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September, 1 9 5 5

FOOTBALL PREVIEW ISSUE

^Altrmnus

An old soldier makes the grade TECH-MIAMI LINEUPS

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TECH'S THOMPSON see page 5


F C ; t n i l > l i »

— t h e editor's notes

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ELL, HERE WE GO AGAIN with another

year. It's the 32nd one for the Alumnus. And for the first time you'll receive eight issues of the magazine in a single school year. This increased f r e q u e n c y made possible by your excellent support of recent Roll Calls—will give us a chance to bring you more and better coverage of campus, alumni and educational events of interest. It wil also enable us to put out—from time to time—special issues on subjects that we believe you'll enjoy. The copy in your hands is our first venture into this special-interest field. It's a football issue, pure and simple. And we make no apologies for it. * * * F YOU'RE ONE OF those Tech men who do a great deal of traveling, you've probably noticed how many of the Tech Alumni Association membership decals are in use. You can't travel far nowadays without seeing one of those little gold T's on someone's car. Associate Professor Rocker T. Staton, MS IE '49 of Tech's IE School, reminded us of the truth of this statement with a report of an incident that occurred during his recent visit to Washington, D. C. It seems that Rocker was driving down one of the middle lanes of one of Washington's many multi-lane, one-way streets when he noticed a car bearing a Tech sticker coming up on his left. As the car pulled abreast of him, Rocker shouted his greetings to the fellow Reck. The man answered just as the traffic stopped for a red light. While waiting for the light to change, the unnamed alumnus asked Rocker, "Which way are you headed?" Rocker, thinking that his new-found friend wanted to pull up somewhere and chat about Tech, answered, "I'm going straight ahead." Handing Rocker a large handful of envelopes, the fellow Reck asked, "Would you mind mailing these letters for me? There's a mailbox in the next block. I'm turning left at this light." If the unnamed alumnus is reading this, we're happy to inform him that Rocker mailed the letters at the very next corner. * * *

I

I

T SEEMS MOST appropriate to us that

Tech—the most televised of the collegiate football teams—was elected to be one of the teams involved in the first

sporting event scheduled for national televising in color. The event singled oui for this honor is the September 17th Tech—Miami game on Grant Field. To aid our TV watchers in the far-off places, we have prepared a program listing the players, numbers, etc. on both teams. You'll find it on pages 12 and 13 of this issue.

S

PEAKING

OF TELEVISION,

the

Jackets

now have a 7-0 record before the cameras. They beat Baylor, 17-14, and Alabama, 7-3, in 1952; Ole Miss, 24-7. and Duke, 13-10, in 1953; West Virginia. 42-19, and Alabama, 20-0, in 1954 and Arkansas, 14-16, in 1955. This only includes the national or regional television contests. It's beginning to look like the Tech footballers should be nicknamed the "Actors" or perhaps the "Hams" instead of the Yellow Jackets.

BUCK FLOWERS AND FRIEND

T

HE FELLOW STANDING ABOVE has just

been notified that he is Tech's first representative in Football's Hall of Fame. Previously Coach Alex and Coach Heisman had been nominated for this honor. But Buck Flowers was the first of Tech's players to make the coveted grade. They couldn't have picked a better one. for Buck was all things to Tech's great teams of 1918, 1919, and 1920. He was a great runner, a great defensive star, a fine drop kicker, an inspirational team man and according to the late Coach Alex, "the greatest punter I ever saw." Tech Alumnus


Something else that we'd like to add about Buck, he's one of the most modest men we've ever known. And he took the news of his nomination to the Hall of Fame just as he took all of his other honors—with humbleness. His reply when we congratulated him in his office in Birmingham was this classic: "Thanks, every once in a while they wake up the dead." The young man also shown in the facing picture is Jimmy Thompson, like Buck a great Tech little man. Possessed of many of the same qualities that made Buck great, Jimmy is also modest and unassumming. When you get the two together, as we did in Birmingham, it's hard to believe they aren't father and son. Just study the picture, you'll see what we mean. Buck and Jimmy are just two of Tech's great little men. To see the whole story about the elves in Tech's football history turn to "The smaller they come" on page 5 of this issue. * * *

I

n

DAYXS ARCHITECTS & ENGINEERS SET THE SHAPE OF AMERICAN TOMORROWS

ROBERT iVNB COM PAQ ASSOCIATES D I V I S I O N

N THE LAST ISSUE, we apologized in this

space for an error we made in the previous issue. This issue we apologize to two alumni for errors that appeared concerning them. This time, however, the errors weren't ours. We had received an Army News Service release that George Corn, IM'54 and Wilson Dreger, III, IM'55, had been recently commissioned 2nd Lts. in the infantry after completing OCS at Fort Benning, Ga. Lt. Dreger informed us a couple days after the magazine was published that he and Lt. Corn received their commissions at Tech and had been attending the Infantry School's basic infantry officer's course at Fort Benning. Fortunately, we had retained the copies of the release we received in their biographical files. So we could legimately indulge in that old army game, "passing the buck." Anyway, we apologize to the two alumni concerned and promise to keep our eyes on the Army Hometown News Service in the future. ECH ATHLETIC FOLLOWERS along with former players and coaches had a double-dose of tragedy on July 5 when it was announced that Dr. Rufus Askew, Tech team physician in the middle forties, and Claud Bond, Tech athletic trainer during the forties, had each taken his own life. Dr. Askew was found dead in his apartment on Peachtree St. while Bond was found dead at his home in the Souteast section of Atlanta. A strange coincidence and a tragic one.

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Call, wire or write today for fur- f " (MllVllP M 4 ther information .. . there is no I I 1 V | r l T l | U f * * * obligation. 4108

September, 1955

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CONTENTS 2. RAMBLIN' — the editor talks about Buck Flowers, television, football, errors and decals. 5. THE SMALLER THEY COME —about elves. 6. 83 — L A M A R C A R S O N - L E — a n old soldier finally gets his name on the program. 10. THE YEAR OF THE IFS —'55 football preview. 12. TV PROGRAM — complete information on the Tech and Miami squads for the Sept. 17th game. 14. THE UNSOLVABLE PROBLEM—tickets. 16. ON THE HILL — Gordon looks at summer vacations and the return to the "flats". 18. WITH THE CLUBS—-the latest reports. 20. NEWS BY CLASSES — promotions, marriages, births, deaths — the panorama of Tech alumni.

Officers of the Georgia Tech National Alumni Association Fred Storey, '33 Pres.

I. M. Sheffield, '20, V-P

Charles Simons, '37, V-P

Walt Crawford, '49, Treas.

W. Roane Beard, '40, Executive Secretary

Staff Bob Wallace, Jr., '49, Editor

Mary Peeks, Assistant

The Cover The serious young halfback on the cover is Jimmy Thompson of Bessemer, Alabama. In one year of Tech football, he has become the hero of both the East and West stands of Grant Field. He's back for another two year* as Tech's latest great little man. For more about Jimmy and the other Tech little men read the facing page. Alumnus

Photo —

Wallace

Published eight times a year — February, March, May, July, September, October, November and December — by the Georgia Tech National Alumni Association; Georgia Institute of Technology; 225 North Avenue, Atlanta, Georgia. Subscription price (35c per copy) included in the membership dues. Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, Atlanta, Georgia under the Act of March 3, 1879.

