Grand Rapids Magazine - May 2020

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THE AREA’S TOP DOCTORS P L U S M E N TA L H E A LT H

HOME DIY PROJECTS

OUTDOOR FITNESS

+

SAVING LIVES:

TOP DOCS 467

OF THE AREA’S BEST PHYSICIANS

VAN ANDEL INSTITUTE’S OWN ‘TOP DOCTOR’ WEI LU USES TECHNOLOGY TO PEER INTO MOLECULES


P R O M I N E N T LY R E P R E S E N T I N G T H E

FINEST IN GRAND RAPIDS REAL E S TAT E F O R O V E R 3 0 Y E A R S

Homes in this ad are not currently on the market. These pictures represent past clients.

Katie-K Team 616.291.3552 Katie@Katie-K.com 1555 Arboretum Dr. SE, Suite 101, Grand Rapids, MI 49546 | Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated


2020 TOP DOCTORS David Albrecht, DO Internal Medicine

Brian Hinkley, DO Family Medicine

Steven Bargwell, DO Family Medicine

James Hoekwater, DO Critical Care Medicine & Pulmonary Disease

Terrance Barnes, MD Critical Care Medicine & Pulmonary Disease

POWERFUL TEAMWORK

EXCEPTIONAL

MEDICINE

James Birmingham, MD Rheumatology

Barbara Karenko, DO Cardiology

Terri Bott-Kothari, MD Radiation Oncology

Natalie Kent, DO Internal Medicine

Kevin Brader, MD Gynecologic Oncology

Kristi Kern, DO Family Medicine

Paul Brown, DO Ophthalmology

Edwin Kornoelje, DO Sports Medicine

Wayne Christenson, DO Family Medicine

Edward Kryshak, MD Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

Jennifer Cory, DO Internal Medicine Timothy Daum, MD Critical Care Medicine & Pulmonary Disease, Sleep Medicine Douglas Doyle, DO Ophthalmology Stephanie Dublis, DO Hematology & Oncology

Expertise, everywhere you need it.

John Dykstra, DO Family Medicine

We’re grateful to 50 Metro Health doctors who were recognized for their outstanding care delivery. They represent hundreds of providers who are committed to providing clinical expertise, quality patient care and exceptional service. Our focus is to deliver the right care, in the right place, at the right time for our patients.

David Ehrhardt, DO Neurology Mohamad El Mortada, MD Infectious Disease

5900 Byron Center Ave SW, Wyoming, MI

metrohealth.net

Tiffany Letts, MD Pediatrics Steven Lown, DO Obstetrics & Gynecology Kurt Meppelink, DO Pediatrics Lance Owens, DO Family Medicine Natalie Parr, DO Internal Medicine Eryn Quinn, DO Internal Medicine Alaa Salhadar, MD Pediatrics

Julie Forstner, MD Radiation Oncology

Guillermo Sanchez, MD Vascular/Interventional Radiology

Kevin Furlong, DO Internal Medicine

Hilary Schmid, DO Family Medicine

Mounir Ghali, MD Critical Care Medicine & Pulmonary Disease

Matthew Sevensma, DO Cardiology

Armita Ghoddousi, DO Gastroenterology

Metro Health Hospital + 18 Area Physician Offices

Ryan Hop, DO Internal Medicine

Jordan Taylor, DO Neurology

Robert Gleffe, DO Internal Medicine

Matthew Tiede, MD Vascular/Interventional Radiology

Ronald Grifka, MD Pediatric Cardiology

Janice Wabeke, DO Family Medicine

Ryan Hamby, DO Gastroenterology

Eric Walchak, DO Cardiology

Sulsal-Ul Haque, MD Hematology & Oncology

Michael Wiltrakis, DO Internal Medicine

Ammar Hassan, MD Gastroenterology

Adam Wolfe, DO Internal Medicine

Marc Helzer, MD Family Medicine

Michael Zakem, DO Hematology & Oncology


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contents MAY 2020 VOLUME 57, ISSUE 5

Helen DeVos Children's Hospital is changing the outcome for patients with congenital heart conditions.

FEATURES

42

OUTDOOR FITNESS MOVE YO U R WO R KO U T O U T DO O R S T H IS S E AS O N . BY ROBIN GOULD

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TOP DOC TORS GR A N D R A P I DS DO C TOR S AR E US I N G T ECH N OLO GY TO IMP R OV E PAT IEN T O U TCOM E S .

