Medi&at Records Department The medical records department is responsiule for cle,·etopiug u system of records fur the nuulysis, study, llll<levaluation of the (JUU.lity of medical rare rendered. 1;fhls department is suven•ise<l by n registered record lil>rnrlan, with nu nc(•redlted re<.-ord teclu1icla11 ns nsslstnnt medical records librarian. Statistics of hos1lltal 011erutious show: Admissions: GcneraL _________________ . _ ti,424 Newborn_. ________________ _ I, 862 Tuberculosis ____ - __________ _ 91 TotaL _________. ________ 7,377 Disohurgcs; GcneruL ____ . _. ___. _______ _ 5,319 Newborn ___ . ______ . ______ ._ 1,809 Tuberculosis. _____________ ._ 101 Death ______________________

145

Total_ __________________ 7,374 Avcmgc daily admissions: Gcneml services ____________ _ General and tuberculosis ______ Avcmgo daily discharges; GenernL_. _______________ . _ General and tuberculosis ____ _ Average daily census: Genera.I services ______. ____ . _ General und tuberculosis. __ ._ Percentage of occupancy: General services (bused on L93 beds) ____________________ _ Tuberculosis (based on 79 beds) _____________________

lD.05

20.20 10.80 20.20 131. 22

184.57 67.10

72.07 Ll!ld tuberculosis Gcnerul {based on 272 beds) ________ 68.54 Gcmeml services (exclude newborn 1111d tuberculosis) (based 80.94 on 160 beds) __ ------------


Births: Premature_, ________________ Stillbirth .....

____.. _......

155 26

.

Twins. _____ ._. ___ . __. _____ _

14

Autopsies ...........

99

- .. - ... .

Table I. Statistics for Year by Month, for All Services, Fiscal Year 1965-66 Averages

Toe.al (J)ollont doys) MonLh

Totnl.

... .... --.. --

.

Dlschorges

,\dmisslons 7,376

i,3H

Census

Admissions OISChotgCS Census

67,300

:!0.::0

20.20

184.57

Ii.SO :!O.61

18.00 20.10 20. \l3 23.03

10.S.41

1965 July ................................

552

S6I

5, 2'11

AugusL .... Scptcmoor .. ------·-·········---Oclooor ... - ......... ......... :-Iovl!ml>cr-·. ......·-·. .......... Decemb<-r.... ... ...----------

63ll 042 735 OiS

625

tr28 i'l4 692

5,732 5,012 0.344 0. 039

607

617

5,008

o.\O

ll:lli 640 tl58

..... . ··-··-··-··-...

·····-.. ---

21.40

23.70 2'160 10.25

23.06

5,004 5,240

:I0.90

20. 10

10.53

19.60

6, 141 5,695

21.00 20.33

:ll.22

1143 540 ::i·~

4,931 4, 90,

17.00 18.06

19. 93

184.00 181.03 ~'04.6-1 :?01.io 180.00

19CG

January ..... ·············-·······-Fcbruory ........ ------·-·········· i\forch ..............................

--. -----------------------.. Moy ................................

April..

June ............................

..

64i

6M 610 530 642

21.43 17.41 17.40

190.45 187.~ 108.09 186.ro 159.06

166.56

Table II. Statistical Guides Pertaining to Hospital Medical Care, Fiscal Year 1965-66 Percent ].

2.

3. 4. 5.

Gross den th rate .. _.. ______ Maternnl death rate ________ Infn.nt death rate __ . __ ..... Anesthesia death rate. ______ Postoperative denth rate. __.

J. 9 0.48 1. 73 ()

0.52

Pucc11t

6. Gross uutopsy nite _________ 68.2 7. Tissue committee report_ ___ 100 0 o. Consultation. ___ . ___. _____ 12.21 4_ 10. Cesnrcnu section rate._ .. __.

8. Sterilhmtion _. _.... __. _.. _.

115


--

°'

Table III. Patient Flow by Month, Admission and Discharge by Services, Fiscal Year 1965-66 Total admlss.lons

Total. .............

Total disobnrges

Tuberculosis A.dmlsslons

7,376 7,229/145

91

Pediatric

Discharges 101/10

Adm.lsslons 1,238

Medical

Discharges

Admlsslons

Surgical

Discharges

I, 226/20

819

761/63

OOfl 131f.l 124/4 120/3 127/1

72

59/6

66

77/4

86

72/5

82

75/6

70

66/4

05

54

72/3 72

(;9

Obstetric

Discharges

Admlsslons 1,286

l, Zl7{'JJJ

Admlsslons

ObservaUon

Discharges

Admbslons

Discharges

2,080

2,005

1,802

149 109 161 214 192 186

165

169 165 200 201 180

127 157 144 181 166 168

200 166 181 170 161 151

199

175

178f.l

154

160

138

181 180 151 140

164 165 135

Hl8/2 162/4 133/4 115/2

1,809/32

1965

July .......... ........... August •••••••• ········September ............... October •• ···-······· •• November ...............

652 639 642 735

nccember .............

-

g

94

10 8 8 4

678

648/13 611/14 614/14 701/13 684,'8-

14

6/1

597

fl:1&/9

10

7

650 547

014/11

654

6t3/15 624/19 531/9 600/13

0/2

141;

6 4

134 132 118 80

108/3

W/3

100 94 100 122 118 99

54/4 59/5

121 90

59/8

59/9

117 9~

104 10'2 112/3

52/4 00/0

104 107

92/2 105/2 122/1 U3/I 107/2

122/2 140/4 142/3

174/3 171/1 100/4

196(]

Jauuary ................. .February ................ March ................... April •.............. May ••• ······-········· June .....................

Non.-Subngures

·-

610 530 542

6

542/7

II

7/1

17/2

6

14

3

6/1 12 7/3

I 10

79 72 126 10'2 80 76

100/2 Ult2 81 83

on discharged columns rcprescut lhc number or "Death discharges."

02 60 71

59 68

Olschargo+subflgures•totnl

100/3 10'2/I 104/2

130

dlschnrgrs.

Table IV. Consultation Report, Fiscal Year 1965-66 Percentage 1•>•>1 •••

·········--·-··············

Total 901

7uly

August 60

GO

_,,.,._, .. IN,,__ 74

86

92

1

1anunry 67

February 64

March 77

~prll

May 94

59

~ 79


Table V. Operations, Fiscal Year 1965-66 I

Rate or ToLol Total openillons- •••• ···········-··· To LoicesorCJl!lsections performed .... ~rron section rate (percent) .......

1,325 78

4

July

August September October November December Jonuary February

117 9 7

111 10 6

88

4 3

135 9 5

12f 4

2

101 8 5

98

96 f 3

6

3

Moy

April

March

114

9 5

95 2 I

June

llf 5 4

132 8 6

Table VI. Outpatient Visits, Fiscal Year 1965-66. Cllnlcs Totul ...........................

Total ~.927

Cardiac .... _ .............. _____.... 608 Dcnnatology .. _ .. _. _____ ····· 133 Dlobctcs ............................. I, 107 EENT ............................... 296 Oenllourlnory ....... _............. ___ 016 Oynecology .......................... 1,382 12,055 Medical.········--······-·········· Ncuropsychllltry ..................... 82 Orthopedic ........................... 442 0, 107 Pediatric ••• ____····--······-··· ••• 552 Plastic ••••••••••••• ······-···--···· Surgical .............................. 18.510 8 Dental •• ·······-····-········ •••••• Pre- nnd pOSt-nntolonly .. ___________ 2,129

.... .... ~

Allgusl. September October No,·ember December Jonuary

July 3,878

3,904

3,40f

3,217

3,081

3,318

3,233

16 8 142 24 46

4f

48

76

3

91 7

i8

0 80 21 2 128 1,040

G

9

8

GO

00

99 If 61 112 J, 043 II 8 867 2 1,026 I 100

99 16 61 100

107 22

928

055

9 8

0 7

640

469

l

0 1,435 0 120

30

52

14 120

39 83

I 103

ti

50

44

32

53

us

66

86

64

107

114

884

89i

1188

60 83 1,058

8 61 672 218 1,818

I

5

49 837

31

I

259

3,25,'.;

3,855

n

3

Juno

May

4,264

13

312

April

4,344

38

192 1,610

March

4,184

10 19 89 26

83

February

1,063 101 1,644

0 38

I

l, 117 1 I, 791 I

117

200

117 l, 146 1 45 831 0 1,882 l 193

ll3 1,052 1 69

720 2 I.~

0 175

5

38 638 l

1,486 0 141

14

17

22

66

122 839 5 40 595 0 1,457 0 226

139 1,229 18 42 859

4 l,fJ9 0 166

1,383 0

09

40

68 126


nccepted into member><hip hr tbe Amcri• can Association of Illoud Banks. The clinical lubomtorr was expanded to almost twicl• its origlmtl size. Severn! pirtes of new equipment have been addecl. uud new procedures have been Introduced. .ln lnsen•lce ti·uiniug progr1un on new laboratory procedures is held weekly.

Medical Laboratory The laborlltOl'.\. Is dlrettell or llll Amer· icon buurd certitled putbolugist. with un experlencecl A.S.C.l'. wedlcal technologisL us laborutor~• >iUtlCr\'lsor, und G other A.S.C.l'. meclical technologists in the del>tlrtlnent.

During the year the blood bank was Lol>om~oryoxomlnoLlons

Fiscal Fiscal year 1965 year 1966

Hematology 1••••••••••••••••••••••• ····-·········· Olochemlstry ............ ·-·· ............................ Bacteriology' • ····-·············-······-········-·-· Serology J........................•.....•••••••••••••••••••• Parnsltology. . ......................................... Urinnl~•sls>.... . ....................................... Blood Ilank...- •••••••••••••••••• ···-····. ·-···· Surgical pu~ology ..................................... Done marrow ............................................. Elcetrocardlogrnm..................................... Autopsy report ............................................

'l'otal..

. ~ .........................

••••• .

Iii, 350 11,624 13,600

zoos . . .. ··-· .• . . .. .

-...........

.

6,010 9, t,34

Decrease

43,655 ·····-········· 23,701 (35%) . 13,087 2,063 (18%) _ ....... 37.154 23,"88 (172%) _ ·-····· .. . ti,332 3,334 (lll%) •• 524 ................ 15,078 6,644 (58%)

tl,,!'24 2. 720 20

7,370

1, 167 147

1.564 160

120,575

131,919

2,369

_ .•.•.

_ .

486 (0%) .............

.

I, 040 (l&o/c,) .. . ........ . .. .. ... . .. ...... 351 {13%)

20 . . . .. ... ... ... ag7 (34%) 13 (0"'/4)

3 (1%)

1 Docronso In number or hematology cxnmlnatlons ill attributed to a chungo In countln~ procodu.rcs. • Incrcnso ht number or bnctcrfoloi:y cxamlnntlons Is aU.rihutod to frequent cultures being tnkon on hospital nroos nnd personnel. > lncrenso ht these cxnmlnntlons is duo to work dono ror outp11Llcnldepartment prc\'lously pcrronned by the l'uhllc llcnlth Department.

Pharmacy The phurmncy is stnfl'ed by two regis· tcre<l phnrmnclst.-., nnd two full•tlmc 11hnrm11ch;t nids. It is rei<ponsible for I he 11rocuring, compouncli11g, nnd ells• 11cmdng of all 11hnrmnccutlc11l prepurur-ion:::. Du1·in,; the 11,;cnlyenr, thb; depnrtment tilled 48.~43 new prescrl11t1011s,plus npproximutely 41.7 refills for 011t1>ntient service nlone.

X-ray Department At tho end of thi.s tlscnl yenr, n totnl of eight employees were employed in th\.,; >'PCtlo11.I l I><tmder the direction of an .\.mericnn bonrd certified rnd!ologii;t, and t,y 1111 c..·q,criencccl reg!stere(l ><1111er1•lsecl racliologlcul technologist. A new :;oo ~A Rndlogr11phlc X•rny diaguostlc lllt1cld11e,lllld a Kodnk X•Omnt lllm 11rocessor were !ntnlled clurl.ng the )'Car. 118

There were 18,432 X•rny exami11nt1011s 1Jerformed n:::i follows :

Abdomen (fetus position)_ .... . 27 Antcriogru.m __ .............. . 7 Barium cncmu _______ .,_ .. _.. 126 Barium ouomn, with uit· con• trost •. _.••• - •... ---· .. ··-· 6 Buri um swallow .. _. __ .... _._. 73 Bouc ugc_ ... _....... _...... . 12 Bone survey ______ .. _.. _ .. __ . 22 Bronchogrum_. ___ . _____ ·---8 U,093 Chest, l4" x 17"-·····--·--·Chcst, 4" x 5" -······--------

2,258

Chcst, fluoroscopy ...... __ ... . 1 64 Cltwiclc- ... - ...... - - . - ... - .. Cystogra.nL __..... _.. _ ... _ ... 11 Esophngmm_ ...... ____ -· ___. 10 I, 256 Extremities, upper_·-··-······ Extremities, lower __ ...... _.. _ I, 376 Facit~l bones _____ ........ _. __ 50 Gull blnddcr series ___. _______ _ 270 Uastroin tcstinnl series ....... __ :37G 221 Hip joinL------·-···-----·-·


Intravenous pyclogram........ IV cholaugiogn\m............. KUB (kidney, ureter, and bind• dcr)_.. .... ....... .. .... .. Jaw......................... Lone bone................... Mandible........... . . . .. . . . . Mastoid..................... 11axilla...................... Myelogram... .. . .. . . ...... .. Nasal bones.................. Orbital...................... Pclvimet,ry ....... __- . . . . . . . . . Pel vis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Placeutogram................ Pneumoencephalogram........ Retrograde pyelogram .... __... Rib cage.................... Salpinogram ........ -·....... Scanogram................... Scapula..................... Scoliosis series ........ _....... Shoulder girdle............... Sinuses...................... Sialogram.......... .. . . .. . ... Skull series.................. Spine cervicuL............... SpiQCicforsaL ... _ ...... _..... Spine, lumbar................ Sternum..................... T.M. joints.................. T. tube cholangiogram... ..... Zygomatic view..............

434 29 463

l 5

70 22 9 17 44 10 54 87 8 4 24 219 3 10 10 24 205 01 3 716 J35 84 335 16

3 5 4

Dietary Department The dietnry department 11ro,·ldes regulur diets unc1 s,pecial diets for inpatients nuder the supervlsiou of un American Dietetic A.,,sooiatlou registered dietitian. It ulso provlcles meals to hospital em· ploye,-..s,members of the medical stuff, 1tnd staff of the Departrueut of Public Health of the Government of Guam. The tuberculosis dining room is now eq11i111Jed with itf' own icemnker and dishwasher. The problem of servinl,! hot nnd colcl foocls, und the problem of cross• infection. are now u1iniruizecl. Dieti1r~• stnff meetings are held regu• IHrly to keeJl employees i11forme<lof 11('· ,·etopmeJ1ts 011(11111ychanges In policies. This time ii; nlso utilized for gh·ing in• :,:e1·vic-e in,;t nwtion:< In new menu prepurntio11ancl in needed 111·ensIn food i;erviCI'. The dietitian rislts lnpntients daily to

get their food 11rcfercnces. During the ~•ear, :!41'dletury imstructions were given to patients by the dietitian, which induded 168 dlul>etic. 66 reducing. +2 blnn<I. nnd G;i other diets.

Housekeeping Department This depui,tment provides custodial :;ervices to the Guam Memorial Hospltnl, the Depa·rtment of Public Health aud Welfnre, nnd <the buHdlug area occupied by the National Institute for Neurological Diseases and Blindness, U.S. Public Health Services, and tJ1e TB Association of Guam. Tbe bonsekeeping department maiu• Wini; nn area of 146,1511square feet of floor spnce, with 34 custodial 1>erso11ncl. at a monthly cost of $0.068 per squarl' foot, or n total of $9,963 per month, unll maintains the ground area around the Guam Memorinl Hospital bnilcllng.

Laundry Department Laundry services to the Guam lie· morlal Hospital, the Department of PubHe Health and Welfare, the U.S. Public Health (NThTDB), and occusionally the Guam Peultentilary, the Government of Guam Housing, and the Detention Homr nre 1n·0Yided by tbe laundry department employing 12 people. Dm-ing th!:; fiscal year then' were (;()7,8:17ponncls (1.094-,ll70Ilieces) of linen lnunclered, a,04:{ pieces of llneu mntm• fnctured. nnd 2,191 pieces of linen mended. T11e average poundage hnm• clered per pntient dally Is 10.54 pounds. li'or the same period. the cost of service per pouncl of linen lnnndere<l Is $0.074. or $0.7~ per dny per patient.

Maintenance Department The maintenance department Is res11onsible for the repair nncl 1>reventlve main· tenance of nil equipment in the hospital. ns well as the physicnl facilities. ?llnjor nctlvitr during the year c-onsistcd of con• struct!o11 of cnh!ncts nnd counter·. snncl• blasting and painting of mctul furuiturt• nnd equipment. remodeling tile hnsines,1 office nncl lahorutory. de,·eloprucnt of n 11nrking lot for employees. 111111co11stn1ctlon of n separate l)Owerlinc in conclnit for tJ1c•X•rny clcpu1·tment.

119


Guam Housing Corporation (PERSONNEL:

6)-(OPER.A!I'ING

The Guam Housing Corporation, successor to the defunct Guam Finance and Development Corporation was created with the enactment of Public Law 8--80 on August 21. 1005, which repealed In Its entirety title XXI of the Government Code ot Gurun relative to the Guam Finance and De,·elopment Corporation. The $2.520,000 "Finance Agency Guarantee Fund'' was redeslgnated "Housing Cor[)Oratlou Guarantee Fuud" and was transferred to the Guam Housing Cor1>0ratlon as a i!eparate nncl special revoh·1ng fuucl with which the Guam Housing Cori>0ratlon operates In the pursuance of Its maln objective ot 11romotl11gthe general welfare of the Inhabitants of the territory of Guam through the Improvement of housing standard& In Guam. All assets ancl property of the Guarantee Fund of the Guam Finance and De,·elopment Corporation were transferred to the Guam Housing Corporation at the ,·nine shown on the books on August 21, 1900., The Gnam Housing CorJ)oratlon assnmecl all the ilabllltles of the Guam Finance nncl Development Corporation. The Guam Housing Corporation Is managed by a board of directors of seven members composed of the secretary of Guam. director of finance, attorney general, and four experienced businessmen appointed by the Governor of Guam with the advice and consent of the legislature. The appointed directors serve for 6 years. Staff includes n president, appointed by the board, an accountant, clerk-stenogra11her,and two account clerks, and a loan 11roject officer. The Guam Housing Cor1>0ratlo11Is an• thorized to engage in the following acth•itle:; when it finds tllnt such activities wlll further its purJ)Oses and wm not conflict with the encouragement nncl pro-

120

BUDO»T:

'44,010.00)

motion of private enterprise in the territory of Guam: (a) To encourage und promote t.he lnYestment of private capital In low-cost resldentlul housing In Guam; ( b) To engage in land use planning for resiclentlal housing purposes to t.he end that the most economic nnd socially beneficial use may be made of land, and to encourage an<l us,ilst private persons and organizations to act In accordance with the re.snits of such 11tannlng; (c) To encourage and engage In lowcost housing activities Including development of residential subdivisions, construction of housing for rental or resale. nnd to make loans to any 1>ersonfor the 1mrchase, construction improvement, or re11aIr of a home. The board decided that all loans ap11roved utter ,Tune 30, 1900, shall bear Interest at the rate of 6 percent per annum. The ugriculturnl, industrial, and couuuercial types of loans are no longer under the cognizance of the Guam Hou.sing Corporation, however, the sen-Icing of such loans still outstanding shall l>e the responsibility of the corporation until maturity or liquidation date. The corporation received 61 loan apllllcatlous of which 43 were approved totaling $0'!3,385. By c.-omparison, 54 loans were authorized in the fl.mount of $706.986 In flS<1llyear 1065. Disbursement cltl'rlng the year on loans approved In fiscal yeo.r 1966 and r>rior years total $!">40,326.63.The amount.~ of $301,857.81 In prl11ci·1>nl repayments and $144,774.42 In Interest were recelYed during the period. As of June 30, 1966, the balance of loans uuthori~ed bnt nnt dl~hnTSed Is $78,560. The cor1>oradou l)aId on a reiulbursaille oasis $2.457 for Insurance premiums


covering properties mortgaged to the corporation as loan collaterals. Balance outstanding as of the stnrt of fiscal yenr 1965 was $1,202.98. Amount collected for repayment of lnsurnnce was $2,729.78. The corporation, pursuant to the power conferred upon It, deemed It necessary nnd appropriate to borrow from a private ioca·l lending Institution to meet the needs of some 34 applicants for low-eost housing loans. The $500,000 borrowed is for 11 term of 2 years at 6 percent interest per annum. Public Law 8-81 enacted on August 30, 1003, conferred the Gua.m Housing Cor1,oratlon additional power to guarantee

payment of loons for hotel construction. The c.-orporntlon ls authorized to guarantee payment of loons in an amount not to exceed the lesser of $1,500,000 or 7u 1>ercentof the total development and construction cost of tourist hotel facilities in Gunm, the total c-ost of the development construction of no one of which hotel facUlties shall be not less tlinn $1,500,000 nud may pledge Its assets in support thereof. The corporation has, so tar, committed to guarantee for one hotel firm. Final action Is being held pending submission of the feasibility studies an<l other required reports.

