Page 1

The

G E O R G I A TECH ALUMNUS

JANUARY - FEBRUARY 1948 Vol. XXVI

No. 3


4

T H E GEORGIA

THE

GEORGIA TECH ALUMNUS ENGINEERING and INDUSTRIAL REVIEW Published every other m o n t h during the college year by the National A l u m n i Association of the Georgia School of Technology

R. J. THIESEN, Editor H. E. KAUFMAN, ' Adv. Mgr.

ROANE BEARD, Asst. Editor H. M. CHAMBLESS, Staff Assoc.

OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 1 0 7 Knowles Building

GEORGIA SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY ATLANTA, GA. ENTERED AS SECOND CLASS MATTER MARCH 22, 1923 at the Post Office at Atlanta, Ga., under the Act of March S, 1S79 Vol. XXVI

January-February, 1 9 4 8

No. 3

NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF TRUSTEES J. J. WESTBROOK, '29 President OSCAR G. DAVIS, '22 Vice-President HUGH HILL, '23 Vice-President CHAS. R. YATES, '35 Treasurer R. J. THIESEN, '10 Exec. Secretary Frank W. Allcorn III, '41 M. A. Ferst, '11 Ivan Allen, Jr., '33 Price Gilbert, Jr., '21 Chas. M. B r o w n , '25 Henry W. Grady, '18 F. A. Hooper, Jr., '16

GEORGIA TECH ALUMNI FOUNDATION, Inc. OFFICERS A N D C. L. EMERSON, '08 .. GEO. W. McCARTY, '08 F. E. CALLAWAY, Jr., '26 W. A. PARKER, '19 HOWARD ECTOR Clem A. Evans, 22 Thos. Fuller, '06 Julian T. Hightower, '19 Geo. T. Marchmont, '07 F. M. Spratlin, '06 J. F. Towers, '01 J. E. Davenport, '08 Y. F. Freeman, '10 Geo. S. Jones, Jr., '12

TRUSTEES President Vice-President Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer Exec. Secretary F. A. Hooper, Jr., '16 Wm. T. Rich, '10 R. B. Wilby, '08 F. H. Neely, '04 C. P. Rather, '23 Geo. W. McCarty, '08 Jno. A. Simmons, '15 A. D. Kennedy, '03 G. W. Woodruff. '17

GEORGIA TECH ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION ALUMNI MEMBERS J. C. HARRIS, '08 L. W. ROBERT, JR., '08 ROBT. B. WILBY, '08 ALUMNI STATE ADVISORY COUNCIL B y Districts 1. E. Geo. Butler, Savannah 1. R. A. Morgan, Rome 2. R. A. Puckett, Tifton 8. I. M. Aiken, Brunswick 3. W. C. Pease, Columbtti 9. W. H. Slack, Gainesville 10. Wm. D. Eve, Augusta 6. W. E. D u n w o o d y , Jr., Macon

THIS ISSUE "Well Done," Team and Coaches Miami Alumni Outstanding Hosts "Pres. Van Leer Rang the Bell" 1947-'48 Alumni Roll Call Report W. H. Hightower Textile Building Network Calculator in Operation Alumni and Service Mentions, Sports

TECH

ALUMNUS

January-February,

1948

Miami Alumni and Orange Bowl Committee, Outstanding Hosts Georgia Tech's large, active and loyal group of alumni in the Miami, Florida, area, the Orange Bowl committee members and many other hospitable Floridians were most gracious hosts to the members of the football team, the coaches, college officials and other Tech visitors to their beautiful cities, for the Orange Bowl game, on J a n u a r y 1, 1948; and it is a sincere pleasure to thank all concerned and our alumni, particularly, in print and otherwise for the excellent entertainment, receptions, and other fine considerations that were shown to the team, its official party and others, during their entire stay at Miami Beach and Miami. A. C. Bivins, Jr., President; John Shuey, Vice-President, and R. Fulton Webb, Secretary, officers of the Georgia Tech Club of Miami, headed the alumni in and around Miami and, in addition to their general hospitality, the members of the Georgia Tech Club gave a large buffet dinner and dance for the team and other guests on the evening of Saturday, December twenty-eighth, at which time a diamond studded football was given to each member of the team by Head Coach Bobby Dodd. Following this fine affair, there were no other night parties for the team until the Victory Dinner at the Copa Cabana Club on the night of J a n u a r y first, following the game. Rhodes Perdue, '21, gave a most enjoyable morning tour on his palatial yacht to the team and Georgia Tech officials, which was one of the features of the trip. After the game members of the team were given several extra days on Miami Beach; and horse races, Jai Alai, and other highly interesting forms of entertainment were indulged in, not to mention swimming and sun bathing. A number of enjoyable parties were given to the Georgia Tech followers and official party before and after the Orange Bowl game, all of which added to the grand success of the highly memorable occasion.

New Textile Building to Be Named In Memory of W. H. Hightower, '09 Georgia Tech's new textile and textile research building will be named in memory of William Harrison Hightower, B.S. in Textile Engineering, '09. This announcement is in tribute to him as one of the most loyal and most beloved graduates of the college. Harrison Hightower was President of the Thomaston Cotton Mills, Thomaston, Ga., at the time of his death in February, 1947. He was born in Thomaston and was a former football and baseball star while at Georgia Tech, where he was also outstanding in many other activities of the college. Mr. Hightower was the leading factor in forming the Textile Foundation of Georgia, Inc., through which most of the valuable equipment for the new textile building at Georgia Tech is being secured, as a gift to the college. A director on railroad and a number of textile boards, he had also served as president of the American Cotton Manufacturers Association, president of the Cotton Manufacturers Association of Georgia, and the Institute of Textile Technology, among other important positions and honors. Work on the million-dollar textile project at Georgia Tech is well under way and it is scheduled to be completed in the fall of the present year. Dedication ceremonies will be held when the new textile building is opened.


January-February,

1948

T H E GEORGIA T E C H

ALUMNUS

5

"Well Done," Team and Coaches

Georgia Tech Apartment Group Dedicated

Heartiest congratulations from the alumni, faculty, students and hosts of other friends are extended and will continue to be paid to each member of the 1947 Football Team, Coach Bob Dodd and his staff, the " B " team and all others connected with the squad, for a great and highly auspicious season. The hard work, self-denials, spirit and courage of all resulted in exceptional accomplishments and your welldeserved successes. Nine games won out of a hard, ten-game schedule; and, in addition, a glorious victory over a really great Kansas team in the Orange Bowl, on J a n u a r y first, represents a record that is not only brilliant but nationally outstanding. You surmounted the handicaps of severe late-season injuries and all b u t won the S. E. C. Championship, regardless; and the consequent praises and compliments should ever remain among your most cherished and enduring remembrances. Faculty, alumni, students and many other staunch friends have joined at different times, this season, in banquets and other well-merited awards to you; which, at best, cannot fully express their kind feelings toward you and, as well, for your grand and continued success, on and off the athletic fields. Your great 20-14 victory in the Orange Bowl, on the first day of 1948, over a powerful University of Kansas team, brilliantly upheld the high standards of Georgia Tech which, easily, has one of the best major bowl records in the nation: five victories and only two losses out of seven games played, respectively, in the Rose Bowl, Orange Bowl, 3 times; Sugar Bowl, Cotton Bowl, and Oil Bowl. Georgia Tech's loyal and large group of prominent alumni in the Miami area, together with other distinguished alumni and many like friends, were thoughtful and affable hosts; and they, along with all others, complimented you as a team and individually upon your exemplary conduct, at all times, as well as for your grand game. So, it is a genuine and sincere pleasure to join again with your host of other well-wishers in the best of congratulations to you and to the members of the other squads, and to your coaches and the entire athletic staff; and to repeat "Well Done" to you with all that it implies.

Officials of the Georgia School of Technology formally opened the school's new 17-unit, million-dollar apartment house project at Tenth, Holly, and Fowler Streets, N. W., at a dedication ceremony and Christmas party on Friday night, December 19, 1947. The ceremony, attended by approximately 100 residents of the project, marked dedication of the seven groups of buildings in honor of seven prominent Georgians — all famous alumni and friends of Tech who have passed on. The entire project, known as the Callaway Apartments, was broken down into seven groups of buildings with each group bearing the name of one of the honored men. Joe J. Westbrook, President of the Georgia Tech National Alumni Association and one of Tech's football greats, announced the names given to each group of buildings, and gave reasons why the groups were so named.

Jackets Boast Great Bowl Record When Georgia Tech met the University of Kansas in the Orange Bowl in Miami on J a n u a r y 1, 1948, it marked the third trip to the Florida bowl and the seventh trip to all bowls for the Yellow Jackets. The engineers went to their first bowl game in 1929, after completing an undefeated season under Coach Alexander. They beat the California Bears in a game featured by Roy Riegel's famous wrong way run, which led to a blocked punt and a safety. That proved to be the margin of victory, the Jackets winning 8-7. Eleven years later Tech's razzle-dazzle confounded the Missouri Tigers to the tune of 21-7, as they soundly trounced the Big Six champions in the Orange Bowl on January 1, 1940. A bid to the Cotton Bowl in J a n u a r y of 1943 led to the Jacket's first defeat when Texas came out on top of a 14-7 score. In going to the 1945 Sugar Bowl, Tech became the first team to play in all four major New Year's Day Classics. The Engineers edged out a 20-18 victory over Tulsa, but the following year the Oklahomans got revenge by taking Tech 26-12 in the Orange Bowl. Georgia Tech's decision over Kansas gives them a record of five wins in seven bowl contests.

The men honored are listed below. George W. Adair was a dominant influence in the athletic life of Georgia Tech. An alumnus of Tech, class of 1893, he became, in a way, the patron saint of the school's athletic activities. George Jordan, a member of the Confederate Army, was instrumental in the creation of Georgia Tech. Victor Allen, although an alumnus of the University of Georgia, volunteeerd his services to Georgia Tech when the school conducted its "Greater Tech" campaign in 1920. He traveled over the South raising funds for the school and was a true friend of Georgia Tech. Dr. Gordon Crawford, former member of the Board of Trustees of the college, was outstanding in local and national civic affairs, and was intensely interested in Georgia Tech. Paul Howes Norcross, nationally known engineer and member of the class of '02, was head of construction projects in Bermuda. He designed and built a water system on the Island of Malta, as well as designing the extension and improvement of City of Atlanta's water system. Maxwell R. Berry was outstanding in civic and national affairs and most interested in the activities of Georgia Tech. He was the principal speaker for the alumni meeting at the fiftieth anniversary of the college. Mercall "Mack" Tharpe, former football player and line coach at Georgia Tech, was killed in action in the Pacific where he was on duty with the U. S. Navy as a Lieutenant Commander during World War II. Relatives of the honored men who attended the ceremony included: Jack Adair, R. C. Jordan, Sr., Mrs. Everard Richardson, Jr., Dr. Maxwell R. Berry, and Mrs. M. McCall Tharpe.

Christmas Wishes Sincerely Appreciated All of us in the Alumni Office gratefully appreciated the numerous kind Christmas and New Year wishes that we received from so many of you during the Yule season; and we heartily thank you for your fine greetings. Our sincerest thoughts were expressed, as best we knew how, to you and to those near to you in the December issue of the ALUMNUS; and, with our repeated thanks, we kindly ask that you visit us, whenever you are on the campus, at our new offices in rooms 208, 207, and 205, Knowles Building which has been converted into an administrative annex. Good luck, once more, and every other good wish, always, to you and to yours.


6

T H E GEORGIA T E C H

ALUMNUS

January-February,

1948

Hydraulics Laboratory Completed

FM Broadcasting Survey Made

Tech's recently completed hydraulics laboratory will enable this school to be a leader in the Southeast in the fields of hydraulic engineering research and study, according to an article by Associate Professor Carl E. Kindsvater in the November issue of The Research Engineer, bi-monthly journal of the Georgia Tech Engineering Experiment Station. The laboratory was equipped through the generosity of two anonymous donors, who deposited $35,000 for this purpose with the Georgia Tech Alumni Foundation. As Professor Kindsvater point ous, hydraulics is that branch of engineering that deals with the behavior of fluids at rest or in motion; the practical science which embraces the elements of fluid measurements, and hydraulic machinery. In the new laboratory, it will be possible to solve such problems as those concerned with production of hydroelectric power, conservation and regulation of critically needed domestic and industrial water supplies, and control of floods. In this connection, laboratory investigations may include the study of spillway models for dams, river navigation models, navigation locks, design of household plumbing fixtures, and general fluid flow investigations. Two main floors and a balcony house the present laboratory, each level is provided with an independent source of water, which is recirculated after use through an elaborate system of tanks and pumps. While the laboratory is designed primarily for use of water as the fluid medium, other fluids and gases will be studied.

