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"ik SEPTEMBER 1957

4.

?freshn\eM to You Through the Years ire's to good times ind good friends may you always have an abundance of both

BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY

THE ATLANTA

COCA-COLA

BOTTLING

COMPANY


— t h e e d i t o r ' s notes

yoU CAN COUNT O N COUNTERS

&Jimfu'4 £Bioc6& I N C O R P O R A T E D

last year's editor of the Georg,,: brand-new publishing year for the maga- Rambler. Dave, a fine photographer a winner of the first annual Geor^,, zine. Our shelves—completely bare of articles and photographs just a few weeks Alumnus award for lournalism A ago—have started to get that cluttered ment, is going underwater to bring m look that means the copy for the coming an upside-down view of Freddie 1.,, famed survival course. issues is starting to pile up. * * V Already completed and slated for the A LATER in the year, we'll bring y0„ October issue is a special series on the feature story on a graduate studem State of Georgia's industrial development program and the important part Tech is with an article by the student on hi playing in it. Authored by five of the Ph. D. thesis and many other u area's outstanding industrial develop- about life at Georgia Tech. Alon_ ment authorities (an alumnus-business- these special features, you'll receive a] man, a power company official and three the alumni news, sports coverage, cam Tech researchers) the series will bring pus news, etc. that you have come i you up to date on the Institute's activi- expect from this magazine. ties in this fascinating field. Also scheduled for October publication is a photo-text story on President Harrison's initial contacts with the ramblin' recks. Tentatively titled, "Students-eye view of the new president," the article is slanted to give you a better idea of the type of man the Board of Regents named as Tech's sixth president.

n

A THIS ISSUE marks the beginning of a

GENERAL

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JA. 3 - 6 6 1 1

FA. 3 - 5 6 5 1

ATLANTA

COLUMBUS GEORGIA

R O B E R T T H A R P 6 . -34

j. L. B R O O K S

' 39

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Rome Macon

Gadsden, Ala. Athens, Tenn. Greenville, S. C .

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A IN NOVEMBER, The Alumnus will present a roundup on electronics research activities at Georgia Tech. The article will trace the growth of this relatively new field of research at Tech and describe in detail some of the activities now going on in electronics on the campus. In the same issue, we will offer you a special photo-text treatment of the Tech students' preparations for the 1957 Homecoming plus the usual coverage of Homecoming day. * * * A DECEMBER will bring you an article on the problems of a coed in a predominately masculine school. With photos by Bill Diehl and text by Paula Stevenson, the article will be the first ever done for The Alumnus from the distaff side. Paula, a senior T E from Atlanta, is a member of the Technique staff, the first female member of the Ramblin' Reck Club, the first female ever elected to the Tech student council, the band's majorette and a runner-up in last year's Miss Atlanta contest. We're not sure you'll agree with all she has to say, but we know you'll enjoy reading the article come December. Also scheduled for December is a unique photo feature by David Milton.

Set The Shape of Hank Clocks »ot.ry Counters T.nter Counters I"p««on Counters pick Clocks Twister Cloc"

America's Tomorrows

Hosiery Counters Pairing Counters Yardage Counters Slasher Counters Sewing Counters Special Counters •"""

. T . M . Reg. U. S. Pah Office See Our R e p r e s e n t a t i v e , o r Inquire Direct

' i

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L.

..

. _

,w

i

ATLANTA

^

P. O . Box 3 0 9 5 Charlotte, N o r t h C a r o l i n a

HENRY GRANGER Advertising Items Sales Representative Readying for the 1957 football season. Alumnus photographer Bill Diehl checks his two Leica M-3's and his two Rolleifle

MORSE DECALS Speakine of sports news, our photo, pher. Bill Diehl (see above) again be covering Tech football. His effo of the 1956 season brought a gre; of praise into the alumni office. Equip as shown. Bill will cover Tech fi from right down on the field where the action takes place. And for P ber, he will bring you a special * the Tech team on an out-of-town * » * A WE ARE telling you all this, soy know that when it comes to cov s Georgia Tech. The Alumnus <*°f -^ If you think of anything you » F want covered on the campus, line. We're always open tor sug,

Tech AN"* 1

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B o x 3 7 3 - N o r t h s i d e Station Atlanta 5, Georgia

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Pressure vessels fabricated by FINNIGAN are built to rigid AS ME Codes! Over 65 years of plate fabrications have given FINNIGAN Engineers and Craftsmen the know-how to build the finest of equipment. That's why the FINNIGAN guarantee can specify that equipment by FINNIGAN is equal to or better than that of any other manufacturer!

9.

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Call, wire or write today for further information ... there is no obligation. •

P.O. BOX 6025, HOUSTON 6, TEXAS 4431 MAPLE AVE., DALLAS 9. TEXAS P.O. BOX 2527, JACKSONVILLE 4, FLA. 4108 C ST., LITTLE ROCK, ARK. 3714 !4th ST, N.W, WASHINGTON, D.C 4054 THALIA AVE., NEW ORLEANS 25, IA. 230 NORTH TORRENCE ST., CHARLOTTE, N. C 41 E. 42nd ST.. NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 5(1 S. W. 47th ST., MIAMI, FLA. 722

* P , e n "> e r , 1957

W J ' ^ T A sSf T 'N . f, ATLANTA MARIETTA . NW VY


Y0U

R a m b l i n '

fflua/t<e$3fru>ofo> I

— t h e editor's notes

CAN COUNT ON COUNTERS

GENERAL

INSURANCE

MORTGAGE

LOANS

JA. 3 - 6 6 1 1

FA. 3 - 5 6 5 1

ATLANTA

COLUMBUS GEORGI A

ROBERT THARPE

"34

. L. B R O O K S . '39

Call Mr. Amco - JA. 1 -0800 for Quick

Delivery

IVAN ALLEN CO. 29 Pryor St., Atlanta Augusta • Rome Gainesville • Macon Gadsden, Ala. Athens, Tenn. Greenville, S. C.

OFFICE SUPPLIES OFFICE EQUIPMENT ENGINEERING SUPPLIES PRINTING • BLUEPRINTS

n

l * * A z t e c s . E»*eers

N C O R P O R A T E D

THIS ISSUE marks the beginning of a

brand-new publishing year for the magazine. Our shelves—completely bare of articles and photographs just a few weeks ago—have started to get that cluttered look that means the copy for the coming issues is starting to pile up. Already completed and slated for the October issue is a special series on the State of Georgia's industrial development program and the important part Tech is playing in it. Authored by five of the area's outstanding industrial development authorities (an alumnus-businessman, a power company official and three Tech researchers) the series will bring you up to date on the Institute's activities in this fascinating field. Also scheduled for October publication is a photo-text story on President Harrison's initial contacts with the ramblin' recks. Tentatively titled, "Students-eye view of the new president," the article is slanted to give you a better idea of the type of man the Board of Regents named as Tech's sixth president. • IN NOVEMBER, The Alumnus will present a roundup on electronics research activities at Georgia Tech. The article will trace the growth of this relatively new field of research at Tech and describe in detail some of the activities now going on in electronics on the campus. In the same issue, we will offer you a special photo-text treatment of the Tech students' preparations for the 1957 Homecoming plus the usual coverage of Homecoming day. * * * A DECEMBER will bring you an article on the problems of a coed in a predominately masculine school. With photos by Bill Diehl and text by Paula Stevenson, the article will be the first ever done for The Alumnus from the distaff side. Paula, a senior TE from Atlanta, is a number of the Technique staff, the first female member of the Ramblin' Reck Club, the first female ever elected to the Tech student council, the band's majorette and a runner-up in last year's Miss Atlanta contest. We're not sure you'll agree with all she has to say, but we know you'll enjoy reading the article come December. Also scheduled for December is a unique photo feature by David Milton.

last year's editor of the Georei Rambler. Dave, a fine photograph ' winner of the first annual Georgia Alumnus award for Journalism A Y " ment, is going underwater to brim an upside-down view of Freddie I famed survival course. • LATER in the year, we'll bring J feature story on a graduate student ale with an article by the student on h Ph. D. thesis and many other feaiu about life at Georgia Tech. Aloi these special features, you'll receive the alumni news, sports coverace. c pus news, etc. that you have come I expect from this magazine.

Set The Shape of America's Tomorrows H.nk Clock! Hclary Count." T.ntar Counter* ^Counters

13 Clocb

Hosiery Counters Pairing Counters Yardage Counters Slasher Counters Sewing Counters Special Counters

TTM. Reg. U. S. Pat. Office See Our Representative, or Inquire Direct

L

ATLANTA

^A

P. O. Box 3 0 9 5 Charlotte, North Carolina

HENRY GRANGER Advertising Items Sales Representative Readying for the 1957 football setM Alumnus photographer Bill Diehl checks his two Leica M-3's and his two Rolleiflexe

MORSE DECALS Speaking of sports news, our photogrs pher. Bill Diehl (see above) again w be covering Tech football. Hiv eft of the 1956 season brought a great I of praise into the alumni office. Equip as shown. Bill will cover Tech foot! from right down on the field wbe the action takes place. And for N«W ber, he will bring you a special W the Tech team on an out-of-to«n t *

H=

SCRIPTO PENS - PENCILS VU-LIGHTERS CALENDARS

I N T O YOUR TANKS, SMOKESTACKS PIPING, BREECHING WATER HEATERS PLATE WORK BOILERS

PRESSURE VESSELS! Pressure vessels fabricated by FTNNIGAN are built torigidASME Codes! Over 65 years of plate fabrications have given FINNIGAN Engineers and Craftsmen the know-how to build the finest of equipment. That's why the FINNIGAN guarantee can specify that equipment by FINNIGAN is equal to or better than that of any other manufacturer!

*

• WE ARE telling you all this, so JfO know that when it comes to cove Georgia Tech, The Alumnus does it If you think of anything you 9 want covered on the campus, di line. We're always open for sugge

Tech V"*

Box373~Norrhside Station Atlanta 5, Georgia

. URNNIGANCO

asasss

Call, wire or write today for further information ... there is no ohlivation.

P.O. BOX 6025, HOUSTON 6. TEXAS 4431 MAPLE AVE, DALLAS 9, TEXAS P.O. BOX 2527, JACKSONVILLE 4, FLA. 4108 C. ST., LITTLE ROCK, ARK. 3714 14th ST, N.W, WASHINGTON, D.C 4054 THALIA AVE.. NEW ORLEANS 25. LA. 230 NORTH TORRENCE ST., CHARLOTTE, N. C. 41 E. 42nd ST., NEW YORK 17. N. Y. SB1 S. W. 47th ST.. MIAMI. FLA,

722 MARIETTA

*>"«rnb

• ' . 1957


**m.

â&#x20AC;˘...

A TRAINER OF DISTINCTION Since 1948, Henry L. (Bu$c) Andel, '43, has plied his trade as trainer for Georgia Tech's athletic teams. Last year, a desire for more edillation hit Buck, and he enrolled as a graduate student in the Industrial Management School. A quarter later he began teaching undergraduate Finance courses while continuing his advance studies. Back of teacher Andel in his professorial garb sits the student managers for the 1957 Jackets, left to right: John Van Houten, Frank Bennett, Ralph Heard and Charlie Reeves. The training room in which they are posed has just recently been renovated and now is white and gold. Photographed for the Alumnus by Bill Diehl, Jr.


IH

A TRAINER OF DISTINCTION Since 1948, Henry L. (Butt:) Andel, '43, has plied his trade as trainer for Georgia! Tech's athletic teams. Last year, a desire for more edijtation hit Buck, and he enrolled as a graduate student in the Industrial Management School. A quarter later he began teaching undergraduate Finance courses while continuing his advance studies. Back of teacher Andel in his professorial garb sits the student managers for the 1957 Jackets, left to right: John Van Houten, Frank Bennett, Ralph Heard and Charlie Reeves. The training room in which they are posed has just recently been renovated and now is white and gold. Photographed for the Alumnus by Bill Diehl, Jr.


SEPTEMBER 1957

/{(mm

VOLUME 36

NUMBER I

CONTENTS 2. R A M B L I N — the editor looks ahead. 4. T R I P L E - T H R E A T T R A I N E R — B u c k Andel in one photograph and just a few words.

7. T E C H G E T S 2Vi M I L L I O N — the reactor story.

12. 14. 16. 18. 20. 31.

T H E C A P T A I N A N D H I S M A T E — a profile of a wonderful pair in words and pictures. T H E Y E A R O F T H E I N N O C E N T S — Old pro Ed Danforth looks at the 1957 season, for you. I M A G I N A T I O N — the key to success. T O U G H J O B , W E L L D O N E — a special salute to Paul Weber for the job he just completed. W I T H T H E CLUBS — a regular feature. N E W S BY CLASSES — lots of it. O F F I C E R S N O M I N A T E D — now vote.

Officers of the Georgia Tech National Alumni Association Fred Storey, ' 3 3 , Pres. I. M. Sheffield, '20, V-P Charles Simons, '37, V-P Walt Crawford, '49, Treas. VV. Roane Beard, '40, Executive Secretary Staff

Bob Wallace, Jr., '49, Editor Bill Diehl, Jr., Chief Photographer Bob Eskew, '49, Advertising Mary Peeks, Assistant

THE COVER Donald P. Stephenson has been a captain practically all his life. Karen Stephenson has been his mate for just a little over two years. The two of them make for one of the most interesting profiles in Alumnus' history. T o find out just exactly what makes this duo one of the favorite married couples in the history of Georgia Tech football, please turn to page 8. Cover Photo - Bill Diehl, Jr. Published eight times a year — February, March, May, July, September, October, November and December — by the Georgia Tech National Alumni Association, Georgia Institute of Technology; 225 North Avenue, Atlanta, Georgia. Subscription price (35c per copy) included in the membership dues. Entered as second class matter at the Post Office. Atlanta, Georgia under the Act of March 5, 1879.

LAST M O N T H , President Eisenhower released th report of the President's Committee on P H ^ ' 1 Beyond the High School. In it, this committee standing business and industrial leaders and ed have done an excellent job of identifying tip urgent problems which will face the Nation's tions of higher learning in the next 10 or 15 Vea addition, the committee has set down certain mendations for the solutions of these problems w already face every college and university administrati It should come as no surprise to any Georgia 1 alumnus that the most urgent of all of these proble concerns the mounting shortage of excellent teacher. For during the past few years the Tech Roll Call ar peals have been built on the great need to help seci and maintain a top-notch faculty for our school. As the report points out, "Unless enough of th Nation's ablest manpower is reinvested in the educa tional enterprise, its human resources will remai under-developed and specialized manpower shortaer in every field will compound. Unwittingly the Unite States right now is pursuing precisely the opposi course. Demands for high quality manpower h everywhere been mounting, but colleges and uni\er sities have found themselves at a growing competith disadvantage in the professional manpower market. 0. Nation, like the prodigal farmer, is consuming the ses corn needed for future harvests. The ultimate resul could be disaster." I'm not saying that money is the answer to all of problems of our universities and colleges. But it big part of the answer to the faculty problem. T past spring the success of our past two Roll Calls n possible the first major faculty salary supplement! program in Tech's history. This supplementation been credited by the Tech administration with the that none of the school's top teaching faculty rr, resigned at the end of the school year, 1956-57 Your contributions to the 11th Roll Call nov getting underway will allow your alumni organiz; to continue to try in every way possible to help * and maintain the best faculty possible for ( Tech. N o institution, no student, no alumnus is better than the quality of its faculty. And don t to get your contributions in before November - > can whip Georgia again for that cup.

p^^u, 4 ^ Tech Al»'

Governor Griffin Pledges $2,500,000 for Tech Reactor GOVERNOR

MARVIN

GRIFFIN

pledged

( j $2,500,000 on August 20 to con,,nict Georgia T e c h s proposed high-flux :h reactor. The pledge was made at a luncheon meeting of the Georgia Nuclear Advisory Commission immediately after Dr. Walter H. Zinn, internationally known nuclear physicist, outlined the conceptual for the Georgia Tech reactor. T h e E n was carried out by the General \uclear Engineering Corporation of which Dr. Zinn is president. In making the pledge. G o v e r n o r Griffin said, "I am convinced that the multipurpose research reactor explained here by Dr. Zinn will be a real asset to the and region as well as to Georgia Tech. 1 am also convinced that at Georgia Tech we have the talent to m a k e the best possible use of this reactor. After a great deal of study on this project, I have Jed. with the help of many o'f the Nation's outstanding experts in this field, ; W must take immediate action o n • project or we will certainly be sorry ln the future. H the Board of Regents of the U n i " 3 Swem will put in a budget rest for $2,500,000 for the Georgia -1 reactor project. I will be happy to sign it" ' g r e ^ e | G | ° V e m 0 r ' S Pledge gave the final t0 a Dm three-phrase expansion jj*m m the nuclear field at Tech. PhaS6 t h e n u c I e a r Proera ' graduate 1underua of the^q-A > 'n the fall quarter schohlstic vear Govern T-"57 - In 1956 m ie Re " ? appropriated $300,00C the R $300,000 gems f o r Sram-,k P h a s e t w o of this p r o * ,u~-tnee cconstruction of a Radioisol0 P* BuilJir,r >g on the Georgia Tech cam*P«*ib.

«r, 1957

pus. T h e building, now valued at $500,0 0 0 as a result of additional grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Board of Regents, will go u n d e r construction this fall. It will provide laboratory space and facilities for courses taught in connection with the nuclear graduate program as well as for research. Beginning with the formation of a Nuclear Science Committee in January, 1955, Georgia Tech's program has moved steadily forward through t h e addition of new courses to t h e curriculum and of nuclear scientists to the faculty and staff. Tech has received a grant from the Atomic Energy Commission for equipment and special supplies to be used in nuclear science and technology courses. Georgia Tech also has taken advantage of the A E C ' s educational support program to acquire 5500 pounds of uranium and a neutron source for use in a subcritical assembly constructed at the school and now in operation. The new reactor will be a heavy-watermoderated, heterogeneous, enriched-fuel type, similar to the C P - 5 n o w in operation at A r g o n n e National Laboratory and the one being constructed at M I T in Cambridge, Mass. T h e reactor will be used in a broad and intensive program of research in physical and engineering sciences. It also will contribute to research in biological, agricultural and medical sciences in the region, as well as m a k e m o r e comprehensive and effective the Georgia Tech graduate program in nuclear science a n d engineering. In his discussion of the Georgia Tech reactor, D r . Zinn said, "With the reactor, Georgia Tech scientists and engineers will be as well equipped as those in any

university in the entire world. This facility will permit work in every important phase of nuclear development. T h e Tech people will not be able to d o every type of nuclear research anyone has ever indulged in, but they will be able to play a full part in m a n y important areas. T h e T e c h reactor is a general purpose m a c h i n e — o n e not designed t o favor any specific type of nuclear research. It will have built into it facilities for materials testing, but it will also have facilities for m a n y other kinds of research—facilities that c a n be used by physicists, chemists, biologists a n d various disciplines of engineering. It will also contain facilities for experimentation and treatment of cancer with neutron therapy. "This reactor will be planned, constructed a n d operated u n d e r strict Federal supervision and licensing through the Atomic Energy Commission," D r . Zinn continued. "It is, in my opinion, the very best research reactor that can be built for the multi-purpose needs of Georgia Tech, t h e State and the area for the amount of m o n e y that will be available to construct it." Present estimates on the capital investment cost of the reactor run from three to four million dollars. Georgia Tech expects to secure the balance of funds needed from Federal agencies. Other speakers at the meeting of the Georgia Nuclear Advisory Commission, which is headed by F r a n k H . Neely, '04 were D r . James E. Boyd, director of the Georgia T e c h Engineering Experiment Station and head of the c a m p u s Nuclear Science Committee, and Dr. William B. Harrison, III, t h e director of the research reactor project at Tech.


SEPTEMBER

/Ofmmi

VOLUME 36

NUMBER I

CONTENTS 2. R A M B L I N — the editor looks ahead. 4. T R I P L E - T H R E A T T R A I N E R — B u c k Andel in one photograph and just a few words.

7. T E C H G E T S 2Vi M I L L I O N — the reactor story.

12. 14. 16. 18. 20. 31.

T H E C A P T A I N A N D H I S M A T E — a profile of a wonderful pair in words and pictures. T H E Y E A R O F T H E I N N O C E N T S — Old pro Ed Danforth looks at the 1957 season, for you. I M A G I N A T I O N — the key to success. T O U G H J O B , W E L L D O N E — a special salute to Paul Weber for the job he just completed. W I T H T H E CLUBS — a regular feature. N E W S BY CLASSES — lots of it. O F F I C E R S N O M I N A T E D — now vote.

Officers of the Georgia Tech National Alumni Association Fred Storey, ' 3 3 , Pres. I. M. Sheffield, '20, V-P Charles Simons, '37, V-P Walt Crawford, '49, Treas. W. Roane Beard, '40, Executive Secretary Staff

Bob Wallace, Jr., '49, Editor Bill Diehl, Jr., Chief Photographer Bob Eskew, '49, Advertising Mary Peeks, Assistant

THE COVER GEORGIA

TECH

Donald P. Stephenson has been a captain practically all his life. Karen Stephenson has been his mate for just a little over two years. The two of them make for one of the most interesting profiles in Alumnus' history. T o find out just exactly what makes this duo one of the favorite married couples in the history of Georgia Tech football, please turn to page 8. Cover Photo - Bill Diehl, Jr.

Published eight times a year — February, March, May, July, September, October, November and December — by the Georgia Tech National Alumni Association, Georgia Institute of Technology; 225 North Avenue, Atlanta, Georgia. Subscription price (35c per copy) included in the membership dues. Entered as second class matter at the Post Office. Atlanta, Georgia under the Act of March 5, 1879.

LAST M O N T H , President Eisenhower released th report of the President's Committee on PA Beyond the High School. In it, this committee" standing business and industrial leaders and e 1 have done an excellent job of identifying tl urgent problems which will face the Nation s j tions of higher learning in the next 10 or 15 yea addition, the committee has set down certain mendations for the solutions of these problems n already face every college and university administrati It should come as no surprise to any Georgia 1 alumnus that the most urgent of all of these problen concerns the mounting shortage of excellent teacher For during the past few years the Tech Roll Call ar peals have been built on the great need to help se and maintain a top-notch faculty for our school. As the report points out, "Unless enough of th Nation's ablest manpower is reinvested in the educ= tional enterprise, its human resources will remai under-developed and specialized manpower shortaa in every field will compound. Unwittingly the Unite States right now is pursuing precisely the opposi course. Demands for high quality manpower hJ everywhere been mounting, but colleges and unher sities have found themselves at a growing competith disadvantage in the professional manpower market. Ot Nation, like the prodigal farmer, is consuming the sfl corn needed for future harvests. The ultimate re could be disaster." I'm not saying that money is the answer to all of problems of our universities and colleges. But it big part of the answer to the faculty problem. I past spring the success of our past two Roll Calls n possible the first major faculty salary supplements program in Tech's history. This supplementation been credited by the Tech administration with the that none of the school's top teaching faculty met resigned at the end of the school year, 1956-57 Your contributions to the 11th Roll Call no» getting underway will allow your alumni organia to continue to try in every way possible to help and maintain the best faculty possible for Tech. N o institution, n o student, no alumnus better than the quality of its faculty. And don t to get your contributions in before November « can whip Georgia again for that cup.

^^xc 4-n Tech

ah*1

Governor Griffin Pledges $2,500,000 for Tech Reactor GOVERNOR

MARVIN

GRIFFIN

pledged

( j $2,500,000 on August 20 t o contract Georgia Tech's proposed high-flux :h reactor. The pledge was m a d e at a l u n c h e o n meeting of the Georgia N u c l e a r Advisory Commission immediately after D r . Walter H. Zinn, internationally k n o w n n u clear physicist, outlined the conceptual for the Georgia Tech reactor. T h e was carried out by t h e G e n e r a l Nuclear Engineering Corporation of which Dr. Zinn is president. In making the pledge. G o v e r n o r Griffin said, "I am convineed that the multipurpose research reactor explained here by Dr. Zinn will be a real asset to the md region as well as to Georgia Tech. I am also convinced that at G e o r gia Tech we have the talent to m a k e t h e test possible use of this reactor. After a great deal of study on this project, I have led. with the help of m a n y o'f t h e p a n ' s outstanding experts in this field, > we must take immediate action o n this project or we will certainly be sorry m the future. !/ the Board of Regents of the U n i stem will put in a budget rest for $2,500,000 for t h e G e o r g i a » reactor project. I will be happy VV1 to sign it.' ^ Governor's pledge gave the final to a Dm three-phrase expansion ™^m in the nuclear field at T e c h . PhaSC t h e n u c l e a r Progra ' graduate 01 u n d e r w a v i n t h o' the^Qe fall quarter Governor r - L S C h ° h ' s t i c y e a r " I n 1 9 5 6 to the R appropriated $300,000 gram-,u8ents f o r P h a s e t w o of this p r o tcpes Bt e c o n struction of a RadioisoUlld 'ng on the Georgia T e c h c a m Sep,

^b e r , , 9 S 7

pus. The building, now valued at $500,000 as a result of additional grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Board of Regents, will go under construction this fall. It will provide laboratory space and facilities for courses taught in connection with the nuclear graduate program as well as for research. Beginning with the formation of a Nuclear Science Committee in January, 1955, Georgia Tech's program has moved steadily forward through the addition of new courses to the curriculum and of nuclear scientists to the faculty and staff. Tech has received a grant from the Atomic Energy Commission for equipment and special supplies to be used in nuclear science and technology courses. Georgia Tech also has taken advantage of the AEC's educational support program to acquire 5500 pounds of uranium and a neutron source for use in a subcritical assembly constructed at the school and now in operation. The new reactor will be a heavy-watermoderated, heterogeneous, enriched-fuel type, similar to the CP-5 now in operation at Argonne National Laboratory and the one being constructed at MIT in Cambridge, Mass. The reactor will be used in a broad and intensive program of research in physical and engineering sciences. It also will contribute to research in biological, agricultural and medical sciences in the region, as well as make more comprehensive and effective the Georgia Tech graduate program in nuclear science and engineering. In his discussion of the Georgia Tech reactor, Dr. Zinn said, "With the reactor, Georgia Tech scientists and engineers will be as well equipped as those in any

university in the entire world. This facility will permit work in every important phase of nuclear development. The Tech people will not be able to do every type of nuclear research anyone has ever indulged in, but they will be able to play a full part in many important areas. The Tech reactor is a general purpose machine—one not designed to favor any specific type of nuclear research. It will have built into it facilities for materials testing, but it will also have facilities for many other kinds of research—facilities that can be used by physicists, chemists, biologists and various disciplines of engineering. It will also contain facilities for experimentation and treatment of cancer with neutron therapy. "This reactor will be planned, constructed and operated under strict Federal supervision and licensing through the Atomic Energy Commission," Dr. Zinn continued. "It is, in my opinion, the very best research reactor that can be built for the multi-purpose needs of Georgia Tech, the State and the area for the amount of money that will be available to construct it." Present estimates on the capital investment cost of the reactor run from three to four million dollars. Georgia Tech expects to secure the balance of funds needed from Federal agencies. Other speakers at the meeting of the Georgia Nuclear Advisory Commission, which is headed by Frank H. Neely, '04 were Dr. James E. Boyd, director of the Georgia Tech Engineering Experiment Station and head of the campus Nuclear Science Committee, and Dr. William B. Harrison, III, the director of the research reactor project at Tech.


