Page 1

transportation

pg 7

Commuting can be a pain. To lessen your burden, we scouted out these cheap and convenient places to park. page 12-13

finance All on your own for college? Here are some tips on how to not break your bank as you adjust to Georgia State. page 16

pg 16

urbanite June 3, 2014

Vol. 1

welcome

to

Atlanta

a guide to the city

pg 19

Start showing off your Panther pride at sporting events! Learn how to get around the sports arenas. page 20-21

neighborhoods Breathe in the life of the city and check out these booming Atlanta neighborhoods while you’re here at Georgia State. page 31-39

pg 23

photo by: allyson busch

sports guide


Search for jobs on the

All New

Panther Career Net Coming July 2014

The transition is as easy as:

1.

Sign into your Panther Career Net account using your campus ID and password to save your résumés and documents to your personal storage device, computer or email by June 15, 2014.

2.

Continue using “the old” Panther Career Net as usual through June 29, 2014.

3.

Starting July 1, 2014 log into Panther Career Net using the link via career.gsu.edu to register and upload your new résumés & documents to “the new” Panther Career Net

*Resumes currently saved to Panther Career Net will not automatically transfer to the new system

*System will be off line for maintenance June 30, 2014

*First uploaded résumé needs to be approved in-person by University Career Services staff

Check career.gsu.edu for updates Visit https://gsu-csm.symplicity.com/students/ and search for HOT summer jobs TODAY!

career.gsu.edu | 404-413-1820


Don’t Worry. We’ve got your back With our live Twitter feeds, breaking Facebook statuses, and full online stories, you’ll never have to leave that comfortable futon of yours. @gsusignal

/gsusignal /signalsports

@gsusignalsports @signalopinions @gsusignalAandL georgiastatesignal.com


table of contents university

student organizations on campus page 7 freshman learning community experiences page 9

transportation

get around on the Atlanta Streetcar page 10 parking spots around campus page 12

14

housing

"crib" guide

page 14

finance economic tips

page 16

column

handling new responsibilities page 17

campus

6 ultimate tips for college life page 18

17


basketball

recruiting strategies page 19

sports guide arena guide

page 20

football

19

players drafted to NFL page 22

intro

welcome to the city

film

bikes

food

a student filmmaker's the Atlanta Beltline review: Harold's story Chicken page 26 page 24 page 29 page 23

neighborhood guides

31

downtown page 31 the highlands page 34 little five points page 36 east atlanta village page 38


THE SIGNAL URBANITE

STAFF

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT EDITOR-IN-CHIEF signaleditor@gmail.com

Anna Yang

SENIOR EDITOR Samantha Reardon signalsenioreditor@gmail.com ONLINE EDITOR Cameron Washington signalmanaging@gmail.com PRODUCTION DESIGNER signalprod@gmail.com

Madeline Richardson

LetteErditors

Sam, Senior Editor

from the

Welcome to Georgia State! You hold in your hands the very first issue of a completely revamped magazine made

Anna, EIC

just for INCEPT, with you in mind. INCEPT is all

ASSISTANT DESIGNER signalprod2@gmail.com

Emily Lasher

NEWS EDITOR signalnewseditor@gmail.com

Ciara Frisbie

ARTS & LIVING EDITOR signalliving@gmail.com

Johnny Gipson

SPORTS EDITOR signalsport1@gmail.com

Alec McQuade

OPINIONS EDITOR signalopinions@gmail.com

Nicole Motahari

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR rschley1@student.gsu.edu

Raven Schley

COPY EDITOR signalcopyeditor@gmail.com

Zoya Hasnain

about a new chapter for you. But before you jump right in, we want you to know that its the beginning of a new chapter for us too.

The Signal is a student newspaper at Georgia State that runs weekly in the fall and spring semester. We have two main parts to our mission: To inform the Georgia State community and to provide a training grounds for students wishing to pursue journalism with a print publication. With this mission in mind, we created a pilot project: The Signal Urbanite. This magazine was created specially for new, incoming students like you. Inside, you’ll find many guides to the ins and outs of our booming, eclectic city—Atlanta. Commuters, we know how hard it can be to find affordable parking in this city. We’ve been there. So our staff scouted out parking spots and their price points and mapped them out for you.

ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR Lauren Booker & Cleo Durham ASSISTANT ARTS & LIVING EDITOR Alex Kugaczewski

Looking for an eco-friendly way to explore the life of the city? Towards the back, we also have a feature on biking in Atlanta. As an extra, our arts and living editor has provided a map of the Atlanta Beltline, which has multiple transportation routes with paved paths just for bicyclists. If you’re looking to use Atlanta’s transportation on a regular basis, you’ll likely be considering your housing options. We know it can be confusing, which is why we’ve

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Allyson Busch

included a housing guide with both university and nearby living spaces.

STUDENT MEDIA ADVISOR Bryce McNeil bmcneil1@gsu.edu

university’s diverse landscape. And because our city—and campus—can be hard on your

MISSION STATEMENT The Signal shall provide, in a fair and accurate manner, news of interest and significance to the Georgia State University community and serve as a forum for the expression of ideas of members of that community. Furthermore, The Signal shall provide an opportunity for students to pursue experience within a professional newspaper environment. The Signal shall also provide truthful and ethical advertising of interest to the Georgia State University community.

Check out the columns for advice that will hopefully help you acclimate to the wallet, our finance columnist has provided some handy advice to help you stretch your budget. And when you’ve got a break to check out all Atlanta has to offer, flip to the very back to find our downtown neighborhood guide. Here you can browse our best bets for dining and entertainment around the university. When you’ve exhausted downtown, we urge you to use the other neighborhood guides—Little Five Points, the Highlands and East Atlanta Village—as a starting point for your adventures off campus. Wherever your time at Georgia State takes you, we want The Signal Urbanite to be a part of your journey. So use it, tear it up, lose it, dog ear it, mark it up. And then, let us

OFFICE INFORMATION

know how we can improve for our second issue. Feel free to send what you loved, hated

Suite 200, University Center • P.O. Box 3968 • Atlanta, GA 30303 • Phone: 404-413-1620 • Fax: 404-413-1622 • Web: www.georgiastatesignal.com

or could have done better at signaleditor@gmail.com and signalseniored@gmail.com.

DISCLAIMER Opinions and Letters to the Editor expressed in The Signal are the opinions of the writers and readers. It does not reflect the opinions of The Signal.

The Signal Urbanite is just like you—new and ready to take on the city too busy to hate. So let’s take it on together. Best,

The first copy of The Signal is free. Additional copies can be purchased from our office for $1.00 each.

Anna Yang & Samantha Reardon


university

: l a i c o s t Let’s ge

s

n io t a iz n a g r o d n a lubs Georgia State’s c

Manumission Organization Type: Activism/ Awareness President: Naomi Oke Mission: Advocating for trafficked children within Georgia. Manumission’s main goals are to educate fellow students, lobby for important legislation and participate in community service for awareness. Member count: About 50 regular members Upcoming fall 2014 events: Once a month, Manumission will host Speaker’s

the signal urbanite | incept issue

photo credit: sustainable energy tribe

g

Georgia State offers 402 chartered clubs and organizations on campus, which focus on a variety of topics such as media, religion, culture, business, politics, academics and more. Below is an updated breakdown of prominent clubs available to students at Georgia State.

Series lectures, inviting orators to provide information about their professions. In the past, the club has had State General Attorney Sam Olens, Senator Renee Untermann and GBI Sara Thomas speak during the lectures. One Tuesday each month, Manumission will host a general body meeting. In addition to these monthly events, the organization will host a Human Trafficking Awareness Week in October. Membership Fee: One-time fee of $15 for active participation with Manumission; however, students are welcome to all free events hosted by the organization.

different cultures found within Africa, according to Macauley. Member Count: More than 100 regular members Upcoming fall 2014 events: There will be an African Cup of Nations expected to be held in September and Taste of Africa planned for November. Taste of Africa will include African food sampling, dance acts and other performances. All other events will be emailed as they are planned. Membership fee: $12 annual fee to start a membership; $10 annually for returning members

Sustainable Energy Tribe (S.E.T) African Students Association Organization Type: Cultural/ Multicultural President: Ethlena Macauley Mission: Uniting students on the university’s campus by creating a powerful force and educating others about the

Organization Type: Environmental President: Julie Smith Mission: Advocating sustainable awareness at Georgia State, according to Smith. S.E.T said they try to accomplish this

Continued on page 8 


university Organizations continued

Anime Club Organization Type: Special Interest President: Haud Nomen Mission: To bring together students who enjoy the art of Japanese animation. The Anime Club also wants to further the understanding of Japanese culture as a whole. “Sometimes we talk about them, sometimes we just talk over them. Depends how serious the subject matter is,” Nomen said about watching anime during their meetings. Member count: Each meeting ranges from 30 - 50 people depending on which film is screening and what times the meetings are held, according to Nomen. Upcoming fall 2014 events: The Anime Club will meet twice a week to watch and discuss various anime films. The club said they hope to screen a film or two at Cinefest either at the beginning or end of the fall semester. Membership Fee: None

photo credit: alliance for sexual and gender diversity

by going on trips, such as their recent trip to LEED certification Indian Creek Lodge. Members participated in rope courses. Member Count:10-15 regular members Upcoming fall 2014 events: No specific fall events are planned now, but there may be hikes or bike rides in the Atlanta area. Smith said she would like to partner with local organizations to hold volunteer events throughout each semester. The organization has a garden plot in Hurt Park and will have workdays/garden parties to collect food and start a fall garden. Meetings will be held from noon -1 p.m. every Tuesday in that location. Membership Fee: None

Wesley Foundation at Georgia State University Organization Type: Religious/Spiritual President: Xi Wang Mission: The Wesley Foundation strives to make disciples of Jesus Christ on the college campus. The organization also said they strive to offer unique worship, service and fellowship opportunities to students. They are also dedicated to leadership development through their Wesley Leadership Team and daily through their service models. “We are supported by the United Methodist Church, but we welcome anyone regardless of background, religious affiliation or beliefs,” Angela Johnson, campus minister for Wesley Foundation said. Member count: 15 current members Upcoming fall 2014 events: The Wesley Foundation meets on Monday nights in the University Center and offers free food and a biblical program. They also meet on Thursday nights in University Center 402.

