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September October 2012 Vol 2 | No 4 $9.95

“We are, in fact, going through a very profound economic structural change”

john scott

Grocery Business Exclusive

warren jestin

david foot

THE ECONOMY: THe new NOrmal PM # 42211029

And what this means for retailers GIC SHOWGUIDE: PAGE 53 grocerybusiness.ca


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September | October, 2012 Volume 2, Number 4 www.grocerybusiness.ca Co-Publisher and Executive Editor Karen James 416-561-4744 KarenJames@grocerybusiness.ca Co-Publisher and Content Director Kevin Smith 416-569-5005 KevinSmith@grocerybusiness.ca Executive Vice-President Content and Market Development Dan Bordun 416-817-5278 DanBordun@grocerybusiness.ca Managing and Online Editor Noelle Stapinsky Contributing Editors Sally Praskey, Angela Kryhul Creative Agency Boomerang Art & Design Inc. Contributing Photographers Tim McGhie Subscription changes & updates or general inquiries: info@grocerybusiness.ca

Grocery Business Advisory Council

publishers’MESSAGE It

is often said that competition makes everyone better and we’re beginning to see the truth of this as new retailers begin to enter the Canadian marketplace. According to the new Advantage Report one of the more positive outcomes of the new competition is the strengthening of existing retailer/vendor relationships and an uptick in the mood of the industry for the first time in several years. Perhaps this because of new senior management in some organizations or just a realization that relationships had to improve for the business to move forward, but a renewed spirit of collaboration is showing up in the research. One group long known for excelling at collaboration are Canada’s independent grocers. Celebrating their 50th anniversary in 2012, this is a milestone year for the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG). The celebration of CFIG’s fifty fabulous years begins on page 40. And for the second year in a row, Grocery Business is very privileged to have been chosen as the exclusive publisher of CFIG’s Grocery Innovations Canada Show Guide – the industry’s must attend event.

This issue marks the beginning of our second exciting year publishing Grocery Business. We’ve been told that we represent the gold standard for grocery b2b publishing in Canada – something we couldn’t have achieved without your valued support.

Bill Dunne, Acosta Canada Phil Donne, Campbell Company of Canada John Scott, Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers Perry Caicco, CIBC World Markets Nancy Croitoru, Food and Consumer Products of Canada Tim Berman, Kraft Canada Inc. Mark Ayer, Procter & Gamble Inc. David Wilkes, Retail Council of Canada Cori Bonina, Stong’s Market Michael Marinangeli, MIDEB Consulting Inc. © Copyright 2012. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. GST Registration No. 83032 6807 RT0001 Publications Mail Agreement No. PM42211029 ISSN 1927-243X Grocery Business Media 390 Queen’s Quay W., PO Box 4085 Toronto, ON M5V 3A6

Thank you and the best is yet to come! karenjames@grocerybusiness.ca kevinsmith@grocerybusiness.ca grocerybusiness.ca Follow us on Twitter @grocerybusiness


Grocery Business September | October, 2012 Volume 2, Issue 4

contents Departments 5 9

Publishers’ Message Front End

What’s happening in the grocery business

13 Top Shelf

48 It Figures

Nielsen spotlights consumer confidence

50 Launch It, List It

The Innovation Advantage

15 Open Mike

How to defend your turf

17 Shelf Life: Open Season

Keep holiday sales rolling throughout the season

40 6

September | October 2012

Check out the latest new products


on the cover

25

The Economy: The New Normal

A roundtable discussion with John Scott, Warren Jestin and David Foot

38

34

22

features 22 Industry Leaders’ Profile:

Mother Parkers Celebrates 100 years

31 The Advantage Report:

What Retailers are Thinking

34 International

Why Wegmans Works

53

38 Technology: Social Studies

Using social media to engage customers

40-47

Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers A celebration of 50 entrepreneurial years

grocerybusiness.ca

GIC SHOWGUIDE 7 General Information 14 Conference and Tradeshow 22 Exhibitor Listings September | October 2012

7


JOINS THE BEST NEW PRODUCT AWARDS AS THE EXCLUSIVE RETAIL PARTNER There is still time to enter Canada’s Largest, Most Credible ConsumerVoted CPG Awards Program. Enter at BestNewProductAwards.biz/Canada before October 16, 2012

Media Partners Trade Partners

Retail Partner

Sampling Partner

Research by

For more information, contact Kim Diamond, Program Director, Canada KDiamond@BestNewProductAwards.com or 647-727-4582


Front End

Grocery People PepsiCo Inc. has named Debra Crew as the president of PepsiCo Americas Beverages. Crew joined the company in 2012 as the president of the company’s Western Europe business, based out of Geneva. She will oversee PepsiCo’s Gatorade and Tropicana business in North America as part of her expanded role. David Mock is the new senior vice-president of merchandising for Canadian Tire Corporation Ltd. A seasoned retail and consumer goods professional, Mock recently served as the senior vice-president of merchandising for hardlines, consumables, pharmacy and cosmetics at Zellers. He was also Loblaws’ senior vice-president of merchandising in Quebec. Following recent management changes at Sobey’s, Trevor Bartlett assumes the role of general manager of Sobey’s Ontario and Sam Bartucci has been named general manager, Sobey’s West. Simon Gagné has been appointed as the chief human resources officer for Sobeys Inc. For the past 12 years, Gagné

served as vice-president of human resources for Sobeys’ Quebec operations. The Oppenheimer Group recently promoted Walt Breeden as its director of sales for Canada. He joined the company in 1987, selling California-grown produce in Western Canada. In 2014, Breeden will take on the position of CPMA chairman. David Cheung will take on Breeden’s previous position of sales manager for Oppenheimer’s Vancouver office. Before joining the company in 2006, Cheung was a buyer for Overwaitea Food Group of Vancouver, B.C. Mike Beltrame, president of Beltrame Leffler Advertising, received the 2012 President’s Award in honour of his 31 years of service and support to the International Dairy, Deli, Bakery Association (IDDBA).

Broker Bulletin:

Nancy Croitoru Food & Consumer Products of Canada (FCPC) President & CEO Nancy Croitoru has been chosen as one of the most influential women in Canada. Croitoru was named as one of the Top 25 Women of Influence, an award which honours and celebrates women with unparalleled reach and influence who have demonstrated strong and unyielding leadership in their sectors. “I want to thank the organizers of the Women of Influence organization for including me in a group with such accomplished and talented women,” says Croitoru. “I am inspired by so many of the women who have been named and incredibly grateful to the leaders, mentors and my family who have influenced and supported me on my journey throughout my career.” Food & Consumer Products of Canada is Canada’s largest industry association representing the companies that manufacture and distribute the vast majority of food, beverage and consumer goods found on grocery store shelves.

Acosta Sales & Marketing has been appointed the agency of record for Associated Brands, effective September 4, 2012, for head office and retail in grocery, drug, mass, club and gas & convenience. Included in the Associated Brands portfolio are J Cloth and Knox Gelatine. grocerybusiness.ca

September | October 2012

9


Front End

When you are shopping in the grocery store or supermarket do you do any of the following? Walk all the aisles to be sure not to miss anything I need

66%

Sample products when available in the store

53%

Take time to browse for products that I would enjoy that week

45%

Look at and read product displays on the shelves to learn more about the products

36% 26%

Look for new products I just follow my shopping list and try to get out as fast as possible

24% 21%

Shop with family members Shop mainly the outside aisles for the healthiest foods HalfPagePetiteBretonneNonBleed OPage 1

C

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Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

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10

September | October 2012

16% 8/2/12

4:18:11 PM

Consumer Insight brought to you by:


Front End

Reset... Walmart Canada opened the first of the 39 former-Zellers locations that it purchased from Target. The store – in Newmarket, Ont. – was renovated and opened in just 65 days. The company plans to open the rest of the locations by the end of the year. . . . . Overwaitea Food Group and UFCW 1518 awarded the Diversity Award to Ladner, B.C. Save-On employees, Ray Ramsay and Jason Shack. The recipients receive a $500 donation in their name to a diversity organization or charity they support. . . . . Target executive, Gregg W. Steinhafel, says the company is on pace to begin opening Canadian stores in the spring of 2013. Renovations have already begun on seven of the former Zellers stores, and will start on 38 more in the third quarter. . . . . A BMO study predicted that Canadians would spend 13 per cent more on back-to-school shopping than last year. . . . . Walmart Canada has awarded a total of $114,000 in bursaries to 48 Canadian students through the Walmart Canada Scholarship program. . . . . Loblaw Companies Limited is the only grocery retailer worldwide to be nominated as a finalist for the 2012 Seafood Champion Award, which recognizes individuals and companies for outstanding leadership in promoting environmentally responsible seafood. . . . . Food and household goods company, Unilever PLC, has signed a definitive agreement to sell its North America frozen meals business to

Dino Bianco assumes North American role at Kraft Kraft Canada has announced that the current president, Dino Bianco,

ConAgra Foods, Inc. for $265 million. The company’s frozen meals business consists of a full range of

has been appointed as the executive

premium, multi-serve frozen entrees and appetizers under the Bertolli and P.F. Chang’s brand names. . . .

vice-president and president for

Brand Momentum, a marketing firm, has acquired Ten81, digital experience agency. . . . . Toronto-

national businesses and marketing

based Longo’s officially opened its 25th store location in Toronto’s Leaside neighbourhood. The 48,000 sq. ft. location is housed in a unique historical building that once belonged to Canadian Northern Railway. . . . . Forbes magazine has named General Mills to its prestigious “The World’s Most Innovative Companies” list. According to Forbes, the 100 global companies that appear on the list are selected and evaluated based on an “innovation premium” score, which measures the premium the stock market gives a company for anticipated or expected innovation.

services for its new Kraft Foods Group. Bianco, who joined the company 22 years ago and has held multiple leadership roles, will be responsible for Canada, North American foodservice, marketing services and export.

General Mills is looking forward to driving profitable growth and excitement for the yogurt category beginning September 1st with the launch of the Yoplait brand under the General Mills portfolio. Across the country, our dedicated team is committed

With innovative plans for our Yoplait segments, we

to providing first-class support on Yoplait, as they have

look forward to sharing our excitement and growing

always done with other General Mills products.

your dairy sales.

If you have any questions or would like to receive more information, please contact your General Mills Sales Representative today. To see what’s happening at General Mills, please visit: lifemadedelicious.ca and yoplait.ca

grocerybusiness.ca

September | October 2012

11


Commitment to Everyday Life

At P&G, we’re committed to delivering products and services that make everyday life better for people around the world. Our opportunity to touch and improve lives comes with a responsibility to do so in a way that preserves the planet and improves the communities in which we live and work. We’re continuing to make progress in our focus areas of Products, Operations and Social Responsibility, enabled by our employees and our stakeholders.

Operations

Social Responsibility

We have set specific strategies and goals

GOAL

GOAL

to ensure we are delivering continuous

Deliver an additional 20% reduction (per unit of production) in energy consumption, CO2 emissions, disposed waste, and water consumption from P&G facilities, leading to a total reduction over the decade of at least 50%.

Enable 300 million children to Live, Learn and Thrive.(1) Prevent 160 million days of disease from unclean water and save 20,000 lives by delivering 4 billion liters of clean water through our P&G Children’s Safe Drinking Water program.(2)

PROGRESS

PROGRESS

Our Focus Areas

improvement toward each of our focus areas.

Products: Delight the consumer with sustainable innovations that improve the environmental profile of our products

Operations: Improve the environmental profile of our own operations

(percent reduction per unit of production) Since July 2007 Since July 2002

Energy Usage

Improve children’s lives through our social responsibility programs

GOAL MET

Number of Children Reached P&G CHILDREN’S SAFE DRINKING WATER PROGRAM

CO2 Emissions

Liters of Clean Water Delivered

GOAL MET

Waste Disposal(1)

Social Responsibility:

Since July 2007

LIVE, LEARN AND THRIVE

Days of Disease Prevented

GOAL MET

Water Usage

Lives Saved

(1) Live, Learn and Thrive (LLT) is P&G’s global cause that focuses our social investments on efforts that improve the lives of children in need.

(1) Total waste disposed includes non-hazardous and hazardous solid waste, air emissions, and strength of effluent measured as chemical oxygen demand.

Our Long-Term Environmental Sustainability Vision includes: • Using 100% renewable or recycled materials for all products and packaging

• Having ZERO consumer or manufacturing waste go to landfills

• Powering our plants with 100% renewable energy

• Designing products to delight consumers while maximizing the conservation of resources

For more information on our long-term vision, go to www.pg.com/sustainability.

(2) Within Live, Learn and Thrive, our signature program is P&G Children’s Safe Drinking Water. Methodology for calculating diarrheal days and mortality was developed with Population Services International and Aquaya Institute. Details are provided in the 2011 Sustainability Report found at www.pg.com/sustainability.


Top Shelf

The Innovation Advantage By Dana McCauley

The pressure on businesses to be innovative has never been higher. A recent infographic circulating in the creative services sector asserts that the word “innovation” is ubiquitous in business after being used in over 35,000 U.S. quarterly and annual reports in 2011.

decide what you sell or how you sell it. Read this book and sit down and start answering that question. When you’re done you’ll know WHY your business exists and that will propel your organization to a higher degree of innovation and success.

While the word innovation is overused, it’s still a valid description of what makes one grocer more successful and meaningful to its consumers than another business. For instance, why is a chain like Trader Joe’s in the U.S. able to endear itself to consumers while others who copy it fail? It comes down to the fact that innovative companies not only do business in a unique fashion, but that they know why they do business differently. It’s their ability to understand their difference and communicate it that makes them successful innovators.

• Where Good Ideas Come From by Steven Johnson. This is a wonderful book to read when attempting to elicit directed, focused creativity. Johnson explores creativity realistically and demystifies the concept of the creative genius who is gifted with special skills and magical powers.

With that in mind, the following three books can help you take that next step. • Starts with Why by Simon Sinek. If you’re a grocer in Canada you may be under the false impression that you compete against a fistful of cutthroat chains and a handful of niche independents. If that were true you’d also likely describe yourself as being in the grocery business. And, you’d be wrong. Twice. In today’s marketplace, grocers compete against restaurants, food trucks and farmers’ markets among other food sellers. That means you need to understand why you’re in business before you

• The Business Playground: Where Creativity and Commerce Collide by Dave Stewart (of pop band Eurythmics fame) and Mark Simmons. Once you have realistic expectations about creativity and realize that anyone can be creative, your team can start exploring new ideas. While that sounds easy, it’s often difficult to shift gears from day-to-day business thinking to a freer, more dynamic thought process. That’s where books like this one can be helpful. Not everyone on your innovation team needs to read Business Playground, but the facilitator of your creativity sessions needs to have a dog-eared copy on her desk!

Dana McCauley is director of product development and innovation at Janes Family Foods and an expert judge on the television show Recipes to Riches broadcast on the Food Network and on Global.

THE canadian producE markETing associaTion

wE bring somETHing bETTEr To THE TablE!

88

th

AnnuAl

CPMA members benefit from tools, programs and services designed to maximize their business success in the Canadian fruit and vegetable marketplace. MeMber benefits inClude: • Discounted rates for our annual Convention and trade show • Access to CPMA’s online members-only zone • CPMA Labelling Service • Online Business-to-Business (B2B) Company Search Tool

• CPMA Doing Business in Canada Tool • Passion for Produce™ industry mentoring program • Access to consumer outreach opportunities through the fruits and Veggies – Mix it up!® and Freggie™ Children’s programs. • and much more…

Visit us online for more information and to apply for membership.

cpma.ca

april 17-19, 2013 dirEcT EnErgY cEnTrE ToronTo (on) canada


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Open Mike

Defending Your Turf By Michael Marinangeli

One lesson that I was taught at a very young age was, “Don’t let anyone take your business away from you.” I learned this from my father who, for many years, owned and operated an independent store. It was further ingrained when I worked, in the ‘70s, as a buyer/ merchandiser at Miracle Food Mart. It was part of our culture.

Over the past 30 years, we have seen a steady erosion of grocery sales to other channels such as drugstores, club stores and mass merchandisers. Now, in addition to lost grocery sales, we are also seeing our perishable sales disappear to club, ethnic formats, deli/bakeries and boxed meat stores. How did this happen? Why did this happen? In my early career at Miracle, I bought and merchandised many high destination categories such as baby, pet food, detergents and household cleaning, paper products and ethnic foods. My strategy in these categories was very simple: “Don’t give our customers a reason to buy these products anywhere else.” Each week, we focused on having the right items at the right price supported by impactful merchandising and promotion. We met or exceeded customer expectations on a week-byweek, store-by-store basis, so that even if the competition promoted the category, the impact was minimal.

grocerybusiness.ca

Supplier collaboration was extremely important. Our procurement strategy was congruent with our pricing strategy. We bought to sell at key price points and made sure that our costing supported our margin requirements. We were very disciplined. If a supplier didn’t support our margin requirements, they sat on the bench until they were ready to play. The strategy worked. Ultimately, the suppliers were happy because we delivered on our promises. Our customers were happy because they could shop knowing that they were getting the best pricing. And while competitors started to lose market share in these categories, we continued to grow and build customer loyalty. With the focus on fresh departments, the centre of store has sometimes been the forgotten family member. Most retailers have been working hard, and rightly so, to expand and improve their perishable offerings, however, it is important not to take your foot off the

pedal in grocery (and that includes dairy and frozen) because it’s still a very integral part of your store. Why? Because:

Grocery... • drives customer traffic. • drives sales. • has high inventory turns. • has the lowest shrink. • has the highest sales per man-hour. • is the most profitable department in the store. The market is getting tougher, the consumer has more choices, and other channels are getting into the grocery business. Be obsessed with not letting others take away your business. Make sure that every category has a plan to address erosion to other channels. Defend your turf! Michael Marinangeli is a principal at Mideb Consulting Inc. and a retailing veteran with more than 40 years of experience.

September | October 2012

15


p in the o r C Introducing a New Segment d e d d G ro wing No Salt A I n t ro ducing a new crop categor y e to grow th Canadians are cutting back on salt. That’s good for all of us.

k on Salt! c a b g n e cutti C anadians a 75% of Canadian households rpurchased a product with either 

a low or no salt claim1

 Del Monte’s No Salt Added segment

has seen +76% $ growth2  Del Monte’s #3 SKU is regular Peaches

& Cream Whole Kernel Corn3  Del Monte is the first and only branded

player offering a full line-up of No Salt Added Vegetables

your n i e l Availab Oct. 1, 2012 e warehous

1. Nielsen, 2007 Sodium Claim Insights Report, Nat GB+DR+MM, $Sales, 52 wks ending Dec. 22, 2007. 2. Nielsen Market Track, NAT XNFLD GB +DR +MM, $ Sales, L28 P/E May 5, 2012 vs. PY. 3. Nielsen Market Track, NAT XNFLD GB+DR+MM, L52wks May 5, 2012, all sales.


Shelf Life

open season With Canada’s growing population of immigrants bringing new flavours and festivities to the table, retailers have the opportunity to keep holiday sales rolling at a steady pace By Noelle Stapinsky

Bright Idea Diwali, India’s biggest and most important holiday of the year, is gaining popularity in Canada. Known as the festival of lights, this celebration features fireworks, colourful lanterns, gifts, and, most importantly, elaborate feasts enjoyed by family and friends over five days. “It’s all about food and celebration,” says Gail Castillo, category insight manager of AB World Foods, manufacturer of Pataks. “What’s nice is that you can start merchandising in mid-October and continue to put things out during Diwali.” Popular foods consumed during this holiday include basmati rice, lentils, breads and curries. With such items, retailers can attract ethnic consumers and Canadian consumers looking for new recipe ideas or menu options. “If merchandised properly, Diwali items may give Canadians a better feel for what they can make at home,” says Castillo. She suggests handing out recipe coupons and information on how to use the products. “Give them a coupon on how to make a butter chicken and couple it with some naan bread and chutney options.”

What types of cuisines have you eaten in the past three months?

Source: Research and Incite Consultants

grocerybusiness.ca

The Curious Case of Great Deli Displays For many shoppers the deli counter is possibly the most tantalizing department in the store. The exquisite displays of meats, cheeses and on-the-go options are hard to resist. And when it comes to the holidays, the deli department is a shopping hotspot. The International Dairy, Deli, Bakery Association (IDDBA) Great Grocery website (www.iddba.org) is a rich source of ideas, tips and Resources trends on how to create excitement in your deli department. Here are just a few: hhEthnic items offer many festive options – fusion food, regional cuisine and sweet and savoury combinations. hhThey can add a new dimension to the traditional holiday meal. hhThink appetizers, small plates and snacks. Sales of charcuterie and specialty cheese are on the upswing right now. hhBe sure to clear highlight new items. A changing assortment is important to your consumers hhValue is also a top priority, so if one meal can be turned into two, customers feel they are coming out ahead.