P H OTO G R A P H BY DAV I D S PA R K S

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COVER DAVID SPARKS


A VA I L A B L E A T

4518 PLAINFIELD AVE NE | GRAND RAPIDS, MI 49525 ��1�� ����49�2 � WWW.SHOPMEDAWAR.COM


contents / may

every issue 08 85

editor's letter dining guide

A guide to the area's best eateries

100 gr gems

Discover artist Mary Gardner Premington

people + places

38

19

12

voice

14

issues

Trevor Straub brings drag to brunch Dominion Sanctuary is home to several rescued farm animals

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moments

19

profile

Highlights from 50 Most Influential Women and WMCAT's iBall Aarie Wade created Black Book Exchange Boxes to share great books

look + feel

24

wellness

28

home

29

gear

30

style

31

expert

How to find the right therapist to help with your mental health Tackle these DIY projects to increase your home's value We've got the gear for your Memorial Day BBQ Spring into saffron Spring cleaning with Moxie Life Organizing

food + drink

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30

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table

38

create

40

cheers

41

top five

Social House hopes to beat its "cursed" location Two Scotts Barbecue's giardiniera Pretty Bitty Bar Co. is the mobile bar service you need Summer wines and dog-friendly patios AARIE WADE KELLY SWEET GIARDINIERA STACY FEYER-SALO RUNWAY COURTESY GABRIELA HEARST


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editor's letter / connect

Innovative health care

Our May issue went into production during uncertain times. COVID-19 was beginning to escalate in the U.S. The content in this issue was all created prior to March and reflects a very different set of circumstances. It seems even more appropriate now that this is our Top Docs issue, however. Technological innovations are changing everything from patient care to drug research. Health care apps and wearable tech are emerging to help patients stay on top of their disease management, telehealth allows doctors and patients to connect outside of the traditional office or hospital environment, and the use of 3D printing, AI and virtual reality are helping to save lives. In West Michigan, physicians are using these emerging technologies to improve patient diagnosis, increase access to services, to improve drug research and more. This month we talked to a handful of doctors in the community about how emerging technologies are changing their practices and what future iterations might bring with them. In this issue, we are also celebrating the many outdoor fitness opportunities available. Parks abound throughout the city so grab a resistance band and head outdoors for your next workout. You can find out how to stay safe and gain tips on planning your workout from Life Addicts trainers Travis and Whitney Washington. If you are looking for an alternative to the standard jump rope, push-ups or hill climbing, check out our pieces on GR Paddling and Grand Rapids Sport and Social Club. We also take a look at the rise of animal sanctuaries in this issue by visiting Dominion Sanctuary in Sparta. Run by the Gadziemski family, Dominion Sanctuary takes in pigs and chickens and ensures they have a life that won’t end on a plate. If you’re looking for a good book this month, consider taking one from the Black Book Exchange Boxes located around town. Aarie Wade wanted to make it easier for her daughters and her community to find books reflecting Black people's experiences, so she began a book exchange box devoted to literature by and about Black individuals. The boxes have grown from one to six and there will be even more coming this year. Stay healthy!

Next issue

Michigan is full of outdoor recreation opportunities. Camping is a big one, but what about glamping? We take a look at the growing trend.

On the radio

Join Managing Editor Charlsie Dewey at 9:45 a.m. Thursdays, as she presents the Weekend City Guide with Shelley Irwin on WGVU Radio FM 88.5 and 95.3.

On TV

Managing Editor Charlsie Dewey joins Shelley Irwin each month on WGVU’s “Community Connection” program to discuss what’s inside Grand Rapids Magazine. FEATURED CONTRIBUTOR

Charlsie Dewey Managing Editor, Grand Rapids Magazine

Julie Tabberer is a librarian at the Grand Rapids Public Library. As head of the History and Special Collections department, she believes that local history should be available to everyone, and is an advocate for digital accessibility of the library's archival collections.

There are tons of ways to reach us. By mail: Editor, Grand Rapids Magazine, 401 Hall St. SW, Suite 331, Grand Rapids, MI 49503. Email: cdewey@grmag.com. Be sure to include your name, address and daytime phone number. @grmag @grmagazine @grmagazine Or follow us online at grmag.com or on social media:

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EDITOR TERRY JOHNSTON CONTRIBUTOR JOHNNY QUIRIN


School Age Summer Camp

Covering Grand Rapids Since 1964

www.grmag.com | info@grmag.com Publisher: John Balardo | Associate Publisher: Jason Hosko

We asked our staff: What's one book you couldn't put down? One of my older favorites is "The Road" by Cormac McCarthy. I read this years ago when it was recommended to me by a friend. It has stuck with me ever since and with what’s going on right now with coronavirus, it has popped into my head a few times. It’s not a story about a contagion, but it’s an end of the world/ life as we know it sort of story. KELLY SWEET

