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Teresa GalĂ­-Izard

Regenerative Empathy


Fall 2018

Studio Report


Teresa GalĂ­-Izard

Regenerative Empathy: Complex Assemblages in a Shared Environment


Regenerative Empathy: Complex Assemblages in a Shared Environment Studio Instructor Teresa GalĂ­-Izard Students Oi Wai Charity Cheung, Su-Yeon Angela Choi, Luis Enrique Flores, Caroline Hickey, Jenjira Holmes, Christin Hu, Danica Liongson, Malone Matson, Melissa Naranjo, Stefano Romagnoli, Joshua Stevens, Hannah Van der Eb Final Review Critics Mustapha Bouhayati, Seth Denizen, DorothĂŠe Imbert, Bonnie-Kate Walker


Title

6


Introduction

Assemblages

8

Preface Anita Berrizbeitia

114

“Les Alpilles” Wild Garden Melissa Naranjo

11

Regenerative Empathy: Complex Assemblages in a Shared Environment Teresa Galí-Izard

120

The Hidden Potential of the Aquifer Recharge Luis Enrique Flores

124

La Route de la Terre: Reimagining Transhumance in Arles Danica Liongson

126

Local Watersheds Hannah Van der Eb

128

Lamb & Wine Oi Wai Charity Cheung

130

HyperCuniculture Joshua Stevens

132

Underground River as Driver of Water Conservation Caroline Hickey

134

Pigs & Peaches Christin Hu

138

SaltyCulture Su-Yeon Angela Choi

140

Pas de Refus Malone Matson

142

Reimagining Rice Farming in La Camargue Jenjira Holmes

144

Salty Carbon Farming Stefano Romagnoli

148

Contributors

Earth & Climate 16

Geology

18

Climate

Translations 24

Scientific Articles

46

Site Visit

54

Market

102

Luma Foundation


8

Preface

Design studios are at the core of education at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD). Guided by a faculty member, students explore questions that lie at the intersection of real world problems and speculative thinking through new frameworks of knowledge that seek to advance design practice. “Regenerative Empathy: Complex Assemblages in a Shared Environment” was one of 20 studios offered at the GSD during the 2018–2019 academic year. Sponsored by the LUMA Foundation, it is the first of a series that will investigate the city of Arles, France, and its surrounding region. The Arles region is an especially auspicious topic of study today. Three distinct landscapes converge in, and give structure to, this territory: the Alpilles Mountains made of limestone formations and scrub forest, the flat lands of the Crau, an extensive rocky plain with a geologically compressed subsoil that can only support grasslands, and the salt marshes of the Camargue in the delta of the Rhône River as it enters the Mediterranean Sea. The region is on a major migratory route for birds, has one of the few remaining operational transhumance routes in

Anita Berrizbeitia

Europe for sheep and other livestock, hosts a robust tourism industry, and produces agricultural goods. More importantly, here, the friction—and sometimes collision—between the forces of nature and the actions of humans to reshape the effects of those forces is ongoing and clearly visible. Occupied and reworked over millennia, this landscape has been dramatically transformed from a windswept “wasteland” in the words of historians Marc Bloch and Fernand Braudel,1 to a garden-region well supplied with water, an extensive fabric of hedgerows of all types and sizes to shelter crops from the Mistral—strong, cold wind that blows across southern France—and an agricultural production that would not have been possible without far-reaching technological inputs. In what were previously wet lowlands and arid plains, an extensive filigree of canals redistribute water where there was none, drains it where there was too much, controls it where it overflowed, and separates salt from fresh water where they were once united. The received image of this edenic patchwork of orchards, vineyards, and sunflower fields—beautifully depicted


1.

See Marc Bloch, French Rural History: An Essay on Its Basic Characteristics (1966), and Fernand Braudel, The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Philip II (1972).

2.

Jane Bennett defines an actant, following Bruno Latour, as a “source of action that can be either human or non-human; it is that which has efficacy, can do things, has sufficient coherence to make a difference, produce effects, alter the course of events.” In Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things (2010).