More complete and better FM radio broadcasting coverage of the Atlanta area is assured as a result of an exhaustive survey of this region recently completed by Tech. According to an article by Professor M. A. Honnell in the November issue of the Research Engineer, the information obtained is of immediate importance to radio broadcasters, in addition to taxi companies, public utilities, and railroads, many of whom are now installing FM communication systems for dispatching purposes. According to Professor Honnel, it appears that horizontally-polarized waves yield a greater field strength than vertically polarized waves on 99 megacycles in the Atlanta area.

M. E. Department Announces Changes In order to meet the changing demands in the field of mechanics, the Mechanical Engineering Department has announced several changes in its curricular courses. Dr. H. S. Weber, head of the department, states that many of the more specialized courses, especially in the case of senior classes, have been dropped in order to facilitate in giving the student a broader background in the fundamentals of mechanical engineering. By means of money grants to the department and invaluable aid rendered by the government, the laboratories have been improved and enlarged since the end of the war. A $90,000 grant to the department by the General Board of Education made possible the installation of a C. F. R. engine for the purpose of testing fuels under operational conditions. Another unit, a $35,000 Fairbanks-Morse double-opposed piston diesel engine for use in laboratory experimentation, has been obtained for the department by efforts of the U. S. Navy. The department is striving to develop the field of gas turbines in the undergraduate department, and the fields of jet propulsion and machine design in the graduate school. The current trends are away from empirical methods and toward development in the theory of elasticity, strength of materials, and the practical application of light metals.

The information was obtained by constructing a transmitting antenna on top of the Georgia Tech Electrical Engineering Building and sending signals of various strengths and frequencies to a car equipped with measuring equipment. Much of the apparatus required and many of the methods of data analysis had to be developed during the course of the survey, which was initiated in 1944. The survey showed that the new FM band of 88 to 108 megacycles, recently established for FM broadcast by the Federal Communications Commission, should yield excellent coverage of the Atlanta area. Georgia Tech has conducted research on radio broadcasting for 30 years, and this study represents another contribution to the development of broadcasting in this area. The Government Gauge Laboratory which was moved to Birmingham during the war was returned in the fall of 1945. The department plans to use this laboratory to the fullest extent, both for the use of Georgia Tech and to aid industry in Georgia and throughout the South. The return of this unit marks the start of the eleventh year of its location on the Tech campus. Many changes and additions have been made to the staff of the department as well. Five new instructors have been added in the past year. They are: Mr. D. W. Coe, who has been made assistant professor in charge of shop laboratories; Mr. E. F. Darby, instructor in heat power; Mr. J. I. Morris, who is assistant professor in heat treating and welding; Mr. A r t h u r Wald, who is assistant professor in the machine laboratory; and Mr. Hayden Zimmerman, who is assistant professor in heat power. Mr. J. P. Vidosic has been transferred from the school's Department of Engineering Drawing to the Mechanical Engineering Department to take the post of assistant professor in machine design. The large enrollment in all departments has forced the Department of Mechanical Engineering to give up the space in the old shop building, formerly occupied by the pattern laboratory, for the use of the Mathematics Department in handling its freshman classes. This shop has been moved into one of the temporary buildings on the campus.

Textile Foundation Established

Athletic Department Shifts Personnel

The Habersham Mills Foundation of Georgia has established a $50,000 trust fund to create the T. Earl Stribling Memorial textile fellowships at the Georgia School of Technology.

In a re-arrangement of the athletic department, Coach Bobby Dodd has announced the appointment of Trainer Dick Jones as freshman coach. He is to be assisted by Lewis Woodruff, who will be freshman backfield coach. George (Mutt) Manning will be assistant varsity line coach under Ray Graves, and Roy McArthur will handle the " B " team, assisted by Bob Miller. The trainer's job is to be filled at a later date. Claude Bond, former trainer and later Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds at Tech, has left to resume his career as baseball umpire.

Dr. R. L. Sweigert, acting dean of the Georgia Tech graduate division, said income from the fund will be used to provide an annual graduate fellowship of $1,500. Native Georgians will be given preference for the fellowship. The fellowships are a memorial to Mr. Stribling, '04, who did much to build up the Habersham Mills.


January-February,

1948

THE GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

7

Network Calculator in Operation The largest and most complete A.C. Network Calculator installation in the United States, costing almost $300,000, located on the campus of the Georgia School of Technology, was put into operation following brief dedication ceremonies on Saturday morning, November 22. Sometimes called an "electro-mechanical brain," the calculator at Georgia Tech, in addition to its use for research and instructional purposes, will be made available to power companies and their engineers for solving the multitude of complex problems encountered in the design and operation of electrical power systems. The Georgia Tech calculator installation, the nineteenth one in the country and the first one in the South available for the use of public utility companies, was obtained through a grant from the Georgia Tech Alumni Foundation. This grant was made possible through contributions to the Foundation of $100,000 by the Georgia Power Company and $20,000 by other public utility companies. The construction of the modern functionally styled, air-conditioned building to house the calculator was financed by an appropriation of $168,000 from the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. Cherry L. Emerson, dean of engineering at Georgia Tech, acted as master of ceremonies at the dedication exercises. Representatives of organizations, which had a part in providing this modern research tool, addressed the gathering of Southern leaders in education, research and industry present for the affair. These speakers included C. B. McManus, newly elected president of the Georgia Power Company; F r a n k H. Neely, president of Rich's, Inc., chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, president of the Georgia Tech Alumni Foundation, and an alumnus of Georgia Tech; and Colonel Blake R. Van Leer, president of Georgia Tech and representative of the Board of Regents. Other distinguished visitors present were Hal S. Dumas, president, Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Co.; T. M. Forbes, executive vice-president, Cotton Manufacturers Association of Georgia; Peyton Anderson, Macon Telegraph; M. R. Ashworth, Ledger-Enquirer of Columbus, Ga.; A. M. Harris, vice-president, National Bank of Brunswick, Ga.; C. J. Hendon, commercial vice-president, General Electric Co.; J. T. Holland, president, Commercial Bank of Thomasville, Ga.; Harbin K. Park, president, First National Bank of Columbus, Ga.; R. Cylde Williams, president, First National Bank of Atlanta, Ga.; Fuller E. Callaway, Jr., president of Callaway Enterprises; W. E. Mitchell, past president of the Georgia Power Company; George J. Yundt, retired comptroller of Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Co.; and Robert H. White, Jr., president, Southern Wood Preserving Co., and many others. The Georgia Tech A.C. network calculator is one of the most intricate pieces of electrical machinery which engineers and scientists have devised. It is possible to reproduce on the calculator exactly and in miniature the characteristics peculiar to any power system. This means that instead of using time-consuming mathematical manipulations extending over periods of many months, electrical engineers can set up a miniature interconnected power system representing major transmission lines extending for hundreds of miles and obtain all necessary measurements and solutions of the distribution of power and voltage at different stations under various conditions in the matter of a few days. According to Herbert P. Peters, who has just joined the staff of the Engineering Experiment Station at Georgia Tech as supervisor in charge of studies and operation of the Georgia Tech A.C. Network Calculator, solutions ob-

President C. B. McMonus of the Georgia Power Company is shown throwing master switch to set the A . C. Network Calculator in operation. M r . Jackson Dick, Power Company director, looks on. Herbert P. Peters, supervisor of the calculator, is seen in the background.

tained on the calculator have resulted in economies that follow from maximum utilization of existing equipment, better service continuity, and assurance that capital expenditures will adequately fulfill system requirements. Mr. Peters speaks from experience, having spent 12 years with the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, all of it working on or in charge of the company's calculator in Pittsburgh. Mr. McManus, in his remarks, stated that as far back as 1945, Preston S. Arkwright, Sr., board chairman of the Georgia Power Company, realized the potentialities which Georgia Tech possessed for being not only a great engineering school but one of the great engineering schools of the United States. He felt further that such an accomplishment would be of tremendous value to the industrial growth of the City of Atlanta and the State of Georgia, and perhaps the entire Southeast. Therefore, Mr. Arkwright and his associates, through the Georgia Power Company and the Commonwealth & Southern Company, made a gift of $120,000 to the Georgia Tech Alumni Foundation, which would enable the Foundation to financially aid President Van Leer in leading Georgia Tech to greater heights of usefulness. Mr. McManus concluded, "After observing the accomplishments and progress of the school during the past three years, the opinion of Mr. Arkwright is confirmed, and we are most gratified at this most tangible evidence of progress." Mr. Neely, among other things, said: "This is indeed an auspicious occasion. The dedication of this laboratory brings into strong relief the type of progress being made by this institution and the type of effort which we trust will continue at an ever increasing rate. . . . When the Foundation received the magnificent gift of the Georgia Power Company and its associate companies, a great responsibility was created to so direct the spending of this money that it would be of maximum value to the institution . . . and to the great power companies of the South. The Board of Directors of the Foundation decided that these ideas would best be fulfilled by the purchase of an A.C. Network Calculator, a large and complex scientific instrument. Bids were taken from several companies and some 18 months ago, an order was placed with the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for its production. Not only will the calculator be useful in teaching graduate students {Continued on next page)


8

THE GEORGIA TECH ALUMNUS

January-February, 1948

Charlie Yates Gets High Position

Alumni Prominently Mentioned

Charles R. Yates, '35, winner of the British Amateur Golf Crown nine years ago and an Assistant Vice-President of the First National Bank of Atlanta, has become Southeastern Representative of Joshua L. Baily & Co., it was announced by President Magruder Dent on November 15, 1947. His headquarters will be at 313 Trust Company of Georgia Building, Atlanta. The Baily Company, which acts as selling agent for a number of major Southern textile manufacturers, is one of the oldest and best known national firms specializing in this field so vital to the economy of the South. As the Baily representative, Mr. Yates will serve the states of South Carolina, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, and Eastern Tennessee. Joining the First National Bank upon his graduation from Georgia Tech in 1935, Mr. Yates has been with the bank since that time except for 54 months leave served in the Navy. He was aboard the destroyer "Mayo" at the J a p surrender in Tokyo Bay in 1945 and was released with the r a n k of Lieutenant, Senior Grade. Treasurer of the Georgia Tech National Alumni Association, Mr. Yates also is a Steward of the First Methodist Church and a director of the Metropolitan Atlanta YMCA. He is a life member of t h e Atlanta Athletic Club, a member of the Capital City Club, and the Augusta National Golf Club. Among his many other sports triumphs, h e was twice a member of t h e U. S. Walker Cup teams in 1936 and 1938.

N. Baxter Maddox, Atlanta banker and member of t h e class of '22, has been elected to the board of trustees of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. Mr. Maddox already is treasurer and a member of t h e executive board of the Georgia chapter of the foundation and a trustee of the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation. In addition, he directed the Fifth District March of Dimes campaign in 1944. Ralph J. Conover, graduate of Georgia Tech and a former architect with the Department of State, foreign building operations, in Washington, has returned to Atlanta as the Southern representative of E. H. Sheldon & Co., Muskegon, Michigan. Frank H. Neely, president of Rich's, Inc., has been appointed Federal Reserve Agent and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta for 1948 and reappointed a Class C Director for another threeyear term which began on the first of January, 1948. Col. Robert L. Watkins, class of 1926, has been appointed chief of staff for the 81st Infantry Division which has its headquarters in Atlanta. Colonel Watkins was a former assistant professor of military science and tactics at Georgia Tech. J. Cantey Alexander, who attended Tech from 1912 to 1916, has become Southeastern representative of two Atlanta textile supply organizations — F r a n k G. North, Inc., manufacturing chemists, and Pioneer Heddle and Reed Co. Mr. Alexander is one of Georgia Tech's best remembered football tackles. 1st Lt. Raymond H. Mayer, killed in action on t h e Normandy Beach, was awarded the Bronze Star Medal posthumously. The medal was presented to his wife, Mrs. Dora C. Mayer and daughter, Linda Ruth, in a ceremony at Post Headquarters by Brig. Gen. C. K. Nulsen, commanding Fort Sam Houston. Lt. Mayer was a member of the class of '38. Admiral John H. Towers, '05 and U. S. Naval Academy, '06, the "Father of Naval Aviation," has retired from active duty to head a civilian scientific research foundation. Admiral Towers, who flew the Navy's first airplane in 1911, reached the statutory retirement age, and left his job as chairman of t h e Navy's General Board to head the Pacific War Memorial Foundation, New York. A proponent of the aircraft carrier as spearhead of the fleet, Towers spent the war commanding the Pacific Fleet air arm and later became commander of the Pacific Fleet. George M. "Pup" Phillips, director of civilian defense in metropolitan Atlanta for the past six years, has been graciously relieved of any further responsibility by special action of City Council. In leaving this position Mr. Phillips received Mayor Hartsfield's praise and thanks "for the efficient and patriotic service" rendered by him and his corps during the war. Lewis R. Sams, vice-president and former associate operating manager of the Retail Credit Co., Atlanta, Ga., has been appointed sales manager of the firm. Lt. Col. Charles C. Wilder, Jr., '40, has been chosen to head the newly established air ROTC at Colgate University, Hamilton, N. Y. R. A. Siegel, Jr., Ch.E., '36, is vice-president of the newly formed corporation, J. J. Haines & Co., Inc. The firm has branches in nine southern cities. Henry Granger, T.E. '22, is now associated with Louis F. Dow Co., "Goodwill Advertisers" of St. Paul, Minn. Mr. Granger has the Ohio territory as district manager. His home is RFD 2, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. E. H. Howell, E.E. '22, has been named manager for General Electric's Meter and Instrument Divisions in Lynn, Massachusetts.

