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AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

POST-EVENT GUIDE • 30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA


ADDRESSING AFRICA'S UNIQUE SECURITY CHALLENGES FOR MORE THAN 20 YEARS

The Verint Comprehensive Intelligence Suite


FOREWORD Welcome to the Africa Security Symposium East & Sub-Saharan 2018 Post-Event Report where, GRV Global would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank all those who participated in this important event; an East & West African series promoting sustainable peace and security across Africa through public-private partnerships (PPPs) and advanced technologies/solutions. Following a very enjoyable and productive week at the Radisson Blu Hotel, Nairobi, this report contains a detailed overview of the various workshops and plenary sessions, solutions exhibition, afternoon matchmaking meetings, and networking functions including a large selection of photographs from the symposia.

GRV Global would like to pass on our sincere gratitude to the various Government, U.S., International and United Nations agency officials that joined our themed plenary sessions across the two days, and were committed to meeting with event delegates throughout our afternoon matchmaking meeting sessions. We are extremely grateful for their kind time and support not only during the week of ASEC18 but also, for their assistance during the build up to the event. GRV Global would like to express special thanks to Major General Arnold Fields, U.S. Marine Corps (RET), Chairman of the NAPA Standing Panel on International Affairs at the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA), who for the third time, so expertly fulfilled the role of Conference Chair across the few days, adding great depth and value to discussions. In its third year, the Africa Security Symposium has been heralded as a significant success by both the participating officials and private-sector delegates alike; testimonials of which can be found later in this report. We welcomed almost 250 local and international participants to Nairobi and facilitated over 700 face-to-face matchmaking meetings. Many security factors and challenges regarding lasting peace and development were discussed and some extremely valuable experiences were shared. As a result of this event, and GRV Global’s ethos of personable engagement, long-standing collaborations are sure to result and ultimately, a stronger base on which to build sustainable peace and security through PPPs.

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GRV Global would like to thank the Radisson Blu Hotel, Nairobi and its professional & helpful staff for its support. We thank all our local partners for helping us to produce world-class materials such as the stage set, banners, all invitations and tickets, and of course the Official Event Guide; in addition to the local students who assisted with managing our registration desk and matchmaking meeting tables. Lastly and by no means least, GRV Global would truly like to thank our Event Sponsors for their support and attendance without which, events of this magnitude and importance would simply not be possible. The support shown by our partners and sponsors was emphatic and a true testament to the potential they see for peace and security across the African continent. Thank you for joining us in Nairobi, we look forward to welcoming you next year!

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ANDREW DOWELL CEO | GRV Global


ISRAEL AEROSPACE INDUSTRIES LTD (IAI)

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CONTENTS CONTENTS Conference Agenda ................................................................ 4 Speaker Profiles ....................................................................... 9 CONFERENCE CHAIR’S 5 Regional Centre onSTATEMENT Small Arms (RECSA) .................................. 22 POST-EVENT REPORT DAY 1 6 Roundtable Profiles ............................................................... 26 3 CONFERENCE AGENDA 16 Media Partners ....................................................................... 38 POST-EVENT REPORT 2 22 Participants List DAY ..................................................................... 40 ROUNDTABLE PROFILES 34 Participants Profiles .............................................................. 42 ATTENDEES LIST 48 Exhibition Floorplan ............................................................. 52 EXHIBITION FLOORPLAN

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While every effort has been made to ensure all details are correct at the time of going to print, there may be late additions or changes to the participants. Whilst every effort is made to ensure accuracy, the organisers and publishers cannot take responsibility for losses resulting from publishing errors, however caused. All editorials published as submitted. All rights reserved. No part of this official guide may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any means of information storage and retrieval systems without prior permission in writing from copyright owners. Multiple copying of the contents of this publication without prior approval is not permitted. w w w. gr vglobal.com

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While every effort has been made to ensure all details are correct at the time of going to print, there may be late additions or changes to the participants. Whilst every effort is made to ensure accuracy, the organisers and publishers cannot take responsibility for losses resulting from publishing errors, however caused. All editorials published as submitted. All rights reserved. No part of this official guide may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any means of information storage and retrieval systems without prior permission in writing from copyright owners. Multiple copying of the contents of this publication without prior approval is not permitted.

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FOCUS ON WHAT MATTERS

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CONFERENCE CHAIR’S STATEMENT THE AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM—EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN was designed to help advance Africa’s security by shoring up its capacity to address a multitude of diverse challenges. With the help of a distinguished assembly of enthusiastic and committed leaders and practitioners from government and non-government organizations, industry, academia and more, the Symposium accomplished its principal objective. It is no mystery that Africa’s challenges are too great for any single symposium, group or institution to resolve; but collective approaches to problem resolution give progress a much better opportunity than unilateral initiatives. The first step in all such matters is to begin the dialogue and to let it lead to collaboration, cooperation, and potential partnership. Leaders at the tactical, operational and strategic levels of regional and national security must be involved in a dynamic process that engenders as much bottom up influence as top down. Now that I have been privileged to chair three consecutive Africa Security Symposia superbly hosted by GRV Global, I am beginning to see positive signs of progress. First and foremost, leaders are talking to each other; enthusiasm is growing, together with increased optimism. More senior government leaders are increasingly finding the time to participate in the symposia; and on this occasion, at least seven active or retired military generals or admirals attended and actively contributed. While some attendees are repeat participants, new faces are showing up as well; and with new participants come new ideas and solutions on how to tactical the issues. A multitude of considerations and recommendations emerged from the six dynamic panels. I offer a few of them I consider most significant: • Be cognizant of the human factor in delivering humanitarian assistance during peacekeeping operations, especially collateral damage that results in the suffering of innocent women and children.

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• Adhere to the Rule of Law and maximize training opportunities to ensure that the mission, the conflict—the social science of it-- and the rules of engagement are fully understood • Adapt research, tactics, techniques and procedures that will maintain the advantage of peacekeeping operations and increase the risk of a dynamic adversary • Create synergy by sharing information and combining resources as needed to minimize the adversary’s capabilities and to encourage regional integration • Develop plans that are comprehensive, properly resourced and rehearsed • Develop an appreciation for cyber in modern conflict and realize that cyber is a borderless phenomenon and can be a strategic weapon • Ensure that existing policies are enforced, and new policies developed and implemented commensurate with an increasingly dynamic conflict environment • Behave in a manner that encourages and reinforces trust among individuals and nations Security requires national, international, regional and local strategies executed in an atmosphere of collaboration, cooperation and partnership. “No one is safe until everyone is safe”, said participant and panelist Dr. Zabulon Yoti, Technical Coordinator, Health Emergencies, World Health Organization.

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Very respectfully, MG ARNOLD FIELDS, USMC (RET) National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA)


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

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ASEC18: DAY 1

POST-EVENT REPORT The Africa Security Symposium East & Sub-Saharan (ASEC18), the fourth in GRV Global’s series for the continent, took place once again, in Kenya’s beautiful capital city Nairobi, on 30th – 31st May 2018. Almost 250 leading security experts and government officials were welcomed to the Radisson Blu Hotel, to meet face-to-face and take part in an active two days of high-level plenary sessions, afternoon matchmaking meetings between public and private sector entities, and a range of networking functions, seeking to achieve the common goal of promoting long-term development and stability across the region.

EVENING RECEPTION

At pre-registration, setup was underway in the Mount Kilimanjaro Ballroom as sponsors prepared their exhibition booths, before all attendees were able to enjoy an informal ‘ice-breaker’ Evening Reception. Participants were able to register and collect their access passes before enjoying a relaxed evening of networking, accompanied by canapes and

refreshments overlooking the hotel grounds; an ideal opportunity for early introductions and discussion ahead of the main event.

DAY 1 WEDNESDAY 30TH MAY 2018

The morning of the Africa Security Symposium East & Sub-Saharan (ASEC18) began with a beautiful sunny day, as delegates enjoyed tea, coffee and pastries ahead of GRV Global’s CEO, Andrew Dowell formally welcoming the entire delegation of Honourable ministers, government & UN officials, experts and private sector specialists to Nairobi, Kenya. Commencing the Opening Ceremony, Mr. Dowell introduced the problem in which all gathered intended to face - the growing threat of terrorism by the likes of Boko Haram, Al-Qaeda in the Sahel, Al-Shabaab and ISIS in Northern and Southern Africa. Andrew reiterated that in order to curb transnational terrorism, a collective response was needed, as he encouraged the country representatives to engage with the private sector, enhance their capacity through the highest-level technologies and expertise, and


Hansel Omondi - Office of the President (OPP); Kenya “Good event, very informative.”

form partnerships amongst the distinguished guests. Andrew then handed over to friend and Symposium Chair, whom he affectionately named ‘The Singing General’, Major General Arnold Fields, USMC (RET), Chairman of the NAPA Standing Panel on International Affairs at the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA). All attendees were embraced by a warm welcome as Maj. Gen. Fields remarked on his excitement at hosting the Africa Security Symposium for the 3rd time before encouraging all delegates to take advantage of the opportunity to learn new things and form partnerships to achieve peace for Africa. ASEC18 commenced with the first of 3 themed panels for the day. Panel One: Border Control & Maritime Security discussed effectiveness & monitoring, delimitation, coastal security, and migration challenges. This panel was Chaired by BG (ret) Dan Bader, Chief Operating Officer of ELTA North America whom was joined by ACP Dinah Kyasiimire, Head of Police Component of the EASF Secretariat,

Dinah opened the discussion on border control by first noting the challenges presented by porous borders: free movement of terrorists, illegal arms trade and human trafficking to name a few, and contended in order to resolve these issues it was necessary to forge greater cooperation and collaboration within the East African region, two words that remained prominent throughout the Symposium’s discussions. She went on to further emphasise the importance of technology in stating that “we cannot fight crime without surveillance and intelligence”. This notion was expanded upon by Cdr Tuemay whom listed drug trafficking, illegal fishing and piracy among the challenges that Somalia faces, which could potentially be resolved through transnational intelligence sharing. Deepening the discussion further, Dr. Sonkor remarked that “security cannot only be viewed as a national interest but one of regional interest” suggesting a holistic approach to assuring securer border, starting with greater government leadership in stabilising the region. Touching on the humanitarian effects of unsecure borders, was Sambujang, whom mentioned the food and nonfood items that UNMISS provided to Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) and the community policing that takes place to ascertain the

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Dr. Katherine Wanjiru Getao, EBS, ICT Secretary Ministry of Information Communication & Technology (ICT); Kenya

Commander Tuemay Aregawi Desta, Head Counter Transnational Organised Crime Pillar of IGAD’s Security Sector Program (ISSP), Sambujang Fatty, Community Policing Advisor of UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), and Dr. Sonkor Jama Geyre, Director General of the Ministry of Defence in Somalia.


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

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human rights situation in South Sudan, and support the peace initiative and accompanying 2406 Resolution. It was clear from this panel discussion that unsecure borders presented a multitude of security risks to the region which can be potentially addressed through a collective, regional effort. Later in the session, BG Bader addressed the statements on a need for greater collaboration, by asking the panellists how their institutions are working together to solve collective problems – to which Dinah highlighted that most of the counties in the lakes region are members of the EASF Secretariat, and possess an intelligence system that allows for the sharing of information and intelligence of possible threats and challenges. Moving towards the first of the days Q&A sessions, Lt. Col. Michael Diers from UN DPKO’s Office of Military Affairs (OMA), posed the question to the panel - how they might best go about handling seasonal migration in the region? Dinah, once again volunteered a response, first stating that this remains a challenging area since “in Africa it is unheard of to close the door on someone that is seeking

help” however, noted it is necessary to ensure that countries are quick to resolve conflicts, exhaust their own capacity before reaching out to international entities, and ensure that the people crossing the borders are in genuine need of refuge and not harbouring ill intentions. At the end of the ASEC18’s opening discussion panel, delegates were treated to a selection of pastries together with tea and coffee, before returning to a special Keynote Welcoming Address by Dr. Katherine W. Getao, EBS, the ICT Secretary in the Ministry of Information, Communications and Technology of the Government of Kenya. In her statement, Dr. Getao, congratulated GRV Global and partners for gathering a distinguished convocation of delegates from the defence, security and intelligence sectors, to examine and discuss the latest technology solutions for keeping people safe in Kenya, the region and ultimately the world. She noted that the conference had recognized the convergence of traditional security sectors in a world where security challenges are becoming increasingly complex:


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

Cdr Tuemay Aregawi Desta - IGAD Security Sector Program (ISSP) “Impressive – bringing together ideas and suppliers! Well thought through, excellently selected topics that are timely to the region, a nearly perfectly organised and managed symposium. Highly experienced panellists and moderators! Thank you all!”