Following is a list of loans outstanding as o.fJune 30, 1966: Agricultural: Cattle, crop, poultry projects and construction facilities_ Commercial: Heavy equipment, construction and business buildings __ Ind us trial: Fishing and other related activities ___ . _______________ Low-cost Housing: Construction of new home, res.identioL .. _.. __.. _ . _.... Total _________________________________________

Numbu

Amount

20

$193,686.95

14

484,148.51

3

4,156.17

299

2,382,125.12

336

3, 064, 116. 75

121


Department of Labor and Personnel (PERSONNEL:

20)-(.APPROPRIATION:

INTRODUCTION The Depurtment of Lttbor nnd Persou11el is chnrged with the udministrntion 1111<1 lmplementatlon of the personnel law, rnleic:. nud regulutions "ithin the goverumcnt of Guam, and all lnbor low,; 11ndregnlations of U1e territory. Ais watchdog of tho merit system, thii::. department through 1>roper controls nsl!urcs thnt equnl employment oppOl'tunitlcs nre pro~ ,·iclcd for nil, and that recrnitment of personnel Is l)n::;ec]solely on nullity iutd fltne&i. As 11 .staff agency, this depurttmmt centrull.,• s<>n•lcesthe :sovernl other 1JeIml'tmcnts In tile gov1?r11me11t of Guam with r!?,!l)ect to personnel 111?ecls. The htbor respou.sibluty of this de1mrtment In the territory inelutl!?s the ntta\11ment of muxlmnm emplo~·,uent through tile Cxl)editlO\I!' retm·n of UllCllllllOyccl workeri; to gnlnful employuumt; lmprovem<>nt of workln~ conditions itnd pay Ntundurd:,;; mid employment preftirence of local avnilnble worker~ over alien llnd other off-I,.lnnd lnl>or. Also tills lnclncle~ t·he 11pprm1ticeshlp trnlnlng 11rogram :,1ponl:lOr1?cl h.v the Gunm Contractors Association ht coordi11ntio11 wiUI this deImrtme11t in the trnlniug of our youths for the Ynrious oCCUJ)Utionul skills nnd the i\In11Iiower Denilopwent llnd Trnl11l11g Act program which l::1 to truin the unemployed 1111<1underemployed. The Gunm ln!Jo1· market is .still ex1x•rlenelng IX!rsistent shortage of com1>etent local lnl>Or to meet the clcmaml for .skilled workers. There ls still n continuing need tor recruitment of ofl:-islnud lubor to fill the !ihortuge occnpntlons. 'l'lle lnhor replncemcut 1Irogrnm 11'1 helng nI1I11le(lnot 011I.rto pril•nte l11d11strynml

122

$1(,117,735)

FN\ernl ugcncies in the area, !Jut lllso to the territorial government. Replacement efforts 111private lndustriei; and the Feder.1I ngeucles urc reported sepnrnteJ~, by till' Guum Employment Service, rut affiliate of the U.S. Em11loyment Service of Uie U.S. Department of Lnbor.

Staff Services Division Thll'I dh·isiou hs resl)Olll:llble for the tcelmicnl aspects o! personnel nclminlstrntion. the chief fuuct,lons of whlcb nrc I10sltlon cln1Sslflcntion, uclministrntlou of tho pny l)lau, recruitment and exnminution (If npplicants for certiflcnt1011 to <luI1111·tmentsnncl ugencies. Tile purposes of thesu functions ure in keeping with the merit system principle lln<l tbe requiremunts of tlle pcr:::mmet nnd compensntlon lnws. Thu following is I\ l>renkdown of Its uc• tl\'ltie:; during the flS(:nl yenr:

Classification This invol\·es res1ionsiblllty in the mninteunnce of clnsslllcntlon and com11Pnsntlo11Iil.111 of the .;overnment of Gnn.m. It tlenht with requests for creation of now positions, pay range renssignrncnti,:, Iwsitlon chtsi,Hlcation and e,·aluntiou i;tudlei,:, preparntlon of new or l'e\'h,ecl clui;s s11Ccittcutlo11s mHl relntetl mutter:<. Thu following u<:th·ities WCI'<' nccon1I 1lii-hed : ('\11ssiflcnlio11 tlllcl/ul' t.'\'1t! m1tiou studies ---------------------7:l l'ny t'llllgu 1·t-nssigumeuts_________ 21 Chtss!?s o.f positlous crl!nted______ 211 ( 'In,;;, NpPti HeuIi nu:< wri ttl•n ur re,·i;,1•1I -------------------

:;1


Off-island hire (U.S.)____________

Rec1'u#1nent

232

)lost vacancies ot the government of Clnssi~ed ____________________ 2,721 Guam in the clnssifled service ure propUnclassified.- ________- . _- _. __ 58 erly advertised in order to attract good potential 0PI)llcants or jobseekerl:l, Some Numbe1· entered service during ot the techniques used in recrultl.ug fo1· fiscal year___________________ 539 position ,·ucuucle1:1lnclnde 1111nouucement, Number left service during fiscal udvertlscmeuts through news 1Uedit1,letyear________________________ 466 ters. nnd through other media for morE' comprehensi\·e co,·erage. The test proPromotions made during fiscal cedmeR invoh·e the processing of nppHyear________________________ 318 catl011s to determine the eligibility of upllikants to participate in the examinnLocallure___________________ 208 tion. seheduling and admlulstratlon of Off-island hire____________ ___ 20 exnmi11ntio11, establishment nnrl certitlcn.tio11of eligibles, et cetera. Tliese obTotal personnel 1Lctionsfor jectives are In keeping with the merit fiscal year __.. ___ - ___. - 5, 363 system. Minimttm Wage and Hour Dwision Recrnlt111eut 1\cth·ites of the olvlslon urP 1H1 followi;: '.l'.1.11::; division is charged with the enfol'cemeut of the Minimum Wage and Joli 1111nounctmients ( open tlll<l Jll'Omotionul) ___________ _ 221 Holll' Att of GttntU with the Director l, 084 of .Lal>or nnd l'ersonnel us the Minlmulll Applications receive<L------\\'nge Commissioner. As!lembled exuminatlons _______ 161 During tile year, 30 firms were hn,estl• Unassembled examinations _____ 143 Eligibles placed on eligluillty list 07:J gntcd; 23 were found to t,e uft'ectecl b~· ;'inmher of eligibles i:;elected____ 217 111·0,·h;lousof the Jaw resulting In the totul puymeuts of $18,871.02. Tile dh·i· sion rectlive<l, during the sume period. 34 Reco1'ds coilltJiulnt" for uonpnyment of l>nck 'l:'he following is a l>l'e1lkdown of ,;;o,·- wnges, howe"er, of the 34 complaints 2 crnmcnt of Guam ew11loyees (executive were l'l'ja<:tecl for insuflkicnt C\!ltlcnc<• brimch) und other 1JC1·sonnel stutistl<:nl 1111d tho halnnce wns completed 1·esl1lting dntu !or the fi><cnlyenr eudlng June ::io, iu u collectio11 of $4,007.12. 1006: The Mininnuu Woge nud Bour A.ct wnl:l amended uy Pul>Uc Law 8-137, pert11inlug 'fotnl tmmber of employees ______ 4, 763 to section -t0003 which became etrectlve Regular ___ - ______ ______ ___ ____ 2, 7 79 Juue :U, 1000, to e...xmn}ltfrom the ol)Cl'I\• Temporary or lirnit'cd term______ 1, 984 tion of the :\Iinimum Wnge nnd Hou!' Act or Unum stncleuts enrolled in tha public 1m<I prh·nte sc:l.wols of G11n111during U.S. Citizens ___________________ 2,708 school s111llll1ern1cntlon.

= =

=

JVIal.e_ - - _- _________ ______ ____ 1, 856 Femnle______________________ 923

=

Guamanians ___________________ 2, 229 Ot~ers________________________ 550 Graded ______________________ 1,922 Ungraded____________________

=

857

Local hire (111ien)________________ 36 Looal hire (U.S. citizens) ________ 2,476 01:T-islnndhire (a.lien)___ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ 35

Oversea Processing and Travel Unit The o,·el'sen processing nnd t1·n\'el unit is m1 office wltbl11 the Depnrtment of Lnhur nnc1 l'ersounel mulei· the cllrec-l supt'n·lsio11 of the rlirector. •rile functions 1111d l'CSIJOUsilJllitles of lhis tlllit 11.l'I! the lnitinl 1·t•c1•uihuent 111"ocessing of perso1111rl,co11l1·1.1ct 1"enew11ls 1111d extensions, ha1Hllh1~ of tru11sportatio11 n1·rungeme11t.· for gon!rnllll'nt of Grmm ottl<:lals truvellnj! nh1·t111ll Oil offldnl h11)<1!1(•~-,;. otr-islancl

123


resident citizens coming within the pro,·lslon of section 4110.1 of the Govern• ment Code of Guam, uud 1>ersonsauthorized transp0rtat1011 at government ex· 11ense. During the fiscal year 1966, thit:1desk processed 454 travel requests and authorizations for the various departments and agenclet:1of the goverument of Guam. Ot the 454 travel requests and authorizations, 76 were for tra,•el between contracts, 111 for initial recruitments, 14 for recruitment ot resident cltl.zens wltbln the 1>rovlslou of section 4110.1, Government Code of Guam 14 for lnsenice training, 60 for completion ot contract, and 177 for official conference and other matters. The total cost for such travel arrangements was elltlmated at $834,000. Of this amount, ${>85,521.25 wa,; expended for 11erso11eltransportation, $201,322.15 fur personnl nnd household etfects and (•nr;:i, nud $45,380.99 for per diem and other sundry Items. The remaining bill· unces are stlJJ outstanding encumbrances. Below lt:1ll tnble showing the number of travel -reque:1ts und authorizations processed tor the thlcnl year 1966: Department of Agriculture-----14 Chief Commissioner's Office-----1 College of Guam______________ 52 Department of Commerce________ 18 Department of Education ________ 209 Department of Finance_________ 12 Guam Memorial HospltaL_______ 74 Island Court;__________________ 1 Department of Labor and Personnel ________________ _ 4 Department -of Land Management8 Department of Law ______________ r, 1 ~. M. Flores Memorial Libra.TY--Office of the Governor_______ 22 Department of Public Health and Welfare__________________ 82 Department of Public Safety_____ 3 Det>ru'tment of Public Utility_____ 1 Department of Public Works_____ 2 Total ---------------------

454

Personnel Board Personnel board actiontl from ,July 1, 100v to June 80, 1060 :

124

Number of classes created-------Appaintme.nts above the m1nimun1 step------------------------Pay range reassignments_________ Appeal cases heard------------Applications considered fOTlnsemce training___________ Pay differential for acting capacity ------------------

26 17 21 3 9 3

Workmen's Compensation Commission This division of the Department of Labor and Personnel ls charged with administering and enforcing the provisions of the Guam Workmen's Compensation Law, Title 88, Government Code of Guam. Basically, tbls Is an act compelllng em• ployers In the Territory having more than ftve regular employees to provide and insure the payment of compensation to their employees for injury, disability, or death arising out of and In the course of their employment. Application of the law, however, excludes the U.S. Government and Its agencies, as well as defense contractors. During the year 1>roof of compliance has been filed by or on behalf of some 185 employers. Investigation of two Orms for noncompllauce with the net, conducted just before the year ended, Is continuing. Pnrtlclpating in the program lllld authorized to underwrite this nature of Insurance under the requJrement:1 and specUl.catlons of the Guam law, with renewed authority for fiscal yenr 1967, are 11 private insurance eompanies doing business In the territory. The excellent cooperation of insurauc.-e adjusting c.-ompnules'personnel and U1elr familiarization llS to the principle objectives nud Intents of the law contributed tremendously toward the ability of this office, In spite of its Umlted staff. to successfully accomplish u great denl of Its activities during the paiJt 12 mouths. particularly in the area of processing Injury claims. Thi:1 factor. and the applicntiou of the direct payment system In uncontested cases, proved highly etfect!Yf' 111acbievlug 11peedysettlemeut of a large uumber of clalm!i, Including three denrh~


cases reported during the year, at minl· mum time. A significant development that deft. nitely has affect on the operation of this division concerned the January 2.5, 1966 directive of the Governor to the Com.mer• cial Port, Guam Housing Corporation, and Guam Economic Development Authority. Acting upon a report of au extensive study made by the management section, the Governor called upon these nonappropriated government agencies to inde• pendeutly assume the payment of com• pensation and medical expenses to their employees under the workmen'::; compen• satlon program.

In arriving at this decision, the Gov• ernor pointed out that awards of com• pensation and the costs ot related medl· cal services tall under, and should be con• sidered as, operating cost and, as such ought to be assumed by the agencies them• selves. Heretofore payments of thJs na• ture are made from the Government ot Guam Fund established by section 3-7042, Government Code ot. Guam, to which these selt•sustalning agencies do not con• tribute. The directive was to take effect July 1, 1966. The following summarizes the acth·i• ties ot the commissioner's office relative to injury reports : Fuccl vear, 1966 /9(J(/

Involving Involving Involving Resulting

no loss of time and only minor medical attention .......... less than 7 days loss of time ............................ more than 7 days loss of time ........................... in death ..............................................

. . . .

407 253 208

514 215 252

3

3

. . . .

152 464 497 119

110 470 509 80

Active Ca&u

Pending at beginning of year ..................................... Opened during the ;year......................................... Closed during the year .......................................... Pending at end of year ...................... ··-··· .............. Of the cases closed, compensation payments involved were: For permanent total disability ................................... For temporary total disability .................................... For permanent partial disability ................................. For head or facial disfigurements ................................. For death benefits ..............................................

. . ·. .

$20,000.00 48,421.36

26,726.65 525. 00 31,371. 18

127,044.19

Retirement Division The annual operations of the Govern• ment of Guam Retirement Fund, for period covel1ingJuly 1, 1965 t.o ,Tune 30, 1966,were as follows : 293 applications were received and processed tor membership In the retirement fund ; 25 applications tor service a.nd dis· ab111ty retirement.s were received, processed and np1,roved; 10 active members died whlle iu the service of the government and 0 of the deceased members whose spouses and children

under the age of 18 were receiving monthly retirement benefits; u retired annuitants dJed whose spouses and children under the age of 18 were receiving monthly retirement benefits; 2, 897 participants in the retirement syste~ as of June 30, 1966; and 245 active members terminated and filed applications for with• drawals of retirement contrl• buttons and were refunded n total of $228,705.36. For 202 retired annuitanb!, the total amount cllsbursed tor the year's DRY·

125


roll was $358,247.18; for 79 survivors of uunultnnts, the totill payroll for the year was $59,854.49; and 4 of the survivors also received $2,910.73 for the period of July 1, 1005 to .Tune80, 1006 ns ''deferred beneficiaries". The bonr<l of trustees of the Govern• ment of Guam Retirement Fund arr 1,roved ancl disbursed $200,000.00 into a time deposit open accounts nnd also $930,000.00 for tile purchase of U.S. Treasury bonds nt 4 11ercent interest due ]'ebruary 15, 1970 and 41/4 percent interest due November 15, 1073, respec• tively.

On August 11. 1065 section -!233 of Ute Government Code of Guam was repealed hy l'ul.Jlh; Lnw R-67 in its entirety. This ,·ery :section of the cocle was revised ln <:ertulu pl'ovislons and further enacted by l'ulJlic Ln w 8-182 eft'ecth·e :\lurch 18, 11)66, E'Xtencling<!Overilge to memuers of the Guam leg!Rlnture In th<! Govemment of Ourun Retirement System. Section 422.1of the retlrelllenL law ,vas nmeode<l hy creutlug ,mbsection (l,) rel~tive to coutrnctlug with lendlllg in• :1t1t11t1onson Guam for tl1e deposits of l"f'Sen·e.-1iu excess of reqnirements for current 01>erntlous. said reserves ro be 11,;e<lto guarantee 0111~,Joans for reslden•

tiul owner occupied homes located in and Yon11 1111dother areas \\'ithln tbfi' territory of Gnnm. All such deposits ;,ihnll not exceed 25 percen-t of said ri>..:en·es uor in an,v event exceed the ,;11111 of $2 mllliou and nny loss of the fnnd i1wnrred 111tlw :<ale of bonds or securities for the 1mrposes of nutk'ing till' deposits shall lJe nu obligation of the governmeut aud shall be paid to the fund Sl11nj1rna

through a1)pro1>ri11tion. '.l'his i;ectiou wns

further amended lJy Pul.Jlic Law 8-70 011 Angnst 21, 1oo;;, adding new Sl'Ctlo11 4225.l e,;rulJllshlng n f.,oan uuuruntet> Del)oslt l!illld in COllllt>ctiouwith ,section -122>;; ( l,) .

Pnbllc Law S-183 became elfective on )Carclt 18, 1060 and 1>ro,·lded that 1111r emJ>lo~'eewho bus completed 80 years of serdce with t11e government lllUY retire regardle::;s of nge nnd shull l><!eutltlecl to full retirement annuity 1wtl nlso any emplOSL'<? at his 01>tloo may retire nfter 20 years of sen·lce reg1u-diess of nge. F'urther section 4210 of rhe Govern• me11t Couo of Guam was nmell(led by addlng tho followl.ng nnrngrnpl1 thereto : "A wember <>f tl11> uniformed personnel shall. upon retlrelllent, he 1>lace<1one ru.nk grucle above th1tt held by Mm on the tlntc of retirement.''

Government of Guam Retirement Fund Ba.lance sheet, Juno 30, 1966 Assets: Cash in bank: Bank of America (retirement fund cnsh) ..... _.. _.... _... Bank of America (time deposit, open account) ... _.. _.... Bank of Hawaii (time deposit, open nccount) ............ Investment in U.S. Treasury bonds ......................... Accrued interest receivable on investment. .................. Accrued interest receivo.ble on time deposits ...........•...•.. Due from general fund ..............

_...........

---··

•••••.

Total .................................................• Liabilities nod i-cserves: Members' contribution reserve .............................• Employer's contribution reserve .................. __........• lfotircmont reserve ......... _...........................•.• Interest and investment income reserve ...................•.. Accounts payable ......................................•••• Due to general fund ......... _.........................•..• Total ..................................................

126

$237, 260. 75 . - 1, 288, 265. 81 . 1, 075, 489. 24 . 11,340,034.47 104, 700. 55 . 406. 25

73,902.19

14,129,059.26 5,102,347.68 3,341,577. 37

5,595,463.44 85,947.10

336. 42 3,387.25 14,129,059.26


Government of Guam Retirement Fund Statement of investment in U.S. Trensury bonds, year ended June 30, 1066 Acquired in prior fiscal years: 4 percent, February 1972______________ ·--------------____ 4¼percent, February 1974_________-----------------------3¼ percent, November 1974______________·- -------------__ 3¼ percent, June 1978-83---- ·----------------------------4 percent, February 1980_________________________________ _ 3½ percent, November 1980______________________·- ________ 4¼ percent August 1987-92 .. _______ ----- _-- ... _____- - ----3H percent, February 1990..... _______________. ______. _____ 4¼ percent, August 1992_________________________.. ________ 3½percent, November 1998________________________________ SubtotaL ______________________________________________

Par colue

$170,000.00 710,000.00 3, 272, 000. 00 716,000.00 199,000.00 514,000.00 237,000.00 3,240,500.00 246,000.00 1, 162, 000. 00 10,466,500.00

Acquired in fiscal year 1966: 4 percent, February 1970_____________________ $695,000.00 4¼ percent, November 1973___________________ 655,000.00 1,350,000.00 Grand total.. ...... ______________ ---------------------Less unamortized discounts and premiums-net. ____. __ . _____. _ __ Amortized cost at June 30, 1966__________________________

20-515

o - s1 - e

11,816,500.00 467, 465. 53 11,349,034.47

127


.... N

00

Government of Guam Retirement Fund Stntc.mcnt. of cash receipts and disbursements, year ended June 30, 1966

Cash on deposit. at July 1, 1965-___________. _________________________________________ ----- ------ ---- - -- --- _ Receipts: Members' contribution reserve: Curre11t year's contributions _________________________. _________--- -----Deposits by members__________________________________________________

$243,306.66

$738,358.69 12,406.81 $750,765.50

Employer's contribution reserve: Prior year's contributions. _______________ . _______.. ____. ___.. ____- _... Current year's contributions ____________________________________. --- --- _

65,074.70 984,904.29

Tntercst on U.S. Treasury bonds, not. of interest paid. _______ . _________------_ - -- _- . --

1,049,979.08 416,589.73

2,217,334.31 2,460,640.97 DISB U RSEM.ENTS: Members' contribution reserve: Refunds to scparntcd members: (Active) _________ ----------------------------------------------(Jnnctivc) __ .. ____________. ____. __________ .. ______________________

227,699.12 l, 006. 24 228,705.36

lleUrement reserve: lletircmc.nt :tllowanecs. ___-- ___---- ___________________----. _. -- . - . --- - Annuities to spouse nod children. _______________________________________ Deferred nnnuitant _________________ . _. __________________--- --- __ - . _. - -

357,738.44 59,854.49 2,725.00 420,317.93

Death bcuefits ___ ---· _______________________ -- - --- -----·------

- - -----

- ------

---- - - ---

Time deposit, open nccount. _________________-- _-- - _____----- _ .. - - ----- - - ------ - . --- - --- Invcsbnent in bonds. _____________________-- . - __- - ------ - --- -- ---- --- -- -- . ---- ------. - -Accounts payable _____ ----·-------.• ---·-------------------------------------------

300.00 200,000.00

930,000.00 ], 694-.49


U.S. Trcnsury l>onds·--·- ·-··-··--· .. _______·-- ·-·· .. __.. ·-- ······-·--·. _··-· _. ·- --· .... Cust.odian fee .. ____ ................ ·-··- ........ ·-· ....... ----·-·-··· .............. __.. Administration and genernl expenses: Prior year's expenses.- .. ·- ............ ·- ..... ··-··· __·--· .... -· - ·- ...... -·. _ 6, 295. 28 Current year's expenses: . $28,159.14 Personnlscrviccs ..••••• -·--·-·······--···-····-·-·····-··1,926.95 Contractunl services .. ·- ... __.................. ··---·--·_ .. 138.91 Supplies and materials .... -·· ....... _.·- ........ ···--· .... . 80.27 Equipment ............ _---· _··- .. ·-· ·- ...... ·-· .. _•.••.• 1,988.77 Miscellaneous ___....... _·-- ..... ·-·- .......... _.. _.... _.. . 32,294.04

397,027.01 6,746.11

38,589.32 Cash

....