, Bob W a l l a c e , Jr.

Photographs • Bill D i e h l , Jr.

f

Te*

fHE CAPTAIN AND HIS MATE nan ond Karen Stephenson, one of twenty married couples on the 1957 Jacket squad, take a long look at each other ing his game on the practice field. H e throws himself into practice with such abandon, that he's liable to wear himself out during the week if we don't sit on him. "He's a great center especially on defense," continued the man who had coached Paul Duke, George Morris and Larry Morris to All-Everything ratings. "He reacts like a cat and has that wonderful extra sense that seems to tell him where the opponent's play is going to develop. He's a natural leader. Do you know he's been captain of every football team he ever played on. "He was co-captain of the Candy Bowl team from Bessemer when he was in sixth grade. The other co-captain was Tommy Lorino of Auburn. In his senior year at Bessemer, Don was captain of the team, yet he never played a single minute during the season. Just three days before his senior year got underway, he broke his leg playing touch football. He wasn't able to walk out on the field for the coin toss till the last game of the season. "But he was so good in his earlier years in high school and such a natural leader that he was named captain of the South Alabama high school all-stars the next summer. Incidentally, Tommy Rose of this year's team was captain for the North in that game. If I remember correctly, Don's team won that game, 7-6. After his senior year, around six SEC schools approached Don about a grantin-aid. I'm sure happy we got him. And «<iTeven,!!ve ^ e a r s - f i f t h i n t e n y e a r s Uen right now I wish we had about six or 'n m history. Is 6 ' 1", weighs 195 pounds and is eight more just like him." Don Stephenson lives in an apartment % , self-confident and one of the determined athletes in Tech's his- in the Techwood project with his wife, he trouble with Don isn't getting Karen. If there ever was a marriage that ' Practice says Coach Bobby proves the old theory that opposites attodd. 'It's tf ying to keep him from leav- tract, it would be this one. There is Mvn

E. THOMPSON, a Georgia Tech

halfback emeritus, dropped in a chair, bed t n e question, scratched his Bar-cropped head and then exclaimed: ' -Tell you about Don Stephenson? Sure I cjn I've known the boy for a good •nany years. He and I went to high school together. He was a country boy, C i was a city boy when we played tther at Bessemer (Alabama). You C ihose big legs of his? Everybody out them. "Well, he got those legs in high school. Used to walk 10 miles to school ilmost every day. And then after football practice, he'd trot back the same distance. "I'm not kidding. It's hard to believe, KJI it's ihe truth. That's the way he got those big legs and the spring in his jump. Remember when he leaped about HIT feet in the air and grabbed that pass luring the 'Bama game last year? Those fog legs did that. He changed the whole »mplexion of the game with that interapiion. Those legs and the long walks * and forth to that farm a few years n us that game. "Damdest thing I ever heard of, all [™ walking in this day and age. But "Jjs a country boy. you know." Donald Priestly Stephenson is a coun• boy who came to Georgia Tech 1 larm near Greenwood, Alabama. is also captain of the 1957 Jackets i f h a " ^ - A m e r i c a n center—Tech's

nothing quiet, shy or retiring about Karen. In fact, vivacious is a word that seems to have been coined just to describe the beautiful brunette who married Stephenson on June 12, 1955. There are no strangers to Karen Stephenson. When she talks—especially about Don—the words tumble out at an unbelievable rate, and it would take a highspeed motion picture camera to keep track of the changes of expression on her pretty face. "Duck and I started going steady in tenth grade," she answered to the first question. "I don't know where he got that name, but he's had it ever since before I met him." At this point, Don broke in to say, "My uncle gave it to me when I was a little boy. He said I followed him around like Donald Duck." "Duck had another nickname for a short time back in high school," Karen continued. "It was 'Splash' and I was responsible for it. During the summers in Bessemer several of the high school football players were working as life guards at the city swimming pool. Duck was one of them. But it seemed that Coach Snider (Snitz Snider, Bessemer High coach) wouldn't let the boys go in the water for the last thirty days before football practice opened. I was always trying to get Duck to swim during those thirty days. I don't know why unless it's because I'm a woman, but I did. And you know how he is about training. He just always lives by the letter of the rules. Well, it became an absolute obsession to me. I had to get him in that water, at least one time. I pleaded, cajoled, threatened—just about everything. But nothing seemed to budge him. So finally one day I announced from the water that if he loved me he would jump right in the

^ b , er . 1957

> •

m


. Bob Wallace, Jr.

Photographs • Bill Diehl, Jr.

Te*»

fHE CAPTAIN AND HIS MATE Don and Karen Stephenson, one of twenty married couples n the 1957 Jacket squad, take a long look at each other ing his game on the practice field. He throws himself into practice with such abandon, that he's liable to wear himself out during the week if we don't sit on him. "He's a great center especially on defense," continued the man who had coached Paul Duke, George Morris and Larry Morris to All-Everything ratings. "He reacts like a cat and has that wonderful extra sense that seems to tell him where the opponent's play is going to develop. He's a natural leader. Do you know he's been captain of every football team he ever played on. "He was co-captain of the Candy Bowl team from Bessemer when he was "l'm not kidding. It's hard to believe, in sixth grade. The other co-captain was hut it's the truth. That's the way he got Tommy Lorino of Auburn. In his senior those big legs and the spring in his year at Bessemer, Don was captain of jump. Remember when he leaped about the team, yet he never played a single iour feet in the air and grabbed that pass minute during the season. Just three days •Sag the 'Bama game last year? Those before his senior year got underway, he h legs did that. He changed the whole broke his leg playing touch football. He wmplexion of the game with that inter- wasn't able to walk out on the field for action. Those legs and the long walks the coin toss till the last game of the «* and forth to that farm a few years season. hi ""But he was so good in his earlier « won us that game. 'Damdest thing I ever heard of, all years in high school and such a natural ™H walking in this day and age. But leader that he was named captain of the South Alabama high school all-stars the *">s a country boy. you know." next summer. Incidentally, Tommy Rose Donald Priestly Stephenson is a counof this year's team was captain for the • wy who came to Georgia Tech North in that game. If I remember cor> [arm near Greenwood, Alabama. rectly, Don's team won that game, 7-6. i- also captain of the 1957 Jackets After his senior year, around six SEC M an . ail-American center—Tech's schools approached Don about a grantUrlh in five years. fifth in ten years in-aid. I'm sure happy we got him. And ^venth in history. right now I wish we had about six or - i' I 6 ' ' w e i g n s 1 9 5 Pounds and is eight more just like him." • shV- self-confident and one of the Don Stephenson lives in an apartment in the Techwood project with his wife, n ^'ermined athletes in Tech's hisE J t r ° U b l e vv ith D o n i s n 't getting Karen. If there ever was a marriage that Practice. says Coach Bobby proves the old theory that opposites at1. - i fs tr ying to keep him from leav- tract, it would be this one. There is Lrtfi E. THOMPSON, a Georgia Tech halfback emeritus, dropped in a chair, scratched his ed the question, Tcw-cropped head and then exclaimed: "-TC11 you about Don Stephenson? Sure , ;an I've known the boy for a good L y years. He and I went to high school together. He was a country boy, and 1 was a city boy when we played er at Bessemer (Alabama). You [hose big legs of his? Everybody bout them. Well, he got those legs in high Used to walk 10 miles to school almost every day. And then after football practice, he'd trot back the same dis-

^•embc

1957

nothing quiet, shy or retiring about Karen. In fact, vivacious is a word that seems to have been coined just to describe the beautiful brunette who married Stephenson on June 12, 1955. There are no strangers to Karen Stephenson. When she talks—especially about Don—the words tumble out at an unbelievable rate, and it would take a highspeed motion picture camera to keep track of the changes of expression on her pretty face. "Duck and I started going steady in tenth grade," she answered to the first question. "T don't know where he got that name, but he's had it ever since before I met him." At this point, Don broke in to say, "My uncle gave it to me when I was a little boy. He said I followed him around like Donald Duck." "Duck had another nickname for a short time back in high school," Karen continued. "It was 'Splash' and I was responsible for it. During the summers in Bessemer several of the high school football players were working as life guards at the city swimming pool. Duck was one of them. But it seemed that Coach Snider (Snitz Snider, Bessemer High coach) wouldn't let the boys go in the water for the last thirty days before football practice opened. I was always trying to get Duck to swim during those thirty days. I don't know why unless it's because I'm a woman, but I did. And you know how he is about training. He just always lives by the letter of the rules. Well, it became an absolute obsession to me. I had to get him in that water, at least one time. I pleaded, cajoled, threatened—just about everything. But nothing seemed to budge him. So finally one day I announced from the water that if he loved me he would jump right in the


11 of quotations. He calls it Food He even has a few of his foughtHere's one," she conin ideas s h e it-opened the scrapbook. pool. Jimmy Thompson W a s ,u "*"** „»n W" he said he heard me and then th iinued. aS his 0 wn idea. 'It is better to silence for a minute and th '• someone else's joke than to tell splash. They called him -Splash".,11 I ^ o f your own. of that year. f ' n j i s tudv together most of the "People are always saying th,, R ue's not a bad student and he is so calm and collected. But p ° % awfully hard at his studies." V< him get pretty upset. Every t j m i ''V h l I she means." her husband said, the fender of the car he ' she has all the brains in the with me." I ! * why she went through college Editor's note: During the ,„, S L years and two summer terms. with the Stephensons, the phone rT ,n , s he' transferred around between track had ran into the back of ,/,""(" E schools while she was doing it. She hensons' car which was parked aclo'fher degree at Oglethorpe this June. street in front of a grocery storT F ffanted to teach this fall in Atlanta. disappeared to look at the damagi ! finished her practice teaching at "You watch when he comes back • l,v • •„» -> Street School and had signed a see if he doesn't tell me that I should Spring •tract when we found out we were park the car in front of that store ting to be parents late this fall." Karen continued. A few minutes later Don returnee • ..(^,-e J wanted to teach, but I'm "How many times have 1 told you • happier this way. I was a big hit at to park that car in front of the gm* Spring Street School, though," she conunued wistfully. "All the boys thought I store?" he asked calmly. , [he best teacher around because "What did I tell you," Karen Jul lantly exclaimed. "He's so consisten Duck was a football player. I took That's why I love him, or at least it's* the whole class to practice one day, and [ was the biggest thing in school from of the reasons. that time on. " H e lost his t e m p e r one t i m e . " "We don't study together now as much . used to. Duck goes to the library "I've only seen him lose his tempt one time. I mean really lose it. It ». I lot now, because he says I talk too right after we were married and hi much. But I notice he still asks me for just moved into this apartment. We ca help when he needs it." she added with home one night from the show and dro, I smile. into the garage in back to park the d He can cook, t o o . " A man was standing in the garage »i: "Did you know that Duck is a pretty a woman. The man had a knife out • good cook? When we have company he was threatening the woman. He b the car and the woman screamed, 1 Joes most of the cooking, although he'll better run. he's killed ten men and ht' deny it if you ask him. He's a great help Bound the house. But he's still the boss kill you too!' m this family. "Well. I was just terrified. But Du. "After he finishes Tech, I suspect he'll seemed pretty calm. Then the w* ran over and jumped into the car » PU) professional football if he can," she added, now off on another tack. . us and pushed Duck in the middle of 1 sure will," confirmed Don. "I'm front seat. The man ran over to the I st not ready to give up this game yet. and yelled. 'Do you want tofightnu "That did it. Duck screamed—I'll ne *tside of Karen, it's the most important ™>8 in my life at present. It's done a forget how he sounded—'You're 9 * or me, taught me a lot about gettine right I want to fight.' And when raj with other people in working toscreamed that he just rared back : rJ a common goal, helped me get seat and smashed his hands against <>"£h college, developed me as a irTan doors of the car. It must have! ™ many other things. I just don't want the man, because he jumped in "': and took out of there in a big hurry some'd6-" UP > e t ' ' k n o w n i h a v e t o got his license number and turned PTOfe ^ a n d ' d o n X i n t e n d to be a to the police. Then we took r «s'onal football bum. But 1 want to I.'M.-K was still take th1tr> f o r a C0L1 P le o f y e a r s , if I can y- e grade." when we eot home, he was that ad calm.Tt "But, he's usually very c~~ "^ld l uWt f lh8e a dt h e r e d up the notes and us ,h ' °or. the thouaht struck surprise a lot of people, but ^ ^ d Pe PS t h e S t e °ne a P"ensons have really a very gentle man. Do yo ( sr ihe tomVT ' m o r e f o r football than he collects quotations? He s s S ^ has done for them. philosopher in his own way- "

THE CAPTAIN AND HIS

DON: "Karen has been a great help to me in my studies. We've been studying together since our high school days."

KAREN:""Don does all of the shopping for us. I just can't control myself when I get in one of those super markets. I always buy everything in sight."

DON: "She's all woman. Stays on that phone an awful lot of the time. I get a big kick out of just listening."

10

?*n

r T e ^ Al" "

"f'embl e r

DON: "A captain has to do a lot of talking too you know. And that public speaking course I took last spring is going to come in handy now."

KAREN: "I'm proud of the way Duck has learned to speak in public. It used to bother him but not anymore. He's getting as bad about talking as I am."

1 DON: "Being a football player and a student can sure take a lot of your time. I feel like I might be neglecting Karen more than I should. She gets lonely."

KAREN: "Sure I get lonely. But Deke. our bird, is company now. And when the baby comes this November, I will have plenty to occupy me for a while."

- 1957 11


THE CAPTAIN AND H K . co

D O N : "Karen has been a great help to me in my studies. We've been studying together since our high school days."

K A R E N : " D o n does all of the shopping for us. I just can't control myself when 1 get in one of those super markets. I always buy everything in sight."

D O N : "She's all woman. Stays on that phone an awful lot of the time. I get a big kick out of just listening."

11 of quotations. H e calls it Food He even has a few of his il\t <h r"1- t v c " I ''""": i n i t . Here's o n e , " she condeaS she opened the scrapbook. p« n ' " nlied • aShU 0 v\n idea. 'It is better to •Tht- ,s*t someone else's joke than to tell KHll K

AT

*

pool. J i m m y Thompson was ^ ^ he said he heard me and then th ; silence for a mini linute and then th P n e r i splash. T h e y called him 'Splash' J of that year. "People are always saying t h a t K is so calm and collected. But I Viimn get net npretty r o t t v iupset. i n ^ i T~. Every tirnVi the fender of the car. he g e t s with m e . " Editor's Di,"r"'8 ">e im with th e Stephensons, s the phone - ; <he Phone ran:\ truck had run into the back of ;/, \ hensons' car which was parked acr street in front of a grocery slor^ disappeared to look at the dan, mage. " Y o u watch when he comes back see if he doesn't tell me that I should' park the car in front of that store K a r e n continued. A few minutes later Don returnee " H o w m a n y times have I told you g to park that car in front of the grog store?" he asked calmly. " W h a t did I tell you," Karen ju lantly exclaimed. "He's so consistar T h a t ' s why 1 love him, or at least it'son of the reasons.

,f your own k and I studv together most of the He's not a bad student and he h S studies "5s a wfully hafd '" her ' husband '" said, U hat she means. she has all the brains in the that " " w h y she went through college £ L years and two s u m m e r terms. "she transferred a r o u n d between 1" e schools while she was doing it. She P L , degree at Oglethorpe this J u n e . L wanted to teach this fall in Atlanta. \ finished her practice teaching at - jug Street School and h a d signed a Jan-act when we found out we were soing to be parents late this fall." • ..s"ure i wanted to teach, but I'm happier this way. I was a big hit at Spring Street School, though," she contmued wistfully. "All the boys thought I ggs the best teacher a r o u n d because Duck was a football player. I took [be whole class to practice one day, and [ was the biggest thing in school from ihat time on. " H e lost his t e m p e r one t i m e . " "We don't study together now as much . used to. Duck goes to the library "I've only seen him lose his temp one time. I m e a n really lose it. It I I lot now, because he says I talk too right after we were married and b> much. But I notice he still asks m e for just m o v e d into this apartment. We cam help when he needs it." she added with h o m e one night from the show and drc j smile. into the garage in back to park the ci He can cook, t o o . " A m a n was standing in the garage »r. "Did you know that D u c k is a pretty a w o m a n . T h e man had a knife out st was threatening the woman. He blocte good cook? When we have c o m p a n y he the car and the woman screamed, j does most of the cooking, although he'll better run. he's killed ten men and be', deny it if you ask him. He's a great help round the house. But he's still the boss kill you too!" "Well. I was just terrified. But Du; in this family. "After he finishes Tech, I suspect he'll seemed pretty calm. Then the WOIK professional football if he c a n , " she ran over and jumped into the ear »' added, now off on another tack. . us and pushed Duck in the middle of "I sure will," confirmed D o n . " I ' m front seat. T h e m a n ran over to the st not ready to give up this g a m e yet. and yelled. ' D o you want to fight mi Jwside of Karen, it's the most important " T h a t did it. D u c k screamed—I'D* ,ng m m I y life at present. It's d o n e a forget how he sounded—'You're i tor me, taught me a lot about getting right I want to fight.' And viM • J wth other people in working toscreamed that he just rared back I I c °mmon goal, helped m e get lh seat and smashed his hands against °"gh college, developed m e as a m a n doors of the car. It must have! any o t h e r things. I just don't want 0 „• the man, because he jumped in » U V P yet- I know I'll have to and took out of there in a big hurry got his license n u m b e r and turned profe! V' a n d ' d o n ' 1 i n t e n d to be a ; ' ° " a l football bum. But 1 want to to the police. T h e n we took the ;'"•> for a couple of years, if I can to h e r h o m e . Boy, Duck was still KL t h e grade." when we got home, he was that • "But. he's usually very calm. l » "«««d I W 1 8 a t h e r e d UP the notes and t h e do surprise a lot of people, but ^ ^ us i h a . ° r - the thouaht struck really a very gentle man. Do yo ^ i d o n e a „ P e r h a p s t h e Stephensons have 7 He's sort lhe 6 deal m o r e for aarrfp u football than he collects quotations rk^ l a s done for them. philosopher in his own way 10

Tech

Aim"'

D O N : "A captain has to do a lot of talking too you know. And that public speaking course I took last spring is going to come in handy now."

L

'e»en,bl e r

, 19S7

KAREN: "I'm has learned to to bother him getting as bad

proud of the way Duck speak in public. It used but not anymore. He's about talking as I am."

DON: "Being a football player and a student can sure take a lot of your time. I feel like I might be neglecting Karen more than I should. She gets lonely."

KAREN: "Sure I get lonely. But Deke. our bird, is company now. And when the baby comes this November, I will have plenty to occupy me for a while."


s to Watch

The

Ed Danforth, recently retired Atlanta Sports editor and Jacket follower since 1 9 2 0 , takes a special look at the 1 9 5 7 team and the rest of the SEC, an ALUMNUS exclusive

ECH MEN will find out how the other half lives this fall. For the first time within memory, the Engineers will take the field with a band of innocent Sophomores who never have played in a college football game. The core of seasoned players is the smallest in modern times. The team will be spirited, but it will be inclined to go galloping off in all directions in the excitement of playing marbles for keeps. That forecast is intended as an amber light to ease the shock when other teams begin throwing long passes for touchdowns. Sophomores just don't win in this league, coaches have found. They usually can move the ball, but they always have a tough time keeping the other team under control. That is the outlook as the 1957 En-

gineers take off against Kentucky in the afternoon half of a double header at Grant Field, September 21. Georgia and Texas will furnish the night show in the double feature that will pack The Flats twice in one day. After battling Kentucky in what looks like an even game at this distance, the Engineers play Southern Methodist here, then take an off day to regroup. From then on the program is LSU, Auburn, Tulane, Duke, Tennessee, Alabama, Florida and Georgia. It is the same program that Bobby Dodd's "best team I ever coached" played last year and lost one game (Tennessee). Nineteen seniors of that matchless squad have gone the way of all Engineers into industrial jobs at a handsome salary. It just does not figure that their successors can do that well (9-1-0) or even come close. Bobby Dodd has been calm in his public appraisals of his squad since he looked them over in spring practice. Both squads moved the ball well and completed passes with shocking regularity. Eighteen out of 35 pitches were completed for 251 yards with only two interceptions. That means the quarterbacks can throw. It also means the defensive halfbacks have a lot to learn about their trade. Lew Woodruff, defensive backfield coach, figures he has a lot of hard drilling ahead of him. He is not used to seeing long passes hurt Tech and he does not want to start suffering at this stage of his career. The press and national magazines have rated Tech close to the top of the Southeastern Conference and among the nation's best. That is a compliment to Bobby Dodd and his staff and to the fine record of Tech in recent years. It will take a nifty miracle and a generous helping of what they call "Dodd luck" to escape

< The key to the 1957 Tech season may rest with Stan Flowers, (33), the only experienced back and Fred Brasleton, (11). 12

vVhose names are familiar will W headlines, but none but the 1* n l i , would trv to guess all the new i°°lK,, will appear. a ' ,J down of established operators A [Thack again presumably as good """Twould include: * S , Stephenson. Tech center; Lou .•h,ds Kentucky tackle; Jerry Na^ rich end: Jimmy Phillips, Auburn *°? Charlie Mitchell. Florida tackle; „TJohnson, Florida guard; Stan Flow" S S halfback; Phil King, Vanderu,' halfback; Tommy Lonno, Auburn halfback- Jim Rountree, Florida half\ Tommy Bronson, Tennessee full| Bill Stacy, Mississippi State quarhi'ck They are old settlers at their positions and can be expected to go Pl:i

THE YEAR OF THE INNOCENTS

T

?m

what happened to Notre Dame las under similar circumstances. A 6-4-0 season looks about right ar 7-3-0 an optimistic score. That 7-3J was the figure in 1954 when the Wade Mitchell-George Volkert crew were Sophomores. Where Tech will figure in the SEC tf race poses an interesting problem. Mississippi with their usual stormv, well-coached team has a good chance to win, while Auburn. Tennessee, Tech, Kentucky and Florida are bumping each other off. Coaches rate the top six teams on potential as Tennessee, Auburn, Tech. Ole Miss, Kentucky and Florida. Here is how they are matched in schedule: TENNESSEE plays Auburn, Tech, Ok Miss, Kentucky. AUBURN plays Tennessee, Kentucky Tech, Florida. TECH plays Kentucky, Auburn nessee, Florida. KENTUCKY plays Tech. Ole Florida, Auburn, Tennessee. FLORIDA plays Kentucky, Auburn Tech. Figure the chances of any one of thai top six going through undefeated and U Rebels Took"like the best bet. The two big ones, Kentucky in September an Tennessee in November. They look bi ter than the rest of their opponents. Kentucky has it rough in starting I with four bruisers in a row. Florida could do well for the btf sanies are well spaced. Tennesss burn, and Tech will take care of 0 other and see to it none escapes. Of the top six, Tech grades lowes experience. The others have more pro' players available. Grouped in the second division <* "winter book" are Mississippi State, Vanderbilt, Tulane, Georgia and bama. If one of them breaks out concentration camp, it will be a si to one and all. Tech Ai""""

Taking a guess at Sophomores who ,howed promise in spring practice, it might be well to watch: JECH—Jack Rudolph, end; Rousey lliason, tackle: John Reed, guard; Fred Braselton, quarterback; Cal James and Floyd Faucette, halfbacks; Jim Benson, fullback.

ADDENDUM- FOUR NEW

GEORGIA—Larry Lancaster, tackle; Tommy Lewis, quarterback; Charlie Britt, quarterback; Don Soberdash, halfback. TENNESSEE—Mike LaSorza, end; Paul Caver, halfback. KENTUCKY—Glenn Shaw, halfback. FLORIDA—Charlie Baetzman, tackle; Mickey Ellenburg, quarterback; Don Deal, halfback. VANDERBILT — Richard Thompson, guard; Tom Moore, halfback. ALABAMA—Charley Allen, tackle; Don Cochran, guard; Gary O'Steen, quarterback. TULANE—Neal Jones, center; Richie Pettibon, quarterback. MISSISSIPPI STATE — Ned Brooks, end; Bob Sisk, tackle; Willie Daniel, halfback. AUBURN—Zeke Smith, guard; Johnny Kern, quarterback; Jackie Burkett, center. MISSISSIPPI—Cowboy Woodruff, halfback; Charles Flowers, fullback. LSU—Jimmy Hardin, fullback; Billy Cannon, halfback. No Southeastern Conference regular season games will be seen on national

TEACHERS

nit FOUR MEN looking out of the picture below are the newest additions to the Tech coaching staff. They are, left to right, Carl Wise, Bob Cummings, Dick Inman and Charlie Tate. Wise, the new backfield coach, came to Tech from Clemson where he handled the backs for two years. He has coached at Penn, Washington and Lee, several high schools and in the Canadian Professional League. Cummings, who replaced Bob Bossons as B team coach and chief

television for the first time since the NCAA took control. Tech has made national TV ten times counting bowl games and cannot gracefully complain. No SEC games were scheduled because sponsors professed to find a low rating index on SEC games in the past. Of course the samples were taken by the rating systems in the more populous north and mid-west, so it is no surprise that Southeastern games did not score well with the systems. It may take a good deal of pressure and salesmanship to get SEC games back on the air. The sponsors have the say-so. The NCAA has no quarrel with the SEC, but they must sell their product. Meanwhile, ticket sales are healthy around the circuit and nobody is talking hard times. Tech has had the strongest season ticket sale in history. The Engineers will be eager and interesting. They will block and tackle hard. They make the leather pop even in practice. It is a team worth watching and will win more than it loses. It is about a year away from greatness as the word has come to be understood at The Flats.

scout, played one year at Tech as a Navy V-12 transfer. He came to Tech from Vanderbilt where he was a line coach. Inman played on Tech's '51, '52 and '53 teams and coached at the ""Flats" before going into the service. He's back now to become assistant scout and B team coach. Tate, a former Florida backfield great, is the new freshman coach. He held the same job at Florida last year and prior to that was one of the Souths outstanding high school coaches. They all have a tough job to do in 1957.