This fall they will be offering fellowship opportunities at a Braves game, Skyzone and board game nights. Membership Fee: None

The Alliance for Sexual and Gender Diversity Organization Type: Activism/Awareness President: Aryn Prince Mission: The organization was created to cater to the LGBTQIQA student population on campus. The Alliance was founded in 1982, making it the oldest queer-straight alliance in Georgia. Member Count: Around 30 regular members. Upcoming fall 2014 events: Events for the fall will not be announced until their first meeting, but Alliance is planning drag shows and other major events, according to the club’s former president, Taylor Alexander. Membership Fee: None Visit gsu.orgsync.com for more information on clubs being chartered at Georgia State.


university

What’s the deal with FLCs? written by: CLEO DURHAM & LAUREN BOOKER

N

ew students often arrive at their university with concerns about their class schedules, meeting new people and doubts about being able to immerse themselves within the college’s culture. This is why Georgia State offers incoming freshmen the option to sign up for Freshman Learning Communities (FLCs) during INCEPT. FLCs are pre-planned corecurriculum courses set with groups of other students. The learning communities link four or five courses from the curriculum with GSU 1010, an orientation course providing information about the university. Students have mixed opinions on FLCs. Check out what some students have to say about these optional courses.

s e g s a t e n g a a t v disad advan “I had a group with criminal

“From what I heard about it,

justice majors and everyone was sort of motivated in a way. Then we all got together and had study groups together, and had our own GroupMe together. We still do. We liked each other so much that most of us decided the same English teacher for English 1102 this semester.”

the credit hours didn’t matter and they would assign the classes. I was more comfortable with me assigning my classes.” -Shahzad Irani, business major

-Kayla Kelly, international economics and spanish major

“I would say do it, because if you come to college you might know too many people. That study group was always good. That was the biggest thing I got out of it.” -Cory Smith, exercise science major

“I thought it was an easy class. Visit http://incept.gsu. edu/preparing-for-incept/ freshman-learningcommunities/ to learn more about FLCs or GSU 1010.

It really was a great intro class to college. Like how do grades work, what is plagiarism and all that kind of stuff. It was the difference between high school and college basically.”

“ . . . the people I know now, we are going to be juniors and they still have connections to freshman year. Even if you don’t take the same class now, you’ll have somebody who might take the same class with you eventually.” -Menyon Belgrave, exercise science major

“It really complicates scheduling. If I would’ve come to Georgia State as a freshman, I still probably would not have been interested in being in an FLC.” -David Peabody, computer science major

-Mariam Chaudry, neuroscience major

the signal urbanite | incept issue


On the track to completion The Atlanta Streetcar to debut this summer

a written by: CIARA FRISBIE

After nearly two years of

construction, travelers, tourists and residents of downtown Atlanta can officially make room for the city’s newest addition—the Atlanta Streetcar. In early June, downtown residents will see their first glimpse of the 96,500 pound S70 streetcars, according to Sharon Gavin, Communications Director for the Atlanta Streetcar. “We will power the overhead system and then we will start testing the cars,” Sharon Gavin said in a May 2 interview. “We are all just so excited about this, to finally see the streetcars running on the streets.” Once the streetcar testing is complete in the second quarter of 2014, the S70s will run at a maximum operational speed of 35 miles per hour. “Then we will go with control testing at speeds and that’s where the streetcars run with traffic,” she said.



Community involvement: Gavin said the Atlanta Streetcar Project team are making arrangements with groups to conduct safety presentations. On May 18 from 2 p.m. - 6 p.m., there was a safety station set up outside of the Peachtree MARTA station. “At that event will be specifically presenting information for cyclists concerning safety around the Atlanta Streetcar tracks,” she said in a May 1 interview. Although there are currently no other dates for events individuals can attend, Gavin also said the streetcar’s official website would have more information about safety modules come out at a later time. “As we do schedule public presentations, we will list them on our website,” Gavin said. Gavin also said the official Atlanta Streetcar website has additional safety information for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists. “Euros in the process of producing safety videos, those should be completed by mid June. We will also have safety brochures available at that time,” Gavin said. “We are available to do safety presentations for any groups that would like us.”

Hours of Operation: •

Monday through Friday 5 a.m. - 11 p.m.

• •

Saturdays 8:30 a.m. - 11 p.m. Sundays 9 a.m. - 10:30 p.m.

More information can be found on the July 2013 Atlanta Streetcar fact sheet.

Payment and fees: • Free rides around 2.7 mile strip of downtown for the first three months • Proposed fare after three months: • $1 for one-way trip • $3 for an all day pass The Atlanta Streetcar project team is also working with MARTA so commuters can use their Breeze cards to get onto the S70s too.


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the signal urbanite | incept issue

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

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map credit: streetcar.atlantaga.gov

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National Center for Civil and Human Rights


A guide to student parking in downtown Atlanta hether students live on campus or commute each day, choosing a place to park that is affordable and conveniently located can be a challenge. Below are updated descriptions on a variety of parking options to help students find spaces near campus:

Lot at Turner Field for free with a valid parking permit but must remove their vehicles from the lot by 5 p.m. on game days in order to make room for those attending the game. A shuttle transports students to and from the lot between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. Monday-Friday. Specific days render this parking lot unusable by Georgia State students. Students should check the Turner Field parking schedule for questions regarding

entrance of University Commons. There are limited spaces (up to 10). 3. LAZ Parking Lot Address: 140 J.W. Dobbs Ave. Price: $3 Early Bird Special (before 9 a.m.; $1 decrease from last year)/$5 all day afterwards. Description: Located just up the street from Shell station about 200 feet. 4. Central Parking Lot Address: 141 J.W. Dobbs Ave.

lot closings.

On-Campus Georgia State Affiliated Student Parking Decks:

Streetside Parking

Price: $4 all day/$65 monthly. Description: Located across the street from the LAZ Parking Lot 5. Parking Company of America (Panther Lot) Address: 145 J.W. Dobbs Ave. Price: $5 all day Description: This lot is attached to the Central Parking lot on the side that faces Aderhold. 6. LAZ Parking Address: 85 J.W. Dobbs Ave. Price: $3 for 0-2 hours/$5 for two or more hours Description: Located near the intersection of J.W. Dobbs and Courtland Avenue 7. Parking Company of America Price: $6 all day Description: Located at the intersection of J.W. Dobbs and Peachtree Center Avenue

written by: CLEO DURHAM

W

G Deck, K Deck, N Deck, S Deck, T Deck, M Deck, Lofts Deck, Patton Hall, Greek Housing and Piedmont North

G, K, M, N, S, T Decks: •

$7 for visitors (students without a parking permit) • $4.50 per entry with valid parking permit • $3.50 per entry with valid Parking Budget Card • $2.25 per entry after 4 p.m. with valid parking permit • $90 per month (for Lofts, Patton Hall, Greek Housing and Piedmont North residents) • $215 per semester (for M Deck, T Deck, or Lofts Deck for nonresidents) Parking permits or parking budget cards can be purchased from Auxiliary and Support Services in the University Center. Students pay a one-time fee for a semester of parking with permits. On the other hand, a budget card is reloadable, allowing students to add money for parking when they need it. Students may also park in the Blue



Students who want to pay for parking on a day-to-day basis can take advantage of the curbside parking available throughout campus. These are marked with parking machines with a blue P on them. Curbside spaces can be found on Gilmer Street and Courtland Street surrounding Hurt Park. Downtown street parking is free on Sundays and city holidays.