Y

ou MIGHT NOT notice it, but business and industry are more and more voicing their willingness to support higher education. The one consistent thing I've noticed about the many and varied efforts of the aidto-education programs of the American corporations is their insistence that before receiving outside aid, the educational institutions must first have the solid financial support of their alumni. Noting this attitude on the part of business and industry, the University of Georgia Foundation recently went all-out to plan a very ambitious fund-raising program among its alumni in the State. It's the beginning step of an overall program to better the University through the Foundation. The leaders of this program are exGovernor Herman Talmadge, now president of the Georgia Alumni Society, and Bob Troutman, Jr., prominent Atlanta attorney. The fund-raising will be handled in the State through a district-county setup on a personal solicitation basis. The Georgians heading the district organizations read like a who's who of the State. All praise for the organization of this plan should go to the two leaders. They've really done a job. You're probably thinking about now. "What in the heck has this Georgia Plan to do with Tech alumni?" Well, it goes something like this: The Georgia Foundation has asked the Tech Foundation to join them by soliciting our own alumni for funds so that in the near future (early 1956) the two organizations can approach Georgia's business and industrial firms and educational foundations and say, "Look what the alumni of the State's two leading institutions are doing for their schools, now how about you all helping them through contributions to the two foundations?" The money raised from industry and other foundations will be split evenly between the two organizations. And all of it will go to the betterment of the schools through salary supplementations to stop the loss of outstanding instructors to other schools or industry, research aid, and many other things that the institutions can't do with their limited state budgets. Through this plan, two educational institutions both doing a different type of educational job, can become the very best in the country. The Tech Foundation Board and the Alumni Association Board gave the plan much study and on Aug. 19th, unanimously voted to go along with the plan. When you are solicited to help Tech in the Roll Call this month, dig deeper. The need is great.

fcrvsviJU

/3JUUL<£> Tech Alumnus


Size doesn't determine stature if your name is Buck Flowers, Shorty Roberts, Johnny Bosch, Jimmy Jordan or . . . Jimmy Thompson.

THE smaller THEY COME

J

IMMY

THOMPSON

is a short

(5'

6"),

bullnecked (16 inch), fireplug-built, 148 - pound halfback whose perpetual choir-boy grin masks the talent and determination of a great athlete. He also happens to be the heir apparent of a tradition unique in collegiate football circles—Tech's great-little-man dynasty. Since 1918 when a 152-pound halfback named Buck Flowers first started remaking the record books, the little man has been an integral part of Tech's football history. Over the years, names like Roberts, Bosch, Eldridge, Peek, Jordan and Rudolph appeared in Tech lineups, wrecking havoc on opponents all out of proportion to their own physical size. Some of them like Bosch were passers, others like Eldridge were running stars, and still others like Jordan and Rudolph were defensive operators. But they all had one thing in common: they stood 5' 7" or under and weighed less than 1 55 pounds. If you were Jimmy Thompson, you would have been aware of this tradition when you were just a 120-pound sophomore at Bessemer Ala. High School. And it stayed in your mind while you starred at halfback for two consecutive statechampionship years in high school.

When it came time for you to select a college, you picked Tech over Alabama, Vanderbilt and others who bid you, because you knew that the Tech coaching staff always gave the little man an equal chance to make the team. During your freshman year at Tech, you made the Baby Jackets, but you weren't a sensation by any means. But in the spring game of 1954, you suddenly blossomed out into a star, catching the eyes of the fans as well as the coaches. That fall, though seldom a starter, you still managed to set a new modern record of 9.4 yards per try during the regular season, eclipsing Leon Hardeman's record of 5.8 yards per try. But your true worth to the team wasn't only in your ability to carry a football. You were a good blocker and an exceptional defensive performer. Your defensive coach, Lewis Woodruff, ranks you with the best he has coached and calls his present trio of deep backs (Wade Mitchell, Paul Rotenberry and you), "the best I have ever coached." Those who saw you flip Georgia's huge Foots Clements in last year's mud battle in Athens rank it as a game-saver along with that magnificent stop of Bobby Marlowe by another Tech little man, Jakie Ru-

JIMMY SCOOTS THROUGH A FIELD OF ALABAMA GIANTS I N 1 9 5 4 September, 1955

dolph, in the '52 Tech-Alabama game. If you were Jimmy Thompson, you'd tackle and block and run as low to the ground as you could. For this is the way a little man must do it if he wants to stay in the game. In your own mind, your size is of little disadvantage. You don't think about your size when you come up to hit a big player. Again you can't afford to. Your motto is an old saw, "He who hesitates is lost." And you live by it. You have all the little man's advantages —speed, change of pace, quick reactions and confidence. And you use them every second. You offset your size disadvantage in pass defense by always playing the ball. And in your first season no one completed a pass over you. You like football and give it everything you have every second that you're playing the game whether it's scrimmage or a bowl game. The game has been good to you. Your ability to excell in it has meant a chance at a college education to you, and you're not forgetting that important point. You would have gone to college anyway, but it would have been a financial struggle for you without football. You feel strongly that the game owes you nothing, but that you owe the game a great deal. And you repay it by your determination to succeed. If you were Jimmy Thompson, you'd be a hero to the Tech fans at the moment. But what to you is even more important, you'd be a hero to every little man who ever wore the White and Gold. Buck Flowers and Jimmy Jordan have called you a solid football player regardless of your size. And they are as proud of your accomplishments as are your own parents. For there is a great bond of mutual admiration between little men. And you are their boy in this era. If you were Jimmy Thompson, you'd still wear the same helmet size as when you came to Tech. All that's happened to you in the past few years hasn't changed that. It's still 67s's—the smallest of the Jackets of the year 1955.


In practice sessions, Lamar throws hiv weight into the dummies with a vengeance on his first day on the varsity. Yesterd;i>. he was taking it on the dummy's other side.

83-LAMAR CARSON-LE The old soldier gets his name on the program

I

large-squad football, it's easy to lose sight of the number of boys who are out there at every Tech practice session getting knocked around without the benefit of a grant-in-aid. Most of the thirty or so boys in this category who came out for last spring's practice session will remain on the B team throughout their college careers. For their efforts, they'll gather the minimum of newspaper space and the maximum of bruises. Love of the game is not their only reason for being out there. For each of them lives for the day when one of the coaches will walk up and remark, "Looking good, Burdell. Tomorrow you put on a white jersey." It doesn't happen to many of them these days, competition being what it is. But it happens just enough to keep the non-scholarship boys trying. Guard Bill Fulcher and End Charlie Huff of the '55 squad had it happen to them. And this past spring it happened to End Lamar Carson, at 26, the old man of the Tech squad. Like many of this group, Lamar was an outstanding high school star. He made All-State playing on the same Atlanta Tech High team as former Tech fullback Bobby North. Small for an end (5' 11", 175 pounds), Lamar received bids from several SEC schools after graduation. But he received none from Tech, the one school he wanted to attend. He decided to work for a spell at Southern Bell, and in 1950 went into the Air Force where he played two years of service ball. In 1952 he entered Tech under the Korean Bill. An EE junior sporting a 2.5 average, Lamar would have probably played fairly regularly at Tech under the two-platoon system. But as it is now, he'll be satisfied to wear the white jersey two years. He's that much closer to his break and his letter. N THESE DAYS OF

Before dummy drills, scrimmage or anything comes the daily helping of calisthenics, a series of exercises most familiar to a veteran of high school, service and college.

Tech Alumnus


Stomping his foot for emphasis, defensiveend coach Tonto Coleman gives Lamar some pointers. Tech's specialized coaching staff offers much more individual coaching.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY BOB WALLACE, JR.

During pass-catching drills, Lamar snags one out of the hands of another end (left). And then, five minutes later, he's blocking A halfback in the dummy scrimmage drill.