?

^5S


t0

Watch

""'"'""'' whose names are familiar will Players « , . , h P la I k L headlines, but none but tthe the new u,d try to guess a11

THE YEAR OF THE INNOCENTS

* .Kdv »'° tLX

h i will appear. J down of established operators A !« back again presumably as good * h l 'T»ould include: "Jv!n Stephenson. Tech center; Lou £ ? " l s Kentucky tackle; Jerry NaM bors Tech end: Jimmy Phillips, Auburn *e * c n a r | i e Mitchell, Florida tackle; Sn'Johnson, Florida guard; Stan Flow" Tech halfback; Phil King, Vanderu,' halfback: Tommy Lonno, Auburn talfback- Jim R ° u n t r e e . Florida halfi-' Tommy Bronson, Tennessee full| Bill Stacy, Mississippi State quarbick They are old settlers at their positions and can be expected to go r Taking a guess at Sophomores who jbowed promise in spring practice, it might be well to watch: -rECH—Jack Rudolph, end; Rousey Mason, tackle; John Reed, guard; Fred Braselton, quarterback; Cal James and Floyd Faucette, halfbacks; Jim Benson, fullback. ,tJ

Ed Danforth, recently retired Atlanta Sports editor and Jacket follower since 1920,

takes a special look at the 1 9 5 7 team

and the rest of the SEC, an ALUMNUS exclusive

T

ECH MEN will find out how the other half lives this fall. For the first time within memory, the Engineers will take the field with a band of innocent Sophomores who never have played in a college football game. The core of seasoned players is the smallest in modern times. The team will be spirited, but it will be inclined to go galloping off in all directions in the excitement of playing marbles for keeps. That forecast is intended as an amber light to ease the shock when other teams begin throwing long passes for touchdowns. Sophomores just don't win in this league, coaches have found. They usually can move the ball, but they always have a tough time keeping the other team under control. That is the outlook as the 1957 En-

gineers take off against Kentucky in the afternoon half of a double header at Grant Field, September 21. Georgia and Texas will furnish the night show in the double feature that will pack The Flats twice in one day. After battling Kentucky in what looks like an even game at this distance, the Engineers play Southern Methodist here, then take an off day to regroup. From then on the program is LSU, Auburn, Tulane, Duke, Tennessee, Alabama, Florida and Georgia. It is the same program that Bobby Dodd's "best team I ever coached" played last year and lost one game (Tennessee). Nineteen seniors of that matchless squad have gone the way of all Engineers into industrial jobs at a handsome salary. It just does not figure that their successors can do that well (9-1-0) or even come close. Bobby Dodd has been calm in his public appraisals of his squad since he looked them over in spring practice. Both squads moved the ball well and completed passes with shocking regularity. Eighteen out of 35 pitches were completed for 251 yards with only two interceptions. That means the quarterbacks can throw. It also means the defensive halfbacks have a lot to learn about their trade. Lew Woodruff, defensive backfield coach, figures he has a lot of hard drilling ahead of him. He is not used to seeing long passes hurt Tech and he does not want to start suffering at this stage of his career. The press and national magazines have rated Tech close to the top of the Southeastern Conference and among the nation's best. That is a compliment to Bobby Dodd and his staff and to the fine record of Tech in recent years. It will take a nifty miracle and a generous helping of what they call "Dodd luck" to escape

< The key to the 1957 Tech season may rest with Stan Flowers, (33), the only experienced back and Fred Brasleton, (11).

what happened to Notre Dame last yea, under similar circumstances. A 6-4-0 season looks about right at 7-3-0 an optimistic score. That 7-3J was the figure in 1954 when the Wads Mitchell-George Volkert crew were Sophomores. Where Tech will figure in the SEC M race poses an interesting problem. Mississippi with their usual stormy well-coached team has a good cha win, while Auburn. Tennessee, Tech, Kentucky and Florida are bumping each other off. Coaches rate the top six teams on potential as Tennessee, Auburn, Tech. Ole Miss, Kentucky and Florida. Here is how they are matched in schedule: TENNESSEE plays Auburn, Tech, Ok Miss, Kentucky. AUBURN plays Tennessee, Kentucm Tech, Florida. TECH plays Kentucky, Auburn nessee, Florida. KENTUCKY plays Tech, Ole , Florida, Auburn, Tennessee. FLORIDA plays Kentucky, Aub Tech. Figure the chances of any one of top six going through undefeated and Rebels look like the best bet. They two big ones, Kentucky in September a Tennessee in November. They look bi ter than the rest of their opponents. Kentucky has it rough in starting I with four bruisers in a row. Florida could do well for the hrt games are well spaced. Tennessee, A burn, and Tech will take care of « other and see to it none escapes. Of the top six, Tech grades lowes experience. The others have more pro' players available. Grouped in the second division o! "winter book" are Mississippi State, Vanderbilt, Tulane, Georgia and bama. If one of them breaks out ol concentration camp it wilill be a sun? to one and all. Tech Al«'

12

^

i

ADDENDUM- FOUR NEW

GEORGIA—Larry Lancaster, tackle; Tommy Lewis, quarterback: Charlie Britt, quarterback; Don Soberdash, halfback. TENNESSEE—Mike LaSorza, end; Paul Caver, halfback. KENTUCKY—Glenn Shaw, halfback. FLORIDA—Charlie Baetzman, tackle; Mickey Ellenburg, quarterback; Don Deal, halfback. VANDERBILT — Richard Thompson, guard; Tom Moore, halfback. ALABAMA—Charley Allen, tackle; Don Cochran, guard; Gary O'Steen, quarterback. TULANE—Neal Jones, center; Richie Pettibon, quarterback. MISSISSIPPI STATE — Ned Brooks, end; Bob Sisk, tackle; Willie Daniel, halfback. AUBURN—Zeke Smith, guard; Johnny Kern, quarterback; Jackie Burkett, center. MISSISSIPPI—Cowboy Woodruff, halfback; Charles Flowers, fullback. LSU—Jimmy Hardin, fullback; Billy Cannon, halfback. No Southeastern Conference regular season games will be seen on national

TEACHERS

THE FOUR MEN looking out of the picture below are the newest additions to the Tech coaching staff. They are, left to right, Carl Wise, Bob Cummings. Dick Inman and Charlie Tate. Wise, the new backfield coach, came to Tech from Clemson where he handled the backs for two years. He has coached at Penn, Washington and Lee, leveral high schools and in the Canadian Professional League. Cummings, who replaced Bob Bossons as B team coach and chief

television for the first time since the NCAA took control. Tech has made national TV ten times counting bowl games and cannot gracefully complain. No SEC games were scheduled because sponsors professed to find a low rating index on SEC games in the past. Of course the samples were taken by the rating systems in the more populous north and mid-west, so it is no surprise that Southeastern games did not score well with the systems. It may take a good deal of pressure and salesmanship to get SEC games back on the air. The sponsors have the say-so. The NCAA has no quarrel with the SEC, but they must sell their product. Meanwhile, ticket sales are healthy around the circuit and nobody is talking hard times. Tech has had the strongest season ticket sale in history. The Engineers will be eager and interesting. They will block and tackle hard. They make the leather pop even in practice. It is a team worth watching and will win more than it loses. It is about a year away from greatness as the word has come to be understood at The Flats.

scout, played one year at Tech as a Navy V-12 transfer. He came to Tech from Vanderbilt where he was a line coach. Inman played on Tech's '51, '52 and '53 teams and coached at the "Flats" before going into the service. He's back now to become assistant scout and B team coach. Tate, a former Florida backfield great, is the new freshman coach. He held the same job at Florida last year and prior to that was one of the Souths outstanding high school coaches. They all have a tough job to do in 1957.


This gifted and resourceful teach imagination encompassed far ^ ' areas than shingles and radiators • shall mention in a few moments. Another illustration—the autom h is recognized as the great Arrieri phenomenon. Some years ago it was an ular to compare our standard of i: -^ with the standards of other countrie I terms of the number of bathtubs capita. In present day comparisons aut[ in early childhood. I hope that sopho- mobiles are counted rather than h moric sophistication has not dulled your tubs, and this is probably logical \» cause Americans take even more rid beliefs in simple fundamental virtues. If this has occurred, you will relearn their than they do baths. It has required tremendous ima°incompelling meaning in later years. tion on the part of the automobile injUs. Now—to return to the consideration of try to create six million unsatisfied cut the key, imagination, certain elements in the equipment of a useful person are not tomers annually. These customers are not dissatisfied with their current vehicles as necessary today as they were in earlier years. For example, in former decades, but are unsatisfied until they obtain the a man's capacity to produce sheer power new models which imaginative engineers was important, but not so today, be- and stylists have created. It is significant that the automobile, the new yardstick cause an electric motor can furnish power to better advantage than can man. of the standard of living, is more techniSimilarly, a modern encyclopedia repre- cally complex than the bathtub, and thai sents a more comprehensive accumula- automobiles have been made available to millions of purchasers through tion of knowledge than is possible within native American engineering manuU one human mind. And today's calculating machines are far more competent turing methods, duplicated in no other in certain mathematical areas than is a country. person. However, one of the essential The industry with which I am more elements for which no book or mechan- directly concerned, namely the developism can substitute is man's imagination. ment and manufacture of aircraft and Let us examine a few of the contri- their propulsion, has been erected more on imagination than on any other factor. butions of imaginative technology. I have often thought back to one of The visions of the Wright Brothers wen revolutionary, but not more so than the my days as a student at Georgia Tech in the class of the late Dr. J. S. Coon, progress which has been made since the able and brilliant head of Tech's their first flight half a century ago. For Mechanical Engineering Department at each step in this progress there was subthat time. His lecture that day dealt stantially no precedent and guidana with a current engineering project. Uncle came only through imagination. Si, as we all knew him, but never dared to call him, had been annoyed by a \ J N E MEASURE of this progress is noisy steam radiator in his office and he found in the amount of power available reasoned that this "water hammer" was to the pilot of an interceptor aircrafi due to improper drainage of the radiator. During World War I the greatest powei As he walked to school that morning he employed was that of the 400 horsepassed a house where the roof was be- power Liberty engine. By the end ol ing repaired and he picked up a wooden World War II interceptors were flying shingle. Upon arriving at his office he with 4,000 horsepower. Today the interraised the inlet end of the noisy radiator cepter pilot is provided with as much and forced the shingle, as a wedge, under as 75.000 horsepower. And imagination that end. He stood back to observe the is already guiding the designs of inter results and found that the "water ham- ceptor engines which, in less than a « mer" was substantially noiser than it had cade, wilf produce 400.000 horsepower During the first forty years of the hi been before. Without wasting time worrying about the theory of the matter, century following the first flight at Kil Hawk, aircraft engines, all of whj Uncle Si removed the shingle, raised the outlet end of the radiator by the use of were of the piston type, inched then his wedge and noted with satisfaction way toward higher performance. Ho" that the noise ceased. After illustrating ever, imagination superseded the incbffl this simple but imaginative approach, process and the new turbo-prop I Dr. Coon concluded by saying, "Now turbo-jet engines were conceived, re" boys, this teaches you how engineering is lutionizing the capability of aircraft-* jet engine now produces 20 times really done."

EDWARD B. NEWILL, '15, A GENERAL MOTORS EXECUTIVE, GIVES THE CLASS OF 1957 SOME EXCELLENT ADVICE

I M A G I N A T I O N - key to achievement

W

ELCOME

to the engineering and

scientific professions! Today you are joining a respected group of citizens who are proud of their professions. Scientists and engineers have made tremendous contributions to our era and will make even greater ones. Members of our profession strive to progress by adding to civilization—by learning the laws of nature and employing them in the creation of plus values. The members of our profession have been busy, particularly during the last twenty years and the demand for technical accomplishment is becoming increasingly great. Therefore we welcome you—your youth, your energy, your courage, your imagination and your impatience with old barriers. At this season of the year, many commencement addresses are being made throughout our land. Most of them are interesting. Most are worthwhile and are worthy of being remembered, but almost all of them are forgotten promptly. Today I hope to be able to present to you at least one thought—no, just one word —which you will remember through the years. Not that it is important that you remember this talk, but that I may provide you with a key which will open closed doors that otherwise would bar your progress. That one word is IMAGINATION—the keenest tool in an engineer's kit. This is the tool without which no great engineering or scientific accomplishment is ever consummated. Imagination—the only picture you can draw of the future. Imagination—the first and greatest element in all creative effort. As to remembering this key word, Imagination. I threaten you that through repetition, if by no other means, I will cause you to remember it for at least a few years of this professional career you are entering today. I hasten to add that there are other characteristics which are necessary in a truly successful engineering life. Some of these are integrity, knowledge, dedication, persistence, courage, soundness of judgment and a love for plain hard work. However, you know these things and I will not dwell upon the essential precepts, some of which you began to learn

oovver per pound of weight as the reciproca tin g engine, dictating its be*1, ^ h performance aircraft. <& '" pagination can be accelerated. concepts of aircraft propulsion Todayhe future discard current engines . jl^ f radically improved types of i think 0 bo-Pr°P a n d t u r b o " J e t e n S l n e s > a s w e ' l r ward new forms of engines such as '' :ets turbo rockets and nuclear power r m ' , m s Further, we imagine these en\C operating, not with conventional •tlrocarbon fuels, such as gasoline, but th new exotic fuels containing substantially more energy per pound of . aht Today, several of these fuels have teen produced only in test tubes, but agination assures us that production in hiusands of tons is feasible, despite the oresent production rate of only teaspoonfuls in the laboratory. In our work with gas turbine engines for aircraft, experiments with complete <n»ines a r e costly and time consuming. One of t n e m o r e complex problems is ihe determination of the necessary characteristics of the fuel control system. Imaginative young engineers have used analogue computers to solve this problem without costly and time consuming experimentation involving complete engines. In fact, before an engine is ever built, imagination permits applying the engine's characteristics to a series of electronic "black boxes" and quickly obijining substantially all necessary information through the analogue.

is, lawyers, teachers, preachers, leaders in government and others, than was the case some years ago. The employment of constructive imagination is the means whereby these groups can understand each other and can participate in team attacks on common problems. During a recent conference of our Aircraft Industries Association it was impressive to hear one of America's leading bankers make an appraisal of future economic trends. Along with his review of such well known indices as Gross National Product, National Personal Income, Ingot Production, etc., he stressed the importance of our nation's annual industrial research budget. He was much encouraged concerning future business prospects because research expenditures in 1956 were 28% greater than in 1955 and the 1957 research budget is 2 0 % larger than in 1956. He is banking on the country's investment in imagination. I stated earlier that there would be another reference to Dr. Coon, but first let me quote what David has written in the Book of Psalms. He writes, in part, "What is man that Thou art mindful of him? . . . Thou hast made him little less than God . . . Thou hast given him dominion over the works of Thy hands." Dr. Coon stated his philosophy in this way. "I would be despondent indeed if I thought that man would not eventually unlock all the secrets of the universe." Dr. Coon, through his imagination and his belief in the future, was stating that it is the responsibility of each generation LEAVING THE AREA of man-carrying to add to the accumulated store of knowlaircraft, we find imagination to be most edge so that we may eventually be cogprominent in the development of guided nizant of the real significance of this missiles. The perplexing enigma in this universe and its laws. These are the art is to assure that the missiles will building blocks for all engineering and reach the selected targets. Their guidance scientific work and should lead us some systems involve stellar navigation, radar day to that attainment described by or infrared target seeking systems and David. "Thou hast given him dominion inertial systems. The hour hand of a over the works of Thy hands." watch appears to move imperceptibly. And now, my young friends, in closHowever, one inertial guidance system ing—let us recognize a basic truth. Sucdetects and corrects any turning of the cess in life is not a destination, it is a missile from its true course if the deviajourney. Fortunately, this means that no tion is as much as one-three thousandth one is obliged to work toward a single of the angular velocity of the hour hand. distant goal and be judged successful The imaginations of groups of engionly if he attains that one objective. As neers and scientists are solving the probwith a traveler, the end of the journey is ems which I have mentioned. What is usually beyond the range of vision, but 'eft for your imagination to undertake? there is much of interest and beauty I T IS OFTEN SAID that we use words Continuing with consideration of mis- to conceal our thoughts, rather than to along the way to reward each day's steps. * guidance systems, some imaginative convey them. Truly, it requires imagi- The happiest journey is not made with engineer will learn the secret of the nation— and the ability to use non-tech- downcast eyes which see only tired dusty Method of navigation employed by a nical language—to accomplish a meeting feet, but with uplifted sight to appreciate a rner pigeon. A guidance system of this of minds with another person, and thus the visible panorama and with the imagiei 8nt, size and accuracy would be most to make possible cooperation with him. nation to understand its significance and •aluablr J°le -in the defense of our country, On a wider scale, in these days of high to picture what may lie beyond. The Of course you have read of the ex- specialization, it is probable that the stars were made for those who look up f'ments during which two persons who scientists and engineers have less mutual and whose imagination knows no limiere remote from each other have com- understanding with the humanists, that tations. s

14

Tech Alu""""

municated without visible or detectable means. Nevertheless, this communication by telepathy, or extrasensory perception, is undeniable. I will risk the guess that a scientist in the physical field, rather than one in the biological area, some day will understand and make use of this fact of nature. Is your imagination adequate to undertake this useful task? As you look toward the future, possibly your imagination should exert itself under water. Seriously, the oceans of our sphere contain vast quantities of practically all materials needed by man. The potential availability of atomic energy promises enough cheap electric power to contemplate the electrolytic reduction of sea water for the recovery of great varieties and vast quantities of many salts and minerals. Thus, when our mine shafts are exhausted, a combination of imagination and sea water can supply our needs. Your imagination may be stimulated by the dilemma that one of the future's scarce commodities will be fresh water. The purified sea water could furnish the billions of tons of this material needed by home and industry, and atomic power could then pump the water to millions of arid acres where moisture is all that is needed to produce great quantities of foodstuffs and industrial supplies. Departing from physical matters, there are other areas in which imagination is all important to the engineer or scientist. Let me warn you that members of these professions are considered generally to be introverts and, there is much evidence to justify this belief. Possibly lack of imagination trends to center interest on one's self, but broad imagination is essential in working with your fellow man. If you are to work in industry, I urge you to be sufficiently imaginative to try to understand the whole problem of your company, rather than interesting yourself solely in your own field. Let's make it broader than that, you will serve your company and yourself better if your imagination also encompasses your customers' needs and desires. In the last analysis, you are on your customers' payroll and your concern with their requirements must be even greater than your enthusiasm for your own technology.

ept,

ember, 1957

13


EDWARD B. NEWILL, '15, A GENERAL MOTORS EXECUTIVE, GIVES THE CLASS OF 1957 SOME EXCELLENT ADVICE

I M A G I N A T I O N - key to achievement

W

ELCOME

to the engineering and

scientific professions! Today you are joining a respected group of citizens who are proud of their professions. Scientists and engineers have made tremendous contributions to our era and will make even greater ones. Members of our profession strive to progress by adding to civilization—by learning the laws of nature and employing them in the creation of plus values. The members of our profession have been busy, particularly during the last twenty years and the demand for technical accomplishment is becoming increasingly great. Therefore we welcome you—your youth, your energy, your courage, your imagination and your impatience with old barriers. At this season of the year, many commencement addresses are being made throughout our land. Most of them are interesting. Most are worthwhile and are worthy of being remembered, but almost all of them are forgotten promptly. Today I hope to be able to present to you at least one thought—no, just one word —which you will remember through the years. Not that it is important that you remember this talk, but that I may provide you with a key which will open closed doors that otherwise would bar your progress. That one word is IMAGINATION—the keenest tool in an engineer's kit. This is the tool without which no great engineering or scientific accomplishment is ever consummated. Imagination—the only picture you can draw of the future. Imagination—the first and greatest element in all creative effort. As to remembering this key word, Imagination. I threaten you that through repetition, if by no other means, I will cause you to remember it for at least a few years of this professional career you are entering today. I hasten to add that there are other characteristics which are necessary in a truly successful engineering life. Some of these are integrity, knowledge, dedication, persistence, courage, soundness of judgment and a love for plain hard work. However, you know these things and 1 will not dwell upon the essential precepts, some of which you began to learn

in early childhood. I hope that sophomoric sophistication has not dulled your beliefs in simple fundamental virtues. If this has occurred, you will relearn their compelling meaning in later years. Now—to return to the consideration of the key, imagination, certain elements in the equipment of a useful person are not as necessary today as they were in earlier years. For example, in former decades, a man's capacity to produce sheer power was important, but not so today, because an electric motor can furnish power to better advantage than can man. Similarly, a modern encyclopedia represents a more comprehensive accumulation of knowledge than is possible within one human mind. And today's calculating machines are far more competent in certain mathematical areas than is a person. However, one of the essential elements for which no book or mechanism can substitute is man's imagination. Let us examine a few of the contributions of imaginative technology. I have often thought back to one of my days as a student at Georgia Tech in the class of the late Dr. J. S. Coon, the able and brilliant head of Tech's Mechanical Engineering Department at that time. His lecture that day dealt with a current engineering project. Uncle Si, as we all knew him, but never dared to call him, had been annoyed by a noisy steam radiator in his office and he reasoned that this "water hammer" was due to improper drainage of the radiator. As he walked to school that morning he passed a house where the roof was being repaired and he picked up a wooden shingle. Upon arriving at his office he raised the inlet end of the noisy radiator and forced the shingle, as a wedge, under that end. He stood back to observe the results and found that the "water hammer" was substantially noiser than it had been before. Without wasting time worrying about the theory of the matter. Uncle Si removed the shingle, raised the outlet end of the radiator by the use of his wedge and noted with satisfaction that the noise ceased. After illustrating this simple but imaginative approach, Dr. Coon concluded by saying, "Now boys, this teaches you how engineering is really done."

This gifted and resourceful tes imagination encompassed far h e areas than shingles and radiator? shall mention in a few moments Another illustration—the autom is recognized as the great Amer phenomenon. Some years ago it vva ular to compare our standard of y**1 with the standards of other countri'' terms of the number of bathtub" capita. In present day comparisons aiT' mobiles are counted rather than b tubs, and this is probably logical l» cause Americans take even more ride! than they do baths. It has required tremendous imagina. tion on the part of the automobile indus try to create six million unsatisfied ej tomers annually. These customers a not dissatisfied with their current vehicles but are unsatisfied until they obtain the new models which imaginative engineers and stylists have created. It is sign that the automobile, the new yan of the standard of living, is more technically complex than the bathtub, and that automobiles have been made available to millions of purchasers through native American engineering mat turing methods, duplicated in no other country. The industry with which I am directly concerned, namely the develop- j ment and manufacture of aircraft an their propulsion, has been erected more on imagination than on any other factor. The visions of the Wright Brothers were revolutionary, but not more so than th> progress which has been made sino their first flight half a century ago. For each step in this progress there was M stantially no precedent and guidance came only through imagination. O N E MEASURE of this progress found in the amount of power availab to the pilot of an interceptor aircrs During World War I the greatest po» employed was that of the 400 hors power' Liberty engine. By the end' World War II interceptors were f with 4,000 horsepower. Today the it cepter pilot is provided with as n as 75,000 horsepower. And imagffl is already guiding the designs of ceptor engines which, in less than a cade, will produce 400,000 horsepo« During the first forty years of the century following the first flight aM Hawk, aircraft engines, all of were of the piston type, inche way toward higher performance * ever, imagination superseded trie process and the new turbo-prop^' turbo-jet engines were conceive . ^ lutionizing the capability of a ' r c [ a m e s . jet engine now produces -0

w er per pound of weight as the n^"h ^Locating engine, dictating its K 1 r " hish performance aircraft. imagination can be accelerated. " concepts of aircraft propulsion r ^ f u t u r e discard current engines & h U of radically improved types of Dro p and turbo-jet engines, as well ard new forms of engines such as 1 eb turbo rockets and nuclear power ' m , L ' Further, we imagine these enoperating, not with conventional drocarbon fuels, such as gasoline, but h new exotic fuels containing subI'ntiallv more energy per pound of right Today, several of these fuels have I produced only in test tubes, but Pagination assures us that production in ,ousands of tons is feasible, despite the present production rate of only teaspoontuls in the laboratory. In our work with gas turbine engines for aircraft, experiments with complete engines are costly and time consuming. One of the more complex problems is the determination of the necessary characteristics of the fuel control system. Imaginative young engineers have used analogue computers to solve this problem without costly and time consuming experimentation involving complete engines. In fact, before an engine is ever built, imagination permits applying the engine's characteristics to a series of elecironic "black boxes" and quickly obtaining substantially all necessary information through the analogue.

LEAVING

Sr car.