My favorite book is "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" by J.K. Rowling. I remember picking this book up when I was in ninth grade and not being able to put it down. To me, it really felt like a magical experience, enjoying the narrative and imagery that the author created for our imaginations throughout the entire series. MATTHEW CAPPO

"Little Fires Everywhere" by Celeste Ng. I loved that this novel was based in a Midwest suburb that was highly relatable. The author creates a perfect environment for character attachment and empathetic responses to their life struggles. ALEXIS MELLOS

Editorial Editor: Tim Gortsema Managing Editor: Charlsie Dewey Digital Editor: Tom Mitsos Editorial Intern: Robin Gould Contributors: Holly Bechiri, Ann Byle, Justin Dawes, Jamie deGraaf-Tulisiak, Sam Easter, Marie Havenga, Austin Langlois, Megan Sarnacki, Pasha Shipp, Julie Tabberer, Tricia van Zelst Design Creative Director: Lindsay Emeigh Associate Art Director: Keagan Coop Graphic Designer: Robin Vargo Contributors: Angela Ciccu, Stacy Feyer-Salo, Tom Froese, Teri Genovese, James Heimer, Jennifer Pickering, Johnny Quirin, Justin Razmus, David Sparks, Kelly Sweet

"The Island of Sea Women" by Lisa See is historical fiction about the haenyeo (female divers) on Jeju island in Korea. The story follows two women from their childhood in the 1930s to adulthood today. It is incredibly moving (definitely had me sobbing) and I love that it's rooted in research. JULIE TABBERER

Sales General Inquiries: Advertisingsales@grmag.com Advertising Director: Jenn Maksimowski Account Executives: Chelsea Carter, Jessica Laidlaw, Renee Looman, Craig R. Rich, Bri Rodriguez, Amanda Smiley Office Manager: Alisha Andres To Order Reprints: Receptionist – (616) 459-4545 Production Production Director: Jenine Rhoades Senior Production Artist: Robert Gorczyca Production Artist: Stephanie Daniel Advertising Coordinators: Robyn Bankston, Amanda Zwiren Advertising Designers: Melissa Flores-Loera, Christian Lott, Daniel Moen, Kendra Okamoto, Christopher Paluch, Marcus Thompson, Amanda Zwiren Web Digital Strategy Director: Nick Britsky Digital Operations Director: Gerald Blakeslee Web Project Lead: Matthew Cappo Web Project Assistants: Mariah Knott, Luanne Lim, Kevin Pell, Bart Woinski

Now Enrolling One of my favorite books is "Fight Club" by Chuck Palahniuk. Palahniuk is one of my favorite authors and I can read almost anything written by him. "Fight Club" was my first book of his that I read, and I have read it three or four times. It is one of the only book and movie combos where I cannot decide which is better than the other!

Marketing Marketing & Events Director: Mary Sutton Marketing & Events Manager: Andrea Straw Digital Marketing Coordinator: Asia Jones Marketing & Events Assistants: Lauren Krzisnik, Alexis Mellos Administration Director Of Business Operations: Kathie Gorecki Publishing Coordinator: Kristin Mingo Accounting Associates: Natasha Bajju, Andrew Kotzian, Katie West

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IT IT Director: Jeremy Leland Circulation Director Of Audience Development: Michelle VanArman Circulation Manager: Riley Meyers Circulation Customer Service: (866) 660-6247

School-Age Summer Camp (ages 6-10 years old)

My current obsession is "Stay Sexy and Don’t Get Murdered: The Definitive How-To Guide" by Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark. It’s a self-help book coupled with tales about their true crime obsession. I highly recommend, especially if you’re into true crime like me!

We have ideas that work.

KATIE WEST

Published By Gemini Media, LLC CEO: Stefan Wanczyk | President: John Balardo Grand Rapids Magazine (ISSN 1055-5145) is published monthly by Gemini Media. Publishing offices: 401 Hall St. SW, Suite 331 Grand Rapids, MI 49503-1444. Telephone (616) 459-4545; fax (616) 459-4800. General e-mail: grminfo@grmag.com. General editorial inquiries: editorial@grmag.com. Periodical postage paid at Grand Rapids, MI and at additional mailing offices. Copyright ©2019 by Gemini Media. All rights reserved. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Grand Rapids Magazine, 401 Hall St., SW, Suite 331, Grand Rapids, MI 49503-1444. Subscription rates: one year $24, two years $34, three years $44, in continental U.S.; Alaska, Hawaii, Canada and U.S. possessions, one year $35. Subscriptions are not retroactive; single issue and newsstand $4.95 (by mail $7.50); back issue $7 (by mail $9), when available. Advertising rates and specifications at grmag.com or by request. Grand Rapids Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited contributions.