John Wesley Dobbs Avenue (near University Commons and Piedmont North) 1. Lanier Parking Lot Address: 214 J.W. Dobbs Ave. Price: $5 all day ($1 increase from last year)/$65 monthly Description: Large open lot located across the street from University Commons toward J.W. Dobbs and Jesse Hill Drive. It is a 10 minute walk from campus. 2. Shell Gas Station Address: 160 J.W. Dobbs Ave. Price: $3 for parking less than five hours/$5 for anything more Description: The gas station is located directly across the street from the main

Peachtree Center Avenue 8. AAA Parking Address: 44 Peachtree Center Ave. Price: $4 all day Description: Turn on to Peachtree Center Avenue from J.W. Dobbs; the lot is about 50 feet down the road. 9. Parking Company of America Address: Approximately 48 Peachtree


transporation

Center Ave. Price: $5.50 all day Description: About 50 feet down the road from AAA Parking lot.

Auburn Avenue 10. Parking Company of America/ Georgia Bookstore Address: 141 Auburn Ave. Price: $5 all day Description: Located behind the Georgia Bookstore; about five to eight minute walking distance from campus. 11. The Loudermilk Center/Boys and Girls Club Metro Atlanta Address: Parking Deck entrance located at approximately 63 Auburn Ave.

Price: $5 for up to 2 hours/$10 for 2-4 hours/$12 for 4+ hours Description: Located about 50 feet away from the intersection of Peachtree Center Avenue and Auburn Avenue facing main campus. Meters are also available for curbside parking.

Wall Street and Decatur Street Decatur Street and Wall Street offer parking options in close proximity to Classroom South and Langdale Hall. However, these locations are more expensive than parking lots further away. 12. Decatur Street Parking Address: 45 Decatur St. Price: $4 for up to 1 hour/$7 for 1-2

hours/$9 for 2-4 hours/$11 for 4-8 hours/$13 for 8-12 hours/$5 on weekends ($1 down from last year). Description: Located across the street from Walter’s Clothing Shop and directly across from Classroom South. 13. AAA Parking Garage Address: 47 Decatur St. Price: $6 all day Description: Located across from the Natural Science Center

14. Lower Wall Street Parking Garage Underpass Address: 15 Lower Wall St. Price: $4 Description: Located under Wall Street, behind Hot Dog Shop near Langdale Hall.

map credit: google maps

the signal urbanite | incept issue




University housing: A new home away from home written by: BETHANY YOUNG

fully furnished kitchens, living areas

Off-campus Housing Options:

and bedrooms. Meal plans are optional

From loft-style apartments to traditional residence halls, Georgia State students can find apartments and dorms which will allow them to experience the urban sprawl of downtown Atlanta. Below are a glance at on-campus housing. Following that, we also have updated fall pricing and details about other off-campus housing options.

is accessible to students for $400 per

Downtown Atlanta and its surrounding areas offer many housing options. However, there are three that are most-talked about on campus by Georgia State students. These are not the only apartment options, but they are conveniently located to campus.

On-campus Housing Options: The Lofts This residence hall has 231 loftstyle apartments with an average of 550 students living there per semester. All floor plans being considered, the average cost for a student to live there is $4,000 per semester. Each room is furnished with a full kitchen and a meal plan is not required. Students can choose a seven-day or five-day meal plan card if they desire. Parking is available in the University Lofts deck for a monthly fee of $90. Family housing is also available in The Lofts with three floor plans for families.

semester.

Patton Hall: The floor plans at Patton are not apartment-style but feature a bedroom and bathroom in suite. There is a study lounge on each floor and an onsite dining hall. In addition to the dining hall, meal plan recipients can eat at the dining facility located in Piedmont North. The meal plan is required for $1,863 a semester. Parking is also available for Patton Hall residences in the University Lofts deck for $90 per month.

Piedmont North: Piedmont North has two buildings—A and B—and provides a residence hall lifestyle for an average of 1,100 residents. Similar to Patton, rooms feature a bedroom and bathroom in suite. This residence hall is located furthest away from all classroom buildings but is only a 10-15 minute walk with Panther shuttles available.

University Commons: Located down the street from Piedmont North, this complex has four buildings and an average of over 2,000 students living there per semester, making it the largest residence hall on campus. These apartment-style rooms have



photo credit: raven schley

f

here, and an attached parking garage

A dining hall is onsite and required to live at Piedmont North. A parking garage is available for students for $400 per semester. For more details about on-campus housing, visit the full version of this story online at www.georgiastatesignal.com. Key search term: housing guide

One 12 Courtland: 112 Courtland St. NE Atlanta, Georgia 30303 One 12 Courtland is a new addition to downtown, but already is becoming a popular option with Georgia State students. Community amenities such as pools, free tanning and study suites are some of the qualities that many students say they are attracted to. The apartments are priced by individual leases with roommates who are responsible for their portion of the rent. One bedroom styles are available for $965-$1180 per month. Two bedroom apartments range from $800-$965 per person. There is also a three bedroom, three bathroom floor plan for $915 per person.


housing

photo credit: raven Schley

Pencil Factory Flats

Four bedroom plans cost $775 $870, with most floor plans having four bathrooms. One 12 prices include all inclusive amenities as well.

photo credit: Anna Yang

12 Courtland with furnished roommate style apartments, individual leases and community amenities. Additionally, WestMar offers a free shuttle bus to and from campus for Georgia State students. WestMar also has its own roommate matching service for students and other individuals. A two bedroom, two bathroom floor plan ranges between $715 - $918 a person. There is a three bedroom floor plan for $700 a month, while four bedrooms cost $645 - $705 per roommate. Individual amenities are a flat-rate of $85 a month per resident.

WestMar Student Lofts:

Pencil Factory Flats:

800 W Marietta St. NW Atlanta, Georgia 30318 WestMar is similar in concept to One

349 Decatur St. SE Atlanta, Georgia 30312 The Pencil Factory Flats feature

the signal urbanite | incept issue

studio and multiple bedroom apartments. All apartments come with stainless steel appliances, walk-in closets and hardwood/concrete flooring. Attached to the complex are several restaurants, salons and a comedy club. Studio floor plans cost an average of $1,046 per month for 625-769 square feet. There are several one-bedroom floor plans ranging $1,028 - $1,595 depending on the square footage desired. A roommate style apartment offers two and three bedroom floor plans with multiple bathrooms. A two bedroom floor plan is $1,378 - $1,812 and three bedrooms range between $1,918 $2,273. Most of Pencil Factory Flats offer a patio or balcony depending on availability.

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written by: MITCHELL OLIVER

i

I’d like to wish you all a warm welcome to Georgia State! As incoming students, you are probably excited about attending school in the big city. Unfortunately, with big cities come higher prices. Luckily you’ve got me, Mitch, to be your eyes and ears: I’m dedicated to helping you save money and ball out, all while sticking to your budget!

subway

tips for freshmen AVOID DINING HALL Lastly, avoid the dining hall. If you’ve already signed up for the meal plan, may your bank account rest in peace. Their pricing is so exorbitant that you would need to eat there three times a day, seven days a week just to make it pay off.

& MOES HOWS &

Also, though parking can be a hassle, there are many options. Turner Field parking is free but comes at a cost. It’s a popular option that leads to crowded buses and long waits at peak hours, and often the shuttles don’t run during Braves games and other events. Thus, I recommend investing in a budget card, which lets you park in a few different parking decks at a cheaper price than paying each time you park. This helps on those days when parking at Turner Field isn’t worth the hassle.

parking perks

Economic

THE

finance

CREENIN

GS

First things first: Know the best places to eat on campus! While packing your lunch is great, sometimes on-campus cuisine trumps your tuna salad surprise. One, Subway is your friend. They have $4 meal deals every day with a sandwich, chips, and a drink for $4. Two, it is time to become one with Moe Mondays. You can grab any of their burritos for $5.50 on Mondays.

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So you’ve got your cheap eats around campus, but what is there to do? I have a few favorites. Cinefest, Georgia State’s theatre, runs free screenings of movies for Georgia State students, so I recommend checking it out. Next is the Rialto Center for the Arts. This place is often overlooked by many, but they constantly have free concerts and live music shows each week.

While it might not change your life, saving money here and there really adds up. It will make your money stretch and allow you to enjoy more of the things you might love on campus later—like the bars on Edgewood Avenue! I hope the semester goes great and you can use a these tips to help make this semester your most cost-efficient ever!