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ideologically, technologically and in terms of the diversity of stakeholders involved in designing and implementing security solutions. She also noted that security goes beyond the absence of threats or a false feeling of safety towards a good quality of life which is adequately protected from physical and cyber-threats. Dr. Getao commended delegates for the role they have played in supporting countries, such as Kenya, which have experienced an enhanced security environment despite facing very real and dangerous threats, noting that it was through collaboration and the support of the security sector that these threats had been successfully mitigated. She noted that all of the issues on the agenda of the conference such as critical infrastructure protection, cyber intelligence and border protection technology were very pertinent to the concerns of the Kenyan Government and she wished delegates a fruitful meeting. After Dr. Gateo’s kind and informative words came Panel Two: Technology - Advancements in Security Capabilities which discussed trends and implications, intelligence collection, cybersecurity & data, systems vulnerabilities, smart technologies & surveillance, regulations, and health security Chaired by Paul Wells, Vice President & Chief Commercial Officer of GovSat. Paul was joined by Christo Myburgh,

Chief Regional Security Officer - East Africa of the African Development Bank Group (AfDB), Dr. Zabulon Yoti , Technical Coordinator - Health Emergencies of the World Health Organization (WHO), Jalal Abdel-Latif, Head - Governance & Human Security Cluster of the UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), and Raymond Kitevu, Conflict Early Warning Expert of the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) Secretariat. Jalal began the discussion with the inarguable statement that “the digital revolution has had a profound impact on the security sector”, as satellite communications have developed and data collection has gotten easier. However, he went on to further note that the challenge now is how to best to utilise the data and technology remains, prompting the suggestion from Raymond for there to be an increase in training programmes so that we can “adapt our research to keep up with a dynamic terrorist environment”. Both Christo and Dr. Zabulon considered the advantage of greater community engagement in unlocking technological capabilities, particularly in addressing issues of conflict and health practices. Christo stated that technology remains an enabler as opposed to an end in itself, that can engage communities and aid security operations but first we must understand the root issues by which conflict stems, concluding that there is


Kobus Fourie – GEW Technologies “Good platform, good connections.” BG Simon West – UN Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) “Very well organised, good speakers and attendees.”

a need for a more comprehensive approach to assessing the key drivers of conflict to ensure a safe environment for all, as “no one is safe until everyone is safe”. Dr. Zabulon noted the efficacy of training communities in sophisticated technology in addressing medical crisis, drawing on the 2014 Ebola crisis as an example of how technology can be used to reduce panic and better speed up the process to recovery, through the training of local people who can collect samples in a timelier manner and improve diagnostics and vaccinations. During the panel’s Q&A session, Raymond was asked to comment on the ways COMESA shares information regionally, to which he referenced the many regional events and East African committees that COMESA engage in, and their collaboration with the African Union to present existing information and possible preventative measures to take in the future. The last panel of the day, and part 1 of an essential discussion on peacekeeping across the two days, beforeGRV Global’s much anticipated afternoon 1-2-1 meetings was, Panel 3: Peace Support Operations (PSOs) & Capacity Building discussing the PSO spectrum including land, air & sea, strengthening local assets, training & diversity, testing methods, regional collaborations, reliable systems & mitigating risk. Chaired by Amnon Sofrin, Marketing

Director- Africa of Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), he was joined by Brig. Gen. Simon West, Senior Military Advisor - Defence Section of the Rule of Law and Security Institutions Group (ROLSIG) at UN Mission in Somalia (UNSOM), Moussa Idi, PSSM Expert of the UN Regional Centre for Peace & Disarmament in Africa (UNREC), Aderemi Adekoya, Principal Coordination Officer of theAfrican UnionUnited Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), and Brig. Albert Kendagor, Head of Peace Operations at the EASF Secretariat. Brig. Gen. Simon, opened the panel by addressing the need for greater attention to be placed on outcomes of capacity building – using Malawi as an example of a poor country with a military that is struggling to deter terrorism and therefore, training should focus on the long term and be bespoke to the country requiring support with a holistic approach that not only focuses on the conflicts, but incorporates other dynamics needed to achieve the aim. Aderemi noted the difficulty in conflict resolution due to the growing resource gap – using Darfur as an example of an area that lacks road networks, which hinders logistical operations due to the lack of road access. Brig. Albert gave a brief overview of the EASF’s role pertaining to peacekeeping within the region, remarking that they’re placed to be enablers rather than solutions to the many problems

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30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

Nick Weller - Pearson Engineering “This was my first GRV Global event. It was highly recommended and I was not disappointed. It was extremely well ran, full of good speakers and the tables were excellent opportunities to speak to the people who count. Thank you.”

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within the region - to allow formal leadership procedures of nations to form uninterrupted, as they proactively collaborate with other regional organisations whom have common interests in border control, conflict resolution and terrorism. In agreeance, Moussa noted that it is important to strengthen the joint efforts of all United Nations entities in the field, in order to strengthen measures to prevent the resurgence of armed conflict, including peacekeeping missions, country teams and international organizations. In the Q&A session, Simon responded to a question on whether it was possible to affect a cultural change in leadership, remarking that behavioural change was possible through the design in training in order to achieve the wanted outcomes on the ground. Conference Chair Maj. Gen. Fields summarised the morning discussions in stating the importance of having a clear mission and working together, before urging all ASEC18 participants to make a prompt return from lunch for the much-anticipated meetings. Delegates returned from a delightful lunch to a transformed Mount Kilimanjaro Ballroom. In the weeks leading up to the Symposium,

delegates were able to identify their preferred 1-2-1 Matchmaking Meetings through GRV Global’s secure scheduling website. Preevent, meeting schedules are finalised and confirmed for all participants in order to maximise potential outcomes; a personable format of 15-minute matchmaking meetings. Wednesday afternoon featured hundreds of 1-2-1 meetings with many organisations taking back-to-back meetings throughout the 3-hour session. Participants were quick to identify their potential value and praised their efficiency. Whilst in Nairobi, some for the very first time, GRV Global wanted to ensure participants experienced some of the rich culture Kenya has to offer and hence, invited participants to a Cultural Dinner at the Tamambo Karen Blixen Coffee Garden, in the famous Karen Blixen area. Guests were welcomed by the rhythmic sounds of beating drums and singing, before dining alfresco, with new acquaintances as they reflected on the day’s talking points and continued the discussions they had already started during the afternoon meeting sessions. n


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

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BG (ret.) Amnon Sofrin, Marketing Director - Africa of Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI)


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CONFERENCE AGENDA 30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

Tuesday 29 May | Radisson Blu Hotel, Nairobi

AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

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17:00 - 19:00

PRE-EVENT REGISTRATION

19:00 - 21:00

EVENING NETWORKING RECEPTION

Event participants may complete registration by collecting their delegate pack & event access pass (business card required). Sponsors are also asked to setup their exhibition booth. An ‘ice-breaker’ opportunity for event participants to meet and discuss the two days ahead in a relaxed and informal setting, whilst enjoying a selection of snacks and refreshments.

Wednesday 30 May | Radisson Blu Hotel, Nairobi 8:00 - 9:10

NETWORKING REGISTRATION

9:10 - 9:30

OPENING CEREMONY

9:30 - 10:30

PANEL DISCUSSION: BORDER CONTROL & MARITIME SECURITY

9:30 - 9:40

Panel Chair: Brig. Gen. (ret) Dan Bader, Chief Operating Officer of ELTA North America

Event participants may complete registration by collecting their delegate pack & event access pass whilst networking and enjoying tea & coffee (business card required).

Andrew Dowell, CEO of GRV Global Maj. Gen. Arnold Fields, USMC (RET), Chairman, NAPA Standing Panel on International Affairs of National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) & CONFERENCE CHAIR Discussing effectiveness & monitoring, delimitation, coastal security, and migration challenges. Drawing on country case studies, this panel will look at current and potential border threats, and the possible solutions to better protect Africa’s vast borders, whilst further exploring current challenges, including cross-border migration, illegal fishing and piracy.

ACP Dinah Kyasiimire, Head of Police Component of EASF Secretariat Cdr Tuemay Aregawi Desta, Head - Counter Transnational Organised Crime Pillar of IGAD Security Sector Program (ISSP) Sambujang Fatty, Commuity Policing Advisor of UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) Dr. Sonkor Jama Geyre, Director General of Ministry of Defence; Somalia

10:20 - 10:30

AUDIENCE DISCUSSION; QUESTION & ANSWER SESSION

10:30 - 11:00

NETWORKING TEA & COFFEE BREAK

11:00 - 11:05

WELCOMING ADDRESS

11:05 - 12:10

PANEL DISCUSSION: TECHNOLOGY - ADVANCEMENTS IN SECURITY CAPABILITIES

Dr. Katherine Wanjiru Getao, EBS, ICT Secretary Ministry of Information Communication & Technology (ICT); Kenya Discussing trends and implications, intelligence collection, cybersecurity & data, systems vulnerabilities, smart technologies & surveillance, regulations, and health security. This panel will explore the increasing role of technology in reinforcing national security with a focus on new technology, and upcoming trends, in meeting future security challenges’ including, the implications of greater data collection, protection & sharing, and the receptiveness of governments to bring regulation in-line with necessary technological changes.


11:05 - 11:15

Panel Chair: Paul Wells, Vice President & Chief Commercial Officer of GovSat

Christo Myburgh, Chief Regional Security Officer - East Africa of African Development Bank Group (AfDB) Dr. Zabulon Yoti , Technical Coordinator - Health Emergencies of World Health Organization (WHO) Jalal Abdel-Latif, Head - Governance & Human Security Cluster of UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) Raymond Kitevu, Conflict Early Warning Expert of Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) Secretariat

12:00 - 12:10

AUDIENCE DISCUSSION; QUESTION & ANSWER SESSION

12:10 - 13:15

PANEL DISCUSSION: PEACE SUPPORT OPERATIONS (PSOS) & CAPACITY BUILDING DAY 1

Discussing the PSO spectrum including land, air & sea, strengthening local assets, training & diversity, testing methods, regional collaborations, reliable systems & mitigating risk, physical security & eradicating small arms/light weapons (SALW), humanitarian operations, and effective response - building smarter, streamlined institutions for greater stability and development within the region.