N \0

011

deposit at

J1111c

30, 1966•• --·-··--·····-···-·-·-········-·--····------·····-···-···

•• •• ••••••

2,223,380.22 237,260.75


...

UJ 0

Government of Guam Retirement Fund Oporoting rccclp13und dlslJursemcnts ond balance ht tho fund, fiscal yours 1952to 1900 Employees contrlbullons

Fiscal year ended June 30

::·:::.:::::: :::::::::::::::::::..:::::::::::::: :::::::::::•·:I 1954.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••• •• ••••••••• 1955•••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1900 ············································-·······-····· l957............................................................ . 1958- ••••• ·-····· ·-·· ·····-······19.59.........................•...•............................... 1~-

····-·-··

·····-·····

1961..................................... 1902••••••••••••••••••••• ··-····

· ........ · ............. ••• -· •• -··-· •••••••••••••

1963 ············-··········-······-··························· 1064•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 11165 ••.•.•.•.•••.••••••••••••••••••••••.••.•

. •-

•••••••••••••••••••• ••• - .•••• ••••• ••••••••

1900.. .. . . ·Total. .... _ ............

.

Interest on lnvestment-s

Total recclpt.s

Total disbwsomcnts

Dalnnco In fund, June 30 $67,622.63 201,303, 05

1,738,633.35

71,822.64 211,278.77 83,680.46 118,869.81 103,212.88

677,421.44 750,765.50

640,006.74 700,265.42 300,748.41 I, 137,842.07 948,989.34 I, 049, 979. 08

1(2,670.00 153,m. 1s :m,m.01 272,~.07 :W0,36L91 357, 2U.60 368,019.42 416,689.73

$413, 263. 76 690, 057. 05 924,86L 75 I. 038, 761. 23 974,661.93 OG0,685.50 1,079,844.37 846, 727. 57

6, 795, 183.44

9, 443,032.02

2, 689,380.69

18,927,590.15

18,890,335.411

463, 766. « 472,118.43 607,873.05

M3,40S.86

-------·-······· $516.838,.It 044,883.'Z7

$3.837.50 18.606. 26 ~. 130.94

527,831.80

68,482.50

m303.15

65.1128.76 95,301.25

646,476.89 S7(,910.10

98,8'28.80 I, 165,737.GO

136,206.00

.Analysisor cash balance on hand, Juno 30, 1000: Cash ln bank (rotlromcnt fund cash) ... ······-·······.............•.•••.•••••••••••••••••••• Cash In bank S.F. (custodian occount) ···········•·······-···································· Total. ...................................

I

$480,Si0-28 889,8'Z7.67 I, 047, 738. 76 882,~.9I 984,268.74 980,293.52 I, 097,869. 73 640,2h9.00 1.741,033.63 1,328,99'.!. 19 I, 444,006.92 I, 148,083.37 2, 048, 400. 12 I, 993, Bao.20 2,217,334.31

$477.038.78 aM.383.18 367. 724.65 2911. 006.61 336, 036. 23 339,615. S8 386,764. G3 398, 761. 10 (22,022.'ZT

.........•....••...........................................

Government contributions

- ...........................................•.•.•

1. 189,535. 96 I. 672, 505.23 1, 113,804. 02 2,004, 107.05 1,863,736.42 2, 223,380. 22

lUO.957.93 120,302.82

237,200.7/;

384,280.06 228,449.74 238,156.65 257,864.67 276,889.93

I», 42'2-20

243,306.00 237,200.75


Department of Land Management (PERSONNEL:

48)-(APPRUPRIATION:

$283,864)

nnd coordluates such notion within and The Department of Land Management between other go,•ernment departments hns cogpiznnce of and is charged with and agencies. He gathers and compiles the adwinlstratton of nu government land Information on Guam's Wstorlcal heriwithin the territory. It administers the tage, utl.llzlng such information in the nse and disposition of such la:nd In acformulation of the Territorial Park Pro• rordance with existing land laws and gram. He sen•es in consultive and coregulations, and provides sta1f assistance ordinating capacity in implementing the to the Territorial Planning Commission, island beautUlcntlon program. the Lnncl Transfer Board, the Parks and :\lonuments Committ.ee, and the Guam Land AdminisJraJion Housing Authority. The. department approves and coordinat.es accurate land surThe inYestlgntion and appraisal sec· tions of the Land Administration DI• veys, enfoTces zoning laws and subdi\'islon are concerned with the use of prlvision regulatlons on private and public lands, negotla•tes for land and easements ,·ate land for public purposes, the use required by other government departnnd dlspositlon of government land, acments and agencies, and ser,·es as the gov- quisition of private property and perpeternment of Guam land rbroker, providing ual easements needed for public use, a1r prnisals of private and go\'ernment proptitle search, negotiation, and sales sen•erty for exchange, and purchase and for lce In exchange and d1sposal of fractional lots In Agnna. Utilizing the territorial lease by the government, nnd procurement master plan, whic.h it maintains and deof signatures on leaseholcl stipulation and veloped, government land Is examined for on lease -agreements for payment of rentgren test use 1l0tentlal to ex:pand the growals on private property needed by the Ing economy of Gunm, Including plllllll1ng government. The division enforces 7..onlng laws in and procurement of land for expanded J)llrk and recreational service. reference to building permits for co11struct1011 or buildings ns well as appro,·The dlrector ls ex officio registrar of ing all business licenses In reference to titles, custodlan of all land records, and Is responsible for their maintenance 11nd placement of business structure all(l use of land occupied. On government land. preserYation. The departm.ent contains the following major filvlslons : Land Ad- the division assigns nnd inspects, processes and Investigates app!lcntlons flied ministration. Land Records, Land Plannlng, Land Suryey, lllld Public Housing. with the Laud 'l'rausfer Bonrcl, and a:sslsts the board as requi.red. During the year. the investigation aml OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR a1mralsal sections acquired 23 J)llrcels br The cllrectorsupen•ises and coordinates pnrchnse and exchange. nod 284 J)llrcels nil nctlvltles of the department. serves by per1)etual easement. Under lnncl use 11s e.xecuth•e secretary of the Territorial 11ermits. 237 new nssigmnents were pro<.~ Planning Commission, as chairman of the essed, 545 were renewed, n.nd 817 were PaTks and :\lonuments Committee. and Inspected. Zoning enforcement cover11cl d1nirma11 of the Land U,UJ.11.ntionCom- 313 h11ilcl111g permits appro,·e<l. a dll:!l\11· pro\'ed, 217 business licenses approved, 1 mlttel'. He Initiates action on all mat11IAAJ)l)roved. nn<l 11) liquor license sites ters ntrectiug govenunent real property.

131


were approved. Investigations were wade on 25 uppllcatlons to acquire lJlterest on government laud and were subsequently referrecl to the Lund Transfer Board for couslder11tlon. Of this totnl, 19 applicntlous were npproved nnd 6 nppllcatlom1 disapproved.

responsibility. Including ad,·ance planning. subdlvlslou admlnlsh·atJon and special projects. and serves as a technical advisor to th!' Territorial l11nnn111gCommission. Advance Plam1i11g.-December 31, 1005. marked the completion of Guam's first com1>rebenslve, lslnndwide master Land Records plnn, which marked n turning point in the historr of planning on Guam. The This division Is composed of the land plan serves as n guide to islanclwlde recording section and the deeds. conzoning, subdivision control. all(l location tracts, and abstract sections. of public facilities. Its value as a tool The recording section Is res1)0nslble for to guide Ille orderly deYelopment of the the recordJng and upkeep of all realtr island hns been proven time and again transactions on Guam presented for reover the pnst 6 months. It is e.'\:pecteclto cording. This Includes nll modes of continue to do so for many years to transfers trom simple deeds and conveycome. Since completion, tlll islanclwide nnces to warranty type lnstrnments, indetailed lnncl use nml housing condition duding special court orders, asslgnmenh!. stndy wus inaugurated. The master plan and qnltclalms. The division prepares was designed to be updated In ,Ja011ary all legal Instruments emanating from the of e,·ery year, providing n yearly check It Ilrepares all searches of department. on existing use pnttems witl1ln the Territitles of abi::tracti:: on government: land as A composite plcturP of growth tory. well as on private land where the governtrends wlJI emerge from nn examination ment seeks to acquire Interest. of Ruch use 1>ntterns o,·er the years which It provides the Department of Finance will permit a more nccurnte and logical <·han~es of !}roperty ownership listings 11rojectio11 of fnture lancl use assign• for purposes of the Guam Ren! Estate rue.11ts. Assessment Roll. makes all searches of The completecl study bas hacl immedititle affecting regh1tratlon of title in IsHrnd Court and. with tlie ad\"lse of couuate applications. The resultant lnnd use ntlns has been used to refine nncl detail ><elfrom the attorney general. represents master plans for the heavily urbnnb:ed the government as material witness pernnd rnpldly growing portions of the taining to land records on nil cases Jn island. It is used, along with the fnhm.> land regh:1tratlon proceedl.ngs in court. land use studies In the master plan, to During fiscal ~•ear 1060. the division develop nu lslnmlwlcle zonlnJ? pattern to receivecl from the sale of government npply zoning laws to nil ponions of thP land. including interest charges 011 contract to deeds. $33.751.28; from S!}Cciul Island rather thnn t.hl' three pri· cent lnnd lenses (not Including laud mse per· presently zoned. mlts). $870 from 1·ecording fees, 1·eproT11c 111xlntlng nnd dctnlllni: of fni-nn, cluctlou fees. and document titles. hmd use plUJtR t11roll)?bouc blgli growth $28.050.45. nrens. nn upclnl inl!" of the• e:...'isllui,: Janel The division recorded 5,456 documents. use ntlns, 1m1J a <lclailed neighliorhoocl and issued 1,804 certiJlcntes of title, and nnnl)•sis within thc> nrunnize(l nreas i,; canceled 738. There were 303 legal 1llstruments prepared; 1,05i> title se1u·che,1 underw11)·. The zoning nnd subnl\"iRlon codes are suhJccled to detnllcu nuaJysis mnde for prh-11.tefirms uU() lmli\"idnuls; for re\·li::ion to hr!ng them to II more 1111d 162 charges of property Ustlngs subsopb!stirnted nml tlexiblc level to 111Pet mitted to 1·heDepartment of Flounce for tlw needs of tllll communit,;. renl estate tnx assessment purposes. Dnrlng the yenr. n total of 1!):J RnbcllPlanning Divisio11 \"ISlon mnlf·e1-,. were 1n·ese11tedby the pln11nlng division. inclrnllng 12 ngrlrnlThe division hns thrtW 1ne11sof major

132


Surrey plans submitted by private surturnl subdivision plans. nnd lu lot pnrYC~'0rs!or t1pproval by this dh·islon haYC cellng plans. 'l'he planning dlvlslou is re1>rescntecl011 been npproved at 1111llverage rute of 2ii 11er month o,·er the lust year. rejecting the ,Toint Armed Forces-Government· of nu 11verage of 28 per mouth. Rejections Guam '!'raffle Ad, 1isory Bonrcl. whicl1 proinclicate lrrespousil>illty or lnck of train,•icles a forum to tliscu~s problem areas ing, or n combinutiou of these deficiennncl pror>0se solutions within the isluutl's cle,,; on hehulf of the p1·lvnte surveyor:<. circnhl.tion system. It is the liue ngency Until corrected, the <11'•isio11 will have nn responsH,le for the admiuistrntlou of nn lsJ:mdw1de recreution plunniug nnd <le- increased loud aud 1·espousil>llity to provelopment progruw, whlc.b, with the co- tect the pul>llc llllli ensure Ihat the requi.remeuts of the lnw nre met. opera tioil and asslstl1llce of the .Bureau The division checks surveys and pluns of Outdoor Recreution. prepared fill interfor the office of the attorney general for im outdoor recreation 11hw entitled "Gunland re(,,'istration cases, averaging 10 per l1a.n-Sngnu Minngof, Sugan Descnnso." A detailed .5-yenr plan has been con- mouth. During the yen1·, o,·er 35 major st1.1'l'e)':<were performed, including reni tracted to J)ri\'Ute consultants. Planning estate rec1uirement surveys for the go,·is in tlrocess on two specific projects-a ernment iuclucllng school sites, rlghts-ofswimming pool as part of uu Aganu wa)·, utility easements, and other site recreational complex, and o senside pork sun•eys for go,·ermuent 11rojects. 1111<1 surfing area ut Tulofofo Bnr. The div!s1011 Is streuwlln.lng procedThe staff Is de,·eloping plans for 011 nreR to J>ro,•lde better ser\'lces. A study arboretum ancl botanical gru:dens, and of computing 111eU10clsund equipment prepnred preliminary site selc<:tion studneeded to expedite completion of the Go,·ies for the terrltol'htl public bousing eruruent of Guam Triangulation Network program. Program. the c11dustrnl mav11h1gprogram. The Territorial Planning Coiwnlssion and other projects 11s~gned to the departheld 10 regular meetings, 5 s11ecl11lmeetment bus been uudertukeu. ings. and ll public hearings In the pust year: 'I'he commission beard 11 requests for Yarin.nce of the zoning law, gl'Uu.ting Publi~ Housing 7 and clisnpproving 4. It beard two upRe:iolutlons Nos. 127 1u111 228 of the 1ietils from decisions of the Building m~hth Guam Legislature established the Official. Three rezoning actions were need for 250 low-rent housing units for taken. including a major re-honing In the the tel'l'ltory of Guam. Tumon-Bnrmon area. Ill February 1966, the l'ul>Uc Housing Authority snbmlttcd a11 application for Survey Division 1>rogrnm 1·eser\'1ttlon covering 250 lowThe dl\'lslon maintains llnd ,,;upple- rent 1mblic housing unit;;, and u request ments Ui~ luud square-plnne system, a for n preliminary lonn of $42,500 to cover lhe costs of surYeys oncl J)launing. Tentriuugulntiou network, and an islandwicle Yertical control system; maintains files tative sites were selected iu Agann :\longmong-Toto-Mnite, and on land 1.mn•ey• tcomplete technical cle- Helgl1ts, Slnnjann. nil within the metro110Ub.111 scriptions llnd other pertinent InformaAguna. tion on nil government nnd prh•ate propThe ·workable l'rogrum for Uonunu<'l'tie:<); 111·<'pare • and maintains a set of cadastnll maps: nnd accumulates recon- nltr Development for Gmuu was up1111iss1111ce infor111atlo11and prepares ni::- proved by the Federal Department of Housing 11mlUrllnn Derelopment. ns well lmllts, topographic and rontour maps. During the pnst yenr, conslderahle ef- as the 250 unit nppllcutlon. The nuthority staff' consists of two confo1·t hns lJef'n expended on the Governsultn.11ts, the Housing Administrator nntl ment. of Gu11111 Tri11n~ul11Ho11:\'etwork ( G.G.T.X.). nnd the estnhllRhmeut of co• _\ssistant IIousiug Adrnlnh:ltrntor, under orclinntr ,·nine:< nn monument:< set to es- contract to U1eDe])artment of Lun<l Manngement. t:thllsh the network.

133


Department of Law (PERSONNEL:

16)-(APPROPRIATION:

$130,108)

GENERAL All matters of II legal nature which concern the Government of Guam, its officers, and employees are uncler the cogni?.llnce of the Department of Law. The department prosecutes all criminal violations falling wltbiu the jurisdiction of tbe civilian authorities and represents the government in actions of a civil nature. Staff The attorne~• general I:. the head of the De11artmeut of Law. 'l'be department bas a 11rofesslonal stair composed of the cleputy attorney general. the Island uttomey and live assistant attorneys general. The department also has one special lm•estfgator. One assistant attorney gene-ral posltlou was vacant during the fiscal year. The nonprofessional i;talf ls c1lmposed of tbP administrative assistant and five i<tenographlc and derlcal poi-ltions. During the year there were four res.ignatlons and four appointments made In the various stenographic ancl clerical positions.

Tax Matters In Oovorm111mt of Oua.11iv. Ocoroo E. ](aster amt o,·ystai K. Koster, No. 20,188, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Nintl1 Cir-

trlbutable to Guam. The case was pending at the end of the flscal yenr uwnltlng trial of additional Issues In the District Court of Guam. .d.tlvins Kt·oU ( G-ua11i), Ltd. v. Government of 011.am.civil cnse No. 54-64 (D.C. Guam 1965), was appealed by the ta..--.:pnyer to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit upon the question of whether a California corporation is u foreign corporntiou for the purpose of the Guam territorial Income tax. At the end or -the ftsc.al year the ca&e was awaiting the court's decision. .d.iJiaUcTrw11s-Paci.flc,I1tc. ,•. A.G. Macldoai, civil No. 55-00 (O.C. Gunm 1006),

now on nppeul by the taxpayer in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Nluth Circuit, concerns the nmeunblllty of a local trucking com))Uny to n Guam gross receipts tax upon its locul activity. /11 Get:: Bros. & ao11iva1111, hie. v. A.. G. Ma1ldo0, Ci\'11Case No. 41-65 (D.C. Guam

1965). the designated judge of the District Court of Guam held invalid un unnpportlouetl gross receipts tax upon gross receipts derived from sules and commissions by u brunch office of a Dela.ware corporation upon the .1,-rolltldthat the tax wus a violation of the corumerc-e clause of the U.S. Constitution. Two separate tax suits, MacDonalrl

cuit, June , 1006, government of Guam Con./Jf1•11ctio11 Compc1·1111 ,. CommisMoncr income tax regulations Nm:1.1 nml 3 were declared hwulld. The court held that the of Rcv01111cm1,1, Taaiatio11, Civil Case No. u0--05 (D.C. Gunm 196:i) nml S. PatU Oon• rcgulutlons were an Ulegal modiflcntion i,fr110Uo11 Oompany \", Oommlssioncr of of the tuternnl Revenue Code of the il<>vc1mc ,ma Ta:DaNon, civil rnse No. 70United States. 'l'he regulutlous, In force fili (D.C. Gunm 1000), were brought by for 13 nud 14 year:., respectively, limited gross Income and deductions, for the 1>ur- rueuit,ers of u joint venture for rcdctcrruln11tio11o! income tax deficiencies. 111 pose of the Gu1u11territorial ineome tux, upholding the tnx In the cafie of Macto tho:.e which were derived from or nt-

134


Donal<L Oonstructio1i Company, the court held that the ta..'l:payer, even though lln Inactive partner, wa.s engaged in bns.lness In Guam and subject to tax upon Its share of the protlb!. The PatU case Involves the allowablltty of deductions claimed by an Inactive member of the joint venture based upon a rntn.uie portion of its overall administrative and off-island overhead expenses. The case wns penning trial In the District Court of Guam at the encl of the ilscal year. Eleven ta."t cases were filed during the fiscal year, three of which were closed, three pencllng on appeal, and the balance t>ending In the District Court of Guum nt year's end. Of the· Jlve tax cases

pend.Ing at the end of the Inst fiscal year, three were closed, one pending appeal, und one pending trlaJ 111 the DJstrlct Court of Guam.

Land Mailers To protect the government's Interests, nll private land registration cases are reviewed IJy the department. Seventy-SL'\: such cases were filed during the period, waivers tiled in 67 cases, and there were 63 actions pending at year's end. The go\·ernmentflled and completed two registration cases during the year. Condemnation suits tiled IJy the go,·ernment were as follows:

'PENDING JOLY l, 196.S Co.soNo. N11mbcr oflots

28-63 31~

35-6.S 37-05

Status, Juno 30, 1960

PllTJ)OSC

33 Sower ea.somont.s,TtU11unlng_............... 8 Sewer pumJ>lng stations plus l occcss road ... 14 Water lino and access road, Ilnnuon ......... 150 Sewer casements, Ago.no Holght.s and Sina• JBDa,

G lots rc.mnln opon. Final judgments entered. Awaiting completion or sorvlco. 'flmo for Mswcr oxplrcs July 10.

FILED DOlUNO .YEAR Case No. Number orlots

1~6.S 8-66 38-66

~-66 00-00

Dnl11flied

Purposo

H Dec. 22, 106.S 22 Fob. 17, 1006 58 Apr. 14, 1966 2 May 23, 1006

Fractlonol lots, block 5 ••••. --•········ Fractional lots, blook o..... --•-·····Fmctlonal lots, block 1-···-·········· AddlLl01U1I casements, Trununlng sower puml)!I station and nccess road. 05 June 10, 1966 Jo"mcuonallots, blocks ••••...• ·-······

Claims T:ndcr the provisions of the Governme11t Claims Act, the department bas ot reviewing all claims the rt-.-;.!')ons11Ji11ty 1tg-niust the government. F'ourtee11 sucl1 clllims were considered nud npr,rovecl for payment- In the totnl sum of $1.903.42. One such dl\lUI WtlS denied. Tn ndtlitlon, the department reviewed 10::i claims against the conunerclal 1>0rt nf Guam ancl n1>1>rovecl payment of $10, :\.!:.t65. denying puyment of $1,42ti.57. Th<- <lP1111rtrueutcollected the sum or $:3.0S)6.111 owecl tbe government th-roug-h

Status, June 30, 1060

Final judgments entered. A waiting scn•tco. A w11.1Ung service. Time for answer expires July 10. Awoltlng service,

lltlgi1tlon lUltl othern·ise. Other sums ,vere collected through nnyroll deduction$.