A note on your newfound freedom in college written by: NICOLE MOTAHARI

H

ello all and welcome to Georgia State! I know you must be excited to start a new chapter in your life, however, when you go off to college, it’s very easy to get carried away. For many students, this is their first real taste of adulthood. The newfound freedom can be deliciously intoxicating for some when taken in small sips. But as with all good things, too much can get to your head. The first piece of advice I’d give is to choose your classes wisely, not just in terms of your major, but also as far as scheduling class times. While you were up at eight in the morning in high school, college takes a greater amount of effort. For all you fellow

commuters, remember that you’ll likely be driving through Atlanta traffic during rush hour or taking MARTA, which is known for breaking down on a regular basis. Take these into consideration before signing up for that 8 a.m. history class. Next, remember that while parties are fun, a balance is the key to everything. Partying non-stop is an assured way to flunk out of college and get yourself kicked out. If you are caught with illegal substances of any kind, Georgia State Housing has a zero tolerance policy. If you are caught, you will be asked to leave Housing and you will not be able to continue dorming. Don’t be foolish and tempt fate. Know your limits, know the law and stay safe. Lastly, if you get a spike of homesickness, don’t be ashamed.

column

Just don’t let that take over or hold you back. Go to that Block Party hosted on the first week of classes or the Panther Prowls that are hosted every month. These are ways to get out and make new friends at Georgia State. Join a student organization that sparks your interest or walk up to the cute guy/girl in your general biology course and ask them to grab a cup of coffee. We have a coffee shop, Saxbys, right on the first floor of Library North. Call home and chat for a couple of hours a week, but don’t spend every free moment texting or calling Mom about how homesick you are. Live a little—after all, this is college! This is the time in your life when it’s OK to take chances, make mistakes and get messy (just not too messy)!

illustration by: MICHAEL AUBREY the signal urbanite | incept issue

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6 h campus

written by: MIA MCDONALD

Hey new Panthers! You are about to embark on a new unfamiliar journey in your life and though there’s no true way to prep you for it, here are some helpful tips. College can be the most exciting yet overwhelming beginning you’ll encounter, but remember there are thousands of people going through the same thing and have the same concerns.

1

Be aware of your surroundings: Georgia State is downtown which means you’re surrounded by all kinds of people; our school and the area are a melting pot. Never travel alone. There need to be at least two people with you at all times. Exchange phone numbers and keep in touch.

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things you

NEED to do when

you start at

Georgia State

2

Take your time choosing a major: The last thing you want to do is spend extra money and time on courses you don’t need. When you’re choosing a major, do your research. Talk to upperclassmen and professors. There’s a difference between having an interest in a subject and investing in your future.

3

Follow the crowd: Before you graduate from Georgia State you will have at least one class in a building called “Aderhold”. It’s easy to get lost, but follow the crowd and you’ll get there. The area can be intimidating the first time walking through, so be cautious and refer to tip number one.

4

Develop a study schedule: If you make studying a part of your daily routine, midterms and finals will come less as surprise.

You increase your chances of being prepared and you won’t be focused if you cram days or hours before.

5

Join student organizations: Like choosing a major, you should research the different organizations. There are academic groups and social groups. Each has a list of requirements that you should become informed about.

6

Be free: Enter college with an open mind. There isn’t a set way to experience college and everyone’s journey is different. Ultimately this is YOUR life. You shouldn’t do anything you don’t want to. You’re an adult and you have to make decisions that fit your liking. Hope this helps and welcome to GSU! #AllBlueAllin #StateNOTSouthern #TheRealGSU


basketball

a written by: ALEC MCQUADE

All it takes is watching Ron Hunter coach once and it becomes evident he is a unique college basketball coach. From his fierce, explosive coaching style from the bench, to coaching a game barefoot once a year for charity, Hunter is not afraid to push boundaries and move the game forward. Hunter’s unique approach extends into his recruiting where he has developed a modern approach to his system: banking off the increasing number of transfers in college basketball. Just in this offseason alone, Hunter has picked up two major transfers: Kevin Ware from Louisville and Jeremy Hollowell from Indiana University. Hunter has been able to pick up top transfers each offseason to build his team, such as Kentucky’s Ryan Harrow last year, and Curtis Washington and Manny Atkins, who transferred in 2012 from USC and Virginia Tech, respectively. The key to Hunter’s approach is building relationships with top prospects coming out of high school even though he knows the recruit won’t choose to go to Georgia State. “No matter how long I’m here at Georgia State, the top 10 player in the country— if he’s in the state of Georgia—he is not going to Georgia

the signal urbanite | incept issue

State,” Hunter said. “But we can continue to recruit that young man.” Hunter said if it does not work out at the school the player chooses, he hopes he will remember Georgia State back home. That is exactly what drew Harrow and Ware back to Georgia State. Focusing on transfers has become Hunter’s dominant approach to recruiting, despite critics who see it as lazy recruiting or speculate that he cannot recruit recent high school graduates. Hunter thinks otherwise. He believes coaches who do not focus on the expanding transfer market in sports are making a mistake for their program, especially at an urban institution like Georgia State. Hunter mentioned the 400-plus athletes who are transferring this year and how it is an expanding market that will only continue to grow. “If you don’t get into that market, you’re going to fail,” he said. In the state of Georgia, nearly 65 percent of high school athletes transfer at some point in their careers, according to Hunter. “If they’re transferring in high school, then guess what, they’re probably going to transfer when they get to college,” Hunter said.

photo credit: Georgia State athletics

Coach Hunter uses a modern approach to recruiting

He said there is nothing wrong with this new trend of college athletes seeking to gain opportunities at other schools. “I transfer jobs, the presidents of the universities transfer jobs—that’s what we do,” Hunter said. “So we criticize a young man for transferring, but as an adult, if we leave our situations to transfer to something we feel is better, why is it a difference?” “Coach Hunter knows what he’s doing. He cares about his players more than just on the court,” Washington said, thinking back on when he transferred to Georgia State. Washington said showing a recruit the program’s success and how he can contribute to future success is Hunter’s best recruiting tactic. “He’s got a way with words, but you can’t fake winning. You can’t fake success, and that’s what we are here, a program of success.” Hunter’s tactics seem to be working for his team as he led the Panthers to being the outright Sun Belt champions in their first year in the conference last season. Now, the team, mixed with newcomers and veterans, will try and build off that recent success and, this time, let it carry them to the NCAA tournament.

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Getting around the panther’s den written by: JEREMY JOHNSON

The Georgia Dome opened Sept. 6, 1992 and is currently the home of the Georgia State Panthers, the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons and Atlanta’s upcoming Major League Soccer team. The Dome hosted two Super Bowls, one in 1994 and one in 2000. Capacity: 71,228 for football events. 80,000 total. 28,155 for Georgia State football games (Lower Bowl). Pros: Playing in a professional stadium can be used as a great recruiting tool. Not many college football teams can boast that they play in a professional team’s stadium, and it allows for the Panthers to give fans a unique gameday experience. Cons: The downside of playing in the Georgia Dome is that it a

photo credit: Georgia State athletics

Georgia Dome

popular place for events to be held such as NFL games, other special college football games and concerts, thus creating scheduling conflicts. The Panther’s season opener had to be moved up a day as there are more college football games scheduled to be held the same weekend in addition to an Atlanta Falcons’ preseason game.

photo credit: Georgia State athletics

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Sports Arena The Sports Arena is the home of the Panther’s men and women’s basketball teams, as well as the volleyball team. It was used for the badminton competitions in the 1996 Summer Olympics. It also hosted ESPN’s college slam dunk and 3-point championships in 2002 and 2007. Capacity: 3,455 for basketball and volleyball. Pros: There is a major upside to having an on-campus arena. The Sports Arena is accessible to Georgia State students as it is located in the heart of campus. This gives the Panthers a true home court advantage as more students can get out to support the teams. Cons: Limited parking is the major down-side to the Sports Arena. The G Deck is only central deck for events at the Sports Arena. Fortunately, there are other limited parking options nearby.


sports guide photo credit: Georgia State athletics

Panthersville Panthersville is the home of Georgia State’s baseball, softball and soccer teams. Panthersville was opened in 1986 and is located in Decatur. Georgia State and Georgia Board of Regents own Panthersville. Capacity: 1,892

Robert E. Heck Softball Complex

Capacity: 1,092

GSU Soccer Complex

Capacity: 500

photo credit: Georgia State athletics

Cons: Panthersville’s downside comes down to one thing: location. Panthersville is located in Decatur, which is nine miles away from the Georgia State campus. Fans with limited means of transportation have difficulties reaching Panthersville to show their support. Georgia State has been trying to move Athletics out of Panthersville for years to a location closer to campus. Recently, Georgia State has shown serious interest in Turner Field and has created a proposal to develop the land into a mix-used development that would include a new football stadium and baseball stadium.

GSU Baseball Complex

photo credit: Georgia State athletics

Pros: Panthersville provides Georgia State sports fans with a one stop shop feeling as all the fields are in close proximity to each other. Panthersville features acceptable fields with bleachers except for Heck Field, which includes seats.

For more on Turner Field, go to georgiastatesports.com

the signal urbanite | incept issue




football

Trio of Panthers headed to the NFL

Ulrick John John, former Georgia State offensive-tackle for four seasons, was drafted in the seventh round of the 2014 NFL Draft by the Indianapolis Colts. He signed a four-year contract estimated at $2.2 million, according to Indystar. John is the second player in Georgia State history to be drafted. Former defensive lineman Christo Bilukidi was the first drafted by the Oakland Raiders in the sixth round of the 2012 NFL Draft. “This is a great opportunity for Ulrick [John] and great news for Georgia State football,” head coach Trent Miles said to Georgia State Athletics. “He has an opportunity to earn a spot with an outstanding franchise. The work is just beginning, but his best football is ahead of him.” John is a massive left-tackle standing 6-foot-7 and weighing 300 pounds. He was All-Conference

tackle and the Panthers’ top lineman for the last two seasons. His athleticism and size caught the scouts’ attention at Georgia State’s Pro Day when he ran a 4.95 in the 40-yard dash. “[The Colts] had been talking to me a lot,” John told the AJC. “The coaches were talking highly of me. Every time they came to the board, I was hoping they would call.”