12:10 - 12:20

Panel Chair: BG (ret.) Amnon Sofrin, Marketing Director - Africa of Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI)

Brig Gen Simon West, Senior Military Advisor - Defence Section of Rule of Law and Security Institutions Group (ROLSIG), UN Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) Moussa Idi, PSSM Expert of UN Regional Centre for Peace & Disarmament in Africa (UNREC) Aderemi Adekoya, Principal Coordination Officer of African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) Brig. Albert Kendagor, Head of Peace Operations of EASF Secretariat

13:05 - 13:15

AUDIENCE DISCUSSION; QUESTION & ANSWER SESSION

13:15 - 14:30

NETWORKING LUNCH BREAK

14:30 - 17:30

1-2-1 SECURITY SECTOR MATCHMAKING MEETINGS

19:30 - 22:00

CULTURAL DINNER - TAMAMBO KAREN BLIXEN COFFEE GARDEN

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Afternoon session dedicated to 1-2-1 matchmaking meetings between Government, U.S., UN & International Agency stakeholders and leading local, regional and global operators. Schedules are prearranged to provide a unique opportunity to discuss sustainable security and peacekeeping solutions for the continent. An informal Cultural Dinner welcoming the Official Delegation and all Event attendees; enjoying local entertainment, food and refreshments. An ideal opportunity for further networking and to discuss the day’s talking points. Transport will depart the Radisson Hotel lobby at 7:30pm.

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Sambujang Fatty – United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) “The Symposium is absolutely interesting and informative. An excellent platform for discussing and addressing security challenges in Africa, and imperatively provided the participants the opportunity to network and collaborate in our efforts to combat transnational crimes, terrorism, etc. an excellent display of equipment, services required in such undertakings.”


CONFERENCE AGENDA 30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

Thursday 31 May | Radisson Blu Hotel, Nairobi 8:30 - 9:00

NETWORKING REGISTRATION

9:00 - 9:15

DAY TWO WELCOMING REMARKS

9:15 - 9:30

UN PROCUREMENT - AN OVERVIEW

9:30 - 10:30

PANEL DISCUSSION: CYBER INTELLIGENCE IN THE ERA OF GLOBAL TERRORISM

9:30 - 9:40

Panel Chair: Mr. Yoram Zohar, Vice President - Sales & Business Development of Verint

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If not already done so, event participants may complete registration by collecting their delegate pack & event access pass whilst networking and enjoying tea & coffee (business card required). A brief overview of day one’s major talking points, with a look ahead to day two’s topics of discussion. Maj. Gen. Arnold Fields, USMC (RET), Chairman, NAPA Standing Panel on International Affairs of National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) & CONFERENCE CHAIR

Nelly Munovi, Senior Procurement Assistant UN Office in Nairobi (UNON) & UN Procurement Division (UNPD) Discussing counter-terrorism including threat identification and radicalisation, effective law enforcement, impact on tourism, migration & prevention measures, and critical infrastructure protection (CIP) including national assets, public safety, investment, and technologies. Considering the rise of extremist non-state armed networks, this panel will look at new cyber intelligence solutions for fighting global terrorism. Additionally, discussing the socio-economic implications of terrorist activities, and challenges greater interconnectedness poses in protecting critical infrastructure.

Hon. Adolf Mwesige, Minister of Ministry of Defence & Veteran Affairs; Uganda Alice Friend, Senior Fellow of International Security Program, Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) Brig. Gen. Abdalla Abdalla Mohamed, Deputy Director General of Somalia National Intelligence & Security Agency (NISA) Lt Col Michael Diers, Deputy Chief Assessment Team of UN DPKO Office of Military Affairs (OMA) Sosthenes M. Makuri, Regional Specialized Officer of INTERPOL Regional Bureau for Eastern Africa

10:20 - 10:30

AUDIENCE DISCUSSION; QUESTION & ANSWER SESSION

10:30 - 11:00

NETWORKING TEA & COFFEE BREAK

11:00 - 12:00

PANEL DISCUSSION: LOGISTICS, SUPPLIES & COMMUNICATIONS

Discussing route clearance, coordination, improved efficiency, resilience & infrastructure, risk assessment, and supply chain security. This panel will provide an overview of implementable strategic and tactical operations at a national and regional level, to improve efficiency in delivering supplies, equipment and reliable communications with a focus on supply-chain security.

Davor Jurisic - EFS Ebrex “Thanks for organizing another great event!! I was really pleased to attend and talk with a few potential clients over the 2 days - we all hope some of these will turn into sales / contracts now.” Dr. Sonkor Jama Geyre - Ministry of Defence; Somalia “Well organised and coached. Met with many new people.”


11:00 - 11:10

Panel Chair: Travis Heneveld, Director - United Nations & International Accounts of Motorola Solutions

UNMAS Mark Connelly, Chief of Peace Keeping Support of UN Mine Action Service (UNMAS) Koos Joubert, Technical Advisor of DCD Protected Mobility James Nyirenda, Regional Security Consultant of African Development Bank Group (AfDB) Lt. Gen. Johnson Okot Jekery Loyang, Deputy CDF for Administration & Finance of Chief of Defence Forces (CDF), Ministry of Defence & Veterans Affairs; South Sudan

11:50 - 12:00

AUDIENCE DISCUSSION; QUESTION & ANSWER SESSION

12:00 - 13:00

PANEL DISCUSSION: PEACE SUPPORT OPERATIONS (PSOS) & CAPACITY BUILDING DAY 2

Discussing the PSO spectrum including land, air & sea, strengthening local assets, training & diversity, testing methods, regional collaborations, reliable systems & mitigating risk, humanitarian operations, and effective response - building smarter, streamlined institutions for greater stability and development within the region.

12:00 - 12:10

Panel Chair: BG (ret.) Amnon Sofrin, Marketing Director - Africa of Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI)

Brig. Gen. Bulti Tadesse Kittila, Chief of Staff Amisom of AU Peace Support Operations Division (PSOD), African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) Peter Wood, Global Security Adviser of Oxfam Moses Gatino Githinji, Regional Security Director of World Vision International (WVI) Brig.Gen Abdihakim Sa’eed, Fmr. Police Commissioner of Somali National Police Force; Ministry of Internal Security

12:50 - 13:00

AUDIENCE DISCUSSION; QUESTION & ANSWER SESSION

13:00 - 13:15

CLOSING CEREMONY

13:15 - 14:30

NETWORKING LUNCH BREAK

14:30 - 17:30

1-2-1 SECURITY SECTOR MATCHMAKING MEETINGS

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Closing remarks from GRV Global, endorsing Partners, and the event’s Official Conference Chair; summing up of discussion highlights and takeaway points. Maj. Gen. Arnold Fields, USMC (RET), Chairman, NAPA Standing Panel on International Affairs of National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) & CONFERENCE CHAIR Andrew Dowell, CEO of GRV Global

Afternoon session dedicated to 1-2-1 matchmaking meetings between Government, U.S., UN & International Agency stakeholders and leading local, regional and global operators. Schedules are prearranged to provide a unique opportunity to discuss sustainable security and peacekeeping solutions for the continent.

Moussa Idi – UN Regional Centre for Peace & Disarmament in Africa (UNREC) “This meeting provides answers to the current needs, in the context of all-out insecurity which prevails.”

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Stefano Sturlese - Meta Aerospace Capital Limited “Well organised; quality participants; valuable networking; exceeded expectations!”


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30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA


EVENT PHOTOS

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Brig. Gen. (ret) Dan Bader, Chief Operating Officer of ELTA North America


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

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ASEC18: DAY 2

POST-EVENT REPORT DAY 2 THURSDAY 31ST MAY 2018

Day two of 2018’s Africa Security Symposium East & Sub-Saharan (ASEC18) began with opening remarks from Conference Chair, Maj. Gen. Arnold Fields USMC (RET) whom gave a brief recap of the panel session discussions from Wednesday, highlighting: the need for there to be greater understanding of the nature of terror threats, the advantage of collaborating and cooperating, particularly with resources and avoid a duplication of efforts, and providing training in order to do what we can with what we have. This set the tone for a unique session on the United Nations Procurement process provided by Senior Procurement Assistant, Nelly Munovi from the UN Office in Nairobi (UNON). Nelly gave delegates an overview of a common tender process and tips to improve their chances of approval, including: how to register and express an interest, completing a proposal and the evaluation process making sure to note the common mistakes that can cause a proposal to be rejected,

including failing to submit applications before the deadline, or not separating the technical proposal from the financial. This proved to be an enlightening addition to the conference as Maj. Gen. Fields urged the delegation to take advantage of such a rare and immediate opportunity. Day two’s discussions started with a topic that has increased in significant importance given the current global security climate. Panel 4: Cyber Intelligence in the

Nelly Munovi, UN Office in Nairobi (UNON) & UNPD


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Hon. Adolf Mwesige, Ugandan Minister of Defence & Veteran Affairs

Building on this point and providing a clearer understanding of the relationship between cyberspace and terrorism in Africa, Alice stated “terrorists have tactical, operational and strategic uses for cyber space”, before identifying the key uses of cybertechnology by terrorist groups: to spread their ideology and recruit, to use the ‘Dark Web’ to buy resources, plan and finance operations, where they can do so in a covert manner and to terrorise civilians and undermine the legitimacy of governments, and claiming attacks to spread anxiety of their capacity online. Looking to the future, Alice suggested that as connectivity increases and extends to rural areas, there is potential for an increase in recruitment. This point was demonstrated by Brig. Gen. Abdalla whom pointed out that Al-Shabaab were able to use cyber intelligence as a form of mass propaganda through radios and social media to target the Somali youth diaspora, however noting the improvements the Somalian government have made in addressing this issue by implementing the Communications Act last year in order to create a framework for tackling cybercrime. As the discussion progressed, Lt. Col. Diers referenced some of the issues raised in Wednesday’s sessions in noting that despite a large volume of data collected by the United Nations, the lack of georeferences creates a challenge in influencing decision makers – at times,

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Era of Global Terrorism discussing counterterrorism including threat identification and radicalisation, effective law enforcement, impact on tourism, prevention measures and technology was Chaired by Mr. Yoram Zohar, Vice President - Sales & Business Development of Verint whom welcomed Hon. Adolf Mwesige, Minister of Defence & Veteran Affairs on behalf of the Government of Uganda, Alice Friend, Senior Fellow of the Center for Strategic & International Studies’ (CSIS) International Security Program, , Brig. Gen. Abdalla Abdalla Mohamed, Deputy Director General of Somalia’s National Intelligence & Security Agency (NISA), Lt. Col. Michael Diers, Deputy Chief Assessment Team of UN DPKO’s Office of Military Affairs (OMA), and Sosthenes M. Makuri, Regional Specialized Officer of INTERPOL’s Regional Bureau for Eastern Africa. Hon. Adolf Mwesige drew on Uganda’s experience with internal threats from the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF) and transnational threats from Al-Shabaab, to exemplify the ways in which “terror groups have taken advantage of borderless cyberspace”, particularly through their use of social media to further their agenda. In response to how this issue can be addressed, he remarked that greater investment in cyber intelligence would assist the situation however, it is fundamental to have a transnational dialogue to effectively address threats and learn from one another.


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

Dejan Dragic - Mile Dragic Production Ltd “This was our first time participating in this type of promotion. We found it to be very useful and for sure we will attend future GRV events.”

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information can be slow to be declassified, which provided a frank and honest account of some of the ways the United Nations could improve their practices to foster a “culture of information sharing”. Providing a glimpse of what this knowledge could look like in practice was Sosthenes of INTERPOL, where knowledge share is a pillar of the organisation. Sosthenes referenced the well-known red notices used to track down wanted persons and fugitives that are issued to 1 country, but is also made known to all 192 member countries so they remain aware of the situation. Although Sosthenes did remark that there remains some limitations in extended information to other law enforcement agencies, which provided the audience with an example of the pragmatism that a centralised system provides. Continuing the theme of open dialogue, in this Q&A session, Brig. Gen. Bulti Tadesse Kittila from African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) asked the Honourable Minister his thoughts on mediation in terrorism. Hon. Adolf Mwesige responded that in Uganda, they try and distinguish between the leaders of terrorist groups and the followers, and their level of responsibility, before mentioning the importance of amnesty laws to protect those that have been misled and can renounce terrorism and reintegrate back into society, emphasising that “this does not mean we have abandoned the fight but extended a hand of forgiveness”. Maj. Gen.