September, 1955


83 - CARSON

continued

A COMBINED EFFORT

L

AMAR CARSON AND his wife Geraldine

live in one of Tech's Callaway Apartments in the 10th Street area of the campus. They met in high school days and were married in August, 1950 just before Lamar reported to the Air Force. Geraldine Carson has worked for American Telephone & Telegraph Company for all five years of her marriage, helping them through the lean service years and the even leaner school years. In the summer, Lamar works for Southern Bell as a central office switchman. Working together to get Lamar through school, the Carsons share the experience of many other married students at Tech. Through it they have developed the genius for enjoying life on a tight budget established by the GIBill married students. And like that group, the Carsons have a tremendous faith that Lamar's future success will repay them for the long present grind. With blueprints handy, Lamar checks central office equipment in Atlanta's CYpress exchange for possible trouble. He expects to stay with Southern Bell after graduation.

Going to school for a married student means finding your recreation at the lowest cost. The Carsons play bridge with other married students, watch television or a movie show. Tech Alumnus


During school nights, Geraldine often reads while Lamar goes after the books. The family Chihuahua, Squeegee, kibitzes a bit. Studying by telephone is standard procedure for married engineering students. You have 10 check your work somehow, and there are no dormitory rooms to group-study in.

Having a woman around makes studying difficult at times, but as Lamar says, "A married student has an easy decision to make, he either studies or does housework." September, 1955


^* ••••«". Gookin

Thomason

^ Smith

Stephenson

A FEW OF THE TOP CANDIDATES FOR THE THREE IF POSITIONS O N THE 1 9 5 5

SQUAD

Question-marks at three positions, a tough schedule and no surprise element make 1955

THE IFS ITH A COUPLE OF BIG exceptions, Tech's 1955 football season wears the look of '51. The exceptions—the absence of the surprise element that worked so well for the Jackets four years ago and the great improvement in the caliber of the teams gracing this year's schedule. Otherwise, a great number of factors look the same as Bobby Dodd readies his charges for his eleventh season as Tech's head coach. This team, like the '51ers, appears to be a year away. It is a sophomore-junior squad like the first of Tech's four straight bowl squads. Of the expected first-game starters only two, or at the most three, will be seniors. Yet lettermen should start at every position but one of the ends. Like '51, this season's success will hinge more on breaks than the average year. With the possible exception of Florida State and LSU, every team on the Jackets' slate is within six points of Tech in team strength. Thus a ball bouncing the right way on every Saturday could bring Dodd's charges home without a loss. But if that ball starts bouncing the other way, Tech could well lose half of its ball games without being any less team. Knowing the law of averages of the bouncing ball as well as he does, Coach Dodd would probably settle happily for a repeat of last season's 7-3 record. He doesn't expect it to bounce as well as it did for the Jackets in 1951. A preseason comparison with last year's team shows the Jackets to be

W

10

stronger at guard, tackle, quarterback and halfback and weaker at center, fullback and ends. Position by position, the Jackets stack up something like this: Ends — gone are five of the top ends of 1954. Only Ellis and Huff of the group have game experience. But last year's freshmen team produced a crop with fine potential. Ellis will be the likely starter on the right side with sophomore Rose and Smith the top candidates for the other terminal slot. Rose and Smith are both fine defensive operators but will take time to reach the offensive level attained by Hair, Sennett and Durham. Ellis is also a solid defensive man short of offensive experience. Huff and sophomores Vickers and Henry will also be much in the picture. To sum it up, the ends should be as strong defensively as last year but weaker offensively —especially in the pass-catching department. Tackles — only two of the tackles with appreciable game time are gone from the squad. And the two top boys, Vereen and Anderson, are back from last year. Anderson will face a stiff fight for the starting right tackle position from converted guard Don Miller brother of AilAmerican Hal Miller of '52 fame. Vereen, top blocker of the tackles, is slated to start on the left side. Lots of candidates like Christy, Gossage and sophomores Askew and Denning will also see action. Askew may be the surprise here. The

tackles are certainly no weaker than lasi year and the seasoning should help them strengthen a '54 trouble point. Guards — strongest point of the line with the great Franklin Brooks and watchcharm Bill Fulcher back along with top sub Allen Ecker. Brooks is a cinch to open at his old left-guard position, but Fulcher faces stiff competition from Ecker and amazingly active, 228-pound sophomore Glazier. No worries here as Dodd comes up with another great crop of guards. Center — loss of great competitor Larry Morris will be felt heavily here. Capt. Jimmy Morris, brother of the 1952's George, is back, but his knee is still a question mark. Returning veteran Jimmy Johnson is big and tough but was slow rounding into form in the spring session. Sophomore Don Stephenson will remind you of Lewis Hook and may be a big factor at this position. Center will definitely he weaker than in 1954, but it's still fairly well manned. Quaterbacks — Wade Mitchell is back and should have his greatest year. He looked much improved in spring practice in his offensive work and nobody ever doubted his defensive ability. Techs coaching staff considers him one of Tech's all-time defensive greats already, and he still has two years to go. In reserve, Toppy Vann and Burton Grant will back up Mitchell but the big Atlanta boy will be number 1 all the way. Tech Alumnus


Rose

Halfbacks — never in Tech's recent history has there been such a fine group of halfbacks, and they all have at least another year to go. Top men will be Thompson and Rotenberry, both superior runners, blockers and defensive operators. According to defensive back coach, lewis Woodruff, these two along with Mitchell make up the best defensive backfield he has had at Tech. And that includes the two-platoon days. Back of Thompson will come George Volkert, a tested speed merchant and Joe Delaney. a fine all-round back who has yet to see varsity action but looked good as a freshman last season. Joe is also a capable left-handed passer, which helps. Back of Rotenberry stands the big sophomore dash man Stan Flowers, who averaged 10 yards a try as a Baby Jacket

last year. Stan, capable of going all the way from anywhere on the field, needs only defensive and blocking seasoning to be a great back. Ready to spell both starters is ace kicker Johnny Menger, who will see much action. Jimmy Noe is another sophomore of promise. No doubt about it, plenty of material here. Fulback — the big question-mark position, with the loss of both Hunsinger and Humphreys at this position anyone could start. Converted halfback Dick Gookin may be the answer. He's fast, agile and a good defensive back. His only drawback is his size (175 pounds). Sophomore Thomason, son of Tech's immortal Stumpy, came on very strong during the last week of spring practice and looked good in the T game. He's a very tough defensive player but lacks Gookins' speed. Dickie Mattison. who has never reached his potential, and Ken Owen may also decide to catch fire this year. If so, this will be a wide-open race for the starting slot. Best guess at this writing would be either Gookin or Thomason. THE OPPOSITION

A quick rundown on Tech's opposition for the season shows Miami and Auburn as the top teams the Jackets face. At least that's the forecast of the so-called experts. Close behind, but not necessarily in order, come Georgia, Florida, Duke, Alabama, SMU, and Tennessee. With LSU and Florida State bringing up the rear. The Miami game, Tech's toughest opener in years, brings to Grant Field and the national TV audience two of

the supposedly top three teams of the South. Miami lost only 8 lettermen from the squad that dropped only a lastquarter, one-point decision to Auburn last season. Florida, lately a Tech stumbling block, will field a team of fine backs and a line equal to last year's, except for tackles. SMU, who has run into tough luck twice in a row against the Jackets will field a team that given a good solid quarterback could win the Southwest Conference. LSU has a new coach but the same tough schedule. They'll have the advantage of playing at Baton Rouge at night. Auburn is expected to be plenty tough with the conference's best fullback, Joe Childress and a bevy of fleet halfbacks. They are co-favorites with Tech and Ole Miss for the SEC title. FSU is still building but is no longer a breather. Duke, Tennessee and Alabama are always tough, especially on successive Saturdays. The Vols and the Tide have new coaches and may catch fire this year after poor '54 seasons. Georgia is near the top of their rebuilding cycle and they were rough last year. If they solve the quarterback problem, they could be the sleeper in the conference. It'll be a tough row to hoe, this '55 schedule, but the feeling here is that Dodd and company—barring bad breaks —should have as good a season as the one just completed. Just watching these halfbacks will be worth your season ticket price this year.