9

in Van Gogh’s paintings—belies centuries of soil exploitation and exhaustion that has degraded its capacity to sustain life. “Regenerative Empathy: Complex Assemblages in a Shared Environment” sought to diffuse this friction through theorizing the rhizosphere—the region of soil around the roots of plants where nutrient exchange between microorganisms and plants occur—as the locus of design. Assemblages of processes, techniques, materials, natural and man-made “actants” are proposed to renovate the degraded soil stratum on which so much of life depends.2 Although the studio has a strong technical component, including the translation of scientific data into spatialized form, it is ultimately a political project that pursues more equal status between all forms of life. It thus raises the larger question of the relationship between humans and the natural world, and the role of landscape architecture in creating a more distributed agency of, and collaboration between, people, animals, vegetation, weather and other abiotic factors, technology, and energy in the era of climate change and the aftermath of environmental ruin.


Watershed geology map.


Earth & Climate In the natural operations of the world, the land is perishing continually. . . . —James Hutton1 Climate simultaneously destroys and builds the earth’s physical structure. It has always been this way. Life and decay work together. Weathering, an expressive consequence of climate, acts through heating and cooling, freezing and thawing, raining and drying; it disturbs and decomposes minerals, from rocks to soil. Weathering finishes buildings until they become ruins. It alters our hair and skin, and it scatters rocks, which then participate in the construction of soil. The unfolding of life is part of this phenomenon too. Particles that have been disassembled are reassembled, incorporating empty spaces for water and air that will allow life to begin. The decomposition of organic material and moisture engages new process and the presence of a new microbiological world. The underground condition of life, related to the decomposition of organic material, is directly attached to the root system of the species

Teresa Galí-Izard

that grow above—roots exude sugars that feed the microorganisms in charge of decay. This space of life, around the radicular system of plants, is called the rhizosphere. We can observe this phenomenon as a common trait wherever we are in the planet. We can also acknowledge and read its consequences and effects in the exploited land with different gradients of intensity. This shared understanding of the rhizosphere in terms of origin, formation, space, and time is key to understanding the final goal of the studio. La Méditerranén est une mer intérieure, entourée de terres une mer que concentre (qui dans l’antiquité grecque, hébraïque ou latine et plus tard dans l’émergence islamique a imposé la pensée de l’Un). —Edouard Glissant3 Rhizosphere, understood as a living entity that is the result of the interaction between climate and geological conditions over time, is our space of design. While reading the practices of human impact in its physical space, we engage

11

Regenerative Empathy: Complex Assemblages in a Shared Environment


Translations The studio sought to encourage students’ empathy toward La Camargue, and to flourish through drawing. Building empathy is not a simple act. It takes time, and needs to be intentional. During the process of discovering, the students’ fascination and excitement had to be kept at bay; instead, they were to focus on the rhizosphere, which contains the scars of agricultural practices laying on top of historical traces. In this process they transcended their personal interests in favor of those of the site. By doing so, they expanded their own worlds, digging into the unknown, seeking a voice and a space for sleeping layers of lost knowledge. We asked them to translate their research, as accurately as they could, into legible drawings. Through a systematic approach and restrictive unique lens, we were able to unveil the complexity of the site in an organized way. We established a shared language—black-and-white line drawing—as a common ground for different sources of knowledge such as geological maps, data from climate, field observations, scientific articles, and abstract diagrams. We agreed to share a graphic convention for each subject, which involved common line weights, and scales of representation and hatches that would represent a certain quality of the earth. The final goal was to discover, through drawing, new relationships. Drawing would reveal the potential of this place after the deposition of knowledge that each line of information carried on. This eventual unfolding of relationships was rid of prejudices, and would form the basis of future proposals.