Fields summarised the session by remarking it is important for policies to keep up with advancements in cybertechnology, using the U.S. as an example of a nation where freedoms, such as free speech are being exploited to the terrorists’ advantage and without prosecution. Moving swiftly on, following a brief Networking Tea & Coffee Break, the penultimate panel session of the symposium; Panel 5: Logistics, Supplies & Communications discussed route clearance, coordination, improved efficiency, resilience & infrastructure, risk assessment, and supply chain security. This panel was Chaired by Travis Heneveld, Director - United Nations & International Accounts of Motorola Solutions whom was joined by Mark Connelly, Chief of Peace Keeping Support of the UN Mine Action Service (UNMAS), Koos Joubert, Technical Advisor of DCD Protected Mobility, James


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30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

Alice Friend - Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) “An excellent networking and learning opportunity. Very well-run. Staff were excellent. I encourage you to continue working to include more women in your events.”

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Nyirenda, Regional Security Consultant of the African Development Bank Group (AfDB), and Lt. Gen. Johnson Okot Jekery Loyang, Deputy CDF for Administration & Finance of South Sudan’s Chief of Defence Forces (CDF). Travis began the session by presenting the question of “how do you measure success?” to the panellists. Koos began the discussion by stating that DCD measured success by the lives they saved, further elaborating that in the current aggressive and threatening climate their Husky vehicles had received 7500 hits in 9 years, therefore a safe transfer to their destination is always considered a success. Mark agreed that the safety of lives is always the first priority however, went on to further state that success can also be measured by the ability to satisfy the many stakeholders that may be involved in a project and thus “success is achieving what you had intended to do” – using the example of a newly de-mined area where communities can return to their homes and re-establish their lives. Conversely, Lt. Gen. Johnson looked at the financial practicality in achieving the aims of a mission - emphasising that success can be difficult to achieve due to the changing nature of demands, whereby the initial anticipated costs are unable to meet the shifting needs. Thus being unable to achieve their mission’s original objectives

Lt. Gen. Johnson Okot Jekery Loyang, South Sudan Chief of Defence Forces (CDF)

and therefore, emphasising the importance and need for there to be greater adaptability. This neatly led to Travis’ second question on how to approach and manage financial risk. James from the AfDB led the response by taking the audience through the process by which the Bank funds projects, noting the step-by-step procedure to ensure that at each stage, the money is used to achieve what it had been allocated for, as well as their central system that allows projects to be monitored - issues are detected and addressed earlier. Travis followed up with a final question on supply-chain security and asked the panellists whether they had found a balance between using government grade security options vs enterprise security options. Koos replied that from a product design point of view, it is easier to use off the shelf components, since it is easier for their consumers to purchase spare parts etc. It was wholly agreed that the panel was a success in achieving a comprehensive discussion on logistics and supply, with a minute to spare! The final session of 2018’s Africa Security Symposium East & Sub-Saharan (ASEC18) and part 2 of the discussion on peacekeeping was Panel 6: Peace Support Operations (PSOs) & Capacity Building, discussing the PSO spectrum including


Koos Joubert - DCD Protected Mobility “The Symposium was well organised. I enjoyed the exposure and interactions.”

land, air & sea, strengthening local assets, training & diversity, testing methods, regional collaborations, reliable systems & mitigating risk, humanitarian operations, and effective response - building smarter, streamlined institutions for greater stability and development within the region. Chaired once again by BG (ret.) Amnon Sofrin, Marketing Director- Africa of Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), he was joined by Brig. Gen. Bulti Tadesse Kittila, Chief of Staff, AU Peace Support Operations Division (PSOD) at the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM), Peter Wood, Global Security Adviser of Oxfam, Moses Gatino Githinji, Regional Security Director of World Vision International (WVI), and Brig. Gen. Abdihakim Sa’eed, Former Police Commissioner of the Somali National Police Force. Amnon started the session with a question for Brig. Gen. Bulti Tadesse on what AMISOM is trying to achieve in the Somali region; to which he responded that the mandate is to reduce the threat of Al-Shabaab by denying their freedom of movement and consequently reduce the number of casualties. However, this has not been without challenges due to poor infrastructure and access to resources. In addition to this, Peter provided a brief description of Oxfam’s approach in assisting

and protecting civilians in Somaliland, which included asking the people in the conflict zone what they would want from the organisation - responding to help them help themselves and reclaim the communities that they had lost. Looking to the future, Amnon asked the anticipated question, of how long the panellists’ felt there will have to be a presence in Somalia? Brig. Gen. Bulti Tadesse highlighted the importance of this question but also the challenges posed in addressing it - there are many components to consider, including to whom the power will be transferred to, before further elaborating that it was evident “handing over power provided the opportunity to test capability, however there remained the risk of Somalia being overstretched as Al-Shabaab continue to hold power over key areas”. Concluding that the operation still requires training and further resources before withdrawal. As the discussion progressed, Moses first commended the efforts of AMISOM in dislodging Al-Shabaab from Mogadishu which has opened up humanitarian spaces to operate, before stating that “there is still a need to reduce the threat” – which has not as yet been achieved. An finally, alluding to Peter’s earlier comments, Brig. Gen. Abdihakim believed training individuals so that they are able to combat threats

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30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

Anne Hammenrudh – UN Department of Safety & Security (UNDSS) “Very well organised with interesting and diverse expert panels. Particularly enjoyed the sessions on Border Control and Maritime Security, and Cyber Intelligence.”

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themselves in the long-term, particularly the youth, played a significant role in the potential of further withdrawals. Ending on a message of ‘hope’ was the perfect end to an informative two days of discussion before the second session of afternoon matchmaking meetings. To bring 2018’s Symposium to a formal conclusion, ahead the final afternoon 1-2-1 meetings, Conference Chair Maj. Gen. Arnold Fields, thanked all distinguished guests for their efforts and participation in making this event a success, and taking the steps towards greater collaboration and a safer Africa. In the Closing Ceremony, borrowing a quote from Dr. Yoti that “no one is safe until everyone is safe”, Gen. Fields recited and treated the delegates to a singing rendition of ‘No Man is an Island’ by poet John Donne (particularly poignant words) before handing over to GRV Global’s CEO, Andrew Dowell. Andrew expressed gratitude to the Kenyan Government for their consistent support, and heartfelt thanks to the event Sponsors whose contributions had made the event possible, and to the local supply partners and facilitators on a world-class setup. Finally, he gave the warmest of regards to Major General Arnold Fields for his stewardship of the Symposium, his enthusiasm and wisdom in presenting the topics covered at this significant event, and for the African security

sector. To round off, Andrew announced that the Honourable Ugandan Minister of Defence, Mr. Adolf Mwesige has sanctioned this Symposium to take place in Kampala, Uganda next May 2019, and duly invited all participants to the upcoming sister event, West Africa Security Symposium in Dakar, Senegal, this coming November 2018. Although the Closing Ceremony had now been held, there was still an afternoon of public-private security sector matchmaking meetings to follow an outdoors Networking Lunch Break. Once again, GRV Global’s structured 1-2-1 meetings format was held in high regard. Almost 700 meetings had been held across the two days in Nairobi – surely making huge strides towards a more coherent and long-lasting effort towards a stable and prosperous Africa for its people. Sadly, it was almost time for participants to say their goodbyes and prepare to head home however, there was a renewed hope that the region could achieve surer security and peace through collaborations. Not only had delegates been able to hear directly from the region’s leading security agencies and governments, but they had been able to meet them personally, discuss potential solutions and create lasting collaborations for the future… Until November for our West Africa Security Symposium in Dakar! n


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Travis Heneveld, Director - United Nations & International Accounts of Motorola Solutions


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ROUNDTABLE LIST 30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

Table No.

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22 32 7 23 24 30 8 2 34 1 29 28 21 27 26 25 11 20 31 3 13 10 18 35 12 9 6 33 19 4 14 15 5 16 17

Organisation/Agency/Ministry Name

AA African Development Bank Group (AfDB) AA African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) AA African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) AA Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) AA Coastal & Fisheries Development Project; Somalia AA Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) Secretariat AA EASF Secretariat AA IGAD Security Sector Program (ISSP) AA International Organization for Migration (IOM) AA INTERPOL Regional Bureau for Eastern Africa AA KenInvest (Kenya Investment Authority) AA Kenya Defence Forces (KDF) AA Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC) AA Ministry of Defence & Veteran Affairs; Uganda AA Ministry of Defence & Veterans Affairs; South Sudan AA Ministry of Defence; Somalia AA Ministry of Federal & Pastoralist Development Affairs; Ethiopia AA Somali Institute for Security Studies (SISS) AA National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) AA Oxfam AA Regional Centre on Small Arms & Light Weapons (RECSA) AA Save the Children AA Somalia National Intelligence & Security Agency (NISA) AA U.S. Embassy Nairobi - KUSLO DoD/AFRICOM AA UN DPKO Office of Military Affairs (OMA) AA UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) AA UN Mine Action Service (UNMAS) AA UN Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) AA UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) AA UN Office in Nairobi (UNON) & UNPD AA UN Regional Centre for Peace & Disarmament in Africa (UNREC) AA UN World Food Programme (WFP) AA UNOPS East Africa Hub (EAH), Nairobi AA World Health Organization (WHO) AA World Vision International (WVI)


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30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

ROUNDTABLE PROFILES

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AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK GROUP (AFDB) The African Development Bank Group (AfDB) is a an ‘AAA’ rated regional multilateral development finance institution, established in 1963, with a mandate to further the economic development and social progress of its regional member countries (RMCs), individually and collectively, in order to reduce poverty. 80 member countries, including all the 54 African countries, and 26 non-African countries in the Americas, Europe and Asia own the Bank. To fulfil its mandate, the AfDB’s key functions include: (i) using its resources for the financing of investment projects and programmes relating to the economic and social development of its RMCs; (ii) the provision of technical assistance for the preparation and execution of development projects and programmes; (iii) promoting investment of public and private capital in Africa for development purposes; and (iv) to respond to requests for assistance in coordinating development policies and plans of RMCs. The AfDB has developed a robust strategy congruent with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, coined ‘At the Centre of Africa’s Transformation’, with the following development priorities, referred to as the High 5s (with the 2025 goals indicated in brackets): Light Up and Power Africa (+162 GW electricity generated; +130 million on-grid connections; +75 million off-grid connections; +150 million households with clean cooking solutions), Feed Africa (+150 million people adequately fed; +100 million people lifted out of poverty; +190 million hectares with restored productivity), Industrialise Africa (Industrial contribution to GDP increased by 130%; 35 special economic zones supported; 30 public-private partnerships developed and strengthened), Integrate Africa (Building regional infrastructure; Boosting intraAfrican trade and investment; Facilitating movement of people across borders) and Improve the quality of life for the people of Africa (Creating 80 million jobs; Building critical skills; Improving access to water and sanitation; Strengthening health systems). The AfDB places special emphasis on promoting regional integration, developing fragile states, developing the agriculture value chain and establishing food security, and promoting capability development of women and girls in Africa. www.afdb.org

AFRICAN UNION MISSION IN SOMALIA (AMISOM) The African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) is an active, regional peacekeeping mission operated by the African Union with the approval of the United Nations in Somalia. It is mandated to support transitional governmental structures, implement a national security plan, train the Somali security forces, and to assist in creating a secure environment for the delivery of humanitarian aid. As part of its duties, AMISOM also supports the Federal Government of Somalia’s forces in their battle against Al-Shabaab militants. www.amisom-au.org

BG Bulti Tadesse Kittila - African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) “This Symposium is very important to share knowledge and experience from different perspectives. I learnt more from experienced panels. This type of event is very important.”