2012 Festive Dates Thanksgiving October 8 | Diwali November 13 – 17 Chanukah December 9 – 16 | The Winter Solstice December 21 September | October 2012

17


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Shelf Life

Say Frommage

The holidays are prime time for high-end cheese. To enhance the consumer’s experience while shopping, Balderson Cheese has added QR codes to its packaging that, when scanned, offer wine and food pairings to complement its range of aged cheddars. This is an opportunity for retailers to build up their displays with other specialty deli items. And just in time for the holidays, customers who buy a Balderson holiday cheese box can scan an additional QR code inside the box for multiple entries in a seasonal contest.

Senior brand manager for Balderson, Mike Sobol, says “this is the time to make sure you have all the age ranges of cheddar and provide adequate shelf space to increase visibility at point of purchase.”

Festive Table Talk Dana McAuley, food innovation expert, offers insights and tips into prepping for your fall/winter holiday season: What are the key trends grocers should be aware of? Themed meals are trending. So whether it’s Diwali or Chanukah the autumn celebration calendar is becoming more crowded than ever. Social media sites make it easy for consumers to share interesting ideas about food and how best to create a themed meal. And Halloween has turned into a week-long funfest and, for safety reasons, parents are replacing the trick-or-treat ritual with kids’ parties. It’s a great opportunity for retailers to maximize sales with a one-stopshop display. Tip: Stock-up on Halloween foods suitable for kids’ parties. Spooky baked goods and ready-to-eat deli trays with meat cut to resemble jack-0’-lanterns, witches and ghosts are the new basics. The winter solstice is an occasion that is receiving increased attention. Celebrating the day with the shortest daylight hours is really marking

grocerybusiness.ca

the beginning of the earth’s long transition toward spring. As a result, baking and foods made with seeds will appeal to consumers who are looking to brighten the day with a celebration. With so many food shows, are Canadians becoming more adventurous with their cooking styles? Yes! Canadians are interested in new flavours but they are also experimenting with new methods of cooking. For instance, grilled or fried turkeys are popular. Although the main ingredient is the same, consumers are experimenting with a variety of cooking techniques. Of course, this will require different equipment to bring their reinvented turkey dinner to fruition. Tip: Include different cooking techniques in your flyer and on your website and be sure to merchandise the complementary products along side your turkey display.

September | October 2012

19


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP SERIES

certified tissue products. Similarly, Kruger Products offers one of North America’s largest

INSPIRING MINDS ON SUSTAINABLE THINKING

portfolios of EcoLogoM certified tissue products. Its overall portfolio consists of more than 100 EcoLogo- and more than 135 FSC-certified products. “We know our consumers value our natural resources, especially here in Canada, so we set out to earn some of the most difficult certifications, like FSC and EcoLogo, to demonstrate that we are committed to protecting the environment,” said Sage. In 2012, Kruger Products announced

takeholder engagement should lie at the

S

a multi-year partnership with Earth Day®

heart of any sustainability program if you re-

Canada (EDC). “Our consumers trust EDC, so

ally intend on making a difference. Stakeholders

aligning ourselves with such a widely respect-

come in many forms – both internal and external

ed third-party will help us more effectively

– so a transparent and multi-faceted strategy is

communicate with these shoppers,” said Sage.

important. In 2010, Kruger Products embarked on

“We’re also working with EDC to develop

its sustainability journey and committed to nine

an employee engagement program to help

measurable targets to reduce its environmental impact. Recognizing the importance and range

The winning dress from the 2011 White Cashmere Collection Vote Couture for the Cure.

of its stakeholders, Kruger Products was keen on

nizations that uphold stringent standards that resonate with its key consumers. By creating meaningful relationships with third parties valued by its consumers, whether through certifications, donations, volunteerism or partnerships, Kruger Products is strengthening its relationship with them. Ultimately, these shoppers feel emotionally aligned with the company, therefore are more will-

ment in Sustainability 2015,” said Sage. Kruger Products proudly contributes to

communicating with them throughout this journey. Kruger Products has a long legacy of aligning itself with causes and orga-

foster a sense of employee pride and engage-

the health, welfare and social wellbeing of its neighbors and community partners. Some noteworthy highlights include: • One of the top five national corporate partners of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation • Presenting sponsor of the Canadian Women’s Curling Championships – Scotties Tournament of Hearts for 31 years – the longest sponsorship of amateur athletics in Canada

ing, and perhaps even loyal, to buying their leading brands, such as Cashmere

• More than 20 years sponsoring the Ronald McDonald House Charities

bathroom tissue, Purex bathroom tissue, Scotties facial tissue and SpongeTow-

• A decade-long support of Friends of We Care; and

els paper towel.

• Sponsor of Nature Canada through White Swan since 2005

Since 2005, Kruger Products has supported the Canadian Breast Cancer

Kruger Products continues to be a leader in sustainability, stimulating last-

Foundation (CBCF) through various brand-led initiatives. The White Cashmere

ing change for the future through various employee, corporate, consumer and

Collection is Canada’s annual celebration of Fashion With Compassion. A fund-

consumer-driven initiatives. To learn more about Kruger Products and its stake-

and-awareness-raiser for the CBCF, the Cashmere bathroom tissue Couture

holder initiatives, visit sustainability2015.ca.

collection, now in its ninth year, stars Canada’s leading fashion designers and our unwavering creative support of CBCF’s vision of creating a future without breast cancer. “We are proud to support the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation as breast cancer touches us all,” said Nancy Marcus, Corporate Vice President, Consumer Marketing, Kruger Products. Since its debut, the collection has grown and now features limited-edition Pink Cashmere, a portion of proceeds from the sale of every package going directly to CBCF during the month of October. “This is our way of celebrating the courage and strength of women affected by breast cancer. We are committed to helping CBCF fund innovative research that improves the quality of life for these women and their families,” said Marcus. In 2011, Kruger Products became the first Canadian tissue manufacturer to receive Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®) certification by Rainforest Alliance and today, it holds one of North America’s largest portfolios of

A portion of proceeds from the sale of the “Limited Edition” Cashmere Pink, Purex Pink, Scotties Pink and SpongeTowels Pink products goes to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation.


Industry Leaders’ Profile

Grounds for Celebration Brewing success for over 100 years, Mother Parkers Tea & Coffee marks this milestone By Noelle Stapinsky

A century has passed since Higgins & Burke first opened the door to its wholesale grocery store at 33 Front Street East in Toronto. Stafford Higgins and his partner saw great opportunity in the grocery business and in 1912, Front Street was a mecca for food vendors and commodity dealers – the Lake Ontario shipping docks were located right behind the buildings, making it easy to load products into the store.

In the early '30s Stafford’s son, Paul, who had joined the family

business, noticed tea was gaining popularity. Two years later, the

Mother Parkers brand name was registered and trademarked, launching the Higgins family into the tea and coffee industry. Today, the family-run empire is one of the largest roasters in

North America, with just under 800 employees, three production facilities in Canada and one in the U.S., producing traditional and

specialty tea and coffee and private-label products for foodservice and retail.

Paul Jr. and Michael Higgins, third generation and current rulers

of the roast operation, started stocking shelves during summers when they were teenagers.

“Our father never put any pressure on us to join the family business,”

says Paul Jr. “But he was a great person for creating enthusiasm. He made it [the business] sound so exciting and interesting.” Paul Sr., who was a well-known face on the production

Paul Jr. and Michael Higgins

floor, taught his sons the importance of having good people work for you to help run the business and make it dynamic. The Pacific, a historic railcar built in 1924 and used by King George VI in 1939 during a Royal Tour of Canada

22

September | October 2012

Paul Higgins Sr.

And like their father, both Paul Jr. and Michael still walk around their facilities to connect with employees.


Industry Leaders’ Profile

MotherParkersremembers.ca with the Alzheimer Society of Canada, and put the historically reVintage Mother Parkers Photos

nowned 1924 railcar, the Pacific, on the tracks to campaign across the province.

Travelling by railroad holds a deep significance

for this family business. Stafford travelled by

rail to sell merchandise, as did Paul Sr. when he needed to buy product.

To officially mark this grand milestone, a big

“Paul Jr. and I have been through the most

fascinating part of both grocery and foodservice in Canada and the U.S.,” says Michael about

their 40 years in the business. Through the '80s and '90s, the company grew rapidly and it even

only one in 1,000 ever do that,” says Paul Jr.

“But to make it to the fourth generation, well,

only three per cent of all family businesses ever reach that.”

To celebrate its 100th anniversary, the com-

celebration will be held on October 25. “Our dad was born on that day,” says Paul Jr. “It’s going to

be great fun and we hope that by that date, we’ll have achieved our goal of $1 million – we are close to $450,000 now.”

It’s certainly a big year for Mother Parkers, but

broke into the U.S. market and built a facility in

pany has events planned throughout the year

to add even more to the celebration excitement,

had to quickly retool the business to handle the

memorate its history for family, employees

a prestigious Golden Pencil award – an award

Fort Worth, Texas. But in 2007 and 2008, they economic shift.

To do this, they needed to improve production

efficiencies, and work with its supply chain to establish a leaner production process.

In keeping with the family tradition, two of

Paul Jr.’s children – Shannon Higgins and Paul

Higgins III – have also joined the business. “For a company in North America to make it 100 years,

“About four or five years ago we had just over 3,000 SKUs. We’re now just below 2,000 SKUs. That’s a pretty dramatic change, but that change has been positive,” says Paul Jr. “This year, we’ll do record volume tonnage and we’ve had our best fiscal year ever. In our 100th year, it’s kind of cool to reach those two milestones.”

grocerybusiness.ca

and created nostalgic memorabilia to com-

and customers. And for clients and employees, it’s holding special appreciation evenings and celebrations at each of its locations.

Among the many events, the Higgins have

also tied-in a campaign to raise $1 million for

Alzheimer’s in memory of their father, who died from the disease in 2004. To raise awareness and collect donations, they’ve launched

the Higgins brothers will also be honoured with

their father created in 1957 to celebrate industry professionals improving Canada’s food industry.

On this recognition, Paul Jr. says, “It’s a huge honour. Over all the years there has only ever been

one other brother duo, the McCains. For us to be in that company is pretty cool. But for it to tie

into our 100th anniversary, well, I couldn’t have written the script any better.”

The Higgins brothers aboard Pacific with Chef Ron Salsbury

September | October 2012

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2012 roundtable

the Economy: the new normal

y r e c o r g

sweeping economic forces are dramatically altering the retail landscape. Low interest rates, stagnant GDP, high personal debt, shifting demographics, inequality of wealth; what does it all mean for retailers? Grocery Business explored the impact of these broad economic influences during a roundtable with: John Scott President and CEO of the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers

Warren Jestin Chief Economist of the Bank of Nova Scotia

David Foot Economist and Demographer

grocerybusiness.ca

September | October 2012

25


roundtable: economic force s of change

john scott

THE BIG PICTURE

warren jestin

Scott: Perhaps we should start by taking a broad view of economic and demographic trends and at the dynamics of the retail grocery industry. There is no question that, since 2008, the pace of change has been both dramatic and profound. Businesses, as well as individuals, appear to be struggling to keep up. Jestin: That’s a fair comment and, in response, I’d like to point out that, although we are accustomed to thinking about economic trends as cyclical – higher interest rates, lower interest rates, etc. – we are, in fact, going through a very profound economic structural change. The familiar economies – Canada, the U.S., Europe and Japan – are becoming less important, and the emerging economies – China, Brazil, India, etc. – are becoming more important. I think these larger forces, which are going to be in place for some time, are catching a lot of businesses by surprise. Foot: I’ve always said that demographics account for about two-thirds of everything, and can be a very strong foundation to build on, but they’re not always the best place to finish. Impacting demographic predictions are globalization – companies are no longer dependent on their home country for customers – and technology, with people being replaced by machines. And I’d like to mention a third impact, which is the rise in income inequality. The “rich take all” effect is having huge implications on the way in

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September | October 2012

david foot

which middle-class households are spending their money. Scott: Well, we are certainly now seeing the impact of a prolonged period of immigration on the Canadian grocery industry. We talked about it over the past 10 years, and although it was very real, it seemed to take forever to materialize. Recently the pace of change has exploded with the influx of new Canadians, particularly in large urban areas, and their tastes and preferences have necessitated that every player in those markets seriously adjust their offering.

“We are accustomed to thinking about economic trends as cyclical – higher interest rates, lower interest rates, etc. We are, in fact, going through a very profound economic structural change.” Jestin: Because our birth rate is relatively low in Canada, we’re seeing population growth across the country driven by immigration. We used to think it was a B.C. Lower Mainland and Toronto phenomenon, but it’s spreading out. It’s a force in Calgary and Halifax, and it’s going to be a force in St. John’s. Annual immigration, mainly from Asia, has already drifted above 300,000 per year, but we may find


Canadians’ Debt Binge

Debt to personal disposable income Credit market debt to personal disposable income

PERSONAL DEBT

160% 150%

Grocery Business: Warren, governments and economists have recently been sounding the alarm on the personal debt of Canadians. What is your perspective?

140% 130% 120% 110% 100% 90% 80%

90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 Source: statistics canada

that, as incomes there rise, it will be more difficult to attract people from that part of the world. At the same time, you may find that Europe’s problems begin to create a population exodus. I wouldn’t be surprised to see a mini-boom in Portuguese, Spanish, Irish and Greek immigrants. When I talk to people in the oil patch, they see an opportunity to bring in welders, carpenters and bricklayers from those countries. And with that shift comes a different market, so ethnic and specialty retail are becoming driving forces in strategic plans in ways not considered in the past. Foot: The research seems to indicate that it takes about five years for immigrants to adopt Canadian values, but at the same time, they bring new culinary ideas to the table that gradually become integrated into the mainstream. Grocery Business: And we see most grocery stores carrying an interesting assortment of European and Asian products now, which speaks to the needs of the consumer’s ever-evolving palate. Scott: All this is a very positive result; great products like sushi are now mainstream. The tastes of Canadian society are highly varied, and we have all been the beneficiaries of this. But it does make it much harder for the trade to source and provide great new products at a standard that will be embraced by our consumers. grocerybusiness.ca

Jestin: Canadians are relatively well off in terms of their net asset position. However, the thing that worries me is the debt of young families who have bought a house in a large urban area at a price that seems ridiculously high, and financed it at a three per cent interest rate. If interest rates go up, the negative effect is going to be massive.

HOUSEHOLD FORMATION Grocery Business: StatsCan reports that the average age for a Canadian male to marry is 31, and 29 for a female. The economic effect of delayed household formation can be significant. Why do you think this delay is happening? Foot: People are living in the family home longer, and I would say that this has to do with life expectancy, which has been increasing two years per decade. Our lives are being stretched out, with more years spent in a healthy retirement. If you retired in the 1950s, you had only two or three years of healthy retirement, but now you’ve got 10-20 years ahead of you.

As a result, all life stages are being stretched out, and kids are staying home with their parents longer. They’re still consuming, but delaying marriage and house buying. Jestin: We see that young adults are spending years in post-secondary school, and then graduating only to realize that they don’t have the skills needed in the workplace. So they go back to community college for two or three more years. Why form a family in your 20s when you’ve been in school for seven years and you have debt but no income? The result is that you end up marrying in your 30s.

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Consumer Debt

Q2 2011

Q2 2012

Credit Cards

$3,590

$3,556

Lines of Credit

$33,855

$33,721

Instalment Loans

$22,281

$22,493

Auto

$16,671

$18,881

Source: Transunion: average consumer’s total debt

THE AGING POPULATION Foot: I’ve been arguing for a long time that an aging population leads to slower economic growth. In the 1950s and ’60s, we had five per cent real economic growth. In the ’70s and ’80s, it was four per cent, and in the ’90s and 2000s, it was three per cent. The next 20 years will likely see two per cent real economic growth, and that simply has to do with the boomers beginning to retire, trying to save – not easy with these ridiculously low interest rates – and not consuming as much. Even though more affluent front-end boomers are ready to spend on indulgent items, they’re being very cautious right now. Normally, they’d be moving into more luxury items, but in this low-interest-rate environment, they’re finding it difficult to generate income. Scott: And we are seeing the reality of your comment at the retail level, David. We are witnessing a trend to trade up to innovative products, but then a balancing by trading down on the necessities. It’s a curious phenomenon, because it seems that even the

relatively comfortable boomers are maintaining their expenditures at a certain level. Perhaps “balancing” is the new “branding” trend that was so prevalent in the ’80s. Jestin: And because a lot of people are going into retirement with vastly lower savings than they had expected, the market for low-margin, low-cost goods will tend to grow over time.

5

THE BIG SHIFT

5 converging forces that are shaping business

David Foot: Of course, high-end stores can still thrive, but those stores will be limited to a particular segment of the population: those in the top five-to-10 per cent of income distribution. Obviously, if you locate those stores in the right neighbourhoods, you’d do extremely well.

GLOBAL CHANGE Workforces have become more diverse and widely dispersed.

Scott: I couldn’t agree more, and you can see it happening in major cities. Companies are differentiating like never before. For example, take a look at Choices and Urban Fare in Vancouver, Pete’s in Halifax, Quality Foods on Vancouver Island, Colemans in Corner Brook, or Longo’s and Summerhill Markets in Toronto. They’re all great entrepreneurs, providing a unique offering to a demanding customer segment.

ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE Companies have become less hierarchical, with front-line employees more involved in value-creating work.

ECONOMIC CHANGE Service industries and knowledge work have become more of a force, at the expense of manufacturing.

GENERATIONAL CHANGE Younger workers, with their different view of workplace values, are challenging traditional methods. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE Digital technologies and social media continue to grow more powerful, with instant connectivity now the norm. Source: Harvard Business Review

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September | October 2012


THE TREND TO DISCOUNT RETAILING

“The effects on a general type of grocery store will be quite profound”

Scott: In many markets, we have specific companies that are dealing at the high-end, and they all seem to be doing well. And yet, the biggest trend in Canadian grocery since 2008 has been towards hard and soft discount. Wage rates in Canada, with the exception of B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan and Newfoundland, are relatively static. That, combined with the debt levels that Warren discussed and a cautious consumer, suggests that for a large segment of the market,

FUTURE PROSPECTS Scott: So what do you think the future holds, based on the various factors and issues we have touched upon? Jestin: In the big picture, Canada is in the sweet spot globally. We are a commodity-rich country in a commodity-poor world. We don’t have the debt problems that many countries have, and our government is in much better shape. And we have yet to feel the effect of peak productivity from the baby boomers. We will be there in three or four years. But, as I mentioned, we are in a global structural versus cyclical shift. With a cyclical shift, we are used to tightening our balance sheet and watching our receivables, but now we have a powerful structural change that will dramatically impact the industry.

grocerybusiness.ca

the value equation is low prices on everyday items. And our society equates low prices with discount offerings. How else do you explain the rise of the Dollar stores, the success of Walmart and the aggressive discount offerings of our established grocery retailers? Jestin: Well, there’s no doubt that a large number of consumers will have to trade down. We are going to see a larger percentage of people hard-

pressed to find jobs, and so we’ll be living with higher levels of unemployment. Lower- and middle-income consumers are going to be squeezed from several points of view. The effects on a general type of grocery store will be quite profound, so, as a retailer, you have to be very efficient and read your market well. The skill level required to develop an effective strategic plan is now dramatically different than what it was 10 years ago.

Foot: And then add in the effect of income inequality, which is a huge problem. Middle-class incomes are being gutted, and that has major implications for the type of products people can afford to purchase. Scott: It would seem that from what we’ve discussed, the key is dramatic differentiation. Whether at the highor low-end of the market, grocers will need to differentiate themselves according to the neighbourhood and community that they serve. Jestin: Yes, and with increasing retail competition, the profit reality will change for all players. But where I see potential, and this goes back to the strength of the independent grocer, is in the neighbourhood-focused type of operation, whether it’s at the high-end or low-end. But I wouldn’t want to be in the middle.