THE 1 9 5 5 GEORGIA TECH FOOTBALL SQUAD WHICH OPENS A TOUGH TEN-GAME SCHEDULE WITH MIAMI Photo In Bill Warren


TV Pre

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Grant Field-Set

NBC GEORGIA TECH

NO.

NAME

10 11 13 16 21 22 23 24 25 26 28

Johnny Menger Wade Mitchell Burton Grant Toppy Vann Paul Rotenberry Joe Delaney Jimmy Noe George Volkert Bobby Dover Stan Cochran . Jimmy Thompson

33 40 41 42 43 50 51 52 53 54 56 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68

Stan Flowers Ken Owen Dickie Mattison Johnny Thomason Dick Gookin Don Stephenson Jimmy Morris (Capt.) Ed Crawford Jimmy Johnson Jim Summer Dick Beard Franklin Brooks Phillip Baum Bill Fulcher Jimmy Rose Allen Ecker Harold Greer Waldo Dodd Don Hinton W . A . Glazier

70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81

Bob Woolf Ken Thrash Tommy Gossage Ormand Anderson Don Denning Leon Askew Carl Vereen Frank Christy Bob Johnson Don Miller Tommy Rose Urban Henry

83 84 85 86 87 88 89

Lamar Carson Charlie Huff Danny Bagwell Ted Smith Jerry Nabors Paul Vickers Don Ellis

12

HT.

WT.

CLASS

HOMETOWN

QB-LH QB QB QB LH RH LH RH-FB RH LH RH

5-11 6-4

Junior Junior Senior

Augusta, G a . Atlanta, G a . Wilmington, N. C.

6-0 6-0 6-2 5-9 5-11

Junior Junior Sophomore Sophomore Junior Sophomore Senior Junior Sophomore Junior Junior Sophomore Junior Sophomore Senior Sophomore Junior Senior Junior Senior

Rossville, G a . Roanoke, Va. Atlanta, G a . Jefferson City, Tenn.

LH FB FB FB FB C C C C C C LG LG RG RG LG LG LG RG RG

152 191 183 167 171 184 171 176 171 177 148 198 184 207

POS.

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RT RT RT-RG RT RT LT LT LT LT RT LE RE LE LE RE LE RE RE RE

6-0 5-10 5-8 6-0 5-10 5-11 5-8 5-10 5-6

6-1 6-2 5-11 5-11 6-1 6-1 6-0 6-1 5-10 6-2 6-0 5-9 5-10 6-2 6-0 6-2 6-4 6-2 6-1 6-0 6-1 6-6 6-1 6-1 6-3 6-2 6-4 5-11 6-1 6-2 6-2 6-2 6-4 6-2

186 171 187 201 186 190 180 196 192 195 177 201 197 181 168 204 228 214 196 201 214 214 215 224 194 195 206 185 204 176 164

Sophomore Senior Sophomore Junior Sophomore Senior Senior Sophomore Junior Junior Senior Junior Sophomore Sophomore Junior Junior Sophomore Junior Sophomore Sophomore Junior Senior

197 196 197

Senior Sophomore Sophomore

181 202

Sophomore Junior

LTS.

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Atlanta, G a . Decatur, G a . Greenville, S. C. Cleveland, Tenn.

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'ON


The Unsolvable Problem TICKETS, TICKETS WHOSE GOT THE TICKETS

T

HERE'S ONE MAN on the Tech campus who has a problem in his daily work that even the new Tech Computer Center would hesitate to tackle. He's Howard Ector, IM '40, a Tech backfield star of the late thirties. And his unsolvable problem is where to find enough good seats in Tech's Grant Field to satisfy the ticket demand. For 2'/2 years now, Howard has been fighting the battle of increased ticket demands. The rapidly-growing alumni body, now convinced that the Athletic Association's ticket policies are proalumni, has jumped its season ticket requests by some 4000 over the past two years. Atlanta's many non-alumni friends of Tech have also furnished an increasing market for tickets. And the stadium isn't getting any larger. Actually. Howard says, "Each year it seems to shrink, especially over on the West side between the goal lines." Recent research by The Alumnus indicates that the new ticket policy, announced in the May, 1953 issue, has been religiously adhered to by the Athletic Association. (The basic tenant of this policy was improving alumni seasonticket locations over the years to come.) The first two years of the new policy have been rough ones, especially for Howard Ector. One of the first moves he made to secure additional alumni West stand seats was to limit all previous season-ticket holders who were not alumni of Tech to two season tickets in the between-the-goal-line section of the West Stands, regardless of the number of tickets they had held in this section in previous years. A storm of protest brewed immediately in this group and blew around Howard for the entire year. But with the complete backing of the Athletic Board, he weathered it. Since that time, not a single non-alumnus seasonticket holder has had his seat-location improved. This group was further penalized when the Board ruled that their ticket rights reverted to the general ticket pool upon their death. In previous years, the widow of a non-alumnus would inherit the right to purchase her husband's

tickets just as the widow of an alumnus may at the present time. As a further source of decent seats for an increasing number of alumni, each alumnus season-ticket holder was limited to four seats between the goal lines and no more than eight seats in the entire West stands. It's a possibility that this group may be limited to only four tickets in the West stands next season. With the additional alumni tickets available, Howard's office started at the 50-yard line and, going both ways, filled the alumni season-ticket orders by class, starting with the oldest Tech group and giving priority to active alumni. Eventually, the entire West stands will be filled with alumni in class order. Individual game tickets are another matter. There are no sideline (East or West stand) seats available for the big traditional ball games as the visiting

teams require all the available Easl stand seats and season tickets take up the West stands. Alumni priority (with the exception of Homecoming and the Georgia game) can't help you in individual game ticket purchases for home games. The only seats available are in the South stands. For the away games, it's the A A s policy to give ticket priority to alumni living in the region in which the games are being played. So if you live in Alabama, you can expect priority for the Alabama-Tech game, etc. Finally, we might point out again thai no matter what your class or priority, ii your season-ticket application arrives in the Athletic Office after the deadline in the spring, you go to the back of the lisi for that year. Thus it's important for you to keep an up-to-date address with the Tech Alumni Association. For the season ticket applications are addressed by the Alumni Association. In future years get in touch with the Alumni Association it you don't receive your ticket application by April 20th. Chances are your address is in error. Until the Stadium can be enlarged by digging-out or double-decking, tickets are going to remain a problem to which there is no satisfactory solution. But no one could try harder to further your best interests than does the present Athletic Association's business manager, Howard Ector. His door is always open.