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,

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A-C Network Calculator

(Continued-from preceding

page)

in Electrical Engineering how to solve the problems which they will encounter if they become operating engineers for power companies, but it will also provide a source of income for the Georgia Tech Research Institute, which will make it available to power companies on a standard rate basis. The thanks of the Foundation go out to Mr. Arkwright, Mr. Mitchell, Mr. McManus, and all the officials of the Georgia Power Company and its associated companies for the fine generosity and the great foresight which has made possible the installation of this marvelous equipment which places Georgia Tech in a pre-eminent position in service to the electric power industry of the Southeast." "This laboratory," stated President Van Leer, "is an evidence of the part of the largest corporation in the State of Georgia that they do recognize the place of Georgia Tech in the scheme of things. The calculator will not only be a splendid teaching tool for the benefit of our students, but it will be a source of income to the Georgia Tech Research Institute, and also, of greater importance, will be a substantial contribution to t h e work of t h e power companies themselves, not only in this State, but in the entire Southeast. . . . It is, of course, our basic purpose to serve these businesses and industries in every way that we know how, so that the Georgia School of Technology may become a great energizing force in building the South to that level of prosperity which it so well deserves." The calculator was put into operation when Mr. McManus, upon the request of Colonel Van Leer, threw the master switch on the instrument, causing the generators to start up which in t u r n turned on the instrument lights. When Mr. Peters twisted certain dials, needles on the many meters swung to various positions, thereby indicating different electrical values. All in all, the laboratory contains 322 of the various types of units necessary for a major power-system study plus more than 500 jumper and cord circuits. Results are correlated at a master operating desk which contains the master instruments.


January-February,

1948

9

THE GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

ALUMNI CLUB MEETINGS

NEW YORK GA. TECH CLUB HOLDS DINNER President' Blake R. Van Leer is shown addressing a group of 75 Georgia Tech alumni at the December 4, 1947, meeting of the Georgia Tech Club of New York. J. Albin "Swede" Johnson, ' 1 1 , President of the Club, is shown under the banner at the left of President Van Leer; James F. Towers, ' 0 1 , is at his right. Other alumni in the picture are: Roland Gooch, Dudley King, Jim Davenport, Edgar Kobak and Carl F. Phillips, foreground. Gene Turner is at the top left of picture, wearing bow tie. Unfortunately, all in the picture are not recognizable and many others are not shown.

Augusta, Ca. In a dinner meeting highlighted by the election of new officers for the coming year, the Georgia Tech Club of Augusta gathered on the night of December 3rd to consume untold quantities of delicious barbecue and conduct other business, which came off only after the food was well out of the way. F. A. "Goat" Saxon presided, and there were some 50 odd Tech men in the gathering, plus several friends and guests. Prominent among the guests were several of the outstanding athletes in Richmond County. One of the first orders of business was the election of new officers for the coming year and, after a lively discussion on what and who and why, the following slate was duly elected and sworn in: President Dorroh L. Nowell, Ceramics '39 Vice-President F r a n k Dennis, Jr., Ch.E. '43 Secretary and T r e a s u r e r . . . . Albert Roesel, E.E. '38 Much discussion followed as to what a club like this can do to best help and further advance the aims of the school. Many helpful ideas were submitted which will certainly be of great value both to the school and to this club. The guest of the evening was Howard Ector, Executive Secretary of the Georgia Tech Alumni Foundation, who spoke briefly of the progress being made at Georgia Tech, and some of the plans for the future. Later Mr. Ector showed the official pictures of the Tech-Georgia football game of 1947, which were well received by all present, there being no Red and Black rooters in the audience.

Chattanooga, Tenn. On Wednesday, November 12, the Georgia Tech Club of Chattanooga met at the Chattanooga Country Club for dinner, a smoker, and movies. The meeting was presided over by Alf J. Law, '28, president of the club. Each member was asked to stand, give his name, class, and present occupation. Eighty-five members were present and there were many oldtimers among them, including Col. Froggy Morrison, '17; Wisdom Goree, '16; Bill Murphey, '11, and a real old-timer, Gaston Raoul, '96. The younger generation, with several '47 graduates, were there in force. Howard Ector, '40, Executive Secretary of the Alumni Foundation, and Roane Beard, '40, Manager of Alumni Activities, Georgia Tech National Alumni Association, made short talks on the progress of Georgia Tech and plans for the future. Gordon Gambill, '16, showed two football films: the TechTennessee and the Tech-Tulane games of this year. Refreshments and a general feeling of comradeship made the meeting a big success. Officers of the club are: Alf J. Law, Jr., '28, President, 1204 Mississippi Ave., Chattanooga, Tenn. W. S. McGinness, Vice-President, Lookout Mountain, Tenn., Louis Chambless, Secretary, P. O. Box 1749, Chattanooga, Tenn. Reid S. Murphey, Treasurer, Elfin Rd., Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Continued

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10

THE GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

January-February,

1948

Alumni Club Meetings

'39 Orange Bowl Team Has Party

Macon, Georgia On the night of December 2nd, some forty-odd faithful Georgia Tech men gathered in the private dining room of the S. & S. Cafeteria to enjoy a delicious meal, and see the official football films of the Yellow Jacket's defeat of the Georgia Bulldogs.

A bunch of the boys were whooping it up out on Bob Ison's farm near Stone Mountain where they met for old time's sake and a glass of suds. The members of Georgia Tech's 1939 Southeastern Conference Champions and winners of Tech's first Orange Bowl game, who live in Atlanta, got together for a big time. The picture of the Orange Bowl game and a transcript of Ted Husing's broadcast were used to bring back memories of days past.

The meeting was called to order by Dr. Kalish, and the regular business was disposed of. The principal guest of the evening was Howard Ector, Executive Secretary of the Georgia Tech Alumni Foundation, who talked briefly on what is going on at the school, and something about its future plans. Later, Mr. Ector showed the films of the TechGeorgia game, which pictures came as a welcome sight after the past few lean years. The meeting adjourned with tentative plans for another and larger meeting in the spring. Miami, Florida On Tuesday night, December 9, 1947, the Georgia Tech Club of Miami met for a smoker at the Columbus Hotel. About sixty alumni were present, including former football players, architects, lawyers, etc. Eastern Air Lines and the Florida Power Company seemed to have the edge in number of Tech men employed. All present introduced themselves, giving name, class, and name of employer. Arthur Bivins, Jr., President of the Club, presided over the brief business part of the meeting, which was concerned with Orange Bowl tickets, etc. Roane Beard, Manager Alumni Activities, from Atlanta, talked about the school today and the football team. Charley Preston, '37, former football star, showed pictures of the Tech-Tennessee game of this year. Plans for activities during the Orange Bowl Festival were tabled until joint committees of the Orange Bowl and Georgia Tech Club could get together. Shreveport, La. On December 5, 1947, the Georgia Tech Club of Shreveport met at the Cadoo Hotel for an informal dinner and smoker. It was the second meeting of the newly formed club. Highlight of the meeting was the showing of the Georgia Tech-Tulane football game which Tech won 20-0. The meeting was presided over by Morley Hudson, '38, newly elected president of the club. " B " Segall, '40, was in charge of the program. Roane Beard, representing the National Alumni Association, talked to the club about the Georgia Tech expansion program, the position of the Alumnus with respect to the future advancement of Georgia Tech, and the enlargement of the Shreveport Club. Discussion was held regarding the next meeting and all Tech men in the Shreveport area are urged to contact the club secretary. Officers of the club are: Morley S. Hudson, '38, President, 3907 Baltimore Ave., Shreveport, La. James T. Carmichael, '36, Vice-President, 927 Boulevard, Shreveport, La. " B " Segall, Jr., '40, Secretary-Treasurer, 603 Cotton St., Shreveport, La. Washington, D. C. November the seventh and eighth, 1947, are two days that will be long remembered by the alumni of Washington and Baltimore. On the seventh, the Washington Alumni Club held its annual dinner meeting at the Hamilton Hotel. Colonel Blake Van Leer, Joe Westbrook, Roy Mundorff and

Present for the occasion were Bob Ison, Ail-American end; Howard Ector, All-SEC fullback; Johnny Bosch, triple threat tail back; Hawk Cavette, guard and kicker de luxe; Charlie Wood, tackle; Roane Beard, center; Billy Gibson, halfback; Roy Goree, fullback; Ralph Plaster, fullback; Paul Sprayberry, end; Phil Richards, guard; Jim Clay, end, and the two managers of that year, Dan Maclntyre and Irvin Massey. Ten wives and three gals were there. Roy Goree preferred to wolf it. As you can guess, not a word was said about football.

Washington Meeting Cont. Walter Herbert accepted our invitation to attend and all gave enthusiastic reports on the rapid expansion of Georgia Tech in recent years. Tech's future is indeed bright if its alumni give Col. Van Leer and Joe Westbrook the cooperation and help they deserve. We, in the Washington Alumni Club, are proud of the achievements being attained under present difficulties and all of us are anxious to see our Alma Mater carry on its prominent role in engineering education. We, therefore, plan to respond generously to Joe Westbrook's stirring appeal on behalf of the National Alumni Association and the 1947 Alumni Roll Call. As Joe Westbrook so aptly said, "By helping Tech, we help ourselves." Among the many distinguished alumni who attended the dinner on the 7th were: L. W. (Chip) Robert, Jr., Admiral John H. Towers, Col. Wooch Fielder, Col. W. G. Lockwood, Dr. S. G. Green and Carter T. Barron. Carter Barron not only underwrites the entertainment and newspaper coverages, but also acts as alternate master of ceremonies, cheer-leader and political railroader in election of officers. "Rip" Williams turned in his usual fine job as chairman, alternately introducing our guests and speakers and needling the fellows on organizational functions and club activities. "Rip" is such a go-getter and good organizer that he found himself re-elected president, along with Bob Austin and George Vierick as 1st and 2nd Vice-Presidents, respectively. Dick Stirni was re-elected Secretary-Treasurer. After dinner, we saw some very fine pictures of the TechAuburn game, accompanied by the excellent running commentary of Joe Westbrook and Roy Mundorff. On the eighth of November, the Tech football team brought the present Navy-Tech series to a fitting close by staging a thriller-diller in Baltimore and winning 16-14. In response to Walter Herbert's suggestion, our club officers are already at work on a spring meeting that will be held on the date that Walter brings the revived Tech Glee Club up for its Washington concert. All alumni are cordially invited to come to our spring meeting and to bring their wives. Anyone who can't make it should listen to the Glee Club broadcast which Carter Barron is arranging. It will be on a national hook-up, if we know Carter.