September | October 2012

29


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Retailer Research

the advantage retailer

report by sally praskey

W

ith new competitors entering the fray, grocery retailers are putting a premium on manufacturers’ ability to meet deadlines and help them compete effectively. So says the latest edition of The Advantage Report, an annual survey of major grocery/mass/club/drug retailers conducted by Toronto-based Advantage. The top priority for executives, senior management, and category managers in 2012 is “Works with a sense of urgency to meet agreed-upon deadlines,” up from third place in 2011. Holding at number two is “Understands and responds to the unique strategies and goals/ needs of our company.” New on the questionnaire this year and immediately skyrocketing to priority number three: “Supports our needs to compete effectively with other distribution channels.” “The sense of urgency has become the number one priority for executives, senior management and category managers in Canada,” says Paul Cussons, director of client services, Advantage. For inventory and logistics managers, the top priority also focused on immediacy: “Delivers orders on time/at the time requested” climbed from number two last year. This year, Advantage also surveyed store-level managers, which it does every second year. Their top priority is “delivers complete and accurate orders,” followed by “delivers orders on time.” These also topped the list in 2010, albeit in reverse order. However you slice it, time is of the essence, and collaboration between retailers and suppliers was never more important. As one retailer commented, “The grocery business is running 24/7. We’re able to get in

grocerybusiness.ca

Retailer Priorities for Manufacturer Support According to Executive, Senior and Category Management Personnel Grocery/Mass Channel Priorities

Value Rating

Rank 2012

Rank 2011

Works with a sense of urgency to meet agreed upon deadlines

87

1

3

Understands and responds to the unique strategies and goals/needs of our company

85

2

2

Supports our need to compete effectively with other distribution channels

82

3

**

touch with people in the middle of the night, on the weekends, when they’re on vacation. There’s a constant need for urgency. The pace will only get quicker.” New information available this year is a Category Ranking which shows how category managers rate the performance of specific categories of products in several areas: Business Relationship and Support; Personnel; Category Development and Shopper Insights Support; Consumer Marketing Support; and Customer Marketing/ Promotion Practices.

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Retailer Research

TM

canada

Retailer Priorities for Manufacturer Support According to Inventory/Logistics Management

Average Net Favourable Rating

According to Store Management

Priorities

Value Rating

Rank 2012

Rank 2011

Priorities

Value Rating

Rank 2012

Delivers on time/at the time requested

88

1

2

Delivers orders on time/at the time requested

78

1

Delivers complete orders/high % fill rate

87

2

1

Delivers complete orders on time

77

2

Works with a sense of urgency to meet agreed upon deadlines

82

3

5

Provides timely peak period replenishment

75

3

While last year’s survey revealed a continued deterioration in the retailer– supplier relationship that began in 2008, that trend appears to be reversing this year. “I do think relationships are getting better this year,” says Cussons. “There is new management in some organizations, but I think what’s happening too is, with the extra competition coming, some of the companies are recognizing that they need to start working on some of these retailer priorities in order to remain competitive, which is a good thing.”

Interestingly, category managers rated suppliers of Breakfast Cereals and OTC in the top third across all areas of performance. By contrast, Confectionery and Shelf Stable Juices and Drinks ranked below average in every area of measurement. “The retailers are seeing different levels of satisfaction across different categories,” says Cussons. “So if a manufacturer is in a category that is below average, there are some issues that need to be addressed. There is more room for improvement in Confectionery and Shelf Stable Juices and Drinks than in Breakfast Cereals and OTC.” Of course, the Category Ranking does not reflect each company’s individual score, but only the category as a whole; some manufacturers may be performing very well, even if their category is not. In the final analysis, collaboration is the key. If manufacturers can better understand the issues that the retailers face, and work with them to find solutions, both partners will benefit. After all, better relationships lead to higher sales and profitability.

Retailers Rate Suppliers’ Performance 35 30 25 20 0

Overall Performance

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Retailer Priorities for Manufacturer Support

September | October 2012

Business Relationships + Support

Manufacture Personnel

Category Development & Shopper Insight Support

Consumer Marketing Support

Customer Marketing Promotional Practices

Logistics/ Supply Chain Management

Logistics Management


Retailer Research

Q&A

with Dwight Konings, VP, Program Innovation & Commercialization, Advantage

Grocery Business: What is The Advantage Report? Dwight Konings: It is a program that Advantage runs in 34 countries to collect ratings and comments to help manufacturers understand how they are perceived by their retailer partners. G.B.: Why is this so important? D.K.: The key for manufacturers, to improve their performance, is to understand how retailers perceive it over time, and relative to the perception they have of the manufacturers’ competitors. We provide the manufacturers with their rating and rank compared to their

competitors, and we collect interview comments from approximately 40 per cent of respondents to help manufacturers understand why they are being perceived as they are. G.B.: Can manufacturers compare their performance from one year to the next to see if they are improving? D.K.: Yes, we run the program annually, allowing manufacturers to see if the changes they are making are improving the perceptions of their organization and moving them ahead of their competitors.

G.B.: How does participation in the program help both retailers and manufacturers? D.K.: We found that frequent sponsors were more likely to receive higher ratings from retailers, and to report that they experienced more positive interactions from those retailers as well. Ultimately, the improvements they make lead to improved sales and profitability for both partners.

Founded in Canada in 1988, Advantage operates in more than 30 countries. Its jointly sponsored programs provide an ongoing industry benchmark for retailers and manufacturers to measure and track their relationships with key business partners. For more information or to participate, contact Paul Cussons at 416-863-0685, ext. 170; pcussons@advantagegroup.com.

Performance Ranking Chart by Category Retailers’ Ranking by Category

Business / Relationship Support

Business Personnel

Category Development / Shopper Insights

Consumer Marketing Support

Customer Marketing / Promo Practices

Baking Breakfast

“Collaboration is the key and best-in-class vendors are open and communicative. This requires that the most talented people work on our account.” “The best vendors ship on time and have high fill rates. They supply us with good information on promotions and have great follow-up.”

Canned Soup/Veg/Fruit Confectionery Frozen Food/Beverages

“With the arrival of more competition, retailer/ vendor relationships might change. Manufacturers may not focus on us as much and this could make it difficult to get supply.”

OTC Pet Food Refrigerator (Dairy)

“With new competitors coming into the marketplace, it is in the retailers’ best interests to partner with vendors and to use their insights, analysis and market data to grow categories.”

Refrigerator (Core) Salty Snacks Shelf Stable J&D

“For retailers, buying responsibilities are getting quite hectic. The manufacturers who can be more proactive and efficient, will benefit.”

Soft Drinks/Water Spread Tea/Coffee/Crystals Total Household Ranking:

grocerybusiness.ca

THE RETAILERS’ POINT OF VIEW

Top Third

Middle Third

Bottom Third

“When suppliers make presentations to us, they try to convince us to delist some of their competitors’ products to make room for their own. Neutrality and a global perspective of the category would help.”

September | October 2012

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International: Wegmans

why

wegmans works

Rochester, N.Y.

Family-owned Wegmans is thriving, even in a less-thanbuoyant economy, thanks to its philosophy of always putting staff and customers first By Sally Praskey

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September | October 2012

Susan Marotta, a businesswoman and single mother, is a regular shopper at the newest Wegmans supermarket in Northborough, Mass. At least once a week, she treats herself and her teenage daughter Kayla to dinner from the store’s expansive buffet of freshly prepared meals. The prepared-foods section – which includes the Market Café for in-store dining – boasts an impressive array of choices, including Thai, Chinese, comfort foods, sushi, and a huge vegetarian/vegan section. There’s also a wokery buffet, as well as Asian and seafood bars with counter seating, where chefs prepare made-to-order dishes. And while Marotta does not buy all her groceries at Wegmans – she describes herself as a dedicated “comparison shopper” – she is impressed, not only with the quality and selection of food, but also with the grocer’s high level of customer service. “If anything is spilled in the aisle, an employee is there immediately to clean it up,” she says. Staff are unfailingly friendly, and always available to help. As the retailer’s website puts it, Wegmans offers “a nearly telepathic level of customer service.” That is no exaggeration. Listed on the J.D. Power 2012 Customer Service Champions list – the only grocer to make the cut and named one of Fortune’s 100 Best Companies To Work For in 2012, Wegmans has received more than 4,400 requests from consumers asking it to open a store in their community. What inspires this cult-like following? According to the website, “We believe we can achieve our goals only if we fulfill the needs of our people.” A familyowned operation now headed by third- and fourth-generation members,


International: Wegmans

Facts and figures History: Founded as The Rochester Fruit & Vegetable Company by John and Walter Wegman in 1916, in Rochester, N.Y. Growth: Under the leadership of Walter’s son, Robert, Wegmans expanded to Syracuse in 1968, and Buffalo in 1977. In 1993, it opened its first out-of-state store in Erie, Pa. Stores soon followed in the states of New Jersey, Virginia, Maryland and, most recently, Massachusetts. Leadership: Robert Wegman remained chairman until his death in 2006. His son Danny is now CEO, and Danny’s daughter Colleen is president.

All images are from Wegmans’ Northborough, Massachusetts store

Wegmans subscribes to the philosophy that if you treat your employees well, they will treat your customers well. To this end, the company provides nearly US$4.5 million in tuition assistance to employees each year, encouraging them to pursue their educational goals. It sends department heads around the world to acquire expertise in their products. All employees undergo extensive training before interacting with the public. Perhaps it is not surprising that Wegmans is flourishing while many of its competitors flounder. According to Booz & Company data presented by Leslie Sarasin, president and CEO of the Food Marketing Institute, at FMI 2012, the grocery industry has built approximately 150 million square feet of new capacity over the last five years. But here’s the rub: Virtually all of that new space was added by supercentres, dollar stores, drugstores, and other small formats like fresh specialists and hard discounters, rather than traditional grocery stores. Wegmans, however, is the exception: The company continues to add stores and branch out into other grocerybusiness.ca

Danny Wegman, CEO

Inventory: The company carries more than 70,000 products – including 300 specialty cheeses – compared to an average of just over 40,000 products in most supermarkets, according to the Food Marketing Institute. Annual sales: US$6.2 billion in 2011 Number of stores: 80, in six states Number of employees: 42,000 Store size: 80,000 to 140,000 square feet source: wegmans.com

Colleen Wegman, President

September | October 2012

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International: Wegmans mid-Atlantic states, albeit always at a manageable rate of no more than three stores per year. The chain now totals 80 stores in six states – and counting. And while the company has closed nine underperforming stores over the years, it has not laid off employees. Profits are reinvested in the company or shared with employees. And with a huge assortment of products to encourage one-stop shopping, its supermarkets boast the highest daily sales volumes. In a 2012 article in The Atlantic, Mary Ellen Burris, the company’s senior vice-president, noted that Wegmans “has proven that you can grow and treat your people well.” As one enthusiastic Massachusetts consumer put it in an online review page: “Wegmans is what every grocery store wishes it could be.”

The secrets of success Grocery Business asked George Anderson, editor-in-chief of U.S.-based website RetailWire, for his take on “the Wegmans’ way.” GB: What distinguishes Wegmans from its competitors? Anderson: Wegmans has established a clear position in the marketplace based on quality, selection and customer service, and has established a culture that recreates the same identity with every store it opens. It treats and trains its employees as skilled professionals who each have the potential to positively affect a store’s performance. This is in direct contrast to many of the grocery retailers in the U.S., who, by actions if not words, treat employees as an expense rather than an asset. GB: What makes its stores so attractive to consumers? Anderson: Store design and an emphasis on interaction with sampling stations in service

grocerybusiness.ca

departments result in an engaged shopper population. The company clearly loves food, and communicates that in terms appreciated by foodies and non-foodies alike. Put simply, it’s fun to shop in Wegmans. GB: How has Wegmans been able to grow without losing sight of its mission and values? Anderson: I think this speaks to the Wegman family presence, along with the long-time workers who understand what it takes to uphold the promise that the family and company name implies. New employees who join the company find it easy to fit in because they are trained and come away feeling that their jobs have meaning, while the same cannot be said for some of their competitors.

September | October 2012

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Technology

Social studies by Noelle Stapinsky

Grocery Business: How did this study come about? Michael: Social networking has become so powerful, so fast, that a lot of business people are struggling with basic questions such as: What is it? How do we use it? And why do we use it? The study is broken into parts to explore those questions.

Michael Sansolo

GB: Who is using social media and how are businesses affected? Michael: It’s not just teenagers and young adults using social media sites, it’s the vast majority of people, who are your basic shoppers. The biggest growth of users are those in their 60s. But not everyone that’s online uses social media the same way. Some people will talk about everything they do during the day, while others may use it for information or networking. Today’s consumers start shopping long before they enter a store and the experience extends well after they’ve left. And they’re probably going to talk about it. One of the things we found early in the study is that when a consumer says something about a business in the social space, they want you to read it and respond quickly. GB: Why is social networking important for food retailers?

The Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council (CCRRC) recently released Untangling the Social Web, a five-part study that reveals just how essential it is for businesses to get online and engage with the masses. Grocery Business interviewed Michael Sansolo, research director for CCRRC, about the study and how grocery retailers can better engage their customers.

Michael: Supermarkets have always been the centre of the community. It’s about communication and having conversations about food with people. Social networking is a technological enhancement to all that we’ve done in the past, but now we can do that with some of the coolest technology ever. The food industry is different from other retailers because we draw in everybody.

Facts & Figures

44% of social networkers

connect with businesses to access exclusive deals Computers and mobile are at the core of connecting on the social web, but other services may become more prevalent and/or change the way we connect.

38

97%

37%

3%

3%

2%

2%

Computer

Mobile Phone

Gaming Console

iPad

InternetEnabled TV

e-Reader

September | October 2012

1% Hand-held Music Player

81% of customers reach out to friends and family on social sites for advice before purchasing product. 86% of Twitter complainers expected to hear back from the company. 75% of those who did hear back were satisfied with the response.


Technology

GB: Part five of the study discusses using social media for hiring and recruiting. How has this changed the process today?

35

Michael: This is something we have to accept. Social media is here. Now, it’s become a matter of how we can use this in a positive way to build business and community and stronger ties to shoppers.

Respondants who spent less on social media recruitment

Shopping and the social web

Job Boards

Campus Recruiting

Corporate Career Sites

To download Untangling the Social Web, go to: ccrrc.org

3rd Party Recruiters and Search Firms

45

55

LEADS ALL OTHER EMPLOYEE RECRUITING CATEGORIES FOR INCREASED INVESTMENT (%)

Social Media

Michael: If you delete a negative comment, it will just get worse. People will want to know what you’re hiding. The online world puts a tremendous emphasis on transparency. Companies need to have a policy in place for dealing with such comments. But first of all, and this surprises people, if a shopper complains about an experience, other shoppers will respond on your behalf if they think the complaint is unfair. It’s almost like there is a policing on the social web. For retailers, this is also a chance to turn a negative into a positive. Retailers can address the comment online saying, “we’re sorry you had a bad experience, please come in and see us. Here’s what we can do for you.”

GB: What would you say to people who might be dismissing this opportunity?

SOCIAL MEDIA

25

GB: How should a retailer handle negative comments?

check out a possible hire, they can check you out. The first thing a new hire is going to do is check out your website, Facebook or Twitter. If you look really old and tired on those social pages they’re going to wonder if they want to work for you.

15

Michael: What we learn in part three of the study is that having an interactive discussion with our consumers is what we’ve always tried to do. The difference now is that you can’t just push information on people; you have to develop a relationship. One of the members of the research council uses Facebook to talk about recipes and shopping strategies. She is now the face of her company. This is a way to give your store a personality.

0

GB: How should retailers use social media?

Respondants who spent more on social media recruitment

How consumers engage

Michael: In part five, a good percentage of human resources professionals reported that they do look up the applicants online and they have found obvious discrepancies between the online information and what was on an applicant’s resumé. But just as you can

Pre-Tail grocerybusiness.ca

retail

post-Tail September | October 2012

39


The Independent

Road Show Earlier this year, at receptions in Toronto and Vancouver, the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG) marked its 50th anniversary with the unveiling of The Most Influential 50 Independent Grocers in Canada, a book celebrating the enduring entrepreneurial spirit of its members. To present the book to each grocer featured within its pages, CFIG President and CEO, John Scott, and Brent Battistelli, CFIG Chair (with support, on occasion,

from Directors and Past Chairs), travelled across the country to personally visit those who were unable to attend the receptions. “This book is about outstanding entrepreneurs who are doing things differently today,” says Scott. “I perceive this account of the “fabulous 50” as a kind of primer for great grocery retailing.  While the grocers featured in the book followed many different paths to success, they all have one thing in common: The ability to think outside the box, coupled with a willingness to take risks.” Scott adds, “This is a book that everyone in the industry can learn from and those who need to significantly differentiate, which I suggest all grocers do, will gain a lot from reading and reflecting on its contents.” Here’s a look at the presentations in some of the communities the CFIG visited. Lanovaz Bigway Foods, Duck Lake, Sask.

The Grocery Store, Whistler, B.C.

Colemans Food Centre, Corner Brook, N.L.

Provigo Choquette Marieville, Que. Sharpe’s Food Market, Campbellford, Ont.

Vince’s Market, Sharon, Ont. Drost Save Easy, Bath, N.B. The Village Grocer, Unionville, Ont.

40

September | October 2012


Harold’s Family Foods, Prince Albert, Sask.

Masstown Market, Masstown, N.S.

Pete's, Halifax, N.S.

Lakefield Foodland, Lakefield, Ont. Powell’s Supermarket Ltd., Bay Roberts, N.L.

Distribution Canada Inc., Burlington, Ont.

L&M Markets, Elora, Ont.

Battistelli’s Independent Grocer, Lively, Ont.

IGA Famille Jasmin, Marché au Chalet Inc., Sainte-Adèle, Que. grocerybusiness.ca

Concord Food Centre, Concord, Ont.

September | October 2012

41


Remote

Possibilities

The Stezenkos are the epitome of the entrepreneur, with a demonstrated side of humanity you just don’t see often John Scott

By Noelle Stapinsky

When Grand Chief Stan Beardy of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation asked David Stezenko, co-owner of family-run Quality Market in Thunder Bay, Ont., if they could supply his communities with groceries and fresh food, it was not only an honour, but also an offer they would not turn down. “To get a meeting with the Grand Chief is almost impossible…he’s a very busy man,” says Stezenko. “He told me about the plight of his people and how their health was deteriorating. Their diet was getting worse and it was hard to eat healthy because of the high cost and risk of transporting healthy food.” The Nishnawbe Aski Nation represents 49 First Nation communities in northern Ontario that have an estimated population of 45,000 spread out across 210,000 square miles; an area so massive that suppliers must fly the goods in. For Quality Market to create a supply arrangement, it meant many meetings with the First Nation, and a lot of hard work. During this process, Stezenko and his team discovered an opportunity to become a supplier for Nutrition Canada that would allow Quality Market to offer a subsidy to remote communities. But the process proved arduous. It took them weeks to sift through and understand the bulky documentation and application process, only to be told by the government not to hold their breath. “They told us they weren’t looking to change the supply chain, just their processes. They had their suppliers already determined.” says Stezenko. Stezenko relayed this to the Grand Chief, who wrote a compelling letter to the government, which quickly turned the tables and landed Quality Market one of the 33 supplier postings in Canada. David and Dan Stezenko

42

September | October 2012

With that in place, Stezenko and team got to work on what would be months of complicated planning to develop an ordering system. He says, “we worked closely with Howell Data Systems (HDS), who wrote the code for an invoicing system that would report all of the accountabilities the government required. There were some initial challenges with the 80-page catalogue that had been created. HDS came to the rescue with a platform for Quality Market to launch an online, user-friendly virtual grocery store, complete with imagery and product information. Language barriers were eliminated because, to order, customers simply click on the product of their choice. “The Stezenkos are the epitome of the entrepreneur, with a demonstrated side of humanity you just don’t see often. They looked at the First Nations people and saw a way to do something for them,” says CFIG president and CEO, John Scott. With the orders from their new northern customers beginning to grow, Stezenko says the feedback on the quality of the products has been great. The ROI may not be immediate, but for Stezenko it’s all about getting the products to the people who need them. The ultimate reward is to be able to look back, see footprints in the sand, and know that what they did is going to make a difference.