14

of

man-carrying

wi learn the secret f the of

"

°

navigation employed by a fr Pigeon. A guidance system of this Ulii hi S ' Ze a n d a c c u r a c y would be most p e in the defense of our country. PenmeC°tUrSe y ° U h a v e r e a d o f t h e e x " »ere r d U n n g W h i c h t w o P e r s o n s who emote from each other have com5e

Tech M*""*

THE AREA

aircraft, we find imagination to be most prominent in the development of guided missiles. The perplexing enigma in this art is to assure that the missiles will reach the selected targets. Their guidance os involve stellar navigation, radar » infrared target seeking systems and menial systems. The hour hand of a witch appears to move imperceptibly. However, one inertial guidance system detects and corrects any turning of the fissile from its true course if the deviajj» is as much as one-three thousandth 'toe angular velocity of the hour hand. The imaginations of groups of engi•erj and scientists are solving the probe s which I have mentioned. What is ft for your imagination to undertake? Continuing with consideration of misguidance systems, some imaginative

P'emb

«r, 1957

municated without visible or detectable means. Nevertheless, this communication by telepathy, or extrasensory perception, is undeniable. I will risk the guess that a scientist in the physical field, rather than one in the biological area, some day will understand and make use of this fact of nature. Is your imagination adequate to undertake this useful task? As you look toward the future, possibly your imagination should exert itself under water. Seriously, the oceans of our sphere contain vast quantities of practically all materials needed by man. The potential availability of atomic energy promises enough cheap electric power to contemplate the electrolytic reduction of sea water for the recovery of great varieties and vast quantities of many salts and minerals. Thus, when our mine shafts are exhausted, a combination of imagination and sea water can supply our needs. Your imagination may be stimulated by the dilemma that one of the future's scarce commodities will be fresh water. The purified sea water could furnish the billions of tons of this material needed by home and industry, and atomic power could then pump the water to millions of arid acres where moisture is all that is needed to produce great quantities of foodstuffs and industrial supplies. Departing from physical matters, there are other areas in which imagination is all important to the engineer or scientist. Let me warn you that members of these professions are considered generally to be introverts and, there is much evidence to justify this belief. Possibly lack of imagination trends to center interest on one's self, but broad imagination is essential in working with your fellow man. If you are to work in industry, I urge you to be sufficiently imaginative to try to understand the whole problem of your company, rather than interesting yourself solely in your own field. Let's make it broader than that, you will serve your company and yourself better if your imagination also encompasses your customers' needs and desires. In the last analysis, you are on your customers' payroll and your concern with their requirements must be even greater than your enthusiasm for your own technology. T is OFTEN SAID that we use words

to conceal our thoughts, rather than to convey them. Truly, it requires imagination— and the ability to use non-technical language—to accomplish a meeting of minds with another person, and thus to make possible cooperation with him. On a wider scale, in these days of high specialization, it is probable that the scientists and engineers have less mutual understanding with the humanists, that

is, lawyers, teachers, preachers, leaders in government and others, than was the case some years ago. The employment of constructive imagination is the means whereby these groups can understand each other and can participate in team attacks on common problems. During a recent conference of our Aircraft Industries Association it was impressive to hear one of America's leading bankers make an appraisal of future economic trends. Along with his review of such well known indices as Gross National Product, National Personal Income, Ingot Production, etc., he stressed the importance of our nation's annual industrial research budget. He was much encouraged concerning future business prospects because research expenditures in 1956 were 28% greater than in 1955 and the 1957 research budget is 20% larger than in 1956. He is banking on the country's investment in imagination. I stated earlier that there would be another reference to Dr. Coon, but first let me quote what David has written in the Book of Psalms. He writes, in part, "What is man that Thou art mindful of him? . . . Thou hast made him little less than God . . . Thou hast given him dominion over the works of Thy hands." Dr. Coon stated his philosophy in this way. "I would be despondent indeed if I thought that man would not eventually unlock all the secrets of the universe." Dr. Coon, through his imagination and his belief in the future, was stating that it is the responsibility of each generation to add to the accumulated store of knowledge so that we may eventually be cognizant of the real significance of this universe and its laws. These are the building blocks for all engineering and scientific work and should lead us some day to that attainment described by David. "Thou hast given him dominion over the works of Thy hands." And now, my young friends, in closing—let us recognize a basic truth. Success in life is not a destination, it is a journey. Fortunately, this means that no one is obliged to work toward a single distant goal and be judged successful only if he attains that one objective. As with a traveler, the end of the journey is usually beyond the range of vision, but there is much of interest and beauty along the way to reward each day's steps. The happiest journey is not made with downcast eyes which see only tired dusty feet, but with uplifted sight to appreciate the visible panorama and with the imagination to understand its significance and to picture what may lie beyond. The stars were made for those who look up and whose imagination knows no limitations. 15


TOUGH JOB WELL DONE The man pictured on these pages has just completed 17 months in the challenging job of acting president of Georgia Tech. During that period he saw to it that Tech continued its advancement and leadership as one of the country's outstanding engineering and scientific educational organizations. H As a small token of their appreciation for his efforts on the behalf of Georgia Tech, the faculty and a few Tech alumni presented the automobile shown in the background to Dr. Weber on his return from a trip abroad in early August. Three weeks later, the Alumni Association's Board of Trustees tendered in an official resolution their "sincere appreciation and gratitude for the excellent manner in which he served as acting president . . . and for his splendid cooperation with the Association in the conduct of alumni affairs." H At the same meeting at which this resolution was passed, Tech's new president, Dr. Edwin Harrison, summed up Dr. Weber's contribution by saying, " I have never moved into an administrative position in which affairs were in such excellent order. I call on him many, many times a day for advice and help. He is always willing to help. He is the most patient man I have ever known." 16


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JB

JOB WELL DONE

The man pictured on these pages has just completed 17 months in the challenging job of acting president of Georgia Tech. During that period he saw to it that Tech continued its advancement and leadership as one of the country's outstanding engineering and scientific educational organizations. H As a small token of their appreciation for his efforts on the behalf of Georgia Tech, the faculty and a few Tech alumni presented the automobile shown in the background to Dr. Weber on his return from a trip abroad in early August. Three weeks later, the Alumni Association's Board of Trustees tendered in an official resolution their "sincere appreciation and gratitude for the excellent manner in which he served as acting president . . . and for his splendid cooperation with the Association in the conduct of alumni affairs." \ At the same meeting at which this resolution was passed, Tech's new president, Dr. Edwin Harrison, summed up Dr. Weber's contribution by saying, " I have never moved into an administrative position in which affairs were in such excellent order. I call on him many, many times a day for advice and help. He is always willing to help. He is the most patient man I have ever known." 16


ED DAN FORTH BATON ROUGE, LA.—Business Manager Howard Ector, '40, of the Athletic Association, was the feature speaker of the June 6 meeting of the Baton Rouge Georgia Tech Club. And on July 27 the club held its annual barbecue at L. W. Eaton's Camp. The club is planning a gala pregame party in the Continental Room of the Bellmont Motel on October 12, the night that Tech plays LSU in Baton Rouge. All Tech men and their wives and guests are invited to this party which gets underway at 4:00 P.M. and lasts till 6:30 P.M. * * * BIRMINGHAM, ALA.—Ray Graves, Tech line coach, spoke to the Birmingham Georgia Tech Club on May 17. At this meeting, Jerald F. Duval was the recipient of the Birmingham Club's 1957 Scholarship award. He will enter Tech this fall. The scholarship is worth $500 towards a Birmingham area boy's education at Tech. The boy is selected for scholarship and leadership. * * * CINCINNATI, OHIO—Dean George Griffin and Alumni Secretary Roane Beard spoke to the Cincinnati Tech Club on May 24. At the business meeting the following officers were elected for the coming year: Robert S. Moore, '47, president; Bill Lemon, '43, vice president and Bill Allen, '50, sec'y-treas. The Highlights of the 1956 football season were shown to the group to wind up the meeting. HOUSTON, TEXAS—Dean George and Mrs. Griffin were the honored guests at the May meeting of the Southwest Texas Georgia Tech Club. Over 100 members of the club turned out for a Texas steak and the Dean's "Tall Tales of Tech." Officers elected at the meeting included Herschel Miller, president; Jodie Crouch, vice president; Raymond Wyngarden, secretary; and Norris Hendrix, treasurer. New directors named were Frank Brady, W. J. McMaster, Rollo Phillips and James B. Shore. Holdover directors are Robert Hill, Robert B. Melanson and Robert W. Pence. * * * LOUISVILLE, KY.—The Louisville Georgia Tech Club held an organization meeting on May 23. Over 25 alumni attended the meeting to hear Dean George Griffin talk about Tech. Ray Kytle, '36, who along with Albert Hill organized the meeting, was elected president of the club. Other officers elected were Bill Cheely, '51, vice president and Chris Stapleton, '48, sec'y-treas. * * * JACKSON, MISS—.The Jackson Georgia Tech Club gave a real "Welcome South" reception and dinner party for is

WILL COVER TECH FOOTBALL GAMES

Coach Bobby Dodd and some of his staff on J u | Dodd and assistants Carl Wise, Jack Griffin and Did man were in Jackson for the 2nd Annual Mississippi i sociation of Coaches Athletic Clinic. Toastmaster for the colorful affair honoring Dodd Hooker Pepper, president of the club. Joe Brown former Tech quarterback, introduced Dodd to the la gathering with a few well-chosen anecdotes about t Tech coach. Dodd made an exceptionally fine presentation of th Georgia Tech of today and its many problems and then talked about Tech football. Over 110 attended the meeting including 10 from out of town. Robert E. Anderson, '39, traveled 247 miles from Corinth, Miss, just to attend the meeting. * * *

AT GRANT FIELD

PENSACOLA, FLA.—The Pensacola Georgia Tech Club held a reorganizational meeting on May 1. Dakin Ferris presided at the business meeting at which the folk officers were elected: B. G. Holloway, president; B. B Drawhorn, vice president; R. C. Freeman, secretary and H. L. Middleton, treasurer. WESTWARD HO! Secretary Roane Beard attended the national conference of the American Alumni Council in Pasadena, Calif., June 30-July 4. On the way out wesi he visited with four Tech alumni clubs. Here are the highlights of the trip: • • • TULSA, OKLAHOMA—Eighteen Tech men turned out for a meeting of the Tulsa Georgia Tech Club on June 2 Beard briefed the group on Tech and showed the "Highlights of '56. Herman Blondet, '38, presided at the me. • * ^ DENVER, COLORADO—Joe P. Byrd, III, '38, preside* over the meeting of 21 Colorado Recks on June 26. The club is planning another meeting in the fall with Roy Daniel. '30 and Sam Whitehill, '41 in charge of arrangements. • • • SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA—Stamps Bethel. % made the arrangements for the June 27th which was 1 at the Old Poodle Dog Restaurant. Ed Demere. '43 elected president of the Bay area Club and Paul E. Evedj '32 was named treasurer. $

$

FOR YOU THROUGH

Yellow Jacket Confidential FOR SEVEN YEARS, Tech men have followed the Engineers through Yellow Jacket — Confidential, an intimate, expert, detailed report written by Ed Danforth, who covered Tech football in Atlanta newspapers for 37 years. You get Danf orth's story on each game and SEC gossip exclusively in these letters . . . the next best thing to a seat on the 50 yard line.

¥

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA—Ninety people turn out for the Southern California Club's dinner dance on Ju 28 at the Naval Officers Club. John Cochran, '31. is P re dent of this very active club. Tech Alu"1"1"

YELLOW JACKET CONFIDENTIAL P. O. Box 1126. Atlanta 1, Ga. Enclosed is my check for which send me Yellow Jacket Confidential for 1957. (Regular mail $4. airmail $5. Make check payable to Yellow Jacket Confidential.)

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e

Ptemb«r, 1957

19


ED DAN FORTH BATON ROUGE, LA.—Business Manager Howard Ector, '40, of the Athletic Association, was the feature speaker of the June 6 meeting of the Baton Rouge Georgia Tech Club. And on July 27 the club held its annual barbecue at L. W. Eaton's Camp. The club is planning a gala pregame party in the Continental Room of the Bellmont Motel on October 12, the night that Tech plays LSU in Baton Rouge. All Tech men and their wives and guests are invited to this party which gets underway at 4:00 P.M. and lasts till 6:30 P.M. &

4

BIRMINGHAM, ALA.—Ray Graves, Tech line coach, spoke to the Birmingham Georgia Tech Club on May 17. At this meeting, Jerald F. Duval was the recipient of the Birmingham Club's 1957 Scholarship award. He will enter Tech this fall. The scholarship is worth $500 towards a Birmingham area boy's education at Tech. The boy is selected for scholarship and leadership. * * * CINCINNATI, OHIO—Dean George Griffin and Alumni Secretary Roane Beard spoke to the Cincinnati Tech Club on May 24. At the business meeting the following officers were elected for the coming year: Robert S. Moore, '47, president; Bill Lemon, '43, vice president and Bill Allen, '50, sec'y-treas. The Highlights of the 1956 football season were shown to the group to wind up the meeting. * * * HOUSTON, TEXAS—Dean George and Mrs. Griffin were the honored guests at the May meeting of the Southwest Texas Georgia Tech Club. Over 100 members of the club turned out for a Texas steak and the Dean's "Tall Tales of Tech." Officers elected at the meeting included Herschel Miller, president; Jodie Crouch, vice president; Raymond Wyngarden, secretary; and Norris Hendrix, treasurer. New directors named were Frank Brady, W. J. McMaster, Rollo Phillips and James B. Shore. Holdover directors are Robert Hill, Robert B. Melanson and Robert W. Pence. * * * LOUISVILLE, KY.—The Louisville Georgia Tech Club held an organization meeting on May 23. Over 25 alumni attended the meeting to hear Dean George Griffin talk about Tech. Ray Kytle, '36, who along with Albert Hill organized the meeting, was elected president of the club. Other officers elected were Bill Cheely, '51, vice president and Chris Stapleton, '48, sec'y-treas. * * * JACKSON, MISS—.The Jackson Georgia Tech Club gave a real "Welcome South" reception and dinner party for is

WILL COVER TECH FOOTBALL GAMES

Coach Bobby Dodd and some of his staff on J iy Q u 3 Dodd and assistants Carl Wise, Jack Griffin and Did man were in Jackson for the 2nd Annual Mississinn' sociation of Coaches Athletic Clinic. Toastmaster for the colorful affair honoring Dodd Hooker Pepper, president of the club. Joe Brown former Tech quarterback, introduced Dodd to the la gathering with a few well-chosen anecdotes about t Tech coach. Dodd made an exceptionally fine presentation of th Georgia Tech of today and its many problems and then talked about Tech football. Over 110 attended the meeting including 10 from out of town. Robert E. Anderson, '39, traveled 247 miles from Corinth, Miss, just to attend the meeting. * * *

AT GRANT FIELD

PENSACOLA, FLA.—The Pensacola Georgia Tech Club held a reorganizational meeting on May 1. Dakin Ferri, presided at the business meeting at which the following officers were elected: B. G. Holloway, president; B. B Drawhorn, vice president; R. C. Freeman, secretary and H. L. Middleton, treasurer. WESTWARD HO! Secretary Roane Beard attended the national conference of the American Alumni Council in Pasadena, Calif., June 30-July 4. On the way out west, he visited with four Tech alumni clubs. Here are the highlights of the trip: • • • TULSA, OKLAHOMA—Eighteen Tech men turned out for a meeting of the Tulsa Georgia Tech Club on June 2; Beard briefed the group on Tech and showed the "Highlights of '56. Herman Blondet, '38, presided at the meetim !?

*

FOR YOU THROUGH

Yellow Jacket Confidential

^

DENVER, COLORADO—Joe P. Byrd, III, '38, preside* over the meeting of 21 Colorado Recks on June 26. The club is planning another meeting in the fall with Roy Daniel. '30 and Sam Whitehill, '41 in charge of arrangements. * * ^ SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA—Stamps Bethel. 1 made the arrangements for the June 27th which was 1 at the Old Poodle Dog Restaurant. Ed Demere. '43 elected president of the Bay area Club and Paul E. EveriS '32 was named treasurer. $ $ $ LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA—Ninety people turn out for the Southern California Club's dinner dance on Ju 28 at the Naval Officers Club. John Cochran, '31. is Pre! dent of this very active club. Te«h A l « * * |

FOR SEVEN YEARS, Tech men have followed the Engineers through Yellow Jacket — Confidential, an intimate, expert, detailed report written by Ed Danforth, who covered Tech football in Atlanta newspapers for 37 years. You get Danforth's story on each game and SEC gossip exclusively in these letters . . . the next best thing to a seat on the 50 yard line.

M e m b e r , 1957

YELLOW JACKET CONFIDENTIAL P. O. Box 1126. Atlanta 1, Ga. Enclosed is my check for which send me Yellow Jacket Confidential for 1957. (Regular mail $4, airmail $5. Make check payable to Yellow Jacket Confidential.)

Name (please print)

Street address (please print)

City (please print)

State

19


nroe '39. ^ l ' receives the $500 Raymond Clapper P . | A.ward from Chief Justice Earl Warren at a N,cl u ! ' i un rheon at the National Press Club in Washington " L U I Munroe, one of five brothers who attended Tech, he coveted awarded for "his comprehensive and dis• reporting concerning the disclosure of congressional travel expenses." Munroe, who operates his own r foreign u ' also was awarded, for the same story, a «e*s• al Headliner Club silver medalion and an award from . j a University's Graduate School of Journalism's i ni Association. Others in the picture are Walker Stone, vi , Munroe and Mrs. Olive Clapper, widow of Raymond flapper, for whom the award was named. u

Honorary Kendall Weisiger, Chairman of the Rotary Educational Foundation of Atlanta, has been honored by the German government for his continuing interest in bringing students from Germany to continue their education in Georgia. He has been awarded '"The Order of Merit" and presented with a medal and citation signed by President Adenhauer of the Federal Republic of Germany.

' 1 J Fred P. Brooks, TE, died May 24 ' • after a long illness. He had been an invalid the past five years. Prior to his retirement he was a salesman with a textile machinery manufacturing firm. His widow lives at 406 So. Candler St., Decatur, Ga. Fred L. Rand, Arch., retired founder and president of Rand & Co. Inc.. an Atlanta blueprint firm, died May 7 after an illness of several months.

' 1 C John Milton Cntliff, ME, president I " and general manager of the Electrical ' Q C James Manning Goldsmith, ME, of Equipment Co. in Raleigh, N . C , died May »»d 2401 No. Decatur Rd., N.E., Atlanta, 9 at the Duke Hospital in Durham. He had died July 2. He was a retired engineer with entered the hospital for a routine checkup. the Fidelity Casualty Co. Mr. Cutliff's co. had branch offices in Richmond, Va., Augusta, Ga. and Laurinburg, ' f l 7 WiUktm V- Kingdon, ME, vice presi- N. C. He is survived by his wife, who lives " ' dent of the Belt Railroad & Stock at 615 Translyvania Ave., Raleigh; two Yards Co., Indianapolis, Ind., recently re- daughters and his mother. tired after 20 years of service. H e will continue as director of the company as well '1J? Paul R. Yopp, ME, and Mrs. Yopp as consultant in matters concerning conIU have moved to 315 Whitfield Ave., struction and development. Sarasota, Fla. Mr. Yopp recently retired as SE District Manager for Babcock Wilcox '11 William C. Wright, TE, of 8520 Ard- Co. in Atlanta. II more Ave., Philadelphia 18, Pa., died Feb. 27. , ' 1 P Allen P. Livar, ME, has joined Mon1 0 crief Furnace Co. as director of' 1 0 C. C. Sloan, EE, has been named to engineering and research. He has been '*• the East Operations Staff with Southmanagement consultant to some of the ern Bell. He has been with the company larger manufacturers of refrigeration and since 1912 and has served as vice president air conditioning equipment he past few and general manager in Atlanta since 1956. years. Mr. Livar lives at 150 Little John Trail, N.E., Atlanta. ' 1 0 Michael A. "Mike" Greenblatt, presiKenneth H. Merry, ME, president and '*» dent of the Fulton Paper Co. in Attreasurer of Merry Bros, Brick & Tile lanta, died May 21 after a brief illness. He Co. in Augusta, Ga., has been elected to the was bandmaster at Georgia Tech in 1911 Board of Directors of the Georgia Power Co. when he arranged one version of Tech's "Ramblin Wreck" song. His widow lives ' 1 Q Frank A. Cowan, EE, engineer and at 1361 Chalmette Dr., N.E., Aaltnta. l*» inventor with the long lines division

of the Bell Telephone System for the 40 years, died lune 21 after a short He was in New York during"'hi's '""' service with the company. Among1 5 Cowan's inventions were the varsitor modulator and demolulator and a teles ' P transmission measuring set. He was the U <; delegate to the International Consult! Commission on Telephony in Paris Switzerland in '46. the author of HIM technical papers, and in 1953 was awarded the Lamme gold medal for outstanding co tribution to long distance communication & development of transmission equipment John H. Simmons, EE. of Arlington I Texas, died unexpectedly April | had recently retired after 30 years of sen ice with the U. S. Treasury Dept. fk in both the Dallas and Ft. Worth offices. ' O Q Donald Mclver, CE, of 3098 Peach i-U tree Dr.. N. E.. Atlanta, died June 15. He was an engineer with the State Highwaj Dept. at the time of his death. M ' 9 9 ^' ^- w'mams> E , assistant di\. t t manager of American Oil Co. in Atlanta, died April 6. N o further information was available at this writing.

' 0 0 Julius H. Rennault, Com, retired ot fcW the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. dieJ April 28 after an illness of several months. He had been with the Department for 31 years prior to retirement 2 yrs. ago. ' O * C. W. Buhrt, Jr., CE. has been made ^ • assistant to the director of production of Allied Chemical Corporation's main ot fice in New York City. He was plant manager at South Point, Ohio prior to thiassignment. His business address is Rector St., N. Y. 6, N . Y.

Henry L. Smith, ' 9 0 , Tech's first g r a d u a t e , dies in Dalton, Ga. H E N R Y LOSSON SMITH, '90, the first man to receive a diploma from Georgia Tech, died in Dalton, Georgia, on August 15. Mr. Smith was 9 1 . Mr. Smith came to Georgia Tech as a transfer student from Davidson College in 1888 and in 1890, he and George Crawford, now deceased were the entire graduating class, both receiving the B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering. Mr. Smith often laughted when he explained the reason how he had the distinction of being Tech's first graduate "We flipped a coin to see who would go up first and I won. It was as simple as that. I considered it my greatest honor." 20

After graduating from Tech Mr. Smith went to work for the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills in Atlanta. In 1' he moved to Dalton where he formed the M. D. & H. Smit Tent & Awning Co. with his brother. The businfl in which Mr. Smith was active upon his death, was la known as the Smith Manufacturing Company. Mr. Smith was active in Dalton as a church and crn leader. H e was an extremely active member of the Geor; Tech National Alumni Association and an enthiisia contributor to all the Tech roll calls. He was an honor* member of A N A K . Tech AK"""1"

Ira H. Hardin. ME, general contractor, L „ heen elected president of the Atlanta Athletic Club. Mr. Hardin lives at 2046 Ponce de Leon Ave.. N.E., Atlanta. Franklin J. Johnson, CE, has been elected president of the New York State Society if Professional Engineers. Mr. Johnson is ,ted with the Consolidated Edison Co. in N. Y. / E. Morris, CE, chairman of the directors of Morris Boehmig & Tindel, Inc., consulting structural engineers, with offices ri 510 Henry Grady Bldg.. Atlanta. R. L. Boehmig, '47 is president and T. A. Tindel, '50. is executive vice president and secretary. t o r Charlton Keen, Sr„ Com., of MariLv anna, Fla., died July 11. He was a partner in Groves-Keen, Inc. in Atlanta from 1927-1940. This firm still bears his name. At the time of his death he was president of the Marianna Coca-Cola Bottling Co. lames W. Petty, Com., has been elected executive vice president of the H & S Pogue Co. He has been with the company since 1937 as sales promotion manager. He was formerly with Davison Paxon in Atlanta. Mr. Petty lives at 2376 Madison Rd., \pt. G-2. Cincinnati 8, Ohio. 'OQ Bolan H. Boatner. EE, has been electt u ed vice president and general manager of the Apparatus & Supply Div. at'Westinghouse Electric Supply Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. Marcus Herring Burrow, G E . of 4832 Stone Mountain Rd., Clarkston, Ga. died June 23 enroute to an Atlanta hospital. He had been associated with the Ga. Power c »- for 30 years as head of the meter record dept. Oscar P. Cleavor, EE, Chief of the E E * n " U ' S ' C o r P s o f Engineers Research « Development Laboratories at Ft. Belvoir, "•• ls 'he first Army employee to be chosen attend the Development Program at ^ornell University. He is one of 40 selected •ecuttves from business and government to a »end the program. Wayne J. Holman, EE, president of P e Mfg Vork° r - Corp" 47 W o r t h St- N e w k City, has been awarded the GBA A d of t h e Year" Alumni Assoc, award for " at the N e w Y o r k onn„ I University Club's nUi ' » meeting in June.

' O Q Robert Brener, Com., is executive LQ vice president of Mechanical Industries, Inc. The new company specializes in engraved markers for a wide variety of uses, such as name plates, marking plates, etc., on metal or plastic. His address is 2502 East Fifth St., Chattanooga, Tenn. Sam R. Parry. G E . general manager of the Chattanooga Division of Combustion Engineering. Inc., has been elected a vice president of the company. H e has been with the company for 28 years. His home address is 4409 Lonsdale Dr., Chattanooga. Charles Clifford Romines, Com, died luly 25 in an Atlanta hospital. He was associated with Retail Credit for 25 years and the past 4 years had been with Sharp-Boylston Real Estate Co. ' Q n Col. Parker S. Day, GS, has been J U named assistant chief of staff of the G-4 (supply) section of the Army Reserve Command at Ft. McPherson, Ga. G. S. Watkins, Com, formerly with Equipment Sales Co. in Atlanta, has been named Ga. manager of the sales division of Birmingham Tank Co. H e will have offices in the 1st National Bank Bldg. in Atlanta. C. Eugene Stephenson, EE, assistant superintendent of the construction and maintenance division in charge of shops at R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., has been given the additional responsibility for all engineer supplies. His home address is 757 Roslyn Rd.. Winston-Salem, N . C. C. Lynn Strickland, ME, owner of Strickland Tire Service Co. in Birmingham, Ala., died June 28 while on vacation in Guntersville, Ala. Mr. Strickland was with B. F. Goodrich Co. from the early 30's until he started his own business 8 years ago. He was active in civic affairs, working with the Boy Scouts, YMCA, Rotary and church activities. He was a past member of the Georgia Tech National Alumni Asso. board of trustees. Mr. Strickland is survived by his wife; daughters, Gail and Bonnie; sons, Lynn, a student at Georgia Tech, David and Andy; mother and several brothers and a sister. Mrs. Strickland lives at 3750 Jackson Blvd., Birmingham. ' 0 0 J. E. Fain, Com, managing director " of the Ga. Chain Store Council, has been elected president of the Atlanta Chap-

ter of the Public Relations Society of America. As manager of the Ga. Chain Store Council he directs a cooperation public relations program for 27 national and regional chain stores. Mr. Fain's business address is 1022 Healey Bldg., Atlanta 3, Ga. Ernest B. McKenzie, Com., has been appointed vice president of the Southern Fire & Casualty Co. His address is P. O. Box 1966, Knoxville, Tenn. Capt. C. T. Raines, of Braniff International Airways, has been promoted to chief pilot of the company's entire operations. Dr. Frank C. Underwood, EE, Deputy Supt. of Savannah and Chatham County Public Schools, was paid special tribute by the "Blue Jacket of '57", a Savannah High School annual, and designated "A Builder in Deed." He was also appointed a member of the State School Bldg. Authority recently. In June he was selected as one of Savannah's most outstanding citizens and was named winner of the Herschel V. Jenkins Award for his outstanding work in the field of Education. Dr. Underwood is active in numerous civic affairs and is currently serving as chairman of the Savannah Chapter of the American Red Cross. ' 0 0 W.J. Turnbull, Com., has been electw v e d executive vice president and member of the board of directors of the National Theatre Supply Co. Since 1951 he has been vice president in charge of eastern district sales for the company. Mr. Turnbull's business address is 92 Gold St., New York 38, N . Y. ' Q i George W. Lowndes, Com, of 57 w " Huntington Rd., N.E., Atlanta, died July 11 in an Atlanta hospital. He was owner of the Lowndes Cotton Tag Co. ' Q C A. C. Arrington, M E , was killed May 0 J 26 when the plane he was flying crashed in a ravine near Woodville, Miss. He and a member of his firm were returninghome from a trip to Mr. Arrington's camp when the crash occurred. Mr. Arrington was in business with his father, Lucius Arrington, '10. They owned and operated the Arrington Welding & Machine Shop in Brookhaven, Miss. More news on page 22

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P»emb«r, 1957

21


nroe '39. ^ l ' receives the $500 Raymond Clapper P . | A.ward from Chief Justice Earl Warren at a N,cl u ! ' i un rheon at the National Press Club in Washington " L U I Munroe, one of five brothers who attended Tech, he coveted awarded for "his comprehensive and dis• reporting concerning the disclosure of congressional travel expenses." Munroe, who operates his own r foreign u ' also was awarded, for the same story, a «e*s• al Headliner Club silver medalion and an award from . j a University's Graduate School of Journalism's i ni Association. Others in the picture are Walker Stone, vi , Munroe and Mrs. Olive Clapper, widow of Raymond flapper, for whom the award was named. u

Honorary Kendall Weisiger, Chairman of the Rotary Educational Foundation of Atlanta, has been honored by the German government for his continuing interest in bringing students from Germany to continue their education in Georgia. He has been awarded '"The Order of Merit" and presented with a medal and citation signed by President Adenhauer of the Federal Republic of Germany.