Albert Wilson Wilson, a wide receiver, signed as a free agent with the Kansas City Chiefs and Agnew has received an invite to the Atlanta Falcons minicamp. Wilson’s speed and productivity as a Panther earned him a shot in the NFL. Similar to John, Wilson placed seventh among his position in the 40yard dash at the combine, recording a 4.35. During his time at Georgia State, the 5-foot-9 wide-out totaled 6,235 yards as a receiver and a kick and punt returner. Wilson is the all-time leading scorer with 26 touchdowns for 156 points for Georgia State. “It’s a blessing to have the opportunity to have a chance to make the team,” Wilson said to the AJC. “I’m ready to go to work.”

photo credit: GSU Athletics

U

lrick John, Albert Wilson and Theo Agnew are the latest Georgia State Panthers now to be members of the National Football League.

photo credit: GSU Athletics

photo credit: gsu athletics

written by: ERIC YEBOAH

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Theo Agnew

Albert Wilson

Ulrick John

Theo Agnew Agnew may not have been selected in the draft or signed as a free agent, but his production as a Panther earned him an invitation to the Falcons rookie mini-camp. Agnew transferred from UMass after two seasons and then played two more seasons at Georgia State. He was a two-year letterman and starter on the defensive line. Agnew is tied for second in Georgia State history in tackles for loss with 14.5, and he ranks sixth alltime in tackles with 124. Agnew tweeted his excitement as soon as he received the invite saying, “Guess im stayin in ATL!! FALCONS HERE I COME #gotTheCall!!!!!” with a picture of himself celebrating. The tryouts took place May 16-18 in Flowery Branch, Georgia. Georgia State’s number of players in the NFL now could go as high as four, the most in the program’s short, four-year history. The football team now prepares for its fifth season, the second season under Miles. The Panthers kickoff the college football season Wednesday, Aug. 27 against Abilene Christian at the Georgia Dome.


intro

Welcome tothe city photo by: raven schley

the signal urbanite | incept issue

the various communities located throughout the city. In this special INCEPT edition of The Signal, students will find information on a variety of people and locations —all relevant to Georgia State’s campus. The section begins with an indepth feature of one of Atlanta’s most promising student filmmakers, taking a closer look at his lifestyle, craft, and goals. Next, The Signal takes a closer look at the rapidly-expanding Atlanta Beltline and Bike-Lane project, a multipurpose effort that looks to both integrate various communities of Atlanta and simplify travel practices

photo by: raven schley

As an incoming freshman at Georgia State, there are a lot of changes to get acclimated to. Atlanta’s reputation of being one of the premiere cities in the country for music, nightlife and food gives one much to anticipate in the coming months. The Signal intends to provide students with high quality stories that not only bring forth the most intriguing cultural qualities of Atlanta, but also provoke a sense of place and identification with

photo by: raven schley

photo by: raven schley

a written by: JOHNNY GIPSON

for Atlanta residents. Also located inside is the Downtown Neighborhood Guide, a concise feature that will familiarize new students with the closest and most-convenient eateries and entertainment locations within walking distance from Georgia State. Readers will also find our previous neighborhood guides within the section, covering a few of the more eclectic neighborhoods near downtown Atlanta: The Highlands, Little Five Points and East Atlanta Village. We hope students enjoy reading. Continue to look for our weekly print publication in the coming months.

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B I G Dreams, small

Camera

photo by: allyson busch

written by: STEPHANIE MINOR

A

nsyl Carpenter is an independent student filmmaker at Georgia State, but his work predates college and high school. Carpenter laughed and shook his head when I asked him how he’d begun his film career. “I was seven,” he said. “And I was following around my older brother to his friend’s house to play—or do what little kids do.” He and a childhood pal trailed after Carpenter’s brother Anthony and his friend John. Carpenter unfurled the scene like a director. They crept into a neighbor’s backyard. The gate was open but the fence was blocking part of the view.

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“We saw John and his brother running into the opening in the backyard,” Carpenter said. “And John was like ‘Ahhhh!’ and he just falls.” Carpenter scuttled closer, wondering what was going on. He saw Anthony creep up slowly. Then Carpenter could finally see. His brother cradled a camera in his arms. “And...cut,” Anthony said. “What are you guys doing?” Carpenter asked. “We are making a movie,” his brother responded. Carpenter went into the house to watch what Anthony and his friends had made. It was a “movie”

by 10-year-old standards, but it sparked something in Carpenter. “We were so into the idea that we started filming ourselves,” Carpenter said. “I was a little more passionate about it than my older brother, so I’ve stuck with it throughout the years.”

Dream Big I was expecting it to be bigger. The camera, I mean. I marveled at the grapefruit-size piece of technology as Carpenter lifted “Nexus” from its bulky leather bag. Carpenter nimbly fastened the Sony Nex-5N camera to the top of a towering tripod. I admit it looked a


film

A Passion Carpenter sat across from me at a tiny table in Reuben’s Deli on Broad Street. We stuffed ourselves in a corner. Camera bags and tripod bags and a tote filled with filters and mics encircled us. The 22-year-old filmmaker—with 15 years of experience and three film festivals under his belt (Sundance Film Festival, Gwinnett International Film Festival and Georgia State’s own Campus Movie Fest)—furrowed his brow when I asked him how he’s fostered that “spark” for all these years. “It’s just honestly something I enjoy doing,” he began. “If I don’t film for a certain amount of time—which I haven’t because of finals—I get restless. And I get this itchy feeling.” The film-junky admitted to skulking about in a terrible mood for the past few months. He attributed this unease to the fact that he has not shot a short film since the beginning of March. “It’s hard to describe,” he looked out the window. “It’s like crack.”

the signal urbanite | incept issue

“Closet Fatty” One of Carpenter’s short films— entitled “Closet Fatty”—playfully examined the phenomenon where skinny girls obsess about food all the time. The film opens with a couple sitting on a couch watching TV. The camera zooms in on the girl. She is pretty and slim, but on her necklace hangs a charm: a hamburger. The girl excuses herself to go to the bathroom, and as she walks away, she passes by her date’s roommate. The roommate is a caricature of an Asian-American female. She speaks with broken English and warns the boy that “everything you talk about, it going to be about food. OK, bitch?” Then she leaves. The boy shakes his head. His date opens the bathroom door. “I’m hungry,” she says.

photo by: allyson busch

photo by: allyson busch

bit funny all the way up there, like a ball on top of a flagpole. “One thing I love about this camera is it gives you really phenomenal pictures,” Carpenter said. “I’ve had people look at my stuff and they’re like ‘Aw, man! What were you shooting on? A Merc-3?’ And I’m like, please, that’s a $2500 camera. Then I pull out this tiny thing.” Carpenter chuckled as he played with the settings on Nexus. “I’ve been able to get some professional quality results on a college student’s budget.”

The lighting and tight-shot filming are exquisite. The topic is quirky, but that’s Carpenter to a tee.

Self Taught Carpenter has grown up with a camera, so he observed differences in students at Georgia State who had not taught themselves. “I took an introductory production class this past semester, and nobody knew how to use Final Cut Pro, the easiest film editing software,” he said. “They didn’t know how to use a camera. They didn’t know the difference between having your aperture at four versus 11.” Carpenter said he does not hold it against them, but then he changed his mind. “If you really love something—a hobby, a person, a TV show, a book, anything—you’re going to do everything you can to know about everything about it.”

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written by: JOHNNY GIPSON

I

t’s an unseasonably warm day in Downtown Atlanta; instead of the usual pleasant springtime breeze associated with mid May, sweltering heat beats down on the neck of a cyclist, pedaling furiously northward. He throws a glance to his right, passing a boisterous patch of wild grass and dandelions. The whir of his bicycle wheels is juxtaposed by the gentle hum of a wasp flying past. Stopping for a moment to admire the ‘Rising Red Lotus’ mural blanketing the underpass, he realizes he’s not the only cyclist making a journey to Piedmont Park. Welcome to the Eastside Atlanta Beltline. The Atlanta Beltline is an urban redevelopment project that looks to create an interconnected

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transportation hub between major communities in Atlanta while also creating multipurpose walking trails and green spaces for improved ecological diversity. The east side of the Atlanta Beltline is one of the most geographically and aesthetically diverse attractions in downtown Atlanta. The Beltline spans a considerable area, beginning slightly east of Georgia State’s campus on Edgewood Avenue and ending just north of Piedmont Park in midtown. The Beltline passes through several popular tourist locations including the Historic Fourth Ward Park, Little Five Points and Ponce de Leon Avenue. Although it is a popular location for skaters and joggers, the Beltline is dominated by cyclists due to recent expansion of marked bike lanes and trails Downtown.