January-February,

1948

11

T H E GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

R e p o r t on the 1 9 4 7 - 4 8 A l u m n i Roll C a l l Led by the class of 1942 with 24 individual contributors, the first annual Georgia Tech Alumni Roll Call is well under way. A total of 404 alumni have done their bit toward a greater Georgia Tech to t h e tune of $10,715.75, for an average gift of $26.52. This is well above t h e national average for gifts to institutions of higher learning. To those 404 of you who have done their part, a hearty and profuse thanks. And to those 15,119 of you who have let this slip your mind, please let this be a gentle hint to you to get out that checkbook and use it! If less t h a n 3 per cent of you can m a k e such a swell showing of over $10,000, Doctor Smith's Math Department tells us that 100 per cent participation in this Roll Call, at this rate, would give Georgia Tech a total gift of $411,672, or the equivalent income from an endowment of $13,722,400! Amazing, isn't it? But it is something easily within the realm of possibility, and you can do your p a r t toward making Georgia Tech the finest engineering school in the whole United States. Will you do this, today? Since Uncle Sam permits deduction, up to 15 per cent, from taxable income for gifts to Georgia Tech, t h e man with a net taxable income of: $1,000 can give 15% at a cost to himself of 81 cents per $1.00. $3,000 can give 15% at 76 cents per $1.00. $6,000 can give 15% at 72 cents per $1.00. $10,000 can give 15% at 64 cents per $1.00. $20,000 can give 15% at 47 cents per $1.00. Make all checks payable to the Georgia Tech Alumni Association, and m a k e t h e m today. The following list of contributors is complete through December 31, 1947: 1890 F. L. Shackelford H. L. Smith W. S. Travis 1892 Robert H. White J. Low Zachry E. W. Connell W. E. Dunwoody 1896 J. Edgar Stewart 1915 1901 Clyde M. Wood James F. Towers V. G. Vaughn 1902 S. S. Green Paul K. McKenny John A. Simmons Julian Priolean R. A. Clark 1903 1916 Alfred Kennedy Paul R. Yopp Charles F. Stone Frank A. Hooper, Jr. Alex R. Howard Paul E. Beard 1904 1917 Frank H. Neely J. Talley Johnson Bryan M. Blackburn George W. Woodruff Joseph E. Moore William E. Turner 1905 Henry H. Harris Goodloe Yancey 1918 Joe A. Schlesinger, Sr. Henry W. Grady 1906 Lawrence Willet F. M. Rowan Ceylon B. Blackwell Frank M. Spratlin D. M. Kessler Creig C. Day W. P. Ferguson 1907 Charles A. Rawson J. G. Holtzclaw Robert W. Beall W. E. DuPre 1919 George T. Marchmont W. A. Parker 1908 M. L. Clein Joel C. Harris George P. Howard R. B. Wilby Eugene P. Zacharias E. V. Camp 1920 George W. McCarty Hamilton C. Arnall L. W. Robert, Jr. I. J. Phillips William R. Snyder William C. Pierce Cherry L. Emerson Hugh McMath 1909 1921 F. Phinzy Gary James Y. Arnold 1910 R. M. McFarland, Jr. William T. Rich William D. Garner J. F. Rogers George E. Edmondson M. A. Greenblatt 1922 N. W. Halliday, Jr. Arlie M. Hitt Harry J. Wood N. Baxter Maddox 1911 Leon K. Camp James A. Gantt Herman L. Gaines M. A. Ferst E. L. Hollingsworth 1912 James C. Shelor Walter A. Aichel Oscar G. Davis C. P. Goree George F. Hoffman R. E. Hightower A. G. Vogt 1913 1923 Harry Segel J. Frank Bell George H. Bond Vernon L. Borum Harleston J. Hall Lee H. Enloe Hugh Luehrmann Alex Rittenbaum 1914 Julian H. Turner Carroll Griffin H. R. Weeks

Iven Granath E. G. Acree Charles W. Young Frank W. Phillips J. I. Alford Emory L. Jenks 1924 John R. Armstrong George F. Dowman R. F. Willingham Wilbur B. King J. A. Peterson Franklin J. Johnson John P. Baum 0 . P. Stark 1925 W. Pat Fisher W. R. Webb Wingate Jackson Charles M. Brown Clifford J. Roberts 1926 Joe Bernath Wiley C. Bracey George S. Brown Harry P. Dews Charles L. McWorter T. G. Reddy, Jr. Hal L. Smith John P. Traber Warren Wheary Web C. Brown 1. L. Partee Spencer W. Boyd Francis L. Irwin 1927 Frank D. Lovette R. B. Moreland Karl B. Nixon N. S. Turner Hazen A. Walker George H. Cochran Eugene C. Smith John R. Adamson Walter L. Hudson M. Berry Grant 1928 H. A. Carroll Clem J. Ford Richard A. Guthman Ernest B. Merry Lewis W. Tabor W. C. Wardlaw, Jr. T. McRae Williams S. A. Kemp J. R. Perkerson James T. Adams Clarence Hagedorn Julian C. Jett C. C. McEachern 1929 V. E. Manget, Jr. F. J. Morgan J. J. Westbrook Sam J. Whigham, Jr. Parker S. Day Capt. R. H. Jenkins Ed W. Swift, Jr. James B. Duke Howard J. Stemm 1930 Volney P. Eakin H. W. Oliver James M. Roberts Thomas P. Goodman Lawrence J. Zimmerman J. R. Thompson Rhea W. Baker Harry Brown G. A. Nellis Robert M. Austin E. J. Ladd Sid Goldin A. H. Swanke Carol M. Smith 1931 W. P. Caddell W. T. Lyford 1932 B. F. Smallwood Harold S. Cloyd W. A. Home, Jr. Ben T. Smith D. B. Alexander 1933 Henry E. Hemboldt A. J. Reeves Leo Suddath, Jr. Horace W. Fletcher J. Alex Fife John S. Gruel, Jr. Ivan Allen, Jr. Norman J. Aaron Herbert A. Williams, Jr. Kenneth T. Farmer Major James S. Chandler J. R. DePriest Hubert E. Ulmer 1934 D. Braxton Blaylock, Jr. (Continued

John M. Harris E. M. Kuhlke James S. Campbell Lawrence Casner Howard T. Tellepsen Wink A. Davis M. A. Honnell Harry L. Baker, Jr. F. E. deGolian A. Richard Stirni Udo O. Thran Julian T. Woodbury J. J. McLendon, Jr. O. S. Willingham John F. Paterson C. A. Short, Jr. Robert Wardle, Jr. 1935 G. M. Anderson Robert L. Bell Cyril D. Stapleton R. J. Thompson Sam Zimmerman, J r . Harrison W. Bray F. A. L. Holloway C. W. Schobourg S. A. Tull Robert C. Eley, Jr. William J. Ellison, Jr. James D. Mann Sam V. Mason 1936 Charles N. Dannals. Jr. Larry D. Montaque R. A. Siegel, Jr. L. Allen Morris W. A. McCree, Jr. Lloyd W. Jackson E. H. Camp J. W. Keith 1937 George E. Bevis Lawrence C. Hays, Jr. Max Kuniansky J. M. Reynolds, Jr. John H. Williams Thomas E. Yandre H. D. Emmert, Jr. George E. Hightower William H. Ratcliff, Jr. Garland Wilson, Jr. Archie E. Goode G. R. Bethume, Jr. Charles R. Simons Ed R. Granberry Edgar A. Poe 1938 Alfred Bernard Frank de Peterse R. E. Rayle, Jr. Ernest Rees, Jr. Willis E. Banks Hugh D. Morgan, Jr. Ben T. Jones Nat C. Harrison, Jr. W. C. Northen James M. Feagle B. D. Zakheim Robert H. Ferst William A. Peavy, Jr. Leland J. Culp W. A. Snellgrove, Jr. John S. Frye 1939 Ed R. Flynt Richard L. Hearn Jack T. Henley William W. Keith H. C. Tilford, Jr. Maj. James E. McKinney Charles L. Belcher, Jr. Max Borges, Jr. A. J. Hill, Jr. Rufus L. Hutto Glenn H. Peavy J. E. Teaford Frank A. Walker Lawton D. Geiger J. Ed Miller, Jr. 1940 Lee A. Sherouse W. Roane Beard Howard Ector Hal Curtis Felsher C. D. Flannigen Paul C. Rhyne, Jr. Alex C. Ormond Ralph W. Pries Robert A. Carl Harry F. Jenkins John S. Montaldo Paul A. Oquendo R. H. Crossfleld Morris V. Geldens A. R. Roach Sam F. Padgett Harold A. Dye Gordon B. Massengale Albert R. Morgan, Jr. Walter H. Zeigler en next

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T H E GEORGIA T E C H

Roll Call Contributors (Continued 1941

J. Clinton Bagwell, Jr. Frank M. Burt Madison F. Cole Warren C. Gregory William J. Hicklin, Jr. A. Thornton Kennedy J. Edwin Kerr James H. Voyles, Jr. Robert Weatherford, Jr. J. L. Meeks Harold K. Couch J. Ross Hanahan Maj. John F. Wear Norman W. Moss Leland O'Callaghan. Jr. Alfred T. Stevens Lewis V. Coursen George H. Graham W. E. Marshall, Jr. 1942 Grover C. Taylor M. A. Emmons, Jr. Eugene M. Ranson, Jr. Carl A. Roessler Charles F. Almand H. M. Fox Walter E. Helin John F. Kneisel B. F. Bottenfield Henry O. Ward, Jr. Hiram M. Hicks John H. Leudemann H. Reese Ivey Robert L. Rod David E. Willis Marvin L. Hughs Sidney A. Gayle C. M. Neuner George P. Guill B. S. Daniel Lloyd J. Fisher, Jr. Richard E. Prince, Jr. J. W. Fogle, Jr. A. M. Bradbury 1943 Robert Barouch Alvin M. Ferst, Jr. Ed E. Francisco, Jr. Harry E. Murray John C. Roesel John E. Schott Robert L. Brannon, Jr. Robert W. Ashe Robert H. Johns R. C. Elder William D. Tucker

from preceding

ALUMNUS

January-February,

1948

1922 Quartet at Home Coming

page)

J. W. Meadors, Jr. Eugene H. Farris Harold I. Castagnetta, Jr. Andrew Duus, Jr. Walter A. Reiser, Jr. John Coery K. R. Hall John F. Richenaker W. R. Mountcastle 1944 Leonard C. Ethien Lelord R. Mabry Russell I. Traver Earnest R. Allen Ino G. Weiske Roy L. Cash John E. Gross Roy D. Landsberg 1945 George F. Smith, Jr. Ben F. Avery, Jr. Marvin A. Evenchick Frank M. Tuttle Donald E. Abell Edwin L. Barnes 1946 W. E. Ruldolph Philip L. Scarff, Jr. Richard N. Smith, Jr. Robert Stevens John W. Wallace James M. Spain, Jr. William D. Clark R. H. Bradshaw 1947 Cadet Howard Callaway W. Wright Lee Forrest A. Morgan Jack L. Redlern Edwin H. Smith Donald J. Deiters Joe E. Floyd Hubert W. Gehring James R. Hall Doyle Johnson Lee C. Bowden Lloyd E. Paschal, Jr. Marion B. Blackwell James E. Collins James E. Foltz 1948 Carl C. Neidlinger Oliver F. Midgette Friends Leslie F. Zsuffa Arthur I. Harris

"President Van Leer Rang the Bell" Instead of expressing our somewhat biased opinion on a subject that is vital not only to Georgia Tech but to many other universities and colleges throughout the nation, we think more can be accomplished, occasionally, by publishing the views of others; and so, we are pleased to have the privilege of publishing, in full, an article in Ed. Danforth's column that appeared in the Sunday, December 28, 1947, edition of the Atlanta Journal, in which President Van Leer of Georgia Tech was quoted, in part, as follows: "Col. Blake Van Leer, president of Georgia Tech, startled the intercollegiate athletic world out of its holiday vacuum when he declared the twin evils of football were not recruiting and subsidizing, but college presidents and faculties. "His forthright discourse was carried by the press services all over the nation. College presidents may have squirmed and coaches shivered, but sports editors enjoyed it. Those who try to express the reaction of the public on subjects in their field applauded the frank statement of Tech's executive head. "A sample of press comment may be taken from the column of W. N. Cox, sports editor of the Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. Cox, in his brusque style, lined up with Dr. Van Leer this way: " 'I'm siding up with Dr. Van Leer. Fact is, at last, a qualified voice has been heard to express my cock-eyed calculations on the same problem years ago. " 'The colleges of this country can control football. They can correct the "evils," if any.

The four young men shown above had not sung together since 1 9 2 2 . You should have heard them go at Home Coming as they sang some of the songs of days gone by; and without missing a word or cue. Left to right they are: Oosterhoudt, Kinney, Dupre, and Stokes, real men of music.

" 'The colleges can do the job simply by demanding that the football players qualify term after term as students honestly interested in their work. That's all. The colleges need not occupy their valuable time with policing the football players as to pay and so-called scholarships received on a basis of their football playing talent. " 'Dr. Van Leer has served up a jolter. In fact it is a simple equation easily understood. Instead of the NCAA "purity code" and assorted "Who Struck John?" the colleges would rule with an iron hand on scholastic standing and presto the light. There never will be a way to keep the alumni from financing football players and other athletes. Therefore, if the scholastic standard is met, actually it doesn't amount to a great deal whether the alumni finance Rapid Richard, the galloping ghost, at a rate of $1,000 per game or at a rate of one meal ticket at the boarding house per week or not at all. " 'My hunch is that Dr. Van Leer is playing a sure thing with his team, Georgia Tech. I should be willing to give you odds that each Georgia Tech football player is filling the terms of Tech's high scholastic standard to the letter. I'll give bigger odds, my dog against any alley cat you can find, that Dr. Van Leer knows this precisely and that he is prepared to fight to the finish against any and all Tom fool schemes that, instead of reflecting against the players and the alumni, actually would reflect against the scholasitc integrity of Georgia Tech.' "Now, the NCAA, which meets in New York early next month to take up their 'purity code,' is merely a standardizing body and has no police power. It also has nothing to do with scholastic requirements. Yet, Dr. Van Leer's pronouncement is so sound that it may put this recruiting and subsidizing business in the proper perspective." (EDITOR'S NOTE: The foregoing article was published on December 28, 1947, as stated in the opening paragraph.)