' 1 J Fred P. Brooks, TE, died May 24 ' • after a long illness. He had been an invalid the past five years. Prior to his retirement he was a salesman with a textile machinery manufacturing firm. His widow lives at 406 So. Candler St., Decatur, Ga. Fred L. Rand, Arch., retired founder and president of Rand & Co. Inc.. an Atlanta blueprint firm, died May 7 after an illness of several months.

' 1 C John Milton Cntliff, ME, president I " and general manager of the Electrical ' Q C James Manning Goldsmith, ME, of Equipment Co. in Raleigh, N . C , died May »»d 2401 No. Decatur Rd., N.E., Atlanta, 9 at the Duke Hospital in Durham. He had died July 2. He was a retired engineer with entered the hospital for a routine checkup. the Fidelity Casualty Co. Mr. Cutliff's co. had branch offices in Richmond, Va., Augusta, Ga. and Laurinburg, ' f l 7 WiUktm V- Kingdon, ME, vice presi- N. C. He is survived by his wife, who lives " ' dent of the Belt Railroad & Stock at 615 Translyvania Ave., Raleigh; two Yards Co., Indianapolis, Ind., recently re- daughters and his mother. tired after 20 years of service. H e will continue as director of the company as well '1J? Paul R. Yopp, ME, and Mrs. Yopp as consultant in matters concerning conIU have moved to 315 Whitfield Ave., struction and development. Sarasota, Fla. Mr. Yopp recently retired as SE District Manager for Babcock Wilcox '11 William C. Wright, TE, of 8520 Ard- Co. in Atlanta. II more Ave., Philadelphia 18, Pa., died Feb. 27. , ' 1 P Allen P. Livar, ME, has joined Mon1 0 crief Furnace Co. as director of' 1 0 C. C. Sloan, EE, has been named to engineering and research. He has been '*• the East Operations Staff with Southmanagement consultant to some of the ern Bell. He has been with the company larger manufacturers of refrigeration and since 1912 and has served as vice president air conditioning equipment he past few and general manager in Atlanta since 1956. years. Mr. Livar lives at 150 Little John Trail, N.E., Atlanta. ' 1 0 Michael A. "Mike" Greenblatt, presiKenneth H. Merry, ME, president and '*» dent of the Fulton Paper Co. in Attreasurer of Merry Bros, Brick & Tile lanta, died May 21 after a brief illness. He Co. in Augusta, Ga., has been elected to the was bandmaster at Georgia Tech in 1911 Board of Directors of the Georgia Power Co. when he arranged one version of Tech's "Ramblin Wreck" song. His widow lives ' 1 Q Frank A. Cowan, EE, engineer and at 1361 Chalmette Dr., N.E., Aaltnta. l*» inventor with the long lines division

of the Bell Telephone System for the 40 years, died lune 21 after a short He was in New York during"'hi's '""' service with the company. Among1 5 Cowan's inventions were the varsitor modulator and demolulator and a teles ' P transmission measuring set. He was the U <; delegate to the International Consult! Commission on Telephony in Paris Switzerland in '46. the author of HIM technical papers, and in 1953 was awarded the Lamme gold medal for outstanding co tribution to long distance communication & development of transmission equipment John H. Simmons, EE. of Arlington I Texas, died unexpectedly April | had recently retired after 30 years of sen ice with the U. S. Treasury Dept. fk in both the Dallas and Ft. Worth offices. ' O Q Donald Mclver, CE, of 3098 Peach i-U tree Dr.. N. E.. Atlanta, died June 15. He was an engineer with the State Highwaj Dept. at the time of his death. M ' 9 9 ^' ^- w'mams> E , assistant di\. t t manager of American Oil Co. in Atlanta, died April 6. N o further information was available at this writing.

' 0 0 Julius H. Rennault, Com, retired ot fcW the U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. dieJ April 28 after an illness of several months. He had been with the Department for 31 years prior to retirement 2 yrs. ago. ' O * C. W. Buhrt, Jr., CE. has been made ^ • assistant to the director of production of Allied Chemical Corporation's main ot fice in New York City. He was plant manager at South Point, Ohio prior to thiassignment. His business address is Rector St., N. Y. 6, N . Y.

Henry L. Smith, ' 9 0 , Tech's first g r a d u a t e , dies in Dalton, Ga. H E N R Y LOSSON SMITH, '90, the first man to receive a diploma from Georgia Tech, died in Dalton, Georgia, on August 15. Mr. Smith was 9 1 . Mr. Smith came to Georgia Tech as a transfer student from Davidson College in 1888 and in 1890, he and George Crawford, now deceased were the entire graduating class, both receiving the B.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering. Mr. Smith often laughted when he explained the reason how he had the distinction of being Tech's first graduate "We flipped a coin to see who would go up first and I won. It was as simple as that. I considered it my greatest honor." 20

After graduating from Tech Mr. Smith went to work for the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills in Atlanta. In 1' he moved to Dalton where he formed the M. D. & H. Smit Tent & Awning Co. with his brother. The businfl in which Mr. Smith was active upon his death, was la known as the Smith Manufacturing Company. Mr. Smith was active in Dalton as a church and crn leader. H e was an extremely active member of the Geor; Tech National Alumni Association and an enthiisia contributor to all the Tech roll calls. He was an honor* member of A N A K . Tech AK"""1"

Ira H. Hardin. ME, general contractor, L „ heen elected president of the Atlanta Athletic Club. Mr. Hardin lives at 2046 Ponce de Leon Ave.. N.E., Atlanta. Franklin J. Johnson, CE, has been elected president of the New York State Society if Professional Engineers. Mr. Johnson is ,ted with the Consolidated Edison Co. in N. Y. / E. Morris, CE, chairman of the directors of Morris Boehmig & Tindel, Inc., consulting structural engineers, with offices ri 510 Henry Grady Bldg.. Atlanta. R. L. Boehmig, '47 is president and T. A. Tindel, '50. is executive vice president and secretary. t o r Charlton Keen, Sr„ Com., of MariLv anna, Fla., died July 11. He was a partner in Groves-Keen, Inc. in Atlanta from 1927-1940. This firm still bears his name. At the time of his death he was president of the Marianna Coca-Cola Bottling Co. lames W. Petty, Com., has been elected executive vice president of the H & S Pogue Co. He has been with the company since 1937 as sales promotion manager. He was formerly with Davison Paxon in Atlanta. Mr. Petty lives at 2376 Madison Rd., \pt. G-2. Cincinnati 8, Ohio. 'OQ Bolan H. Boatner. EE, has been electt u ed vice president and general manager of the Apparatus & Supply Div. at'Westinghouse Electric Supply Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. Marcus Herring Burrow, G E . of 4832 Stone Mountain Rd., Clarkston, Ga. died June 23 enroute to an Atlanta hospital. He had been associated with the Ga. Power c »- for 30 years as head of the meter record dept. Oscar P. Cleavor, EE, Chief of the E E * n " U ' S ' C o r P s o f Engineers Research « Development Laboratories at Ft. Belvoir, "•• ls 'he first Army employee to be chosen attend the Development Program at ^ornell University. He is one of 40 selected •ecuttves from business and government to a »end the program. Wayne J. Holman, EE, president of P e Mfg Vork° r - Corp" 47 W o r t h St- N e w k City, has been awarded the GBA A d of t h e Year" Alumni Assoc, award for " at the N e w Y o r k onn„ I University Club's nUi ' » meeting in June.

' O Q Robert Brener, Com., is executive LQ vice president of Mechanical Industries, Inc. The new company specializes in engraved markers for a wide variety of uses, such as name plates, marking plates, etc., on metal or plastic. His address is 2502 East Fifth St., Chattanooga, Tenn. Sam R. Parry. G E . general manager of the Chattanooga Division of Combustion Engineering. Inc., has been elected a vice president of the company. H e has been with the company for 28 years. His home address is 4409 Lonsdale Dr., Chattanooga. Charles Clifford Romines, Com, died luly 25 in an Atlanta hospital. He was associated with Retail Credit for 25 years and the past 4 years had been with Sharp-Boylston Real Estate Co. ' Q n Col. Parker S. Day, GS, has been J U named assistant chief of staff of the G-4 (supply) section of the Army Reserve Command at Ft. McPherson, Ga. G. S. Watkins, Com, formerly with Equipment Sales Co. in Atlanta, has been named Ga. manager of the sales division of Birmingham Tank Co. H e will have offices in the 1st National Bank Bldg. in Atlanta. C. Eugene Stephenson, EE, assistant superintendent of the construction and maintenance division in charge of shops at R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., has been given the additional responsibility for all engineer supplies. His home address is 757 Roslyn Rd.. Winston-Salem, N . C. C. Lynn Strickland, ME, owner of Strickland Tire Service Co. in Birmingham, Ala., died June 28 while on vacation in Guntersville, Ala. Mr. Strickland was with B. F. Goodrich Co. from the early 30's until he started his own business 8 years ago. He was active in civic affairs, working with the Boy Scouts, YMCA, Rotary and church activities. He was a past member of the Georgia Tech National Alumni Asso. board of trustees. Mr. Strickland is survived by his wife; daughters, Gail and Bonnie; sons, Lynn, a student at Georgia Tech, David and Andy; mother and several brothers and a sister. Mrs. Strickland lives at 3750 Jackson Blvd., Birmingham. ' 0 0 J. E. Fain, Com, managing director " of the Ga. Chain Store Council, has been elected president of the Atlanta Chap-

ter of the Public Relations Society of America. As manager of the Ga. Chain Store Council he directs a cooperation public relations program for 27 national and regional chain stores. Mr. Fain's business address is 1022 Healey Bldg., Atlanta 3, Ga. Ernest B. McKenzie, Com., has been appointed vice president of the Southern Fire & Casualty Co. His address is P. O. Box 1966, Knoxville, Tenn. Capt. C. T. Raines, of Braniff International Airways, has been promoted to chief pilot of the company's entire operations. Dr. Frank C. Underwood, EE, Deputy Supt. of Savannah and Chatham County Public Schools, was paid special tribute by the "Blue Jacket of '57", a Savannah High School annual, and designated "A Builder in Deed." He was also appointed a member of the State School Bldg. Authority recently. In June he was selected as one of Savannah's most outstanding citizens and was named winner of the Herschel V. Jenkins Award for his outstanding work in the field of Education. Dr. Underwood is active in numerous civic affairs and is currently serving as chairman of the Savannah Chapter of the American Red Cross. ' 0 0 W.J. Turnbull, Com., has been electw v e d executive vice president and member of the board of directors of the National Theatre Supply Co. Since 1951 he has been vice president in charge of eastern district sales for the company. Mr. Turnbull's business address is 92 Gold St., New York 38, N . Y. ' Q i George W. Lowndes, Com, of 57 w " Huntington Rd., N.E., Atlanta, died July 11 in an Atlanta hospital. He was owner of the Lowndes Cotton Tag Co. ' Q C A. C. Arrington, M E , was killed May 0 J 26 when the plane he was flying crashed in a ravine near Woodville, Miss. He and a member of his firm were returninghome from a trip to Mr. Arrington's camp when the crash occurred. Mr. Arrington was in business with his father, Lucius Arrington, '10. They owned and operated the Arrington Welding & Machine Shop in Brookhaven, Miss. More news on page 22

5e

P»emb«r, 1957

21


National Honorary Board Named by Trustees SEVEN Tech

OUTSTANDING alumni from

Georgia

Tech

men will

represent

every section of the country on the

The new National Honorary Board hers, left to right: Morris. Roberts T ^ Pund,

Harris,

Tellepsen.

and R Beardeg

Va., and W i s . ) ; Howard T. Tellepsen, "34, president of h Tellepsen Construction C o . of Houston. Texas, who

newly-created National Advisory Board of the Georgia Tech

represent the Southwest Area (Ark., La., Miss., and Tea i

National Alumni Association.

and G. Nolan " B u t c h " Bearden, '29. New England M

Selected to the new honor for one-year terms

were

Life Insurance C o . of Beverly Hills, California, who w

L. Allen Morris, ' 3 6 , president of the Keyes Co., Miami,

represent the Western Area

Florida, who will represent the Peninsula Area

Mont., N e b . , N. M., N . D., Okla., Oregon, S.

(Florida,

possessions and foreign c o u n t r i e s ) ; J. T o m Roberts, ' 2 0 , president of Southern Boiler & Iron Works of Memphis, Tennessee, who will represent the Mid-South A r e a

(Ala-

(Ariz., Calif.,

Wash., and W y o . ) .

Idaho

Kan..

D - Utah,

T h e National Advisory Board was created by an unar imous vote of the Board of Trustees of the Alumni Associa-

bama & T e n n e s s e e ) ; William S. Terrell, ' 3 0 , president of

tion at their March meeting. T h e selection of the men

the Terrell Machine C o . of Charlotte, North Carolina, w h o

made by a special Committee of the Trustees head.

will represent the Atlantic Area

Charles Simons, '37, vice president of the Alumni Associa-

(Del., D.C., Md., N . C . ,

S . C , and V a . ) ; H . R. " P e t e r " Pund, ' 2 9 , vice president

tion. T h e Honorary Board members were approved at the

of the Shipbuilding Division of Bethlehem Steel C o . of New

April meeting of the Board of Trustees.

Y o r k City, w h o will represent the Eastern Area

(Conn.,

The new Board, created to keep the Trustees informed

Me., Mass., N . H., N . Y., Pa., R. I., and V t . ) ; David W.

as to alumni problems in areas outside the State of Geor-

Harris, ' 1 2 , president of the Universal Oil Products C o . of

gia, will be installed at the Annual Meeting of the Nal

Des Plaines, Illinois, w h o will represent the Mid-Continent

Alumni Association

Area (111., Ind., Iowa., Ky., Mich., Minn., M o . , Ohio., W.

on Homecoming Day, November I

1957. T h e meeting will start at 1 0 : 0 0 A . M .

Apart, they're News by classes - cont. J. H. Stanaland, member of the sales staff of J. Fred Miller Co.. Atlanta realty firm, has purchased the business. The firm name has been changed to Stanaland Realty Co. His business address is 1500 No. Main St., East Point, Ga. E. Davis Wilcox, Arch, and Associates, won fourth place and $1500 prize for their design of the 5 million dollar Cowboy Hall of Fame and Museum to be built in Oklahoma City. The nationwide contest had entries from 260 architects from 39 states. Dave is located in Tyler, Texas. ' 0 1 William B. Frederick, Ch.E., of 2093 w I Donnalee Ave., S.E.. Atlanta, died July 29 in an Atlanta hospital. He has been ill about 2 years. Mr. Frederick was chief chemist with the H. B. Fuller Co. George H. Hightower, T E , has been elected president of the Cotton Manufacturers Assoc, of Ga. H e is vice president of Thomaston Mills, Thomaston, G a . Arthur A. Miller, M E . is production superintendent for the National Lead Co.'s Sayreville Plant in Sayreville, N . J. He joined the company in 1945 and has served as a pigment plant supt. and since 1925 has been finishing supt. 22

James S. Moore. IM, former district states from Virginia to Texas in I manager for Chain Belt in Atlanta, has assignment with the Company. been transferred by the company to New York City where he will serve as district ' O Q William Merritt Pope, EE, General sales manager. • * " Agent with the Volunteer State Life Ins. Co.. has completed all the requirement! James B. Ramage. I M . has been named to be certified as a qualifying member of the 1957 Honor Unit Manager of the Equitable Million Dollar Round Table. His busines Life Assurance Society's Southern departaddress is P. O. Box 227. Panama Cil ment. The award is based on his production, managerial abilities, civic and professional achievements. He is manager of a unit of ' 4 1 1 Rl!ssel1 Bobbin. IM. has been named Equitable, the H. C. Johnson Agency in " " a vice president with the Citizen- i Atlanta. Southern Bank of Atlanta. He is manager o the bank's Howell Mill Rd. office in / . R. Danson. Jr., TE. district man Col. John E. Carmack has assumed ager for Shell Oil Co. in St. Loui command of Hunter A F B and the 804th Air Base Group at Savannah. He has was recently made a member of the been in the service since 1938. His more and Over" Club. recent assignments have been at Dobbins Lt. Col. John L. Wilson, Jr.. EE,Jj AFB and Warner Robins A F B . both in cenily graduated from the Army War O Georgia. His various assignments have lege at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. carried him all over the world. BORN TO: Mr. and Mrs. John E. AnderEdward H. Mattingly, IM, C.L.U. agency Jr.. a son. John Bristow Anderson. M»l supervisor of the Holcomb T. Green Agency of the Guardian Life Insurance Co., has ' 4 1 William H. Burnett. Arch, has ^ 1 named chief architectural dafl been elected president of the Guardian's with Stevens & Wilkinson, Atlanta aren't Leaders Club, a national organization. His and engineers. He has been with the I address is 108 Lakeview Ave.. N.E.. Atlanta. W. A. Snellgrove, ME, has been propany for 11 years. moted to assistant branch manager of More news on p"9e Jenkins Bros, in Atlanta. He will cover the

'38

Tech Alt)""""

liquid..

. . . helping make parts for your car, your television set, and even your tableware THESE TWO LIQUIDS flow as freely as

Epoxies a r e

water. Yet when poured. together they

used to make the huge dies that stamp

quickly turn into a solid — without the

out automobile trunk lids and hoods,

STUDENTS AND STUDENT ADVISERS: Learn more about career opportunities with Union Carbide in ALLOYS, CARBONS,

use of heat or pressure. Harder than

airplane wing sections and other varied

CHEMICALS,

so h a r d that they are

many metals, the resulting plastic is

shapes. These dies are molded in about

called epoxy.

half the time it takes to shape all-metal

Delicate p a r t s f o r t e l e v i s i o n , radio,

dies . . . and, at substantial savings.

and other electronic equipment are em-

M a n y i n d u s t r i e s are now looking to

bedded in epoxies to protect them from

epoxies to make better things for you.

moisture and vibration. And, in durable

Developing and producing epoxies —as

tableware, epoxy adhesives seal knife

well as such plastics as vinyl and poly-

blades in their handles with a strong,

ethylene—is only one of the many impor-

permanent bond.

tant jobs of the people of Union Carbide.

• UCCs *KELITE, \ INYLITE, and K R E N E Plastics THETIC ORGANIC C H E M I C A L S c

Agricultural Chemicals

Trade-marked

PYROFAX Gas

L I N D E Oxygen

Products

NATIONAL Carbons

P R E S T O N E Anti-Freeze

PREST-O-LITE Acetylene

GASES,

and

PLAS-

TICS. Write for the 1957 edition of "Products and Processes" booklet G-2. Union Carbide Corporation, 30 East 42nd St., New York 17,N.Y. In Canada, Union Carbide Canada Ltd., Toronto.

includeU N I O N Calcium Carbide

UNION CARBIDE Silicones

HAYNES STELLITE Alloys

EVEREADY Flashlights and Batteries

Dynel Textile Fibers

ELECTROMET Alloys and Metals


I National H o n o r a r y Board N a m e d by T r u s t e e s SEVEN OUTSTANDING Georgia Tech men will represent Tech alumni from every section of the country on the newly-created National Advisory Board of the Georgia Tech National Alumni Association. Selected to the new honor for one-year terms were L. Allen Morris, '36, president of the Keyes Co., Miami, Florida, who will represent the Peninsula Area (Florida, possessions and foreign countries); J. Tom Roberts, '20, president of Southern Boiler & Iron Works of Memphis, Tennessee, who will represent the Mid-South Area (Alabama & Tennessee); William S. Terrell, '30, president of the Terrell Machine Co. of Charlotte, North Carolina, who will represent the Atlantic Area (Del., D.C., Md., N.C., S.C., and Va.); H. R. "Peter" Pund, '29, vice president of the Shipbuilding Division of Bethlehem Steel Co. of New York City, who will represent the Eastern Area (Conn., Me., Mass., N. H., N. Y., Pa., R. I., and Vt.); David W. Harris, '12, president of the Universal Oil Products Co. of Des Plaines, Illinois, who will represent the Mid-Continent Area (111., Ind., Iowa., Ky., Mich., Minn., Mo., Ohio., W.

The new National Honorary Board bers, left to right: Morris. Robei Pund, Harris, Tellepsen, and

Va., and Wis.); Howard T. Tellepsen. '34, president of Tellepsen Construction Co. of Houston. Texas, who represent the Southwest Area (Ark.. La., Miss., and Texa' and G. Nolan "Butch" Bearden, "29. New England Mut Life Insurance Co. of Beverly Hills, California, who w represent the Western Area (Ariz., Calif., Idaho Mont., Neb., N. M., N. D., Okla., Oregon, S Wash., and Wyo.). The National Advisory Board was created by an urun imous vote of the Board of Trustees of the Alumni Association at their March meeting. The selection of the mei made by a special Committee of the Trustees heack Charles Simons, '37, vice president of the Alumni Association. The Honorary Board members were approved at the April meeting of the Board of Trustees. The new Board, created to keep the Trustees informed as to alumni problems in areas outside the State of Georgia, will be installed at the Annual Meeting of the National Alumni Association on Homecoming Day, November 2 1957. The meeting will start at 10:00 A.M.

Apart, they're liquid. ^^^^^iogether, News by classes - cont. J. H. Stanaland, member of the sales staff of J. Fred Miller Co.. Atlanta realty firm, has purchased the business. The firm name has been changed to Stanaland Realty Co. His business address is 1500 No. Main St., East Point, Ga. E. Davis Wilcox, Arch, and Associates, won fourth place and $1500 prize for their design of the 5 million dollar Cowboy Hall of Fame and Museum to be built in Oklahoma City. The nationwide contest had entries from 260 architects from 39 states. Dave is located in Tyler, Texas. William B. Frederick.

'37 £

Ch.E.. of 2093

July 29 in an Atlanta hospital. He has been ill about 2 years. Mr. Frederick was chief chemist with the H. B. Fuller Co. George H. Hightower. TE. has been elected president of the Cotton Manufacturers Assoc, of Ga. He is vice president of Thomaston Mills. Thomaston, Ga. Arthur A. Miller, ME. is production superintendent for the National Lead Co.'s Sayreville Plant in Sayreville, N . J. He joined the company in 1945 and has served as a pigment plant supt. and since 1925 has been finishing supt. 22

James S. Moore. IM, former district manager for Chain Belt in Atlanta, has been transferred by the company to New York City where he will serve as district sales manager. James B. Ramuge, IM. has been named 1957 Honor Unit Manager of the Equitable Life Assurance Society's Southern department. The award is based on his production, managerial abilities, civic and professional achievements. He is manager of a unit of Equitable, the H. C. Johnson Agency in Atlanta. ' 0 0 Col. John E. Carmack has assumed *»U command of Hunter AFB and the 804th Air Base Group at Savannah. He has been in the service since 1938. His more recent assignments have been at Dobbins AFB and Warner Robins AFB. both in Georgia. His various assignments have carried him all over the world. Edward H. Mattingly. IM. C.L.U. agency supervisor of the Holcomb T. Green Agency of the Guardian Life Insurance Co., has been elected president of the Guardian's Leaders Club, a national organization. His address is 108 Lakeview Ave.. N.E.. Atlanta. W. A. Snellgrove, ME, has been promoted to assistant branch manager of Jenkins Bros, in Atlanta. He will cover the

states from Virginia to Texas in his ne» assignment with the Company. ' O Q William Merritt Pope, EE, General " " Agent with the Volunteer State Life Ins. Co.. has completed all the requirement' to be certified as a qualifying member of thi Million Dollar Round fable. His busineaddress is P. O. Box 227. Panama Cit\. Fll

'4fl

Rl!ssel1 Bohhi

"- IM' nas been named

" U a vice president with the Citizens i Southern Bank of Atlanta. He is manager n the bank's Howell Mill Rd. office in Atlanl J. R. Dunson. Jr.. TE. districl ager for Shell Oil Co. in St. Louis. Ma, was recently made a member of the and Over" Club. Lt. Col. John L. Wilson. Jr., I I cently graduated from the Army War 0 lege at Carlisle Barracks. Pa. BORN TO: Mr. and Mrs. John E. AnderJr.. a son. John Bristow Anderson, > J 1 William H. Burnett. Arch, TI named chief architectural with Stevens & Wilkinson. Atlanta and engineers. He has been with n o r w ffor nr 1 i/oorc pany 111 years.

has t des; areni the c

M o r e n e w s on p°9

Tech

e

X

Alur"""

they're solid

... helping make parts for your car, your television set, and even your tableware flow as freely as water. Yet when poured together they quickly turn into a solid — without the use of heat or pressure. Harder than many metals, the resulting plastic is called epoxy.

THESE TWO LIQUIDS

Delicate parts for television, radio, and other electronic equipment are embedded in epoxies to protect them from moisture and vibration. And, in durable tableware, epoxy adhesives seal knife mades in their handles with a strong, permanent bond.

• UCCs ELITE, VINYLITE, and K R E N E Plastics

Epoxies are so h a r d that they are used to make the huge dies that stamp out automobile trunk lids and hoods, airplane wing sections and other varied shapes. These dies are molded in about half the time it takes to shape all-metal dies . . . and, at substantial savings. M a n y i n d u s t r i e s are now looking to epoxies to make better things for you. Developing and producing epoxies — as well as such plastics as vinyl and polyethylene—is only one of the many important jobs of the people of Union Carbide.