Wo-rkmen's Compensation Tile deputy attorney gcuernl Is tl1e workmen's compensation commissioner and one of the assistant attorneys gen• eral is the law member of the commJssion. All aw11rds to injured workmen were reviewed dnrlng1:he year. One i;Ult was IJrought ngalt1st tile c0111mi,;.~io11. Cruz v. O<>m111i118i(>ncr, J.C. Sp. Proceedings :-.lo.02-6-1. C'Onccrnlng rejec-

135


tion of u clnlm for injuries. The court sustuiucd thP order of t•ejection nn(] grunted Sttlllli111ry judgment in fnvor of I he Co1111uissI011cr.

Legislation Bill drafting continued as n major del>ilrt:mental uctlvity during the yca-r. A Lolitl of GO 1>111s were prepared for sub111i~ion to the legil;lnture.

Criminal Matters 'l'he Department of Daw serves ns the t,ro:recutlng ugency for nll crimlunl offenses within the jurlscllction of the goYt'r111ucnt of 01111111. Olfense:i by serYlcerneu ore geuernll~• handled by millt!11·y 1111tL,,rities with tbc exception of those nets within the jurisdiction of the police court. A summary of criminal cases hnn• died during the tlscnl yenr Is ns follows:

DlstrlcL court

l&lnndcourt

Police cour~ Juvcntlo court

Cnscs beginning or yenr, pending, July 1, 1966._._ 2 10 Cwscslllod -··--·--·--·-·-·-···········--······-21a 14 o (11) 232 (274) 1a (13) Convictions by coun ....... ·---··-···-·---·-·· Convictions b)• Jury •••••••• ·-··········-····-········-····-·······-··-·-·-·········-···············-···· ,\cqulU.nls by court •• -·······-·-·····-······ s (10) ~~::::: by Jury .. --·······-··········-··::: ···(«)· 1 P di d (I) en .ngntcn or ycnr·-·-···--········-·-···· o 26 1 Convictions upJ)Colod(0th circuit) •••••••••••••• -···-··········· -·· •••• -4.ppoalsnfflrmed(9th circuit)......................... _· •• • -·· ····--·····-· Convictions opJJcoled (nppollnt.o division. OIS· • • ••••••••• • • •• •••• trlct or Cohunblo) .. - .•........•.......•••••••. ···········-·-·· 1 Appools nmmicd (nppcllnlu division, DtstrlcL or Columbln).. • ······-········-·····-······· ····-····•······ J ········-···· ApJ)Cllls reversed or d!smlssed (9th circuit) ..•••• ··-···-········ •••••••.•••••••.••••••••.••• Appeols reversed or dismissed (nppcllotc dlVlslon, District of Columblo} ·················-······· ······-·····-·· ,\ppools dismissed on motion or govc_rnmonL ·············-·· ........................................... Appools ponllln~ nLund or flscnl yeor.·-········

:i

5 8 (8)

·-······::::~i): ··-··29 :::=::~::::: :::::::::::=:= ••••••••••••••••

o

·-·············· ••••••••••••••••

···················-···········

N0Tl!.-Flguros In pnronthusls lndlcntu numhor or d,•rondnnts.

Pauoelitian ,·. Govcmmcnt of 01tam, Criminal Appeal Ko. 33-A. cleclded by the cllstrlct court of appeals, arose from n conviction of Pangelinan in the Island <·ourt for the offense of attempted extor• tlon. Pnngelh1n11 wni; sentenced to 3 months' Imprisonment. He 11ppealeclon the basis of insufficient e,'1clence. The district court of appeals affirmed t.he con• ,·iction holding tbnt there was sufficient evidence to sustnin the conviction. 'l'olan ,•. Go-vcnunc11tof G-11,am, Crim• iunl AJlpeal No. 34-A, was an appeal bY Tolan from his conviction In the Island court of Gunm for the offenses of mull· clous mli;chlet, disturbing the pence, a11<l ni::sault. Tolan uelng sentenc-ecl by said court to (i months' Imprisonment. The n11pea1wns cllsmls.-reclby the cllst.rlct court of appeals for fnllnre of n1lpe1lnnt, Tolan, lo perfect his appeal.

136

General Civil Litigation TJo,-,TaUo v. Dft·ecto,· of Department of Ri11a11<:e, J.C. Sp. Proceeding No. 117-65.

hnrolved a 1mblished notice imr:IUng bids for Yarlous pieces of equipment. An un• successful bidder rtlleged thnt the notice wns defective in tlmt It clicl not state the time for closing of the bids or the time for O!lCJting same. The court nuheld the bldcler's contention nn!l enjoined any nwarcl under the notice. In this category. Rorr1allo v. G1tcrrero. Civil Onse 27-0ti, wn1< of pattlculnr Im· J>Ortnnee. In the Borda llo cnse. the legis• lntnre Included In nn npproprlntlon bill n rlde1· whicll would hnve repealed the limited stntntory authority of the Gov• ernor to transfer funds between executive depnrtmeuts ns the need arose. A.ctlug nuder the Item veto nuthorlzatlon set out


lo the Organic Act of Guam, the Governo-r vetoed this section of tl1e bill Thereulter, suit was brought by some members of the legislature seeking nn lnjunction. '£he court ln granting the Injunction ruled that the~ltem n!lo authorization ns set out In the Organic Act does not extend to substantive provisions attached as u rider to an uppropriatlou act. lu another important cnse, Falktt v.

Government of Guam v. Jeius J. Me11tllola, Ch•ll Cnse No. 57~5, wus brought by the government to collect upon dnm• The case resulted In settlement.

age:; lo government propert)'.

llamaila11

Roel.·

Prod11ct11 ,._ Guam

/t'oods, Inc., ct al, Civil Case No. 10-00, wns nu nctlou by Hawaiian Rock Products for paving work done for defendant 011 the parking lot In front of defendant's lloant ot Tr-118tees, Gua,m Memorial JJ0.~- store. Because the action was brought t1£tal, Civil Cnse 44-60, the l)laintltr filed under the meclmnlcs' lien provision of un injunction In the District CoUTtwhich the Code of Civil Procedure and because would re<tulre the Bourd of Trustees of the Guam Housing Corporatiou has tl the Guam Memorial Ilospltnl to nllow superior mortgage on the same real estale the governm(!J)t is n necessary dehim the use of hospital fac.lllUes. The court found in favor of the ho1:1lptalhold- fendunt. At tho present time, it bs not uottciputed that this CMO wlJJ come to Ing that the bylaw which excluded the trial as loug as Gunm Foods. Inc., makes defendant !rom use of hos1>itnl facilities was reasonable. The case Is l)resently on regular monthly payments to Hawaiian appeal to the Ninth Circuit Court of Rock Proclucts on tho amount drn>, Appeals. Exlemat Aclivities ct ai ,._ J{ai8cr Jlatoaii-Ka, In ilfon>/111, Dcvclopmc11t Oo11~panv,ot al., Civil Case The deportment hns under contrnct uu 111-65, plalntltrs brought suit against nttoruey handling lnnd mutters In conKalser HawaU-Kul Development Co. for uectlon with the Federnl Gnarn Rehablldamage by flooding to property and ltution Act. Also, law firms in Wnsh• against the government of Guam as co- logton under the general coordin1ttlo11of deteudunt. As to the government of the uttornoy general represent tho govGunm, plulntul's nsked for damages allegedly caused by Improvement of a pub- ernment before the Federal Maritime CommJsslou, the Civil AeronnutJc Bonrcl lic road. 'l'he plalntlJis contended that nnd Board of Appeals for tho District of the Improved road contributed to the flooding of ·plnlutJrr't:1lands. The cnse Columbia as to mntters of concern to the was dismissed us to the government of government. Guam upon wotlon of the t>lnlntiffs. In another cnse, O'Kccfc v. ai,c1-rct1·0, AddiJional Ac1ivi1ies Civil Case 6-66, petitioner flied u writ of RoutJne functions Include the drufti11g mnndamus In the DlstrJct Court to re- ot proclnmntions nod executive orders. quire tbe Insurance commissJoner to issue the preparntJon of opinion:,; and the dny him n general agent's lnimrance license. to day a<lvlce furnl.shed rnrlous ngenDuring pr.etrlnl conference, on the court's cles as needed. recommendation. It wns determined thnt Other services provided Include: the nctlon $hould be dismlsscd without 1. Druftlog or review of niles nnd rcgprejudice, and tl1e court entered nu 11pulnt!oos for various departments. ngenproprlate order. CIPS,commissions and boards. -Tolm H. O'Oom,01· v. Jla,wcl 1•'. L. Guerrero, Civil Case No. 70-65, wns 2. Special lnvestlgntlon~. brought to require the government of3. nrnttlng or re,•few of rnrlous <·oulklah; lo endorse t'<'rtnln pt•nul lnws nml trncts, deeds, laws or other legnl docuto obtnln n declnrntory judgment con- me11t>1ot toncern tu govPrnment. struing Lhcse laws. 'l'he cnsc dismissed -1. Review of 1-'P<lernllnws which arc hr the <'ourt. nppllcable locally.

137


u. The malntenance of records as to the composition of all commissions, agencies, and boards, and the processing ot apPointments. 6. The maintenance of Unison with legal counsel of the Federal Government nnd with law enforcement officers.

138

i. The review of various actions of the Department of Finance under the Ren! Property Tax law. 8. The providing of bearing officers tor appeals under the AdminJ.strntlve Ad· judlcatlon A.ct. 9. The processing ot appllcatlon for nppolntment of notary public.


Nieves M. Flores Memorial Library (PERSONNEL:

0)-(APPROPJUATION:

The Xleves M. l<'lores Memorial Library Is the pubUc library of Guam and serves the entire population of Guaw. The library ls admiuisterecl by the Guam Public Library Board, a seven-member board appointed by the Governor with the consent of the legislature. Collectiou develorm1ent continued to be the runiu emphasis of the llbrtu-~•program for the year. A total of $20,000 was budgeted for acquisition of Ubrary materials; 4,127 items were added while 2,357 Items were discarded. The need to maintain a usable and fresh collection as a service to the entire community requires the activity of the entire staff. Slgnlftcant additions to the juvenile collection were made to offer the best of children's material for the ever widening interests of the library's young users. The reference ,collection has been reinforced to permit fuTther service to the government, business, and professional community. The Ubrnry was designated nB a depository library for U.S. Government documents under provisions of Public Law 87-570. A total of 6,100 documents were added to the dePository collection.

Staff Development Workload Is assigned to individual stnff' members aud each bas total responsibility, In addition to the circulation clesk schedule. Staff' members are assigned such specialized task.s as periodical and serial organlzutlon and control; govl'rnment documents organization and coutrol ; YPrtlral flip organization nnd con-

$69,664)

trol; cataloging and classification, and library extension activities (bookmobile service to villages and to children at schools and library services to the blind).

Library and Facilities The library program is strengthened by its 11urticlpntlo11in the Library Services aucl Construction Act of 100v. Construction of regional units of the library are planned to be located In Agat and Dededo. A large Portion of the library's operatlonul budget it; also derived from the LSC Act. A special collection conslstlug of agricultural materials Is now ·11oused at the Department of Agriculture us part of the extension ser,•lcei:i of the library. The collection Is set up In the director's office ,ls a result of coustnnt request from the farmeris. The efl'ect of the geuernl library p1·0grnm is mensured by actl\·ltles which hove been recordell. TWs yen.r's acco11111llshment~ are ns follows: Books clrcuhlted (NMFML) __ 68, l2U Books circulated ( mobile library service) ____________ 11. 010 'l'otal books circulated ____ 80, 148 Xew hon·owers added_________ 2,358 Books recei\·ed nncl processed__ 4,127 Book collection _______________ 40, 641 l'amplllet collectiou__________ u,350 GovernmPnt documents______ 5, 100 Volumes wltlulrawn (worn an<l obsolete)----------------2,357

139


Mmeum of Guam activity In the Museum ot Guam Is shown by the following projects : Frequent change of ex.hlblts. Talks before clusses on tbe history of Gnorn. Systematic Inventory of ill1 objects nnd specimens not yet n part of lhc museum collection.

140

The museum Is operoted by a museum attendant In a bulldlng dntlng from the lute Spanish period. an llillount of S4,o59 was budgeted to help the museum open dally throughout the year. There were 4,576 visitors und 00 tours during the yenr.


Passport Office (PERSO~'NEL;

The passport office, opern-teclon Guam as n division of the office ot the Governor, continued norlllal operation during fiscal year 1066.

2)

A. total of 2,813 passports were processed ; 2,220 were new passports, 443 were renewals, 144 nmendments. nnd 6 we1·e extensions.

Report of Passport Issued, Renewed, Amended and Extended for the Year Ending June 30, 1966 Issuance

Month

Renewal

~\lnond.mont

Extension

'l'otnl

1905

July-·.···-·-·-·--·-.·--··

•• ·-----·-·

August ••• --··•· •••• ····-·····--·

•••••

Soptomblll'............................ . October••• ····-·.-···-········-··· November .......•..•...•• ··-···· •.... December •••••••• --·······-·· •••••••

125

20

161

39 31 32

163 116 162

Sb

130

10

167 201

21)

2M

◄◄

231 262 277

63

s8 ·-·········· 14 •

• •••• ---··

II

163

!!OS UIS

IS7 199

12 ....•••••.... 5

15'1

/f){)O

January .............................. February ... ···-·· ................... March.............................. April ................................ Moy.................................

. . . . .

June ...... ___ .. __....................

.

Tol<II..................

.

2,220

13 10

:!(JO

310

62

18 1:l :!'2

43

13

33◄

443

144

30

248 21);

340

6

2,813

141


Department of Public Health and Welfare {PERSO~EL:

125)-(APPROPRIATION:

$1,825,055)

This was the second year thnt the Deparbnent of Public Health and Welfare bas been In existence. Durlng this year. many problems have been experienced that have occurred largely as a result of t.ragmentation or separation of the DeJlltrtment of Med1Cl\l Sen·lce.-, Into Its com1>0nent Jlllrts--the Guam Memorial Hopsltal and the new Department of Public Health and Welfare. The department was delegated the professlonul re!!pom1ibilitles for public ben.ltb aud welfare, but Inadequate admlnlstrative peri:;onneland organization accompn.nled the delegutlou. The• most serious problems resulting t.rom this Inadequacy have been experienced in J)rocurement and supply und In fiscal operation. Plans for correcting till!< situation have been com1,leted ancl Incorporated in the budget for 1066-67. Problems also be<~a1ueevident with regard to r.-pnce and S})ace utilization. Spnce hns been reassigned to promote better uUllzatlon and more effective traffic control In sen•lcing the cllnlcs and other offices offering services, such as vital statistics and public welfare.

accountant IV, recommendations for reclassifications tor the director of publJc henlU1 nursing, the medlcnl laboratory sn1,en·lsor. and the welfare admlnistrator. Two h1-ser,•lce tralnees returned with their lISW's. There ore two lnser,ice trnlnees currently in the United States, and one Is l>eing processed for training clurlng the year and wUJ depart In llscal yenr 1007.

Administration

Maternal, Child Health, Crippled Children and Public Health Nursing Sections

Personnel. fiscal matters. procurement. iwd mulntennnce nre the responsibilities of the office of the assistant to the director of public henltb and welfare. All personnel nctlons were processed hy this unit. '!'here were 60 new appQlntments. 44 reslgnntlons and terminntions. 4 promotions, 14 1>nrt-time contract negotiations nnd other miscellaneous perRonnel actions. Importm1t 11en;on11elaccomplishments were the reclnsslflcntion of a social worker II to l!OClal worker supen•lsor. 1·ec1ass1Jlc11t1on of the ncconntant Ill to

142

Dwision of Public Health The Division of Public Health Is re,.1>011slble for maintaining adequate health standards for the territory. This Is nccompllshed through immunization programs, sanitary Inspections to malntnln safe aml saultar~' public an<l prl'l"ate facilities. programs designed to control coutagioUl:1diseases such ns tuberculosis and leprosy. and examinations to detect and prevent disease before It produces Illness or permanent crippling. Although 1mhllc health does provide treatment senices In a few Instances. these nre specUlcally to prevent crippling, or the s11rend of diseases ln the community. Its ser,,lces are l)rlmarll:v preventive.

Under the maternal lllld child health programs. there were 4.417 pre.natal and 695 1>0St part11m clinic visits. All patients nttencllng the prenatal clinic also had Papanlcolnou smears for detection of cancer. Assistall<;-e in family planning wa~ made available during tile post partUlll clinic. Classes for expectant parents were beld in two areas. A minimum of eight well-child clinics were helcl each week tl1roughont the island. A total ot


6,319 were seen by physicians and there were 30,200 visits to nursing conferences. The following numbers of immunizations were given : Diphtheria-pertussisteta.nus___________ D-3,684. P-2,689. T-8,607.

Typhoid____________ 2,676. Cholera____________ 1,514. Orn! polio__________ 1-2,174. 11-2,357. :\leash~~----------Smallpox_________

111-2,289. 1,600. 1,747.

The school health program was extended to include visits •to the schools by the v111.o.genurse. Ohlldren a-ttending sixth grade •were examined by -aphysician uu.d received bo<>Ster immunizations. The majority of children enrolling for 1h~t grade were also examined by personnel of the Department of Public HealU1 and Welfare. Vision and hearlng testing were done by the school personnel in most areat:1Wlder the supervision of the Division of PubUc Health N'lll"Sing. The Crippled Children's Unit bas con• tinned its effoi,ts to locate crippled cbil· dren and to provide diagnostic and tbera• peutic services to these children. Durini: fiscal year 1966 there were 406 visits to cardiac clinic, 604 visits to ENT clinic, 693 ,•!sits to eye clinic, 870 visits to orthopedic clinic. and 313 visits to pediatric clinic. There were 112 patients ndlllltted to Guam Memorial Hospital and 1,740 days of patient care were authorized. Eleven patients were sent to Hnwllii for furtl1er care. This Included five chtl· clren for cnrcUac catheterlzatlon and surgery, one for cnrdiac catheterlzation only, one with lm11Crfornte llllUS, one with malignant hypertension, and three wllo were referred to tbe Shrlner't:1 Hospital for ortho11edJc care. (This was seven less tban were referred otl: Island m 1965.) Other referrals Included 38 to the Catholic Medical Center, 20 to the out• 1mtlent department of Guam Memorial Hos11ltal and 29 to the U.S. Naval Hos• pita I.

Tbe Public Health Nursing Section ad• ministers the nursl.ng services in all public health programs of the department. In spite of continuous problems in recruiting quallfled nurses, the school nursing program wns el.-tended and additional emphasis was placed on the family care program. Services o1fered under the family care program were extended and strengthened during the year in preparation for the anticipated increased need when the medJcare program becomes effective July l, 1067. An administrative Htudy w:u; conducted including cost analysis. Family Care Program of the Chronically Ill and Aged (Ccueload by diagnosis)

.Dlagno,i,

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ____ . ___._ Parkinsonism ____ .. _ Cardiovascular disease ______________ Kidney_. _.... _..... Arthritis ___.. _.. __ .. Cancer _____________ Diabetes .. _. __.. _... Orthopedic conditions .. _ .. _ ... __.. Senile conditions ... _. Tuberculosis .. _._ ... Gout _______. _______ Anemia ..... __ .. ____ Others _____________ TotaL _____ . _

Nu.mbero/ palitnU admitltd

16

Nu.mbcr of ltm, hargtd

lt:i

4

6 2

19

6

0

0

3 0 2

3

0 0 6 0 0 7

0 0 3 0 0 8

57

31

3 0

A. totnl of 2,000 visits were made by nurses to 1>rovldesupportive and specJal• lzed nursing care orders by the physician. Physical therapy was provided in addl· tiou to nursing care. Much needed social service:; were added this year. To the extent available, the family care program also provides patients, on a. loan 1111<1 need basis, with wheelchnirs, crutches, walkers, urinals, and bedpan!t". The uee<l for these Items of equipment by patients, who do not have the mean:< to obtain them, exceeds our supply.

143


,q,imma.ry of TB Oontrol and Ohest OU11ic ,1.otivi.ties

Xumller uf clinic cases _________ 2, 631 Xew cases ndmitted ___________ 432 Cnses readmitted _____________ 17 Xuwber of cases dischnrgecL__ 212 148 ~umber of new active cases___ :-iumher of cnses renctivated_ 65 ~umber of cases inactive ______ 1,036 Tuberculosis is the most serious single public health 11roblem currently facing Guam. Although there bas been a con• siderable accentuation of efl:ort placed 011 caseflndtng during fiscal year 1966, only fl smnll percent of the apparent high in· Summary of Districl. Health Center Acl.ivities-Home

and Offi,C6V1"sii.!!