AFRICAN UNION-UNITED NATIONS HYBRID OPERATION IN DARFUR (UNAMID) UNAMID is a joint African Union (AU) and United Nations (UN) peacekeeping mission formally approved by United Nations Security Council resolution 1769 on 31 July 2007 to bring peace and stability to the war-torn Darfur region of Sudan while peace talks on a final settlement continue. The African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS), which was previously responsible for peacekeeping, was merged into this new force by 31 December 2007. During the FY 2017/18, the authorized strength of the UNAMID military component is to be reduced from 15,845 to 8,735 troops by the end of June 2018. Additionally, the authorized strength of the UNAMID police component is to be reduced from 3,403 personnel to 2,500 personnel by the end of June 2018. The budget amounts to $948,761,800 for the period from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018. The most recent extension of the mandate was authorized by the Council in its resolution 2363 (2017), by which the Council extended the mandate until 30 June 2018, which reaffirms UNAMID’s strategic priorities, as set out in resolution 2296 (2016) as (a) The protection of civilians, the facilitation of humanitarian assistance and the safety and security of humanitarian personnel; (b) Mediation between the Government of Sudan and non-signatory armed movements on the basis of the DDPD, while taking into account ongoing democratic transformation at the national level; and (c) Support for the mediation of inter-communal conflict, including through measures to address its root causes, in conjunction with the Government of Sudan, the United Nations Country Team and civil society. unamid.unmissions.org

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CENTER FOR STRATEGIC & INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (CSIS) The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) is a bipartisan, nonprofit policy research dedicated to providing strategic insights and policy solutions to help decisionmakers chart a course toward a better world. The CSIS International Security Program tackles one of the most robust and ambitious research agendas in the field. It covers conventional political-military issues, including defense strategy and policy, acquisition and industry, counterterrorism and homeland security, U.S. nuclear policy, WMD proliferation, defense budget analysis, missile defense, strategic futures, and security cooperation. ISP is also committed to addressing a growing range of nonmilitary issues defining U.S. foreign and security policy, including security cooperation and stability operations. Nonpartisan/bipartisan analysis of the ongoing defense and security challenges facing the United States and its partners provides Congress, the Executive branch, and industry the information needed to make tough decisions. ISP assembles top-level leaders and provides the platform for them to define critical issues and explain the impact nationally and globally. www.csis.org

COASTAL & FISHERIES DEVELOPMENT PROJECT; SOMALIA WWW.GRVGLOBAL.COM

The Federal Government of Somalia launched the Somali Coastal and Fisheries Development Project in a bid to develop the fisheries sector and the coastal areas at large, following years of chaos in Somalia. Rampant piracy and illegal foreign fishing trawlers engulfed Somalia’s fishing industry which created a violent environment, that threatened the Babul Mandab, the global business route which led to the presence of EU led anti-piracy missions off the coast of Somalia.


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

ROUNDTABLE PROFILES COMMON MARKET FOR EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA (COMESA) SECRETARIAT COMESA’s peace and security programs are anchored in Article 3 of the COMESA Treaty which recognizes the importance of peace and security programs in achieving and realizing regional development and integration. The process of establishing the formal structures to address peace and security issues in the region began in 1999, and up to date COMESA has curved its niche around economic and other structural causes of conflict, through programs including: 1) the establishment of a Conflict Early Warning System (COMWARN) - a regional conflict early warning system specialising in analyzing and highlighting the structural and dynamic factors that continue to influence conflicts in the region; 2) Maritime Security Program; 3) Democratic Governance Program; and 4) Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Development (PCRD) Program. www.comesa.int

EASF SECRETARIAT

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The Eastern Africa Standby Force is a regional organization whose mandate is to enhance peace and security in the Eastern Africa region. It is one of the five regional multidimensional Forces of the African Standby Force (ASF) consisting of Military, Police and Civilian components. EASF was established as a regional mechanism to provide capability for rapid deployment of forces to carry out preventive deployment, rapid intervention, peace support/stability operations and peace enforcement. EASF attained Full Operational Capability in December 2014 and has now moved to the deployment phase, a status that enables it to participate in Peace Support Operations (PSOs) as and when mandated by the African Union. www.easfbrig.org

IGAD SECURITY SECTOR PROGRAM (ISSP) Launched and operational in October 2011 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, the objective and missions of IGAD’s ISSP are: contributing to foster peace, security, sustainable development and regional integration in the IGAD region; enhancing the effectiveness of the member states security sector to address common transnational, regional and national security threats; enhance and enable member states’ security sector capacity to address common transnational security threats, thus, engendering sustainable economic development; and contribute the prediction, anticipation, prevention, and management of emerging, evolving, and exiting security threats in the IGAD region for sustainable development and economic integration. www.igadssp.org

Michael Carroll - Comprehensive Health Services “Very well done. Hopefully you could include a focus on expeditionary medical support at the Dakar event.” Vincent Muthui – Office of the President (OPP); Kenya “Nice event. An eye-opener in many areas of security.”support at the Dakar event.”


INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR MIGRATION (IOM) Established in 1951, IOM is the leading inter-governmental organization in the field of migration and works closely with governmental, intergovernmental and nongovernmental partners. With 166 member states, a further 8 states holding observer status and offices in over 100 countries, IOM is dedicated to promoting humane and orderly migration for the benefit of all. It does so by providing services and advice to governments and migrants. IOM works to help ensure the orderly and humane management of migration, to promote international cooperation on migration issues, to assist in the search for practical solutions to migration problems and to provide humanitarian assistance to migrants in need, including refugees and internally displaced people. The IOM Constitution recognizes the link between migration and economic, social and cultural development, as well as to the right of freedom of movement. IOM works in the four broad areas of migration management: Migration and development, Facilitating migration, Regulating migration, and Forced migration. www.iom.int

INTERPOL REGIONAL BUREAU FOR EASTERN AFRICA

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INTERPOL is the world’s largest international police organization, with 192 member countries. Our role is to enable police around the world to work together to make the world a safer place. Our high-tech infrastructure of technical and operational support helps meet the growing challenges of fighting crime in the 21st century. We work to ensure that police around the world have access to the tools and services necessary to do their jobs effectively. We provide targeted training, expert investigative support, relevant data and secure communications channels. This combined framework helps police on the ground understand crime trends, analyse information, conduct operations and, ultimately, arrest as many criminals as possible. At INTERPOL, we aim to facilitate international police cooperation even where diplomatic relations do not exist between particular countries. Action is taken within the limits of existing laws in different countries and in the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Our Constitution prohibits ‘any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character’. INTERPOL’s General Secretariat is based in Lyon, France, supported by the Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore, seven regional bureaus, and Special Representative offices at the African Union, the European Union and the United Nations. www.interpol.int

KENINVEST (KENYA INVESTMENT AUTHORITY) WWW.GRVGLOBAL.COM

With the Mission “To promote and facilitate domestic and foreign investment in Kenya by advocating for a conducive investment climate, providing accurate information and offering quality services for a prosperous Nation”, the Kenya Investment Authority (KenInvest) is a statutory body established in 2004 through an Act of Parliament (Investment Promotion Act No. 6 of 2004) with the main objective of promoting investments in Kenya. It is responsible for facilitating the implementation of new investment projects, providing After Care services for new and existing investments, as well as organizing investment promotion activities both locally and internationally. The core functions of KenInvest include; Policy Advocacy; Investment Promotion; Investment Facilitation which includes Investor Tracking and After Care Services. www.investmentkenya.com


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

ROUNDTABLE PROFILES KENYA DEFENCE FORCES (KDF) The Ministry of Defence is comprised of the Kenya Army, the Kenya Air Force, the Kenya Navy, the Defence Forces Constabulary and the Civilian Staff. Our mission is to defend and protect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Republic, assist and cooperate with other authorities in situations of emergency or disaster and restore peace in any part of Kenya affected by unrest or instability as assigned. The Ministry of Defence is committed to defending the people of the Republic of Kenya and their property against external aggression and also provides support to the Civil Authority. This service Charter is a commitment by the Ministry of Defence to render efficient and effective services to the citizenry and the stakeholders. www.mod.go.ke

KOFI ANNAN INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING TRAINING CENTRE (KAIPTC)

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The Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC) is one of three institutions designated by the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) as a regional Centre of Excellence, delivering globally-recognised capacity for international actors on African peace and security through training, education and research in the areas of conflict prevention, management and peacebuilding, to foster peace and stability in Africa. The KAIPTC has to date offered over 230 courses in diverse aspects of peace support operations for over 11,000 military, police and civilian personnel. www.kaiptc.org

MINISTRY OF DEFENCE & VETERAN AFFAIRS; UGANDA The Ugandan Ministry of Defence & Veteran Affairs is derived from the Constitution of the Republic of Uganda and is to ensure defence of the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Uganda. Their vision is to have an Efficient, Effective and Accountable Defence of the People of Uganda - To Provide Strategic Support to the UPDF in carrying out its Constitutional Mandate and to ensure Effective Reintegration and Resettlement of Military Veterans into Civilian Life. The overall political direction and supervision of the Ministry vests in the Minister of Defence and Veteran Affairs assisted by the Minister of State for Defence and Veterans Affairs (Veterans) and the Minister of State for Defence and Veterans Affairs (General Duties). www.defence.go.ug

MINISTRY OF DEFENCE & VETERANS AFFAIRS; SOUTH SUDAN MINISTRY OF DEFENCE; SOMALIA The Ministry of Defence is charged with co-ordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the Somali Armed Forces. The President of Somalia is the Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces of the country. The Ministry of Defence provides policy framework and resources to the Armed Forces to discharge their responsibility in the context of the defence of the country. The Armed Forces (including Somali Army, Somali Air Force, and Somali Navy) under the Defence Ministry are primarily responsible for ensuring the territorial integrity of the nation. mod.gov.so


MINISTRY OF FEDERAL & PASTORALIST DEVELOPMENT AFFAIRS; ETHIOPIA The Ministry of Federal & Pastoralist Development Affairs of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia is responsible to ensure equitable development in emerging regions through coordination and integrated support of Federal-Regional bodies, to ensure sustainable peace and security of the peoples by establishing systems for preventing and resolving conflicts, to facilitate peaceful means of dispute resolution among regional states, to uphold and enhance peaceful relations and mutual respect among different religious followers and believers, to facilitate and coordinate efforts to prevent extremism, and to serve as a focal point of good federal-regional relation. www.mofa.gov.et

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (NAPA) The Academy is an independent, non-profit, and non-partisan organization established to assist government leaders in building more effective, efficient, accountable, and transparent organizations. The Academy’s unique feature is its 800+ Fellows—including former cabinet officers, Members of Congress, governors, as well as prominent scholars, business executives, and public administrators. Our Fellows have a deep understanding of financial management, human resources, technology, and administrative functions at all levels of government, and direct most of Academy’s studies. The Academy’s work is directed primarily by Congress or executive branch leadership who are seeking assistance with complex management problems that require the expertise and independence the Academy provides. Leveraging the expertise of their Fellowship, the Academy provides a full range of advisory services to federal departments and agencies with a particular focus on: organizational assessments/strategy development; implementation support and technical assistance; performance measurement systems; and stakeholder outreach/collaboration. The Standing Panel on International Affairs focuses on the National Academy’s role in the international community. It considers a broad range of issues, such as: assisting in the development of democratic institutions in transitional democracies throughout the world; addressing public management challenges in developing countries; examining the management of the U.S. government’s international activities; and promoting information sharing on promising practices in public management. www.napawash.org

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OXFAM

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Oxfam is a global movement of millions of people who share the belief that, in a world rich in resources, poverty isn’t inevitable: Oxfam works in emergencies by making sure people can get clean water to drink and decent sanitation. It provides help for people to get food and the essentials they need to survive and ensure the most vulnerable are kept safe from harm. Oxfam also supports in being better prepared to cope with shocks and uncertainties and helping rebuild communities. Oxfam also works at a grassroots level, promoting development - supporting people’s right to work, advancing women’s rights and building fair livelihoods. Oxfam is additionally an advocacy based organisation making sure the voices of the world’s poorest people are heard loud and clear. Working on big issues that keep people poor, like inequality, climate change and hunger. www.oxfam.org