photo by: allyson busch

Fixing to ride the Beltline

Mikel Madison, owner of Fixie Bicycle Gallery on Edgewood Avenue, said he could not be happier. “The Beltline and bike lane construction is absolutely necessary for Atlanta,” Madison said. “Since Atlanta isn’t set up on a grid, driving a car is a huge hassle. It actually takes me longer to get to work in car than on a bike. Bike riding is the future of transportation in Atlanta.” Madison has been the premiere custom bicycle maker in Atlanta since 2009, specializing in flamboyant and unorthodox fixed gear bicycle design. “I started building single speed bikes because they were simple and had a lot of style to them,” Madison said. “I’m a graphic design and brand management guy, so I wanted to sell a product that could be utilized in the urban environment


bikes

photo by: allyson busch

the signal urbanite | incept issue

photo by: allyson busch

while also promoting health and well-being.” Madison looks at bicycle design in a more interpersonal fashion, stressing the importance of style and individuality for his customers. “I try to blend a person’s individual style with their physical needs,” Madison said. “If I can get them on a stylish bike, they’ll ride more, get compliments and become immersed in the culture. Once you get the bug, I don’t have to do too much else.” To the untrained eye, a “fixie” bike may seem no different than any other bike on the road. Madison believes differently. “Fixed gear bikes fall in between road bikes and BMX bikes,” he explained. “It’s the perfect balance between the two and there’s a wide variety of styles. It’s light, agile and rigid, which is perfect for street riding.” Madison was very enthusiastic in expressing the intricacies of riding a fixie bike in the city, which is a daily experience for him.

“It’s for people who make calculated, quick decisions because you’re literally playing with your life riding in the streets,” Madison said. “Adrenaline junkies are definitely attracted to the fixie life.” Madison even took it a step further, explaining the experience on a psychological level. “It’s a more interactive ride,” Madison said. “It’s aggressive, physical riding; you’re blazing through traffic, trying to catch that light or slide between two cars that are 2 feet apart. It raises your mental awareness of what’s around you and kind of makes you tap into an intuitive sixth sense in terms of how you have to anticipate everyone’s motions.” Although Madison enjoys Beltline riding, he expressed his frustration with bike riding on Atlanta streets. “You have to consider yourself a vehicle,” Madison said. “You have to make the cars ride according to you. It’s frustrating riding in the city sometimes because if I were a

slow moving vehicle like any other situation, it’d be no different than someone just driving past. “A lot of motorists in Atlanta just don’t know how to deal with cyclists and that’s when it gets dangerous to ride in the streets,” Madison continued. “Luckily, these new bike lanes have made the lifestyle way easier.” Madison, who has built more than 250 bikes over the years, explained the pleasure he gets from customizing a bike and then seeing it somewhere in the streets. “It’s a great feeling when I see someone who I’ve made a bike for and they tell me how much attention their bike gets them or how many compliments they get.” Even though Madison loves to see his bikes in action—both in the streets and on the Beltline—he also thinks the popularity of the Beltline is “a blessing and a curse for riders.” “The Beltline is really crowded; that it’s only downfall,” Madison said.

Continued on page 28 


bikes Beltline continued “I try to ride on it outside of rush hour, when everyone is getting off work. All the joggers take a huge amount of space from people that like to ride on bikes or skates. I definitely think that it needs to be widened. The popularity of the Beltline is a blessing and a curse for riders.” Despite the shortcomings, Madison ultimately feels that the

Beltline and bike lane construction is beneficial for the culture in Atlanta. “The lanes have only fostered what was already happening in the city,” Madison said. “With the transformation on Edgewood from the trolley construction, the lanes and trails are perfect. The Beltline is amazing because it’s connected so many neighborhoods and villages. It’s going to change the culture of transportation in Atlanta.”

Although the Beltline circles a large portion of downtown Atlanta, it has a special relevance to Georgia State students, who may be unable to afford a car in the city. With the rapid expansion of the Beltline, freshly painted bike lanes and artistic individuals like Mikel Madison committed to creating superior two wheel transport, buying a Fixie bicycle may be the best investment a Georgia State student can make.

map credit: beltline.org

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Restaurant Review:

H A R O L D ’ S C H I C K E N photo by: raven schley

written by: JOHNNY GIPSON

d

Downtown Atlanta has several premiere places to get good fried chicken, but one that often gets overlooked is the scabrous, yet sophisticated, Harold’s Chicken. Nestled in the heart of the Old Fourth Ward, Harold’s Chicken and Ice Bar has established itself as the face of good eating on Edgewood Avenue. Although the restaurant’s name includes “ice bar”, it is slightly misleading. There aren’t any ice sculptures dazzling the eyes of guests, but there is a full bar, containing many classic drink choices like Jack Daniels, Grey Goose and Malibu. It’s almost impossible to miss the restaurant in passing, and you’re

the signal urbanite | incept issue

almost certain to hear it before you see it; a constant mix of R&B, Hip Hop and Soul music resonates from its interior. If the sounds of the establishment don’t capture your attention, the imposing steel bars covering its front windows surely will. Upon entry, you’re instantly overtaken by the juxtaposition of fine art and flat screens resting on the walls. If one of the games on the numerous televisions isn’t entertaining enough, a quick glance at the beautiful, portrait style paintings throughout the restaurant will surely intrigue you. The brickladen walls and low-key lighting make Harold’s appear rough and rugged, but the ambiance is anything but. After being seated, an expansive

menu is soon provided; with selections spanning from fried catfish to chicken gizzards to okra, Harold’s serves more than just the typical chicken wings and fries. The typical chicken and fish combo meal runs between $11-13, but larger meals— like the 24 piece wing buckets—cost $33. A fish filet dinner costs $11, and a fried green bean or sweet potato tater-tot appetizer costs $5. Although everything on the menu is extremely appetizing, my personal favorite is the ‘Perch and Wings’ combo, a combination of three chicken wings and two pieces of fish with a side of fries. The signature chicken wings are large and flavorful. With the option

Continued on page 30 


food Harold's Chicken continued

Grade: B+

photo by: raven schley



and the occasional live performance during the week. Harold’s is the perfect place to end a wild night out during the weekend, or to simply enjoy a good game during the week. Anyone who appreciates fine art, great music and fried chicken wings will find this restaurant to be more than satisfying. Just make sure you get them extra crispy.

photo by: raven schley

of getting either “hot” or “mild” sauce to dip them in, I prefer the mild sauce every time. The tomato-based sauce boasts a tangy, yet sweet flavor to complement the juicy crunch of the chicken. It recommended you order your wings “extra crispy” to provide that extra crackle when you bite down. There are three wings provided in a typical meal, and a side of large cut french fries. The fried perch included in the “Perch and Wings” order is also exceptionally tasty. The fish is fried golden brown and then seasoned with a generous touch of salt. Two large pieces are provided, and their sweet tartar sauce on the side brings balance to the strong flavor of the fish. Aside from the chicken and fish, there are also several sides that can be ordered with a meal. Cole slaw and thick-cut french fries are the default sides in any meal, but mushrooms, onion rings, or—my personal favorite—fried okra, can also be ordered in replacement. The french fries are lacking considerably in flavor, but the fried okra’s delectable flavoring makes up for what the fries miss; lightly salted and deep-fried, the okra still retains the moist, juicy taste that we are familiar with, in addition to the delicious crunch that makes it so fun to eat. A slice of bread can also be found at the bottom of many of the entrees on the menu, which is a nice touch if you happen to order something spicy like the messy ten piece buffalo wings or a jalapeño pepper side.

The service at Harold’s is commendable. Every server has a smile, and constantly asks if everything is up to par. On a regular day, your food comes to you within 10 minutes of placing your order. On busy weekend, food arrives between 15 and 20 minutes after ordering. Harold’s largest point of appeal is the fact that it is open until 3 a.m. on weekends, making it a game-changer after an Edgewood bar-crawl. There is even a live DJ on Saturday nights


Neighborhood Guide: D O W N T O W N written by: ALEX KUGACZEWSKI photo by: raven schley

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Straight out of high school, many college freshman will find themselves outside the confined space of familiar concrete halls and thrown into the foreign, bustling environment of downtown Atlanta.

With the luxury to go anywhere before and after classes, Georgia State’s incoming freshman class should know the best places to spend their time around Georgia State’s campus and the surrounding area.