Assemblages Regenerative agriculture is a new way of managing the land, based on the complex relationships and original assemblages of living creatures and lifeways. It seeks to regenerate the rhizosphere as a biological entity by creating dynamic synergies between us humans and new associations of living systems. The creation of this community of different life-forms is, in reality, a constructed complex ecosystem where humans step back and renounce exploiting the land at its maximum. The process of bringing soils back to life is successful under a highly sophisticated management regime: always maintaining minimum soil disturbance, integrating animals in a daily rotation routine, always having the soil covered, increasing plant diversity, and keeping roots alive. These principles are the consequences of reading closely and understanding natural processes and the search to create novel synergies over time. Under this system high yields of production are possible, along with the creation of biodiversity, fertile soils, biomass, and other forms of life—what traditional agriculture has destroyed by seeking only high yields through monoculture, soil disturbance, mechanization, and fertilization. Regenerative agriculture is the paradigm of inhabiting our milieu in a conscious way. It portends a shift in the way humans have exploited the soil as a resource for millennia. This is a turn on the traditional way of understanding our place in the planet, which overcomes the human-centric vision of the world. This ambitious task can only be done with empathy, inclusion, and a great deal of love and generosity. The result of applying these new principles implies radical changes in the territory, not only in its management over time but also in its configuration and final outcome: it implies the disappearance of the regular traces of machines, and the beautiful patterns of the agricultural landscapes that are so integrated in our minds. This is why, as landscape architects, we are testing design capacities under this new paradigm, because it will change the landscape at a large scale and, hopefully, forever. After two months of drawing, the landscapes of La Camargue, Les Alpilles, and La Crau became translated into the language of design, and the new associations we were expecting appeared like easy labor. Under the constraints of regenerative agriculture and the display of the drawings altogether, new original assemblages became possible.

Regenerative Empathy

12

with a discovery of its historical marks. We seek a radiography which will give us enough transparency to discover its structure. What are the consequences of the layering of events over time? We will focus on the rhizosphere’s health, which has been described by Wes Jackson as a dying placenta: “. . . a tough, elastic membrane which has given rise to many life forms and has watched the thousands of species from their first experiments at survival . . . But it is itself now dying. It is a death that is utterly senseless, and portends our own.”3 This studio explores new ways of understanding the relationship between this placenta, the rhizosphere, agricultural production, and resource management in the Mediterranean region of La Camargue, France.


Teresa Galí-Izard

A continuous system of anchored pastures in the mountains of Les Alpilles, from which goats, outfitted with their seasonal “wardrobe,” disperse seed and regenerate the soil. A new “transhumance” logic embedded into the landscapes of La Crau, Les Alpilles, and La Camargue as a seasonal, migratory route of soil regeneration and culture transformation. A rotational, regenerative practice integrating Crau hay, the Camargue bull, and existing peach orchard systems under the logic of a gradient of densities of trees, connecting the fragmented reserves of La Crau. A salty system of Sylvopastures in La Camargue enlisting horses, cows, poultry, and poplars in the regeneration of biomass and carbon sequestration. A radical landscape of pigs and peach trees, which adapts the formality of the pruned, industrial peach orchard with the messiness of pig habits, restoring a culture of natural regeneration. A sheep and sunflower plot typology of water recharge and retention along existing underground river networks. A gradually extending network of rabbit tunnels and warrens along existing fruit tree hedgerows and sunflower fields, creating a subterranean landscape and economy of regeneration in the region of Arles. Regenerative plot and grazing system of fig trees, rice and oats, poplars, and cows, embracing the unpredictability of the Mediterranean climate through different topographies. A linear grazing and cultivation system of sheep, hay, and pear trees on existing vineyards, fostering mutually beneficial relationships among all agents within and above the rhizosphere. A system of collection ponds along existing drainage channels that work together with Italian cypress and alder, sheep, fruit trees, rice, and cattle, to generate a dynamic landscape around otherwise forgotten edges. A new association of Camargue horses, Collared pratincole, Salicornia, and asparagus with triangular grazing plots fanned across the thick, shifting boundaries of saltwater intrusion. A cyclical grazing system and circular plots of weeds, grasses, and shrubs, out, and in between the teeth of goats, bulls, and sheep.