The Choice

for Chair Incoming CFIG chair Mark Vickars brings enthusiasm and experience to his new role By Sally Praskey

As incoming chair of the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG), Mark Vickars has what it takes to lead the venerable organization into a new year – one that is sure to present unique challenges and opportunities. “Mark is one of the most insightful leaders I have ever seen at CFIG,” says president and CEO, John Scott. “He doesn’t mince words, and he has a very clear grasp of the market reality of our membership and of his own company.” The CEO of Choices Markets, an eight-store Vancouver-based independent that pioneered the concept of one-stop shopping for natural/ organic foods and conventional groceries, Vickars champions wellness, sustainability, and ethical sourcing. During his six-year tenure on the CFIG board and executive, Vickars has held the positions of secretary, treasurer, and vice-chair. He has also sat on, or chaired, a number of committees, including Governance, Public Policy, and Environmental Sustainability. “As a retailer

who sells primarily organic and natural food, issues around local, sustainable and being environmentally sensitive are particularly close to my heart,” he says. Vickars joined Choices in 1994, but stocked shelves for founders Wayne and Lloyd Lockhart back in the early ’80s while in university. A few years after graduation, he went to the store to request a letter of recommendation from the brothers. Wayne refused, insisting instead that he put on an apron and get to work! The rest, as they say, is history. Vickars describes his upcoming chairmanship as “merely custodial in the sense that I just need to let the very talented people at CFIG continue to do their jobs. John Scott has built a very capable team of able staff that seamlessly handle the most difficult of issues.” That said, he plans to start his tenure with strategic planning on several fronts, including:

“I don’t think there’s anything finer than the grocery industry. People have to eat, and they want to eat well.

• Regulation changes around sustainability for items such as plastic bags and packaging; • The possible effects of changes to the debit/credit issue; • Streamlining the process for dealing with recalls. CFIG will continue to work closely with its new members from the grocery distribution side of the independent trade on issues that are specific to them, as well as on those issues that intersect with the association’s retail members. He notes, “I also look forward to working closely with our vendor community as we all deal with increasing competitiveness in the whole grocery category.” He identifies continued industry consolidation and the arrival of U.S. retailers as some of the formidable challenges independents will face. “I think it would be prudent for CFIG to begin anticipating how this kind of expansion might affect the industry,” says Vickars. Never one to shy away from challenges, Vickars says he is looking forward to a “collaborative and productive year.” Scott is equally enthusiastic about the prospects. “CFIG members will learn a lot, and the organization will grow significantly during Mark’s tenure,” he says. “We are all looking forward to working with him next year.”

I think that’s pretty powerful stuff.” Mark Vickars grocerybusiness.ca

September | October 2012

43


PAST CHAIRS’

PERSPECTIVE:

Steve Rome

Mike Coleman

Harry Watson

Francois Bouchard

Cori Bonina

What impact is the growth of soft discount having on the independent?

44

Can you describe the process you use to determine your unique offering and how you keep your store fresh for your consumer?

We are seeing a decline in DSD; does that concern you?

Although soft discount seems to be in its infancy in Western Canada, we are starting to see the effects. In the last few years there’s been a drastic shift and we’re all going to have to be mindful of our pricing in order to keep increasing our market share.

It’s my belief that this is one area where the independent will always have the advantage. Decision making isn’t head office based, it’s handled by the owners and operators that are hands-on in their stores. Because we are in constant contact with our customers, we can identify and react to emerging trends faster than most big box retailers.

Yes and no. Consolidation can sometimes mean better pricing but DSD allows us to forge stronger relationships with suppliers and distributors.

We’ve seen an overall downward pressure on retail pricing and this, in turn, has forced us to remove costs to maintain our operating gross. It has, in fact, forced us to become a better operation.

Differentiation has always been a key element of our success and we are constantly looking for ways to improve the customer experience. For instance, we offer a unique online shopping service and a variety of local and ethnic products not normally found in large chains. And we are in touch with the industry to adapt best practices.

Yes, it’s a great concern. I understand the need for manufacturers to minimize costs but that too often leads to a loss of a sense of partnership between the retailer and manufacturer.

I believe that soft discounts are challenging the independent grocer to become better at what they do best. We can’t always win on price but we can win on service.

We look for things that the other retailers are not prepared to do because it will drive up wage factors, for instance, delivering groceries to seniors and shut-in customers. Plus, we are known for our friendly and helpful staff and keep the deli and bakery fully staffed at all times.

This is a huge concern because we’ll be losing the contacts we have in the vendor community and the expertise and knowledge that that particular specialist has.

There has always been a discount channel and there will always be a consumer only interested in price. Our goal is to court the consumer who is interested in a better shopping experience.

We do the things that the large chains cannot do. Things like live entertainment, customer appreciation events and getting involved with our schools; little things that make a difference.

There has been a decline in some categories but the companies that do it really well will continue to grow (with us).

In our case, the proximity of soft discount continues to put pressure on our gross margins. Their aggressive pricing means our weekly specials must be priced right to attract the price conscious consumer.

Staying in touch with your customer and community and being visible in the store are important. We also carry a wide variety of products from upscale, to ethnic, to locally produced products like Italian sausage that we make in-store.

My wholesaler has been able to move a number of DSD items into their warehouse resulting in a better in-stock position so I don’t have to be concerned about meeting minimum order requirements. As well, I receive the product more often so I don’t have to carry excess stock.

September | October 2012


Do you feel that technology is becoming, or will become, more of a factor in your interactions with customers?

What are your thoughts on attracting and retaining young talent to our industry?

As a grocery entrepreneur, what is the single thing that excites you the most and what keeps you in this business?

We will all need to have a social media presence to connect with younger customers. Technology has created a much more informed consumer which forces us to stay ahead of industry trends.

I believe that this is going to be a problem which will require a dramatic shift in how we traditionally run our businesses. Young people are looking for flexible and accommodating workplaces with opportunities for them to advance within our organizations.

I have a passion for food and people and I’m thankful every day, that I have the opportunity to live my passion in our community.

Technology is moving so rapidly, it’s difficult to predict where it’s going. We are strong believers in the potential of online shopping and we are also keeping a close eye on emerging electronic payment systems.

Attracting young talent is one of the industry’s biggest challenges. We spend a lot of money training them through their school years only to see them leave when they graduate.

I’d always believed that the grocery industry was fast moving, exciting and quite rewarding and, 30 years later, I feel exactly the same way. I appreciate having the opportunity to influence the lives of many people in our community and of building excellent personal and business relationships over the years.

Online flyers are the wave of the future and we are seeing more and more people moving into social media.

We have to demonstrate that there’s a future in our industry and offer things like top-notch benefits and retirement programs. When some of the big companies are doing away with those programs, we are doing the exact opposite.

What keeps me in the business is change. There never is a week that is the same as the last and it’s exciting to stay ahead of the curve.

You have to make it exciting and entertaining while providing training so that they can see a career path. We have some great, young talent and they help energize us.

I love the competition and every week, in this business, you are measuring your company against some of the best retailers in the world. It doesn’t get any better than that.

We expect that mobile marketing and online ordering will increase in importance and we are investing in both these technologies.

Smart phones with mobile marketing and couponing can be a game changer. I’m seeing an increase in the number of shoppers with cellphones in hand, accessing nutritional information and recipes.

grocerybusiness.ca

We’ve had some success identifying part-time employees who seem to have a passion for the business. To retain them, we keep hours flexible, properly compensate them, offer advancement opportunities, share information and set goals with them.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CFIG 2012 SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS AND THEIR STORE SPONSORS Whitney Sipprell Drost’s Save Easy, Bath, N.B. Sarah Park Coleman’s, Corner Brook, N.L. James Neal-Ellis Sun Valley Supermarket, Toronto, Ont. James Beaton Coaldale Food Market, Coaldale, Alta.

I still get a real sense of satisfaction from offering my customers what I feel is the best store in town.

Chayla Wilcox Safety Mart Foods #7, Chase, B.C. Cindy Chen Longo’s Bloor Street, Toronto, Ont. Shamez Walji Save-On-Foods, Edmonton, Alta. Bethan Mansell Save On Foods Westbank, Westbank, B.C.

September | October 2012

45


2012 CFIG Master Merchandiser

Award Nominees The Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers’ (CFIG) Master Merchandiser Awards – one of the industry’s most sought-after honours – will be presented at Grocery Innovations Canada October 1 & 2, 2012, at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. The Canadian Master Merchandiser program and award ceremony honours point-of-sale merchandising and relationship-building between grocery retailers and their suppliers by encouraging them to build effective displays, promotions and events. “For big or small retailers, in-store displays are the cornerstone of successful merchandising,” says Ward Hanlon, vice-president of industry relations for CFIG. The program aims to identify independents and their suppliers from across the country that breathe creative life into retail promotions. A panel of representatives from Canada’s top-tier food industry manufacturers and distributors evaluate all promotions on creativity, effective use of sponsor and/or supplier materials and overall performance across all formats. For more information on participating, please contact Jaimie Robins at jrobins@cfig.ca

46

September | October 2012

SMALL

up to 14,499 sq. ft.

01

1. Walnut Grove Buy-Low Foods, Langley, B.C. 2. Sun Valley Supermarket, Scarborough, Ont. 3. Blind Bay Village Grocer, Blind Bay, B.C.

03

05

4. Central Butte Fine Foods, Central Butte, Sask.

02

04

5. Powell’s Supermarket, Harbour Grace, N.L.


MEDIUM

15,000 - 24,999 sq. ft.

01

1. Quality Foods Waterside, Parksville, B.C.

03 02

2. Safety Mart, Chase, B.C. 3. Metro Fogarty, Charlemagne, Que. 4. Hinton Valley IGA, HInton, Alta. 5. Barrhead Freson Brothers IGA, Barrhead, Alta.

04

05

LARGE

25,000 sq. ft. or more

1. Moncion’s Your Independent Grocer, Ottawa, Ont. 2. Colemans Garden Market, Corner Brook, N.L. 3. Dessureault Independent, Orleans, Ont.

02

03

05 01 04

grocerybusiness.ca

4. Save-on-Foods Woodgrove, Nanaimo, B.C.

5. Quality Foods Northridge, Nanaimo, B.C.

September | October 2012

47


it figures >

Consumer Confidence What your customers are saying about the economy

28% 26%

are eating breakfast at home more often

39% are eating dinner at home more frequently

are packing a lunch more often

Takeaway Think meal solutions and convenience – consumers are more time crunched than ever and offering convenient, easy options is a good way to attract customers.

32% 31% of household budgets will be squeezed if interest rates rise 1%

of Canadians consider themselves worse off financially than a year ago

Takeaway What comes down eventually goes up. Rising interests rates are future threats to the household budget. Something will have to give and reducing spend on CPG is a primary target. With less money to spend, the primary motivators for your consumers will be getting more bang for their buck and buying on promotion. 48

September | October 2012


Canadians owe $1.52 for every dollar they earn. One-in-five (21%) Canadians admit that they have no spare cash at all.

21%

Takeaway The ever-rising debt level of Canadians is cause for concern. The continued trend to balance the household books is smart finance, but it hampers spending levels.

63% 34%

of Canadians say they’ve changed their spending to save on household expenses

of Canadians say this is a good or excellent time to buy, considering current costs and finances Takeaway Consumer packaged goods performance is treading water, with units still struggling for growth. Dollars are increasing, but it’s due to rising prices, not an increase in consumer demand.

50%

of Canadians feel that we’re still in a recession. That’s an improvement from the last survey, but up from 43% who said the same midway through last year. Takeaway What we’re seeing is two steps forward, one step back. The perception that we’re still in recession hasn’t lifted, and with that mindset consumers are proceeding with caution. Your customers will have their eyes focused on value, and that will drive consumer trends.

Carman Allison is Director of Consumer Insights for The Nielsen Company in Canada and is responsible for creating thought leadership reports and insights for CPG manufacturers and retailers.

Carman Allison

grocerybusiness.ca

a l l stats co u rtes y: N ie l sen

September | October 2012

49


list it

New products you need to know about

Wake up Your Biscuit Sales New belVita Breakfast Biscuits!

Delicious and satisfying biscuits specially designed to be part of a complete breakfast that helps keep you going. They are available in two Soft Baked varieties, Banana Oatmeal & Chocolate and Cranberry Orange, and two Crunchy varieties, Blueberry, and Oatmeal Crunch. To learn more, go to belVitaBreakfast.ca

Eco Tote Steward Reusable Bags A terrific add-on item, Steward Bags reusable produce bags are made with 100 per cent certified organic cotton. Lightweight and transparent they have a drawstring closure and are washable and biodegradable. stewardbags.ca

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September | October 2012


Shake it up Simpli OatShake, an all-natural single serve smoothie beverage, is now available in Canada through Pacific Bottleworks Company Ltd. The award-winning beverages come in chocolate, coffee and tropical fruit flavours. livesimpli.com

Piece of Cake

Sara’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream Cakes

Bendick’s Ice Cream has launched a new line of Sara’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream Cakes. Bendick’s, distributed by TransCold Distribution Ltd., has created nine new, rich flavours produced with its finest premium ice cream. sarasicecream.com

Get Crack’n California-grown Wonderful Pistachios are sun-ripened and 100 per cent naturally opened. These nuts are roasted without added oil using a unique rotary technique, and seasoned with roasted salt or salt and pepper. wonderfulpistachios.com

grocerybusiness.ca

Cup Creations

PaperChef’s Culinary Parchment Lotus cups PaperChef’s Culinary Parchment Lotus cups add a functional elegance to baked treats, savoury side dishes or appetizers. These 100 per cent biodegradable cups, earned Toronto-based PaperChef a 2012 Gold Sofi Award in the Non-Food Specialty item category. paperchef.com

September | October 2012

51


Kevin Smith Dan Bordun

Karen James

kevinsmith@grocerybusiness.ca

danbordun@grocerybusiness.ca

karenjames@grocerybusiness.ca

416 569-5005

416-817-5278

416-561-4744

Check out our website at: grocerybusinessmedia.ca


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

CONTENTS GENERAL INFORMATION 5 7 9 11 12 13

Welcome Message General Information 2012 CFIG Board of Directors CFIG Associate Members’ Council CFIG Staff Thank you to our sponsors

CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

UPCOMING EVENTS

Grocery Showcase West 2013 Sunday, April 14 & Monday, April 15 Vancouver Convention Centre Vancouver, BC Grocery Innovations Canada 2013 Monday, September 30 & Tuesday, October 1 Metro Toronto Convention Centre Toronto, ON

14 Program at a Glance 16 Detailed Program 20 Trade Show Features

EXHIBITOR LISTINGS 22 35 37 IBC

Exhibitors by Company Name Exhibitors by Product Category Exhibitors by Booth Number Trade Show Floor Plan

Grocery Innovations Canada Presented by

The Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers 2235 Sheppard Avenue East, Suite 902 Willowdale, ON M2J 5B5 Tel: 1-800-661-2344 / 416-492-2311 Fax: 416-492-2347 • Email: info@cfig.ca

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

3


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF INNOVATION AT CFIG WELCOME HOME TO GROCERY INNOVATIONS 2012 – THE FUTURE IS HERE It has been an honour and a distinct pleasure to be serving as Chair of the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers on this most exciting of years in CFIG’s illustrious history. As Chair, I have enjoyed the privilege this past year of travelling across Canada to many of our Members’ stores, as we celebrated this milestone anniversary by presenting the 50th Anniversary commemorative book to retailers from all corners of this nation. No task as Chair more supremely highlights the joy and pride we have as an industry, doing a job that we love, in communities that we love, and being the very best at what we do. In this way, the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG) feels more like a family than an institution, and in that vein, we would like to welcome you home to this 50th Anniversary edition of Grocery Innovations Canada. To commemorate CFIG’s 50th anniversary, we have put together a great line up of speakers and events for all to enjoy. A great deal of effort has been put into ensuring that GIC 2012 presents the most business relevant yet enjoyable conference yet. Continuing the celebration, we’ll be hosting our very own “Taste of Toronto” food event at Toronto’s famous Steam Whistle Brewery, with entertainment by a great local band, Fallen Ground. A fantastic evening to relax and enjoy the friendship of our communities. The GIC 2012 Trade Show sold out in record time, and we know you will be blown away by the diversity and engagement of all of our spectacular exhibitors this year. It’s an exciting year for everyone! The 50th Annual Canadian Independent Grocery of the Year Awards gala will be a grand celebration, taking place in the beautiful John Bassett Theatre…don your tuxes and gowns and walk the red carpet! Get ready for the most exciting and memorable Grocery Innovations Canada yet. As Chair of CFIG, thank you all very much for a great year, and be sure to enjoy every aspect of GIC 2012!

BRENT BATTISTELLI CHAIR CANADIAN FEDERATION OF INDEPENDENT GROCERS G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

5


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

GENERAL INFORMATION ON-SITE REGISTRATION HOURS

CONFERENCE HOURS

Metro Toronto Convention Centre - North Hall Pre-Registered Delegates ONLY Sunday, September 30 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

Metro Toronto Convention Centre Monday, October 1 7:30 am – 12:00 pm Tuesday, October 2 7:30 am – 12:00 pm

CONFERENCE

TRADE SHOW HOURS

Metro Toronto Convention Centre – North Hall Monday, October 1 7:00 am – 5:00 pm Tuesday, October 2 7:00 am – 5:00 pm

Metro Toronto Convention Centre Monday, October 1 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm Tuesday, October 2 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

TRADE SHOW

BADGE COLOURS

Metro Toronto Convention Centre – North Hall Monday, October 1 12:00 pm – 4:30 pm Tuesday, October 2 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Exhibitors Retailers/Wholesalers Manufacturers/Suppliers/Visitors Media

SELF-GUIDED STORE TOURS

BLUE RED GREEN GREY

RECOMMENDED ATTIRE

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to take a tour of exciting stores around the city. Starting on Saturday, September 29th, pick up your copy of the Self-Guided Store Tour brochure at the Concierge desks at the Intercontinental Toronto Centre Hotel Lobby.

Sunday Night Reception Conference Tradeshow Monday Evening Event Tuesday Evening Dinner & Awards

Smart Casual Business Casual Business Casual Smart Casual Formal (Black Tie Optional)

SERVICES FIRST AID OFFICE With respect to our first aid office, it is located on the main level beside room 203C, attached is a floor plan showing the location. For any emergency, call 8160 from an internal phone or (416) 585-8160 from your cell phone. DO NOT CALL 911 as responding emergency staff (police, ambulance, fire department) will not know the precise location required. Emergency numbers are posted at all house phones.

WHEELCHAIR SERVICES In regards to wheelchairs, we have (3) available at our North Guest Service desk. These are on a first come first serve basis.

Attendees borrowing a wheelchair will be required to leave their driver’s license with the Guest Service agent until the wheelchair is returned. Should you anticipate a high demand for wheelchairs, I would recommend that Show Management source additional wheelchairs and manage this service.

MEDIA OFFICE Dan Leggieri is the key media contact for Grocery Innovations Canada 2012. National and Regional media are in attendance at the show and the Media Office is a resource for media to obtain press kits and product sampling. All media must be registered before entrance into the trade show. Location: Metro Toronto Convention Centre, Room 203 D

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

7


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

2012 CFIG BOARD OF DIRECTORS CFIG is governed by a Board of Directors elected from the membership and reflecting a regional distribution. A national office consisting of the President and staff implement the federation's operations in a manner consistent with the policies established by the Board. The Board and the President also receive ongoing input from advisory committees consisting of members and established across Canada.

Brent Battistelli, Chair* Battistelli’s Your Independent Grocer Lively, ON

Jim Bexis Sun Valley Supermarket Scarborough, ON

John Briuolo Quality Foods Qualicum Beach, BC

Cori Bonina, Immediate Past Chair* Stong’s Markets Ltd. Vancouver, BC

Eric Bouchard IGA Bouchard Sherbrooke, QC

Christy McMullen Summerhill Market Toronto, ON

Peter Cavin Country Grocer Victoria, BC

Jacqui Knipfel Chesley Grocery Store Chesley, ON

Joey Longo, Secretary* Longo Brothers Fruit Markets Inc. Mississauga, ON

Dana Lougheed Central Butte Fine Foods Moose Jaw, SK

Doug Lovsin Freson Bros. IGA Stoney Plain, AB

Peter Luckett Pete’s Bedford, NS

Scott Mitchell Treasurer* Market Street Vulcan Vulcan, AB

Dave Powell Member at Large* Powell’s Supermarket Ltd. Bay Roberts, NFLD

John Scott, President & C.E.O. * Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers Toronto, ON

Denis Moncion Moncion Grocers Petawawa, ON

David Stezenko Quality Market Thunder Bay, ON

Mark Vickars Vice-Chair* Choices Markets Delta, BC

* = Executive Committee

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS’ COUNCIL Co-operation and communication between supplier and retailer have become increasingly important in grocery retail. CFIG’s Associate Members’ Council (AMC) has in turn become more integral to the direction of the federation as a whole. • The Associate Members’ Council is a group of senior executives representing a variety of Canadian grocery product companies. The AMC meets quarterly, and provides professional guidance to the Board of Directors on industry news and trends.