Program

Mnternity: Ant~partum _____.. Postpartum ___... _ Health promotion ____ Disease control: Arthritis ____. _____ Cancer ___________ Cardiovascular disense __ .. _.... Cerebral vascular accident ______ ., Diabetes __________ Other chronic. __ ._ Tuberculosis ___ . __ Veneral disease ____ Other communicnble_____. _ .. __ Injuries ______. __ ._ Mental illness ..... Mental reto.rdatiorL .. - .. - .. - .. N onoommunicable. Total, nil programs __ . Not home, not found______ Grnnd totaL..

ca,u

ndmlUid

I, 029 762 3,695

1,655 1,290 8,724

27 10

272 79

134

880

38 108 785 I, 535 62

294 378 3,280 5,416 47

2,092 382 3

3,646 451 96

28 347

110

NA Not available.

657

---

11, 037

27,275

NA

2,648

11,037

29,.823

Total patients seen during scheduled office hours_ ... --

144

vi.u,

6,036

cident population bas been screened. In spite of this, the number of new active cases located 1U1dllrought under treatmeut clurlug the year indicates that the lucldence of tuberculosis on Guam is a11111·oxiwutel.,·10 lo 50 times the stateside rutes; the bighest rntes being In the older age group. A. special grant 1·1!questhas been prepared und submitted to the U.S. Public Healtl1 SerYice for assistance In extendiug 11udimproving our tuberculosis control program. The most important factor In the grant request Is the request for assignment of II physician to de,·ote full tll.lle to tube1·culosis control. 'f.he trn ,·elers immunization clinic was discontinued this fiscal )'ear since this has provided u speciallze<l ser,·ice to individuals not ln flunnciul need. Efl:orts previously exerted on the travelers imm\lllhmtlon clinic were diverted to more essential activities in ronnection wltl1 comrnunlcnllle disease control, primarily tuberculosis.

Sanitation Seel-ion Tbe sanitation section provided coni:;ullntive, l11s1>eetlon,bealth education, ancl law enforcement services ln all areus of environmental hen Ith clurlug flscnl ye1u· 1066.

'l'he section stntr Included a sanitary engineer, chief i<anltarian, six sanlt11riru1s. nn insect nncl rodent control crew foreman. five insect and rodent control l·rew lnborers. ancl a clerk-typist. The lillnltary engineer position was est11hlisher1 In ~o,·ember 1005. by the assignment of a U.S. Public Health Se1·,·ictofficer to the department. The engineering po!:iltlon permitted increased section nctlvitles in the fields of water suppl, uud sewage disposul us well os genernl sanitation. The constn1ctio11 ncUvities and economic de,·elopment now occurring on Guam dictates o neecl for incrensecl em11hnsll"on Public benlth 11mlgenernl snnitation. Sucb development necessitnte:u11grnding of the stntr competence b;v a program of i111:1ervice training for existing stnfl: tLml by filling future ,·nconciei< witb college trnlned snnitnri1111s. 1. Wa,tcr Suppty.-Prnctlcally C\'ery home 011 Guam has nn onJlremise water


supply. ~lost of the homes as well as business estal>lishments ore supplied by water dlstrlbutlon system operated by the go\'ernruent of Guam (PU.A.G). Water samples were collected by the section stafl: monthly to assure that tbe various supplies remained safe for drinking purposes. Although ~bis sampling program was limited by the lack of laboratorr facilities, lmpro\•ements can be expected us soon as the presently planned enlurgement of the public health laborarory Is completed. Ohtorine residuals were also checked 1>eriodk-ally to assure maintenance of adequaite chlorine residuals in the systems which required treatment. None of the government of Guam water supplies were being fluoridated. 2. Sew(/uc Disposal.-Only portions of the ch•illan communities of Aganu, Agat. nnd Dedeclo were served by sewer systems. Sewage from the Dededo area was treated ht a package-type trerutment 1,lant. Sewuge from Agann and Agat dischnrged to outfitlls which terminated ne11r the edge of the reef. Such dis<:harges <:outrllmted to pollution of the ueache:; to the Wgbly 1>0pulnted area:< nlong the weste1·u shore of the island. Elsewhere. sewage disposal was prodded by 11rivies, cesspool,., nnd septic tunk sy:;teun;. :\Inuy of tl1eso !ndiv-id11111 fncllitles• fulled to pro,·lde for sanitary llisposal of excrement nnd liquid "'aste ancl rre-.1tt!d sever!' local health prolllem;.-some also contrtbutecl to pollution of ))each nreas. During the year. the s1wltn.tlon section lntenslfted efforts to pro,·icle for nclet1nato design nucl coni.tructlou of these indh·ldual \\'IISte clis110St1lfaclllt.!es. Slnce the existing code provided limited <:ontrol over the lnstnllation of sucl1 fa<:illties. the department hn.s requested cllunges in the existing laws. The ,·arlom; mll!tary Installations ali.-o tli-"Charged 1111treute<I sewage to Guam's ·hor11 ,,·,1.ter~. Complete 11ssessme11tof milltury sewnge treatme11t needs will have to await completion of additional >'tnd!es 1U1(1 the esfollllshmeut of wnter <1unllty c1·!Lerlu u~•the go,·ermuent of Unum. A. prelilllluury engineering report pre-

pured l)y Metcalf & Eddy, consulting englneers. was comr>leted in February

1965. This report proposed sewerage faclllties for most of the island's civilian commnnltles. A. major project for n sewerage system (stage I) nnd ocean outfall to serve Agana iuul other communities in the central district was under construction and scheduled for completion hi June 1007. The department plans to implen1ent n snm1>ling program and wate.r qunUty studies in the vicinity of the new Agana. outfall. Suc.h studies wlll be needed to determine whether additional treatment will be required to prevent contamination of shore waters, particularly beach areas. 3. Water Poll1ttio1~ Oonh·ol.--Guam has no water pollution control laws e.xcept for some general provisions In the Healtlt ancl Sanitation Code. Legislation is needed to provide for comprehensive plam1iug, development, and utlllzatlon of the Island's ground and surface wate.r resources as well n's for enforcement of adequn te .water pollution control measures. The Fed~ral Water Quality A.ct of 1965 requires each State and territory to establish water quality criteria. The estab• llshment of such criteria w,IU require the adoption of appr~prlate legislation to authorize the estabUshment of such criteria. Deadlines of October 2, 1006, and June 30, 1007, are involved with the Federal leglslatlou. 4. Jr'ooa.Dafry anct BottUnu Pla11ta.-A majority of Ute island's food supply was ilnported from the mainland or A.ustrnlln with slgnlftcant amounts from the Orient. Since no agency has specific resp·onslbWty for the quality of food products shipped to Guam, some shipments have been found to be ,substandard in quality. Although Public Law 7-116 prohibits importation and sale of ·rice that is not vitamin enriched. whole, parboiled, or fortlfted shl-pments of unfortified polished rice continued to be selzerl. There were 115 restaurants and snackbars, 201 retail grocery stores, 17 meat markets, and 5 bakeries. Most of these establishments have been newly constructed or extensively remodeled during the past few years. There were 38 new business estt1bl!shme11ts opened clurlng the past year. All of these establlsh-

145


ment.s were inspected approximately monthly to assure compllance with health department requirements. The sanitation section continued to upgrade food sanitation practices by the promotion of improved fac!Utles nnd operations. A series of training course-s Is planned far food service •personnel during the next yenr. Products from the single commercial dairy, five frozen dessert plants, and two bottling plants were sampled twice monthly tor laboratory examination. 5. Oommerc/,al Service a-nd Recrea.ti<m Establislmumts.-These establishments included 68 barber nnd benuty shops, 3 nursery and day-care centers, 2 thenters, 2 laundry and dry cleaners. 12 poolrooms. 0 cockpits, and 1 lee plant. All recei ved frequent inspections and technical consultation as needed. Tempornry cnrulvals. festivals, sporting events, and othel" community gatherin1,rs were inllpected ancl supervised, :,mecial attention being given to site conditions, food sanitation. toilet nncl lnvatory fnclUtles. and premise sanitation. School S<mftation.-All l)Ubllc, 1,rivate. nnd parochial schools were inspected approximately tour times dl!l'lng the school rear to determine the adequacy of sanltn.ry conditions. Cafeteria and kitchen facilities l"eceh'ed particular attention. Comprehensive environmental health sur,·ey reports were prepared for seven !i!chools. Then• was a need for Improved housekeeping and food 1c1nnitatlom;practices ut most of the scl1ools. Transportation of food to schools without kitchen facilities represented a mnjor health 1,roblem. It has been recommended •l:hllt the hot lunch I)rogram should 'be cllscontluued at the schools without kltche.ns nntU corrective measures can be implemented. 7. Home and Premises Sa,iitatio11.Durlng the past year, the section contributed to tbe improvement of overall heillth conditions on the island by partlcl1mtlng, as:,ilsting and, where ueces,mrr. enforcing 11remlses cleanup. Com11letesolution to premises sanitation will not, however. be renllzecl until an ndec111ate1,'llrbnge nucl refuse disposal 1>rogram ls Implemented on the Island. Specinl nsslstnnce was given to the com-

146

missioners from the five soul:hern communltles-Umatac, Merlzo, Inarajan, Talofofo, and Yonn-for general community cleanup which included removal of car bocUes. debris, trash, and unwanted dogs. ilS well 11s insect and rodent control. 8. Garba.ge a11dRef11BeDisposal.-Ga,rbage and refuse disposal were in need of Improvement throughout the island. While-011vUlages received <.-ollectlonservice l>ythe goYernment of Guam, the sel"l'lce was Inadequate. Uncovered storage containers, infrequent collection, open collection vehicles and open burning <lumps c:reated severe health haznrds locally as well as islandwide. The entire oper-ations encourage extensive fly, mosquito. and rodent populations-all ::ienre as important vectors of disease. The dep!l'rtment obtained the services of a U.S. Public Health specialist in January 1966, to study the island's garbage and refuse dJsposal problem with pa.rtlcular refere11ce to fly, mosquito, and rodent control. His report recommended o })rogrnm thn,t would provide for adequate onpremlses storage, frequent collection, and final dl~sal In a well-maintalned sanitary landfill. 0. Insect ana Rod.ent Oontrols.-The Island has a large rodent population ln· eluding m.ice, the roof rat, the polynesian rat, the asiatlc shrew, and the Norway rat. The se<:tlon's rodent control crew conducted poisoning and trapping programs at vnrlous locaUons. A total of 2,924 rodents were destroyed by trapping nnd 1.180 pounds of W11:.rf-11.rln l>ait was used for poisoning. This program pro,·ldecl temporary relief In local areas, but shoul/1 be accompanied by a program to eliminate rodent food sources and harhor11ge. Implementation of an adequate garbage ancl refuse cllsposnl program rep• resents an Important 1mrt of a rodent control program. Spraying tor fly, mOS(luito, ancl Otht'I' Insect control was conducted at government buildings and other locations. Approximately 1,500 gallons of liquid Insecticides and 340 pound~ ot powder were used for this purpose during the year. 10. S1oimmlno Pool mul Bathin{J Bcaclt

.Sanitat/011.-Approximntely 140 water snmples were collected to determine the


adequacy of various beach areas for bathing purposes. The sanitary engineer reviewed plans for construction of one new S\vlmmlng pool (motel) and eucouragecl improved operation at two other public (motel nnd couut07 clubs) pools. Since the Oode of Guam contained no provisions pertaining to sw-Immlug 1>001and bnth1.ng beach , sanitation, proposed legf.slntion was submitted to the attorney general's ofl:ke to correct this deficiency. 11. illlscella11co11s.-Regulatlons were prepared for operation of the newly established public cemetery near Pitl. Two laborers from the sanitation sec• tion were assigned to assist the Depart• ment of Public Safety with dog control for several months during the last two quarters. The section staff also partici• pated in discussions for planning n per· ruanent dog control program. Sanitation

statfaticaZ ,·eport fot· 1965-66

Pay ranges for dentists were adjusted upward during the year. This should facilitate recruitment nnd retention of dentists at least to some extent. In spite of the luck of an adequate uumber of dentists, there was u slgnifi• cuut lncreuse in the number of po.tlents served. The total number of patients treated during the yeo.r was 14,689. This com1,ures with 10,641 treutecl durlng lls• cal year 1965. Emphasis was ))lacecl during the yeur on prophylactlve therapy and education for schoolchildren and intensified care for vroblem children (Crippled Chllclren's Services).

Public Health l,.,aborator,, Section The Public Health Laboratory is responsit,le for providing lalJoratory i;ervices for the ,•arlous program units of PulJUc Health and Welfare. This section usslsts In the diagnosis, and prevention of colllmlllllcable diseases and other lllues,;es of Publlc Health concern. This ftscal year, laboratory servlcei: were performed by II medical Jabora.tory supervisor, medical technologist II, medlcn1 technologist I, medical technologist (cancer), medical laboratory technlclnn I, and three student trainees under the cureer orlentntlon program. A chemist was employed nnd programs for foocl, water, and drug analysis nre being set UJl to meet our legal obligations.

Eating and drinking establishment inspections ------------------1, 185 RetnU food store il1spectlons_____ 1,106 Meat market inspections_________ 74 Bakery Inspections ______________ 21 Barber and beauty shop inspections ------------------------218 Bottling plant lnspectlom;_______ 17 Iceplant Inspections _____________ 8 Private llome ))remlse Inspections_ 1,778 ~ew establl:<luuents Inspected nnd opened---------------------38 Health permits Issued----------~ Health cleurunce Issued__________ 374 Examinations performed : Allen contract employees' housing Hematology --------------12, o,:; luspections ___________________ 4-l Parasitology ______________ 0, 660 :\!Uk 1u1d dairy products lnspec• Chemistry --------------a20 tlons -----------------------GS Serology ____ ___ 1. 781 Subsurface sewage clh;posal InspecUrology-------------------11,000 tions ----------------------189 Snnltntlon bacteriology: Chlorine residual determlnntlons Beach water _______________ 18V (public water supply)_______ 866 Potable water ___________ 131 Rat, mosquito, fly, flea, roach, dead llii Beverages -----------------nnlmnl, gUl'bnge, and other comDairy product _____________ 87 00 1ilulnts ---------------------General bacteriology: Totul lu,.anltnry conditions abated 2, SOS Cultures _________________ 1.24 SensltMties ____________ 7S De,ital Section Colony counts ____________ Ou The llentul 1>rog1·nmcontluued to be Smenrs --------------30 humperecl hy Inability to recruit dentists.

147


T.B. laboratory : Totul specimens ________

2,265

1,222 1. Sputum!:i ----------------2. Gastric washlugs __________ 700 253 a. Urines ----------------4. Ttacl1ea1 washings ________ 2i i'i. Spinal fluids _____________ 7 6. Others __________________ 4i

Total cultures --------------2. 266 I. Contnminnterl cul,tures ______ 440 2. Sensitivities______________ 18 Total smears ____________ 5,074 1. Direct ___________________ 2. Concentrated -------------:t .J!'rom positive and contamlnuted cultures ----------4. Hansen's disease ------------

1,867 2,255

l'oslth·e tests for AFB (ucicl fast cllli) : J. Surnars -------------------· 2. Cultures -----------------a. Patients ----------------4. Protmblc typical ___________ r,_ Protmble atypical _________

051 2 bn1.83

305 12-i

53 190

A serious attempt was mtHle during tl1la year to improve the services for dlnguosls and treabnent control of tuberculosis. Preliminary trial with special 7Hl0 med1a were conducte<l In an attempt to provltle fnster results nn<l to expedite direct sensitivity testing. Differentiation of typlcnl nml ntypicnl acid fast organisms was initinted whlch revenlecl n surl)rlsing !lituntlon. Approximately four times ns runny atypical organisms were isolated ns typical organisms. Further i,1tudies nnd experience will be 1~ c1ulred to Indicate the true significance of these fincling:<. Cancer program: Totru number of Pap smenri; __ 1, 020

Upper Respiratory (sputum and gastric) __________

30

Class !________________ 27 Olnss JL_______________ 2 Olass III_____________ 1 Urine _________________

7

Class L _____________ _ Class IL ____________ _

5 1 1

Class IIL-------------:\Il"ce\11u1eous: Buccal muenrs, hormone pattern--------

6

A grand total of 37,488 examinations were performecl by the Public HealtJ1 Laboratory during the yenr. The Public Health Laboratory personnel gave bealth lectures on worm infestlltlon to 17 public elementary schools. A total of 87fl ·!xth grnderis submitted ::itool specimens for ovu and parasite examinations, nud 148 or 16.7 percent were found to be positive. This incllcntes n ::iubstnntinl reduction in worm Infestations nmong schoolchlldrrn over the Inst scwcrnl years.

VITAL STATISTICS SECTION Comparative Summary of Statistical Events-1963, 1964 and 1965Guam Yonrs amd number

Evont..~

LlveblrU1 ..... l>onth .. _____ ...........

.

lnlnnl death ... __ ....... . Mru-r!nga___ ••• ····---Olvorco .... ______........ .

1003

1064

2,500 :W3 7ll

2,525

2,573

363

336 82

382 43

390 02

65

{71

00

Femrue b'llllital organ_ ____ 1, 483 Oluss

L----------------

1,444

31 Olasi; 11_______________ 6 Class 111_____________ rv______________1 Class Olass "-------------1 ---

148

Table I. Death-Guam, 1965 Tot41Jden.th recorded ______________ :336 Death locally____________________ 334 Death elsewhere rmd recorder! here__ 2


Table II. Total Death by Sex and Percent-Guam, 1965

Table W. Infant Deaths by Age and Place of Death-Guam, 1965 Pineo or donth

Male ..... _____...... ___. Female ... ___._ .. _. __.... Total.

_______

203 60.4 133 39.6

Age (months)

Total

Hos• pita)

336 _____ _

. ___ .

-------1---

Table III. Total Death by Sex, Place of Death, and Agency ReportingGuam, 1965

---

1st week........... 2d wock••• ·-······ 3d wock_·-······· 4th weck•• ·-······ 9 •.•....

-..

Guam Memorlol Uospltal. ................ U.S. N ovol Bospltol... Other .................. 'l'otnl. ...........

--

87

ill

33

26

160 69

3◄

117

83

203

--

-133 336

47. 62 17.60 34. 82

.......

,.................. . .

2d ........

ad ........

4th ....... 6th ....... 6th .......

ith .......

11th........ I0~h. ___

---

2

4

'.! 2 --······ ........ 2 ...............

3

0••••••••

2

?

-··-··

2

I

1 •••••••

_

··-··

10.--·•····-······ I .•.•.•.. -······ 11.... ............. I I ...... 12._ .......•.................................•..... Unknown ••••• - .••••••••• ······••.•.•.. -··-·· 82

Cow;o

Dl.!scasC!s or tho heart and blood vcs.,ets (42CH56). Motor vel1lcloand 1111 other ncoldcntal cuuses (E800-E062). lll-doflnud dlsoosos pocu• liar to cnrly lnfoncy !llld Immaturity unqualified (773-770). MoUgnont neoplasm, all Sites (H0-20.5). lnJlucnm ond pncu• monlno (480-493). Othor dtsoascs or ccntml nervous system, I.e., ALS !llld l'nrklnsonlsm (360-356), VBSculorl09lons olTccUng central nervous syst.cm

Numbcr

Por• cont

--

01

18.2

36

10. i

33

0. 7

30

8.0

26

7. i

21

6.3

16

4.;

Cirrhosis or tho liver (681). Postnnllll IISJ)hy:rfaond uL~loctnslS(762). Dtnbctcs ruclUtus (200).... AIt other causes ...........

12 10

3.6 3. 3

0

82

2.6 :14.4

Total (nil couscs) ....

336

100,00

. .

··• ••••••••••••••.•

4

(33o-334).

8th .......

--

$......... ...... ... .

Table V. The 10 Leading Causes of Death-Guam, 1965

1st_ ____

Aomu

6 2 2 2

5 •• -- ······-······

100.00

Ordnr

Hos•

pltol

38 IG ••••••••.••••••• •-····· •••••••• ··-···-· -· .••••••• 4 2 I I

7 ••...• ••••• ••••• ••••••••.•••••••

--

---

U.S. Naval

54

3••••••••• ·-··-·· 6..................

.Molo .Fomalo Toto! Porcen

Ouam Mc• morhll

66

21

.

6


Livebirth by Place of Birth, Mother's Birthplace, Illegitimacy, and Ratio to Total Births (For tho period or 190.S)

Mother's birthplace

Total.. - •• ·----- - --- •

Totnl, nll placos

Placo or birth

Ounm

Memorial Hospital

2,623

Lcg!Umncy

U.S. Nova! Home and Jlospltnl other Legitimate

1,809

681

33

2,296

JUegltl-

mate

Ratio to totol birth

227

I :11.1

I: 8.3 1,692 1,424 138 30 1,400 192 443 497 7 1:72. 0 60f 61 Contlnentnl UnIWd S1.otas_ ·····---·· 211 1:43.2 219 163 SI 2 6 PhlUpplncs. - - • - -•• -- --·· •• Trust territory _____________ IM 6 1 132 23 I: 6. 7 148 43 ······--·--· 56 13 66 ----······-· .. ..... , Other&----------·······--· Unknown._ .......... -- . -- - ......... -....... ............. ................. ·--·----·-- ··-··----·- --·----··-- --···-·-····

Ouam.-·-·------··--·----·-

-

Percent by plaC<Iof birth._.