In the search of what our contribution to La Camargue could be, we found that empathy and freedom were critical—empathy as an elastic trajectory that brought us from here to there; and freedom as an open window to imagine a different future without prejudices, and with our spirits alive. The recognition of the too-often alienated world of living things, and the constraints of climate that define our milieu, despite our efforts to overcome them, has also been critical. In this context we challenged ourselves to propose something special and genuine for this Mediterranean region, and we celebrate that with this presentation of drawings.

1.

2. 3.

James Hutton, “Theory of the Earth or an Investigation of the Laws observable in the Composition, Dissolution, and Restoration of Land upon the Globe,” Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh I (Edinburgh: The Society, 1788), 296. Edouard Glissant, Poétique de la Relation (Paris: Gallimard, 1990). Wes Jackson, New Roots for Agriculture (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1980), 10.

13

The proposal revealed these possibilities:


14

Earth & Climate


—Tetsuro Watsuji, Climate and Culture: A Philosophical Study (Tokyo: Hokuseido Press, 1961).

15

I use our word Fu-do [climate], which means literally, “Wind and Earth,” as a general term for the natural environment of a given land, its climate, its weather, the geological land productive nature of the soil, its topographic and scenic features. [...] It is not without reason that I wish to treat this natural environment of man not as “nature” but as “climate” in the above sense.


16

Geology

Legend can be found on pages 20–21.


17


18

Climate

Legend can be found on pages 20–21.


19


Legend for Geology and Climate

ROCKS & SOILS

Gravel

M2A4

Fu2

Fy M1bC M2aS

C7aG

UZ

My

C1-2 C3

C7AP

C7aC

CONGLOMERATES

C5

LIMESTONES

M2A2 M2Aa M1Ba

Biogenic Material

ORGANIC

N3C N4u G

SANDSTONES

20

Sand

R

INORGANIC (mm)

Silt

2.00–60.0

M2bS

Clay

0.05–2.00

N5 C6 C7a

N3a-b

0.002–0.05

FxG

Soils

SANDSTONES WITH PEBBLES

N2A

CLAYEY LIMESTONES, PEBBLES, AND MUDSTONES

M2a1 N2B M1B M2a3

Terrestrial Rocks

< 0.002

Marine Rocks


CLIMATE Field Condition WIND DIRECTION (ESWN)

high

50–150

mid

< 50

low

< 18

18–25

WIND INTENSITY

PRECIPITATION (mm)

>150

> 25

21

TEMPERATURE (°C)

Gaussen Diagram 55

100

50

90

45

80

40

70

35

60

30

50

25

40

20

30

15

20

10

10

5 0

0 J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

TEMPERATURE (°C)

PRECIPITATION (MM)

110


22

Translations


—George Steiner, Language and Science (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998).

23

Great translators—and they are very rare—act as a kind of living mirror. They offer to the original not an equivalence, for there can be none, but a vital counterpoise, an echo, faithful yet autonomous, as we find in the dialogue of human love. An act of translation is an act of love. Where it fails through immodesty or blurred perception, it traduces. Where it succeeds, it transfigures.


24

Wetlands and Hydrology

Translation of scientific article from Mike Acreman, Wetlands and Hydrology (Paris: Tour du Valat, 2000).

Hannah Van der Eb


Caroline Hickey

25

Wetlands and Water Resources

Translation of scientific article from Fred Pearce, Wetlands and Water Resources (Paris: Tour du Valat, 1996).


26

Characteristics of Mediterranean Wetlands

Translation of scientific article from Fred Pearce and Alain J. Crivelli, Characteristics of Mediterranean Wetlands (Paris: Tour du Valat, 1994).