Mark Ayer, Vice-President Customer Business Development, Canada Procter & Gamble Inc.

Tim Berman Vice-President, Sales Kraft Canada Inc.

Bill Dunne President Acosta Sales and Marketing

Steve Fox Sr. Vice-President, Customer Development Nestlé Canada Inc.

Doug Gingrich Sr. Vice-President, Customer Development Maple Leaf Consumer Foods

Stephen Kouri, Vice-President Sales & Trade Marketing Smuckers Foods of Canada Corp.

Scott Lindsay Sr. Vice-President, Sales and Marketing Coca-Cola Refreshments

Michel Manseau Corporate Vice-President, Consumer Sales Canada Kruger Products LP

Doug McGillivray Vice-President, Sales General Mills Canada Corporation

Tom Michaelis Vice-President, Customer Development Unilever Canada

Darryl Rowe Chair President McCain Foods Canada

Blair Ruelens Vice-President, National Sales Pepsico Foods Canada

Mark Rutledge Vice-President, Sales Campbell Company of Canada

Joe Weber National Vice-President, Retail Dairy Sales Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP

Dean Yuzdepski Vice President Sales Weston Bakeries Limited

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

CFIG STAFF John F.T. Scott President & C.E.O.

Diana Stevenson Executive Assistant to the President

Gary Sands Vice President, Public Policy

Alex Nielsen Coordinator, Technical Services

Ward Hanlon Vice President, Industry Relations

Dan Leggieri Manager, Communications

Jaimie Robins Manager, Member Services

Irmeli Koskinen Coordinator, Member Services

Eden Minty Director, Events

Laura Knetsch, Operations Manager, Events

Rolster Taylor, Manager, Sales

Mia Bachan Account Representative

Fran Nielsen Vice President, Finance & Administration

Sharon Lindsay Accounting Assistant & Office Coordinator

CFIG MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION The Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG) is a non-profit trade association founded in 1962, which continues to be a collaborative community, equipping and enabling independent, franchised and specialty grocers for sustainable success. CFIG provides relevant services to support the needs of its membership. These services fall within the categories of member services, government, industry relations and grocery industry events. Our Retail services support the education and operations of the independent and franchised grocery operations, while Associate services provide manufacturers and suppliers greater interaction with the independent marketplace. Through effective government and industry relations, CFIG improves the business environment for its members. A council of senior executives from Canadian grocery product companies provides CFIG’s Board

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of Directors with guidance and insight into industry issues and trends, which, in turn, enables CFIG to maximize co-operation and communication between trading partners. CFIG supports progressive education and business interaction within the grocery industry through its management of two annual expositions: Grocery Showcase West, held each spring in Western Canada, and Grocery Innovations Canada, held each autumn in Toronto.

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE BENEFITS OF CFIG MEMBERSHIP CONTACT 1-800-661-2344 X 240 OR VISIT CFIG.CA


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

Grocery Innovations Canada 2012 would like to thank its sponsors for their support.

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PROGRAM AT A GLANCE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30TH INTERCONTINENTAL TORONTO CENTRE HOTEL 12:00 pm

CFIG Annual General Meeting & Luncheon (For CFIG Members Only)

5:30 pm

Grocery Innovations Canada Welcome Reception (Open to ALL Attendees and Exhibitors)

CONFERENCES MONDAY, OCTOBER 1ST

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2ND

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE

7:15 am

ALL NEW Brain Food Power Breakfast Canadian Trade Media moderated by Nick Jennery

7:15 am

ALL NEW Brain Food Power Breakfast Panel on Payments moderated by Gary Sands

8:30 am

Perry Caicco CIBC World Markets

8:30 am

Vicente Trius Loblaw Companies Limited (Not open to Media)

9:30 am

Michael Sansolo Retail Food Industry Consultant

9:15 am

10:45 am

Robert Deluce Porter Airlines

10:15 am

11:45 am

Luncheon of Honour (Open to Full Delegates Only & Invited Guests)

11:00 am

11:45 am

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Frank Coleman Coleman’s Food Centres

Carman Allison Nielsen

Ken Schley Quality Foods

Incoming Chair’s Luncheon (Open to Full Delegates Only & Invited Guests)


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

TRADE SHOW

EVENING EVENTS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 1ST & TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2ND 12:00 NOON to 5:00 PM METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE NORTH HALL Grocery Innovations Canada 2012 Trade Show featuring: • Choose Ontario • Made in Canada • First Time Exhibitors' Pavilion • Enhanced New Product Showcase • CFIG 50th Anniversary Museum • Connection Lounge • 8th Annual Canadian Best Bagger Contest • 3rd Annual Top 10 Most Innovative Products Contest

MONDAY, OCTOBER 1ST 7:00 PM Join us at the Grocery Innovations Canada’s “Taste of Toronto” party at the Steam Whistle Brewing Roundhouse – home of Canada’s Premium Pilsner

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2ND 6:00 PM Come out for a night of honours and esteemed recognition. Join us for the CFIG Award of Merit Dinner followed by the 50th Annual Canadian Independent Grocer of the Year Awards gala, and celebrate in grand style!

Come see the many fine products ACOSTA represents at booth # 998

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA • 2011 OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

DETAILED PROGRAM SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30TH

8:30 am - 9:30 am

INTERCONTINENTAL TORONTO CENTRE HOTEL 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

CFIG Annual General Meeting (For CFIG Members ONLY) Ballroom A

5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

Grocery Innovations Canada Welcome Reception (Open to ALL Attendees and Exhibitors) Ballroom A

Keynote Presentation Perry Caicco Managing Director, CIBC World Markets

With over 15 years of experience in the supermarket, general merchandise and packaged goods industries (including Loblaw Companies and CocaCola), Perry Caicco has been ranked as the number one Merchandising analyst in Canada for the past nine years. He is also ranked number one in Consumer Products. In this “pull no punches” one-hour session, Caicco will unveil up-to-the-minute insight on the state of grocery retailing in Canada. John Bassett Theatre

Reception Sponsored by:

Speaker Sponsored by:

MONDAY, OCTOBER 1ST METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE 7:15 am - 8:15 am

Brain Food Power Breakfast A Conversation with the Canadian Trade Media Panel moderated by Nick Jennery

Featuring: • Karen James, President and Executive Editor, Grocery Business • George Condon, Food Industry Consultant • Jennifer Litterick, Publisher, Canadian Grocer • Frank Yeo, Publisher & Editor, Western Grocer ONE KEY FOR THE 2013 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE WILL BE DRAWN

Breakfast Sponsored by:

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Conference Session Michael Sansolo Retail Food Industry Consultant

Untangling the Social Web Social networking is one of the most discussed and least understood topics facing business today. Learn how the social web offers companies an unparalleled opportunity to build community, communication and to strengthen links to customers, associates and partners. This presentation offers specific details on how to understand the power of social networks, who uses it and why, along with clear ideas on how to harness this emerging power.

John Bassett Theatre Speaker Sponsored by:

Constitution Hall

Sponsored by:

9:30 am - 10:15 am

Car Sponsored by:

10:15 am - 10:45 am

Sponsored by:

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

Mix & Mingle Coffee Break Level 100 Foyer


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

DETAILED PROGRAM 10:45 am – 11:30 am

12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Conference Session Robert J. Deluce President & CEO, Porter Airlines

A Canadian Entrepreneur’s Story As President & CEO of Porter Airlines, Robert J. Deluce is one of Canada’s most knowledgeable and respected airline owners and operators. He founded Porter Airlines with an objective to add competition to Canada’s scheduled air service landscape, providing additional choice for travellers. Come hear the fascinating story of branding “Flying Refined” in Canada.

KEY FEATURES: • 8th Annual Best Bagger Contest • Choose Ontario • SOLD OUT - First Time Exhibitors • CFIG 50th Anniversary Museum • VOTE! Top 10 Most Innovative Products (see page 20 for details)

6:30 pm – 10:30 pm

John Bassett Theatre Speaker Sponsored by:

Grocery Innovations Canada Trade Show

GIC 2012 Celebration Party at the famous Steam Whistle Brewing Roundhouse Fallen Ground

Steam Whistle Brewing Roundhouse

ONE KEY FOR THE 2013 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE WILL BE DRAWN

11:45 am - 12:45 pm

Luncheon of Honour (Open to Full Delegates & Invited Guests ONLY)

Honouring Life Member Recipients: • Ernie Skinner, The Market on Yates, Victoria, BC • Peter Singer, Thomas, Large & Singer, Markham, ON • Yuri Stezenko, Quality Market, Thunder Bay, ON • Glen Wilson, Crossmark Canada (retired), Mississauga, ON

Featuring: • Entertainment by Fallen Ground • Canada’s Premium Pilsner and a Local Ontario Wine Bar • GIC’s “Taste of Toronto” culinary adventure

Steam Whistle Brewing 255 Bremner Boulevard, Toronto, ON

Presenting 2012 Spirit of the Independent Recipient: Anthony Longo, Longo Brothers Fruit Markets, Vaughan, ON Party Sponsored by: Constitution Hall Title Sponsor:

Supporting Sponsor: Soft Drinks Sponsored by:

Wine Sponsored by:

Entertainment Sponsored by:

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

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DETAILED PROGRAM TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2ND

9:15 am – 10:00 am

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE 7:15 am - 8:15 am

Family owned and operated, Coleman's Food Centres offers 12 store locations across Newfoundland. With a Golden Pencil designation under his belt and the grandson of Coleman's founders, Frank Coleman, has run the operation since 1986. Come hear his unique story of life as an independent on the Rock!

Brain Food Power Breakfast Everything Retailers Need to Know About Payment Processing (*But were afraid to ask…) Panel moderated by Gary Sands

Featuring: • Gary Locke, Associate Vice President of Client Management, Interac • Paul Rogers, Head of Business Development, Visa Canada

ONE KEY FOR THE 2013 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE WILL BE DRAWN

Independent Retailing Insight Session Frank Coleman CEO, Coleman's Food Centres

John Bassett Theatre Speaker Sponsored by:

10:00 am - 10:15 am

Mix & Mingle Coffee Break Level 100 Foyer

Constitution Hall Sponsored by: Breakfast Sponsored by: Car Sponsored by:

8:30 am - 9:15 am

10:15 am - 11:00 am

Keynote Presentation Vicente Trius President, Loblaw Companies Limited

Named President of Loblaw Companies Limited in February 2011, Vicente Trius will underscore his new direction and commitment to the sector by addressing the Grocery Innovations Canada delegation. Mr. Trius will provide his perspective on the Canadian grocery industry and Loblaw’s relationship with independent retailers. (PLEASE NOTE: This session is NOT open to Media)

Canada Retail Vision 2017 Today’s consumers are still shaken by the recession and their quest for value continues to define a number of current trends. Over the next 5 years, value will continue to be a key consumer motivator, but we need to look for new ways to connect with consumers to get beyond just price. We will explore future growth areas that will define Canadian Retail 2017. John Bassett Theatre Speaker Sponsored by:

John Bassett Theatre

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Independent Retailing Insight Session Carman Allison Director of Consumer Insights, Nielsen

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

DETAILED PROGRAM 11:00 am – 11:45 am

5:30 pm - 6:15 pm

Independent Retailing Insight Session Ken Schley President, Quality Foods

In 1982, Ken Schley, John Briuolo and Noel Hayward, all in their mid-twenties, discovered the present Qualicum Beach location and soon after, Qualicum Foods opened. Innovation has been a large factor in establishing Quality Foods as a strong independent. And today, QF continues a tradition of putting their customers first, making them leaders in the grocery industry.

Award of Merit Reception (Invitation ONLY) Reception Hall

Reception Sponsored by:

6:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Award of Merit Dinner Constitution Hall

Dinner Sponsored by: John Bassett Theatre Speaker Sponsored by: Soft Drinks Sponsored by: ONE KEY FOR THE 2013 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE WILL BE DRAWN

Chocolate Sponsored by:

ONE KEY FOR THE 2013 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE WILL BE DRAWN 11:45 am - 12:45 pm

Incoming Chair’s Luncheon (Open to Full Delegates & Invited Guests ONLY)

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Partake in Honouring: • The 2012 Anthony G. Wilshaw Memorial Scholarship national winner • The 7th Annual GS1 Canada Supply Chain Efficiency Award winner • And the Incoming CFIG Chair for 2012/2013…Mark Vickars, Choices Markets, Vancouver, BC Constitution Hall

DRAW FOR THE FINAL KEY FOLLOWED BY THE ALWAYS EXCITING "IGNITION TEST" TO FIND THE WINNER OF THE 2013 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE!

Reception & Program Sponsored by:

Lunch Sponsors:

12:00 pm - 5:00 pm

50th Annual Canadian Independent Grocer of the Year Awards Gala John Bassett Theatre

Grocery Innovations Canada Trade Show

KEY FEATURES: • 8th Annual Best Bagger Contest • Choose Ontario • SOLD OUT - First Time Exhibitors • CFIG 50th Anniversary Museum • DISPLAYED! Top 10 Most Innovative Products

Car Sponsored by:

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

TRADE SHOW PROGRAM TWO DAYS OF ACTIVITY AND PRIZES AT THE CFIG LOUNGE

4:15 pm

CFIG Lounge Sponsored by:

YOU COULD DRIVE AWAY A WINNER!

MONDAY, OCTOBER 1ST 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Top 10 Most Innovative Products Voting Submit your ballot at the CFIG Lounge before 4:15 pm and you’ll be eligible for a chance at ONE KEY FOR THE 2012 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE. See below for more details!

Rest tired feet at the Best Bagger Lounge

Sponsored by:

1:30 pm – 3:00 pm

8th Annual Canadian Best Bagger – Preliminary Rounds

Title Sponsor: Supporting Sponsors:

3:00 pm

Sponsored by:

Daily Trade Show Prize A draw to win one minute in the Money Machine! Deposit coupons at CFIG lounge

4:30 pm

Daily Trade Show Prize A draw to win one minute in the Money Machine! Deposit coupons at CFIG lounge

Sponsored by:

DON’T FORGET TO CHECK-OUT THE ALL-NEW GIC 2012 MOBILE APP! ACCESSIBLE FROM ANY MOBILE DEVICE

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G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

TRADE SHOW PROGRAM TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2ND 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

2:00 pm

Give your legs a break at the Best Bagger Lounge

Daily Trade Show Prize A draw to win one minute in the Money Machine! Deposit coupons at CFIG lounge

Sponsored by: Sponsored by: 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

8th Annual Canadian Best Bagger Semi-Finals and Finals

4:30 pm

Title Sponsor:

Daily Trade Show Prize A draw to win one minute in the Money Machine! Deposit coupons at CFIG lounge

Supporting Sponsors: Sponsored by:

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

CHOOSE ONTARIO

7000 Islands Foods 728 1482 Cliveden Ave., Delta, BC V3M 6L9 P: 604.521.7187 F: 604.528.6018 info@pulocuisine.com www.pulocuisine.com Pulo is an authentic collection of sauces and marinades inspired by the diverse cuisines of the Philippines.

Acosta Sales & Marketing

988

250 Rowntree Dairy Rd, Vaughan, ON L4L 9J7 P: 905.264.0466 F: 905.851.2243 www.acosta.ca Acosta Sales & Marketing deliver end to end sales & marketing solutions designed to achieve superior results which is why the world's most trusted brands trust Acosta.

Advantage Sales and Marketing Canada TM 195 160 McNabb Street, Suite 330 Markham, ON L3R 4B8 P: 905.475.8361 F: 905.475.5439 john.graham@asmnet.com www.asmnet.com Advantage Sales and Marketing Canada TM is a fully integrated division of Advantage Sales and Marketing LLC, North America's largest CPG sales and marketing agency. Agropur 101, Roland-Therrien Blvd, Longueuil, QC J4H 4B9 P: 450.646.1010

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339

CFIG MEMBER

Ahearn & Soper Inc. 415 100 Woodbine Downs Blvd., Toronto, ON M9W 5S6 P: 416.675.3999 F: 416.675.3457 salesdept@ahearn.com www.ahearn.com Ahearn & Soper is a Systems Integrator of customized software & leading edge products for Inventory Management and Asset Tracking. We are a leading reseller and service provider for I.D. Technologies encompassing Labeling Equipment (wrapping, print n apply, etc.) barcode label printers, scanners, handheld computers, and RFID products. We produce & supply consumable materials (labels, tags, cards) for printing and packaging requirements.

Alto-Shaam Canada 525 207 Edgeley BLVD, Unit 4 Concord, ON L4K 4B5 P: 905.660.6781 F: 905.660.6782 tomf@alto-shaam.ca Manufacturers of combi ovens, cook and hold ovens, chillers, deli display cases and other equipment for HMR.

Aidan's Gluten Free Inc

API(+) 1175 2709 Rocky Point Dr., 201 Tampa, FL 33607 P: 813.281.9299 F: 813.281.9292 ahenken@apiplus.com www.apiplus.com api(+) is a multidisciplinary design firm offering strategy, architectural, interior, and graphic design, and focusing on the development of consumer - centric concepts for retail driven environments.

1203

131 Queensdale Avenue, Toronto, ON M4J 1Y5 P: 416.406.4060 info@aidansglutenfree.com www.aidansglutenfree.com Aidan's Gluten Free Inc. offers a variety of fresh gluten free bread products desired by consumers without compromising taste, texture, appearance and convenience.

Alfa Cappuccino Imports Inc. 767 231 Millway Avenue, Concord, ON L4K 3W7 P: 905.660.2750 F: 905.660.2755 Alliance of Ontario Food Processors 850 Fountain St. South, Cambridge, ON N3H 1J3 P: 519.546.3193

814

Anthony 188 1185 Colborne Street, East, Brantford, ON N3T 5M1 P: 416.818.1460 F: 519.759.8551 jvos@anthonyintl.com Doors for Walk-ins, Retro-fit Glass Doors for Existing Display Cases, Replace existing Low-Temp Doors with Non-Heated Doors.

Arneg Canada Inc. 575 18 Richelieu Lacolle, QC J0J 1J0 P: 800.363.3439 F: 450.246.4428 nquenneville@arnegdml.com www.arnegcanada.com Manufacturer of refriggerated display cases.

Alokozay Tea Canada 425 1100 Central Parkway West, Unit 16, Suite 100 Mississauga, ON P: 905.276.4449 info@alkozay.ca

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

ASL Print FX Ltd. 136 1 Royal Gate Blvd, Unit A Vaughan, ON L4L 8Z7 P: 800.263.2368 F: 905.264.1529 info@aslprintfx.com www.aslprintfx.com Award winning printer of innovative prime label and promotional products. Products include; extended content labels, PIN programs, In-store merchandising, speciality print and direct mail. Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd. 62 Howden Road, Scarborough, ON M1R 3E9 P: 416.285.5535 F: 416.285.6649

526

Austrian Consulate General - Commercial Section 322 30 St. Clair Avenue West, Suite 607 Toronto, ON M4V 3A1 P: 416.967.3348 F: 416.967.4101 toronto@austriantrade.org Fandler (Organic Fine Pumpkinseed & other high quality extra virgin oils); Furore (Cheese and Fruit Mustards); Confiserie Heindl (Fine Chocolate Pralines, Mozart Kugeln, Chocolate covered dried fruits); IMS Hollinger (Organic Fruit Juices, Syrups & sugarfree Apple Beverages); Sonnentor (high-end teas, herbs & spices); Staud (iconic Jams & Syrups): Zotter (Organic Fair-Trade hand-scooped Chocolate) Backyard Superstar 40 Trowers Rd., Woodbridge, ON P: 647.244.9622

730

Bagcraft Papercon 3900 West 43rd Street, Chicago, IL 60632 P: 773.843.8014

731


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

CHOOSE ONTARIO

Bank of Canada 202 150 King Street West, Suite 2000 Toronto, ON M5H 1J9 P: 905.206.2501 F: 905.206.2591 parr@bankofcanada.ca www.bankofcanada.ca Most counterfeit money enters circulation at a retail point fo sale. Visit our booth #202 for information on how to protect your business from fraud.

Bee Maid Honey Ltd.