Trade-marked

PYROFAX Gas

Products

NATIONAL Carbons

STUDENTS AND STUDENT ADVISERS: Learn more about career opportunities with Union Carbide in ALLOYS, CARBONS, CHEMICALS,

GASES,

and

PLAS-

TICS. Write for the 1957 edition of "Products and Processes" booklet G-2. Union Carbide Corporation, 30 East 42nd St., New York 17,N.Y. In Canada, Union Carbide Canada Ltd., Toronto.

includeUNION Calcium Carbide

UNION CARBIDE Silicones

' THETIC ORCANIC CHEMICALS LINDE Oxygen PRESTONE Anti-Freeze HAYNES STELLITE Alloys Dynel Textile Fibers c Agricultural Chemicals PREST-O-LITE Acetylene EVEREADY Flashlights and Batteries ELECTROMET Alloys and Metals


News by classes - cont. D. R. Berry, ME, has been appointed president of Scripto of Canada, Ltd. He joined Scripto in 1946 as a member of the Engineering Department and in April, 1951 entered Canada to establish the Scripto subsidiary there. ' AO Minton V. Braddy, Jr., Arch, who has "™ been with Stevens & Wilkinson, Atlanta architects & engineers, for 11 years, has been appointed chief architect of a staff of 75 people. David A. Crosby, IM. manager of the insurance dept. of Thibadeau, Shaw & Brannan Co., realty brokers of Decatur, Ga., has been promoted to the position of vice president. »ji Q George R. L. Shepherd, Ch.E., has • " been issued a U. S. Patent on "Desulfurization of Crude Oil & Crude Oil Fractions" by a process in which contaminants are removed by passing through cheap absorbent material before contact with desulfurizing catalysts. He is also co-author of one other patent recently granted. George has been with Humble Oil since 1947 and is now serving as section head. His home address is 144 W. Bayshore Dr., Baytown, Texas. ' A A Dr. Hugh N. Powell, Ch. E., has been • • appointed associate professor of Mechanical Engineering at Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. I AC Thomas U. Burke, ME, has been pro• J moted to project engineer in the Magnetic Tape Devices Dept. of the Product Development Lab at IBM in New York City. Herbert B. Langford, EE, has assumed duties as plant supt. of the Burnell-No. Pettus recycling plant of Pan American Petroleum Co. near Pettus, Texas. Eugene Miller, Ch. E., associate managing editor of Business Week has just returned from a four-week trip to Europe. Mr. Miller, a Naval reserve officer, visited the 6th Fleet as a guest of the 6th Fleet Commander. Frank M. Tuttle, EE, has been appointed District Plant Superintendent for the Long Lines Dept. of American T & T in Indianapolis, Ind. I AC Nathaniel Jackson Golding, Jr., A E , 1 0 received his M.S. in Applied Mechanics this past June from Washington University. 1

A~1 R. L. Boehmig, CE, has been named • I president of Morris, Boehmig & Tindel. Inc.. consulting structural engineers, with offices at 510 Henry Grady Bldg.. Atlanta. George B. Campbell, EE, senior engineer of Southern Services Inc., has been named assistant secretary and assistant treasurer of the Southern Company. He has been with the company since 1947. Mr. Campbell lives at 1815 Windsor Blvd., Birmingham, Ala. 24

Married: Ted C. Cox, IE, to Mrs. Francis L. Schramm last March. Their address is 1304 Fourth St., Neptune Beach. Fla. Ralph L. Edwards, Jr., EE, has been awarded an outstanding performance rating at Redstone Arsenal, Ala. Mr. Edwards is Director of the Corporal Guided Missile Project in the research and development division of the Ordnance Missile Lab. T. Russell Foster, M E , has joined the Chemstrand Corp. at Decatur, Ala. as a patent lawyer. He was a patent lawyer in New York prior to joining Chemstrand. His address is 710 Cedar St., Decatur, Ala. Robin B. Gray. AE, received his Ph.D. in A.E. this past June from Princeton University. Joseph M. Mass, IM, left Davison-Paxon after 10 years of service to open a women's apparel shop. Casual corner. The shop is located at 133 Sycamore St., Decatur, Ga. 'Aft Married: Edwin Lamont Anderson, ^ 0 y r ., I E , to Miss Glenice Hall Aug. 24. A Scott Bennett, Jr., IM, has been appointed district inspector in Atlanta for the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the U. S. He has been with the company since 1948. His business address is 739 West Peachtree St., Atlanta 5, G a . Born t o : Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. Boss, H, ME, a son, Herbert Edmund. Ill, April 23. Their home address is 121 Clay Hill Rd., Stamford. Conn. William P. Calhoun, Jr., IM, recently announced the opening of Calhoun Sales Co., food brokers & mfrs. agent. T h e firm is located at 3000 Forest Park Dr., Charlotte, North Carolina. Exert E. Clark, IE, is with Turner Halsey Co. as a sales representative. His home address is 3229 Glenvalley Dr., Decatur, Ga. John A. Dorsey, TE, is now Superintendent of Dyeing & Finishing at the Tifton Rug Mills plant in East Point, G a . MARRIED: Ramon Echols to Miss Diane Brantley July 13. Mr. Echols is with Atlantic Steel Co. in Atlanta. ' A Q Benjamin F. Caffey, CE, was recently •*• promoted to manager of engineering for Petroleum Combustion and Engineering Co. in Los Angeles. His home address is 5909 Overhill Dr., Los Angeles 43, Calif. MARRIED: Newt Morris Hallman, Ch.E., to Miss Marilyn Reeling Aug. 3. Mr. Hallman is associated with the Universal Oil Products Co. in Des Plaines, 111. R. C. Nisbet, CE, has been promoted to District Civil Engineer at the Government

Wells District for Humble Oil & D fi Co. His mailing address is P n t> n'ng Freer, Texas. ' ' Box MARRIED: Charles G. Pefinis, IM tr, Sandra M. Matheson July 7 Their H * is 20 Standish Ave.. N. W Ant D S ' Atlanta. Ga. Romulus H. Thompson, Arch, and man D. Hancock, *50, have formed a nership for the practice of architecture PT firm, known as Thompson & Han Romulus H. Hancock. Architect has nm"* at 3092 Maple Dr., N . E., Atlanta Ga MARRIED: Robert Baldwin Tippeu A h to Miss Mary Ann Hendon, July ft >/' Tippett is a partner in the firm of Johns 1 & Tippetts, Architects, in Atlanta. 'K[|

C. Emory Breedlove, ME, is n o Chief Engineer with Tomkins-Becfc with, Inc. in Jacksonville. Fla. Dr. Robert Gordon Carson, Jr., IE ha been appointed Director of Instruction in the School of Engineering at N.C. State College Prior to his appointment, he was head of thp I.E. Dept. BORN TO: Mr. and Mrs. James C. Dering. ton, E E , a son. Thomas Smith, May 2 Their address is 25 Polk Dr.. Huntsville Ala. BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs. Carl H. Fulton, IM, a son. Richard Thomas, August If)! Carl is with Fulton Bros. Electric Co. Their home address is 2070 W. Homewood Ct.. Decatur, Ga. MARRIED: Rev. Curtis C. Goodson. EE. to Miss Anna Alves Lourdes of Sao Paulo. August 17 in Sao Paulo. Herman D. Hancock, Arch, and Romulus H. Thompson, have formed a partnership for the practice of architecture. The firm a known as Thompson & Hancock, and is located at 3092 Maple Dr., N. E., Atlanta. James S. Holmes. Jr.. IM, has been promoted by Southern Bell from plant manager at Winchester, Ky. to district traffic manager at Frankfort, Ky. Louis Klein. Ch.E.. formerly with Gull States Paper Corp.. is now associated with Rust Engineering in Birmingham, The home address is 2502 Mountain Branch Cir.. Apartment C; Birmingham, Alabama. MARRIED: William K. Knight, IM, to Mia Evelyn Merle Timmons. Mr. Knight I assistant manager of the Milledgeville Telephone Co.. Milledgeville, Ga. Estes W. Mann, IM. has been transferred by Colgate-Palmolive Cia from Sao Paulo. J U

David S. Lewis, Jr., AE '39, manager of all projects for the McDonnell Aircraft Company, has been elected a vice president of the company, effective August 1. Lewis has been associated with McDonnell since 1946. He has served in the Company's airplane engineering division as chief of aero-dynamics, design engineer, group engineer, and as head of the preliminary design department. He was promoted to manager of sales in 1955 and to manager of F3H (Demon) program in 1956.

This Is Your Wife How the telephone

helps her to be Jive busy

This is the pretty girl you married. She's the family chef. And the nurse. And the chauffeur and maid.

M o r e n e w s on page lb

And when she's all dressed up for an evening out—doesn't she look just wonderful!

^^•^H^^

How does she do it? Of course she's smart and it keeps her busy, but she never could manage it without the telephone.

Working

Tech Alu""11"

together

to bring people

people

When the "chef" needs groceries, she telephones. Supplies from the drugstore? T h e "nurse" phones her order. A train to be met? T h e telephone tells the "chauffeur" which one. A beauty shop appointment? A call from the "glamour girl" makes it easily and quickly. Handy telephones—in living room, bedroom, kitchen and hobby room —mean more convenience and security for everybody.

together . . . BELL T E L E P H O N E SYSTEM Pi


News by classes - cont. D. R. Berry, ME, has been appointed president of Scripto of Canada, Ltd. He joined Scripto in 1946 as a member of the Engineering Department and in April, 1951 entered Canada to establish the Scripto subsidiary there. ' A 9 Minton V. Braddy, Jr., Arch, who has • * been with Stevens & Wilkinson, Atlanta architects & engineers, for 11 years, has been appointed chief architect of a staff of 75 people. David A. Crosby, IM. manager of the insurance dept. of Thibadeau, Shaw & Brannan Co., realty brokers of Decatur, Ga., has been promoted to the position of vice president. >A0 George R. L. Shepherd, Ch.E., has • " been issued a U. S. Patent on "Desulfurization of Crude Oil & Crude Oil Fractions" by a process in which contaminants are removed by passing through cheap absorbent material before contact with desulfurizing catalysts. He is also co-author of one other patent recently granted. George has been with Humble Oil since 1947 and is now serving as section head. His home address is 144 W. Bayshore Dr., Baytown, Texas. 'At Dr. Hugh N. Powell, Ch. E., has been •• appointed associate professor of Mechanical Engineering at Cornell University. Ithaca. N. Y. ' AC Thomas U. Burke, ME, has been pro« • moted to project engineer in the Magnetic Tape Devices Dept. of the Product Development Lab at IBM in New York City. Herbert B. Langford, EE, has assumed duties as plant supt. of the Burnell-No. Pettus recycling plant of Pan American Petroleum Co. near Pettus, Texas. Eugene Miller, Ch. E.. associate managing editor of Business Week has just returned from a four-week trip to Europe. Mr. Miller, a Naval reserve officer, visited the 6th Fleet as a guest of the 6th Fleet Commander. Frank M. Tuttle, EE, has been appointed District Plant Superintendent for the Long Lines Dept. of American T & T in Indianapolis, Ind. ' / I R Nathaniel Jackson Golding, Jr., AE, TU received his M.S. in Applied Mechanics this past June from Washington University. ' A~l R. L. Boehmig, CE, has been named • ' president of Morris. Boehmig & Tindel, Inc., consulting structural engineers, with offices at 510 Henry Grady Bldg.. Atlanta. George B. Campbell, EE, senior engineer of Southern Services Inc., has been named assistant secretary and assistant treasurer of the Southern Company. He has been with the company since 1947. Mr. Campbell lives at 1815 Windsor Blvd., Birmingham, Ala. 24

Married: Ted C. Cox, IE, to Mrs. Francis L. Schramm last March. Their address is 1304 Fourth St., Neptune Beach, Fla. Ralph L. Edwards, Jr., EE, has been awarded an outstanding performance rating at Redstone Arsenal, Ala. Mr. Edwards is Director of the Corporal Guided Missile Project in the research and development division of the Ordnance Missile Lab. T. Russell Foster, ME, has joined the Chemstrand Corp. at Decatur, Ala. as a patent lawyer. He was a patent lawyer in New York prior to joining Chemstrand. His address is 710 Cedar St., Decatur, Ala. Robin B. Gray, AE, received his Ph.D. in A.E. this past June from Princeton University. Joseph M. Mass, IM, left Davison-Paxon after 10 years of service to open a women's apparel shop. Casual corner. The shop is located at 133 Sycamore St., Decatur, Ga. ' A f l Married: Edwin Lamont Anderson, ^ 0 jr., IE, to Miss Glenice Hall Aug. 24. A Scott Bennett, Jr., IM, has been appointed district inspector in Atlanta for the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the U. S. He has been with the company since 1948. His business address is 739 West Peachtree St., Atlanta 5, Ga. Born to: Mr. and Mrs. Herbert E. Boss, II, ME, a son, Herbert Edmund, III, April 23. Their home address is 121 Clay Hill Rd., Stamford. Conn. William P. Calhoun. Jr., IM, recently announced the opening of Calhoun Sales Co., food brokers & mfrs. agent. T h e firm is located at 3000 Forest Park Dr., Charlotte, North Carolina. Evert E. Clark, IE, is with Turner Halsey Co. as a sales representative. His home address is 3229 Glenvalley Dr., Decatur, Ga. John A. Dorsey, TE, is now Superintendent of Dyeing & Finishing at the Tifton Rug Mills plant in East Point, Ga. MARRIED: Ramon Echols to Miss Diane Brantley July 13. Mr. Echols is with Atlantic Steel Co. in Atlanta. ' A Q benjamin F. Caffey, CE, was recently W promoted to manager of engineering for Petroleum Combustion and Engineering Co. in Los Angeles. His home address is 5909 Overhill Dr., Los Angeles 43, Calif. MARRIED: Newt Morris Hallman, Ch.E.. to Miss Marilyn Reeling Aug. 3. Mr. Hallman is associated with the Universal Oil Products Co. in Des Plaines, 111. R. C. Nisbet, CE, has been promoted to District Civil Engineer at the Government

Wells District for Humble Oil & ^ ^ _ efin n Re« Co. His mailing address is P n D* '8 B Freer, Texas. ° MARRIED: Charles G. Pefinis IM t . Sandra M. Matheson July 7 Their ?i is 20 Standish Ave., N. W An. „ r t Atlanta. Ga. " Apt' M l , Romulus H. Thompson, Arch, and u man D . Hancock, '50, have formed nership for the practice of architecture11 firm, known as Thompson & jr a ' Romulus H. Hancock. Architect has nm** at 3092 Maple Dr., N. E., Atlanta, G ' MARRIED: Robert Baldwin Tippett A \ to Miss Mary Ann Hendon, July 6 M" Tippett is a partner in the firm of j 0 h n V & Tippetts, Architects, in Atlanta. 'CO

C. Emory Breedlove, ME, is nou . Chief Engineer with Tomkins-Beclt with, Inc. in Jacksonville, Fla. Dr. Robert Gordon Carson, Jr., I£ j ^ been appointed Director of Instruction in the School of Engineering at N.C. State College Prior to his appointment, he was head of the I.E. Dept. BORN TO: Mr. and Mrs. James C. Derim-. ton, EE, a son, Thomas Smith, May 2 Their address is 25 Polk Dr., HuntsviUe Ala. u u

BORN T O :

Mr.

and

Mrs.

Carl H. I

IM, a son, Richard Thomas, August 10. Carl is with Fulton Bros. Electric Co. Their home address is 2070 W. Homewood Ct_ Decatur, Ga. MARRIED: Rev. Curtis C. Goodson, EE. to Miss Anna Alves Lourdes of Sao Paulo. August 17 in Sao Paulo. Herman D. Hancock, Arch, and Romulus H. Thompson, have formed a partnership for the practice of architecture. The firm is known as Thompson & Hancock, and is located at 3092 Maple Dr., N. E., Allan:. James S. Holmes, Jr., IM, has been pro moted by Southern Bell from plant manager at Winchester. Ky. to district traffic manager at Frankfort, Ky. Louis Klein. Ch.E.. formerly with Gult States Paper Corp.. is now associated wifl Rust Engineering in Birmingham, The home address is 2502 Mountain Branch Cir.. Apartment C; Birmingham, Alabama. MARRIED: William K. Knight, IM, to Miss Evelyn Merle Timmons. Mr. Knight t assistant manager of the Milledgeville Telephone Co., Milledgeville, Ga. Estes W. Mann. IM. has been transferred by Colgate-Palmolive Cia from Sao Paulo.

David S. Lewis, Jr., AE '39, manager of all projects for the McDonnell Aircraft Company, has been elected a vice president of the company, effective August 1. Lewis has been associated with McDonnell since 1946. He has served in the Company's airplane engineering division as chief of aero-dynamics, design engineer, group engineer, and as head of the preliminary design department. He was promoted to manager of sales in 1955 and to manager of F3H (Demon) program in 1956.

More news on page 26

This Is Your Wife How the telephone

helps her to be five busy

This is the pretty girl you married. She's the family chef. And the nurse. And the chauffeur and maid. And when she's all dressed up for an evening out—doesn't she look just wonderful! How does she do it? Of course she's smart and it keeps her busy, but she never could manage it without the telephone.

i

Working together to bring people

Tech Alumni'

people

When the "chef" needs groceries, she telephones. Supplies from the drugstore? The "nurse" phones her order. A train to be met? The telephone tells the "chauffeur" which one. A beauty shop appointment? A call from the "glamour girl" makes it easily and quickly. Handy telephones—in living room, bedroom, kitchen and hobby room—mean more convenience and security for everybody.

together . . . BELL T E L E P H O N E SYSTEM

HJHL,


News by classes - cont. Brazil to Cali, Columbia where he will serve the company as general manager. His business address is c / o Colgate-Palmolive Cia. Apartado Aereo 2324, Cali, Columbia. ENGAGED: Elmer Little Perry, Jr., Arch, to Miss Mary Nell Johnson. Mr. Perry is with Scroggs & Ewing, Architects, in Augusta, Georgia. Robert W. Prentice, AE, received his M.S. in A.E. from Cal Tech this past June. His permanent mailing address is 5501 Fairfield Rd., Pensacola, Fla. 'CI

BORN T O : Mr.

and Mrs.

Charles

D.

•' Quarles, T E , a son, Charles Jr., July 29. Mr. Quarles is with Parker, Helms & Langston, Inc., Box 425, Jacksonville, Fla. BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs. Ira G. Ross, T E ,

a daughter, Leslie Sue, June 1. Their address is 602 Minnesota Ave., McComb, Miss. T. A. Tindel, Arch., has been named executive vice president and secretary of Morris, Boehmig & Tindel, Inc., consulting structural engineers, with offices at 510 Henry Grady Bldg., Atlanta. Ernest P. West, IE, is now with the Carolina Natural Gas Corp. of Hickory, N . C. as operations manager and chief engineer. He lives with his wife and two children at 1083 14th Ave., N . W., Hickory, N . C. BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs. M. E.

Akridge,

IM. a daughter. Patricia Susan, May 7. Mr. Akridge is with the American Sugar Refining Co. Their home address is 4930 Feliciana Dr.. New Orleans, La. John O. Allred, Ch.E., has been promoted to Ch.E. in the Technical Service Div. at Humble Oil's Baytown, Texas refinery. His home address is 109-B Forrest St., Baytown. Harold S. Becker, AE, has joined the Guided Missile Research Div of RamoWoolridge Corp. in Los Angeles. BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs. Victor J. Caruso, M E . a son. Victor. Jr., April 19. Mr. Caruso is a sales representative for the General Cable Corp., Tampa Sales office. Their home address is 5311 Rainbow Dr., Tampa. Fla. J. R. Gannon, Ch.E., Packaging Specialist with Union Multiwall Bags, has devised a new materials handling method for the moving of bags which results in an annual savings of $1400-8000 for each 450M of the various size bags used. The company, which is a division of Union Bag-Camp Paper Corp., offers free information about this plan. Eugene E. Holman, IM, has been appointed personnel administrator for Bendix Radio Div., Bendix Aviation Corp., Baltimore, Md. He lives at 1001 E. Belvedere Ave., Baltimore, Md. MARRIED: Francis Dennis Pry or, Jr., IM, to Miss Alice Sutherland, June 22. Mr. Pryor is with A. M. Byers Co. in Atlanta. MARRIED: John Loflin Ergle, Ch.E. to Miss Eleanor Ann Petree June 28 in Bartlesville. Okla. BORN

TO:

Mr.

and

Mrs.

William

A.

Gresham, Ch.E., a son, William A., Ill, in February. Mr. Gresham is employed by the 26

Georgia Tech Engineering Experiment Station. Their home address is 3085 E. Fairway Rd., N . E., Atlanta. BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs.

Ted

Lachmann.

Don Anthony Lautman. Phys his Ph.D. in Astronomy this past w T ^ Princeton University. MARRIED:

Robert

W. Lee,

IE

ME, a son, David Theodore, June 11. Their address is 19 Rampart West, Rt. 26, Media. Pa. Raymond B. Smith, M E . has been promoted to staff engineer at the EAM Product Eugineering Dept. of the IBM Product Development L a b at Poughkeepsie, N. Y.

Claire F . Murray May 25. The c o J V side in San Francisco where Mr l • the insurance business. Harold C. McKenzie, Jr., Jg • Troutman. Sams. Schroeder & Lock U* His business adress is 1607 WiUi am ^ p 3 " Bldg.. Atlanta 3, Ga. Randolph E. Neal. EE, is an instru mem MARRIED: Thomas Carroll Aderhold, ation engineer with Aero. Inc. at Tullah to Miss Peggy Jane Ingram AuTenn. His home address is 1003 Glenw^, gust 10. Mr. Aderhold is with Sasser & Co. Manchester. Tennessee. Lt. Thomas V. Brooks, Jr., IM, served Tench M. Phillips. Jr.. IM, is a p a r t n e r in the new and used car firm, AutomoviH as instructor during annual summer training which is a franchised dealer for the Encl'h of ROTC cadets at Ft. Bragg. He is assigned Ford. His partners in the business are ! to Davidson College. MARRIED: Louis Young Dawson, III, CE, brother. Conoly. and father, Tench Phillip! Sr.. '22. The firm is located at 956 F li,,i to Miss Elizabeth N . Verner last April. Mr. Creek Rd., Norfolk, Va. Dawson is with Dawson Engineering Co. in Charleston, S. C. Robert E. Russell. IE, has been assigns as sales representative to the Atlanta disMARRIED: Cecil Moye Hodges, Jr. I M , trict of Allis-Chalmers Industries Group to Miss Shirley B. Harris July 20. Mr. MARRIED: Leon B. Spears, IM, to Hodges is associated with the Cecil Hodges Patricia Davidson. Sept. 7. Mr. Spears i Lumber Co. in Oconee, G a . with the Carroll Daniel Construction Co BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Hodin Gainesville, Ga. ges, Arch, a daughter, Susan Kennedy April MARRIED: Emory Lloyd Upshaw, Jr.. |\i 16. Their home address is 209 Erie Ave., to Miss Susan L. Addy, June 23 Decatur, G a . Upshaw is associated with Sears, Roebuck BORN TO: Mr. and Mrs. Francois Martz& Co. in Atlanta. loff, EE, a son, Didier Georges July 24. MARRIED: George Phillips White. IM. • Their home address is 20 East Housatonic Miss Nancy Ann Tatum, June 15. St,. Pittsfield. Mass. Francois is with General Electric's Transformer Division as a G. Cabell Childress, Arch, ha: lab development engineer. separated from the Navy and is atNorman L. Morse, M E , has joined Pan American World Airways at Miami. He has tending the University of Colorado's School of Architecture. His mailing address is Genbeen assigned to the airline's engineering eral Delivery, Boulder, Colo. department, Latin American Div. MARRIED: Lt. John L. Gielow, TE, Ralph A. Petersen, IE, has been appointed Miss Betty Lane last April. Lt. Gielow • manager of the Birmingham, Ala. district serving with the Marine Corps at Miami. office of Pangborn Corp. His business adFlorida. dress is 1731 C Valley Ave. MARRIED: Walker Edward Gossag< U. E. Voetter, M E , has been promoted to Miss Virginia Maude Eastman in July. to resident engineer at Schlumberger Well Their address is 1435 Nightingale. LouiSurveying Corp.'s Mechanical Engineering ville 13. Ky. Dept. at Houston, Texas. His new address BORN T O : Mr. mid Mrs. Sidney E. is 5724 H.M.C., Apt. 8, Houston 21, kins. CE. a son. Franklin William August" ' C O Richard J. Belardi, M E , has been Their home address is 9-C Coleman Apt* "** promoted to first lieutenant in GerAsheville, North Carolina. many where he is maintenance officer of Joe B. Hoburt. Jr.. ME. comply the 71st Ordnance Bn. tour of active duty with the Corps Ben F. Brian. Jr.. M E , has been transEngineers in July and is now with Hobai ferred by DuPont to Waynesboro, Va. H e Welding & Repair Works in GreemiH is in the Engineering Dept., Textile Fibers. Miss. He is married to the former Mar£ His home address is 308 Florence Ave., Maxwell. Their mailing address is P. 0.1 Waynesboro, Va. 192, Greenville, Mississippi. W. H. Brogdon, I M , has been named MARRIED: William Thomas Musffn Nashville Warehouse foreman for Shell Oil IM. to Miss Joan Maddox June 29. I Company. Musgrove is with Gulf Oil Corp. in MARRIED: Walter Rex Hawkins, Ch.E., to Charles L. Thomas. Jr.. IM. is a » Miss Edith Petrie August 24. Mr. Hawkins engineer for the Gulf Oil Corp. at Tam is attending Emory School of Medicine where he has just completed his sophomore ' C C Darrxl C. Aubrey. Ch.E.. has I year. J J separated from the Army and is Jerome A. Holiber, IE, has been appointed at Humble Oil & Refining Co. at Ba> Head of the Safety Branch, Naval Research Texas. He is in the Technical Sen' Laboratory. Washington, D . C. Mr. Aubrey lives at 3117 Inninois St.. Earl L. Lauber, EE, is with Bell Teletown. phone Labs at the A F Missile Test Center, Lt. Robert J. Bitowft. Arch, has compi Patrick AFB. Fla. His home address is 229 it Golf View Drive, Titusville, Fla.

WHICH OF THESE JOBS CAN YOU FILL? COMPUTER AND CONTROL ENGINEERING

'52 71

'54

More news on P«9*

1

ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS with 2 or more years experience

in:

Gyro Development Servo-mechanisms and Feedback Systems Analog Computers Military Specifications Electronic Circuitry Magnetic and Transistor Amplifiers Network Design Inverters AC and DC Servo Motors Electronic Research Fire Control Systems Microwaves and Radar • • • • .