PROBLEM IS NOT H O W MANY SEATS BUT H O W MANY GOOD ONES

FOWLER

TECHWOOD

14

STREET

AVENUE

Tech Alumnus


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once a year, and after about three months leaves. During this time a strange breed of our race is sprung upon the public scene in various stages of education, mostly unfinished. Nomenclature: College students. Tech contributes its share to this contingent. And needless to say these contributions are more than eager to test their most recent acquisitions of knowledge on the strange world around them. That world they've been removed from and all but made immune to for nine months of a year. Well, where do they get to? Personally, I got to New York and brought the light of enlightened thought to a struggling architectural firm. Of course, they being a bit retarded, it has taken no end of effort to get them to recognize the gifts I come bearing. But then I can take solace in the fact that most other college graduates of last June, or near-graduates, have the same trouble persuading their employers to see the light of their genius. Fortunately, for the engineer graduate, he can struggle along in this task while enjoying the comparative luxury of a pretty fair salary and what other benefits the job interviewer offered as bait last Spring. That is if the job interviewer was one other than a uniformed representative from the Santcumest of Sanctorums, the Pentagon. In which case a form of socialism sets in for two to four years, and any genius you may possess is best kept under wraps or you're accused of buckin'. To a large extent the latter was the fate of most Tech Bachelors. R.O.T.C. is a popular course these days. At least preferred to the courses offered by local draft boards. Even the non-bachelors feel the pinch in the form of summer camp and summer cruises. These are lots of fun I hear tell. And then there are a few hardy souls that stay on at old Ivy through the cotton-choppin season in Atlanta for one reason or another. This takes more courage than I can muster. Perhaps when they decide to air-condition the Old Shop Building I'll be able to take it. There's a safe bet. Speaking of bets, I have a friend here in New York who happens to be a graduate of the University of Miami and is badgering me for points on the forthcoming hoedown twixt the Hurricanes and Jackets. I was on the verge of offering about 50 but felt this was placing undue pressure on Coach Dodd. So not wanting to become a dissatisfied alumnus I bet him even. Played upon his school spirit. He kept mumbling something about the U. of M. never winning a road game in four years. I scoffed with tongue in cheek, knowing this would make it five. I happen to be on the side of the majority of the student body when I say I believe this is Tech's year . . . again.

S

16

UMMER COMES AROUND

I also happen to believe I side with the majority when I say that I don't go along with this idea of scheduling games before school starts. I'm just naive enough to think that the sport belongs to the students and should be played for them. Sometimes facts and the ideal conflict. It seems with the coming of money into the realm of football the students prerogative has been shunted aside. Don't misunderstand. We love that team and we'll support it, cheer and pray for it every game they play. We just want the chance to see every game they play. Is that asking too much? Just a thought; the only student support the team will have on hand to speak of will be this fall's incoming Freshman Class. They won't even be able to sing all the verses of the "Ramblin Reck" for the National TV audience. The Florida game will also be history before registration. Perhaps the taste is necessary, but it ain't good. But it will be good to get back among the grits eatin' folk come September. I think it's going to be a mighty good fall quarter on the Hill. And I miss a few faces down there, though there hasn't been a shortage of familiar ones up here. Bob Wallace and Roane Beard from the Alumni Office sauntered to and fro a few weeks back conventioning. World Student Fund Scholarship recipients and plain tourists from Tech have also put in appearances along with professors. So all in all it hasn't been too barren in the big city. There are also a few graduates plying one trade or another in these parts, and they're welcome sights. Among the latter are a lot of lads who I recall as having complained bitterly about 8 o'clock classes. They now roll out around six so they can commute for a few refreshing minutes each day. You never know when you've got that good deal until you haven't anymore. And I haven't anymore . . . to say . . . for now.

Speaking of coming back, it won't be too long before you'll be coming back to see those Ramblin' Wrecks parade at Homecoming. It's October 29th this year and you best start making your plans to take in all of the big events on the schedule. Duke is the guest. Tech Alumnus


Bargains f r o m " Y e O l d R o b b e r y "

FOR THE T E C H F O O T B A L L F A N , the perfect g i f t — a personally-autographed copy of Coach Dodd's book about the style of football that has made Tech famous throughout the country. A highly-technical, yet easy-to-read volume, handsomely illustrated with shots of Tech footballers in action. $4.50' each plus $.25 t o cover tax, postage and handling—$4.75. THE JUNIOR-SIZED T E C H FANS will get a real kick out of these football jerseys. They're exact replicas of Tech's

1955 team jerseys

(and not the tear-away

type). A n d as an

added feature, they have " W r e c k 'em Tech" printed across the f r o n t . O n the back is a giant-size number, just like the Jackets'.

In

juvenile sizes—2, 4, 6 and 8 plus junior sizes— 10, 12 and 14. Only $2.75 each post paid.

A L L THE T E C H S O N G S in one MUSICAL

78 RPM record album. The Tech

F O O T B A L L , plays

"Ramblin' Reck" when you t r i p the

Band and Glee Club give a su-

lever. The fine Swiss music move-

perb

performance

ment is encased in a pigskin-col- 1

Reck,

Up W i t h

ored plastic football, four inches in

G o l d , the Alma M a t e r and other

of

Ramblin'

the W h i t e and

length. The laces are painted white

Tech favorites. Packaged in an at-

and gold and even the grain of

tractive album with a gold color

the football is effectively imitated

scheme. A few left at $3.60.

—$3.25 each, post paid.

M U S I C A L CIGARETTE CASE of solid walnut. Reach in f o r a smoke, and the fine Swiss movement rings o u t with the "Ramblin' Reck". Finished with the Tech seal in silver, $10.75.

PLEASE SEND ME THE FOLLOWING INDICATED ITEMS— Wo.

Item

Size

FOOTBALL JERSEY (state size — $2.75 each)

i J

MUSICAL CASE (10.75)

J 1 enclose my check for

No.

Item

Style

RAMBLIN 1 'RECK ALBUM ($3.60 each) MUSICAL FOOTBALL (3.25 each) BOBBY DODD'S BOOK ($4.75 each)

to cover the above items.

MAIL WITH CHECK OR MONEY ORDER TO GEORGIA TECH COLLEGE I N N , ATLANTA, GEORGIA

September, 1955

17


AUGUSTA, GEORGIA — Professor Fred B. Wenn, of Tech's Industrial Management School and End Coach Jack Griffin were the feature speakers at the July 11th meeting of the Georgia Tech Club of Augusta. Over 80 members of the club turned out to hear the two Tech officials talk about their particular spheres of interest. The next meeting of the Augusta Club is set for sometime in October with a club dance scheduled for Thanksgiving time. The club sends a deserving Augusta boy to Tech each year with the proceeds from this dance, which last year was held during the Christmas season. * * * HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA — the "progress of engineering education at Georgia Tech" and the "problems of the modern-day engineering educator" were the main topics of President Van Leer's address before the Huntsville Georgia Tech Club on May 27. Members and guests of the club heard the Tech president spotlight the increase in enrollment, the improvement in physical plant and the growth of the graduate school as indications of the progress at Tech. In discussing the many problems faced by an engineering educator, the president pointed out that many of the high schols in this area do not teach the minimum requirements of mathematics necessary to enter Tech. Thus, a number of good Southern boys are denied a chance at an engineering education because of their high school background. Guests at the meeting included: Mr. Julian Newman, superintendent of high schools, Athens, Alabama; Mr. Walter Jenkins, principal of Decatur, (Alabama) High

School and Dr. Martin Schilling, deputy chief of the Re search and Development Division of Redstone Arsenal. * * * LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA — George P. Burdell made his annual appearance at the summer dinner-dance of the Los Angeles Georgia Tech Club on Saturday night. July 23. George was among the California alumni registered at the affair presided over by Henry Hopkins, EE, '31. president of the club. George did not make a speech. He just ate and danced, and, as usual left without paying his check. The next scheduled activity of the club will be a TV party on the afternoon (morning in California) of Sept. 17th when the group will gather to watch the nationallytelevised Tech-Miami football game. * * * BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA — the Baton Rouge Georgia Tech Club extends a cordial invitation to all Tech men planning on attending the Tech-LSU football game to come by Spinosa's Restaurant, 4835 Florida Street, on Saturday, October 8th for cocktails, hors d'oeuvres and fellowship. The time is 4:00 P. M. as the Tech-LSU game is scheduled for that evening. Spinosa's is an excellent restaurant not far from the hotels, motels and stadium, and the Baton Rouge Club has reserved a room at the restaurant that should accomodate a good crowd of Recks. If you're coming to Baton Rouge for the game, plan to come by Spinosa's and renew old Tech acquaintances. Dinners will also be available for those who care to go directly from the meeting to the ball game.