807

625 Roseberry St., Winnipeg, MB R3H 0T5 P: 204.786.8977 F: 204.783.8468

Beverage World Inc. 1131 560 Arvin Ave., Unit 4 Stoney Creek, ON L8E 5P1 P: 905.643.7713 F: 905.643.9562 skergl@beverageworld.ca Beverage World attains the Canadian exclusive rights to

CFIG MEMBER

Calypso Lemonades & Teamonades, Alo aloe vera juices, The Pop Shoppe, Tradewinds Kettle Brewed Iced Teas, Mr. Pure juices & drinks and Rip It Energy.

Bizerba Canada Inc. 569 2810 Argentia Road, Unit 9 Mississauga, ON L5N 8L2 P: 905.816.0498 www.bizerba.com Bizerba Canada provides the complete supermarket solution. Market leaders in technology with our 3rd generation of PC based scales. Brascon Stainless Steel Fabricators Inc. 981 5670 Timberlea Blvd., Mississauga, ON L4W 4M6 P: 877.427.2726 F: 866.792.2724 pkovacs@brascon.com www.brascon.com Brascon is a maufacturer and supplier of pedestrian control and access solutions such as the entech security gate, turnstiles, railings and portable retracta-posts.

Brencar 408 #207 - 15272 Croydon Drive, Surrey, BC V3S 0Z5 P: 604.531.5122 F: 604.531.5106 info@Brencar.com www.Brencar.com Brencar is Canada's leader in supplying the finest Government Approved, NSF, User Friendly, Bulk Food Dispensing Systems available in North America. Bulk, The Ultimate Green Packaging BULK UP! Burnbrae Farms LTD.

566

5434 Tomken Road Mississauga, ON L4W 1P2 P: 905.624.3600 F: 905.624.5298 cgoodhall@burnbraefarms.com Burnbrae Farms presenting our unique, innovated, ready to eat egg products. Quick and Easy!!

Campbell Company of Canada 60 Birmingham Street, Toronto, ON M8V 2B8 P: 416.251.1117 F: 416.253.8649

578

Canada Bread Company Limited 10 Four Seasons Place, 12th Floor Etobicoke, ON M9B 6H7 P: 416.622.2040 F: 416.622.9332 www.dempsters.ca

558

Canadian Food & Grocery Guide 797 4917 Prospect Ave. Victoria, BC V9E 1J5 P: 250.708.0427 F: 250.708.0429 fred@contactcanada.com www.contactcanada.com Free copies & listings in online, ebook and print directory that helps build your business network and saves time and money. Popular year long desk reference. Canadian Grocer Magazine 934 One Mount Pleasant Rd., 7th Floor, Isabella Tower Toronto, ON M4Y 2Y5 P: 416.764.1665 F: 416.764.1523 meagan.kashty@rcirogers.com www.canadiangrocers.com Canadian Grocer is the #1 publication of the grocery industry and has supported Canadian independents for over 125 years, reaching 70,000+ readers every month.

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

Cari-All Products Inc./ Technical Ltd.

CHOOSE ONTARIO Cayuga Displays Inc.

CFIG MEMBER

533

CB Powell Limited

1161

198

12425 Industriel Blvd., Montreal, QC H1B 5M7 P: 647.350.9371 F: 514.645.2661 crowe@cari-all.com www.cari-all.com We are North America's Leading Manufacurer of wire and plastic shopping carts, stock trucks, hand baskets, shelving and backroom equipment. A Wanzl Company

88 Talbot Street E., Cayuga, ON N0A 1E0 P: 905.772.5214 F: 905.772.3179 info@cayugadisplays.com www.cayugadisplays.com Cayuga will be showcasing the latest innovative refridgerated merchandisers, fixtures and mill work developed for various fresh departments such as produce, bakery, floral and delicatessen.

2475 Skymark Avenue, Suite #1 Mississauga, ON L4W 4Y6 P: 905.625.4000 F: 905.625.9413 ptetford@cbpowell.com www.cbpowell.com C.B. Powell Limited is an importer and brand marketer of many wellknown retail food products, such as Stagg Chili, SPAM, Blue Diamond Almonds, Patak's, Angostura Bitters and Tabasco. C.B. Powell Limited offers Canadian brand marketing and distribution management services for the food industry, including customs clearance, brand label development, regulatory approvals, order management and warehousing services.

CCD International Trading 206 Unit 330 - 3771 Jacombs Road, Richmond, BC V6V 2L9 P: 1.604.561.6008 F: 1.604.207.7798 cevdetdaglar@ccd-trading.com European Food Canned Vegetables, Tomato Paste, Juice, Pasta, Olive Oil, Teas. CG&B Group 120 South Town Centre Blvd., Markham, ON L6G 1C3 P: 905-479-6670 F: 905-479-9164 allison.posen@cgbgroup.com

724

Cinnaroll Bakeries Limited 142 2140 Pegasus Rd. N.E., Calgary, AB T2E 8G8 P: 403.255.4556 F: 403.259.5124 reid@cinnaroll.com info@bakerboys.net www.bakerboys.net Manufacturers of gourmet world famous cinnamon rolls and other baked goods. Our high quality products are frozen from the oven to offer the convenience of a thaw and sell product that is incredibly moist and tender. CIS Group 138 55 Castonguay Street, Suite 301 Saint Jerome, QC J7Y 2H9 P: 450.432.1550 F: 450.436.8801 info@cis-group.com www.cis-group.com CIS Group is one of the largest providers of Direct Store Delivery (DSD) and Sales Force Automation Solutions in North America. Clover Leaf Cheese Ltd. 1201-45 Avenue N.E., Calgary, AB T2E 2P2 P: 403.250.3780 F: 403.291.9782

805

CMR Home Entertainment

717

3737 Cote Vertu, St.Laurent, QC P: 514.998.4129

Coca-Cola Refreshments

143

42 Overlea Boulevard, Toronto, ON M4H 1B8 P: 289.233.1842 katucker@coca-cola.com www.icoke.ca A global company with a portfolio of more than 3,500 beverages, from sparkling to still beverages such as fruit juices and drinks, waters, sports and energy drinks, teas and coffees, and milk and soy-based beverages.

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

CHOOSE ONTARIO

CFIG MEMBER

Coldmatic Refridgeration 803 8500 Keele Street, Concord, ON L4K 2A6 P: 905.326.7600 F: 905.326.7601 markg@coldmatic.com www.coldmatic.com Custom built temperature controlled environments insulated buidling panels and specialty door systems. A leader in providing grocery convenience, pharmaceutical and fast food markets.

ConAgra Foods manufactures Canada's most familiar brands incld: Del Monte, Aylmer, Orville, Chef Boyardee. We are an innovative organization.

Colgate-Palmolive Canada Inc.

Crown Verity Inc 37 Adams Blvd., Brantford, ON N3S 7V8 P: 519.751.1800 F: 519.751.1802

420

Dairy Farmers of Canada 3-304 Stone Road West, Suite 321 Guelph, ON N1G 4W4 P: 519.837.2304 F: 519.837.8838

399

Dairy Farmers of Ontario 6780 Campobello Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 2L8 P: 905.580.9761 F: 905.821.3160 navraham@milk.org www.milk.org

743

1188

895 Don Mills Road, Toronto, ON M3C 1W3 P: 905.678.3700 F: 416.421.4618

ConAgra Foods

792

5935 Airport Road, Suite 405 Mississauga, ON L4V 1W5 P: 416.679.4286 F: 800.304.1527 elaine.harman@conagrafoods.com www.conagrafoods.com

CROSSMARK Canada Inc.

973

2233 Argentia Rd., Ste. 112 Mississauga, ON L5N 2X7 P: 905.363.1000 F: 905.363.0710

Dan-D-Foods Inc. 1169 45 Basaltic Drive, Unit #5 Vaughan, ON L4K 1G5 P: 905.889.7807 F: 905.889.2684 dandtoronto@dan-d-pak.com www.dan-d-pak.com For over 20 years, Dan -D-Pak has been providing fine foods of the earth, to consumers. Dan-D-Pak is reconized for their innovative, quality and wide assortment of products ranging from nuts, dried fruit, cereals and other health snacks.

Digi Canada Inc.

203

87 Moyal Court, Concord, ON M3C 1E4 P: 905.879.0833

Distribution Canada Inc. (dci) 723 3425 Harvester Road, Suite 102 Burlington, ON L7N 3N1 P: 905.681.3933 F: 905.681.0314 sharon@distributioncanada.ca www.distributioncanada.ca dci is a national organization of independent grocers that fosters collaborative selling relationships

between its shareholders, manufactureres and key stakeholders in Canadian grocery industry.

Dove Tale Collections 146 2008 Hollybrook Cres., Gloucester, ON K1J 7Y6 P: 877.746.6698 F: 613.746.2135 dominique@dovetalecollections.com Dove Tale Collections is proud to represent Duchy Originals, Rude Health, Salty Dog, Fine Cheese Company, Mackays, Elsa's Story, Bove's and other imported fine food lines. Dufflet Pastries/Chocolate Signatures 935 166 Norseman Street, Toronto, ON M8Z 2R4 P: 416.536.1330 F: 416.538.2366 info@dufflet.com www.dufflet.com Showcasing fine pastries and confections from Dufflet Pastries and Chocolate Signatures. Dyna-Pro Environmental 565 Roseberry Street, Winnipeg, MB P: 204.774.5370 Etalex Inc. 8501 Jarry East, Montreal, QC H1J 1H7 P: 514.351.2000

808

1183

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

CHOOSE ONTARIO

Farm Credit Canada: Agribusiness and Agrifood Division 576 2050 Derry Road West, Suite 210 Mississauga, ON L5N 0B9 P: 905.542.3498 F: john.geutjens@fcc-fac.ca www.fccfinancing.ca With our $22 billion portfolio, we finance processors, wholesalers, input providers, equipment manufacturers and dealers: businesses that enhace Canadian agribusiness and agri-food. Faxinating Solutions Inc.

1197

6600 TransCanada Highway, Suite 209 Pointe-Claire, QC H9R 4S2 P: 800.282.6283 F: 514.459.0221 shatajlo@fsiedi.com www.fsiedi.com Faxinating Solutions provides: *Automated data capture services - Fax/Email to EDI; *Automated eXact SME invoice processing; * GS1 catalogue loading; and *EDI/ ERP integration services.

Federated Insurance

412

PO Box 5800, WInnipeg, MB R3C 3C9 P: 800.665.1934 F: 204.783.4443 stacey.erlendson@federated.ca www.federated.ca Comprehensive insurance coverage and loss prevention programs specific to the food and grocery industry. Loss prevention consultants provide advise helping owners reduce claims.

Financial Management Solutions 8028 Ritchie Hwy, Ste 212 Pasadena, MD 21122 1075

26

321

Flowers Canada 45 Speedvale Ave. E., Unit 7 Guelph, ON P: 1.800.698.0113

CFIG MEMBER

727

Food & Consumer Products of Canada 1005 100 Sheppard Ave East, Toronto, ON M2N 6N5 P: 416.510.8024 F: 416.510.8043 jamin@fcpc.ca www.fcpc.ca FCPC is Canada's largest industry association representing the companies that manufacture and distribute the vast majority of food, beverage and consumer goods found on grocery store shelves. Our members are all based in Canada, providing job to almost 300,000 Canadians, and include small and large multinational and Canadian-owned companies. Food Banks Canada 2150 Lake Shore Blvd. W, Toronto, ON P: 416.203.9241

1224

Foodland Ontario 932 1 Stone Road West, 3rd Floor, Guelph, ON N1G 4Y2 P: 519.826.3486

Freeman Herbs Inc. 1194 4838 Lincoln Ave. N., Beamsville, ON L0R 1B3 P: 905.563.8890 F: 905.563.5860 freeman@freemanherbs.com www.freemanherbs.com Wholesale grower and distributor of certified organic potted herbs and vergetables as well as naturally grown herbs. Year round production grown with biological controls only. From Farm To Table Canada Inc.

210 Sheldon Drive, Unit 104, Cambridge, ON P: 519.621.1163 info@fromfarmtotable.ca Our gourmet popcorn is made with Local Food Plus certified corn that is GMO free and Pesticide Free. Natural seasonings. Gluten Free. Nut Free. Low sodium. Foodland Ontario logo on the front of the bags make it a winner with all Foodies. Meets school nutrition guidelines in many provinces. NEW Ancient Grain popcorn made with blue, red, purple and white corn.

Gala Bakery

Forté Product Solutions 1006 One Ward Parkway, Suite 330 Kansas City, MO 64112 P: 816.741.3000 F: 816.741.3008 dhimes@forteproductsolutions.com www.forteproductsolutions.com Fixtures and equipment to improve your operations efficiency, enhance facilities appearance, showcase merchandise to generate more sales and, overall, to enrich your customers' shopping experience.

1128

1127

Gay Lea foods is an Ontario based farmer-owned, dairy co-operative. We start with fresh, wholesome milk to make our best selling sour cream, real whipped cream, Nordica cottage cheese and Ivanhoe cheese. Feel good about serving Gay Lea to your family.

GBS Food Service Equipment 539 951 Matheson Blvd. E., Mississauga, ON L4W 2R7 P: 905.897.2333 F: 905.897.2334 pdouglas@gbscooks.com www.gbscooks.com GBS offers a full line of combiovens, blast chiller/freezers, heated and refrigerated display cases, fryers, gas or electric rotisseries, on-site training and Canada wide service/support. GE Lighting Solutions 132 1975 Noble Road, East Cleveland, OH 44112 P: 888.694.3533 F: 216.266.2158 info@gelightingsolutions.com www.gelightingsolutions.com GE Lighting Solutions help covenience stores slash energy, reduce maintenance and maximize ROI. Come see our extensive line of high-performance LED retail product solutions.

29 Milburn Road, Hamilton, ON P: 905.578.6485

Gambles Produce 302 Dwight Ave, Toronto, ON M8V 1Y3 P: 416.259.6397 Gay-Lea Foods Co-operative Ltd. 5200 Orbitor Drive, Mississauga, ON L4W 5B4 P: 905.283.5200 F: 905.283.5339 www.gaylea.com

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

613 General Mills Canada Corp.

1007

581

5825 Explorer Drive, Mississauga, ON L4W 5P6 P: 905.212.4105 F: 905.212.4105 rita.diclemente@genmills.com New innovation from General Mills: Nature Valley Granola Thins, Fiber 1 Brownies and Chocolate Caramel Pretzel Bar, Pillsbury Chocolatey Crescents and New Products from Old El Paso.


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

GFTC 939 88 McGilvray Street, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 P: 519.821.1246 F: 519.836.1281 info@gftc.ca www.gftc.ca GFTC is a world leader in food industry solutions, helping companies along the entire food value chain compete globally by strengthening the very foundations of their business: their products processes and people. Government of Newfoundland and Labrador 414 PO Box 8700, Avalon Office, 28 Pippy Place St. John's, NL P: 709.729.1943 www.gov.nl.ca dguillemette@gov.nl.ca Under the Seafood Ice Breaker: Mussels in wine or beer sauce Newfoundland Chocolate Company: Artisan chocolates Jumping Bean Coffee: Selection of Coffee and Teas Chatman's Bakery: Cookies and Squares

CHOOSE ONTARIO

CFIG MEMBER

Grand Valley Fortifiers 1139 151 Savage Dr., Cambridge, ON N1R 5W6 P: 519.621.4400 F: 519.621.0999 emilyenns@grandvalley.com www.grandvalley.com Utilizing proprietary nutritional technology, we coordinate the supply chain from field to fork for differentiated food products that are research proven to improve human health.

Grocery Business Media 124 390 Queen's Quay W., PO Box 4085 Toronto, ON M5V 3A6 P: 416.569.5005 Kevin Smith, kevinsmith@grocerybusiness.ca, www.grocerybusinessmedia.ca Grocery Business is recognized by the industry as THE #1 grocery publication in Canada. Grocery Business: Canada’s grocery magazine - The Best Reach, The Best Read, The Best Value.

invest nurture prosper

Hazy Jean is an environmentally friendly, socially responsible completely Canadian Wholesale greeting card company offering over 500 seasonal and everyday designs - since 2001.

Grow Guelph 1138 City Hall 1 Carden St., Guelph, ON N1H 3A1 P: 519.822.1260 F: 519.837.3656 barbara.maly@guelph.ca www.growguelph.ca Grow Guelph promotes and builds Guelph's prominent agrifood cluster. Visit booth #1138, to see how Guleph, Ontario can be your food company's competitive advantage.

Hewitt Material Handling 129 425 Millway Ave., Concord, ON L4K 3V8 P: 905.669.6590 F: 416.661.1513 www.hewittmaterialhandling.com Hewitt Material Handling is the authorized dealer in Ontario for Caterpillar, Jungheinrich and Mitsubushi lift trucks. New and used equipment, rental, parts and service.

GS1 Canada 522 1500 Don Mills Road, Suite 800, Toronto, ON M3B 3L1 P: 416.380.2531 F: 416.510.1916

Hip Hop Beverage Corp 20600 Belshaw Ave Carson, CA 90746 800.686.3697 www.hiphopbev.com

Hazy Jean

Hormel Foods International Corporation 1025 Earl Cres., Burlington, ON P: 905.631.5595

grow guelph

41 Crewe Avenue, Toronto, ON M4C 2J2 P: 416.429.4977 F: 416.429.5882 hello@hazyjean.com www.hazyjean.com

1209

137

213

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

Howell Data Systems

CHOOSE ONTARIO

159

130 - 3 Pennsylvania, Vaughan, ON L4K 4A9 P: 800.410.6871 F: 905.761.9131 sales@howelldatasystems.com www.howelldatasystems.com Howell Data Systems provides point of sale, hand-held mobile, gift card, loyalty solutions, deli scales & DVR systems for grocery, Pharmacy and Specialty Retail stores.

Hussmann Canada Inc. 204 5 Cherry Blossom Road, Unit 3, Cambridge, ON P: 519.653.9980 I-D Foods Corporation 181 26 Claireville Drive, Toronto, ON M9W 5T9 P: 1.800.668.7911 F: 416.679.8601 mftaylor@idfoods.com www.idfoods.com We are Distributors/Brokers with a wide variety of food products. We have been ahead of the competition for a long time, as far as developing the Ethnic market and bringing in new products. Come by and see what new products we have to offee this year!

CFIG MEMBER

IDL - Instachange Displays Limited 209 360 Harry Walker Parkway South, Unit 1 Newmarket, ON L3Y 9E9 P: 289.297.1100 F: 289.297.1111 info@idldisplays.com www.idldisplays.com IDL is your online service for one of the most extensive selections of visual merchandising & P.O.P display components, fastener & accessories available anywhere. Indulge Gourmet Kettle Corn 221 98 Squire Drive, Richmond Hill, ON L4S 1C7 P: 905.884.8186 F: 905.737.9288 info@indulgegourmetfoods.com www.indulggourmetkettlecorn.com Indulge Gourmet kettle corn manufactured in Canada. A peanut/ nut free natural product. Available in 200g and 30g retail bags. Inovata Foods Corp. (Bassili Best) 12803 149 St. N.W., Edmonton, AB P: 780.454.8665

726

InStore Products Limited 1177 5181 Everest Drive, Mississauga, ON L4W 2R2 P: 1.888.473.3629 F: 1.866.625.2235 info@bringyourbag.com www.instorecorp.com Reusable bags, collapsible boxes, lunch bags, shopping carts, hand baskets, and the Green box Integral Security Systems 820 3359 Griffith St., Saint-Laurent, QC H4T 1W5 P: 514.669.2919 F: 514.737.7913 stephen@kucer.com www.integeraltechg.ca Integral invites all visitors to its Stop-the-Thief Challenge! Test Integral's intelligent security systems which combine software solutions with multiple sensors, flashing lights and automatically locking arms. International Dairy-Deli-Bakery Association 612 636 Science Dr., Madison, WI 53711 P: 608.310.5000 Ishida Canada Inc. 12692 82nd Ave., Surrey, BC V3W 3G1 P: 778.578.2928 F: 604.608.4771 mike@ishidacanada.com www.ishidacanada.com

MERCHANDIZE TO SELL!

SEASONAL

1147

IN-AISLE

It is Ishida's primary goal to make life more convenient and profitable for our customers through our weighing technology and our customer first policy.