Luis Enrique Flores


27


Christin Hu

28

Title

Mediterranean Land Systems: Representing Diversity and Intensity of Complex Land Systems in a Dynamic Region

Translation of scientific article from Žiga Malek and Peter Verburg, “Mediterranean Land Systems: Representing Diversity and Intensity of Complex Land Systems in a Dynamic Region,” Landscape and Urban Planning 165 (2017): 102–116.


29

Firstname Lastname


Stefano Romagnoli

30

Title

Aquaculture in Lagoon and Marine Environments

Translation of scientific article from Elisabeth Rosecchi and BĂŠatrice Charpentier, Aquaculture in Lagoon and Marine Environments (Paris: Tour du Valat, 1995).


31

Firstname Lastname


32

Perturbation and Delayed Recovery of the Reed Invertebrate Assemblage in Camargue Marshes Sprayed with Bacillus Thuringiensis Israelensis

Translation of scientific article from Brigitte Poulin and Gaetan Lefebvre, “Perturbation and Delayed Recovery of the Reed Invertebrate Assemblage in Camargue Marshes Sprayed with Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis,” Insect Science 25:4 (2018): 542–48.

Danica Liongson


33


34

Refus de Pâturage dans les Parcours de Camargue

Translation of scientific article from L. Willm, N. Yavercovski, L. Mishler, and F. Mesléard, Refus de pâturage: dans les parcours de Camargue (Paris: Tour du Valat, 2012).

Malone Matson


35


36

Functions and Values of Mediterranean Wetlands

Translation of scientific article from Jamie Skinner and Sally Zalewski, Functions and Values of Mediterranean Wetlands (Paris: Tour du Valat, 1995).

Jenjira Holmes


37


38

Management of Nest Sites for Colonial Waterbirds

Translation of scientific article from C. Perennou, N. Sadoul, O. Pineau, A. R. Johnson, and H. Hafner, Management of Nest Sites for Colonial Waterbirds (Paris: Tour du Valat, 1996).

Su-Yeon Angela Choi


39


Melissa Naranjo

40

Title

L’Anguille Européenne

Translation of scientific article from Alain Crivelli and Coralie Hermeloup, L’Anguille européenne (Paris: Tour du Valat, 2013).


41

Firstname Lastname


42

Cistude dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Europe en Camargue

Translation of scientific article from Michel Gauthier-Clerc, Anthony Olivier, and Jenyfer Peridont, Cistude dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Europe en Camargue (Paris: Tour du Valat, 2011).

Oi Wai Charity Cheung


43


44

Les Flamants Roses en Camargue

Translation of scientific article from Arnaud Bechet, Marc Thibault, and Olivier Boutron, Les flamants roses en Camargue (Paris: Tour du Valat, 2017).

Joshua Stevens


45


Title

46 Itinerary for site visit to Les Alpilles, La Crau, La Camargue.


47

Firstname Lastname


48 Site visit to Les Alpilles.


49

Translations: Site Visit


50 Site visit to La Crau.


51

Translations: Site Visit


52

Christin Hu, Christin Hu, Christin Hu, Christin Hu

Site visit to La Camargue.


53

Firstname Lastname


Honeybee: apis mellifera

Melissa Naranjo

Title

54

La Camargueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s iconic species


55

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Cow & Bull: raço di Biòu

Luis Enrique Flores Stefano Romagnoli

Title

56

La Camargue’s iconic species


57

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Grape: vitis vinifera

Caroline Hickey

Title

58

Pest reduction through maintenance


59

Translations: Market


Hay

Oi Wai Charity Cheung

Title

60

Land recovery device


61

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Asparagus: asparagus officinalis

Joshua Stevens

Title

62

Saline resilience


63

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Camargue Horse: equus ferus caballus

Su-Yeon Angela Choi

Title

64

Seasonal salty grazers


65

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Peach Tree: prunus persica

Christin Hu

Title

66

Pruning prunus


67

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Figue de Solliès: black bourjassote

Jenjira Holmes

Title

68

The drought-tolerant fruit tree


69

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Mulard: cairina moschata x Anas platyrhynchos