January-February,

1948

13

THE GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

Weddings and Engagements

Births

ALLISON-BURNS Dr. and Mrs. John Herman Allison of Augusta, Ga., announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Rosalind Allison, to William Hight Burns, of Atlanta. Mr. Burns is employed by the Ford Motor Company in Atlanta. He graduated from Georgia Tech in March, 1947, with a B.S. degree in Industrial Management. BENNETT-PEDRICK Mr. and Mrs. E. Kontz Bennett of Waycross, Ga., announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Dale Bennett, to Larry Esteen Pedrick, Jr., of Waycross. The wedding has been planned for June. Mr. Pedrick received his degree in Industrial Engineering from Georgia Tech, where he was a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity. He is now associated with the Buckeye Cotton Oil Company in Atlanta.

BROYLES Mr. and Mrs. F r a n k Broyles announce the birth of a son, in Waco, Texas. Mr. Broyles attended Georgia Tech with the class of 1947 and was quarterback on the football team. He served as backfield coach for Bob Woodruff at Baylor, last season. CANNON Mr. and Mrs. J a y Lee Cannon, Jr., of Houston, Texas, announce the birth of a son, J a y Lee Cannon III, on November 26, 1947. Mr. Cannon received his B.S. degree in General Science from Georgia Tech in 1935 and is now associated with the Chamber of Commerce in Houston. DANIEL Mr. and Mrs. Albert G. Daniel announce the birth of a daughter, Ethelyn Dyar, on December 9, 1947. Mr. Daniel attended Georgia Tech with the class of 1940. HAWKINS Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Hawkins, Jr., of West Palm Beach, Fla., announce the birth of a daughter, Susan Marie, on December 25, 1947, at St. Mary's Hospital in West Palm Beach. Mr. Hawkins graduated from Georgia Tech in 1925 with a B.S. degree in Commerce. HENDRICKS Mr. and Mrs. James T. Hendricks, of Gilbertsville, Ky., announce the birth of a daughter, Janelle Blye, on December 22, 1947. Mr. Hendricks graduated from Georgia Tech with the class of 1935 with a B.S. in Civil Engineering. He is now associated with T. V. A. YATES Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Yates announce the birth of a son, Charles Richardson, Jr., on J a n u a r y 12, 1948, at Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta. Mr. Yates graduated from Georgia Tech with a B.S. degree in General Science, in 1935. He is Treasurer of your Alumni Association, and is now associated in business with Joshua L. Bailey & Co., Atlanta. WILSON Mr. and Mrs. F r a n k B. Wilson announce the birth of a daughter, Nancy Louise, on December 28 at Crawford Long Hospital, Atlanta. Mr. Wilson received his degree in Commerce from Georgia Tech in 1932. He is Purchasing Agent for Georgia Tech. GREENE Mr. and Mrs. Ken Greene announce the birth of a daughter, Linda Ruth, on J a n u a r y 4, 1948. Mr. Greene graduated from Georgia Tech with the class of December, 1946, and is now living in St. Albans, W. Va. MURRAY Dr. and Mrs. Sam D. Murray announce the birth of a son, Sam, Jr., on J a n u a r y 8, 1948, at Emory University Hospital. Dr. M u r r a y graduated from Georgia Tech in 1927 and, since his return from service, is located in Atlanta.

DAKE-JORDAN Mr. and Mrs. Lanius T. Dake, of Austell, Georgia, announce the engagement of their daughter, Nelle, to Mr. Jack P. Jordan, class of 1943, the marriage to be solemnized on February 14, 1948, at Glenn Memorial Chapel, Atlanta, Georgia. ETHERIDGE-SUMMERS Announcement is made of the marriage of Miss Jessie Brown Etheridge to Carl Summers, Jr., of Opelika, Ala., on December 27, 1947, at 7:30 P.M., at the North Avenue Presbyterian Church, in Atlanta. Mr. Summers graduated from Georgia Tech in 1947 with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. He is now with International Harvester Company in New Orleans. HAIGLER FOWLER The Decatur First Methodist Church, Decatur, Ga., will be t h e scene of the marriage on February 7, 1948, of Miss Sallye Haigler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Haigler, Jr., and Carl Campbell Fowler, Jr., also of Decatur. Following his discharge from the Army, Mr. Fowler returned to Georgia Tech where he graduated with a degree in electrical engineering. At present he is associated with the Tennessee Valley Authority in Knoxville. HAYTER-DANIEL Mr. and Mrs. John Thompson Hayter, of Abingdon, Va., announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Nancy Ward Hayter, to the Rev. Eugene Lewis Daniel, of Atlanta, on December 27, 1947, at the Abingdon First Presbyterian Church. Rev. Daniel graduated from Georgia Tech in 1933 with a B.S. degree in Commerce. The couple is under appointment by the Presbyterian Church as missionaries to Korea. They plan to go to Korea in the summer and they are, at present, studying the Korean language at Yale University. LeCRAW-RAND Mr. and Mrs. John Walter LeCraw announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Joyce LeCraw, to Edgar O'Connor Rand. The wedding was an important event of December. Mr. Rand received the degree of Bachelor of Aeronautical Engineering from Georgia Tech in June, 1947. He is now connected with Fleming-Rand enterprises. LUCAS -HARRINGTON Mr. and Mrs. James Herty Lucas announce the marriage of their daughter, Miss Virginia Lillian Lucas, to Roger Darden Harrington, of Jackson, Miss., on December 26, 1947, at All Saints Episcopal Church, in Atlanta. Mr. Harrington served in the Army Air Forces during the war and is now attending Georgia Tech.

MARTIN-BEARD Mrs. Annie M. Martin announces the engagement of her daughter, Miss Mary Virginia Martin, to Paul Eugene Beard, Jr., the marriage to take place J a n u a r y 31, at the Cathedral of St. Philip, in Atlanta. Mr. Beard was in the Army Air Forces for 38 months. Upon his discharge, he attended Georgia Tech, where he (Continued on next page)


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T H E GEORGIA T E C H

ALUMNUS

January-February,

1948

Deaths BARRETT Clarence Neal Barrett, formerly of Atlanta, died recently at his home in Dallas, Texas. Mr. Barrett' graduated from Georgia Tech in 1928 with a B.S. degree in Commerce. He is survived by his wife, the former Miss Ruth Madden, of Atlanta; two daughters, Betty Barrett and Ruth Barrett, of Dallas; a sister, Mrs. El McCarley, a brother, Julian N. Barrett, of Atlanta; and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Barrett, of Dallas. BUCHANAN Corliss Buchanan, president of Buchanan & Sons Oil Terminal, Chattanooga, Tenn., died in a local hospital early on the morning of December 11, 1947, from a heart attack. Mr. Buchanan attended Georgia Tech with the class of 1912. He was in Atlanta for Homecoming Day, September 27, and for the reunion of the 1909 football squad. A native of Chattanooga, Mr. Buchanan and his family resided in Athens, Tenn., 14 years, during which time he was consignee for the Texas Oil Company in a six-county district. He sold his holdings in Athens several months ago to give full time in direction of the terminal. Mr. Buchanan was the son of the late Judson and Angie Coffee Buchanan. He took an active interest in civic affairs and the Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, two sons, Judson and Corliss Buchanan, Jr., and three grandchildren, all of Chattanooga. Funeral services were held at the Buchanan home, 710 Wilder Drive, Signal Mountain. FITZSIMONS A. Foster FitzSimons, of 89 East P a r k Lane, N. E., Atlanta, prominent in insurance circles, died December 9, 1947, following a lengthy illness. Mr. FitzSimons was born in Atlanta but had also lived in New York, Chicago, and Europe, before returning to Atlanta 30 years ago. He was connected with various insurance companies for 35 years and was special agent for the Pearl Assurance Company Limited, for the past six years. He attended Georgia Tech with the class of 1909 and was a member of the Chi Phi Fraternity. A member of St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Mr. FitzSimons was also a member of the American Legion and the Kiwanis Club. An ardent fisherman, he spent his vacations at St. Marks, Fla., where he and several other Atlanta business men owned a lodge. Survivors are his wife; two sons, Foster FitzSimons, professor at the University of North Carolina, and James Middleton FitzSimons, B.S. '37, Atlanta insurance man. GRIFFIN Mr. Carroll Griffin, President of Griffin Construction Company and builder of many of Atlanta's landmarks, died J a n u a r y 15, 1948, at his residence, 34 Muscogee Ave., N. W., following an illness of three months. Funeral services were held in West View Cemetery, Atlanta. Mr. Griffin, a life-long resident of Atlanta, attended Georgia Tech with the class of 1914. Responsible for much of Atlanta's skyline, Mr. Griffin built the Ten Pryor Street Building, the Volunteer Building, a Georgia Tech dormitory, the Capital City Country Club, the Coca-Cola Bottling plant, the Jewish Temple, the First Baptist Church, the East Atlanta Christian Church, and the Cathedral of Christ the King. He also was contractor for the construction at Lawson General Hospital; Cochran Field, Macon; Warner Robins Field, Macon; Naval

Air Station, St. Simons, and the Naval Air Station, Brunswick. He was a steward at St. Marks Methodist Church. He also was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, the Capital City Club and Past President of the Georgia Chapter of Association of General Contractors of America. Surviving are his wife, the former Kathleen Holder; a daughter, Mrs. Paul W. Pate, of Atlanta; his mother, Mrs. W. W. Griffin, of Monroe; a sister, Mrs. E. S. Summer, of Monroe; three brothers, Norwood and Matt Griffin, both of Atlanta, and Will W. Griffin, of Knoxville, Tenn.; several nieces and nephews. He was the son-in-law of former State Highway Board Chairman John N. Holder, of Jefferson. KENDRICK John Thomas Kendrick, Jr., of Athens, was killed Friday, January 16th, in an automobile accident on the highway between Athens and Monroe. He formerly resided in Atlanta. Mr. Kendrick was a graduate of Georgia Tech and a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon. He served three years with the Army Air Forces during World War II. About three years ago he moved to Athens. Surviving are his wife and a son, John T. Kendrick III, of Athens; father, John T. Kendrick, Sr., of Atlanta; mother, Mrs. W. R. Calverley, Atlanta; sister, Mrs. Olin Puckett, Jr., of Marietta; and a brother, W. R. Kendrick, of Waco, Texas. MURPHY Mr. Tarver S. "Pat" Murphy, 1901, former Georgia Tech baseball star of 1899, 1900, and 1901, active and prominent alumnus, passed away at his home in Swainsboro, Georgia, on J a n u a r y first, 1948. Although ill at the time, he was determined to see Georgia Tech and Georgia play at least one more game, and his wishes were fulfilled, as he was brought to Atlanta and saw the Jackets defeat a good Georgia team 7-0 on Grant Field, November 29. Mr. Murphy was an outstanding civic leader and had the pleasure of seeing his son, Tarver S. "Pat" Murphy, Jr., graduate from Georgia Tech with a B.S. degree in E.E., 1932. Mr. Murphy is survived by his wife and the following children: his son, as mentioned; daughters, Mrs. L. H. Cone, and Miss Isabel Murphy and another son, William R. Murphy.

Weddings and Engagements (Continued from preceding page) pledged Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He is now a manufacturer's representative in the Southeast. RAINE-DANNALS Mr. and Mrs. George B. Raine announce the betrothal of their daughter, Miss Mary Frances Raine, to Charles Dannals, Jr., the ceremony to be performed at 8:30 P.M., J a n u a r y 27, at the First Presbyterian Church in Atlanta. Mr. Dannals attended Georgia Tech with the class of 1936, and is now in business in Atlanta. RUNNELS-HUNGERFORD Mr. and Mrs. John Atkins Runnels announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Katherine McCrary Runnels, to Ernest Timmons Hungerford. The date and plans for the marriage will be announced later. Mr. Hungerford received his B.S. degree in Physics in 1943 from Georgia Tech.


January-February,

1948

T H E GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

15

Portrait of Former Coach, John W. Heisman

C O N T R I B U T I O N S BEING M A D E FOR H E I S M A N PORTRAIT All old-timers of the 1 9 0 4 - 1 9 1 9 era who would contribute toward the Heisman Portrait are requested to mail their checks to the Heisman Fund, care of George C. Griffin, Dean of Students, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, Ga. $ 2 0 0 . 0 0 is needed to complete payment on the portrait. This portrait will be presented to Georgia Tech at an early date. It will be displayed in the Georgia Tech Athletic Association Building. The portrait was painted by M r . Lewis C. Gregg of Atlanta. The following old-timers have contributed: C. D. " D u m m y " LeBey, A . R. " B u c k " Flowers, C. P. " R o y " Goree, E. C. " P a t " Patterson, Oscar G. Davis, J . J . " J a c k " McDonough, Julian Hightower, A l Slafon, Frank Freeman, Frank Ferst, Chip Robert, W . G. " P u g " Bryant, Geo. Butler, Ralph Pucket, Red Barron, E. D. Hill, Henry Collier, Frank Pruitt, Craig Day, Joe Pitts, R. G. Malone, M . S. Hill, Wooch Fielder, Ed Lafitte, Paul Beard, Everett Strupper, R. Irwin, Judy Harlan, Pinky Black, Charlie Turner, Cantey Alexander, Ham Dowling, Robert Gregg, Skinny Borum, E. E. Elmer, Jim Senter, Stewart Colley, G. M . " P u p " Phillips, Bob Glover, A . C. Knight, A . D. Black, Si Bell, Geo. " H i p " West, Ben Sinclair, Bob Lang, W . K. Jenkins, W . A . Alexander, R. J . " J a c k " Thiesen, Geo. C. Griffin, T . B. " D a d d y " Amis, J . K. " J i m " Luck, Jim Davenport, E. K. Thomason, Jack Spalding, Dewey Scarboro, A l Loeb. The Alumni and Athletic Associations also have contributed.