SPAN© CHALFANT — C o n d u i t and E.M.T CRESCENT — W i r e , Cable and Cords STEEL CITY — O u t Boxes and Fittings W A G N E R —E.M.T. Fittings KINDORF — Conduit & Pipe Supports

18

Tech Alumnus


THREE TELEPHONE PIONEERS from different sections of the country are shown here. They are Robert C. Price of Williamsport, Pennsylvania; Mrs. Marguerite T. Burns of Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Melvin F. Held of St. Louis, Missouri. Shown also are the emblems of the two Pioneer associations.

They're Telephone Pioneers Experience and fellowship of long-term telephone men and w o m e n are i m p o r t a n t f a c t o r s in g o o d t e l e p h o n e s e r v i c e Robert C. Price, Mrs. Marguerite T. Burns, and Melvin F. Held, shown together here, are Telephone Pioneers. They are representative of the more than 180,000 men and women who belong t o two big and i m p o r t a n t organizations in the telephone business. These are the Telephone Pioneers of America and the Independent Telephone Pioneer Association. These two organizations are com-

posed of employees who have spent many years in the business, their average service being well over 21 years. About one out of every four telephone people in the Bell System and independent telephone companies in the United States and Canada is a Pioneer. Each day the active, working Telephone Pioneers bring over 3 % million years of "know-how" and experience to the job. Equally important is their BELL T E L E P H O N E

September, 1955

spirit of service that is so important a part of the telephone business. By sustaining and nourishing this spirit, they help to insure its continuance and provide a solid foundation for greater progress to come. The fast, courteous, low-cost telephone service you enjoy today is due in no small measure to the men and women who wear the proud emblems of the Telephone Pioneers. SYSTEM 19


BY ' 0 . 9 Rlcnard Baxter Wiley, Sr., retired vi. Atlanta architect, died June 11 at his home, 2015 Ridgewood Dr., N . E., Atlanta. He had designed churches throughout Georgia and Alabama, as well as cottages and a factory in Thomaston, Ga. Survivors include his wife; daughter, Mrs. N . A. Kain; sons, Richard B., Jr., and Dr. William B. Wiley, and several grandchildren. ' A C Fred C. Morton, E E , recently toured U J 40 states, covering 10,000 miles. H e was accompanied on the trip by his wife. They visited 12 of his previous occupational centers and many of his former homes from coast to coast and from Canada to New Mexico. Mr. Morton, now retired, is living in Punta Gorda, Fla. His mailing address is P. O. Box 608. ' 0 0 Thomas J. Allen, E E , superintendent *-L 0 f transmission for Georgia Power, is vice chairman of the Georgia Section of the American Institute of E. E. His address is 3966 Peachtree Dunwoody Road, N . E., Atlanta. T. L. Johnson, Com., well-known Atlanta businessman and sportsman, died June 12. He had been seriously ill for the past two years. Mr. Johnson, who founded the Atlanta Blue Print & Supply Co. 36 years ago, was a partner in the business with his sons at the time of his death. He was top Southeastern conference football official for 21 years, retiring in 1952. H e officiated at several major bowl games. Mr. Johnson was originator of Yaarab Basharat, Shrine magazine, and was associated with various civic orgnizations in Atlanta for many years. Survivors include his wife, of 120 Peachtree Battle Ave., N . W., Atlanta; sons, T. L., Ill, and James L., both of Atlanta. ' O C MARRIED: Neil Ernest Brooks, M E , fcJ to Miss Marion Maddox, August 24, in Newnan, Ga. Mr. Brooks is an engineer in charge of industrial engines with Continental Motors, Muskegon, Mich. After September 1, the couple will reside at 2546 Wickham Dr., Muskegon. ' O P W. L. Gordy, Com., formerly district » " sales manager for Retail Credit in Los Angeles, is now serving in the same capacity in the New York Office. H e has been with the company since 1925. While in Los Angeles, Mr. Gordy was presidenfcrof the Los Angeles Georgia Tech Club. His business address is P. O. Box 427, Grand Central P. O., New York, N . Y. C. Perry Smith has been appointed general manager of the new Town House Motor Hotel in Albany, N . Y., and the Mount Vernon Motel in East Greenbush. He has been in the motel business for nine years and prior to moving to Albany was general manager of the largest motel chain in the Southeast. His address is the Town House Motel, Northern Blvd. and Shaker Rd. 20

CLASSES

John P. Traber, E E , took part in the history-making launching of the first telephone cable system ever to span the ocean. The launching took place June 22 at Clarenville, Newfoundland. Mr. Traber is an engineer with the long lines department of American T & T and is acting as a technical assistant on the project. T h e cable will link New York directly with London and add 36 extra circuits to the present overseas system. ' 0 0 William C. Wardlaw, Jr., president of t O Wardlaw & Hunter, Inc., in Atlanta, has been named 1955 winner of the Armin Maier community service cup, awarded annually by the Rotary Club of Atlanta. He is immediate past president of the Atlanta Area Council, Boy Scouts of America; member of the board of trustees, Scottish Rite Hospital and the Jr. League Speech School, and an officer of the Jesse Parker Williams Hospital. I Q O E. Sam Jones, M E , received recognivL tion as Civitan of the year for 1954 in the Atlanta Civitan Club. Mr. Jones lives at 3961 Tuxedo Rd., N . W., Atlanta. ' Q Q Henry Knox Bums, Jr., M E , has been « w named president of the GSPE. Mr. Burns owns the Burns Buick Co. of Macon. His home address is 1620 Waverland Dr., Macon. Col. John G. Turner, E E , graduated June 16 from the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa., and is scheduled for assignment overseas. H e has been in the Army since 1941 and holds the Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, Bronze Star and Air Medal. His permanent mailing address is 651 Ormewood Ave., S. E., Atlanta. ' O C Lt. Col. Nicholas Dunlap, M E , re« J cently graduated from the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa. He has been in the Army since 1940 and holds the Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster. His wife lives at 610 W. 46th St., Ashtabula Ohio. ' 0 1 S. S. Dewson, Jr., has been promoted * " to Time Equipment Manager of IBM's Columbia, S. C , office. H e has been with IBM since 1941. His home address is 4720 Meadowood Rd., Columbia, S. C. ' A f l J°nn W. Bozeman, E E , is now a " « member of the technical staff of the Advanced Electronics Laboratory, Hughes Research & Development, Culver City, Calif. H e was formerly associated with the Republic Aviation Corp. Reuben E. Fields, EE, is working for the Atomic Power Commission at Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corp. H e is engaged in research work on the production of an atomic plane. Mr. Fields' address is 432 Clayton Rd. West, Fort Worth, Texas. C. Douglas Flanigen, HI, M E , has been appointed Chief Engineer of Bendix Aviation Corp. in New Jersey.