Jenjira Holmes

Title

70

Duck-maize coproduction


71

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Sunflower: helianthus annuus

Malone Matson

Title

72

Taproot resilience


73

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market

Loam

Mycorrhizal nutrient absorption

H0 ²


Vegetables

Luis Enrique Flores

Title

74

Irrigation infrastructure and windbreakers


75

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Goat: capra aegagrus hircus

Danica Liongson

Title

76

Scrubland and wind terroir


77

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Wild boar: sus scofra

Malone Matson

Title

78

Disease spreading through overpopulation


79

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Pig: sus scofras domesticus

Malone Matson

Title

80

Life cycle


81

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Almond Tree: prunus dulcis

82

Dry and neutral soil

Su-Yeon Angela Choi


83

Translations: Market


Olive: olea europaea

Danica Liongson

Title

84

Management for millennia


85

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Rabbit: oryctolagus cuniculus

Joshua Stevens

Title

86

Microbial soil health


87

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Sheep: ovis arles

Oi Wai Charity Cheung

Title

88

Landscaping through transhumance


89

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Blue-Winged Teal: anas discors

Jenjira Holmes

Title

90

Migratory ducks in Camargue


91

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Chicken:

Christin Hu

gallus gallus domesticus

Title

92

Breeding diversity


93

Firstname Lastname


Wheat: triticum aestivum

Stefano Romagnoli

Title

94

Soil salinization


95

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Camargue red rice: oryza longistaminata x oryza sativa

Hannah Van der Eb

Title

96

Soil desalination


97

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Greylag Goose: anser anser

Caroline Hickey

Title

98

Anatomical optimization


99

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Market


Twaite Shad: alosa fallax

Hannah Van der Eb

River infrastructure

Upstream, Freshwater, Gravel Bottom Shad Spawning Grounds

25–40 cm life span 10–12 yrs

Nuclear Power Plant

100

Title

Hydroelectri

Sedimentation in Dam Reservoir


Translations: Market

Historic Migration Present Migration

Salt and Brackish Water / Shad Habitat

Freshwater

Clay

Contamination

Salinity

Silt

Temperature Increase

Sand

ic Dam

101

Firstname Lastname

Gravel

Gravel Extraction

Twaite Shad Spawning Migration Aprilâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;June

Zingel Asper

Habitat Distruction


Luis Enrique Flores Jenjira Holmes

Title

102

Canne de Camargue: arundo donax


103

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Luma Foundation


Stefano Romagnoli Hannah Van der Eb

Title

104

Rice: oryza longistaminata x oryza sativa


105

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Luma Foundation


Su-Yeon Angela Choi

Title

106

Sunflower Enterprise: helianthus annuus


107

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Luma Foundation


Oi Wai Charity Cheung Joshua Stevens

Title

108

Algae Lab


109

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Luma Foundation


Caroline Hickey Melissa Naranjo

Title

110

Salt Crystals


111

Firstname Lastname

Translations: Luma Foundation


112

Assemblages


—Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010).

113 113

Assemblages are ad hoc groupings of diverse elements, of vibrant materials of all sorts. Assemblages are living, throbbing confederations that are able to function despite the persistent presence of energies that confound them from within. They have uneven topographies, because some of the points at which the various affects and bodies cross paths are more heavily trafficked than others, and so power is not distributed equally across its surface. Assemblages are not governed by any central head: no one materiality or type of material has sufficient competence to determine consistently the trajectory or impact of the group. The effects generated by an assemblage are, rather, emergent properties, emergent in that their ability to make something happen (a newly inflected materialism, a blackout, a hurricane, a war on terror) is distinct from the sum of the vital force, but there is also an effective proper to the grouping as such: an agency of the assemblage. And precisely because each member-actant maintains an energetic pulse slightly “off” from that of the assemblage, an assemblage is never a stolid block but an open-ended collective, a “non-totalizable sum.”