ItalPasta Limited 116 Nuggett Court, Brampton, ON L6T 5A9 P: 905.792.9928 F: 905.792.2381 gmcgrath@italpasta.com J & J Display Sales Inc. 2455 Meadowvale Blvd., Mississauga, ON L5N 5S2 P: 905.814.5252 F: 905.814.8147 graphics@jjdisplaysales.com J & J Sales

ENDCAPS

ASK US ABOUT MORE SOLUTIONS

28

VISIT US AT BOOTH 1006 816.741.3000 x103 • www.forteproductsolutions.com

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

1205

Ketchum Manufacturing 812 1245 California Avenue, Brockville, ON K6V 7N5 P: 613.342.8455 F: 613.342.7550 jasonb@ketchum.ca www.ketchum.ca Manufacturer of point of sale signage, price tags, shelf and case dividers, and shelf talkers etc. to promote higher sales volumes for grocery stores worldwide.

EQUIPMENT & FIXTURES

Waste Cans Cigarette Disposers Gas Station Waste/Windshield

595

2184 Thurston Dr., Ottawa, ON P: 613.744.1049

FOR EVERY REASON, EVERY SEASON, EVERY DEPARTMENT

Dunnage/Storage Racks Display Merchandisers Recycle Bins

1204

FREE STANDING


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

CHOOSE ONTARIO

Koko Patisserie 1208 #102 - 1205 Broad Street, Regina, SK S4R 1Y2 P: 306.581.9271 F: 306.791.1908 kmpunshon@accesscomm.ca www.kokopatisserie.com Koko patisserie is home to the hand crafted fusion of all things good and fresh. We use only the finest ingredients. Kraft Canada Inc.

559

95 Moatfield Drive, Don Mills, ON M3B 3L6 P: 416.441.5874 F: 416.441.5013 niall.quaid@kraftfoods.com At Kraft Foods delicious is our difference! We are committed to collaborative partnerships with our customers and retailers industry wide and our brands enjoy consumer loyalty, trust and satifaction worldwide. Please visit our booth to learn about Kraft's exciting 2012/2013 product innovation, the latest in powerful merchandising materials and impactful consumer media advertising.

Krinos Foods Canada Ltd 251 Doney Crescent, Vaughan, ON L4K 1P6 P: 905.669.4414

1180

Krispy Kernels - Yum Yum 673 rue Giffard, Longueuil, QC P: 450.651.1111

825

CFIG MEMBER Lainnir Natural Products

Kruger Products L.P.

789

1900 Minnesota Court, Suite 200 Mississauga, ON L5N 5R5 P: 905.812.6900 F: 905.812.6910 steve.turner@krugerproducts.ca www.krugerproducts.ca Kruger Products L.P. is a leading Canadian manufacturer and distributor of tissue and paper towel products for consumer in-home use and commercial away-from-home use.

L. H. Gray & Son Limited 593 RR #7, Strathroy, ON N7G 3H8 P: 905.708.0110 F: 905.708.0180 rmooradian@grayridge.com Marketing regular and specialty shell eggs, liquid egg products under Gray Ridge Farms and GoldEgg. Ask about new Golden "D" vitamin D enhanced eggs! La Carrera (Canada) 10 Cumberland St. #101, Barrie, ON L4N 2P4 P: 705.733.7976

520

La Selection Twinpack

718

500 Rue Morin, ainte-Adèle, QC J8B 2P9 P: 450.229.3071 F: 705.446.0052 info@twinpack.ca www.twinpack.ca Importation and distribution of Belgian High-end food products; cookes - chocolates.

1195

95 Research Road, #5, Toronto, ON M4G 2G8 P: 416.423.6681 F: 416.423.7242 hugh@lainnir.com Lainnir natural products is a Canadian manufacturer of natural, non-hazardous, effective household cleaning products. Look for Hamish the family-friendly terrier on every bottle.

Lesage Inc. 817, Rue Salaberry, Laval, QC H7S 1H5 P: 514.337.3585 F: 450.668.9404

572

Full service printing company specializing in web to print customized signage featuring new innovative shelf talker designs. Easy to use POOL (Product Ordering On-Line) System.

Maggi 25 Sheppard Ave. West, Toronto, ON M2N 6S8 P: 416.988.5500 F: 416.979.5500

1134

Maple Leaf Foods Inc.

547

6985 Financial Drive, Sales Mississauga, ON L5N 0A1 P: 800.663.1595 F: 705.725.1489

Martin's Family Fruit Farm

Loblaw Companies Limited

941

1 President's Choice Circle, Brampton, ON L6Y 5S5 P: 905.455.2500

M&T Printing Group

1425 Bishop St. N., Cambridge, ON N1R 6J9 P: 519.621.6611 F: 519.621.6323 terryl@mtprint.com www.mtprint.com

1420 Lobsinger Line, RR#1, Waterloo, ON P: 519.664.2750

McCain Foods Canada

Lumsden Brothers 521 6355 Viscount Road, Mississauga, ON L4T 1W2 P: 1.800.268.6328 F: 1.866.365.7115 www.lbl.on.ca Lumsden Brothers is a fullservice food distributor, servicing Independent Grocery Retailers in the Ontario markets. Programs include Independent Foodtown, Independent Food Market and Kwik-Way Convenience. 716

920

959

10 Carlson Court, Etobicoke, ON M9W 6L2 P: 514.352.6302 F: 514.352.4446 dsmichau@mccain.ca www.mccain.ca Come visit the McCain Foods Canada team to find out more about our great line-up of frozen foods. It's all good!

Meilleures Marques/ Best Brands 1206 9050 impasse de L'invention, Montreal, QC P: 514.324.5400 Best Brands Ltd is a distribution centre located in Anjou (Montreal) distributing over 1770 products and marketing in the food sector. We distribute mostly in Quebec, Ontario and the Martimes.

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

Melitta Canada Inc.

CHOOSE ONTARIO

1181

6201 Highway 7, Unit 10, Vaughan, ON L4H 0K7 P: 905.851.0429 F: 905.851.9375 pgood@melitta.ca

Mike and Mikes Inc. 1 Royal Gate Blvd, Woodbridge, ON L4L 8Z7 P: 416.987.2772 Ministry of Agriculture, Food & Rural Affairs 1 Stone Road West, 3rd Flr., Guelph, ON N1G 4Y2 P: 519.826.4445

809

930

MOM Brands 327 117 Taylorwood, Bolton, ON L7E 1H8 P: 905.533.0100 rjsinclair@mombrands.com sallycereal.ca Sally cereals are the perfect combination for great tasting ingredients, and environmentally friendly packaging. Monarch Beverages 336 1123 Zonolite Road, Suite 100 Atlanta, GA 30306 P: 404.262.4040 F: 404.262.4001 m.oneill@monarchbeverages.com monarchbeverages.com Monarch Beverages is a diversified internation beverage company operating in 35 countries and offering over 200 products spanning traditional carbonated soft drinks and New Age categories such as energy drinks.

30

CFIG MEMBER

National Importers Inc. 735 120-13100 Mitchell Road, Richmond, BC V6V 1M8 P: 604.324.1551 F: 604.324.1553 janinesibley@nationalimporters.com www.nationalimporters.com National Importers - We bring the work to your table. Our booth features Hot Beverages, Snacks, Ethnic Food, Specialty Food and Sauces. Please visit our booth. Nature's Path Foods Inc. 9100 Van Horne Way, Richmond, BC V6X 1W3 P: 604 248 8870 F: 604.248.8763 www.naturespath.com

605

Nem Food

928

Nimbus Water Systems Inc. 1141

Old Dutch Foods Ltd

928 Wilson Avenue, Toronto, ON M3K 1E7 P: 800.508.7125 steve@nimbuswatersystems.com www.numbuswatersystems.com Full sdervice water systems company. Best range of equipment and options for both vended and store use water, Purchase, leasing, rental and revenue share available.

100 Bentall Street, Winnipeg, MB R2X 2Y5 P: 204.632.0249 F: 204.632.7016 www.olddutchfoods.com Old Dutch Foods Ltd is a national snack food company, manufactruring and distributing a full assortment of your favorite Old Dutch and Humpty Dumpty snacks.

Northland Floral Inc.

Olympic Dairy Products 413 7178 Vantage Way, Delta, BC V4G 1K7 P: 888.488.8848 F: 1.604.952.7070 info@olympicdairy.com www.olympicdairy.com Olympic dairy products promotes health and wellness by producing the highest quality of natural and organic dairy products for our customers.

1215

1703 South Service Rd., St. Catherines, ON L3R 6P9 P: 905.646.2828 N'Take Ecodurable Products 150

96 Covington Rd., Hamilton, ON L8E 2Y5 P: 905.547.6688 www.nemfood.com

Nestlé Canada

615 Orwell Street, Unit 1 Mississauga, ON L5A 2W4 P: 905.272.2247 F: 905.272.8840 s.mitchell@ntake.com www.ntake.com

779

25 Sheppard Avenue West, North York, ON M2N 6S8 P: 416.218.2715 F: 416.218.2700 lorrayne.pereira@ca.nestle.com Nestlé Canada procvides food and beverages for every occasion and stage of life, helping Canadians live healthier and happier lives.

News Marketing Canada 329 100 King Street West, Suite 7000 Toronto, ON M5X 1A4 P: 416.775.3000 F: 416.775.3055 oelkady@newsmarketing.ca www.newsamerica.com/newscanada With a Canadian Retailer network of over 5,000 stores, NMC sells an executes in-store couponing and advertising programs which help increase basket size.

On The Right Track Inc

Nutreco Canada Inc. 721 600 James St. South, St. Marys, ON N4X 1C7 P: 519.652.3019 chris.ciesielka@nutreco.ca www.nutrecocanada.com Manufacturer of Dry Dog & Cat Food. Marketer & Distributor of canned dog & cat food, dog treats & biscuits as well as cat litter. Office Sampling Inc.

1201

104 Warner Drive, Oakville, ON L6L 6G5 P: 647.208.2718 F: 866.609.2687 linda@officesampling.com Uniquely connect with your key consumers right at their place of work. Let Office Sampling show how we can work 9-5 for YOU!

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1191

160 Snyder's Rd W, Baden, ON N3A 2L9 P: 519.634.1141

Ontario Disability Support Program

1213

80 Grosvenor Street, Hepburn Block, 3rd Floor Toronto, ON M7A 1E9 P: 416.325.5280 F: 416.326.1735 miguel.aguayo@ontario.ca Don't Waste Talent encourages Ontario employers to hire people with disabilities. This portal provides facts about disabilities and tips to making the hiring process accessible.


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

OR' Gourmet Inc

CHOOSE ONTARIO

516

3171 Lenworth Dr., Unit #9, Mississauga, ON L4X 2G6 P: 416.848.8911

Organika Health Products Inc. 120 13480 - Verdun Place, Richmond, BC V6V 1V2 P: 604.277.3302 F: 604.277.3352 www.organika.com Organika is a manufacturer of health supplements and functional foods celebrating over 20 years of supplying the world with quality products. Ozery's Pita Break 938 11 Director Court, Vaughan, ON L4L 4S5 P: 905.265.1143 www.pitabreak.com mail@pitabreak.com Ozery bakery makes a range of innovative breads & snacks that are all-natural, wholesome & delicious. Our family of products includes Crispy Pitas, toasted pita snacks, sandwich buns, fruit & grain buns, crackers and flatbreads. Pan-Oston Ltd.

149

660 Neal Drive, P.O. Box 267 Peterborough, ON K9J 6Y8 P: 705.748.4811 F: 705.748.9213 glenn.bonner@panoston.ca www.panoston.ca Store fixtures, Checkouts, Counters and Cabinets.

CFIG MEMBER

Papa Jack Popcorn 1205 2184 Thurston Dr., Ottawa, ON K1G 6E1 P: 613.744.1049 F: 613.744.8175 jjsales@on.aibn.com Pre-popped popcorn in 8 different flavours ranging in sizes from 22g 360g bags for retail and fundraising.

Parmalat Canada

189

405 The West Mall, Toronto, ON M9C 5J1 P: 416.626.1973 F: 416.620.3546 www.parmalat.ca Parmalat Canada produces milk and dairy products, fruit juices, cultured and cheese products and table spreads. Brands: Beatrice, Lactancia, Astro, Black Diamond, and Balderson.

PepsiCo Canada

389

5205 Satellite Drive, Mississauga, ON L4W 5J7 P: 905.212.3438 F: 9054.212.7208 daniel.lalonde@pepsico.com Food and beverage innovations from some of the world's most recognized and trusted brands.

Piccola Cucina Inc.

1193

3187 Pipeline Rd., West St. Paul, MB R4A 8A3 P: 888.688.4454 F: 888.688.3679 pina@piccolacucina.ca www.piccolacucina.ca Canadian made gluten free and dairy free italian macaroons and pie crusts made with the goodness of almonds. All natural, free of perservatives and chemicals.

Primo Foods Inc. 56 Huxley Road, Toronto, ON M9M 1H2 P: 416.741.9300 F: 416.741.3766 cgasparro@primofoods.ca

597

Prinex Media Inc 1192 1788 Drew Road, Suite 202 Mississauga, ON L5S 1L7 P: 905.673.8787 F: 905.565.1080 info@prinexmedia.com www.prinexmedia.com We Design, Print, Manufacture, Assemble and Fulfill corrugate floor displays, counter-top displays, retail packages, display ready pallets and other cost effective solutions for retail marketing.

Procter & Gamble

589

4711 Yonge Street, Toronto, ON M5W 1C5 P: 416.730.4317 F: 416.730.4339 www.pg.com P&G grows by touching and improving more consumers’ lives in more parts of the world…more completely.

Redbud 1155 611 Tradewind Dr., Suite 200 Ancaster, ON L9G 4V5 P: 888.733.2830 F: 888.733.2850 jeff@redbud.com www.redbud.com Redbud services retailers across the country with high quality branded merchandisers, that carry specialized plant material.

Rivi's Guilt Free Cookies 221 4480 Chesswood Drive, Unit 13 Toronto, ON M3J 2B9 P: 416.630.7502 F: 416.630.6098 rivi@guiltfreecookies.com www.guiltfreecookies.com A selection of all natural, nut & dairy-free cookies and granola snacks, kosher and containing no added fats, artificial flavour, colour or perservatives. Rotobale Compaction Solutions 1000 7232 Arthur Road #5, Kenilworth, ON N0G 2E0 P: 519.323.3673 F: 519.3323.3816 steve@rotobalecompaction.com www.rotobalecompaction.com Rotobale Compaction offers the safest waste/recycling compactors/ rulers with the most compaction; we pack more so you spend less. RTS Retail 1027 Industrial Place, P.O. Box 179 St. Clements, ON N0B 2M0 P: 519.699.0022 F: 519.699.0027

607

Rubicon Food Products Ltd. 180 Brodie Drive, Unit 1, Richmond Hill, ON P: 905.883.1112

621

Sabra Canada, Inc 1143 55 St Clair Ave West, Suite 230 Toronto, ON M4V 2Y7 P: 914.372.3855 Sage Valley Marketing Ltd. 1199

Box 635, Rosedale, AB T0J 2V0 P: 403.823.8664 F: 403.823.7670 sales@sagevalleymarketing.com www.naturesessentialgarden.com Natural & Deet free Family buzz patch Organic bath and body

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

CHOOSE ONTARIO

Saint Lucia Trade Esport Promotion Agency TEPA 510 Hewanorra House, 2nd Floor Pointe Seraphine, Castries P: 1.758.468.2286 F: 1.758.452.4606 info@opsrslu.org www.opsr.org.lc Come experience authentic Saint Lucian products-direct from the Caribbean. Gourmet sauces, seasonings, condiments, liquers & premium beverages, confectioneries and natural-based personal care products and supplements. Saputo Dairy Products Canada G. P. 1310 Steeles Ave. E., Brampton, ON L6T 1A2 P: 905.456.5621

359

CFIG MEMBER

Shafer-Haggart Ltd. 140 2000 Argentia Road, Plaza One Suite 220 Mississauga, ON L5N 1P7 P: 905.826.3211 F: 905.826.3374 gdoucette@shafer-haggart.com Shafer-Haggart specializes in branded and private label packaged goods to food service, retail and industrial accounts. National sales and distribution network. Shana Foods 180 Brodie Drive, Unit 1, Richmond Hill, ON P: 905.883.1112

619

Signature Foods 139 5786 Highway 129 North, Suite 100 Pendergrass, GA 30567 F: 706.693.0097 daniel@signaturefood.com www.signaturefood.com Private Label, Frozen Foods, Meal Solutions and Meat Processing.

Simpson Screen Print & Lithography

916

865 Sawmill Road, Bloomingdale, ON N0B 1K0 P: 519.744.3745 F: 519.744.3136 carla@simpson-print.com www.simpson-print.com Simpson Print offers superior screen print, offset and digital print production solutions. From point of conception through to extensive bindery and finishing, we offer over 40 years of history in retail signage, kitting and fulfillment experience.

Sir Solutions 3565 Jarry East, suite 650 Montreal, QC H1Z 4K6 P: 514.798.9015 Smucker Foods of Canada - Ethnic Fare Booth 80 Whitehall Drive, Markham, PE L3R 0P3

333

947

Smucker Foods of Canada Corp.

951

80 Whitehall Drive, Markham, ON L3R 0P3 P: 905.940.7530 F: 905.940.5969 tj.hill@jmsmucker.com www.smuckers.ca Smucker Foods offers quality brands including: Smuckers and Double Fruit Jams & Spreads, Bick's Pickles, Robin Hood, Five Roses, & Golden Temple Flour, Carnation Evaporated Milk, and Folgers Coffee. Come check us out and sample our great new products in 2012.

Solo Cup Canada, Inc. 531 2121 Markham Road, Toronto, ON M1B 2W3 P: 416.332.3472 F: 416.332.3489 hector.hofilena@solocup.com Solo Cup Canada is the leading supplier of single-use tableware in Canada. We offer a complete range of cups, plates bowls and cutlery.

No Matter how you Slice it. A Better Product and now Serviced by Direct Plus

A Winning Combination

WE ARE YOUR SALES, MERCHANDISING, & DELIVERY SOLUTION 1.800.663.4746 www.directplusfoodgroup.com www.MamaMarys.com

BOOTH # 1004 32

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

Somerville Nurseries 5884 Cty. Rd 13, Box 1445 Everett, ON L0M1J0 P: 705.435.6258 F: 705.435.6259

CHOOSE ONTARIO

725

Spartan Foods of America Inc. 1004 1063 Treadstone Lane, Powder Springs, GA 30127 P: 864.595.6262 Mama Mary's par-baked pizza crust. Kosher and available in traditional, thin, whole wheat style crust. There are 2-12" crust and 3-7" crust per package. Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co.

929

50 Centre St., Box 430, Warkworth, ON P: 705.924.2727 info@sprucewoodbrands.com

Steer Select Sales 7370 Bramalea Rd. Unit 36, Mississauga, ON L5S 1S4 P: 905.670.9870 F: 905.670.0163 info@steerselect.com

801

STM 320 1055 Middlegate Road, Unit 1 Mississauga, ON L4Y 3Y4 P: 905.814.5577 F: 905.279.0390 kent.wagg@shelftalkers.com www.shelftalkers.com Sun-Rype Products Ltd.

562

1165 Ethel Street, Kelowna, BC V1Y 2W4 P: 250.860.7973 F: 250.762.3611 info@sunrype.com www.sunrype.com Sunrype 100% fruit juices and snacks. Real fruit goodness from the heart of the Okanagan Valley. Taste the sun.

Sunshine Pickles

CFIG MEMBER

917

RR 5, 30043 Jane Road, Thamesville, ON P: 519.692.4416 info@picklesplease.ca We provide a wide variety of organic and trafitional pickeld vegetables as well as provide co-packing and private label opportunities.

TC Media 419 25 Sheppard Ave. W., Suite 100 Toronto, ON M2N 6S7 P: 416.227.8306 F: 416.227.8298 Temple Lifestyle 793 9600 Rue Meilleur, Suite 932 Montreal, QC H2N 2E3 P: 514.382.3805 info@templelifestyle.com www.templelifestyle.com An emerging force within the Health and Wellness industry, Temple Lifestyle is at the forefront of the AllNatural and Organic Industry's; offering National best sellers in Coconut Water and Kale Chips. TFB & Associates Limited 931 7300 Warden Avenue, Suite 210 Markham, ON L3R 9Z6 P: 905.940.0889 F: 905.940.0913 matt.riddell@tfb.ca www.tfb.ca TFB & Associates import specialty foods, confectionary and natural food products for distribution to warehouse and direct-to-store across Canada.