1948 Football Schedule Date Opponent To be Played in Sept. 25 Vanderbilt Nashville Oct. 2 Tulane Atlanta Oct. 9 Washington & Lee Atlanta Oct. 16 Auburn Atlanta Oct. 23 Florida Atlanta Oct. 30 Duke Durham Nov. 6 Tennessee Atlanta Nov. 13 Alabama Atlanta Nov. 20 Citadel Atlanta Nov. 27 Georgia Athens The Home Coming game will be selected at an early date and will be announced in the March-April issue of the Georgia Tech ALUMNUS. All alumni interested in attend ing next year's games are urged to keep the Athletic Association and Alumni Office informed of their correct addresses so that football ticket notices will reach you in ample time to get your orders in.


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T H E GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

January-February,

1948

Alumni Mentions R. P. Williams, Jr., is manager of the Washington office 1912 Thomas D. Guinn, E.E., is a Captain in the U. S. Navy and of the Rheem Manufacturing Co. 1932 lives in Coronado, Calif. Garnett J. Giesler, former Lt. Col., is facilities officer for Robert E. Hightower is president of the Thomaston Mills, the Veterans Administration in Atlanta. Thomaston, Georgia. 1913 William J. Watson saw four years' service in the Navy William K. Jenkins, president of the Georgia Theater and was released with the rank of Lt. Comdr. He is now Co., has been awarded a certificate of distinguished industrial relations officer with the Naval Air Station at achievement for his accomplishments during the two years Moffett Field, Calif. he served as chairman of the Georgia chapter, National Ira K. Weil, former 1st Lt., Signal Corps, is a partner in Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. Weil's Antique Shop, Montgomery, Ala. 1914 1933 Jack R. Belsinger is general manager of the Belsinger William P. Stevens is president of the Atlantic RefracContainer Corp., Atlanta. He served as a Lt. Comdr., tories Co., Macon, Ga. U.S.N.R. 1918 M. Graham Clark, Jr., is vice-president of The School of Henry W. Grady, M.E., is vice-president of the Robinsonthe Ozarks, Pt. Lookout, Mo. Humphrey Co., Atlanta, Ga. Charles L. Schultz, released from service with the rank Sidney J. Stubbs, C.E., is president of the S. J. Stubbs of Major after 67 months of active duty, is now operating Lumber Co., Deland, Fla. manager for General Electric Supply Co., San Antonio, 1920 James M. Robinson, E.E., Artillery Lieutenant in World Texas. Leonard M. Thompson, T.E., is production manager for War I, is president of the Robinson Welding Supply Co., Dan River Mills, Inc., Danville, Va. Detroit, Mich. 1934 1921 John H. Hitchins, former Lt. Col., Ordnance, is president Edmund M. Eastman, C.E., is vice-president of the Beers of the De-Journette Mfg. Co., Atlanta. Construction Co., Atlanta, Ga. Major Robert A. Van Houten is with the U.S. Army at 1922 Albert H. Staton, former Lt. Col., USAAF, is manager Milledgeville, Ga. Lawrence W. "Chip" Robert HI is regional manager, NaIndustrial de Gaseosas, S. A., Medellin, ant., Columbia. Devereaux D. Rice, president of the Southern Mica Co., tional Sales Division, The Coca-Cola Co., Atlanta. He Johnson City, Tenn., was elected District Governor of Ro- served as Major in a Parachute Infantry Regiment. tary International, at the 1947 Rotary Convention held at 1935 San Francisco. Frank H. Baker, Jr., was discharged as a Lt. Col. after 1923 serving five years. He is now Ga. district manager, KelCharles Fleetwood has been promoted to vice-president vinator Division, Nash-Kelvinator Sales Corp., Atlanta. Henry M. Dozier is Captain, Flight Operations Dept., in charge of Mortgage Loan and Real Estate Department, with the Prudential Insurance Company of America, New- United Air Lines, Chicago, 111. ark, New Jersey. Reuben I. Gunnell, M.E., was a Comdr., U.S.N.R. At 1925 present he is an engineer with Yancey Bros., in Atlanta. John P. Harrison, T.E., is vice-president and general Harold F. Jackson, Assistant sales manager with A. & P . manager of the Commander Mills, Inc., Sand Springs, Okla. Tea Co. in Atlanta, recently received his B.C.S. from the Phil B. Narmore served as a Naval Lt. in World War II, Georgia Evening College. He received the Faculty Award, given to the member of the Senior Class who has been the and is now Executive Dean at Georgia Tech. most co-operative. 1926 Col. Wm. E. Green, who served with the General Staff Charles L. Smith, Jr., president of Smith-Bittenbring Corps, is cashier for the Travelers Insurance Co., Atlanta, Inc., Cedartown, Ga., served as a Lt. Comdr., U.S.N.R. Ga. Richard B. Wiley, Jr., former Lt. Col., Corp of Engineers, Carlos H. Home, vice-president of the Alabama Gas Co., is assistant manager of Belcher Industries, Inc., Miami, Birmingham, Ala., received his degree in General Engi- Fla. 1936 neering. 1928 Albert N. Bray is service engineer for the South Atlantic Rufus H. Carswell, former Lt. Cmdr. in U. S. Naval Gas Co., Savannah, Ga. He was released from service as a Aviation, is now secretary-treasurer of the Thomas-Cars- Lt. Col., Ordnance Corps. well Co., Atlanta, Ga. Thomas J. Flynn, former Captain, S.H.A.E.F. is a sales 1929 engineer in Jacksonville, Fla. Alvin A. Hero, former Commander, U.S.N.R., is a p a r t Robert E. Hammond, former Lt. Col., is Chief of Adminner in the Comfortair Co., New Orleans, La. istrative Division of the Atlanta Regional Office, Veterans John H. Home, who served at Lt. Col., Ordnance, is Administration. assistant plant engineer at the new Ford assembly plant in Harry P. Kupiec, design engineer for Air Associates, Inc., Atlanta. has also been made vice-president of the Scranton Tucker 1930 Distributors, Inc. Mr. Kupiec designed the Servo-matic Sidney Goldin, Ch.E., was recently appointed manager of Gear Shifting System used in the new Tucker. the Asphalt Sales Dept., Shell Oil Co., New York City. 1937 He served at Lt. Comdr., U.S.N.R. David C. Boy, Jr., who served as a Lt. Col. in the Air 1931 Corps, is Director of Training, Riverside Division, Dan Henry W. Persons, E.E., spent four years in the army. At present, he is secretary and treasurer for Randall River Mills, Inc., Danville, Va. Brothers, Inc., Atlanta. {Continued on next page)


January-February,

1948

T H E GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

17

J. Warner Morgan, who served in the Navy, is associated with Toombs & Creighton, Architects, in Atlanta. Bernard M. Schmitter, former Lt. Col., Ordnance, is asDawsie L. Echols, former Major, AAF, is secretary-treassistant Supt. on Const, with the Turner Const. Co., New u r e r for the Matthews Eng. Co., Dallas, Texas. Sidney B. Ehrlich recently organized a firm to provide York City. Charles A. Sherrod, chief test engineer with the Norge technical research and engineering services for Southern Div., Borg-Warner Corp., Chattanooga, Tenn., served with industry. The firm is located in Atlanta. Rafael M. Mendez, Jr., former Ordnance Major, is a the U.S. Army. partner in the firm of O'Kelly & Mendez, San Juan, P. R. 1942 Earle Gillespie Caldwell, who spent three years in the Fred B. Ragland is Director, Bureau of Finance, Florida State Board of Health, Jacksonville, Fla. He served as Navy in the Pacific, is personnel & construction supervisor in Atlanta. Major, AAF. Ira E. Campbell, Jr., is a partner in Campbell Sales Co., Cecil F. Smith, Jr., salseman for C. W. Farmer Co., MaAtlanta. He served as Lt. in the Navy. con, Ga., spent two years in the European Theatre. Charles C. Courtney, Jr., served in the Corps of EngiSamuel R. Young, Asst. Dist. Airport Engineer, Civil Aeronautics Adm., Montgomery, Ala., was a Lt. Col. in the neers. At present, he is president of the Decatur Eng. Co., Decatur, Ga. AAF. 1938 Charles Czegledi served as Lt. in the Navy and now lives James W. Atkins, Jr., former Lt. Col. in the Engineers, is in Paulsboro, N. J. Benjamin S. Daniel, former Lt. USNR, is a chemist with an electrical engineer with Gulf States Utilities Co., Beauthe Lanett Bleachery and Dye Works, West Point, Ga. mont, Tex. 1939 David W. Doughty is an engineer for the Link-Belt Co. James L. Brooks, Jr., former Naval officer, is president in Atlanta. He spent 4% years in the army. Robert E. Garst, who served in the AAF, is an engineer of Brooks Const. Co., Inc., Atlanta. Benjamin S. Goodwin is an engineer at Aberdeen P r o v - with E. E. Garst in Louisville, Ky. ing Ground, Md. He was a Lt. Col. Ordnance Dept. Harold T. Gaymon, former Captain, Ordnance Dept., is Vardry D. Ramseur, Jr., former Capt. AAF., is a partner an estimating Engineer for the Worthington Pump & Machinery Corp., Atlanta. in V. D. Ramseur & Sons, Greenville, S. C. Robert P. Hermes, sales engineer with the James E. DeWerner F. Ziegler, one of seven brothers who have attended Tech, is assistant superintendent, Swift Manufac- gan Co., Detroit, Mich., served with the combat engineers. turing Co., Columbus. His brother Frank is fullback on Marion T. Lewis, former Naval flyer, is owner and manthe football team this year. ager of Hearn and Lewis in Atlanta. 1940 William H. Northup served in submarines and is now an Robert E. Carpenter is a salesman at Jacksonville, Fla. engineer with the Florida Pulp & Paper Co., Pensacola, Fla. He is former commanding officer of the U.S.S. Tracy. Edward P. Oliver, former Lt., USNR, is a research aeroGordon B. Cauble is a Lt. Col., Signal Corps, and is attending the Harvard Graduate School of Business Admin- dynamicist, Aerophysics Lab., North American Aviation Co., Los Angeles, Calif. istration, Cambridge, Mass. Gabriel J. Picozzi, who served in the Navy, is asst. plant Major Ernest W. Chapman, now in the regular army, is manager for the N. J. Machine Co., Hoboken, N. J. attending the '47-'48 course at the Command and General Staff College, Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas. Clyde P. Schlesinger, Jr., former Capt. AAF, is asst. technical director, Gilman Paint and Varnish Company, ChatThomas C. Clodfelter, Jr., former AAF pilot, is owner of tanooga, Tenn. a service station and garage in Macon, Ga. Kurt E. Shuler, who served in Intelligence during the Ben G. Cole, who was a Major, AAF., is doing Chemical war, is a graduate student at Catholic University in WashResearch for American Enka Corp., Enka, N. C. Paul H. Decker, Jr., is associated with Carter Bldg. & ington, D. C. 1943 Supply Co., Laurel, Miss. He was a Lt. USNR. Harris M. Carter, Jr., is in the process design division, Jarrell R. Dunson, former Marine, is marketing service Cal. Research Corp., and lives in Jackson, Miss. He served representative for Shell Oil Co., Inc., Jacksonville, Fla. George H. Holladay, Jr., former Lt. Comdr., USNR, is two years in the A.U.S., Manhattan District, Corps of secretary and treasurer for the Alpine Corporation, Chi- Engineers. cago, 111. Donald F. Clow, who spent two years in the Navy, is in J. Turner Jones is president of the Turner Jones Co., Inc., the industrial engineering department, Mica Insulator Company, Schenectady, N. Y. New York City. David A. Crosby, I.M., is purchasing agent NAPA, New Robert L. Ison served in submarines and now lives in Orleans, La. Atlanta. 1941 Howard G. Dean, former army Lt., is a War Department Richard G. Burton, former Lt. USNR, is designing drafts- Civil Service employee in Manila, P. I. Andreas Duus, Jr., industrial engineer with the Indusman for the Pennsylvania Water & Power Co., Baltimore, trial Tape Corp. in New Brunswick, N. J., was an AAF Md. Robert P. Cochran, Jr., is in the Research and Develop- pilot during the war. Marvel A. Elliott, E.E., is an engineer with the General ment Dept., Dixie Mercerizing Co., Chattanooga, Tenn. He Electric Co., Erie, Pa. served as Major, QMC. Curtis T. Ewing, former Naval Lt., is a chemist with the Osborne J. Dykes, Jr., former Lt. Comdr., USNR, is presiNaval Research Lab., Washington, D. C. dent of the Dykes Co., Inc., Shreveport, La. Andy P. Felton, secretary and asst. manager with S u m Bennett M. Fultz, who served in the Navy and on the Oak Ridge Project, is manager of the Houston Seed Co., ner's, Inc., was a Captain with the Corps of Engineers. Birmingham, Ala. Edward E. Francisco, Jr., is assistant senior project engiJerome M. Hoffer, Jr., is manager of the Hoffer Flying neer, Reaction Motors, Inc., Dover, New Jersey. He was a L t , USNR. (Continued on next page) Service, Camden, S. C.