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GR M AG .CO M

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OVERCOMING

ADVERSITY AND

LIVING YOUR TRUTH

graci@gracillc.com


people+places THE GUIDE TO YOUR CITY

Allie Gadziemski operates Dominion Sanctuary, a farm animal rescue.

ISSUES

Pig safe haven page 14

» P LUS: BL ACK BOOK EXCHANGE BOXES BRUNCH ENTERTAINMENT

P H OTO G R A P H BY C AS S I E P I E T R O N GR M AG .CO M

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Trevor Straub founded MI Drag Brunch. He also performs and does hair and makeup for Grand Rapids Civic Theatre productions.

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people + places / voice

VOICE

Bringing drag to daytime Trevor Straub founded MI Drag Brunch. BY CHARLSIE DEWEY

// PHOTOS BY TERI GENOVESE

On July 1, 2018, Trevor Straub brought something new to Grand Rapids: daytime drag shows. Straub is the CEO/show producer for MI Drag Brunch, an entertainment company that produces drag shows in Grand Rapids and Detroit. Straub said after regularly attending drag shows at Rumors nightclub he felt an “urgency” to bring the art form to a broader population through daytime entertainment. The shows have been going strong — often selling out — ever since. Can you share a little bit about yourself and your background? I started involving myself in the arts community at the age of 6. Throughout my childhood, I volunteered with local community theater group STAGE-M and continued my studies with the Big Rapids High School theater department. Throughout those years, I learned every aspect of “putting on a show,” from hanging stage lights, doing hair/makeup, directing and, of course, being a performer. After high school, I was accepted into the American Musical and Dramatic Academy and moved to Los Angeles to further my studies and become a professional artist. Drag Brunch really took off in GR and even expanded to Detroit. How does it feel to see such a positive reception? It is absolutely gratifying. Sometimes one faces difficulties not because you’re doing something wrong, but because you’re doing something right. I strongly believe in this as we continue to spread our awareness and push the “boundaries.” For someone who's never seen a drag show, what can you tell them about the experience? Drag Brunch is 100% unpredictable, that is the beauty and joy of it all. However, it is guaranteed to have you laughing, singing and dancing to the tunes,

enjoying some of Grand Rapids’ finest eateries, and making new friends along the way. You truly never know what is going to happen. What do you enjoy about drag performances? I love the dramatics. It is larger than life, and such a relief from the everyday that makes it so enjoyable. Have you ever done drag? I was actually put into drag by one of our Brunchette entertainers and performed for the very first time at our 1-year anniversary show! It was a great experience. I was able to walk the footsteps of my entertainers and gain an even stronger appreciation for what they do. Since beginning Drag Brunch, how has it changed/influenced you? I’ve been able to discover, study and appreciate an entire new art form that I’ve come to profoundly respect. Drag Brunch has provided me with so many new relationships within the community that I am eternally grateful for. Throughout my life I’ve always been taught to be bold, loud and let my artistic passion be my driving force. This lesson is something I will always continue to do.

Drag Brunch has provided me with so many new relationships within the community that I am eternally grateful for. Trevor Straub

Editor’s note: This interview has been edited and condensed for space and clarity. GR M AG .CO M

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people + places / issues

A few of the residents of Dominion Sanctuary enjoying a snack.

ISSUES

Providing peace for pigs — and chickens The Gadziemskis have turned their passion into a sanctuary. BY HOLLY BECHIRI

Just north of Grand Rapids on a 12-acre property live two adults, four kids, seven pigs and five chickens. Dominion Sanctuary, a haven for animals and humans alike, was created by Allie Gadziemski and her husband Jim. Just over three years ago, Allie Gadziemski found herself taking in an abandoned chicken — who ended up living in their home for three days — until she could be placed in a rescue. With the chicken gone from the living room, Gadziemski’s lifelong dream to take care of mistreated animals could not be put off any longer. She and her husband immediately started looking for a larger property where they could take in animals 14