Full of eateries, markets, stores and attractions, there’s no shortage of places for students to enjoy their time around campus. Here are the top four places for new Georgia State students to visit.

photo by: raven schley

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photo by: raven schley

Anatolia Cafe & Hookah Lounge 52 Peachtree St. NW Anatolia Cafe & Hookah Lounge isn’t a typical campus dining establishment—it’s a bar, a hookah den and an eatery all in one. Couple that utility with the affordable pricing, and Anatolia Cafe is undoubtedly one of downtown Atlanta’s premiere student attractions. The building’s first floor is wide and spacious with plenty of seating options for customers, including window-side booths, bar stools and tables. Upstairs, the interior

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and its people over the centuries. Current exhibits include a vintage trolley, a Sweet Auburn drug store and a wall-scaling timeline of African history. The timeline is visualized with numerous illustrations, documenting early African civilizations throughout history. Turning right, visitors will notice a slave ship replica against the next wall. Apex Museum founder Dan Moore takes great pride in the museum

item because all of the restaurant’s dishes are good, but she noted that the gyros, kebobs and vegetarian dishes are popular choices. Gungoren also said that Anatolia Cafe & Hookah Lounge appeals to more than just Georgia State students. She serves foreigners and businessmen as well. “I like cooking, and I wanted to have my own business. Me and my children are very into our business. It’s probably the most important thing,” Gungoren said.

photo by: raven schley

To say that the Apex Museum’s exterior is low-key would be an understatement. The building’s entire front facade consists of nothing more than a brick wall with the museum’s name printed across a red awning mounted over the front door. Inside the building, however, is one of Auburn Avenue’s most exciting and educational attractions. The museum, opened in 1978, offers visitors a number of exhibits documenting the history of Africa

photo by: raven schley

Apex Museum 135 Auburn Ave. NE

adopts a more casual tone with its numerous couches and plush cushions. Anatolia Cafe & Hookah Lounge brings its own culture to the downtown Atlanta food scene as well. Anatolia offers students a variety of Mediterranean dishes, including gyros, falafel and tabbouleh in addition to numerous alcoholic drinks and hookah flavors. Owner and founder Rabia Gungoren said that she doesn’t want to recommend a singular menu

and believes it to be an important historical documentation of Black accomplishment. Moore said that one of his goals when founding the Apex Museum was to dispel the many myths surrounding black history. “I asked myself why there wasn’t an African American museum in a city like Atlanta,” Moore said. “We believe there’s a great contribution by Africans and African Americans to world history. They’re overlooked in many instances.”


downtown

photo by: raven schley

It’s no secret that the strip of Broad Street closest to Aderhold Learning Center is completely dominated by restaurants and eateries. From pizza to smoothies to sushi, there’s no shortage of choices for students looking for a meal. Dua Vietnamese Noodle Shop is certainly one of the busiest stores in the area. It’s nearly packed every weekday during lunchtime hours, and it’s easy to see why. The shop offers students a variety of Vietnamese

dishes at affordable prices. While the shop’s interior looks like your typical restaurant, Dua’s downstairs eating area is the place to sit if seating is available. Strings of light bulbs line the ceiling, and the brick walls and muted colors lend the room an underground atmosphere. Owner and founder Mylinh Cao established Dua six years ago on Broad Street to provide downtown Atlanta with quality Vietnamese cuisine. According to Cao, she

the signal urbanite | incept issue

reserved entirely for the chefs and their ingredients, leaving customers to enjoy the gorgeous scenery of Centennial Olympic Park while sitting on any of the numerous benches along the building’s perimeter. Those benches provide the perfect space to enjoy Googie Burger’s menu choices, which include classic hamburgers, sandwiches,

didn’t anticipate the speed of the restaurant’s success. In addition to the quality of the food, which is all freshly prepared, Cao said that Dua’s simplicity sets it apart from the competition, specifically noting Dua’s single-page menu. “It’s a very simple concept. Most Vietnamese restaurants have three or six page menus. If I’m going to cater to businesses and Georgia State, I want to keep it simple.”

photo by: raven schley

First impressions are undeniably important, and Googie Burger certainly strikes an impressive one. The angular, white rooftop architecture offers a stark contrast to the lush green of the trees and grass surrounding the building’s perimeter. No other burger spot in the downtown area looks quite like it. Googie Burger’s interior, unlike many downtown food stops, is

photo by: raven schley

Googie Burger 265 Park Ave. W NW

photo by: raven schley

Dua Vietnamese Noodle Soup 53 Broad St. NW

salads and shakes at affordable prices for the frugal student. Customer Stacey Lucas said that she enjoys Googie Burger’s food and that it is a good excuse to come down to the park while she’s not working at the Atlanta Children’s Museum. “It’s good food, and it’s nice to sit outside in the park. The milkshakes are probably my favorite,” Lucas said.

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Neighborhood Guide: THE HIGHLANDS written by: SAMANTHA REARDON

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he Highlands boasts such a vast array of awesome local haunts that it would be impossible to highlight all of them. But in this installment of The Signal’s neighborhood guide series, we bring you five local establishments you won’t want to miss. Bonus: they’re all within walking distance of one another.

Cafe 640 640 North Highland Ave. NE

Righteous Room 1051 Ponce De Leon Ave. NE Sandwiched between Urban Outfitters and the Plaza Theatre off Ponce de Leon Avenue, The Righteous Room is the perfect stop for drinks after a Friday night Rocky Horror show—it’s a dive-bar with a bohemian flair, a kickass playlist and general coolness. Business partner and bartender Patrick Galvin was printing CD covers for albums he burned for the

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Cafe 640 is at all times many things: a bistro, a cafe, a restaurant and a bar. Chef Peter Frazzano mixes European and American cuisine to produce dishes that are both affordable and contain high quality ingredients. “That’s the nice thing about the title of our restaurant—Cafe 640 —we can really do anything. We’re not stereotyped as being a certain

restaurant,” Frazzano says. General manager Ticia Grass attests to the importance of lending a hand to other local businesses and appealing to customers. “We definitely try to appeal to our neighborhood,” Grass says. The cafe also boasts various events throughout the week, such as live music performances each Thursday at 8 p.m.

bar’s playlist when he discussed his start as a bartender at The Righteous Room. The bar has been serving the Highlands for 17 years, and some of the regulars are just folks working down the street. Drinks come sans tax; a $4 beer is $4 flat. “People in the service industry, I don’t think they want to pay $8 to $12 for a drink, you know? ‘Cause

they don’t make much money either. You know, they need to pay rent and pay all their bills, so we afford them the opportunity to drink on the cheap,” Galvin explains. This solidifies the bar’s neighborhood relevance, making it one of the most iconic spots in the Highlands.


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highlands photo by: candra umunna

Atlanta Cupcake Factory 624 North Highland Ave. NE

Highland Row Antiques 628 North Highland Ave. NE Highland Row Antiques is rather unassuming if you never make it past the main floor. But the cashier will prompt you to go downstairs, and by all means—go. You will be greeted by six rooms filled with everything from vintage clothing to mid-century furniture to preserved Playboys, and everything in between. Owner Angela Carbon opened Highland Row Antiques 10 years ago with a handful of vendors, and now she has more than 20 who sell their wares in the store. “I just like to keep it small. I don’t like change too much. I like the personalities of the people that are there. You sort of have to fit the store.” The store’s aesthetic is funky and eclectic—a reflection of Carbon’s vendors. She tries to focus mainly on antiques from the 50s through the 70s. It seems like they have everything imaginable. “We’ve had some vintage, erotic S&M stuff before—I mean, we’ve got it all.”

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In its eight-year run, Atlanta Cupcake Factory (ACF) has made quite the name for itself under the helm of owner Jamie Fahee; it has been featured in several local publications, including Creative Loafing. ACF is not just any cupcake shop, baker Zoe Mayfield explains. Fahee opened her doors before cupcakes became trendy.

“We’re like the original gangster of cupcakes, so we did cupcakes before the trend,” Mayfield says. Mayfield thinks you’re either born to bake or you’re not. But either way, anyone can enjoy the cupcakes at ACF. What really sets ACF apart are the natural ingredients used, making each bite taste like it was homemade in the family kitchen. All cakes are baked fresh daily.

Videodrome 617 North Highland Ave. NE Videodrome is covered wall-towall in DVDs and movie posters, and, at first entry, it’s a little overwhelming. But with the selection of about 18,000 DVDs covering several genres—American indies, foreign films, sci-fi, horror and anime—it’s as simple as speaking to an employee and finding something you like. Owner Matt Booth opened Videodrome in 1998. His introduction to non-mainstream films came when he was a student at the University of Georgia. After

seeing films like Unbelievable Truth, Booth explains he couldn’t stop. And though movie lovers can easily stream movies online now, Booth says that Videodrome offers an alternative to the culture of having to sign up for multiple, costly accounts that carry different films, like Netflix and HBO GO. “Because different sources carry different material...so we have all that, so you don’t have to search around for what you want,” Booth says.

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Neighborhood Guide: I

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I O

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T L V N T

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written by: SAMANTHA REARDON & JEWEL WICKER

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ittle Five Points is—arguably— the Atlanta neighborhood with the most character. On any given day, locals and tourists alike can hear live music flooding the streets, shop for handmade and vintage goods and grab a beer with friends. For this part of the neighborhood guide series, we want to highlight the diverse array of businesses that most embody the spirit of this eclectic district.

Little Five Soul 1131 Euclid Ave. 