Alumni Mentions —cont'd


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T H E GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

January-February,

1948

Georgia Tech Apartment Named for Coach "Mack" Tharpe, '27 Mercer McCall "Mack" Tharpe, football player and coach, 1927 graduate of Georgia Tech, business executive, and naval officer, who gave his life for his country in World War II, was honored on Thursday noon, January 15, with the unveiling of a beautiful bronze plaque placed on one of the Georgia Tech apartment buildings at Tenth and Holly Streets, named in his memory. The plaque, which shows Commander Tharpe in naval uniform, was designed and executed by Julian H. Harris, a schoolmate of the hero and one of the South's foremost sculptors. Pres. Van Leer Opens Ceremonies Colonel Blake R. Van Leer, President of Georgia Tech, opened the ceremonies and introduced the various speakers, including Ed Danforth, sports editor of The Atlanta J o u r nal; Mr. Joe Westbrook, president of the Georgia Tech National Alumni Association; Captain J. W. Adams, U. S. Navy, commandant of the Georgia Tech NROTC, who read a citation written by Mr. Ralph McGill, editor of The Atlanta Constitution, and Dr. Phil B. Narmore, executive dean of Ga. Tech. Commander Tharpe was born July 12, 1903, at Buena Vista, Georgia. His parents are Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Tharpe of Moultrie, Georgia. "Mack" played football at Georgia Tech 1924-26, and graduated in the spring of 1927 with a B.S. degree in Commerce. While attending Georgia Tech, he became a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, and was selected a member of Anak, when it was the sole senior society on the campus, and of Koseme, the junior society, and was also elected to the Bulldog Club. All-Southern Tackle "Mack" started out on the scrub team and ended up as an All-Southern tackle. He was a line coach at Georgia Tech and the junior partner in one of Atlanta's leading insurance firms. He coached at Georgia Tech because he loved the game of football and on account of his loyalty to the school. He gave time that often could be ill spared from his business. In business, "Mack" built his founda-

Alumni Mentions — cont'd David L. Friedman, former Lt., USNR, is an industrial engineer in McKeesport, Pa. Jervis J. Gennari is an acoustic engineer with R.C.A. in Camden, N. J. He served as Lt., USNR. Robert A. Hall, former combat infantryman, is unit buying control supervisor, Sears, Roebuck, & Co., Richmond, Va. 1944 Moses Cenker, Chem., is a research fellow, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, Ind. Cleveland W. Cochran, who served in the Navy, is an engineer with Tennessee Eastman Corp., Kingsport, Tenn. Thomas V. Cooney, former Ensign, USNR, is an aeronautical engineer at Langley Field, Virginia. Otto E. Fry, who served in the Navy, is assistant section leader in chemistry and metallurgical research at Los Alamos, N. Mex. Charles E. Littlejohn, power plant engineer, A. & R., NAS, Jacksonville, Fla., was an Ensign, USNR. John R. Paus, former Lt., USNR, is a marine engineer at Larchmont, N. Y. 1945 Harry E. DiChristina, Jr., who served in the Navy, is a

T H I S BRONZE PLAQUE was placed on one of the Ga. Tech apartment buildings a t Tenth and Holly Sts. Thursday, Jan. 1 5 , in ceremonies naming the building in honor of Mercer McCall Tharpe. — Courtesy "Technique", Ga. Tech

tions on integrity and hard work. He was universally liked and respected by both his policy holders and his insurance officials. At the age of thirty-eight, he enlisted in the Navy. Civilians at thirty-eight are not allowed on flying fields. The story of how Tharpe enlisted in the Navy and the course of his career that landed him at forty-one a fullfledged Navy pilot aboard a carrier, in the Pacific, is a Navy tale that will be told for years to come. On Sunday, March 4, 1945, the word came that Lt. Commander Tharpe had been killed in action and buried at sea with full Navy honors. salesman and engineer with Race & Race, Inc., Winter Haven, Fla. Edward E. David, Jr., recently received his Masters from M.I.T. and is now working on his Ph.D. 1946 Robert D. Clarke is an Ensign on the USS Marquette. William J. Gilmore, former Ensign, is vice-president of Henderson and Gilmore, Inc., Jacksonville, Fla. William J. Wren, Jr., who served in the Navy, is control engineer for the Carrier Corp., in Atlanta. James J. Zipperer is a test engineer at Schenectady, N. Y. He served in the U.S.M.C.R. 1947 Robert F. Darby, architectural designer for Reynolds, Smith, and Hill, Jacksonville, Fla., served in the USNR. Dean E. Harriman, Jr., who received his B.S. in E.E. in 1940 and his M.S. in 1947, is a research engineer with Westinghouse Research Laboratories, E. Pittsburgh, Pa. He served five and a half years in the AAF. John A. Moody recently completed an orientation course given by the International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation, New York. This course is designed to give recent graduates an opportunity for more rapid advancement with the firm.


January-February,

1948

THE GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

19

Rhodes Memorial Trophy Awarded to Bob Davis

Bob Davis, All-America tackle, receives the Joe Rhodes Memorial Trophy. Davis was selected as the most valuable man on the squad. Presenting the trophy are Miss Francis Crawford Robinson

and James Dixon Robinson I I I , grand niece and grand nephew of " M r . Joe" Rhodes, while Bob's father, M r . Robert Thomas Davis, looks on.

Davis Makes All-America

Alumni Honored By Atlanta Touchdown Club

Bob Davis, Tech's giant tackle, has made every All-American team published to date, which includes AP, Colliers, INS, Saturday Evening Post, Look, Quarterback, etc. Bob hails from Columbus, Ga. Only 20 years old, he tips the scales at about 225 and is 6 feet 4 inches tall. He has been a standout at Tech in all phases of activities, making ANAK, ODK, President of Chi Phi Fraternity, Cadet Colonel of the Army ROTC Unit. He has been an excellent student during his stay and Georgia Tech is mighty proud of him.

Varsity Men Make All-Sec Eleven Bob Davis, tackle, and Captain Bill Healy, guard, made the 1947 All-Sotheastern Conference team, selected by the Associated Press, after consultation with coaches, sports writers, and game officials. The first team was made up of Edwards (Ga.) and Poole (Miss.) ends; Davis (Tech) and Garrett (Miss. St.) tackles; Healy (Tech) and Wozniak (Ala.) guards; Rhodemyre (Ky.) center; Conerly (Miss.) Gilmer (Ala.) McWilliams (Miss. St.) and Collins (LSU) backs. George Broadnax (end), Lewis Hook (center), and Dinky Bowen (back), of Tech, made the third team.

George Gardner, '25, former Georgia Tech football player, was elected president of the Atlanta Touchdown Club for 1948. Gardner is secretary of the Southeastern Conference Officials Association. He has just resigned from active officiating after 21 years as a football official, principally as a head linesman. He is in business as a manufacturer's agent for the Louis Allen Company, with headquarters in Atlanta. Gardner succeeds Fred Moore, '24, also a former football player at Tech. P u p Phillips, '19, former Georgia Tech great and first president of the Atlanta Club, was elected one of the two vice-presidents.

Freshmen Halfbacks Honored Two halfbacks, Red Patton and Bob McCoy, of Georgia Tech, made the Atlanta Journal's All-Southeastern Conference All-Freshman Team. Both men starred in games when the chips were down. Patton and McCoy each scored a touchdown in the Navy game, which Tech won 16-14. McCoy got Tech's only score in tho Alabama game, which Tech lost, 14-7. Patton threw the touchdown pass which beat Georgia 7-0. These two yearlings turned in stellar performances whenever they were in the game and will be seen plenty in the years ahead.


20

T H E GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

Tech Sinks Navy, 16-14 In their closest contest to date, Georgia Tech eked out a victory over the Naval Academy by the close margin of two points. The game was played on a soggy field at Annapolis on November 8, 1947, and at times seemed like a replica of the 1944 (17-15) and 1946 (28-20) Tech-Navy games played in Atlanta. Both were won by Tech though it was anybody's game until the last sound of the horn. The winning of any game cannot be contributed to any one person, b u t if it could, Dinky Bowen, Tech's capable fullback, should get the credit. His field goal provided the necessary margin to win the game and his stellar play during practically the entire game did much to bring about a victory. Bowen's field goal won in 1944. Tech received the opening kickoff and, starting from their 20, moved the ball up to the 50 yard line. From here freshman Bob McCoy went off tackle and scampered the full distance for the first score. Bowen's attempted conversion was wide. Navy received and, after several exchanges, marched to a score with H o m e passing to Swofferman from the 8 to score. Navy's Wills kicked the extra point to put Tech behind for the first time this year, 7-6. Close to half time Tech advanced the ball to the Navy 11 yard line. Failing to gain, Bowen kicked a field goal which split the uprights. Tech led at the half, 9-7. In the third quarter an inspired Navy r a n and passed for their second touchdown; Gerber going over from the 8 yard line on a plunge through the center. Wills again converted, putting Navy ahead 14-9. In the fourth quarter Navy had the ball but when George Broadnax hit Swofferman of Navy, he coughed up the ball and Broadnax recovered for Tech. On second down, Red Patton took a lateral from J i m m y Southard, ran far to the right and threw back to Southard over near the left sideline who scored. Bowen kicked the extra point and, for the fifth time, the lead changed hands as Tech went ahead to win 16-14. It was a gruelling test and the Jackets came away knowing they had played a great Navy team. Navy made 14 first downs to Tech's 10, gained 164 yards rushing to Tech's 142, passed for 98 to Tech's 93. Tech's freshmen halfbacks, Patton and McCoy, came through in grand style in their first real test.

Bama Trims Tech, 14-7 On November 15, 1947, in Birmingham, the University of Alabama removed Georgia Tech from the ranks of the unbeaten by two touchdowns to one. In the first quarter, Alabama's Harry Gilmer completed five straight passes, then scored on foot from the two yard line. Morrow kicked the extra point and Alabama led 7-0. In the second quarter Bowen fumbled a punt which was recovered on Tech's 22 yard line by Alabama. Gilmer threw 13 yards to Seiner and then, after three tries at the line had failed, threw to Steiner again on fourth down to score. Again Morrow converted and Alabama led at the half, 14-0. Starting the second half a short kick and penalty gave Alabama the ball on Tech's 40 yard line. For most of the third quarter Alabama kept Tech backed up against their goal line. Tech made two stands on the goal in which their line threw back Alabama on every running attempt. Finally, in the fourth quarter, Tech marched 85 yards on a mixed running and passing attack to score. Bob McCoy circled end for the touchdown. Bowen kicked the extra point: score Ala.-14, Tech-7. Tech started moving again after a punt exchange, but were stopped short when passes failed to click. The game ended after Tech regained possession, but only had time

January-February,

1948

for one play. The feature of the game was Harry Gilmer's passing and the excellent receiving of Bama ends Steiner and Cain. Alabama observers say Gilmer played the best game of his entire career, and the Yellow Jackets will, undoubtedly, support this claim. Gilmer completed 11 of 13 passes for 122 yards and was the largest ground gainer on the field as well. Tech's passers, Still and Southard, completed 8 of 18 for 113 yards. Tech made 13 first downs to 11 for Alabama. Tech's line play was brilliant throughout the game, especially when a score was imminent.

Georgia Tech 51, Furman 0 On a muddy field, during intermittant rains, Georgia Tech ran over F u r m a n November 25th to the tune of 51-0. Tech's scores were made by end George Broadnax, quarterback Joe Brown, tackle Bob Davis, halfback Red Patton, quarterback Jack Bills, Red Patton again, fullback Morris Harrison, and fullback Buster Humphries. The first team r a n up 26 points in t h e first quarter without running into any trouble, then went to t h e showers. The second team scored 19 points in the second quarter and the second half brought out the third and fourth stringers. During the second half only one touchdown was scored. Outstanding runs were made by Bob McCoy, 36 yards; Billy Queen, 47 yards; a punt return of 59 yards by Joe Brown, a 17 yard scoring play in which Jim Nolan caught a pass and lateraled to tackle Bob Davis who went over standing up, and a touchdown r u n by Buster Humphries for 48 yards. The second half was shortened by 10 minutes and brought forth Hays McKinney, regular guard, having his try at halfback. McKinney received a big ovation when he came out of t h e game. The F u r m a n team fought hard, but it cannot be denied that their band is all that kept them in the game.