100

71.7

Division o.f Public Welfare Tbe Division of Public Welfare is responsible for developlng and implementIng a system of public social services to meet the needs of the territory. It provides economic benefits and social services Ln order that no Lndividual wlll be forced to live on less than an adequate level of subsistence. In compliance with this philosophy, tl1e needy aged, disabled, and others in financial needs are provided means to maintain themseh•e,: nt 11 level of health nnd decency. Through Its child welfare services program, casework services are provided when circumstances or personal problems impair the adults' ability to perform their role as parents or when the chUd bas need or problems with which no parent can be expected to cope. Througb its commuuit.y centers. it implements recreational prograrus and general tomu11111ityself improvement endeavors. Though this program was initially designed for the youth of the territory, participants hnve included adults and the ngecl. It operates a group home for <1epe11clf'11t nn,1 <lellnquent boys.

Famil11Seroices Section The family services section provldes preventive and rehabilitative services to strengthen family Ute and promote seltsnpport and selt-CJlre. Famlly services

150

20. 9

1.4

·-··-···-··- -·---·---- --··-----·-··

expanded a total sum of $801,870.00 for money payments and medical vendor payments alone, throughout the fiscal year. Such expenditure represents nn Increase of approximately $8,873.62 !rom the previous fiscal year. The monthly average for the different programs were: Old-age assistance (OAA), 180; aid to families with dependent children (AFDC), 100; aid to the _permn.nently and totally disabled (APTD), 46; aid to the btind (AB), 6 ; and general assistance (GA), 82 cases. Altogether the average total monthly caseload wns 4.-04 cases. There were 127 ne,Y cases approved during the fiscal year and 112 enses were terminated during the same The majority of cases apperiod. proved were the agecl ancl those families wliere the breadwinner wR:-: lncnpncltated. While the number of cases receiving assistance wns comparatively less than the last fiscal year, the referrals that reached this section from ditferent sources dncrease<l by 2(, percent ba\'lng jumped from lO;J.to 2.5areferruls. Like last year. the two mn1n sources wbicb submitted names for PoSslble assl.stnnce were the municipal commissioners and the prospective clients themselves. These two source~ accounted tor almost fiO percent of the total referrals received. Tbe remaining half came from public health


nurses, private individuals, social ser,•ice ( Gunm Memorial Hospital). etc. The two major reasons for closing cases during flscul ~•ear 1066 were death of the recipient and transfer of cases from one progrnru to another. The !utter action was mostly related to those under the general asslstnn<.-e program. WhHe the tal>les show the most terminations under the AFDC program, the predom1nant reason for closing those cases was that of Increased ·in<.'Omefrom employment of individual family members (8~ percent). Secondly, there were u number of cases where the fam1Iy rece1vec1contributions from relatives or other :wurces (22 percent). Terminations clue to death of the recipient was more Jlre,·nlent for the old-age assistance programs. lfor example, of the 29 cases closed for this reason, 16 cases wel'C under the OAA program; R tor APTD; 3 for OA ; ancl 2 tor AFDC. Personnel turnover continued to present a problem ln lmplemeutlng the categorlcnl programs during this fiscal year. During the year. four Individuals were recruited tor the !IOciaJ seni<'E' worker I positions, but only two are currently with the section. The continued Jack of sufficient qualified personnel has resulted in n hacklog of referrals ancl l11nclet1uate semJannual reviewfl. Continuous efforts were mucle clnring the year to improYe services. The most nch·antageous chllngc for the recipients was the Increase of' the monthly grants by 15 percent. This was the .·econcltime the grants hnvt>been lncrensecl i::lnce100!>. hnt the effect of these increaf:et bn,·e been h1rgely mltlgatecl by the cont11111ousincreases In cost of llYing. Other lmportnnt chnnges were Jlbernllzation of the nge requirement for AFDC chllclren and of i::umdnrcls for indlv'iclnnli::of family income. A..11otlwr,;ignlttcant new J)rovlslon l11 program operation wns in the nren of medical care for the agetl. A specln-1proj-

ect was performed by the famUy services section aimed at helping all the MAA aucl OAA recipients to s.lgn np for the Medicare program. Rccipientfs Oha1'Uctcri,Ytic8 for Adult Old-Age assistance. As OatcuorleB.-(a)

of June 80, 1966, the total number of aged reclpients was 179 lndivldunls out of which 112 (61 percent) are female and 67 male. From this number, 151 persons are clnsslfted as either married, widowed, di,,orced, or separated. Only 28 recipients claimed they were never married. Out of 170 recipients, approximately 41 percent live in their own home; 26 percent live with relatives or friends; and 0 percent are living in quarters m.aiJ1tnlned as their own home. The remaining 24 percent are under other living arrangements. (b) Aid to the perm1U1entlyand totally disabled. Throughout fiscal year 1966, an average of 46 ind.ivWuals were helped under tbJs program. By .June 30, 1966. there were 47 recipients. A total of 30 recipients were classified as having adjustment problems or mentally deficient while the remaJnlng 17 persons had some form oC physiological dlsabillty. Ninety-one percent of these clients were nmbulatory. (c) Aid to the t,Und. Family services section is 11rovicllngassistance to only six illillv!cluals under this program. Five of these six are males. Only two bave never been married, two are wiclowed ancl two nre still Jiving with t1lelr spouse. All of these clients llllve hacl, emplo~•ment experience-mostly with private firms. but none were actually en1ploye<lnt the time they were receiving assistnnce. Three of them, however, n.re undergoing training at the Division of Vocational Rehabllltntlon. 'l'he origin of blludness tor most of them wni:: through accident or the nftereffect of nn Illness they hod enrlier in their lives.

151


.... V1

N

Family Services Cases and Payments, by Month, Fiscal Year 1966 Old-ago osslstnncc

Coses

Monthly grouts

Aid t.o famlllcs witll <1epo11dent chUdrcn Coses

Monthly grants

/f/G5

July.

·---·--·- ... ·--··----· ·-•

August_ ............................

September •• ····-······-·-· ••• October ...................•.•• ····November •• ····-········--· ....... December. . . .....................

175 177 176 174 177 183

$6,130.01 G,aa!.01 6,304.10 6,661.73 287. 21 0,56'.?.46

180 186

O,M0.04 0,536.76 0, 547. 74 6,675.53 G,481.1)9 6,341.02

o.

Aid to pcrmoueutly ond totally disabled Cosos

134 $10,00!.96 11,478.r.2 127 11,181.2:, 128 11,3«.os 128 130 U,865. 13 1« 12.704.42

«

144 140 148 I~ ltl> 143

48

"4 ◄3

-t3 46 40

Monthly grants

SI, 434.(l; 1, 3()0.13 1,310.M I, 289. 74 1,367.U

1.377.85

Aid to the blind Monthly i:ronts

Coses

0

0 0

6 G 0

$182.98 179.05 179.65 179. 65 170.<>b 170.05

Tot.nl

0 cuerol osslstancc

Cases

31

32 33 36

34 37

Monthly grouts

$1,154.80 1,318.41 1,447.99 1,516.33 1,3&5.54 2, o.58.71

Cases

300

Monthly grouts

$10,610.83

386

20,653.82

386 :?86

20,423.63 20,801.53

uo

22,973.00

coo

21, ooc. 78

lf/G6

Jnnuar)•-·· ........................ Fcbnmry ........................... Mnrch.. . . .............•. ···-· •• April ...... o••········•••• ···-··· May •• ""·-····· .......... ·····-··· Ju110................................ Totnl ......................... Mo11ll1l>• avcmi;o...

······-

184 183 182 1711 2,162

····-

180

12,&1)0.22 12,fl2L38

12,098.15

49 47

13,131.48 12,174.09

49 48

12,0M.83

47

77,166.90

1,681

l«.842. 71

SSC

G,430.58

140

12, OiO.22

46

I, 633. 74 1,518.13 1,470.29 I, 600. 99 1,603.30 I, li3G.75 17,<Ul.~

, .• 60.00

G 0 0 6 6

G T.! 0

170.05 179. 05 179.65 170.0S 179.0S 170.0S 2,160.13 179.1)2

33

30 37 31

26

24

1,362.23 1,770.39 1,663.« 1,493.1>8 1,017.00 009.62

i.2, 407 300

22,490.48 22,032.31 22,659.87 22,981.63 21,460.51 21,021.37

41~ {23

422

389

17; 085.13

~. -t34

258,665.75

32

1,423.76

404

21, 65.S.47


Source of Referral, FiscaJ 1966

I August IScpl()mber I Octooor I No,,crnoor I Dcccmoor I Jnmmry I Fcbruury IMnroh I April I Mny I June I Totol

Jul)' .\!unlclpnl commiss1onrr:<

S

4

o

Sol!•rcfcrred ......... .....•......... 3 1 PrJ,•nto lndJvldunls ••••••••••• ··-······· l'nbUc hcnli-h nUise. ··-···-········ 1 Soclnl sen·ICl!-Ouam Mcmorlnl Ilospltnl. 2 l Child wclforcscn·l~'<!S.................... T.t'glslnturc ·•··••·-···-··-···-······· 3 •\fl~llnncous. ··········•-············· •••••• Vocuuonnl rchnbllltotlon ·-···-······· ••••••••

4

7 6

2 •••••••••••• I 7 •••••••••• ··-········ ·-··-··· ····-·I •••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••• 3 I 2 •••••••• -· I ·-···-····

rubllcso(cly ............ ................ l'robnllon ...............................

..•..••. -····-

-········

Attorncy gcncrnl ······-•···············

······-

••••••••••

Clergy .................................••

······-

-rowl.. ....

....

V.

l>J

••••••••••••

···•·I

·····-···

2 ••.•.••.•••• ··········-

12 O

2 I I

-········

-·········

4

5

6

6

13

5 3 7 I 3

5

5 4. i

4

7 2

0 3 2 3 2 S 3 4 1 I ·-······ •• 2 •••••••••••• I •••••••••••• •••••••••• •••••••••••• ··········t ••••••••••••

I ......•..... ··-··-····

1

·········-·

I ••••••••••••

I ······-····

--···•·•·

10

30

29

2S

2S

33

3

o

··-··........ •••••••• •••••••• -·····

········I 1 I 2 1

66

2

58

30 32 :ltl 13 7

····-·· J •••••••• I ....................... .

..............................

-

••••••••••••••••••••

····-··

··-····

·····-····

........

..

........ 19

3

2 2 3 2 J •••••••• ·-····· I ···-·· ··-····

4

I ............ I

1 ••..•.•.•••••.••.••••••.••..•.••••.....•••••.•......•...

10

1--1-t--l--

1----1

-----i---il----1-----1---1----11----t

27

20

2 2

.....••• ...•........ 7

6 6 6

I G

253


Cases Opened for Fiscal Year 1966 by Month and Program Aid to Aid to per. Clloillllles Old~ge mannnt\y Ald I.O with do• osslst.ancc and totally tho blind pcndont disabled chUdrnn

Medical

Gon~l asslst-

Tot.al

anco

O rand

asslstl\IICO

for the oged

total

/1165

July ..................

.

3

August ........ _ ..... September ............ October .............. November.- •• ·-····· December ............

. . .

I

• 2

.

6 1 ••••••••••••

u

3

12

9 ••••••••••••

9 IO

2

? ..........

•••••••••• 2 2 3 ••••••••••

5

2 6 6 19 ••••••• •••••

19

26 ••••••••••••

:!U

/966

Jnnunry···-··········

6

3 ··-·····

Fobruary.............. 5 ..•...•.•... Mnrch................. 5 ~ ·······-·· April.................. 7 6 Moy ............................................................... lune...................

I

1 ··-····· ··-·····

5 ?

4 ...................

.

.

I ............................... 13 .........

'T'olnL ••• ···-··

. .

14 7 11

5

••••••••••

·--······

13 4

24

13

a

10

11

1 13

12

0

22

16

16 •••••••••••• 2 ...........

.

127

32

130

Cases Closed for Fiscal Year 1966, by Month and Program Aid to famlllos with dependent ch!ldrc!I

Old-ago asslstnnco

Aid to permanonUy nnd tot.ally d!sablod

Aid to tho blind

Med!col

Oenorol

Total

nsslst,-

nnce

/9(/5

July. ..... ........ AUllUSl...... .....

. .. . ..

September ..... ····-· October.__ ·····-·· ···-······· November._...... ••• December... . .. ....

3

7 3 2

2 .................. ...................

. .

4 ...............................

.

••••.••••••• •••••••••••• •••••••••• 7 3 ··-········ ••• ••••• 5 I ... .... ...

3 2 5

llSSfstnnco Ornnd

to the aged

..

12 ... ..... 5 ................... 0

3

3 .................... 12 -·---·····12

1966

Jonuary. .... ......... 3 ................................. Februnry ..... ...... ... 3 3 2 March................. ... ... .... .. 7 2

.

April.................. May...................

10 3

. .

lune...................

2

Total_._

..... .

45

1 ......... 1 .........

2 .....................

29

Child Welfare Seroices Section The prlmarr 11.lmof this section i::; to 11r11"1ue casework services to chlldren who ,ire dependent. neglected. a-bused, pre1l!'ll11qum1t nr delinquent prone, ruid de• Uu(tttt>nt ~·uungsters.

154

10 ·····-··

2 I 0

0 2

. 28

total

5

9 15

18 10 5 IL2

..........

- .... 2 2 '.?

12 5 0

a 12

13

5 II 17

20 II

3

8

14

126

l<'oster care, one of the major J>rogmm.,, continuously since itl:i bus been 11,·1111111.>le lnC\!}ltl<m In 1061 to cllildren who nre iu ueed of :<n<:hsen·lc~. This Is Intended co ""i>Plr the needs of n <:hild on 11 tern1101:n ry bnsil; while more pennnnent nr•


Approved cases for fiscal 1966, by month and reason for action

I August ISeptember I Oclobcr I Novcm~r I Decembtr I Janunry I Fobrunry I J\:tarohI April I

July Needy old ogc...........•.......... -···· Brcndwlnnor Incapacitated .... - ... -.... Needy disabled_ ................................ Dread.winner desert«! •••••••••••• ··-··· Otbcr •• ---······························ 13rcadwlnncr deceased•• --- ••• ·····-··· Separation or divorced.- ...............•• Motherlllllllnrrll'd ...............................

2 1 . 1

6

2 3 3 ----1----------1

-·········I······-···•I······-··

4

J ·-·. ·····1············1··-·-···1 .••.•.•••••.••••••••.••••••••••••. -········ ·······-··· ...........

··-····

3

9 7

5 1..........

-1

ti 2

2

3

I

2 2

4 2 3 3

6 1••••

s

2

l···········•I

I Juno I Total

May

3'I

l

11 ...-.~1

20

I 4 1........

1........

1

2

1 3

-··•l••-······a·

2

1

·····-··

15

16

3

118

I l••····••I

12

l····-·+·······I

2 ~

. ----1---1---1---1---1-

II

Total_ •• ····-·-········-······••:

s

10

6

19

26

II

13

0

2

1e

IZI

• Flgurn Includes monthly gcnoml nsslstru1cocasos.

Closed cases for fiscal 1966, by month and reason for action

I

July

ocau,or recipient .......................

.

Tmnsrer to olher program ...............

.

Employment or Increased earnings ...... . Contribution rrom relatives or other

August

ISeptember

October

I

2

4

2 1..

-

V1 V1

I J

I

12

' l··········I

I

5

I

2

a

2

6 .

2 ,...........

···•··-·····

Othcr ••• ·-········-···················· ··-········-·· •••••••••••• ··-·-·· ········-· lncapacltaled parent returned to (!Ill• ployment- ••••••••••••• ··- •••• -· -·· ., •••• ··-1·· ___ ··1- ......... ·1···· ..... . Support !rom rcLUmcdparent............ a ............................... . Marriage or rcmorrlngc or mother......... ......•. l ........•... ···-·····1··· 'l'otal_. -· ··-· --· ...........•.••

I

November December Jnnuory

!1········3·

2 1

21··········1

sources•• ····-························j

I

I

Fcbruory

3

March

Apr~!

8 4

2

3

3

I 3

7 3

2

3 2 2 1...........

--1-------1

4

a 2

12

5

27 I

24

2

18 17 10

6

0

6 3

l-·• .. •·••l••••··••l•-•··-1••••··••,

I 12

Mn>~! Juno ! Total

3 l-•···•-I••··-··

2 l••-····••l••·-···•-•l••····••I

I

6

I I

I 15

l--1--1--

18

10

5

ll2


nI11geme11tsare IJelng mude. The p\ocetuent mmully lasts anywhere between o few weeks to tl few ~,enrs. depending on the situation of the <'hild one\ the nntnral home. nnring the fiscal year 1966 the umonnt of $60.971 was hndgeted to fln1tnce the 01->erotlon of the chii<l welfare services program. The i;upervfsor completed his grndunte training Rnd returned to the lslnn•~ In .June 1966. FouT of the soclnl ve comI>letecl their bachelor's "·or·Kers 1111 degree and one is worklng toward that goal. The Gnnm Foster Home Parents Assodntion rendPre<I much needed sUJ>port to the foster care progratu. The foster home program has also shown pro{!ress this year as inclicated tu tht• nrmro,·ecl homes and J>lncemen-ts. 'l'hls WllS nccom1>lished throni;h the nssigntuent of u worker us a foster home llncler 011 a llulf-thne IJnsls. 1'hls year. the section rt'Celved n slzn·ble 11111111,er or referrals 011 situations ema11nti11~from r-nsesof neglect.

Number of Children in Foster and Boarding Care by the Month According to Sex Month

Malt

Female

'l'olal

Community Servfres Section

1986

July ________ - - - - August ___________ Septcmbor _____ . __ October __________ Novomber ________ December ________

essed. Since the deportment is not nctunlly nn nclopUng agency, these npplicents were prot-es.·ed ns n service for other ngencles or for future references. The new Group Home for Boys wni: completed during the year and occupied the latter pnrt of September 106i>,providing for the first time ndeqnnte quarters. '!"he howe was staffed IJy eight people pins a cook aud two student trainees. In spite of inndequnte stuff, considerable progress was mnde during the yenr reaching the objectlYes of the home. Two nights a week, 1 hour was devoted for large and small group discussions. A. gron11 therapy session wns ulso conducted once n week. This was the most beneflclnt of all programs from the standpoint of mntual help that the detnl.nees obtained from e.'lch other. The change of behavior following such sessions wns evident. A merit system wns initiated. ThiR proved to he nn Important approach ln terms of mnintninlng discipline. The detainees were given merits or demerit!-! for the previous week'!-! behavior. ThosE' who earned a certain number of merits were given )lrlvlleges.

12 15 18 18

27 23 23 25 24 26

30 38

A mnjor goal of the Community Ser,·lces progrnm Ir; to reduce jnvenile de• 41 llnquency by providing activities noel 43 14 38 programs to productively OCCUI>Y the chUclren n11tl ~•outh. Through the use 15 41 of n wicle variety of grunes nn<l n well1966 January __________ 44 rountle<l program of 11ctlYltles. much can 14 30 Fobrunry _________ 31 44 be 11ccompllsl1eclfor n group or commu13 March ___________ nity. 'l'he section offe1·ed services ut 42 29 13 April _____________ t>lght centers during the ,\'ettr. '.:\umerons 41 13 28 May _____________ 12 27 39 types of nctlvltle,; were nvnllable; I.e.. June _____________ 8 21 29 plng-)long. fotberbn 11,bni::kc>thaII. ·bnsebnll, ,·otlf'ybnll. foothnll. bn,lmlnton, nnd quiet The Deportment of Public Henlth nnrl game1-. WE"ekenclclnncei:. movies. hiking. Welfare pnrtlciJ)nted In the Project swlmmln,ir. nncl youth clnb n.ctivities were Hendstart. program of the Department of included In the ('omnn111lty Sen·lces proF.ducntion. The child welfare staff fol.irrnmR. .\11 agreement, between tl1e DelowPcl 10 percent of the total cases p1·oc- pnrtmrnt of Erlue11.tion nnd the Dh•lsion essed by the Hendstnrt social workers. of Pnbllc Welfnrn provided for the use of During the year. the section received school fncilil'ies for .\'Ottth clu!J dunces numerous inquiries regarding adoption. nncl meetings. A Commnnlty Servl<:es From these Inquiries, n conslclernble m111I- worker w11,; nsslgnell to net n.· nn official bPr of llllllLicants were received and procrepresentntil'c> from the Division of Puh-

156


Table I Nwnl>cr of ohU• dren received

llonth

Avorogo Number Toto! Total dolly numbe.r of chU• number, child· O{>U· of chUdnm C otlon dron released carodoys

Maxi• mum opu-

C otlon

Mini• mum or,u• at on

C

AVCl't\88 lonrh of chU -caro deys ol children released

/9(;6

July ..................... August .... -. ............ Soptombor. ____________ October ... --: .......... November .. _ ...........

December..........

--.

22 16

27 17

11 10

47S

16

338

8 6 11 0

,16 17 24

3 4

30

0

282 341 502 707

10 9

18

10

36

U.6

28

34

7 6

773

10

806

28.8

2

30

14

067

3

2l ~6 30

3 5 6

624

23.54 17.4

622

20.2

623

20.8

3:.! 33 18 22 20

14

I

3

II 16

12 13 21

25

7 7 JO 12 21

13 13 20 0 10 17.13

23 'Z1

IOI

18 17 18 19

Ml.I 98.3 108.3 131.<1

11

/9/J(J

JonuaTY----·-······ • Februnry _________ ......