' A J Richard L. Simms, Jr., and Mrs. • ^ Simms of Atlanta became the parents of their fourth child, Anne Marie, on Julv 17th at Atlanta's Piedmont Hospital. Dick is with the Grizzard Advertising Agency in Atlanta. ' A C George B. Hills, Jr., M E , has been '" appointed Executive Vice President ol Martin Paper Products, Ltd., a subsidiary of the Powell River Co., Ltd. His business address is 755 St. Jean Baptiste St., St. Boniface, Manitoba, Canada. ' A~l Gene Guenther, IM, recently received * ' his LLB from the University of Kansas City. His home address is 304 Williams Ave., Versailles, Mo. Philip A. Thomas, I M , is now district development representative with Shell Oil Co. in Miami. His business address is P. O. Box 8, Buena Vista Station, iMami. Mr. Thomas recently notified us of the birth of a son, Philip, Jr., last December. BORN TO: Charles A. Burdell, Ch.E., and Mrs. Burdell a daughter, Mary Celeste, on August 1. The Burdells' home address is 2026 Wesley Chapel Road in Decatur, Ga. ' 4 0 Clarence E. Adams, I M , has been " 0 appointed manager of the Compensation & Liability Div., Underwriting Dept. of Manufacturers and Merchants Indemnity Co. and its subsidiary, The Selective Ins. Co., with home offices for the two companies in the Kroger Bldg., 35 E. Market St., Cincinnati, Ohio. ' / [ Q Don Waite Braidwood, EE, recently "*» received his Masters in Electrical Engineering from the University of Missouri. His home address is 2610 Colorado St., Kansas City, Mo. Walter E. Crawford, IM, evecutive vice president o fthe Atlanta Convention Bureau in Atlanta, has been named president of the Executive Secretaries Club of Atlanta. Mr.

Old Tech-Auburn games were replayed when ex-Jacket ends John Staton, EE '24 (left) and Walter Mitchell, TE '23 (center) met up with former Plainsman halfback "Jungle Jim" Price at the El Panama Hotel in Panama. Staton and Mitchell were on their way to Columbia, S. A. to visit John'* brother, Al Staton, ME '22, when they happened across the noted Indian authority Tech Alumnus


Crawford's business address is 912 RhodesHaverty Bldg. BORN TO:

Jim B. Goldman,

I M , and

Mrs.

Goldman, a son, Braden Finley, July 8. Mr. Goldman is district manager with State Farm Ins. in Nashville. Their home address is 2339 Fernwood Dr., Nashville. Fred Gunter, Jr., IM, has been promoted to zone manager with headquarters in Atlanta for The Texas Co. His business address is 864 West Peachtree St. Maj. Henry J. Schroeder, EE, graduated June 24 from the Army's Command and General Staff College at Ft. Leavenworth, Kans., and is now assigned to the Office of I he Asst. Chief of Staff for operations and training in Washington, D. C. ENGAGED: Marvin Slotin, IM, to Miss Reba Kolodkin. Mr. Slotin's address is 1327 West Peachtree St., Atlanta. >Cfl Arthur E. Cohen, MS, received the J U degree of Doctor of Medicine from Tufts University on June 12, 1955. His home address is 44 Oakland St., Lowell, Massachusetts. BORN T O : James F. Daniels, EE, and Mrs. Daniels, a daughter, Donna, July 11. Their home address is 305 Delmont Dr., N. E., Atlanta. BORN T O : Witt Langstaff, Ch.E., and Mrs. Langstaff, a son, George Quigley, July 10. Their address is 1877 Kenwood Dr., Kingsport, Tenn. BORN TO: Ewell Pope, Jr., IM, and Mrs. Pope, on July 30, in Atlanta, a real watchcharm guard, Ewell Pope, III; weight 4 lbs. 13 oz. ' C I Eugene Floyd Cox, Chem., recently J I received his Ph.D. from Cal Tech. His mailing address is 602 33rd St. Ct. West, Bradenton, Fla. BORN T O : Theodore E. Lachmann, ME, and Mrs. Lachmann, a daughter, Jean Marie, June 29. Their address is 75 Darley Rd., Claymont, Del. Harold A. Osborne, ME, is now a member of the technical staff of the Systems Div., Hughes Research and Development, Culver City, Calif. MARRIED: Audrey Kelzo Singletary, IM, to Miss Betty Joyce Upton, August 7. Mr. Singletary is in business with his father in

Frank C. Underwood, EE '32, executive assistant superintendent of schools of Savannah, has been awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree from California College of Commerce of Long Beach, California. September, 1955

Thomasville, Ga. His address is 301 No. Madison St. MARRIED: William F. Slife, IM, to Miss Marty Joe Black, June 17. Mr. Slife's address is 669 Dill Ave., S. W., Atlanta. BORN T O : Barrett L. Walker, IE, and Mrs. Walker, a son, Barrett L., Jr., May 14, in Richmond, Va. Thomas H. Willings, Jr., TE, recently received his master's degree in B. A. from Xavier Univ. His address is 2474 Ferguson Rd.. Cincinnati, Ohio. ' C O BORN T O : Roger A. Dysart, Ch.E., " ^ and Mrs. Dysart, a son, Michael Craig, June 11. Mr. Dysart is associated with DuPont at its nylon plant in Martinsville, Va. Their address is 913 Gates St., Martinsville. Kenneth F. Farmer, IM, was recently separated from the Navy and is now with G. E. in Schenectady. His address is 2333 Niskayuna Dr., Apt. 5, Schenectady, N . Y. Navy Lt. Robert M. Harp, IE, recently graduated from the Navy Pre-Flight School at Pensacola and is now assigned to Whiting Field, Milton, Fla. His home address is 37 Moreland Ave., N . E., Atlanta. Emmette G. Jackson, ME, has been separated from the Navy and is now associated with the engineering department of the Aluminum Co. of America at their Edgewater Works. His address is 190 Knickerbocker Rd., Apt. 5, Englewood, N . J. Terrell N. Lowry, EE, is now a member of the technical staff of the Advanced Electronics Laboratory, Hughes Research and Development, Culver City, Calif. ' C O MARRIED: Ens. William M. Billings' • w ley, TE, to Miss Annette Fletcher, July 24. Ens. Billingsley is stationed at the Naval Air Station, San Diego, Calif. Arthur Bruckner, II, IE, has joined the Industrial Engineering staff of the University of West Virginia, Morgantown, W. Va. Herbert G. Dowes, TE, was recently promoted to first lieutenant in the Air Force and is now stationed at Wolter AFB, Texas. His permanent address is 844 Kings Court, N. W., Atlanta. MARRIED: James Flournoy Watson, IM, to Miss Judith McDaniel, Sept. 2, in Tulsa, Okla. Mr. Watson recently completed a tour of duty with the Air Force. His address is 178 17th St., N . E., Atlanta. BORN TO: Dr. Ernest L. Pollitzer, Chem., and Mrs. Pollitzer, a daughter, Elizabeth Marylee, June 2 1 . Dr. Pollitzer is with University Oil Products Co. Their home address is 61st and Brainard Ave., LaGrange, 111. MARRIED: William D. Powers, EE, to Miss Helen Waid, June 11. Mr. Powers is an electronics engineer with the U. S. Navy Mine Defense Lab. His address is P. O. Box 113, Panama City Beach, Fla. Lt. James 1. Price, USN, ME, reported in July to the Office of Naval Material for duty in the Production Div., Washington, D. C. MARRIED: Donald L. Rowlee, EE, to Miss Joanne Berrong, July 16. Mr. Rowlee recently completed a tour of duty with the Army and is associated with Westinghouse in Pittsburgh.