Melissa Naranjo

114

Title

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Les Alpillesâ&#x20AC;? Wild Garden

A continuous system of anchored pastures in the mountains of Les Alpilles, from which goats, outfitted with their seasonal "wardrobe," disperse seed and regenerate the soil.


115

Firstname Lastname


Title

116


117


Title

118 The areas of La Crau and La Camargue; areas of opportunity.


119


The Hidden Potential of Aquifer Recharge

Luis Enrique Flores

irrigation canals reserve naturelle coussouls de crau peach tree orchards irrigated permanent meadows

120

water well

irrigation canals reserve naturelle coussouls de crau peach tree / irrigated permanent meadows irrigated permanent meadows water well

A rotational, regenerative practice integrating Crau hay, the Camargue bull, and existing peach orchard systems under the logic of a gradient of densities of trees, connecting the fragmented reserves of La Crau.

Maps of the plain of La Crau. Top: Existing agricultural land use defined by its aquifer/irrigation canals, wells. Bottom: Proposed agricultural land use that reallocates an overlap of orchards, irrigated meadows, and elimination of wells in the reserve naturelle coussouls de Crau.


Gaussen diagram of Provence: Bouches Du Rhone with actors according to their presence in the different seasons


122


123

Firstname Lastname


124

La Route de la Terre: Reimagining Transhumance in Arles

A new "transhumance" logic embedded into the landscapes of La Crau, Les Alpilles, and La Camargue as a seasonal, migratory route of soil regeneration and culture transformation.

Danica Liongson


125


126

Local Watersheds

A system of collection ponds along existing drainage channels that work together with Italian cypress and alder, sheep, fruit trees, rice, and cattle to generate a dynamic landscape around otherwise forgotten edges.

Hannah Van der Eb


127


128

Lamb & Wine

A linear grazing and cultivation system of sheep, hay, and pear trees on existing vineyards, fostering mutually beneficial relationships among all agents within and above the rhizosphere.

Oi Wai Charity Cheung


129


Joshua Stevens

130

Title

HyperCuniculture

A gradually extending network of rabbit tunnels and warrens along existing fruit tree hedgerows and sunflower fields, creating a subterranean landscape and economy of regeneration in the region of Arles.


131

Firstname Lastname


132

Underground River as Driver of Water Conservation

A sheep and sunflower plot typology of water recharge and retention along existing underground river networks.

Caroline Hickey


133 Top: Mitigating water loss and improving recharge.

Bottom: Pumping station water retension.


Christin Hu

134

Title

Pigs & Peaches

A radical landscape of pigs and peach trees, which adapts the formality of the pruned, industrial peach orchard with the messiness of pig habits, restoring a culture of natural regeneration.


135

Firstname Lastname


136 Map of La Camargue showing areas of opportunity.


137

Firstname Lastname


Su-Yeon Angela Choi

138

Title

SaltyCulture

A new association of Camargue horses, collared pratincole, Salicornia, and asparagus with triangular grazing plots fanned across the thick, shifting boundaries of saltwater intrusion.


139


140

Pas de Refus

A cyclical grazing system and circular plots of weeds, grasses, and shrubs, out, and in between the teeth of goats, bulls, and sheep.

Malone Matson


141


142

Reimagining Rice Farming in La Camargue

Regenerative plot and grazing system of fig trees, rice and oats, poplars, and cows embracing the unpredictability of the Mediterranean climate through different topographies.

Jenjira Holmes


143


144

Salty Carbon Farming

A salty system of silvopastures in La Camargue enlisting horses, cows, poultry, and poplars in the regeneration of biomass and carbon sequestration.