Mnrch.---·-··-···-···April. .. -·- ...... Mny .................... Juno•.•••• ----··-··· •••

5 0

lie Welfare to see thnL the dances were conducted properly. The formation of youtlt clubs hns become a vital part of Comunmlty Services. Each Oommnnlty Services worke1: nttemptecl to create u youth clttb in his as• signed comnnmlty Lf none were In exist• ence. He also ncted as the adviser to youth clubs and atteucled most of the meetings. There were se,·eu youth clubs assisted by community services during the year. Community , ervlces were di• rt!Cted primarily toward chlldren and youth. ages 7 to 21. This represents 4ij pel'ceut of lhe totnl islund population. The 11umbc1·of visits to ench community center were ns follows: Agnua Heights--------------3,642 Dedeclo ------------------23, 424 Yona ___________________ 20,244 lnarnjan

-------------------

30. 887

14.84

Siuajaua -----------------28,014 ~11ugl1110----------------30,336 Tnnrnuing _________________ 10, 721 Agrtt

------------------

11, o78

'l'he flgurel'l l'ep.oosencone child's nse of the fu·clllty llel' duy. They clo not inelncle repeatecl visits the snme dny.

Summer Camp For the second com;t!Cutive year. the agency conclnctecl two 2-week summe1· cum11sessions. One session wns fol' boys nncl the other for girls. The objective of tbc resident cnmp program is to enrich the matnrntiounl process of youths th1·ougb n weU-plnnnecl nrrny of nctivl• Hei,. J!'or the first time, a siznble munber of nnclerprlvileged cl11Jdren such as public assistance recipients partlcipntecl in this program.

157


Depanment of Public Safety (PERSONNEL:

22G)-(APPROPRIATION:

$1,156,548)

The Department of Public Safety is responsible for the protection of life and property: the mni.nteunnce and enforcement of law and order; the preservation of public pea<.-e;the operation of a penal 1>rogrnminvolving care, custody, and control of both Territorial and Federal pris011ers; the safeg11arding of Immigration lletninees; the prosecution of fire prevention and suPinesslon program; and such other activities as the Governor or the legislature may assign from time to time. During this reported pel'l<><l,the department was coniposed of the General Ad· mlnlst:ra tlon Division, Police Dlvlslou, Security Division. Penal DMslon, Fire Division, and the Guam Bo~1ng Commission.

control center at Tamuniog Central ~'ire Station can now communicate with anr Guam police, fire, ambulance. or civil defense ns well as Armecl Forces police patrol radio units on any part of the island, n tremenclous improvement in mdio coverage. About 30 members of the department participRted In a 2-week course in the nrt of Alkido, especinll~• 11daptecl for police officers hy n Japanese lending IJ1structor of the nrt. An Intensive lnservicc training }lrogrnm continued throughout the year for new officers. Instructors were officers of the department assisted by representntives from the government of Guam amt Federal agencles.

General Administration

Records and. Identification

The construction of the first increment of the new 1>enltenttary, including a bulldlng for workshops, was <.'<>mpleted and In operation during the first part of the fiscal year. The commander of the Penal Division returned from the malnlancl after completing a 6-month training course In prison administration at the Federal Correctional Institution In OaUfornia ancl Texas, plaUJJed and sponsored by the Federal Buret1u of Prisons for the prospectl,·e warden of the new penitentiRry. To insure u sound correctional 11rogram at the 1,enitentl.ary, n retlxecl employee of the Federal Bureau of Prisons was hired for l year to assist in training per.sounel, setting u1> the new 11enal operations. and developing n rehabilitation program. The department's two-way radio i;tation was relO<'ated to the top of T.ebugon Hill. near Mt. Alutom. On this new i-:itc, the muil1 control center at Agana Police Heatlquurters and tbP se<>oncln"r)·

The records and ldentlflcRtlon section received noel recorded 0,2u2 cases which were reported to and handled hy the department; l'.i.147 required s1leclftc Investigative action. Of the total. 3.4u3 cases were processed nnd trnusmlttecl to 11roper authorities !or nction or Information, Including 2,941 to the attorney genern,l's office, 344 to juvenile court, 106 to military nuthorities, and 2 to the U.S. ottorney's office. A totul of 2.805 person:; were fingerprinted In connection with criminal offense;;, loyalty tlrogram, issnnnce of ID carcls. Issuance of taxicab clri\'er's licenses ancl Issuance of ftrearm reglstrntlons. During the year. u71 nre11rmswere registered, making u total of a,a52 flreRrm;; permnnenbly registered with the department, Including 567 pistols, 490 re\'OlYers. 94J) shotguns. 1.2W rlfleN,and 1:17 carbine;:;. "rbe )lhotographlc laboratory deYeloped 6.778 exposures anl! Jlrlnted 8,019 photogrnphs of which 2.0~i were cleveloped and a,66!) were prlntecl

158


Guam Penitentiary, the island's first adequate pxison, made possible by Federal funds under an act of Congress designed to restore and add to the island's public facilities fo helping the territory recover from the destruction of Typhoon Kuen. for other departments ot the government ot Gunm. A total ot o,941 police clearances were processed for other agencies of the temtorinl and Federnl Governments.

Police and Security Dwisi01u In trn.llic low enforcement. 5,402 citations for moving violations, 1,941 tor nonhazardous violations, and Ci80 "·nrnlng clbntious were issued. Patrol officers rendered 2.526 miscellaneous services to the public. Criminal offenses increased 15.8 i,ert·<mtover the J>revlonsfiscal year. Actual crimes reported to the police In t\scu.Jyea_r 1900 totaled 2.992. nn increase of 400 offenses o,·er last year. Thero were 1,049 rriminnl offense;, cleared In 1006, or 3o J)ercent of U1e total cnses actually known. Of this total, jm·eniles were res1xm~lble for 34;; <:uses or 32 percent, nclnlts for :,38 or 53 percent. and military persounel for 160 or 15 percent. C'ompnrnble figures for the Hscnl year mo:;wore: juvenllf'S 289 or 26.3 percent. adults 682 or 61.0 percent. and military personnel 180 or ll.8 percent. There were 1,0:>-J1>er.sonsarrested, including :{23j1t\'eniles nnd 75 females, and. in adclltlon. ·400 r,erso11s, Involved In crlmlnn.l otreni<es hut not urre!lted, were referred

to tlJe attorney ,renerlll's office for I)rose<:utlou. Truffle officers Investigated 1,431 traffic acciclents. au iucreuse of 240 accidents over tiscnl year 1965. The number of persons injured as a result of such accidents increased from o67 in 1965 to 014 In 1000. There were 21 fatalities as c:ompnre<l to IO Lu the 1,revlous year. 'l'rnfflc statistics ,,;how -that the main causes of the ac.'Cldents were speeding. following too closely, aull failing to yle1cl the rlgbt of way. Some 250 nddltion11l ,·eblculur accidents oc.-currlng on private 11roperty and classified as nontrafllc were also 1.nvestignted by traffic officers. The tr11fflcsection processed 11,052 a1>i,llcn t1011s tor driver's licenses, handled 138 cltl:&ens•c-omplaints of traffic Yiolations. 1111din conjunction wltl1 the Department of Pnlllic Works, disposed of Hl vehicles which were left abandoned on public highways and other government-owned lands. Personnel nssigned to the ,·ehlcle safety Inspection station 11111de 23,$4-2safety inspections of motor Tehlcles involves 21,664 Yebicles, 970 of w'hlch were rejected for not meeting tbe re<tulrements of the vehicle code. The operation of the station dnrlng the yen1· produced revenue In the amount of $18.1G2.

159


Under the G~m Reha~ilitatio~ Act, one of the first facilities completed was this juvenile detent1on home 10 Mangdao. It includes office, dormitory, and shop areas.

Penal Division '.l'hc 1>riso11popuh1tlo11 \'Uried slightly rlwoughout the year: the mnximum was JO. the mi11iunm180. A. total of 521 1>ris1111ersiubnllil'ed the Gunm Peuitentlnry 1lurlng the llS<,1LIycur. Of the total nn1111111 popnhrUon. 18.4 perc-eut wPrc betel for l!'edernl ugen<:ies. Sentenct>s ranged frmn 2 duys to life. The )lrlson kltchN1 served 36,R1,2menls nt fin nveroge co>'t of ~0.-1.6tler meal. In No,•ember l~i, the llCMI <llvlslon mo,·e<l its operntlons from the congestccl facilities ot the Agnnn lockup at headquarter: to thP nen,Jy co1uplete<l Gnnm Penltentl11ry with the spnclous dormitory. classl'oom, kit<:llPU. i\Ucl 1110<1er11 workshop. The prl:<on fnrw wn" stnrted during the )·<•flr 1111<1 provlcle<l the tlrll$-Onkitchen Si,7 1mm11lsof ,·egt>tnblPS,\'llllled flt $15:'i.70. 1111<1 -IO0 r>011ndsof ))Ork. vnlnecl ut $220. The prison received reveuuei; In the amount of ~.748 for the conllnement amt <:nre of Feclernl prisoners nncl the snlc, rPdemptlon, :111<1<-nre of Impounded f<trn)• nnlmals. Under the prison rellnbllitnUon progl'llm, two inmates completed u 4-mouth l'Ottrsc in refrigerntion, one inmate <-Om• pleted 114-mouth course i.11car1,entry, and three lumnt<'s nre 1•11rrcntly t11kl11gnct1H1l job tr11i11in~111hog rnlslng. J>Otlltry r11lslng, 1111dtruck g11rdc11L111-r. 'l)W(I p1·is• ,,nors, with loni:- tcrmf', who nre eligible for 1111rolewere nllowecl to work nt the <:unm Recrcutio11 Commlsl'IOn 1111cler c-1,·mnn supervi;:ion.

160

The dog control section continued itf< strict enforcement of the Dog Control J,nw nnd, during the year, disposed of 2,40!) Rtrn~• or nnliceni;crl clog;;.

Fi1·e Division Fire personnel continued fllJllillarizntlon tours to the various communities nud conducted fire IJnipe<:tlons of residences, 1mblle buildings, und buslues~ estnbllsh· ments. AlS-O,brush and trnsh piles prcpnred for burning were Inspected nllll permits were Issued In cnses where lu· spectors con:!lderecl the site snfe to bnl'II. Fire hydrants nrul stundpipes in nil the <'ommtmitJes were ins11Cctedund serviced perlodlcnll:v. nncl ftrc e.,'t.ingulshers iu nll public lmlldlngs were rualntniued. Fire Prevt>ntlon \Veek ·was obserycd <luring the mouth of October. Fire prevention J)OStPri<were place(! on business cstnbllshmenti;:. i:ovcrnment bull(]ing;;. ancl in C011i<plc11011s locatlom; In the ,·illngcs thro11~ho11t the island. There wfls n slight increase Iu the num1.lcr of fires in fi;:cai year 1966 ns compored to 100(;. The total of 874 fires which occurred clnrin~ tlle yenr lnclude<l 62 how,c ftre>', !'i!)7 grn;;s nncl brui;h flre;;. 6fi nuto ftrc;:, nncl lii0 mi1'Cel11rneonsfire>'. !<'ire lo'>!Scsnmo1111tcclto *222,:iG0, nncl 11roperty suvcd wn1<vnlnecl nt ~712,00!i. 'l'lle three nmlmlnnce units re11clcr1!d 1,871 i1111lmlnnccservices to th<' pnhllc·. G11a111,

Boxi11,g Commission

'l'here were 110 nc:th·itie,,; d11ring this rl'1>0rti11gperiod.


Arrest Statistics, Fiscal Year 1966

~ 01111rgl ii;cnL

mn11£111uthtcr .... --

~ <>gllgcnLntnn~lnui:htcr

lt3fH.' .........

ISeptember I Octo~r I Novc111l)erI Occcmbcr I J:muury IFobru11ryl

AugusL

July

Offenses

•···••I•

······••I

I •April

Murch

Jwic

Moy

Total

2

···•

I

3 ,.

..

8

1•.

2 I ..

-.

Hobbcrr .. . ,\ggmvntrd llS!!llllll,S

2

0

··-·----- -

Burglury. f.<irccny: 011111dI heft..

···-1•··-

l'clL)' thcll

~,,II

• ·······-······

.\UlO lhCfl,. .................. Other 03SOU!ls.

•··I·•

I

1

Forgery 1111d c:ounLcrlclUng

8

:;