Tech 7, Georgia 0 Well, the boys won the big one; the game that makes any season a success if won, or a failure if lost. It was the hardest fought, most brilliantly played defensively, and most evenly matched game seen on Grant Field in many a day. The sound of bodily contact was plainly audible in the stands and the crowd had a feeling that this game meant as much as life itself to those who played their hearts out during 60 minutes of play on Saturday, November 29. The first half saw a Georgia team that limited Tech to 2 first downs while they were only able to get 5. Georgia completed several passes and gained some on the ground, but neither team was able to sustain any drive at all. Georgia definitely looked like the stronger team in the first half. In the third quarter Tech began to show more offensive power, working the ball into Georgia territory. However, Georgia took over and, in attempting to pass from their 17 yard line, had one intercepted by Jimmy Castleberry, Tech end, who had dropped back to defend against the pass. Castleberry ran the ball behind fast forming interference to the Georgia 13 yard line. On the first play, Petit was wide with a pass thrown down the right sideline. Patton relieved Petit and, running to his right, threw deep to his left where George Broadnax managed to get a step ahead of the Georgia defenders and make a fine catch in the end zone. The Tech crowd went wild. End Robert Jordan added the extra point. The rest of the game was a see-saw battle featuring passes by Georgia, running by Tech, penalties and fumbles by both teams, and desperate defensive play by both. (Continued on page 22)


January-February,

1948

T H E GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

21

Orange Bowl Victors

The 1 9 4 7 Georgia Tech Football Squad窶認ront Row: (left to right), Bills, Castleberry, Broadnax, Bowen, R. Jordan, McCoy, M c K i n ney. Peek, Queen, Petit, Ziegler, Hook; Second Row: Bethea, North, Patton, Bossons, Frizzell, Coleman, Bradach, Southard, Phillips (Alt. Capt.), Pope, Harrison, Flanagan, Humphreys, Mathews; Back Row: J . Jordan, Williams, Slaten, Davis, Anderson, Nolan, Glenn, C. Matthews, Busbin, Griffin, Still, Smith, Doyal, Brown, Healy (Capt.).

The Jayhawkers of Kansas had Georgia Tech rooters biting their finger nails and casting anxious glances at the clock, but an opportune fumble by Quarterback McNutt sewed up t h e game for the Jackets in one of the most thrilling finishes in Orange Bowl history, as the Techmen came out on t h e right end of a 20-14 decision in the Miami classic. Tech took the initiative during the first quarter on the strength of Billy Williams' remarkable kicking. During (the first quarter he punted out of bounds at the Kansas six with a booming 53 yard boot, out at the four with a 37 yard kick, and a 49 yard beauty to the Kansas six. A penalty put the Jayhawks on their own one, and a short kick out gave Tech its first scoring opportunity, which they promptly capitalized on with a beautiful 24 yard pass from Quarterback J i m Still to freshman Red Patton, Bowen converting. Stung into action, t h e boys from the Sunflower State lashed back after receiving the kickoff with a sixty-five yard surge on eight plays. All American Ray Evans split the middle of the powerful Tech line with a 12 yard dash for the score. A successful conversion knotted the count 7-7 with no further scoring during the half. The Engineers caught fire the second half, taking the kickoff on their own fifteen yard line and marching 85 yards to go into the lead once more. Still tossed his second six pointer of the afternoon to Billy Queen, and Bowen again converted to give Tech a 14-7 lead. A pass interception by Ray Smith on t h e Kansas 36 once more gave the Jackets an opportunity and again they took advantage of it as Red Patton made a diving catch of Still's pass in one of the most spectacular plays of the game. Dinky Bowen missed the point but the thirteen point lead looked very big going into the fourth quarter. But if Kansas was a beaten team they gave no indication of it. Coming to life in t h e fourth quarter, they drove 56 yards, scoring on a pass from Hogan to Evans. The successful conversion made the score 20-14 with five minutes to play.

Kansas kicked off and Billy Queen almost got away. A roughness penalty set Tech back but Billie Queen again burst through only to fumble at mid field. The Jayhawks took to the air and End Schnellbacker came up with a couple of "impossible" catches to move the ball to the Tech one. McNutt attempted a quarterback sneak as Healy, Davis, and Phillips converged on him. When the officials dug down to the bottom of the heap they found Guard Rollo Phillips firmly clutching the ball. That was it and Tech r a n out the clock with line bucks.

Footnotes on the Orange Bowl Classic George Broadnax, Tech's stellar end, made the All-Bowl Team, as picked by Steve Snider, U P sports writer. Broadnax was placed alongside many Ail-American greats who lived up to their reputations in the bowls. Bob Davis, Georgia Tech's All-American Tackle, has signed a pro football contract with the New York Yankees. Jim Still, pass-pitching quarterback, signed up with the Los Angeles Dons right after t h e Orange Bowl game. Still completed 10 of 13 passes for 123 yards against Kansas. Bill Healy, All SEC guard and 1947 team captain, denied reports that he would sign a pro football contract. Healy says he will r e t u r n to Tech to complete his eligibility next fall and then will go into business. Healy was voted the outstanding lineman by the Kansas squad. Tech Seniors who played their last game in the Orange Bowl are: Busbin and Robert Jordan, ends; Davis and Slaten, tackles; Phillips, guard; Bills, Still, Mathews, Williams, all backs. Tech players were unanimous in their choice of Forrest Griffith, Kansas fullback, as being the outstanding player for Kansas and the hardest runner they h a d played against this year. Bama Captain, John Wozniak, stated that Georgia Tech, whom they defeated 14-7, was a better football team than Texas, to whom they lost 27-7 in t h e Sugar Bowl. Bama was just flat.


22

January-February,

T H E GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

1948

Tech 7, Georgia 0

Basketball Gets Under W a y

(Continued from page 20) Tech had the edge in statistics as follows: First downs, Tech 10; Georgia 8; yards rushing, Tech 129; Georgia 61; yards passing, Tech 43; Georgia 83; punt returns, Tech 85; Georgia 31; punting average, Tech 38.5; Georgia 36.5. To choose outstanding players for Tech is difficult. Bill Healy, guard and Captain, played brilliantly. Bob Davis, Ralph Slaten, Ewell Pope, Ray Smith, Bob Bossons, Lewis Hook, George Broadnax, Robert Jordan, Jimmy Castleberry, and Rollo Phillips all played fine games in the line. In the backfield Frank Ziegler gave a stellar performance after being out several weeks; Jimmy Pettit, J i m Southard, Red Patton, Billy Queen, Dinky Bowen, Joe Brown, and Bob McCoy all played top-notch ball.

Basketball, under Coach Roy MacArthur, is well under way at the Flats now. Right now the team needs a little more spit and polish but, by the end of the season, they should give a good account of themselves. In the first game of the season they lost a tough one to Furman, after the game had ended, when a free throw by the opposition put it on ice for them. They then took Citadel and Virginia. During the Christmas holidays Tech journeyed to Oklahoma City, Okla., to play in the All-College Tourney, sponsored by the Daily Oklahoman. Tech lost three straight, but gave a good account of themselves and gained valuable experience. They lost to Texas, Rice, and Hamline.

This game marked the end of a very successful regular season. Tech was second in the Southeastern Conference. The University of Mississippi had played more conference games than Tech and were awarded the title. Tech won 9, lost 1 (to Alabama). Their bowl game in Miami on January 1st, marked their seventh bowl bid.

Name Height J. C. Anderson 6-3 Henry W. Schoening, J r . 6 Maurice "Bob" Jones 6-2 Marvin Joe Keener 6-3 y2 Melvin J. Dold 6-2 5-10 James Fritch Michael F. Sermersheim . 5-10 William A. Binns 6-2 David Paul Godwin, J r . 6-2 Clifford Rudy Stewart 5-9 James Stewart 6-2 William S. Johnson 5-11 Barry Blemker 6-2 Jack F. Proctor 6-1 Herb Bergman 6-3 Jim Nolan 6-8

Tech Captures Cross-Country Georgia Tech won the team title in the Annual Southeastern Conference Cross-country meet with a low score of 51. Tennessee, one of seven teams entered, nosed out Auburn for second with 73 points to 74. Red Smith, of Tech, previous record holder, was third behind Whitey Overton, of Auburn, who set a new course record for three miles of 16.41 minutes.

BASKETBALL ROSTER Class So. So. Fr. Fr. Fr. Fr. Fr. So. Jr. So. So. Grad. Fr. Jr. Sr. Jr.

Hometown Centralia, 111. Louisville, Ky. Cannelton, Ind. Evansville, Ind. Flora, 111. Jasper, Ind. Jasper, Ind. Savannah, Ga. Delray Beach, Fla, Columbus, Ga. Atlanta, Ga. Davenport, Iowa Augusta, Ga. Statesboro, Ga. Savannah, Ga. Macon, Ga.


January-February,

1948

THE GEORGIA TECH A L U M N U S

23


24

T H E GEORGIA T E C H

Tech Graduate Appointed Team Physician Announcement was recently made by the Georgia Tech Athletic Association naming Dr. Samuel D. Murray, '27, as team physician, effective J a n u a r y 1st. Dr. Murray graduated with a B.S. degree in Commerce in 1927, then received his M.D. from Tulane in 1936. At Tech he was a member of the football squads of 1924, 1925, and 1926. He was president of his senior class. During the last war Dr. Murray served as a Commander in the U. S. Navy and was in action in the Battle of the Philippine Sea. He is married, has two sons and a daughter. 1947-48 BASKETBALL SCHEDULE Home Games

'

Furman Chattanooga Virginia Kentucky Tennessee L. S. U. Tulane Georgia Florida Duke Auburn

Games Away Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Mar.

9 Tulane 10 L. S. U 13 Furman 30 Auburn 31 Alabama 3 Georgia 6 Tennessee 18 Georgia 21 Kentucky 28 Florida 4, 5, 6—S. E. C. Tournament

1948

B" Jackets Lose to Bulldog Bees

Dean of Men, George Griffin, everybody's friend, had so many requests for tickets to the Tech-Georgia game that the money and name of one alumnus became separated in the scramble. Anyhow, Dean Griffin has $8.40 belonging to some good alumnus who didn't get tickets for his money. If any of you are out of balance by $8.40, please let Dean Griffin know.

17 19 20 19 24 26 9 12 13 16 25

January-February,

NV

Notice

Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.

ALUMNUS

New Orleans Baton Rouge Greenville Auburn Tuscaloosa Athens Knoxville Athens Lexington Gainesville Louisville

In the annual charity game for the Scottish Rite Hospital on November 27, the Geogria " B " Team came out on top . of the Tech " B " Team by a 20-13 score. Led by the excellent kicking and passing of Pat Field, Georgia put the Bee on the Jackets in the first half as they ran and passed for two touchdowns. Billy Mixon was the running spark for Georgia. Georgia was greatly aided in the first half by Tech fumbles, recovering three for themselves. In the third quarter an intercepted pass gave Georgia the ball on Tech's 42 yard line. Three passes connected, giving them another score and Tech found themselves behind 20-0. Finally, in the fourth quarter, Tech got together and moved 58 yards in six plays, scoring on a pass from F r a n k (Moose) Miller to Charley Peterson, end. The next score was made following a touchback. Bill Scharfschwerdt threw a pass to Moose Miller for an 80 yard scoring play. Miller out-distanced the Geogia secondary for the touchdown. 1948 SWIMMING SCHEDULE Christmas Holidays—Ft. Lauderdale, Invitation—Ft. Lauderdale Jan. 9 Auburn Jan. 17 Tennessee Jan. 31 N. C. State Feb. 7 Pensacola Navy Feb. 14 Duke Feb. 21 Florida Feb. 27 North Carolina Feb. 28 Georgia Mar. 6 S. E. A. A. U Mar. 13 S. E. C Mar. 22 Florida

Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Mar. Mar. Mar.

17 24 30 31 2 7 13 21 28 6 9 13

Fla. Auburn Knoxvile Atlanta Atlanta Durham Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Atlanta Gainesville

1948 WRESTLING SCHEDULE Vanderbilt Nashville Georgia Athens Maryville Maryville Chattanooga Chattanooga Auburn Home Duke Atlanta Chattanooga Atlanta V. M. I Lexington Auburn Auburn Georgia Atlanta Maryville Atlanta Vanderbilt Atlanta


Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine Vol. 26, No. 03 1948  

A publication of the Georgia Tech Alumni Association.

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