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

ROUNDTABLE PROFILES

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REGIONAL CENTRE ON SMALL ARMS & LIGHT WEAPONS (RECSA) The Regional Centre on Small Arms in the Great Lakes Region and the Horn of Africa (RECSA) is an intergovernmental organization that was established in June 2005 with the mandate of coordinating the implementation of the Nairobi Protocol for the Prevention, Control and Reduction of Small Arms and Light Weapons which was signed on 21st April 2004. RECSA’s mission is to coordinate action against Small Arms and Light Weapons proliferation in the Great Lakes Region, the Horn of Africa and Bordering States. RECSA has 15 Member States and the Secretariat is hosted in the Republic of Kenya. www.recsasec.org

SAVE THE CHILDREN Save the Children is the leading independent, child-focused organization in the world. We work for lasting improvements in children’s lives in more than 120 countries through 30 member organisations. We achieve change for children by building evidence from innovations, partnering with key stakeholders, and being the voice for change to implement our programs at scale to impact millions of children. Last year our programs benefited more than 70 million children globally. In Kenya, Save the Children has been operational since the 1950s, providing support to children through developmental and humanitarian relief programmes delivered both directly and through local partners. We currently employ around 250 staff working from one of five field offices and our Nairobi Country Office. In 2015, we reached more than 650,000 Kenyans directly through our programmes. Save the Children now has an operational presence in Bungoma, Dadaab Refugee Camp, Garissa, Mandera, Turkana and Wajir and we work through partners in many other parts of the country. www.savethechildren.org

SOMALI INSTITUTE FOR SECURITY STUDIES (SISS) The Somali Institute for Security Studies was launched in April 2016, established to fill the void in the field of security studies across Somalia. The Institute studies in the areas of food security, environmental and economic, and also contributes recommendations to combat money laundering and organized crimes across the country. The Institute focus’ its work on promoting peace-building, conflict resolution and a culture of peace dialogue in addition to youth development and building the capabilities of government forces. www.siss.so.org

SOMALIA NATIONAL INTELLIGENCE & SECURITY AGENCY (NISA) The National Intelligence & Security Agency (NISA) is the national intelligence agency of the Federal Republic of Somalia, in-charge of secret service, intelligence and covert operations for the national interests of Somalia. The main objective of NISA is to collect the intelligence data through different means and to safeguard the national interests - to identify and block the threats to the state and its citizens, and to reinforce the country’s security and safety. NISA was officially reestablished in January 2013 by the new Somali Federal Government in place of the defunct National Security Service (NSS). Headquartered in Mogadishu, NISA is tasked with firming up security; assisted in this capacity by the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM).


U.S. EMBASSY NAIROBI - KUSLO DOD/AFRICOM The Kenya/U.S. Liaison Office (KUSLO) is the United States Africa Command’s (AFRICOM) office of security cooperation. KUSLO works with the Kenya Defence Forces in order to address training, equipment, and operations that meet U.S. and Kenyan national security interests. KUSLO operates out of the U.S. Embassy in Gigiri, Nairobi. ke.usembassy.gov

UN DPKO OFFICE OF MILITARY AFFAIRS (OMA) OMA is responsible for providing military advice through the USG, DPKO to assist the Security Council, the General Assembly, other intergovernmental bodies, troop-contributing countries (TCCs), and the senior United Nations leadership at Headquarters and in the field on military issues in peacekeeping operations. OMA is also responsible for: - the development of operational plans for military components of potential, ongoing or closing peacekeeping operations, based on military assessment; - the generation of military forces, observers and United Nations Headquarters’ staff for deployment, including pre-deployment assessments, coordination of deployments and rotations of the military components of missions; - daily monitoring of and support for the military components of peacekeeping operations; - contributing to training activities of DPKO and Member States deploying uniformed personnel including the institutionalization of high standards of conduct and discipline. peacekeeping.un.org/en/office-of-military-affairs

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UN ECONOMIC COMMISSION FOR AFRICA (UNECA) ECA’s core aim is to promote knowledge delivery and the efficient utilization of policy research in member States; as well as to support governments, and pan-African institutions in building and strengthening their capabilities at individual, organizational and institutional levels to achieve Africa’s transformation agenda. The Capacity Development Strategy, approved by the Conference of Ministers in Abuja, in 2014 “articulates how the Economic Commission for Africa, in its acknowledged areas of competence, supports its member States, the African Union, Regional Economic Communities and other Pan African institutions in order to strengthen their capacity to promote and achieve sustainable and inclusive economic growth, and to accelerate structural transformation in the context of the African Union priorities and its NEPAD Programme as well as Agenda 2063”. www.uneca.org

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Pavel Stefanov - OPTIX “It was a very successful symposium for us and it was a great pleasure, the level of organization was at a very high standard and we greatly appreciate your work.”


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

ROUNDTABLE PROFILES

AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

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UN MINE ACTION SERVICE (UNMAS) Established in 1997, UNMAS collaborates with 11 other UN departments, agencies, programmes and funds to ensure an effective, proactive and coordinated response to the problems of landmines and explosive remnants of war, including cluster munitions. UNMAS provides direct support and assistance to 17 countries/territories/missions including Afghanistan, Central African Republic (MINUSCA), Colombia, Cyprus (UNFICYP), Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUSCO), Iraq, Lebanon (UNIFIL), Libya (UNSMIL), Mali (MINUSMA), Palestine, Somalia (UNSOS) (UNSOM), Sudan, Abyei (UNISFA), Darfur (UNAMID), South Sudan (UNMISS), Syria, Western Sahara (MINURSO), and the rapid response and technical support. www.mineaction.org

UN MISSION IN SOMALIA (UNSOM) The United Nations Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) was established on 3 June 2013 by UN Security Council Resolution 2102. UNSOM is based in Mogadishu with regional office representation in all Federal member States. UNSOM is a political mission and provides strategic policy and technical advice, and leads in coordinating international support to assist the Federal Government of Somalia to rebuild Somalia’s national security architecture primarily through the Rule of Law and Security Institutions Group (ROLSIG), including advice on Police, Defence and Security Sector Reform, Justice and Police, DDR and Human Rights. unsom.unmissions.org

UN MISSION IN SOUTH SUDAN (UNMISS) The United Nations Mission works with the people of South Sudan to protect civilians and build durable peace. More than 14,000 peacekeepers, police, security and civilian personnel from at least 60 different countries work to deter violence against civilians by providing a safe and secure environment for South Sudanese people who have fled violence and sought sanctuary at Protection of Civilian sites across the country. UNMISS peacekeepers also work to facilitate the safe delivery of humanitarian assistance, such as food, clean water, shelter and healthcare, to the millions of displaced people. The aim is to provide a safe and supported environment so that these people can return to their former homes and communities to live safely and with dignity. unmiss.unmissions.org

UN OFFICE IN NAIROBI (UNON) & UN PROCUREMENT DIVISION (UNPD) The United Nations Procurement Division (UNPD) aims at providing best value for money in the timely delivery of goods, services and capacity to enable our customers to execute their missions and achieve their objectives within a fair and transparent commercial partnership provided by our vendors. UNPD’s customers cover a range of UN Headquarters Departments such as the Office of Information and Communications Technology (OICT), the Facilities Management Service (FMS), etc., as well as UN peacekeeping and special political missions, Offices Away from Headquarters (OAH) and other organizations seeking procurement support services. UNPD does business with vendors from all over the world and is actively working at increasing its sources of supply from developing countries and countries with economies in transition. www.un.org/Depts/ptd


UN REGIONAL CENTRE FOR PEACE & DISARMAMENT IN AFRICA (UNREC) UNREC, as a regional centre of the United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs (UNODA), is mandated to provide, upon request, substantive support for initiatives and other practical efforts of Member States of Africa towards the realization of measures of peace, arms limitations and disarmament. UNREC assists African Member States in their efforts to effectively implement their obligations found in various disarmament, arms regulation and confidence-building instruments and to reform their defence and security forces. The Centre supports African States, the African Union and subregional organisations by strengthening their capacity and providing them with the technical, legal and substantive assistance necessary to achieve sustainable peace and security. www.unrec.org

UN WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME (WFP)

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WFP Regional Bureau, Nairobi: Supporting WFP operations in East and Central Africa (South Sudan, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Kenya, Somalia). WFP is the leading humanitarian organization fighting hunger, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Globally, on any given day, WFP has 5,000 trucks, 40 oceanic shipments and 70 planes on the move, delivering food and other assistance to those in most need. WFP’s efforts focus on emergency assistance, relief and rehabilitation, development aid and special operations. Two-thirds of our work is in conflict-affected countries where people are three times more likely to be undernourished than those living in countries without conflict. This is exceptionally relevant for this region, given we work with refugees and returnees in all of our countries. Regional Security Approach: Under the WFP Security Framework of Accountability, the Regional Security Officers (RSO) team is empowered and accountable within the Security Divisions area of responsibility for maximising the safety and security of WFP staff and assets. This is in line with the WFP decentralised management approach in ensuring our country office teams get the best possible support. The RSO has technical over sight of all deployed Field Security Officers in the region, in direct support of WFP programmes. The RSO team includes security analysis, training, operational support and surge capacities. Regular analysis supports operational planning and empowers security advice with a field orientated approach. Information and intelligence translates rapidly into networked, actionable security support for the development of effective security mitigation. We provide specific knowledge of the threats and risks in a country or region and advice on mitigation and prevention measures. Our areas of expertise are: risk assessment and risk management; operational planning and crisis management; context and conflict analysis; training to enable field security operations; gender considerations in security management; information management; humanitarian access analysis and negotiation; hostage and incident negotiation and management; physical security and blast mitigation. www.wfp.org


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

ROUNDTABLE PROFILES UNOPS EAST AFRICA HUB (EAH), NAIROBI UNOPS is an operational arm of the United Nations, helping a range of partners’ implement $1 billion worth of aid and development projects every year. By implementing around 1,000 projects for our partners at any given time, UNOPS makes significant, tangible contributions to results on the ground. UNOPS customizes its support to individual partner needs, offering everything from stand-alone transactional services to long-term management of development projects. We provide this support in three main areas: Sustainable Project Management, Sustainable Infrastructure, and Sustainable Procurement. At UNOPS, quality means continually getting better at the things that our partners want from us. This means completing our partners’ projects on time, within budget and in line with their expectations. It means ensuring that the results we deliver really benefit the communities where we work. www.unops.org

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)

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The World Health Organization (WHO) are the directing and coordinating authority on international health within the United Nations’ system, working in 150 country offices. The organization focuses on Health systems, preparedness, surveillance and response. www.afro.who.int

WORLD VISION INTERNATIONAL (WVI) World Vision is a global Christian relief, development, and advocacy organisation dedicated to working towards the sustained well-being of the most vulnerable children, families, and communities, in more than 100 countries around the world. World Vision has strong, deep experience working in: Emergencies - In natural disasters and conflicts we deliver life-saving aid immediately and then walk alongside communities to help them recover and rebuild. Advocacy - Our advocacy at local, national, and international levels are focused on changing unjust policies, practices, and structures affecting the most vulnerable children. Our emphasis through 2021 is ending violence against children. Development - our unique, integrated model of development has been fine-tuned for more than 60 years and is the foundation on which our work is built. We seek to be a catalyst bringing partners together to improve and sustain the well-being of vulnerable children. The local partners we work with include churches, other faith communities, governments, businesses, community-based organisations, and other nongovernmental organisations. www.wvi.org

Mark Connelly – UN Mine Action Service (UNMAS) “Great opportunity to meet organisations involved in the same regional issues. Great diversity of topic and participants.”