2

5

0

5 2 I

3 2

13 3

2 10 13

2 4

IS

s

10

11

--

··--

··l····

~~~':1-..··-· ••--·····-····--

?

2 2

2

'.!

••• ·······-

'.!. I

-.. ---.

9

l··········I··

13 0

I 9

7

68

17

107

s

2

31 112 :!

0

a

8

3 0 I

14

3

II 3

13

I!

II

5

8

15

a

2

2

a

!!

3

4_

12 2 '.! 27

4

3

~

3

2

3

3'!

2

.•.••. • ··1-- ·• ••••

I•••••••

••I

'.! 1---

Eml>OlZICmCnL ...

. . . ·I .....

Stolen property..... .. Wcnpo11s,cnrryinl!, etc ...........

.

f'rost.lwtlon nnd rommc1-cioliz~~-I

vice................

. 4

2

3

Stx offenses..-. OITcuscsversus fnmlly 011,1

,.......

cltlldrcn ..•. _.__ -·--······ .:-:_nrcollc (lrug lnws ............... T,1quor lnws...

....

Oru111<c11nl'SS. l.>isordorly ~OlldllCI \'ogronc)• ••••••••••• --······

Onmbliug. .. . Orl\'ing while illLOxiclltod ....

·····I --·•··

---1

\':mdnllsm ..

Curfew lnw....................

.... °'

'l'otnL. ..................

3 ...... Ill

a G 3

.

All oU,cr ofTcnsrs

.....

·I.....

·I

.

... ----.......

.. . . ..... -.... 1 .

.

jl jl

~

- ..--

~ ·- • 4

9

:i 14

1

I

..--.

..

II II

s

.-ol-I3

G

12

12

81

5-1

75

00

"

I

11 r,

4

-·-----13

s

5

Ii

i

s 15

5

11

'.! 17 13

3 I

2-'i

94

12'2

123

6

4

2 7

12 5 6

I

5 7

.......

--·-I 4 1

z .. -···-1···· ---- . .. -·-----·• I 3 z 2 10

10

-· ,. -- . ... . ·--....... --

···----· 6

7 ••••••

:i I 4

22

2G 34 146 8

35

--· ••

'I

s

5

5

0

8

0

14

10,I

0

I 0

1 ll

11

24

II

MG

78

Iii

04

113

---

103

60 H

1.05'1


..... ~

Crime Statistics-, Fiscal Year 1966 Offenses

July

August

-········1···

Nonncglb!cnt m1msloughtcr•••.••••••••••• Ncgllgcnl mnnslnughlcr. ·-······

.....

::rbery.·-···-··-············.

·-··

Aggmvatcd !IS'OUJt... . ...... ..... Burglary...... .•... ·-······· Lorccny: Grond ihelt •••• ······-······

I September I October _I November I Do«mbcr j 1anunry

... 2·

4 20

-········1-······ ... 2 ...........

.

16

17

I

3

I 23

1 2'.?

2 IS

23

23

7

19

53

24

12 49

27

as

10 44

I .. .........

Sex oltcnscs•••• ··············-·· l'rostituUon.nnd commcrclnllzcd vlco. ·····- •••••••••••• •··-· ••

I

3

◊~~:~~:~~~~~~~'.~.~~'.~ ................... ·•-··· Nnrcotlo drug laws......................... .......... ............ Oo.mblJng..................... ... l>r!vhig whllo1nloxlcntccl... . . ...

-······-

I

4

23

········2 ........••

'?

2

2

t

G

5

39 ····-··· ····-

6 ...•....•..•

2

3

II

38

31

.............

'

·-

1

4-1

i 49 G 30

:ioo I

™I

4

6

3

6

~

• ... ·-······ ..............

11 G

45

30

34

2

4

18

19

20

36

33 4 211

49

5

All 0lh1•ro1Tcnse.«_...............

2'.?1

209

196

207

1'01ot •• ···-·•····

••••••••.•

I

261

G - .. 18 2

2

0

Vnndnllsm... .• Curlrwlo11• .... _

I 31

9

2 27

4

u

lb

9

12

10

40 H 24

48

48 H

54

17 27

$2

1311 501 176 400

26

8 45

4 •••• •••••

·-·· ····--

G

11

u

3 ·----·---·---1

I I······ 3

1 3

3 13 I I

a

1

I

3

-l 2

20

20

5

l!

4

I .•.•.•.

·••I

2 I 27

2 33

30 33

3 I 21 30

326

4

40 4 34

6 42 J 37

2481

Zl2

_I_

····I··········

G

-···-·····1 • ......... , 11 · ·-····1···· ·-·I ............ I ................... . 1 2

J2

-····-···· .. ······-

8

8 5 8 24

2

3

I ····-···· . . .......

2 •.....••••

21 25

13

3

I

1

I

..

20

Total

a l··········l··········I

Woapcns, corryh1g, clc.. .......

······-··

June

2

l •••••••••• •••••••••••• • ••• •• •••••• ············l••········I __ ... ... ....... .... .......... ............ I

···-···-

May

l 1..........

Embculcme1Jt. ····-············ Stolen properly ............................

l,lquorlaws •• ··•···········-··

April

3

_....... .. . ...

nruJ1k:onncss ••• - •• ·-······-·· Disorderly conducL ..... -....... Vagrancy •••••••••• ··········-··

Fcbrunryl March

.. 1

I

10 10 5 9 16 29 33 33 49 38 10 9 !3 16 16 Other nssoults. ..... .... .... .. . . .. 37 28 30 42 34 f"orgcry nnd couutcrloltlng ••••••• ··-· .'.••• ········-··-······ ·····-··· •••••••••••• Arson ••••••• ·-·--·········· ·······-· ••••••••••••••••••••• ·····-·· •••••••.••••..••••.• 1''rnud.-···-····· ....•...•..... 3 1 ............ I 2

t•cuytholt. ......... Aulo thclL...... ..

I

2 G 32

8 31 0 49

2S2

Zi8

36

I

I

5 3l

7 r,o 461

i 33

63 378

274.

2,992


Public Utility Agency of Guan1 (PERSONNEL:

220)-(OPERA'l'ING

Waler Present requirement for domestic use of water 011 Gunm by the civilian community is approximately u.3 million gallons 1>erday. The rate of growth of demnml npperu-s to be 7o0,000 gallons per day each year. To lnstu:e sufficient water for this growth, a 10-year contract bus been slgne<.l wLth Layne International, Inc., to 1>roducewater from known well fields in the central Gunm area nnd to supply nnd maintain the equipment fo1·pumping the water to the distribution system. Water sources in southern Guam are springs and small rivers; their water requires some degree of treatment before entering the d,lstributlon Hues. .An initial nttempt has been made to supplement the water supply with new wells locutecl in the Tnlofofo lllld Mnlojloj urens. Consideration will nlso be given in the future to development of the Ugum

EXPENSE:

$,1,730,712.47)

und 'l'ulofofo RlYers for both II domestic water supply and irrigation purposes. A considerable portion of tlie central Guam water system will be enlarged or rebuilt in the next 3 years and additional rese1·~oirs added to Improve the water pressure and give better fire protectiou to all areas. Under construction nt present Is n new 14-inch water main from Dededo to 'l'amuoing, n reservoir ancl elevatecl tank at Dedeclo, and six new wells which will ench supply 250,000 gl!llons of water per clay into the system.

Power 11O\Vel' m1eully the cJVilillU l'COllOW)' Gunm i::1 1mrchasetl from tlie U.S. Xu,·y under wholesale power agreement!< which stlpulntc the nmouut of power ll\'Ullullle nnd the rate for demand nnd energy of resale power. .L\: of .July 1. 1960, n 22 1>ercentreduction in the resnh•

All

<Ill

New headquarters building for the Public Utility .Agency of Guam, another Guam rehabilitation project.

163


1>0wer rote to the Pul.lllc Utility Agency was nnnouncccl by the U.S. Novy. This wu,; due to incrcnsecl economy nncl better efficiency In tlll' 011crntlon of the generuting system. plus the fnct thnt the go,erument of Gmuu hns contributed $4,-1;;0,000to the instnllntlon of new genernttng equl))wcnt in the Pit! Powerplnnt. As n result of the lower wholesale power cost·, the go,·emmeut of Guom nnuounc.-ed II reduction in its resiclentinl "A" rates ou August l. 1066, 1H1 follows:

.F'irst 100 kw.-hr. nt 4.5 cents. ~ext 150 kw.-br. nt 3 cents, ~ext 250 kw.-ht·. n,t 2 cents. ,U1 o,·cr GOOkw.-ltr. l.8 centi,;.

rt i,; estimotecl thot there will he a sa,·Lug of nppro:-..imntcl~• $200,000 to the customers of the ngeuc)· in 1967. ns n result of t hh; reclnctlon in 1·otes. ('.,<msnmption of powe1· Lili:< post y1>or has Increased from 09.00!.av6 kw.-hr. in 100;; to ll4,657,IH2 kw.-hr., :1 gnln of 15.4 1)e1·centIn 1 year. Peuk dcmond hns iucrensecl from 10,llO kw. in lf)(:iij to 21,057 kw .. n gain of 1a.2 percent in 1 ~renr. Lighting Morine Drive hns hegnn with the installation of high-Intensity mercury ,·nt)Or lights nlonl{ the c·onrso In TamuDing. FJ,·cntunlly this will ho Pxtended to Anigun nncl Inter to Pit!. ApproxJmntely 20 miles of new power th-cults bn,·e hPen instnllerl this past year

nnd 6,800 k,·.-a of new lrnnsformer cnpacity hns been nddecl to the system. A 1·ousidernbl(' portion of this iucreaso in cnpacltr h, dne to the muny new school:< recently 1.mllt on Guam with rehnbllltntlon fund:<. This will not mnterlally add to the <',·enlng peal;: loud on tlte system.

Sewe1· A new extended aeration sewer treatwent plant wus Installed in Decleclo thi1-; })n:;t year to handle the sewerage disposal from the new Kaiser subdivisions in Dededo. Thl' plnnt will also treat sewagl:! from the new junior high school and elementury school recently completed. The <:onstructlou of the new central sewor system in Tumunlug, Agauo, nncl Agauo Heights is ou schedule. This will Include 1m outfall liue over the reef and n new centrul pmnplug 11tntlon ut the Paseo. It will 1.Jecorueoperational 11hout .Tuly 1067.

Telepho1ie .-\.new satellite tele11hone exchange was imitalled ln Ilarrigadn this past year to i11111ro,·e the service and aJlow for growth lu t11e 111·e11.Tweuty-f<_mr new prlvatl' nutomatic 1.Jrunch exchnnges (PABX) commercinl-tyJ)e telepho1m instnllntions were maclo tile tlast yenr, mnklug 11 totul of 02 instnJJecl on the system. Public pay stntious were in<:reui,ed by 12 this ye1u-

As part of Guam's rehabilitation program, n central sewage system outfall is laid across Agana Bay and beyond the reef, where it will release effluent into ocean currents.

164


to a tolnl or 35. .\ telephonP consnltnnt from :--ew )'.ork hus been retained by the governmeut of Gnaw for the purpose of umklug iw ul)l11·nlsulof the Pntire system nud equipment servini: the subscribers of the l'uulic Utility Agency. A memo· ruudmu of m1tlru·stnndiug with the U.S. Xnvy which Is lu etrect nu intercouuectio11 ugreemeut will also lie llrought up to date. With tJili; ill.for1UaL.iou, the go,·· ermneut of Guum will lie in u 1>osltlonto

make a decision in regards to disposal of the telephone system through iw invita· tion for bids. The present telephone network covers an nren of 70 square miles, l'lllllraces H IUUlliclpalltles, nnd hns O"rer 100-milcs of cable serving the subscribers in the ~ystem. A net l.ucreuse of 388 sul>scril>ers we1·e aclded to the system, amounting to a gain of 10.-1:percent over 1065.

1966 Statistics Doscriptlon

Commercial

Resldonttnl

use

use

Total

Power:

KJ!owntt hours sold ....•••••.••••.•.••.••.. ·····-···· Number of cust-Omcrs. Amount .. _________··•·- ______ .......................... Avcmgoper customer monthly (kw.-hr.) ..... -·····-····

.

40,950,527 I, 100

5:l,068,442 0, 124

$1,32"2,267.67 4. 268

$1, 606.7110.00

4.20,8211,000

I, 029, 680,005

581

Water: Gallons sold ...............

.

:,/IJ1llbcr of CUSLOIIIOl'li •......... ti.mount.······-· .......•.....• ·-··· .......•.... ·-·· Av11n1goper customrr monthly (gals.) .................. Telephone: :-.u111b11r of cust-0mcrs.................................. Amount ...........................................

.. .

009 S23S,0'24.46 02, 903

8,378 $537,451.811

. .

058 ~7,378.45

5,005 $313,622.Ol

12.200

00, 018,1169 10,224 $'2,010,058.83

--------------I, 450,507, \!&

9,047 $772,410.34

--------------5,003 $001,000. 46

Cost of Operation Descript1011

Water

-

Tolophono

Powor

Hovonur. ------·--------------... r-:,ponscs.....................................

S768,264. 42

sz,m, 244.25

078,014.70

3,118,611.61

OpcroUug gain or (loss)................

(220, 660. 28)

Total

$001,414, i4 633, 186.10

$4, 288, 913, 4J

(31,771.42)

(~J, 799. 00)

( 189,367. 30)

4, 730,712.47

Capital Improvement Projects (Not Rehabilitation) Financed From Plant and Equipment Depreciation Fund Water

$i8.4J2.34

Power $191.,048.48

Tolopbono $53, 003. I0

1.'otol $823,463. O'!

165


Department of Public Works (PERSONNEL:

406)-(APPROPRli'l'lON:

The Department ot Public Works bus two bnslc responsibilities. the m11inte11nnce or p11blic fucllltles nnd the planning nnd supervision ot public construction. Aside from theee two bnslc fnnct Ions, tho department pertorms other es"entinl public i:;ervlcel!. such ns provid... trnnsport.ntlon for i:ocbool chiling 1111 dren. collection ot gnrbnge und trash. rlel"elopment aml maintenance of public porks nncl grounds, administration of the honslnir program for oft-Island contract employeoo. and operation ot trnns1,ortaHon services for gol"ernment activities. The f11nctlons of the depmonent are perl'onnecl through eight major activities.

General Admini.sJrali~, Tills activity hns the bnsic function of overall direction Rnd !.\lpervlslon of

$2,462,-U0)

the subordluute work ucthitieli of the de1,artment. It ls also responsible for recording payroll nnd job cost nccounting dutu. uncl the procurement and warehousing of materials und equjpment.

Engineering Division This division ot the department prorides euglueerlug services for nil activitl~ of the go,·ermnent, administers constn1ctlo11 <:ontrncts, and enforces com11llu11cowith the provl!dom1 of the ·build· Ing t'Ode of Guam. Tbe total number ot building permits Issued this year was 1,641 l.'or nn estimated value of con11tr11ctlonof $0.270,233. Tbis representi. 1111 Increase of 4.0 Jlercen-t over fiscal year 1900. based on the estimated value ot construction.

A new Public Works Center in Tumon replaceddecrepit quonset huts formerly used by Gwam's Department of Public Works, one of the island's biggest and most imporaant public services. A rehabilitation program faciliry, it includes offices, shops, and other necessary structures.

166


Parks and Grounds Division This dlvisl'on is responsible for the development. upkeep, and general maintenance of pubUc parks, school campuses, playgrounds, housing areas, and other government-owned land. During the rear, o park named nfter the first Gunmnnian priest (Padre Palomo Park) wns develope<l on the beach in Agaun. A total of 800 different trees and assorted shrubs ,vere pl:llnted in various parks, beache::i. school grounds, noel other public arens.

Public Building Maintenance Division This dh·islou is 1·eSJ>011sli>le for the 11111lntemrnceof public buildings. including 1mulic school buildings, municipal 1.mlldlngs. hcultl1 ceuteri;:, and go\'ern-

ment housing. :Ualntenance includes structural, plumbing, electrical, Tefrigerntion. and air-conditioning work. This nctl,·lty al$0 provides jrutltorlal services for the go,·ernment. ndminlstrntion buildings. the library, and public works.

Highway Division Thls dlvision 1s responsi:ble for the coimtructlon and maintenance of all public rond!! n.nd village streets. Primary roads which ore jointly utilized by the military are also maintained jointly by the government of Guam and the military on n 70 percent (goven1ment of Guam)-80 percent (Navy) basis. The highway division presently maintains HO llllles of roucls nncl o8 ntlles of village !;trects. Major highway construction projects nncl their percentage of (:Ollll)ietion IITClisted below:

Projecls-F1'scal Year 1966 Mlle•

Comf:ll<m

llatru ptrtent)

1. Paving of streets and construction of culverts within

2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9.

10.

Santa Rita Village ___________________. ___ . ______ Tai Road _________- ------ - ------- ---- --- - - ---- --Barrigada subdivision _____________________________ Chalan Pago school access ron.-0__________- _- - ____- _Dededo School access road _________________________ Agat-Santa Rita School access road _________________ Ysengsong-NCS Road ___-- ____----- __-- ---- --- --- • Talofofo School access road _______________________ _ Nimitz Beach-San Isidro Road---------------------Dededo subdivision _______________________________

2. 4 .5 . 22 . 60 1. 2

.5 l. 5

. 24 . 57 . 1G

100 100

50 50 80 50 40 100 100 20

Drainage and niiscellaneous projects 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

New Agat drainage ____ - - ____-- -- -- - --- - . -- ___--- --- --- --Old Agat drainage ________________________________________ Penitentiary sewer system _________________________________ _ Impounded vehicles lot ____________________________________ Administration parking lot_ ________________________________ Government staff housi.ng__________________________________

67 47

80 100 100 100

167


Housing Division

Comtrttcti01i Division

This activity ad.ministers the housing progrnm for the go\·emment of Guam offIsland contract employees 1111dother 1111thorized personnel. During the pust Usenl renr the honsing dlvlsion operated a22 housing units, of whlcl1 171 were government-owned. 104 were government c:011trolled. nno 47 were leased from l)rh·nte owners.

This division Is respousll>le fo1• the construction of capital lmpron!ment project;:. Projects handled l.>y this division <luring the fiscal year are ns follows:

Garbage Collection This acth·ity I~ 1·esrJOusilJlefor the eollectlou <1f i;.rarbuge and trnsll throughout the civilltlli community. 'rl1is iucl11de1: re1:ldentlal und commerdul estalJllshments, :<l'hools, c-lturcl1es, go\·c1·11111c11t offlcei,i. gonimmeut hou!Sing urcn:a:.nnd the Guam Memorial Eospitnl. The sr1·,·it·l' is provided ut nominal cost to commercial e,;tubllshlllents. llll<l free to other:;. lu>\·e1111e reullzt..>tlduring the year wns $2,287. A totnl of 8.067 pickups pe1· week were made-using 7 ,1um1>trn<:ks and 3 Dnmpsterfl.

Transportation Division This acth'it~· is n-sted with the rcs110nslbllity of prOYicllng l.>ustransportation to schools. and the repn.ir nnd mnintennnce of uutomotl\·e nnd construction equipment for lhe government of Guam, exelurlil1g equipment: operuted l.>ythe commcrcinl port aml the Pul>lic Utility .\.gency. A. totnl of 401 different pieces of equipment were 111nintnined nnd opernted by t.he 1Uvlsion. '.l'hese Include G4 schoolbuses. 2iiii units of standard usage, 71 units af special usnge uutomotlvc equlpment. 71 units of construction units of miscellaneous equipment. and. equipment.

ao

168

Oo11ipict l011

f',·oJect 1. Improvement

statua, percent

of Aga.na l>ont basin (first Increment)__ 2. Ipao Beach faciJltles..._____ 3. Tumon High School com·ersion ___________________

-J. Public safety •remoclellng___ :;, . tnff house No. u reconstruction _______________ f>. Acl111i11Jstrntlonlmildlng

100 100

97 100 100

al-

teration --------------7. Constrnctiou of IJleacllers. !'<1u1lturynnd lighting facilities for rccrention centers ------------------8. College of Guam llbran• IJuilcliug ______________

O. College of Guam flue arts bulld,ing ________________

7iJ

7Zi ,44

67

10. Storuge building for meclicul equipment ( Gmun Mewol"ial Hospital>----------11. Sisters' (Junrte~ __________

70 60

The uew public works area in u1>per Tumon was occut>led ln November 1965. These facilities were n part of the Rehabllltation Act construction llrogram. uncl provide the department with an ef· tlclent modern plant for Its diverse activities. The housing division warehouse. ancl the body and fender and tbe pahtt shops of the Transportation Division continue to operate in the old area in Tamunl.ng pending construction of ad<litlonal facilities in the new public works area.


U.S. Selective Service System (PErtSONNElI,:

8)-APPROPRIA'rION:

The Selective Service System on Guo.w has beeri ill operation for more than 15 yeurs. The l)riwnry mis!:.1onof the system is the procurement of manpower for the U.S. Armed l!'orccs. In flscal 1966 the locnl boards which arc responsible for the registration, classification, selection, nml clellvery of 1:eglst.rants for induction delivered 222 registrunts to the U.S. Armed Forces Exnmlning and Entrance Station for Induction. Of the urunber forwarclecl. 203 were inducted, 5 were rejected. 7 intlnctlou order,- were J)OSl· poned, and 7 induction orders were canceled. Other functions of the local boards are to: l.. Assist the recruiting services of the Armed l!''orces, both regular and reserve. 2. Channel men i,y meuns of deferments to colleges, nnl\'erslties, and to ap-

$51,003.00)

pro,·ed apprentice t.rnillJng programs so that we may h1we nn ndequnte number of trained perl:lonnel iu nll fields. 3. Mnintnln a current inventory of mnn110wer resources by menus of registration clu.sslftcntion. -4. Report to the Reser\"C components concerning the nvniln.bility of Standby Reserve. The loc11lboards ure nuthorized to deterllllne the availnbili~' of members of the Stn.nclby Reserve of the Armed Forces nnclet· section 672(u) of title 10 of the United State!' Code, ns amended, in time of war or nntionnl emergency decliu•eclby t11eCongress or wheneYer otherwise authorized by lnw. Following is the report of availability 11.n<l :mmnuuy of cluss!ncn tion of tlle territory ns of June 30, l.906.

169


Report of Availability and Summary of Classification for Guam as of June 30, 1966 Total living registrants (classified ________________-·. ____.. _... _. ____·-Total living unclassified registrants .......... _... _ ... -·_ .. ___.... _._. __. Total living registrants .. _ .... __. __........... - ... ___._ ... _. __..... __._ Registrations canceled ... _.... ________.. ____.. _______-·. - _. _-· - _.. __.. Registrants deceased- ... _.-·-·· .... --·-·-· .. _... _......•• -- --·· ····-·. Total all re~istrations .............. ·-- _. -· ·-···- ··-· ·-·--· _-·. ···-- __• Classes I-A and I-A-0-single or married after Aug. 26, 1965•• ····-··---Classes I-A and I-A-O-married before Aug. 26, 1965·--·-···--······--·26 years of age and older with lie.billty extended (single or =ried) .. - . _..•... Under 19 years of age (single or married) ............ ••·--·····------·-·· I-C-members of the Armed Forces of tho United States (inducted)-----··· I-C-membcrs of the Armed Forces of the United States (enlisted or com• missioned and on extended active duty) •• ·-······-·········-·-··--···· I-D-qualificd member of Reserve component or student taking military training, including ROTC and accepted aviation cadet applicant ........ . _..... ____._ ........ . 1-S-statutory deferment-high school. ............ I- Y-registrant qualified for military service only in time of war or national omergency •••••• ----···········-·-··•·----············--·-··-······ II-A-occupational deferment other than agriculture and student. ... -·_ .. . II-A-apprentice .. ··--··.-·____....... _____..... - -- ........ - - ___... . II-8---student deferment. .... __......... _. ___.......... _....... ___.·-· III-A-extreme hardship deferment or registrant with a child or children .... IV-A-Registrant with sufficient prior actlvc service or who is a solo surviving son ...........•••••••••••••••• --·----······-···-·····-·········-·· IV-B-o'fficial deferred by law ..... ·--···· .................. --· ....•• -IV-C-alien not currently liable for military service .................... ·IV-D-rninJster of religion or divinity studcnt ..•••.•. --•-----············ IV-F-registrant not quruified for any military service.··- .... _··----···._ . \I-A-registrant over the age or liability for military service ..............

170

10,085 169 10,254 3,650

81 13,985 354 9

37 08

314

1,743 29 354

834 17 64

135 445 651 3 15 24

2,137 2,822


Territorial Parole Board The Territorinl Parole Ronrcl w1Li-< eiltUbllshcd by lhe l+'lrst Guam Legislature. lt Is composed of flyr members np1>0lntedby the Go,·emor with the consent of the legisll\tnre. Ilil activities iu llscnl 1006 were 11s follows:

Pilrolc ilpplicutlons receh·ed_____ ~i 1a Paroles granted----------------Applications denied_________ !l Applications pending___________ 1 Violation of parole__________ -l Wnrrnnts of arrest issued________ 1 Certificates of discharge issued_ 7

171


Guam Recreation Commission (EMPLOYEES:

-1)-(APPROPRIATION:

The Recreation Com.mission is charged with the responsibility of orgiu1l½ing, L)romotlng, and carrying om u year-rOUlld program of recreational activities. Employees are II recreation supervisor. as;;.lstant recreation superviso1·. und two nrnlntenance peri,;ouuel. ht addition, the <·ommisslon ii; ai:;sisted in Its malntenanC(' responsibilities by inmates of the Guam Penitentiary. The commission mnlnutlued In fiscal 1066 the same munber of recreational fadlitics ns i11 the Inst fiscal ye:tr.

Type of ncllvlty

Nwnbor of tcoms

Pony bnskctbnll lcnguc .. _________________ _ Rnbc Ruth 1>11skcthrill _____________________ _ Women's sortbnlL ___ ----·-·-·---·-··-s1nglo tennis. ____.... __----· ______.. ____ . Doub lo tonnls____. _-----·--· ------ ------·. Ptng-pong toumomcnt. __.. _. -···•. ·--- ____ Men'8 soltbnll lcugu~.--- ·-------. -· ___. ___

111 nddition. the commission started a new project-11 bnllfleld-nt n former school site in the Tumo11 Bay nren for youths and ndnlts. Temporn r~· wooden strncture:, for fencing, backstop. and dugouts were pnrtiall~· erected. Resident. were instrumental tu the organizntlon or Llltle Lengue baseball. Womeu's softball. Hube Ruth bu:seunll. a11d Senior Softball I.euguei,. which nece~itatecl a bnllflelcl. The> Cullowlng recreational uctivitie:s w1we organized from No,·c.mber 1065. to Jnlr 8, 1006:

Age

Numbor or ployors

10 12 10 2'l

2li 25

20 8

40 80 25

12

$34,302)

2li 22

Totol ~rticlpnt ons

13LO14...-·-· -········-···-15lO Ii---•--•-------·--·15nnd np -········-·No t1n1lt. _. -·----- -·--- ___•• N'ollmll No limit._.

.___ ·--·····------·· . __________. __

No limit

...·-. - ·-·-·-··--·-

250 300 260 22 40 80 300

111111 10 ))lay ::oftball. bnseb111l, nnd bnsketco1111ectio11 hnll.

'l'he <:out111issio11co11ti1111edto nssist

some of the publi<: school!< In

with physical etlucntion activities. The 1'11seode Susunu nrens were nsed nlmost nightly, except 011 Suncln)s 's, uy tbe public. During the :school piny days for boys nncl girls, the Puseo recreullonul :;it<'!\ were used extensively. 'l'o promote goodwill with our neighbOt'iug islands, the conunlssiou spousored tcnm!-; to Sui-

172

11rogr11111 wu:: e::t11hlished for A ::11m111er iuschool children in t<-nnls 11i11g-11011g null the :strucHon nt tlw rnseo facillti~ intcrel:ll cli,;J)lnye<l wa,; gr:1Ufylug. .\ little uoy',; hni:;ketbnll lPngne whlcl1 tht> co1u111iisl<i011 is iuitinHng for hoys rnuglng 111age fro111 Oto 12 ii,; n "flri;t"' in Gnam':: sport history.


Board of Engineering and Architectural Examiners The board consists of the Director

of

Publlc Works, ex-officio, as chalrma11, aml three members appointed by the Go,·ernor-oue ttn urchlteot, one au engineer, nnd one uu e11giueer-su1·,·e;vor. '.l'he board is a member of the Xational CouuciJ of State Hoards of Englueering l~xmnluen; lll.ld of the National Council of Donrds. It .\rcbitecturttl Registration uses standurd e..,rnminutlons of tJ1e two 11atiouul councils and conducts exnminutions coucLUTPntly with other F;tate

.\ bill that would have amenclecl nppllcnnt qualifications ill line witlt nntionnl stnudnrds was placed In the inacti'"e file. The bounl intends to recommend similar tegislutio11 lo tlle next legislature. 1.'lte board took !n $510 iu fees in fiscul for reg!stl·ntion.

1000 n11de.Y1,ei1dcd$040.0i . A suo101ary of thc.bonr<l'i:; ncth·ities for tbc yenr follows:

Tbe uercentnge passing is extremely low au<l Is prnctl<:!1Uy the reverse of the national uvernge. It lio nppnrent that our recent nppllcants nre not ns well bused In the professions ns canclldntei'i in othc1· nrens. In nu effort to Improve this sltuat1011 in tbe Held of lnncl surveying, the bonnl Is supporting n move to set up n trnlulng c·,mrse in imr1·eyl11g.which

1n·obably will he concJnC'tecl mtder the cllrectlo11 of tht• 'ollege of Gunm. Tile hoard was instrnmentill in the lntrodnction of leglslntion to nmc.nd t11e basic law as it concerns corpc1rntc>practice nncl permnnent rcsh'lcnt eligibility

..,

~

'e

boards.

t ~ •ro :c e ~ AppUooUons rccoll'cd ...... llcglstrutlons grunted .... _ 11. By ox11mlnBtlou.____ b. Dy reciprocity ........ RcglstroUon dcn!ctl ........ I'endl.ng 0XUlllLWIU0II ...... n. Origl.nal appllcoUon ... b. RCC!:uimLW1tlon .. _ .... Being Pl'000.5SC<.L......... Rt'COIISldcrnUons........... u. Prior notion offirmcd.. Appllcotlons wlthdrnwn __ Violations .................

<

~

0

>,

---·-

(0) (3) ... .......... l 0 2 4 (I) (0) (3) (2)

§l:i

~<O

I

Cd

j

I (I) (0) 0

0

I

2

0

0

~

I

~-

J (J) (0) 0 4 (0) (4) 0

(2)

"'

~-=

0

-I 0

a

~

&l.: .,,,. u

0 (0) (0)

0 0

·-·· .... ---·-··---·0 0

0

0

0

0

0

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTINGOFFlCE: 1967

0-243

515

173





Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.