Little Five Soul doesn’t stand out from the other businesses on Euclid. But the music playing on the inside filters into the street, and that, explains manager Dave Soul, is what draws customers in. “When you walk in, there’s a certain vibe to it, and the music is always good.” This is what initially drew Dave to the store, which was originally located across the street at an open-market bazaar. He said that the original location reminded him of a cross between Magazine Street and the French market in New Orleans, his hometown. Eventually, Dave became more than a customer, and enjoys his job helping people find the music they’re looking for. “Our niche has been to offer the public things that you don’t really find at Best Buy or Target, and different stuff that you don’t find on mainstream radio.” The store carries a variety of genres, including R&B, jazz, broken beats, house and rap. They also offer t-shirts, locally designed jewelry, sunglasses and beverages. Dave explained the importance of the store to promote a niche market that caters its customers, unlike department stores. “It’s the pop and pop shops that maintain that personal touch—that interaction with the people, and a lot of the department stores don’t have that.”

photo by: candra umunna

L F P

Savage Pizza 484 Moreland Ave. NE What was first inspired by Southern Californian pizza boutiques is now a restaurant staple in Little Five Points. Savage originally opened its doors in 1990 at a Virginia Highlands location. Co-owner Field Cox said the move came because Little Five garnered more buzz and foot traffic. “There is a lot of neighborhood stuff around here: Inman Park, Candler Park—all the people living in those neighborhoods are a great draw.” Cox said that one of the most important roles he plays at Savage is to draw customers in and keep them coming back. “You have to treat people well and take an interest in them personally.” Savage—with its brightly decorated walls and comic book references— has a very personal atmosphere and welcoming service. The wall art started with Cox’s partner Myron’s paintings that originally hung in a new wave club in the late 70s. “It just kind of took on a life of its own after that,” Cox said of the decor.


little five

Elmyr 1091 Euclid Ave. NE

Variety Playhouse 1099 Euclid Ave. NE Steven Harris, owner of Variety Playhouse, said some of Wax n’ Facts’, a nearby record store, musician clients learn about the store while in the area for a show at Variety Playhouse. Even when they’ve outgrown the venue, they still come back to the community. Musicians from every genre play at the venue, which sells general admission tickets and offers both standing and seating options on a first-come, first-served basis. Harris said Variety Playhouse has been the community’s music venue for nearly 24 years. Before then, it was a movie theater, a church, an art house and a place where toxic chemicals were stored. He took over the venue in 1990 and said his experience as a show promoter gave him a better understanding of the market than the previous owner. He said the small community benefits from the fact that everything is within walking distance. “I think one thing that’s a plus for Little Five Points is that it’s a walking neighborhood. So you can come here, you can drop your car for the night, get a meal before the show, come see a show, go get some drinks afterwards, or food afterwards, and do all of that in a neighborhood.”

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According to co-owner/manager/ “fix-it dude” Jim Shelly, Elmyr (pronounced El-meer) is both a party bar and a restaurant. Elmyr started as one of his favorite local bars, then became his workplace. Since he began, he’s worked aside some of Altanta’s prominent artists and musicians. Shelly explained how that’s part of Elmyr’s goal to support local creative people. “Bill from Mastadon worked here for years when he first moved to Atlanta.”

Sacred Heart Tattoo 483 Moreland Ave. NE Although it’s the oldest running tattoo shop in Atlanta, a banner sign stating the word “Tattoo” is Sacred Heart’s only marker from the street. Once you enter the brick building and find your way up its stairs, you’ll be greeted at the door by the buzz of tattoo needles and cadence of hip hop beats. Manager and artist Loki Shane has been tattooing for 16 years, in his own hometown of Little Five Points. He first got interested in the industry while getting his first tattoo.

Shelly said Elmyr is also the hangout of bands like the Coathangers, who will be premiering their new music video at Elmyr on March 5. “It’s a really fun bar you can go to and party and you know you’re going to see somebody you’re friends with here for sure.” The Latin inspired cuisine is prepared fresh every day, and things on the menu have stayed relatively the same, with the exception of everyday specials. “The minute the girl started on my skin, I knew this is what I was going to do for the rest of my life.” Shane has been an artist since childhood, painting and drawing in his sketchbooks. He described his work as mostly large-scale, vibrantly colored tattoos. His favorite tattoos to do are cover-up pieces, which he said gives people a second chance. “It gives people new life. When you have a lot of bad tattoos, people regret, because of bad memories or bad things connected to them, or they we’re horribly done so they’re embarrassed to show them. To be able to give someone a new piece of art that they’re going to enjoy showing off, make them happy about showing they’re body again—it means a lot.” Working at a shop that has been around for 20 years has given Shane the chance to watch the local businesses grow and evolve. “There is never a dull moment in this neighborhood.”

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Neighborhood Guide:

written by: SAMANTHA REARDON, JEWEL WICKER & JOHNNY GIPSON

photo by: afi cakpo

E A S T A T L A N T A V I L L A G E

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ast Atlanta Village is a community with a chip on its shoulder. Its gritty streets and single gear bicycle riders give it a recalcitrant charm comparable to none. For this part of the neighborhood guide series, we highlight a tight knit community of entrepreneurs and artists not-so-quietly tucked behind Moreland Avenue.

The Graveyard Tavern 1245 Glenwood Ave. SE

The T-Shirt Lady 490 Flat Shoals Ave. SE

Graveyard Tavern is arguably the most well-known attraction in EAV. Boasting a wide array of nightly events for every demographic, Graveyard is impossible to miss while passing through, both literally and figuratively. If the eerie black hearse guarding its front doors isn’t intriguing enough, its unique interior set-up surely is. Situated as a restaurant with a full bar, couches and dance-floor, Graveyard blends every entity of nightlife into one.

“Everything we do is for the village,” manager Drew Gillespie said. “We take pride in being an above average service bar..” Live music is taken very seriously at the Graveyard, with events nearly every night featuring premiere DJs and bands from Atlanta’s music scene. And offering five dollar pitchers, flavorful wings and handmade burgers, it almost feels wrong not to eat while there.

Since moving to EAV from Jonesboro two years ago, the community has received The T-Shirt Lady well because she has something to offer everyone. “[My customers are] real diverse. All kind of people. You have the young kids that just come in, you have the soccer moms that come, you have

the people from family reunions, you have…rappers, artists.” The owner, who prefers to be called T-Shirt Lady, has been designing shirts for a decade. She said she enjoys the community in EAV more than the Jonesboro community because it encourages the growth of local businesses.

“Where my shop used to be they didn’t care. They’re more involved in keeping the businesses here. Especially if it’s a product that they want.” The T-Shirt Lady is a healthy blend of creating designs for customers and implementing the ideas they bring into her store.

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EAV

Carson Bryce Trading Company 720 Moreland Ave. SE

The Gallery EAV 490 Flat Shoals Ave. SE T-Shirt Lady loved the EAV community so much that she decided to open a nonprofit art gallery right next door to The T-Shirt Lady last August. Colorful paintings and brown masks from various artists line the brick walls in The Gallery EAV where art exhibits, community and private events are held. “I decided to open up a gallery so that people could express themselves in different art forms. But not just art like on the wall. I mean rappers and musicians, dancers, anything that revolves around art.” The Gallery runs off of donations from visitors and a percentage of the art that is sold during exhibits. “Even if they put a dollar in, [it’s] the fact that they even gave and they know that this place exists and the artists are able to express themselves,” she said.

Fluff and Em Florist 500 Flat Shoals Ave. SE the signal urbanite | incept issue

Carson Bryce Trading Company owner Carla Foster said her desire for true happiness and freedom from corporate strain inspired her to open up her eclectic apothecary store. “I always wanted a mom and pop shop with treasures. I got tired of working in corporate America, so I started to develop a bit of a following through festivals.” Foster explained her products as

a mix between bath and body goods and antiques. She takes pride in having “one of a kind” objects and creates natural home goods like body butter and organic soap while also selling women’s clothes and home décor. “I really like making a unique display. I like the way my shop matches the diverse environment that it’s situated in. I just love the whole area, there’s such a sense of community.”

Lynne Tanzer co-owns and operates Hodgepodge Coffeehouse and Gallery, which is housed in a 70-yearold historical building just a few blocks away from the bustling EAV neighborhood. And though Tanzer said that their

space was more affordable than those in EAV or L5P, Hodgepodge makes it a goal to invest in local goods. Hodgepodge recently began incorporating pastries, cupcakes and sandwiches into their menu. “We really wanted to make sure that we were... making everything here so that it was as fresh as it could possibly be.” Hodgepodge is also a haven for handmade local goods, which are situated throughout the space. Collections of paintings hang in the gallery and jewelry and candles stock the bistro, among others. “We’ve got a little bit of a reputation as somewhere where you can get local and handmade.”

James Morgan Jr., owner of ‘Fluff and Em Florist’, believes since “people thrive on the village lifestyle,” he’s been able to remain one of the cornerstone shops in EAV after 16 years of business. “My mother showed me the power of flowers,” Morgan said. “I would bring her dandelions and small flowers, and it always softened whatever struggles we were facing at the time.”

Originally working out of his basement, Morgan expanded his business to EAV because he loved the tight knit community and saw great potential in the area. A current resident, Morgan says he can see the evolution right before his eyes. “When we first came here, ...it was an area in transition with no stability. ...but we decided that nothing would overcome our dream.”

Hodgepodge Coffeehouse 720 Moreland Ave. SE

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The Signal Urbanite Vol. 1  

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