MISSILE GUIDANCE ENGINEERING • Gyro Development » Servo-mechanisms and Feedback Systems • Analog Computers » Military Specifications » Electronic Circuitry • Magnetic and Transistor Amplifiers » Network Design • Inverters > AC and DC Servo Motors > Electronic Research • Missile Control Systems

Antennas Beacons Receivers Transmitters Pulse Circuits

Digital Computers and Data Processing

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS with 2 or more years experience in:

RESEARCH SCIENTISTS with broad experience in:

Inertial Guidance Systems Gyro Development Military Specifications Servo-mechanisms Product Design and Packaging of Electro-Mechanical Devices Fire Control Systems

Inertial Guidance Systems Gyro Development Military Specifications Servo-mechanisms Product Design and Packaging of Electro-Mechanical Devices

Electromagnetics Solid State Physics Electrical and Optical Communications Systems Physical Chemistry

Theoretical Mechanics High-vacuum Techniques Electronic Circuitry Stability of Electrical and Mechanical Systems

Do you dare tackle tough problems? At Ford Instrument Co., finding the answer to problems is the engineer's prime responsibility. As a result, the engineer who meets this challenge receives the professional and financial rewards his work merits. Our qualifications are high, and we want to be sure you can match the high

standards of our present engineering staff. Our projects are too important and too complicated to trust to most engineers. What will you do at FICo? That depends on your specific abilities and experience. For details about the challenge, environment, and opportunity at FICo, write Philip F. McCaffrey at below address.

t | FORD INSTRUMENT CO. DIVISION

Tech AH""""

- •

OF

31-10 Thomson Avenue

SPERRY

RAND •

CORPORATION Long Island City 1, N. Y.


News by classes - cont. Brazil to Cali, Columbia where he will serve the company as general manager. His business address is c / o Colgate-Palmolive Cia. Apartado Aereo 2324, Cali, Columbia. ENGAGED: Elmer Little Perry, Jr., Arch, to Miss Mary Nell Johnson. Mr. Perry is with Scroggs & Ewing, Architects, in Augusta, Georgia. Robert W. Prentice, AE, received his M.S. in A.E. from Cal Tech this past June. His permanent mailing address is 5501 Fairfield Rd., Pensacola, Fla. 'CI

BORN T O : Mr.

and Mrs.

Charles

D.

•' Quarles, T E , a son, Charles Jr., July 29. Mr. Quarles is with Parker, Helms & Langston, Inc., Box 425, Jacksonville, Fla. BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs. Ira G. Ross, T E ,

a daughter, Leslie Sue, June 1. Their address is 602 Minnesota Ave., McComb, Miss. T. A. Tindel, Arch., has been named executive vice president and secretary of Morris, Boehmig & Tindel, Inc., consulting structural engineers, with offices at 510 Henry Grady Bldg., Atlanta. Ernest P. West, IE, is now with the Carolina Natural Gas Corp. of Hickory, N . C. as operations manager and chief engineer. He lives with his wife and two children at 1083 14th Ave., N . W., Hickory, N . C. BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs. M. E.

Akridge,

IM. a daughter. Patricia Susan, May 7. Mr. Akridge is with the American Sugar Refining Co. Their home address is 4930 Feliciana Dr.. New Orleans, La. John O. Allred, Ch.E., has been promoted to Ch.E. in the Technical Service Div. at Humble Oil's Baytown, Texas refinery. His home address is 109-B Forrest St., Baytown. Harold S. Becker, AE, has joined the Guided Missile Research Div of RamoWoolridge Corp. in Los Angeles. BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs. Victor J. Caruso, M E . a son. Victor. Jr., April 19. Mr. Caruso is a sales representative for the General Cable Corp., Tampa Sales office. Their home address is 5311 Rainbow Dr., Tampa. Fla. J. R. Gannon, Ch.E., Packaging Specialist with Union Multiwall Bags, has devised a new materials handling method for the moving of bags which results in an annual savings of $1400-8000 for each 450M of the various size bags used. The company, which is a division of Union Bag-Camp Paper Corp., offers free information about this plan. Eugene E. Holman, IM, has been appointed personnel administrator for Bendix Radio Div., Bendix Aviation Corp., Baltimore, Md. He lives at 1001 E. Belvedere Ave., Baltimore, Md. MARRIED: Francis Dennis Pry or, Jr., IM, to Miss Alice Sutherland, June 22. Mr. Pryor is with A. M. Byers Co. in Atlanta. MARRIED: John Loflin Ergle, Ch.E. to Miss Eleanor Ann Petree June 28 in Bartlesville. Okla. BORN

TO:

Mr.

and

Mrs.

William

A.

Gresham, Ch.E., a son, William A., Ill, in February. Mr. Gresham is employed by the 26

Georgia Tech Engineering Experiment Station. Their home address is 3085 E. Fairway Rd., N . E., Atlanta. BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs.

Ted

Lachmann.

Don Anthony Lautman. Phys his Ph.D. in Astronomy this past w T ^ Princeton University. MARRIED:

Robert

W. Lee,

IE

ME, a son, David Theodore, June 11. Their address is 19 Rampart West, Rt. 26, Media. Pa. Raymond B. Smith, M E . has been promoted to staff engineer at the EAM Product Eugineering Dept. of the IBM Product Development L a b at Poughkeepsie, N. Y.

Claire F . Murray May 25. The c o J V side in San Francisco where Mr l • the insurance business. Harold C. McKenzie, Jr., Jg • Troutman. Sams. Schroeder & Lock U* His business adress is 1607 WiUi am ^ p 3 " Bldg.. Atlanta 3, Ga. Randolph E. Neal. EE, is an instru mem MARRIED: Thomas Carroll Aderhold, ation engineer with Aero. Inc. at Tullah to Miss Peggy Jane Ingram AuTenn. His home address is 1003 Glenw^, gust 10. Mr. Aderhold is with Sasser & Co. Manchester. Tennessee. Lt. Thomas V. Brooks, Jr., IM, served Tench M. Phillips. Jr.. IM, is a p a r t n e r in the new and used car firm, AutomoviH as instructor during annual summer training which is a franchised dealer for the Encl'h of ROTC cadets at Ft. Bragg. He is assigned Ford. His partners in the business are ! to Davidson College. MARRIED: Louis Young Dawson, III, CE, brother. Conoly. and father, Tench Phillip! Sr.. '22. The firm is located at 956 F li,,i to Miss Elizabeth N . Verner last April. Mr. Creek Rd., Norfolk, Va. Dawson is with Dawson Engineering Co. in Charleston, S. C. Robert E. Russell. IE, has been assigns as sales representative to the Atlanta disMARRIED: Cecil Moye Hodges, Jr. I M , trict of Allis-Chalmers Industries Group to Miss Shirley B. Harris July 20. Mr. MARRIED: Leon B. Spears, IM, to Hodges is associated with the Cecil Hodges Patricia Davidson. Sept. 7. Mr. Spears i Lumber Co. in Oconee, G a . with the Carroll Daniel Construction Co BORN T O : Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Hodin Gainesville, Ga. ges, Arch, a daughter, Susan Kennedy April MARRIED: Emory Lloyd Upshaw, Jr.. |\i 16. Their home address is 209 Erie Ave., to Miss Susan L. Addy, June 23 Decatur, G a . Upshaw is associated with Sears, Roebuck BORN TO: Mr. and Mrs. Francois Martz& Co. in Atlanta. loff, EE, a son, Didier Georges July 24. MARRIED: George Phillips White. IM. • Their home address is 20 East Housatonic Miss Nancy Ann Tatum, June 15. St,. Pittsfield. Mass. Francois is with General Electric's Transformer Division as a G. Cabell Childress, Arch, ha: lab development engineer. separated from the Navy and is atNorman L. Morse, M E , has joined Pan American World Airways at Miami. He has tending the University of Colorado's School of Architecture. His mailing address is Genbeen assigned to the airline's engineering eral Delivery, Boulder, Colo. department, Latin American Div. MARRIED: Lt. John L. Gielow, TE, Ralph A. Petersen, IE, has been appointed Miss Betty Lane last April. Lt. Gielow • manager of the Birmingham, Ala. district serving with the Marine Corps at Miami. office of Pangborn Corp. His business adFlorida. dress is 1731 C Valley Ave. MARRIED: Walker Edward Gossag< U. E. Voetter, M E , has been promoted to Miss Virginia Maude Eastman in July. to resident engineer at Schlumberger Well Their address is 1435 Nightingale. LouiSurveying Corp.'s Mechanical Engineering ville 13. Ky. Dept. at Houston, Texas. His new address BORN T O : Mr. mid Mrs. Sidney E. is 5724 H.M.C., Apt. 8, Houston 21, kins. CE. a son. Franklin William August" ' C O Richard J. Belardi, M E , has been Their home address is 9-C Coleman Apt* "** promoted to first lieutenant in GerAsheville, North Carolina. many where he is maintenance officer of Joe B. Hoburt. Jr.. ME. comply the 71st Ordnance Bn. tour of active duty with the Corps Ben F. Brian. Jr.. M E , has been transEngineers in July and is now with Hobai ferred by DuPont to Waynesboro, Va. H e Welding & Repair Works in GreemiH is in the Engineering Dept., Textile Fibers. Miss. He is married to the former Mar£ His home address is 308 Florence Ave., Maxwell. Their mailing address is P. 0.1 Waynesboro, Va. 192, Greenville, Mississippi. W. H. Brogdon, I M , has been named MARRIED: William Thomas Musffn Nashville Warehouse foreman for Shell Oil IM. to Miss Joan Maddox June 29. I Company. Musgrove is with Gulf Oil Corp. in MARRIED: Walter Rex Hawkins, Ch.E., to Charles L. Thomas. Jr.. IM. is a » Miss Edith Petrie August 24. Mr. Hawkins engineer for the Gulf Oil Corp. at Tam is attending Emory School of Medicine where he has just completed his sophomore ' C C Darrxl C. Aubrey. Ch.E.. has I year. J J separated from the Army and is Jerome A. Holiber, IE, has been appointed at Humble Oil & Refining Co. at Ba> Head of the Safety Branch, Naval Research Texas. He is in the Technical Sen' Laboratory. Washington, D . C. Mr. Aubrey lives at 3117 Inninois St.. Earl L. Lauber, EE, is with Bell Teletown. phone Labs at the A F Missile Test Center, Lt. Robert J. Bitowft. Arch, has compi Patrick AFB. Fla. His home address is 229 it Golf View Drive, Titusville, Fla.

WHICH OF THESE JOBS CAN YOU FILL? COMPUTER AND CONTROL ENGINEERING

'52 71

'54

More news on P«9*

1

ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS with 2 or more years experience

in:

Gyro Development Servo-mechanisms and Feedback Systems Analog Computers Military Specifications Electronic Circuitry Magnetic and Transistor Amplifiers Network Design Inverters AC and DC Servo Motors Electronic Research Fire Control Systems Microwaves and Radar • • • • .

MISSILE GUIDANCE ENGINEERING • Gyro Development » Servo-mechanisms and Feedback Systems • Analog Computers » Military Specifications » Electronic Circuitry • Magnetic and Transistor Amplifiers » Network Design • Inverters > AC and DC Servo Motors > Electronic Research • Missile Control Systems

Antennas Beacons Receivers Transmitters Pulse Circuits

Digital Computers and Data Processing

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS with 2 or more years experience in:

RESEARCH SCIENTISTS with broad experience in:

Inertial Guidance Systems Gyro Development Military Specifications Servo-mechanisms Product Design and Packaging of Electro-Mechanical Devices Fire Control Systems

Inertial Guidance Systems Gyro Development Military Specifications Servo-mechanisms Product Design and Packaging of Electro-Mechanical Devices

Electromagnetics Solid State Physics Electrical and Optical Communications Systems Physical Chemistry

Theoretical Mechanics High-vacuum Techniques Electronic Circuitry Stability of Electrical and Mechanical Systems

Do you dare tackle tough problems? At Ford Instrument Co., finding the answer to problems is the engineer's prime responsibility. As a result, the engineer who meets this challenge receives the professional and financial rewards his work merits. Our qualifications are high, and we want to be sure you can match the high

standards of our present engineering staff. Our projects are too important and too complicated to trust to most engineers. What will you do at FICo? That depends on your specific abilities and experience. For details about the challenge, environment, and opportunity at FICo, write Philip F. McCaffrey at below address.

t | FORD INSTRUMENT CO. DIVISION

Tech AH""""

- •

OF

31-10 Thomson Avenue

SPERRY

RAND •

CORPORATION Long Island City 1, N. Y.


News by classes - cont. a two year tour of duty with the Navy and is with General Electric in Schenectady. ENGAGED: James Edgar Boswell, Jr.. Ch.E.. to Miss Edith P. Beene. Mr. Boswell is with Reynolds Metals in Sheffield, Ala. PFC James Kee Chi, TE, is a member of the Third Armored Cavalry Regiment now serving in Germany. Charles B. Coulbourn, Jr., EE, has joined the technical staff of the Control Systems Div., Ramo-Wooldridge Corp., 5730 Arbor Vitae St., Los Angeles, Calif. D. Jack Davis, T E , is an engineer with the Lee Hall Div. of Dow Chemical at Warwick, Va. ENGAGED: William Clark DeLoach, IE, to Miss Sarah Morris. Mr. DeLoach is with the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co.. Newport News, Virginia. MARRIED: Frank Exley Edrington, IM, to Miss Frances Edwards Sept. 14. Mr. Edrington is with Southern Bell in Atlanta. W. L. Greene, Jr., Chem. has joined Sheil Oil in the Norco Refinery, Norco, La., as analytical chemist. Edgar B. Hamilton. IM, has been promoted to first lieutenant in Germany where he is assigned to the 8th Inf. Div. He is a platoon leader in the division's 13th Regt. ENGAGED: Robert LeRoy Hardin, ME, to Miss Mary Jane Marbut. MARRIED: John Ronald Howard, EE, to Miss Johnella Fossett June 29 in Canton, Georgia. MARRIED: George William Humphreys, IM. to Miss Virginia Fleming June 15. Mr. Humphreys is with the Peerless Woolen Mills. Tifton, Ga. James R. McCord, Ch.E., is attending MIT graduate school of Applied Mathematics where he holds a research assistantship in Operations Research. He was married last October to the former Miss Louise Manning. Their address is 60 Brattle St.. Apt. 204, Cambridge 38, Miss. Lt. Edmond T. Miller, CE, recently received the Association of the U. S. Army Medal for scholastic achievement. He won the award for maintaining the highest grade average in his class of the engineer officers basic course. Lt. Larry N. Murray, Ch.. has graduated from the motor officer course at the Army's European Ordnance School in Fuessen. Germany. He is a platoon leader with the 44th Chemical Co. MARRIED: James David Pride, EE, to Miss Ruby Camp. Sept. 7. Mr. Pride is with Lockheed in Marietta, Ga. BORN T O : Lt. and Mrs. Pepper Rodgers, IM, a son, Kyle Scott, July 25. Robert C. Schroeder, IE, recently completed his tour of active duty with the Army. He served a year in Germany with club and school division under Berlin command. He is with Babcock-Wilcox in Lynchburg. Va. His address is 1405 Langhorne Rd. MARRIED: Hull H. Teegardin, EE, to Miss Eileen Charton, lune 15. Mr. Teegardin is employed by the Georgia Tech Engineering Experiment Station. MARRIED: Ronald Aaron Wasdin, IE, to Miss Marjorie Lamb June 22. Mr. Wasdin

is with the Ga. State Highway Dept. and is attending Graduate School at Georgia Tech. MARRIED: Charles M. Weems, Jr., EE, to Miss Jeannette Burk June 22. Mr. Weems is an associate engineer with Westinghouse Air Arm Division on the Missile Sub-System Project. MARRIED: Usher Thomasson Winslette, Jr., CE. to Miss Linda Stoner July 27. Mr. Winslette is with Law-Barrow-Agee in Atlanta. ' C D Lt. Hamilton C. A mail, Jr., IM, has •»U received the silver wings of an aircraft navigator at Ellington AFB, Texas. He is assigned to the 427th Refueling Fighter-Bomber Sq. at Robins AFB, Macon, Georgia. Lt. John H. Burson, HI, Ch.E., has completed the Chemical Corps officer basic course at Ft. McClellan, Ala. Pvt. Charles F. DeMars, U. S. Army. Arch, is in combat training with the Third Inf. Div. at Ft. Benning. Ga. Philip D. Denton, Jr., ME, has been commissioned Ensign in the Navy. He is stationed at Saufley Field in Pensacola for flight training. MARRIED: Lt. Charles Frederick Eaton. Ch.E., to Miss Marylyn Duke, June 29. MARRIED: James Collier Fanning. Chem. to Miss Sybil Smith, August 10. Mr. Fanning is doing graduate work in Chemistry at Georgia Tech. MARRIED: Lt. William E. Green, Jr., IM, to Miss Ann Whitehead. The wedding took place in July. Lt. Green is stationed at Ft. Benning. Ga. Army Lt. Curtis B. Herbert, HI, Phys. has graduated from the Airborne course at the Infantry School, Ft. Benning, Ga. Alton B. Hollis, Jr., IM, has been made Public Relations Manager for the Chemstrand Corp. at New York City. He will have offices in the Empire State Bldg. MARRIED: Lt. Frank Reeves Howard, Jr., IM, to Miss Mary Williams, June 22. Lt. Howard is serving with the Air Force at Marianna, Fla. Lt. Danny B. Kennedy, ME, has completed the Chemical Corps officer basic course at Ft. McClellan, Ala. BORN T O :

Ens.

and

Mrs.

Howard

Law.

IE, a daughter, Vicki Lynn, July 16. Ens Law is stationed in Washington, D. C. Ens. John V. Linn, Jr., T E , recently graduated from Pre-Flight School in Pen-

sacola and received his commks Navy. He is in flight training a , v J Field. Milton. Fla. Ens. Linn WM June 23 to Miss Eleanor Wright Th^ dress is 106 Chorena Ave.. Pensac ENGAGED: Alvin K. Lubin, IM ° Susan Speer. The wedding will t.'i Oct. 29. Mr. Lubin's current a d d r e s s ' t ^ Fernwood Dr., Akron 20, Ohio. Lt. John C. McFarland, IM. graduJune from the Infantry School's basi/J course at Ft. Benning. Ga. Don R. Meaders, IM. is serving ttilh U.S. Army Forces Weapons P r o j " Killeen Base, Texas. His home addr 1215 Jacqueline St., Killeen, Texas Lt. Thomas E. Morris, EE, has be> signed to the 3560th Pilot Traim, Webb AFB, Texas where he is servL flight instructor. Thomas F. Murray. AE, has cornpleM his initial training at Delta Air Lines' flleh, engineers school at the Atlanta Airport Ens. Lewis S. Nathanson, S.C.. USNk IM. is serving as Disbursing Officer the USS Mercury (AKS-20), c/o F.Pfj New York. N. Y. The Mercury just returned from a VA month tour of the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. Lt. William A. Ogram, EE. has grai from the U.S. Army Ordnance Guided Missile School. Huntsville. Ala. He member of the faculty at the Ordnana Guided Missile School at Redstone \ Huntsville, Ala. Pvt. Eugene H. Palmer, Jr.. IK. basic combat training with the Army's new Trainfire Co. at Ft. Benning. Ga. L. S. Payne. IE. was recently made branch manager of the Mobile brunch i American Blower Div. of American Radi ator. His business address is 461 Government St.. Room 7, Mobile, Ala. BORN TO: Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Peder son. IE. a daughter. Feb. 1. Their home address is 3842 Holley Ter., S. E.. Wa ington, D. C. MARRIED: Walter William Props!. Miss Mary Joe Hughs. Sept. 11 Mr. Props! is with the Caterpillar Tractor Co. i Peoria, 111. Lt. Robert S. Riley. USA. CE. ha assigned to the 169th Engrg. Bn. at Ft Stewart, Ga.

GIFTS FROM TECH •

For The Boss

For The Office

For The W i f e

For The Kids

For Future 'Reeks'

JUVENILE " T " SHIRTS Young Wrecks will really ramble with these smart shirts direct from the Flats. Available in three styles, each will brighten the life of your youngster. 1. The Ramblin' Reck from Georgia Tech. 2. A large yellow jacket with the words " I ' m a little STINGER from Georgia Tech." 3. Maize terry cloth " T " shirt with Georgia Tech 19??". Sizes 2 . 4 . 6. 8 Price $1.25 Each

GEORGIA TECH 6LASSES Toast Tech Get these sparkling Georgia Tech glasses in four sizes—a size for each member of the family. Modern cut highlights the crystal clear design; livens up the party. These glasses make a smart gift and a set you'd like yourself. Pilsner Glasses — $ 1 . 0 0 Each Others — $ 55 Each

3 For $3.50

Postpaid

MUSICAL FOOTBALL •Ramblin' Reck" — the most famous college song of all time played by this musical football. This authentic miniature pigskin is appropriately trimmed with white and gold lacing. Has the Georgia Tech seal stamped on the side. You'll want several of these musical momentos—a unique gift for young and old. Available individually or with connecting ash tray. Price — $ 3 . 2 5

Postpaid

With Ash Tray $5.25

M o r e news on page 30

Available Only From The College Inn

Norman G. Statham, IM '50, has been named wage and salary supervisor for the Los Angeles area offiice of the Shell Oil Company in July. Statham received his MBA degree in 1951 from the University of Chicago in personnel and labor relations. He has been with Shell since 1953. Since 1955 he has served as industrial relations analyst in the Los Angeles office of the company. He served in the Army Air Force from 1942 to 1947 with the rank of Major. He spent three years overseas, participating in the invasions of France and the Rhine campaign. Statham is married to the former Barbara Burch of Georgia.

TO: THE GEORGIA TECH COLLEGE INN 2 2 5 NORTH

AVE., N. W .

ATLANTA, GEORGIA

Please mail me postpaid ( U . S. only) the following items for which I enclose my check or money order:

FROM:

i

Se

28

For The Alumnus

P»ember, T 9 5 7

29


News by classes - cont. a two year tour of duty with the Navy and is with General Electric in Schenectady. ENGAGED: James Edgar Boswell, Jr.. Ch.E.. to Miss Edith P. Beene. Mr. Boswell is with Reynolds Metals in Sheffield, Ala. PFC James Kee Chi, TE, is a member of the Third Armored Cavalry Regiment now serving in Germany. Charles B. Coulbourn, Jr., EE, has joined the technical staff of the Control Systems Div., Ramo-Wooldridge Corp., 5730 Arbor Vitae St., Los Angeles, Calif. D. Jack Davis, T E , is an engineer with the Lee Hall Div. of Dow Chemical at Warwick, Va. ENGAGED: William Clark DeLoach, IE, to Miss Sarah Morris. Mr. DeLoach is with the Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co.. Newport News, Virginia. MARRIED: Frank Exley Edrington, IM, to Miss Frances Edwards Sept. 14. Mr. Edrington is with Southern Bell in Atlanta. W. L. Greene, Jr., Chem. has joined Sheil Oil in the Norco Refinery, Norco, La., as analytical chemist. Edgar B. Hamilton. IM, has been promoted to first lieutenant in Germany where he is assigned to the 8th Inf. Div. He is a platoon leader in the division's 13th Regt. ENGAGED: Robert LeRoy Hardin, ME, to Miss Mary Jane Marbut. MARRIED: John Ronald Howard, EE, to Miss Johnella Fossett June 29 in Canton, Georgia. MARRIED: George William Humphreys, IM. to Miss Virginia Fleming June 15. Mr. Humphreys is with the Peerless Woolen Mills. Tifton, Ga. James R. McCord, Ch.E., is attending MIT graduate school of Applied Mathematics where he holds a research assistantship in Operations Research. He was married last October to the former Miss Louise Manning. Their address is 60 Brattle St.. Apt. 204, Cambridge 38, Miss. Lt. Edmond T. Miller, CE, recently received the Association of the U. S. Army Medal for scholastic achievement. He won the award for maintaining the highest grade average in his class of the engineer officers basic course. Lt. Larry N. Murray, Ch.. has graduated from the motor officer course at the Army's European Ordnance School in Fuessen. Germany. He is a platoon leader with the 44th Chemical Co. MARRIED: James David Pride, EE, to Miss Ruby Camp. Sept. 7. Mr. Pride is with Lockheed in Marietta, Ga. BORN T O : Lt. and Mrs. Pepper Rodgers, IM, a son, Kyle Scott, July 25. Robert C. Schroeder, IE, recently completed his tour of active duty with the Army. He served a year in Germany with club and school division under Berlin command. He is with Babcock-Wilcox in Lynchburg. Va. His address is 1405 Langhorne Rd. MARRIED: Hull H. Teegardin, EE, to Miss Eileen Charton, lune 15. Mr. Teegardin is employed by the Georgia Tech Engineering Experiment Station. MARRIED: Ronald Aaron Wasdin, IE, to Miss Marjorie Lamb June 22. Mr. Wasdin

is with the Ga. State Highway Dept. and is attending Graduate School at Georgia Tech. MARRIED: Charles M. Weems, Jr., EE, to Miss Jeannette Burk June 22. Mr. Weems is an associate engineer with Westinghouse Air Arm Division on the Missile Sub-System Project. MARRIED: Usher Thomasson Winslette, Jr., CE. to Miss Linda Stoner July 27. Mr. Winslette is with Law-Barrow-Agee in Atlanta. ' C D Lt. Hamilton C. A mail, Jr., IM, has •»U received the silver wings of an aircraft navigator at Ellington AFB, Texas. He is assigned to the 427th Refueling Fighter-Bomber Sq. at Robins AFB, Macon, Georgia. Lt. John H. Burson, HI, Ch.E., has completed the Chemical Corps officer basic course at Ft. McClellan, Ala. Pvt. Charles F. DeMars, U. S. Army. Arch, is in combat training with the Third Inf. Div. at Ft. Benning. Ga. Philip D. Denton, Jr., ME, has been commissioned Ensign in the Navy. He is stationed at Saufley Field in Pensacola for flight training. MARRIED: Lt. Charles Frederick Eaton. Ch.E., to Miss Marylyn Duke, June 29. MARRIED: James Collier Fanning. Chem. to Miss Sybil Smith, August 10. Mr. Fanning is doing graduate work in Chemistry at Georgia Tech. MARRIED: Lt. William E. Green, Jr., IM, to Miss Ann Whitehead. The wedding took place in July. Lt. Green is stationed at Ft. Benning. Ga. Army Lt. Curtis B. Herbert, HI, Phys. has graduated from the Airborne course at the Infantry School, Ft. Benning, Ga. Alton B. Hollis, Jr., IM, has been made Public Relations Manager for the Chemstrand Corp. at New York City. He will have offices in the Empire State Bldg. MARRIED: Lt. Frank Reeves Howard, Jr., IM, to Miss Mary Williams, June 22. Lt. Howard is serving with the Air Force at Marianna, Fla. Lt. Danny B. Kennedy, ME, has completed the Chemical Corps officer basic course at Ft. McClellan, Ala. BORN T O :

Ens.

and

Mrs.