Stefano Romagnoli


145


146

System structure


147

Silvopasture bringing back the forest to La Camargue

Horse and cane harvester


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Contributors

Anita Berrizbeitia Anita Berrizbeitia is a landscape architect specializing in theory and criticism of nineteenth and twentieth-century public landscapes in the United States, Latin America, and Europe, with particular interests in material culture, design expression, and the productive functions and roles of landscape in processes of urbanization. Berrizbeitia is professor of landscape architecture at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design and chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture. Berrizbeitia is editor of Urban Landscape—Critical Concepts in Built Environment Series (Routledge, March 2015); editor of Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates: Reconstructing Urban Landscapes (Yale University Press, 2009); author of Roberto Burle Marx in Caracas: Parque del Este, 1956– 1961 (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004); and coauthor with Linda Pollak of Inside/ Outside: Between Architecture and Landscape (Rockport, 1999).

Teresa Galí-Izard Teresa Galí-Izard is a landscape architect who translates the hidden potential of places by exploring new languages that integrate living systems into design. She seeks a contemporary answer that includes non-humans and their life-forms through researching climate, geology, natural processes, dynamics, and management. Galí-Izard is associate professor at the Harvard GSD. She was chair of the department of landscape architecture at University of Virginia from 2013 to 2015, and has been principal of ARQUITECTURA AGRONOMIA since 2007. Some important projects are Passeig de Sant Joan and Sant Joan Landfill restoration in Barcelona, San Telmo Palace garden in Seville, Arriaga Lake in Vitoria, Odesa Park in Sabadell, Logroño Train Station park, Casabermeja Park in Malaga, Desierto Square in Bilbao, Giner de los Rios garden in Madrid, and Parque Primeros Pasos in Caracas, Venezuela. Galí-Izard is author of The Same Landscapes: Ideas and Interpretations (Gustavo Gili, 2005).


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Colophon

Regenerative Empathy: Complex Assemblages in a Shared Environment Instructor

Teresa Galí-Izard Report Designers Christin Hu, Stefano Romagnoli Report Editors Christin Hu, Stefano Romagnoli A Harvard University Graduate School of Design Publication Dean and Alexander and Victoria Wiley Professor of Design Mohsen Mostafavi Assistant Dean and Director for Communications and Public Programs Ken Stewart Editor in Chief Jennifer Sigler Associate Editor Marielle Suba Production Manager Meghan Sandberg Series design by Laura Grey and Zak Jensen

Acknowledgments We wish to thank Dean and Alexander and Victoria Wiley Professor of Design, Mohsen Mostafavi; Chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture, Anita Berrizbeitia; Founder and Executive President of the Luma Foundation, Maja Hoffmann; Director of Luma Arles, Mustapha Bouhayati; Professor and Director of Mas Planeses, Marc Gracia; and Director of the Tour du Valat Domain, Olivier Pineau; without whose gracious time and support this studio would not have been be possible. We are also grateful to Bas Smets, Astrid Nou, Matthieu Humery, and Jan Boelen, for their generous commitment, enthusiasm, and insights during our conversations in Cambridge and our travels in the landscapes of Arles. The editors have attempted to acknowledge all sources of images used and apologize for any errors or omissions. Harvard University Graduate School of Design 48 Quincy Street Cambridge, MA 02138

ISBN 978-1934510-75-9 Copyright © 2019 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without prior written permission from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. Text and images © 2019 by their authors.

publications@gsd.harvard.edu gsd.harvard.edu


Studio Report Fall 2018

Harvard GSD Department of Landscape Architecture

Students Oi Wai Charity Cheung, Su-Yeon Angela Choi, Luis Enrique Flores, Caroline Hickey, Jenjira Holmes, Christin Hu, Danica Liongson, Malone Matson, Melissa Naranjo, Stefano Romagnoli, Joshua Stevens, Hannah Van der Eb

ISBN 978-1-934510-75-9

9 781934 510759

Profile for Harvard GSD

Regenerative Empathy: Complex Assemblages in a Shared Environment  

Regenerative Empathy is a Studio Report from the Fall 2018 semester at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design based on the option...

Regenerative Empathy: Complex Assemblages in a Shared Environment  

Regenerative Empathy is a Studio Report from the Fall 2018 semester at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design based on the option...