FROM LOCAL TO GLOBAL

MAUVE - SUPPORTING THE AID & DEVELOPMENT SECTOR Is your organisation considering expanding its defence and security projects into a new location? Do you have employees, workers or volunteers on international assignments? Mauve Group can give you an insight into what it means to operate in an unfamiliar location as well as give you important and useful tips that will help your cause to avoid the pitfalls and keep its project costs to a minimum.

AT A GLANCE

ASK MAUVE

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How does Mauve Support Humanitarian Projects?

money, personnel and resources to projects. Our partners are rigorously due-diligence tested by a third-party provider, and we Mauve Group’s solutions and avoid the “middle-man” approach services were designed as a For more than 20 years, Mauve of many of our competitors to gateway enabling organisations Group has built an expert and to access to new locations quickly, ensure absolute compliance. compliant worldwide network. cost-effectively and compliantly. We can be there for you from With long-standing experience Value for Money - Budgets the day you make the decision for humanitarian projects are to venture overseas and we will assisting both the private and not-for-profit sectors, Mauve often extremely tight, and any remain by your side for as long understands their unique needs contracted partnerships must as you need our support. and can provide unparalleled demonstrate absolute value-forsupport to the securities industry money. Where public money is Supporting the Not-For-Profit in the following areas: concerned, board members must Sector see every penny accounted for before a project is confirmed and Mitigation of Risk Security Mauve has a proven history of often require a rigorous tender projects often take place in partnering with not-for-profit process. By the same token, unstable environments; put organisations. Some of our the securities industry must simply, organisations must do valued clients include: avoid cheap but non-compliant their utmost to mitigate risk. services, which can cause Safety, compliance and financial WaterAid headaches and greater expense gambles can derail an overseas Family For Every Child further down the line. Mauve’s project, particularly where THET resources are tight. A partnership solutions offer competitive value Compassion in World Farming for money whilst also ensuring a with Mauve acts as a litmus test Teach For All market-leading service level. for organisations rolling out into new overseas locations. Our solutions offer peace of mind and Time- Sensitive Delivery allow organisations to dip their Deploying workers into a new toe in-country before committing country can involve extremely time-consuming logistics, Established in 1996, Mauve Group offers a diverse range of solutions particularly when safety and in more than 60 countries worldwide. With a well-established, compliance are priorities; any international infrastructure, Mauve Group can provide tailored corners cut can lead to challenges workforce mobility and global HR solutions for all our clients’ later down the line. However, requirements. From global payroll, risk assessment and contract time usually isn’t always on your management to fully managed employment solutions, our creative side due to resource constraints. and innovative approach ensures all our clients receive a cost With an experienced team already on-the-ground, Mauve’s process is effective, reliable and compliant solution.

ABOUT US

expert and efficient, and delivery timescales can take a matter of days rather than months. Reliable Support - Organisations in the securities sector need to be certain their chosen suppliers have walked the path before; support must be trustworthy, tried-and-tested, and personal. They look for a service provider with a reputation underpinned by reliability and honesty, rather than profiteering; Mauve was built as a family-run business and these principles continue to inform our first-hand, warm and supportive service offering every day. Local Expertise - Organisations venturing into a new location need to be certain that their workforce and resources are in expert hands. Mauve is onthe-ground to provide marketleading expert knowledge to organisations where global operations and HR are being managed from afar. We will bridge the gap to familiarise your staff with local practices.

Tel UK: +44 1904 550530 Tel CY: +357 26 818210 Tel UAE: +971 44328528 info@mauvegroup.com www.mauvegroup.com


AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

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30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA


EVENT PHOTOS

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Paul Wells, Vice President & Chief Commercial Officer of GovSat


ATTENDEE LIST Aberdair Aviation Group Adrian Wilcox CEO

30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

AeroHawk Vicente Huerta General Manager Aero-Pioneer Group Andrew Little Chief Strategy Officer & Co Founder Africa.com Susan Gitau Africa.com Debra Winter Africair, Inc. Sanjiv Birsen Regional Sales Manager African Development Bank Group (AfDB) Christo Myburgh Chief Regional Security Officer - East Africa African Development Bank Group (AfDB) James Nyirenda Regional Security Consultant African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) Brig. Gen. Bulti Tadesse Kittila Chief of Staff Amisom African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) Aderemi Adekoya Principal Coordination Officer Afritech Innovation Centre James Kagwaini Director AFR-IX Telecom Norman Albi CEO

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Airsys Africa David Sadler Director Airsys Africa Olivier Molinas International Sales Manager

AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

Airsys Africa Sam Reese Operations Manager Airsys Africa Phil King Technical Director Airsys Africa Stanley Gacheru Airsys Africa Nkya George Airsys Africa Andrew Khamza Airsys Africa Martin Matua Airsys Africa Joseph Ndome ALVO Mobile Hospital Tadeusz Olszewski Founder and President American Society of Industrial Security (ASIS) Kenya Chapter Anthony Maina Mithanga CEO Amiran Communications Zvi Denemark Director Anti-Human Trafficking Advocacy Makori Kemonde Nyangau Chairman Anti-Human Trafficking Advocacy Harrison Mukeka Joseph Manager at FRIENDSLINK ENTERPRISE ASIS, Kenya Chapter Ahamed Mohmmed Brigadair General Astral Aviation Sanjeev Gadhia CEO Astral Aviation Charles Simiyu Commercial Director Barrett Communications Nigel Pescott Business Development Manager Barrett Communications Hussein Choke Technician Barrett Communications Boniface Munyua Muthee Technician Biometrics Technology Ltd (ASIS Member) Anthony Maina Mithanga CEO BMW SA Michael De Souza Brand Manager


BMW SA Penny Sterley Head: Corporate, Direct and Special sales BMW SA Pinky Ndlumbini Key Account Manager BMW SA Kananelo Sebati Key Account Manager Bridgeway Pro-Barriers Kevin Caulfield International Sales Bridgeway Pro-Barriers Liam Fallon Managing Director Cellebrite Lior Waknin Sales Manager Cellebrite Sammy Kioko Strategic Alliance Manager Africa Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) Alice Friend Senior Fellow Centurion Systems Oliver Butchart Senior Exports Consultant Centurion Systems Yves Sunaili Djuma Senior Exports Consultant Coastal & Fisheries Development Project; Somalia Abdi Gino Alasow General Manager Codan Radio Communications Michael Rowlinson Field Service Representative Codan Radio Communications Uwe Niske Regional Sales Manager, Africa Codan Radio Communications Torsten Schwenke Sales Director - Africa

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Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) Secretariat Raymond Kitevu Conflict Early Warning Expert Comprehensive Health Services Michael Carroll Compliance and Ethics Advisor Cotecna Inspection SA Tyrone Robert Taylor Senior Vice President Crewshield International Michelle Howard Business Development Director Cyber Security Review Julia Dolengo DCD Protected Mobility Cornerlius Grundling General Manager DCD Protected Mobility Martie Bezuidenhout Marketing & Sales Manager DCD Protected Mobility Koos Joubert Technical Advisor DHL Express Lisa Mugera Marketing Assistant DHL Express Jerry Don Nickerson Reginal Customer Manager DHL Express Wambui Kinuthia Regional Customer Manager, Sub Saharan Africa DHL Express John Wamutitu Service Point Adviserr Dumaresq Enterprises, LLC Rear Admiral Hamlin Tallent Co-Owner EASF Secretariat Brig. Albert Kendagor Head of Peace Operations

EFS Ebrex Davor Jurisic Vice President of Strategic Growth and Business Development Egyptian Embassy in Nairobi Sherif Elsheikh ELTA North America BG (RET) Dan Bader Chief Operating Officer Embassy of Sudan - Nairobi Elsadig Diab Ambassador Embassy of Sudan - Nairobi Yasir Khiry

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EASF Secretariat Dinah Kyasiimire Head of Police Component


ATTENDEE LIST Embassy of Sudan - Nairobi Muntasir Mohamed

30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

Embassy of Sudan - Nairobi Hamdi Musa Emergency Live Laura Alzapiedi EnerSys Bert Schenk Commercial Manager Engage Communications Sammy Kimani Senior Media Executive Essential Business David Taylor Ethiopian Airline Oscar Mwanza Driver Ethiopian Airline Angela A Oduor Sales representative Ethiopian Airline Yilma Goshu Gobena EUCAP Somalia Ulf Jakobsson Senior Reporting Officer Feka Construction Industry and Trade Inc. Onur Gedik Board Member Flatter, Inc. Dr. J.R. Flatter Chairman

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Fleischhacker GmbH & Co. KG Robert Dale International sales manager Flicos Construction and General Services Beyrouk Brahim Khalil General Manager

AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

G Feron Prefabs Rod Macleod Technical and Sales Manager G4S Risk Management Group Max Francis-Jones Head of Corporate Development - Africa GEW Technologies Kobus Fourie Regional sales and marketing manager Global Eagle Dr. Joe Kamau Managing Director, EMC Kenya Ltd Global Fleet Sales Chris Grakul Regional Sales Manager Global Fleet Sales Kayla Pina Sales Manager Global Wheel (PTY) LTD Jaco Pepler Executive Officer Technical Global Wheel (PTY) LTD Tony Glazebrook Technical Director GovSat Thomas Thiong’o Sales Manager, Global GovSat Paul Wells Vice President & Chief Commercial Officer GRV Global Andrew Dowell CEO GRV Global Glenn Fitzpatrick Events Manager GRV Global Mohamed Ahmed Head of Government Relations GRV Global Elliott Kayser Head of Operations GRV Global Antoinette Orr Head of Event Coordination GRV Global Graham Stoner Head of Business Development GRV Global Ian Whitty Head of Event Production IGAD Security Sector Program (ISSP) Cdr Tuemay Aregawi Desta Head - Counter Transnational Organised Crime Pillar Intelsat Simon Hoey Business Development, Global Government International Organization for Migration (IOM) Michael Doherty Somalia Programme Manager - Intergrated Border Management


INTERPOL Regional Bureau for Eastern Africa Sosthenes M. Makuri Regional Specialized Officer IOMAX Joseph Mbai Manager IOMAX Lee Moritz Senior Director IOMAX Michael Kingsley Vice President , Global Government Affairs WORLD VISION INTERNATIONAL (WVI) Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) Nissim Perez Director Marketing for Africa

World Vision is a global Christian relief, development, and advocacy organisation

dedicated to working (IAI) towards sustained well-being of theDirectormost vulnerable Israel Aerospace Industries BG the (ret.) Amnon Sofrin Marketing Africa

children, families, and communities, in more than 100 countries around the world.

World Vision has strong, deep experience working in: Emergencies - In natural Judiciary Kenya Winnie Mosioma Lawyer

disasters and conflicts we deliver life-saving aid immediately and then walk alongside

Kazan Helicopters” Emeliushin Chief Advocacy of export department communities PJSC” to helpAlexander them recover and rebuild. - Our advocacy at local,

national, and international levels are focused on changing unjust policies, practices,

TABLE NUMBER 17

Kazan Helicopters” PJSC” Arturthe Metkiy Manager and structures affecting mostMarketing vulnerableDepartment children. Our emphasis through 2021 is ending violence against children. Development - our unique, integrated model KenInvest (Kenya Investment Authority) Cathryn C Langat Investment Promotion Officer

of development has been fine-tuned for more than 60 years and is the foundation

on which work is built. We seekSylvia to be Mwago a catalyst bringing partners together to KenInvest (Kenyaour Investment Authority) improve and sustain the well-being of vulnerable children. The local partners we

with Force include churches, other faith communities, governments, businesses, Kenyanwork Defense Alex Barasa Manager community-based organisations, and other non-governmental organisations.

Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC) Rosemond Aryeetey Head of Corporate Affairs Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC) John Elikem Tsotorvor Senior Programmes Officer

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MADO Simon Macharia Executive Director

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w w w. gr vglob al. com


ATTENDEE LIST Mauve Group Kerry Katsapaos

30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

Meta Aerospace Capital Limited Stefano Sturlese Business Development Director Mifram Shlomo Dar Vice president Sales and Marketing Mile Dragic Production ltd Dejan Dragic CEO Mile Dragic Production ltd Dusko Vasilic Technical manager Ministry of Defence & Veteran Affairs; Uganda Sanyu Mandy Councellor Ministry of Defence & Veteran Affairs; Uganda Emmanuel Akunda Military Asst. to the Minister of Defence Ministry of Defence & Veteran Affairs; Uganda Adolf Mwesige Minister Ministry of Defence & Veterans Affairs; South Sudan Lt. Gen. Johnson Okot Jekery Loyang Deputy CDF for Administration & Finance Ministry of Defence & Veterans Affairs; South Sudan Panom Koryom Director of Contracts Ministry of Defence; Somalia Sonkor Jama Geyre Director General Ministry of Defence; Somalia Abdifatah Ahmed Said Director of Policy and Planning

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Ministry of Federal & Pastoralist Development Affairs; Ethiopia Tsegabrhan Tadesse Berhe Director General Intergovernmental Relations Strengthening Directorate

AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

Ministry of Information Communication & Technology (ICT); Kenya Dr. Katherine Wanjiru Getao, Ebs ICT Secretary Moench Group Stephen Elliott Motorola Solutions Travis Heneveld Director - United Nations & International Accounts Motorola Solutions Jerry Nachmann Regional Marketing Manager SSA Motorola Solutions Nicolas Coussinoux Senior sales manager Motorola Solutions Zvi Denemark Narok county assembly Jackson Yenko Chief sergeant At Arms Narok county assembly Nickson Mutai Senior sergeant-at-arms National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) MG Arnold Fields Usmc (Ret.) Chairman, NAPA Standing Panel on International Affairs Navcom Ltd Andrew Khamza Sales and Operations NEC XON (Pty) Ltd. William Hunter Africa Business Development Manager NEC XON (Pty) Ltd. Marie-Denise Toure Business Development Manager - Africa NSSLGlobal Ltd Peter Crafter Group Sales Director Enterprise & Government NSSLGlobal Ltd Steve Tunks Head of Sales & Business Development, Africa Office of the President (OPP); Kenya Emmanuel Maingi Analyst Office of the President (OPP); Kenya Hansel Omondi Analyst Office of the President (OPP); Kenya Sammy Muthai Director Office of the President (OPP); Kenya Alfred Muthui Senior Researcher Optix Boris Nonchev International Sales Manager


Optix Pavel Stefanov International Sales Manager Oshkosh Defense Michael Repetski Senior Manager Organisation Name First Name Last Name Job Title / Position Oxfam Peter Wood Global Security Adviser PAE Nicholas Visconti Capture Manager PAE Marcel Bahlmann Regional Program Manager Panalpina World Transport Kavinda Atapattu Sales and Business Development Manager Panalpina World Transport Neil Dursley Vice President Pearson Engineering Nick Weller Regional Sales Manager Pelican Products S.A Ms Sanette Nel Manager Sub Sahara Region Plasan Nir Korman Regional Director Africa Polaris Digitech Ltd Niyi Okuboyejo CEO Regional Centre on Small Arms & Light Weapons (RECSA) Irene Ndungu Principal Officer - Communication Regional Centre on Small Arms & Light Weapons (RECSA) Baker Ntambi Principal Officer - Monitoring and Evaluation

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Regional Centre on Small Arms & Light Weapons (RECSA) Eric Kayiranga Principal Officer PSSM Regional Centre on Small Arms & Light Weapons (RECSA) Dody Sahinguvu Principal officer-Resource Mobilization Rhino Stars Supplies & Construction Co. Ltd Peter Atem Ngor Managing Director SAAB Kenya Ltd Geoff Van Hees Deputy Vice President Country Unit Sub-Sahara Africa SAAB Kenya Ltd Dr. Joseph Evans Executive Vice President & Head of Strategy, MEA SAAB Kenya Ltd Ms. Chikka Yambo Marketing & Business Development Executive Save the Children Anthony Ombara Child Protection Specialist (Children & Armed Conflict) Schober International Speditions and logistik GmbH Ole Erichsen Export Schober International Speditions and logistik GmbH Guido Howoldt Managing Director SEI Industries Ltd Andy Smith Sales Manager International Smiths Detection Simon Eyob Director Smiths Detection Soualhi Salah Director Key Accounts Smiths Detection Salah Soualhi Responsable Regional Afrique Du Nord Smt security ltd John Metzger Director Smt security ltd Ami Rufeizen Managing Director

Somali National Police Force; Ministry of Internal Security Ayan Mohammed Advisor Somali National Police Force; Ministry of Internal Security Brig. Gen. Abdihakim Sa’eed Fmr. Police Commissioner Somalia National Intelligence & Security Agency (NISA) Brig. Gen. Abdalla Abdalla Mohamed Deputy Director General SourceSecurity.com Kiran Nagula

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Somali Institute for Security Studies (SISS) Abdullahi Ali Maow Chairman


ATTENDEE LIST St. Paul’s University Margaret Mungai

30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

State Company Ukrinmash Yuriy Kyrylych Director of Department State Company Ukrinmash Maksym Gontar Head of division Sudan Police HQ; Ministry of Interior Imad Mohamed Khair Director of International Cooperation Directorate Sudan Police HQ; Ministry of Interior Ahmed Ali Mohamed Idreis Executive Director - State Minister Office Sudan Police HQ; Ministry of Interior Babiker Ahmed Alamin Digna State Minister Telerob Gesellschaft fuer fernhantierungstechnik mbH Thomas Biehne Managing Director Turtle-Pac Laszlo Torok Director U.S. Embassy Nairobi - KUSLO DoD/AFRICOM Jason Moore Program Officer Ukrainian Helicopters, PSJC Artem Lanetskyi Manager, Business Development Ukrainian Helicopters, PSJC Dmytro Smirnov Senior Manager, Business Development UN Department of Safety & Security (UNDSS) Anne Hammenrudh Senior Operations Officer UN DPKO Office of Military Affairs (OMA) Lt Col Michael Diers Deputy Chief Assessment Team

54

UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) Jalal Abdel-Latif Head - Governance & Human Security Cluster

AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

UN Mine Action Service (UNMAS) Mark Connelly Chief of Peace Keeping Support UN Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) Brig Gen Simon West Senior Military Advisor - Defence Section UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) Sambujang Fatty Commuity Policing Advisor UN Office in Nairobi (UNON) & UN Procurement Division (UNPD) Nelly Munovi Senior Procurement Assistant UN Regional Centre for Peace & Disarmament in Africa (UNREC) Moussa Idi PSSM Expert UN World Food Programme (WFP) Bernard De-Wouters Air transport officer UN World Food Programme (WFP) Daz Slater Chief Security Officer - Kenya UN World Food Programme (WFP) Anne Machira Procurement Specialist (tech rep) Organisation Name First Name Last Name Job Title / Position UN World Food Programme (WFP) Tarek Kevshavjee Regional Logistics Officer - East Africa UN World Food Programme (WFP) Mark Kelley Regional Security Officer - East Africa UN World Food Programme (WFP) Philip Kimanthi Supply Chain Specialist (tech rep) UN World Food Programme (WFP); Somalia Bernard De-Wouters Air transport officer Unit Export Limited Grevil Sharp Business Development Manager UNOPS East Africa Hub (EAH), Nairobi Robert Natwoli Head of Security Verint Moshe Samoha Director, Strategic Marketing Verint David Ben Aderet Marketing Verint Ofir Fischlim Pre-sale Verint David Sugarman Sales Verint Itay Rotem solution engineer


td

Verint Yoram Zohar Vice President - Sales & Business Development Verint Aron Dovrat Vice President Sales and Marketing W.S Darley & Co Marius Koekemoer Sales Manager Africa Will and brothers Ndja Elong William WIP Dror Tal AVP Sales - EMEA WIP Yarden Tuvia Presale and Trainings World Health Organization (WHO) Dr. Zabulon Yoti Technical Coordinator - Health Emergencies World Parts Supply Ltd John Charlesworth Managing Director SMT Security Ltd

Unit Export Limited

Smiths Detection

Verint

World Vision International (WVI) Moses Gatino Githinji Regional Security Director WS Insight JonathanUkrinmash Simpson Chief Commercial OfficerWIP StateLtd Company XTAR Paul Bosher Director of International Business Telerob Gesellschaft fuer

World Parts Supply Ltd

Fernhantierungstechnik mbH

WS Insight Ltd

Turtle-Pac

W.S. Darley & Co.

Ukrainian Helicopters, PSJC

XTAR

Photo: Sam Ngendahimana

BG (ret) Dan Bader - ELTA North America “Good event. I hope the relationships made will lead to business and improved national capacity.”

www.grvglobal.com/WASEC

55

Africa Security Symposium West, North and Central 7-8 November 2018 | Dakar, Senegal

For more information visit: www.grvglobal.com/WASEC or contact Ben Hardy: +44 (0) 203 640 8222 | bhardy@grvglobal.com

WWW.GRVGLOBAL.COM

Join GRV Global in Dakar for the Africa Security Symposium West, North and Central, to network and personally engage with Africa’s senior government and agency officials, buyers, suppliers and key decisionmakers via our one-to-one meetings.


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

EVENT PHOTOS

AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

56

Mr. Yoram Zohar, Vice President - Sales & Business Development of Verint


57

WWW.GRVGLOBAL.COM


30-31 MAY 2018 • NAIROBI, KENYA

EVENT FLOORPLAN

AFRICA SECURITY SYMPOSIUM • EAST AND SUB-SAHARAN

58

22 AA African Development Bank Group (AfDB)

34 AA International Organization for Migration (IOM)

32 AA African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM)

1

7

AA African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID)

23 AA Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) 24 AA Coastal & Fisheries Development Project; Somalia 30 AA Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) Secretariat 8

AA EASF Secretariat

2

AA IGAD Security Sector Program (ISSP)

AA INTERPOL Regional Bureau for Eastern Africa

29 AA KenInvest (Kenya Investment Authority) 28 AA Kenya Defence Forces (KDF) 21 AA Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre (KAIPTC) 27 AA Ministry of Defence & Veteran Affairs; Uganda 26 AA Ministry of Defence & Veterans Affairs; South Sudan 25 AA Ministry of Defence; Somalia 11 AA Ministry of Federal & Pastoralist Development Affairs; Ethiopia


59

20 AA Somali Institute for Security Studies (SISS)

6

31 AA National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA)

33 AA UN Mission in Somalia (UNSOM)

3

AA Oxfam

10 AA Save the Children 18 AA Somalia National Intelligence & Security Agency (NISA)

19 AA UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) 4

AA UN Office in Nairobi (UNON) & UNPD

14 AA UN Regional Centre for Peace & Disarmament in Africa (UNREC) 15 AA UN World Food Programme (WFP) AA UNOPS East Africa Hub (EAH), Nairobi

35 AA U.S. Embassy Nairobi - KUSLO DoD/AFRICOM

5

12 AA UN DPKO Office of Military Affairs (OMA)

16 AA World Health Organization (WHO)

9

AA UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA)

17 AA World Vision International (WVI)

WWW.GRVGLOBAL.COM

13 AA Regional Centre on Small Arms & Light Weapons (RECSA)

AA UN Mine Action Service (UNMAS)


47-49 BOROUGH HIGH STREET, LONDON, SE1 1NB, UNITED KINGDOM W W W. G RVG L O B A L . C O M

ASEC Post Event Report 2018 final hi  
ASEC Post Event Report 2018 final hi