The Clorox Company of Canada 1165 150 Biscayne Crescent, Brampton, ON L6W 4V3 P: 905.595.8200 F: 905.454.6670 www.clorox.ca We make life better, every day. From great tasting Brita water to the truly natural personal care of Burts Bees to innovative and sustainable solutions for the future.

TI-Foods 969 50 Travail Road, Markham, ON L3S 3J1 P: 416.292.2228 F: 416.291.8800 www.ti-foods.com One of the leading national wholesaler specialized in providing high quality of international dry groceries, frozen foods, marketing planogram and promotional support to Canadian retailers.

The Floral Express Inc. 465495 Curries Rd, Woodstock, ON N4S 7V8 P: 519.424.9689

323

Time Definite Services Transportation 1360 Madeline Ln, Suite 300, Elgin, IL 60124 P: 1.800.466.8040

The Linkage Group 60 Centurian Drive, Suite 204 Markham, ON L3R 9R2 P: 905.415.2300 F: 905.415.2299

125

The Retail Merchants Association 1159 10 Milner Business Court, Suite 401 Scarborough, ON M1B 3C6 P: 416.293.2100 F: 416.293.2103 rmoyal@rmacanada.com The Retail Merchants Association "RMA" has been serving the independent retailers and associations since 1910 to prosper by offering a broad range of benefits and savings to keep members strong and profitable. The Stonemill Bakehouse 121 426 Nugget Ave, Toronto, ON M1S 4A4 P: 416.757.5767 F: 416.757.5131 bob.creasy@stonemillbakehouse. com

144

Tootsi Impex Inc. 614 6995 Jeanne-Mance, Montreal, QC P: 514.381.9790 www.tootsiimpex.com mmousavi@tootsiimpex.com Tootsi Impex is a supplier of quality bulk food and ingredients in Canada with more than 1,000 products in stock (nuts, dried fruit, candies, chocolates and etc...) in organic and conventional. Touche Bakery Inc. 983 384 B Neptune Cres, London, ON N6M 1A1 P: 519.455.0044 F: 519.455.5843 aswartz@touchebakery.com www.touchebakery.com Biscotti, cookies, meringues, cakes, frozen batter and dough produced in a HACCP Kosher & Totally Nut Free facility.

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME FIRST TIMER

Tree of Life Canada

CHOOSE ONTARIO

373

6030 Freemont Blvd., Mississauga, ON L5R 3X4 P: 905.507.6161 F: 905.507.2727 www.treeoflife.com As the nation's leading distributor of natural, organic, specialty, ethnic and gourmet cheese food products, Tree of Life has helped Canadians to "Live Well"!

CFIG MEMBER

UNFI Canada 153 - 12757 Vulcan Way, Richmond, BC V6V 3C8 P: 604.276.2411

601

Unico Inc.

796

8000 Keele Street, Concord, ON L4K 2A4 P: 905.669.9637 F: 905.669.3585 customer.services@unico.ca www.unico.ca

Unico is a leading and innovative marketer of high quality mediterranean food products with 93 years of expertise and brand equity. (Unico, Gallo, Liberty, Safflo)

Unilever Canada

759

2360 Meadowpine Blvd, Unit 1 Mississauga, ON L5N 6S2 P: 905.819.5323 F: 905.819.6101 melody.chiu@unilever.com www.unilever.ca We meet every day needs for nutirition, hygiene and personal care with brands that help people feel good, look good and get more out of life.

Vineland Research & Innovation Centre Inc.

802

4890 Victoria Ave. N, Box 4000 Vineland Station, ON L0R 2E0 P: 905.562.0320 F: 905.562.0084

VV Foods, LLC 338 4025 E. Belknap Street, Ste. A Halton City, TX 76111 P: 817.834.2715 F: 817.834.1399 info@vvfoods.com www.vvfoods.com VV Foods is a manufacturer and distributor of soup bases and spice packets for use in making popular asian noodles or soup.

Weber Marking Systems Canada 1001 6180 Danville Rd, Mississauga, ON L5T 2H7 P: 905.564.6881 F: 905.564.6886 jvieira@webermarking.ca Weber Marking Systems provides high-quality labels and labelling and coding products to the Canadian marketplace. Western Grocer Magazine 804 1740 Wellington Ave., Winnipeg, MB R3H 0E8 P: 1.800.337.6372 F: 204.954.2057 robin@mercury.mb.ca www.mercury.mb.com Western Grocer magazing has been servicing the grocery industry in the West for over 95 years. We are the publishers of the official show guide for Grocery Showcase West. Weston Bakeries/ Ready Bake Foods Inc.

1425 Queensway, Etobicoke, ON M8Z1T3 www.weston.ca joneill@westonbakeries.com Weston Bakeries Limited/Ready Bake Foods Inc is a major supplier of fresh and frozen baked goods across Canada, servicing both food service and retail businesses. Weston Bakeries Limited brands as Wonder TM, D'Italiano TM, and Gadoua TM.

Wilden Media #104, 2310 St. Laurent Blvd, Ottawa, ON

34

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347

530


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITOR BY PRODUCT CATEGORY Advertising/ Media/ Marketing Programs Grocery Business Media News Marketing Canada Office Sampling Inc. Redbud Simpson Screen Print & Lithography Western Grocer Magazine

Automation Systems CIG Group

Bags

Instore Products Limited N’Take EcoDurable Products

Baked Goods: Fresh/ Frozen/ Refrigerated Canada Bread Cinnaroll Bakeries Limited Dufflet Pastries/Chocolate Signatures Koko Patisserie Lumsden Brothers Piccola Cucina Inc. Rivi’s Guilt Free Cookies Touché Bakery Inc.

Bar coding equipment/systems Ahearn & Soper Inc. CIG Group Weber Marking Systems

Beauty & Personal Care Unilever Canada

Beverages

Advantage Sales and Marketing Canada TM Beverage World Inc. Coca-Cola Refreshments Hip Hop Beverage Corp. Monarch Beverages Nestlé Canada Nimbus Water Systems Inc. PepsiCo Canada Temple Lifestyle

Cards

Hazy Jean

Carts

Cari-All Products Inc. / Technibilt Ltd. Instore Products Limited

Cereal

Advantage Sales and Marketing Canada TM MOM Brands

Coffee & Tea

CCD International Trading Dove Tale Collections Smucker Foods of Canada Corp

Condiments & relishes

Confectionery

Austrian Consulate General – Commercial Section Dufflet Pastries/Chocolate Signatures Nestlé Canada TFB & Associates Limited Tootsi Impex Inc.

National Importers Inc.

Foods: Canned

Burnbrae Farms LTD Gay Lea Foods Grand Valley Fortifiers L.H. Gray & Son Limited Olympic Dairy Products Parmalat Canada

7000 Islands Foods Dove Tale Collections I-D Foods Corporation National Importers Inc. Ti Foods Tree of Life Canada Unico Inc. VV Foods, LLC Acosta Sales & Marketing Lumsden Brothers McCain Foods Canada Nestlé Canada Ti Foods Unilever Canada

Aidan’s Gluten Free Inc. CCD International Trading Cinnaroll Bakeries Limited Dufflet Pastries/Chocolate Signatures I-D Foods Corporation Indulge Gourmet Kettle Corn Koko Patisserie National Importers Inc. Piccola Cucina Inc. Sunshine Pickles Ti Foods Tree of Life Canada Unico Inc. VV Foods, LLC

Foods: Health

Foods: Spreads

Foods: Frozen

Display Cases

Alto-Shaam Canada Anthony Coldmatic Refridgeration GBS Food Service Equipment Farm Credit Canada: Agribusiness and Agrifood Division Federated Insurance Trade Association The Retail Merchants Association

Foods: Snack

Foods: Specialty

Foods: Dry

Dairy & Eggs

Burnbrae Farms LTD Smucker Foods of Canada Corp

Foods: Ethnic

Parmalat Canada

The Retail Merchants Association

Foods: Prepared

Acosta Sales & Marketing TFB & Associates Limited

Foods: Deli

Coupon Redemption Services

Olympic Dairy Products Ozery’s Pita Break Piccola Cucina Inc. Redbud Rivi’s Guilt Free Cookies Sunshine Pickles Temple Lifestyle TFB & Associates Limited Tootsi Impex Inc. Tree of Life Canada

CB Powell Limited ConAgra Foods Dan-D Foods Inc. Indulge Gourmet Kettle Corn Old Dutch Foods Ltd. Papa Jack Popcorn Parmalat Canada PepsiCo Canada Rivi’s Guilt Free Cookies Sun-Rype Products Ltd. Touché Bakery Inc.

CCD International Trading CB Powell Limited Shafer-Haggart Ltd Unico Inc.

Faxinating Solutions Inc. Federated Insurance GFTC Grocery Business Media N’Take EcoDurable Products Ontario Disability Support Program

Anthony api (+) Brascon Stainless Steel Fabricators Inc. Brencar Cayuga Display Inc. Forté Product Solutions Pan-Osten Ltd. STM

Food Safety & Sanitation

Foods: Baby

Consulting Services

Fixtures: store

Alto-Shaam Canada GBS Food Service Equipment

Canadian Food & Grocery Guide Food Service Equipment Alto-Shaam Canada Forté Product Solutions GBS Food Service Equipment Ishida Canada Inc. Nimbus Water Systems Inc.

CB Powell Limited Dove Tale Collections I-D Foods Corporation Sunshine Pickles

Financial Services

Food Preparation Equipment

Aidan’s Gluten Free Inc. L.H. Gray & Son Limited

Foods: Kosher

Dan-D Foods Inc. Touché Bakery Inc.

Foods: Natural/ Organic

Aidan’s Gluten Free Inc. Dan-D Foods Inc. Freeman Herbs Inc. Grand Valley Fortifiers Indulge Gourmet Kettle Corn Koko Patisserie L.H. Gray & Son Limited

7000 Islands Foods Smucker Foods of Canada Corp Unilever Canada

Fruits

ConAgra Foods Shafer-Haggart Ltd

Household Products, Cleaners & Supplies The Clorox Company of Canada Lainnir Natural Products

Housewares

Solo Cup Canada, Inc.

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITOR BY PRODUCT CATEGORY Juices

Austrian Consulate General – Commercial Section Coca-Cola Refreshments PepsiCo Canada Sun-Rype Products Ltd.

Labeling & Pricing Equipment Ahearn & Soper Inc. Howell Data Systems Ketchum Manufacturing Weber Marking Systems

Lighting

Seafood

Material Handling & Backroom Equipment

Security Systems & Equipment

GE Lighting Solutions

Cari-All Products Inc. / Technibilt Ltd. Hewitt Material Handling Rotobale Compaction Solutions

Natural Products

Austrian Consulate General – Commercial Section The Clorox Company of Canada Lainnir Natural Products Tootsi Impex Inc.

Meats: Other

Grand Valley Fortifiers

Nutritional Aids

Packaging ASL Print FX Ltd. GFTC Ishida Canada Inc. N’Take EcoDurable Products Simpson Screen Print & Lithography Solo Cup Canada, Inc. Weber Marking Systems

Paper Products, Towels, Linens Hazy Jean Kruger Products L.P. Solo Cup Canada, Inc

Pet Food & Supplies Nutreco Canada Inc.

Pharmaceuticals: OTC

Brascon Stainless Steel Fabricators Inc. Cari-All Products Inc. / Technibilt Ltd. Howell Data Systems Integral Security Systems

Signage & Graphics

api (+) Ketchum Manufacturing M & T Printing News Marketing Canada Sage Valley Marketing Ltd. Simpson Screen Print & Lithography STM

Spices & Flavourings VV Foods, LLC

Stationery Supplies Hazy Jean

Store Furnishings & Design api (+) Cayuga Display Inc. STM

Trade Association

The Retail Merchants Association

Trade Publications

Canadian Food & Grocery Guide Canadian Grocer Grocery Business Magazine Western Grocer Magazine

Advantage Sales and Marketing Canada TM

Vitamins & Supplements

Point of Sale Systems & Equipment

Warehousing

Sage Valley Marketing Ltd.

Ahearn & Soper Inc. CIG Group Howell Data Systems IDL – Instachange Display Limited

Hewitt Material Handling Waste Management Rotobale Compaction Solutions

Private Label

The Clorox Company of Canada Coca-Cola Refreshments Nimbus Water Systems Inc.

Cinnaroll Bakeries Limited Instore Products Limited Temple Lifestyle

Recycling/Balers

Forté Product Solutions Rotobale Compaction Solutions

Refrigeration, HVAC & Freezers Anthony Arneg Canada Inc Cayuga Display Inc. Coldmatic Refridgeration

36

Shafer-Haggart Ltd

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

Water


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITOR BY BOOTH NUMBER Location Name Organika Health Products Inc. The Stonemill Bakehouse Grocery Business Magazine The Linkage Group Hewitt Material Handling Inc. GE Lighting Solutions ASL Print FX Ltd. Southern United Sates Trade Assn (SUSTA) CIS Group Shafer-Haggart Ltd. Cinnaroll Bakeries Limited Coca-Cola Refreshments Inc. Time Definite Services Transportation Dove Tale Collections Pan-Oston Ltd. N’Take Howell Data Systems I-D Foods Corporation Anthony Parmalat Canada Inc. Advantage Sales and Marketing Canada Cari-All Products Inc. Bank of Canada Digi Canada Inc. Hussmann Canada Inc. CCD International Trading & Marketing Company IDL - Instachange Displays Limited Hormel Foods International Corporation Indulge Gourmet Kettle Corn STM Financial Management Solutions Austrian Consulate General - Commercial Section The Floral Express Inc. MOM Brands Company News Marketing Canada Sir Solutions Agropur Weston Bakeries Saputo Dairy Products Canada G. P. Old Dutch Foods Ltd Tree of Life Canada Inc. Pepsico Dairy Farmers of Canada Brencar Federated Insurance Olympic Dairy Products Inc Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

Booth Number 120 121 124 125 129 132 136 137 138 140 142 143 144 146 149 150 159 181 188 189 195 198 202 203 204 206 209 213 221 320 321 322 323 327 329 333 339 347 359 365 373 389 399 408 412 413 414

Location Name Ahearn & Soper Inc. TC Media Crown Verity Inc Alokozay Tea Canada Office of Private Sector Relations (OPSR) OR’ Gourmet Inc La Carrera (Canada) Lumsden Brothers GS1 Canada Alto-Shaam Canada Corp. Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd. Wilden Media Solo Cup Canada Cayuga Displays Inc. GBS Food Service Equipment Maple Leaf Foods Inc. Canada Bread Company Limited Kraft Canada Inc. Sun-Rype Products Ltd. Burnbrae Farms Limited Bizerba Canada Inc. Lesage Inc. Arneg Canada Inc. FCC Agribusiness & Agrifood Campbell Company of Canada General Mills Canada Corp. Procter & Gamble L. H. Gray & Son Limited J & J Display Sales Inc. Primo Foods Inc. UNFI Canada Inc. Nature’s Path Foods Inc. RTS Retail International Dairy-Deli-Bakery Association Gambles Produce Tootsi Impex Inc. Shana Foods Rubicon Food Products Ltd. M&T Printing Group CMR Home Entertainment La Selection Twinpack inc. Nutreco Canada Inc. Distribution Canada Inc. CG&B Group Somerville Nurseries Inovata Foods Corp. (Bassili Best) Flowers Canada

Booth Number 415 419 420 425 510 516 520 521 522 525 526 530 531 533 539 547 558 559 562 566 569 572 575 576 578 581 589 593 595 597 601 605 607 612 613 614 619 621 716 717 718 721 723 724 725 726 727

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THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

EXHIBITOR BY BOOTH NUMBER Location Name 7000 Islands Foods Fire in the Kitchen Spice Co. Backyard Superstar Bagcraft Papercon National Importers Inc. Dairy Farmers of Ontario Unilever Canada Alfa Cappuccino Imports Inc. Nestlé Canada (Toronto) Kruger Products L.P. ConAgra Foods Temple Lifestyle Unico Inc. Canadian Food & Grocery Industry Guide Steer Select Sales Vineland Research & Innovation Centre Inc. Coldmatic Group of Companies Western Grocer Magazine Clover Leaf Cheese Ltd. Bee Maid Honey Ltd. Dyna-Pro Environmental Mike and Mikes Inc. Ketchum Manufacturing Inc. Alliance of Ontario Food Processors Integral Security Systems Krispy Kernels - Yum Yum Simpson Screen Print & Lithography LTD Sunshine Pickles Martin’s Family Fruit Farm Nem Food Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co. Ministry of Agriculture, Food & Rural Affairs TFB & Associates Ltd. Foodland Ontario Canadian Grocer Dufflet Pastries/Chocolate Signatures Ozery’s Pita Break GFTC Loblaw Companies Limited Smucker Foods of Canada - Ethnic Fare Booth Smucker Foods of Canada Corp. McCain Foods Canada TI-Foods (a Thai Indochine Trading Inc. Co.) CROSSMARK Canada Inc. Brascon Stainless Steel Fabricators Inc. Touche Bakery

38

Booth Number 728 729 730 731 735 743 759 767 779 789 792 793 796 797 801 802 803 804 805 807 808 809 812 814 820 825 916 917 920 928 929 930 931 932 934 935 938 939 941 947 951 959 969 973 981 983

Location Name Acosta Sales & Marketing Rotobale Compaction Solutions Inc. Weber Marking Systems Canada, Inc Spartan Foods of America Inc. Food & Consumer Products of Canada Forté Product Solutions Gay Lea Foods Cooperative Ltd. Gala Bakery From Farm To Table Canada Inc. Beverage World Maggi Nonna Pia’s Gourmet Sauces Ltd. Grow Guelph Grand Valley Fortifiers Nimbus Water Systems Inc. Sabra Canada, Inc. Ishida Canada Inc. Redbud Supply Inc. The Retail Merchants Association CB Powell Limited The Clorox Company of Canada Dan-D-Foods (Toronto) Inc. API(+) InStore Products Limited Krinos Foods Canada Ltd Melitta Canada Inc. Etalex Inc. Colgate-Palmolive Canada Inc. On The Right Track Inc Prinex Media Inc Piccola Cucina Inc. Freeman Herbs Lainnir Natural Products Faxinating Solutions Inc. Sage Valley Marketing Ltd. Office Sampling Inc. Aidan’s Gluten Free Inc ItalPasta Limited Papa Jack Popcorn Meilleures Marques/Best Brands Koko Patisserie Hazy Jean Inc. Ontario Disability Support Program Northland Floral Inc. Food Banks Canada

G R O C E R Y I N N O VA T I O N S C A N A D A • 2 0 1 2 O F F I C I A L S H O W G U I D E

Booth Number 988 1000 1001 1004 1005 1006 1007 1127 1128 1131 1134 1137 1138 1139 1141 1143 1147 1155 1159 1161 1165 1169 1175 1177 1180 1181 1183 1188 1191 1192 1193 1194 1195 1197 1199 1201 1203 1204 1205 1206 1208 1209 1213 1215 1224


THE FUTURE IS HERE • GIC SHOW

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE OCT. 1 & 2 • GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA 2012 OCTOBER 1ST - 2ND

METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE


Purina Proudly Supports the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation!

DRIVE CATEGORY GROWTH & PROFITABILITY!

Purchase these products and help PURINA reach its goal of contributing

100,000!

$

NEW!

UNIQUE

DESIGN:

• Protein SIMMERS in the sauce infusing it with flavour and keeping it moist • STEAM locks in the fresh taste and texture of the vegetables, rice and pasta • Separate sauce for customization

TM Trademarks of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, used under licence.

Winner of 2 Awards:

Overall Consumer Acceptance & Innovation in Pet Needs

AVAILABLE OCTOBER 2012 • • • •

Lean Cuisine is the market leader with 32.3 $ Share* Fresh Inspirations features impactful visibility and on-shelf differentiation Premium innovation that drives incremental dollars to the category Available in 6 varieties

Thank you to those who have contributed to our success! P R E M I U M P E T FO O D

purinaone.ca

PURINA TRADEMARKS OWNED BY SOCIÉTÉ DES PRODUITS NESTLÉ S.A., VEVEY, SWITZERLAND.

*Source: Nielsen All Channels PE June 30, 2012. TRADEMARK OWNER: SOCIÉTÉ DES PRODUITS NESTLÉ S.A., VEVEY, SWITZERLAND. LICENSEE: NESTLÉ CANADA INC., NORTH YORK, ON M2N 6S8.


September/October 2012