Edward C. Fiss, MS ChE '38, of Charlotte, N. C, has been named director of a special development section, recently created by Duke Power Co. to study atomic energy application for power generation. He has been chief chemical engineer in Duke's steam production department in Charlotte. John Steinechen, CE, was recently promoted to first lieutenant. He is assigned to the hospital at Fort Jackson, S. C. His permanent address is 391 Peeples St., S. W., Atlanta. » E * Elwyn C. Caldwell, EE, has joined *» ' the Field Engineering staff of Hughes Aircraft Co., Culver City, Calif. BORN T O : James E. Elliott, EE, and Mrs. Elliott, a son, James Edwin, Jr., June 24. Mr. Elliott is a design engineer with Convair. His home address is 7737 Norman Ave., Ft. Worth, Texas. MARRIED: James Reuben Fincher, CE, to Miss Jane Hart. The wedding took place in August. Mr. Fincher is working on his master's at Tech and will become a member of Ga. Tech C E faculty in the fall. MARRIED: Lt. Curtis Sylvester Martin, Jr., EE, to Miss Patricia Marie Ellison, July 10. Lt. Martin is in Officers' Radar School at Ft. Monmouth, N . J. His home address is 1011 College St., Cuthbert, Ga. MARRIED: Lt. D. Ellis Scarbrough, IM, to Miss Martha Cooper, August 2 1 . Lt. Scarbrough is stationed at Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Ala. His home address is 314 E. Main St., Ft. Valley, Ga. Lt. Douglas N. Smith, IE, recently graduated from the Infantry School's basic infantry officers' course at Fort Benning. His wife lives at 612 So. Evelyn PI., N. W., Atlanta, Ga. Ens. Hugh L. Tannehill, IE, is in advanced flight training at Corpus Christi. His address is BOQ-NAS, Corpus Christi, Texas. Lt. William Van Houten, III, TE, recently graduated from the Infantry School's basic infantry officers' course at Ft. Benning. His home address is 3881 No. Drew Valley Rd., Brookhaven, Ga. Lt. Julian L. Wade, Jr., TE, recently graduated from the Infantry School's basic infantry officers' course at Fort Benning. His address is 6 Tindol Ave., Greenville, S. C. ' C C ENGAGED: Ens. Lovett Bennett Pick» * ren, M E , to Miss Mary Lulu Peagler. MARRIED: Harry G. Dulaney, Jr., Phys, to Miss Charlene Barrett, Sept. 10. Mr. Dulaney is working toward his M.S. at Ga. Tech at the present time. (More news on page 22) 21


Joseph B. Paxton, ChE '51, has been named assistant superintendent of the Dow Chemical Company's Freeport, Texas division. Richard G. Gibson, T E , has been named 1955 winner of the gold medal presented annually by the Cotton Manufacturers Assoc, of Ga. The medal is awarded in recognition of top scholastic achievement to the senior who, according to the Tech T.E. faculty, shows the greatest promise of developing into a capable and successful mill executive. His address is 2654 Ellwood Dr., N. E., Atlanta. MARRIED: William Dobson Griffiths, IE, to Miss Carolyn Handley, August 27, in Atlanta. Mr. Griffiths is associated with DuPont's Savannah River Project. His address is 1122 Johns Rd., Augusta, Ga. MARRIED: Gerald F. Hilton, IM, to Miss Jewell Ruth Thome, June 14. The couple resides in Laurel, Miss., where Mr. Hilton is associated in business with his father. MARRIED: James Charles Leathers, M E , to Miss Sarah Crewe Hamilton, Sept. 1. Mr. Leathers is employed as a junior engineer with Southern Railway in Atlanta. His address is 270 Third Ave., Decatur, Ga. ENGAGED: Myron Benjamin Levy, T E , to Miss Betty Stein. Mr. Levy's address is 1310 Meadow View Dr., Hewlett, L. I., N . Y.

MARRIED: William Hardy Nettles, Ch.E., to Miss Robbie Holland, Sept. 4, in Register, Ga. Mr. Nettles is associated with the Celanese Corp. of America in Rome, Ga. BORN T O : George W. Poole, CE, and Mrs. Poole, a daughter, Lisa Gorgann, June 25. Their home address is 2081 Bolton Dr., N. W., Apt. 5, Atlanta. Ens. William Hart Sibley, Jr., IM, was killed in an accident aboard the aircraft carrier Bennington July 21 while the Bennington was docked at the Naval Yard at Brooklyn, N . Y. H e fell from one deck of the vessel to another. The accident occurred after Ens. Sibley had made an inspection of "lower void" storage space below the 7th deck. He had been in the area about 5 minutes and was apparently overcome from lack of oxygen. He died en route to the Naval Yard Dispensary. He graduated from Tech last March and was a member of Tech's varsity golf team, the American Society of Management and Chi Phi. Survivors include his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Sibley, Sr., of 51 Muskogee Ave.,

N. W., Atlanta; brother, Samuel Hale Sibley, II; grandparents, Judge S. H. Sibley and Mr. Asher B. Wilson. Guerry B. Stribling, IM, has been named industrial manager of the Ga. Chamber of Commerce. He will develop and supply facts about Georgia's advantages to prospective manufacturers. Mr. Stribling's address is 90 Peachtree Hills Ave., N . E„ Atlanta. MARRIED: Dee Granville Sullins, T E , lo Miss Joanne Colwell, July 31, in Griffin. Mr. Sullins will enter the Air Force in August. His mailing address is 220 W. College St., Griffin, Ga. MARRIED: Horace Coleman Taylor, CI•':. to Miss Odell Williams, Sept. 11. Mr. Taylor is associated with the Hundlay Construction Co., 55 Gasser Rd., Jackson, Tenn. MARRIED: Roy Andres Vaillant, Ch.L.. to Miss Marolyn Mitchell, August 27. MARRIED: Graham Streeter Wallace, EL, to Miss Jackie Wheeler, August 8, in Atlanta. Mr. Wallace is employed by the Hazeltine Electronics Corp., Long Island. New York.

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George is back a nd YJ CONFIDENTIAL'S got him

YELLOW JACKET

CONFIDENTIAL

BOX 1697 — G E O R G I A TECH ATLANTA, G A . I'm a Tech fan, put me down for a year of YJ CONFIDENTIAL. Enclosed is my check for $4.00. Rush me the first copy.

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George, of course, is George P. Burdell, long-time follower and student of Georgia Tech football. A n d he will be doing the writing this year f o r the new Y E L L O W J A C K E T C O N F I D E N T I A L , an intimate weekly newsletter devoted t o the on-the-scene and behindthe-scene views of Tech football.

YJ C O N -

FIDENTIAL is published the Monday following Please make all checks payable t o : \<FYELLOW JACKET CONFIDENTIAL

each Tech football game of the season, which means you'll g e t 10 fact-fijled issues this season t o keep you abreast of the doings of the Jackets. It's the next best thing t o a seat on the fifty, and no real Tech fan will want t o

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22

^P-™ ' -

'

Tech Alumnus


HERE COME THE FRESHMEN THE FIRST FORTNIGHT OF COLLEGE is a wondorous and

bewildering experience for all who survive it. The Class of 1959 will be going through those fourteen days of talks, rat caps, tests and fraternity rushing starting on September 15th. Following them with camera and pencil will be the Alumnus. In the October issue, in pictures and text, we will bring you the look of the freshmen class of 1959. The issue will also feature a brand-new approach (for us) of covering Georgia Tech football games. In exclusive photos and text, we'll bring you Tech's clashes with Miami and SMU at Grant Field and the Florida battle in Gainesville. All this plus the regular features and a surprise story will be coming your way around October 20th. Be looking for us then.

W e buy, sell, rent and exchange Electrical Equipment. W e rewind and rebuild Electric Motors,

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Electrical Equipment Company J. M. Cutiiff, E.E. ' 1 5 , President and Gen. Manager

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September, 1955

Laurinburg, N. C.

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23


Lasting quality throughout the years


Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine Vol. 34, No. 01 1955