Howard

Law.

IE, a daughter, Vicki Lynn, July 16. Ens Law is stationed in Washington, D. C. Ens. John V. Linn, Jr., T E , recently graduated from Pre-Flight School in Pen-

sacola and received his commks Navy. He is in flight training a , v J Field. Milton. Fla. Ens. Linn WM June 23 to Miss Eleanor Wright Th^ dress is 106 Chorena Ave.. Pensac ENGAGED: Alvin K. Lubin, IM ° Susan Speer. The wedding will t.'i Oct. 29. Mr. Lubin's current a d d r e s s ' t ^ Fernwood Dr., Akron 20, Ohio. Lt. John C. McFarland, IM. graduJune from the Infantry School's basi/J course at Ft. Benning. Ga. Don R. Meaders, IM. is serving ttilh U.S. Army Forces Weapons P r o j " Killeen Base, Texas. His home addr 1215 Jacqueline St., Killeen, Texas Lt. Thomas E. Morris, EE, has be> signed to the 3560th Pilot Traim, Webb AFB, Texas where he is servL flight instructor. Thomas F. Murray. AE, has cornpleM his initial training at Delta Air Lines' flleh, engineers school at the Atlanta Airport Ens. Lewis S. Nathanson, S.C.. USNk IM. is serving as Disbursing Officer the USS Mercury (AKS-20), c/o F.Pfj New York. N. Y. The Mercury just returned from a VA month tour of the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. Lt. William A. Ogram, EE. has grai from the U.S. Army Ordnance Guided Missile School. Huntsville. Ala. He member of the faculty at the Ordnana Guided Missile School at Redstone \ Huntsville, Ala. Pvt. Eugene H. Palmer, Jr.. IK. basic combat training with the Army's new Trainfire Co. at Ft. Benning. Ga. L. S. Payne. IE. was recently made branch manager of the Mobile brunch i American Blower Div. of American Radi ator. His business address is 461 Government St.. Room 7, Mobile, Ala. BORN TO: Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Peder son. IE. a daughter. Feb. 1. Their home address is 3842 Holley Ter., S. E.. Wa ington, D. C. MARRIED: Walter William Props!. Miss Mary Joe Hughs. Sept. 11 Mr. Props! is with the Caterpillar Tractor Co. i Peoria, 111. Lt. Robert S. Riley. USA. CE. ha assigned to the 169th Engrg. Bn. at Ft Stewart, Ga.

GIFTS FROM TECH •

For The Boss

For The Office

For The W i f e

For The Kids

For Future 'Reeks'

JUVENILE " T " SHIRTS Young Wrecks will really ramble with these smart shirts direct from the Flats. Available in three styles, each will brighten the life of your youngster. 1. The Ramblin' Reck from Georgia Tech. 2. A large yellow jacket with the words " I ' m a little STINGER from Georgia Tech." 3. Maize terry cloth " T " shirt with Georgia Tech 19??". Sizes 2 . 4 . 6. 8 Price $1.25 Each

GEORGIA TECH 6LASSES Toast Tech Get these sparkling Georgia Tech glasses in four sizes—a size for each member of the family. Modern cut highlights the crystal clear design; livens up the party. These glasses make a smart gift and a set you'd like yourself. Pilsner Glasses — $ 1 . 0 0 Each Others — $ 55 Each

3 For $3.50

Postpaid

MUSICAL FOOTBALL •Ramblin' Reck" — the most famous college song of all time played by this musical football. This authentic miniature pigskin is appropriately trimmed with white and gold lacing. Has the Georgia Tech seal stamped on the side. You'll want several of these musical momentos—a unique gift for young and old. Available individually or with connecting ash tray. Price — $ 3 . 2 5

Postpaid

With Ash Tray $5.25

M o r e news on page 30

Available Only From The College Inn

Norman G. Statham, IM '50, has been named wage and salary supervisor for the Los Angeles area offiice of the Shell Oil Company in July. Statham received his MBA degree in 1951 from the University of Chicago in personnel and labor relations. He has been with Shell since 1953. Since 1955 he has served as industrial relations analyst in the Los Angeles office of the company. He served in the Army Air Force from 1942 to 1947 with the rank of Major. He spent three years overseas, participating in the invasions of France and the Rhine campaign. Statham is married to the former Barbara Burch of Georgia.

TO: THE GEORGIA TECH COLLEGE INN 2 2 5 NORTH

AVE., N. W .

ATLANTA, GEORGIA

Please mail me postpaid ( U . S. only) the following items for which I enclose my check or money order:

FROM:

i

Se

28

For The Alumnus

P»ember, T 9 5 7

29


N e w s b y classes - cont. Henry C. Satterwhite, IE, has graduated from the U.S. Coast Guard OCS at New London, Conn, and is now stationed in Honolulu. Lt. John A Schnabel, CE, has graduated from the Army's Anti-aircraft Artillery & Guided Missile School at Ft. Bliss, Texas. Lt. Robert L. Simerly, IE, graduated June 22 from the Infantry School's basic officer course at Ft. Benning, Ga. Lt. Donald C. Tettelbach, CE, has graduated from the motor officers course at the Army's Ordnance School in Feussen, Germany. Ens. Howard L. Wilson, I M , is in advanced training in multi-engine aircraft at Hutchinson, Kans. He recently qualified in radio instrument flight at Foley, Ala. Lt. William L. Wyrick, IE, has been assigned to the Army's Communication Zone Advance Section in France. His permanent mailing address is 421 Reading Rd., Reading, Ohio. ' C T MARRIED: Denny Sherman Alford, * " I M , to Miss Sally Suzanne Harris, June 12. Mr. Alford is with General Electric in Schenectady, N . Y. BORN T O : Lt.

and Mrs.

Ray

K.

Allen,

TE„ a son, Ray Kenneth, Jr., May 17. Lt. Allen is stationed at the Aberdeen Proving Ground. Their home address is 201-B So. Court Rd., Aberdeen, Md. ENGAGED: Albert Boyd Braselton, IM, to Miss Polly Neal. Mr. Braselton is with IBM in Atlanta. Lt. Lyle A. Brooks, Jr., I M , has graduated from the field artillery officers basic course at the Artillery & Guided Missile Center, Ft. Sill, Okla. MARRIED: Charles A. Blondheim, Arch, to Miss Maxie Reaves June 7. Mr. Blondheim is attending MIT's Graduate School of Architecture. MARRIED: Robert Andes Browne, IM, to Miss Elizabeth Gay, June 15. John G. Cladakis, Ch.E., is with the Whiting Research Laboratories of Standard Oil Co., Whiting, Ind.

Ens. Frank B. Coleman, I M , USN, is serving aboard the USS Arneb. flagship of Task Force 43. He participated in the Navy's "Operation Deep Freeze" at the South Pole. Peter Y. Ditching, IM, is with the engineering department of Pan American Airlines at Miami, Fla. MARRIED: Charles Eugene Dunn, Jr., IE, to Miss Carol Smith, August 10. The couple will reside in Cheyenne. Wyo. temporarily and then go to England where Mr. Dunn will be stationed with the Air Force. Carol Freedenthal, Ch.E., has joined the research department of Monsanto Chemical Co.'s Inorganic Chemical Div. at St. Louis, Missouri. John W. Fussell, IE, is an engineer in the Navigation Systems Dept. of the Aeronautical Equipment Div. of Sperry Gyroscope in New York. Lt. Marion T. Heeke, IM, has graduated from the Army's Anti-aircraft Artillery & Guided Missile School at Ft. Bliss, Texas. David W. Jeffrey, Ch.E., is with the Research & Development Div. at Humble Oil's Baytown, Texas refinery. His address is 2622 Virginia St., Baytown. He will enter M I T in the fall for graduate work. Lt. Danny B. Kennedy, ME, has been assigned as a project engineer with the munitions division of Engineering Command, Army Chemical Center, Md. MARRIED: William Paul Killian, Ch.E. to Miss Beverly Buchanan. The wedding took place in early Sept. Mr. Killian-is employed by Esso Standard Oil in Baton Rouge, La. Needham H. Lowery, AE, has been commissioned a Navy Ensign and is now assigned to primary flight training at Saufley Field, Pensacola, Fla. Herbert A. Mcintosh, Ch.E. is with Texaco's Research & Tech. Labs at Port Arthur, Texas. MARRIED: Ens. Arnold Maugham, USN, IE, to Miss Elizabeth Eadie, August 31. The couple live in San Diego where Ens. Mangham is stationed. Leland Charles Murphree, Jr., Ch.E., has joined the Tech. & Research Dept. of Humble Oil's Baytown, Texas refinery. He lives at 3116% Indiana, Baytown, Texas.

John D. Perm, Jr.. IM, is Traffi with Southern Beli in Jacksonville V,'"'^ address is 4535 Mundy R d ' MARRIED: Arthur Grax Powell n , Miss Marguerite McDaniel, Sent '' Powell is with Anderson Electric Birmingham, Ala. Joe H. Roberts. EE, is with Sperr scope as an assistant engineer in th D 0 " & Guidance Systems Dept.. Aero EQ C MARRIED: Marion Lee Roberts u*^ Miss Beverly Ballard, June 28 Abbie G. Schuler IM, ""has joined th college graduate training school of rService Oil Co. He will be assigned «7, company's Crude Oil Supply Div. i„ B a ° n * ville, Okla during training. ENGAGED: Charles F. Stamm Ch F Miss Martha Pitts. Mr. Stamm 'is W j' th '„ International Div. of the Colgate Palm r Co. He wil enter the Army in January" Lt. Jack C. Strickland, USA, IE i, graduated from the Army's Anti-aircraft A* tillery & Guided Missile School at Ft Blk Texas. MARRIED: William F. Talley, Jr., IE Miss Betty S. Weinberg, June 14 u ? Talley is with Wolverine Tube Co. in Decatur, Ala. ENGAGED: George Anthony Volkert, IM to Miss Sandra Jones. The wedding wili take place Sept. 14. George was co-captain of Tech's 1956 football team. Conrad G. Whitfield, IM, has graduated from the U. S. Coast Guard OCS at New London, Conn, and is now at Portsmouth Bay, Va.

Robert H. F e r i t , ' 3 8

FOLR OUTSTANDING T E C H

Attention: All A N A K members You are invited to the 50th Anniversary Dinner

of the Georgia Tech ANAK Society Friday, November 29, 1957, 7:00 P.M. A t the Brookhaven Country Club Contact, George Griffin about reservations

EDGAR E. DAWES & CO. • '18

Direct

Factory

Representatives

for *

SPANG-CHALFANT Conduit a n d E.M.T.

WAGNER E.M.T. Fittings

KINDORF Conduit and Pipe Supports

STEEL C I T Y Stamped Boxes and Fittings

I

Serving the. Electrical Industry in t&e Southeast since 1924, has afforded us experience, knowledge and "know hQw" which can be invaluable to you also. We welcome if our inquiries. Phone: JAckson 4-7571 30

4 0 5 R h o d e s Building

Atlanta 3 , Georgia Tech Alu""""

A L U M N I have

heen nominated as candidates for the officers of the Georgia T e c h N a t i o n a l Alumni Association for t h e 1957-58 •tar. The nominating c o m m i t t e e ( R o d jey Garrison, ' 2 3 , c h a i r m a n ; Ira H . H a r din, '24 and John R. M a d d o x , ' 5 5 ) jjting in accordance with Article Five of the By-laws, n a m e d Charles R. Simons. '37, of Gainesville, G e o r g i a t o he the nominee for president of the Association. Nominated for the other posts were I M. Sheffield, Jr., ' 2 0 , of Atlanta, vice president (renominated from last y e a r ) ; Charles E. Thwaite, Jr., ' 3 3 , of C o l u m bus, Georgia, vice president at large; and Walter Crawford, ' 4 9 , of A t l a n t a , treasurer (renominated from last y e a r ) . In accordance with the By-law changes voted at last year's annual meeting, the committee also nominated the following for 3-year terms as trustees of the Association: Robert H. Ferst, ' 3 8 , Atlanta; Joe L. Jennings. ' 2 3 , of West Point, Georgia; C. D . Lebey, ' 2 2 , A t l a n t a a n d Roy Richards, ' 3 5 , Carrollton, Georgia. Under Article VIII of t h e a m e n d e d B y-laws, four trustees shall be elected by "he members of the Association each fear for 3-year terms. In addition the immediate past president ( F r e d Storey, in this case) and six alumni n a m e d h V the new president, will also be m e m r , v j i U W U ) w i n diaw u c u i G i i i »ws 12 of the Board of Trustees. T h e other members of the Board include the Assoi ssociation officers and the trustees with °"e or two years to serve. The N o m i n e e s 0r

e

President — Charles R. Simons has

P»ember, 1 9 5 7

Roy

C. D. L e b e y , ' 2 2

Eight Alumni Nominated for Officers and Trustees

g^CCXp

EDGAR E. D A W E S ,

Joe L. J e n n i n g s , ' 2 3

been the vice president at large for the Association for the past t w o years. I n its years of greatest growth, Charlie has been a p o t e n t force in t h e development of several activities of the Association. H e is president of the C h a t t a h o o c h e e F u r n i t u r e C o . in F l o w e r y Branch, G e o r gia a n d is a business a n d civic leader in the Gainesville area. For Vice President — I. M . Sheffield, Jr. h a s served t w o t e r m s as vice president of the Association. A n outstanding Atlanta civic leader, I. M . is c h a i r m a n of the B o a r d of t h e Life I n s u r a n c e C o . of Georgia. For Vice President at large — Charles E. T h w a i t e , Jr., president of t h e F o u r t h N a tional Bank in C o l u m b u s , w a s a leader in the t w o recent successful roll call drives in the C o l u m b u s area. H e is a m e m b e r of the present b o a r d of Trustees. For Treasurer — W a l t e r E . C r a w f o r d is one of T e c h ' s o u t s t a n d i n g y o u n g alumni. H e is presently executive vice president of the A t l a n t a C o n v e n t i o n B u r e a u and for the past t w o years has been treasurer

Richards, ' 3 5

of the A l u m n i Association. For Trustees — R o b e r t H . Ferst is president of M . A. Ferst, L t d . of A t l a n t a and a m e m b e r of a famous T e c h family. J o e L. Jennings, executive vice president of the West Point M a n u f a c t u r i n g Co., h a s been a staunch T e c h w o r k e r in the Valley area for years. C. D . Lebey, president of the C . D . Lebey C o . of Atlanta, is a former T e c h football star a n d has been a w o r k e r in almost every T e c h c a m p a i g n since 1 9 2 3 . R o y R i c h a r d s of R i c h a r d s a n d A s s o ciates of Carrollton, G e o r g i a h a s long been o n e of t h e most active T e c h w o r k ers in t h e Carrollton area. H e is a business a n d civic leader in Carrollton. How

to Vote

All active m e m b e r s of the Association w h o desire to confirm the above nominations for officers a n d elected trustees or w h o wish to present write-in candidates m a y d o so by filling out the official ballot o n this page a n d mailing it to the G e o r g i a T e c h N a t i o n a l A l u m n i Association, A t l a n t a 13, Georgia. This vote is for election, n o t for confirmation of n o m i n a t i o n . Be sure to sign y o u r ballot.

BALLOT FOR N A T I O N A L A L U M N I A S S O C I A T I O N OFFICERS A N D TRUSTEES,

1957-58

~~| My check in box indicates approval of nominees or I vote for the following write-in '—' candidates: =OR P R E S I D E N T : FOR VICE P R E S I D E N T : . FOR VICE PRESIDENT (at large):_ FOR TREASURER: FOR TRUSTEES (vote for four):_

_Class:_ Signed:. Mail before Oct. 16 to Georgia Tech Alumni Association; Atlanta 13, G a . 31


N e w s b y classes - cont. Henry G. Satterwhite, IE, has graduated from the U.S. Coast Guard OCS at New London, Conn, and is now stationed in Honolulu. Lt. John A Schnabel, CE, has graduated from the Army's Anti-aircraft Artillery & Guided Missile School at Ft. Bliss, Texas. Lt. Robert L. Simerly, IE, graduated June 22 from the Infantry School's basic officer course at Ft. Benning, G a . Lt. Donald C. Tettelbach, CE, has graduated from the motor officers course at the Army's Ordnance School in Feussen, Germany. Ens. Howard L. Wilson, I M , is in advanced training in multi-engine aircraft at Hutchinson, Kans. He recently qualified in radio instrument flight at Foley, Ala. Lt. William L. Wyrick, IE, has been assigned to the Army's Communication Zone Advance Section in France. His permanent mailing address is 421 Reading Rd., Reading, Ohio. 'E"7 MARRIED: Denny Shermon Alford, *• * IM, to Miss Sally Suzanne Harris, June 12. Mr. Alford is with General Electric in Schenectady, N . Y. BORN T O : Lt.

and Mrs.

Ray

K.

Allen,

T E „ a son, Ray Kenneth, Jr., May 17. Lt. Allen is stationed at the Aberdeen Proving Ground. Their home address is 201-B So. Court Rd., Aberdeen, Md. ENGAGED: Albert Boyd Braselton, IM, to Miss Polly Neal. Mr. Braselton is with IBM in Atlanta. Lt. Lyle A. Brooks, Jr., IM, has graduated from the field artillery officers basic course at the Artillery & Guided Missile Center, Ft. Sill, Okla. MARRIED: Charles A. Blondheim, Arch, to Miss Maxie Reaves June 7. Mr. Blondheim is attending MIT's Graduate School of Architecture. MARRIED: Robert Andes Browne, IM, to Miss Elizabeth Gay, June 15. John G. Cladakis, Ch.E., is with the Whiting Research Laboratories of Standard Oil Co.. Whiting. Ind.

Ens. Frank B. Coleman, IM, USN, is serving aboard the USS Arneb, flagship of Task Force 43. He participated in the Navy's "Operation Deep Freeze" at the South Pole. Peter Y. Ditching, IM, is with the engineering department of Pan American Airlines at Miami. Fla. MARRIED: Charles Eugene Dunn, Jr., IE, to Miss Carol Smith, August 10. The couple will reside in Cheyenne, Wyo. temporarily and then go to England where Mr. Dunn will be stationed with the Air Force. Carol Freedenthal, Ch.E., has joined the research department of Monsanto Chemical Co.'s Inorganic Chemical Div. at St. Louis, Missouri. John W. Fussell, IE, is an engineer in the Navigation Systems Dept. of the Aeronautical Equipment Div. of Sperry Gyroscope in New York. Lt. Marion T. Heeke, IM, has graduated from the Army's Anti-aircraft Artillery & Guided Missile School at Ft. Bliss, Texas. David W. Jeffrey, Ch.E., is with the Research & Development Div. at Humble Oil's Baytown, Texas refinery. His address is 2622 Virginia St., Baytown. H e will enter M I T in the fall for graduate work. Lt. Danny B. Kennedy, M E , has been assigned as a project engineer with the munitions division of Engineering Command, Army Chemical Center, Md. MARRIED: William Paul Killian, Ch.E. to Miss Beverly Buchanan. T h e wedding took place in early Sept. Mr. Killian -is employed by Esso Standard Oil in Baton Rouge, La. Needham H. Lowery, A E , has been commissioned a Navy Ensign and is now assigned to primary flight training at Saufley Field, Pensacola, Fla. Herbert A. Mcintosh, Ch.E. is with Texaco's Research & Tech. Labs at Port Arthur, Texas. MARRIED: Ens. Arnold Mangham, USN, IE, to Miss Elizabeth Eadie, August 31. The couple live in San Diego where Ens. Mangham is stationed. Leland Charles Murphree, Jr., Ch.E., has joined the Tech. & Research Dept. of Humble Oil's Baytown, Texas refinery. He lives at 3116 1 4 Indiana, Baytown, Texas.

John D. Penn. Jr., IM, is Traffi with Southern Bell in Jacksonville \ address is 4535 Mundy Rd j MARRIED: Arthur Gray Powell // ,nV'" Miss Marguerite McDaniel. Sept 7 Powell is with Anderson Electric r Birmingham, Ala. Joe H. Roberts. EL. is with Sperrv f scope as an assistant engineer in th & Guidance Systems Dept.. Aero Equjn n MARRIED: Marion Lee Roberts, Mc Miss Beverly Ballard, June 28. Ahbie G. Schuler, IM, has joined .k college graduate training school of rService Oil Co. He will be assigned to", company's Crude Oil Supply Div. in B ville, Okla during training. ENGAGED: Charles F. Stamm Ch F Miss Martha Pitts. Mr. Stamm 'is with fc International Div. of the Colgate Palm r Co. He wil enter the Army in January'" Lt. Jack C. Strickland, USA, IE h graduated from the Army's Anti-aircraft Ar tillery & Guided Missile School at Ft. Blis, Texas. MARRIED: William F. Talley, Jr., IF. Miss Betty S. Weinberg, June 14. Mr Talley is with Wolverine Tube Co. in L W tur, Ala. ENGAGED: George Anthony Volkert. IM to Miss Sandra Jones. The wedding will take place Sept. 14. George was co-captain of Tech's 1956 football team. Conrad G. Whitfield, IM, has graduated from the U. S. Coast Guard OCS at New London, Conn, and is now at Portsmouth Bay, Va.

Attention: All A N A K members You are invited to the 50th Anniversary Dinner

of the Georgia Tech ANAK Society Friday, November 29, 1957, 7:00 P.M. A t the Brookhaven Country Club Contact, George Griffin about reservations

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4 0 5 R h o d e s Building

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Robert H. Ferst, ' 3 8

Eight Alumni Nominated for Officers and Trustees FOUR OUTSTANDING T E C H A L U M N I h a v e

been nominated as candidates for t h e officers of the Georgia T e c h National Alumni Association for t h e 1957-58 \ear. The nominating committee ( R o d jey Garrison, '23. c h a i r m a n ; I r a H . H a r Jin. '24 and John R. M a d d o x , ' 5 5 ) acting in accordance with Article Five of the By-laws, n a m e d Charles R . Simons, '37, of Gainesville, G e o r g i a t o be the nominee for president of t h e Association. Nominated for the other posts were I. M. Sheffield, Jr., ' 2 0 , of Atlanta, vice president (renominated from last y e a r ) ; Charles E. Thwaite, Jr., ' 3 3 , of C o l u m bus, Georgia, vice president at large; .tnd Walter Crawford, ' 4 9 , of Atlanta, treasurer (renominated from last y e a r ) . In accordance with the By-law changes voted at last year's annual meeting, t h e committee also nominated the following for 3-year terms as trustees of the Association: Robert H. Ferst, ' 3 8 , A t l a n t a ; e L. Jennings. ' 2 3 , of West Point, Georgia; c . D . Lebey, ' 2 2 , A t l a n t a a n d *0J Richards, '35, Carrollton, Georgia. Under Article VIII of t h e a m e n d e d "Haws, four trustees shall be elected by « members of the Association each • e d r f o r 3 -year terms. In addition t h e .^mediate past president ( F r e d Storey, in this case) a n d six alumni n a m e d h y the I heK ( new I president, ^"- : > , u c » 1 1 ; will wui also aiso be oe m m ee m m -p o t , h e B o a r d of Trustees. T h e other - members of the Board include t h e Assoc latton officers and t h e trustees with 0ne °rtWoyearsto serve. The Nominees ' President 'Ptemb

*r. 1957

Charles R. Simons h a s

been t h e vice president at large for the Association for the past t w o years. I n its years of greatest growth, Charlie h a s been a potent force in t h e development of several activities of t h e Association. H e is president of t h e C h a t t a h o o c h e e F u r n i t u r e C o . in F l o w e r y Branch, G e o r gia a n d is a business a n d civic leader in the Gainesville area. For Vice President — I. M . Sheffield, Jr. h a s served t w o t e r m s as vice president of t h e Association. A n o u t s t a n d i n g A t lanta civic leader, I. M . is c h a i r m a n of the B o a r d of t h e Life I n s u r a n c e C o . of Georgia. For Vice President at large — Charles E. T h w a i t e , Jr., president of t h e F o u r t h N a tional Bank in C o l u m b u s , w a s a leader in t h e t w o recent successful roll call drives in t h e C o l u m b u s area. H e is a m e m b e r of t h e present b o a r d of Trustees. For Treasurer — Walter E . C r a w f o r d is one of T e c h ' s o u t s t a n d i n g y o u n g alumni. H e is presently executive vice president of t h e A t l a n t a Convention B u r e a u a n d for the past t w o years has been treasurer

of the A l u m n i Association. For Trustees — Robert H . Ferst is president of M . A . Ferst, L t d . of A t l a n t a a n d a m e m b e r of a famous T e c h family. Joe L. Jennings, executive vice president of t h e West Point M a n u f a c t u r i n g Co., has been a staunch T e c h w o r k e r in the Valley area for years. C. D . Lebey, president of t h e C. D . Lebey C o . of Atlanta, is a former Tech football star a n d has been a w o r k e r in almost every T e c h c a m p a i g n since 1 9 2 3 . R o y R i c h a r d s of R i c h a r d s a n d Associates of Carrollton, G e o r g i a h a s long been o n e of t h e most active T e c h workers in t h e Carrollton area. H e is a business a n d civic leader in Carrollton. How

to V o t e

All active m e m b e r s of t h e Association w h o desire t o confirm the above n o m i nations for officers a n d elected trustees or w h o wish to present write-in candidates m a y do so by filling out the official ballot o n this page a n d mailing it t o the G e o r g i a T e c h N a t i o n a l A l u m n i Association, A t l a n t a 1 3 , Georgia. This vote is for election, n o t for confirmation of nomination. Be sure t o sign y o u r ballot.

BALLOT FOR N A T I O N A L A L U M N I A S S O C I A T I O N OFFICERS A N D TRUSTEES,

1957-58

~~| My check in box indicates approval of nominees or I vote for the following write-in — candidates: "OR PRESIDENT: FOR VICE P R E S I D E N T : FOR VICE PRESIDENT (at l a r g e ) : . FOR TREASURER: FOR TRUSTEES (vote for four):

Signed:.

Xlass: Mail before Oct. 16 to Georgia Tech Alumni Association; Atlanta 13, G a . 31


rfk

OCTOBER 1 9 5 7

Refreshment to You ThroM* the Years ere's to good times and good friends may you always have an abundance of both

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Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine Vol. 36, No. 01 1957