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in need of sanctuary. They found it near Sparta, and on Mother's Day 2018, Big Carlos the pink pig, and his kids Moana and Mowgli, moved to Dominion Sanctuary. Since then, the sanctuary has officially become a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, and four more pigs and five chickens have joined them. Of course, it’s tempting to keep taking in more animals. But for now, Gadziemski and her family are careful not to grow too fast. That sustainable approach includes limiting their sanctuary opportunities to just pigs and chickens. Keeping their mission tightly focused helps them make sure they can take good care of each one

of the animals — and continue enjoying their work to provide a peaceful, loving environment for each creature. As more people grow increasingly concerned about the environment, health and animal rights, shelters and sanctuaries are becoming more common. Unlike shelters, sanctuaries are not rescuing animals to then send them out to new owners. Instead, when a sanctuary takes in a new resident, it’s usually for life. Sanctuaries often take in neglected, abused or abandoned animals of all kinds, with a mission to provide a humane home for life. Founded on vegan principles and working to help people “understand the PIGS COURTESY DOMINION SANCTUARY


Get involved Pigs & Kids Sat. May 23, Sun. May 31 Begins at 10 a.m. Yoga with Pigs Sundays at 4 p.m. June 7, July 12, Aug. 2, Sept. 13 *RSVP needed for all events Plan a group visit Small group visits can be arranged on an individual basis. Become a sponsor, volunteer or donor Help feed the animals and pitch in on special projects, in person or with your financial support. Visit dominionsanctuary.org for more information.

plight of 'farmed’ animals” and learn about plant-based living, Dominion Sanctuary is helping its West Michigan community to connect to a practice of empathy, embrace collective responsibility and increase sustainable choices in their everyday lives. It's also the only one in the Grand Rapids area that takes in pigs — Allie’s favorite animal since childhood. “I’ve been an empath my whole life, so I felt the sadness of what happens to farmed animals pretty heavily, even as a young child,” said Gadziemski. “I just knew in my heart that I was there to be a friend to animals, rather than a consumer of animals.” Now she and her family all work together to care for the residents. The sanctuary has grown with the help of volunteers providing over 2,000 hours of help in a year and dozens of donors helping pay for food and veterinary care. Together, they’ve created not just a safe place for animals, but a welcoming environment for visitors as well. Though they’re careful to explain that it's not a petting zoo or a hobby farm, by which they mean animals don’t have to perform for humans and are not exploited in any way, they do provide chances for donors and other visitors to come see and connect with the animals. They provide educational opportunities with events a couple times a month, like “Pigs & Kids” and “Yoga with Pigs,” as well as monthly tours. These unique events give people a chance to get to know the animals — and their personalities. "It’s a great way," said Gadziemski, "for people to see the animals as more than just food, but as individuals." Perhaps the best event, though, happens on Thanksgiving Day. Over 40 friends and donors join the Gadziemskis on the holiday to provide a feast for the animals — big platters of food are provided for the pigs

FARM EDUCATION COURTESY PAULINA M PHOTOGRAPHY CHICKEN COURTESY DOMINION SANCTUARY

and chickens. In 2019, one friend even made a cake for the pigs to enjoy. Only after the animals are treated to their feast do the humans go inside for their own plant-based potluck. It’s just one way that the Gadziemski family shows their love to their animals, and their appreciation to the donors and volunteers that make Dominion Sanctuary possible. Still in need of more donors and volunteers to help with the cost and work, husband Jim says Dominion has become an inspiration, and a labor of love, for his family and so many more. “Allie’s really the inspiration to the rest of us,” he said. “She has a very kind and loving heart to do this, and it makes us want to do it with her.” Her empath beginnings have turned into not just a family enjoying caring for animals together — but a growing community of support. Not to mention that Big Carlos and his friends have found peace.

Dominion Sanctuary provides educational experiences for kids (left) and adults.

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William Baer, MD Internal Medicine

Iain Charnley, MD

Ruggero Battan, MD

Anamaria Bondici, MD

David Booth, MD

Esmerelda Cadena, MD

Jamie Caughran, MD

Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism

Infectious Disease

Family Medicine

Pediatrics

Breast Surgery

Family Medicine

Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism

Emilie Collins, MD

Sandra Dettmann, MD

Roni Devlin, MD Infectious Disease

Ronald Duemler, MD Geriatric Medicine

Rick Edgar, MD

Nnaemeka Egwuatu, MD

Muhammad Farooq, MD

Kevin Foley, MD

Minerva Galang, MD

Christopher Glisson, DO

Christopher Goshgarian, MD

Joshua Greenberg, MD

Denise Gribbin, MD

Daniel Harro, MD

Jessica Hedeman, DO

Albert Ho, MD

Infectious Disease

Vascular Surgery

Neurology

Psychiatry

Emergency Medicine

Geriatric Medicine

Family Medicine

Infectious Disease

Neurology

Neuro-Ophthalmology

Sleep Medicine

Neurosurgery

Neurology

Bryan Hull, MD

Internal Medicine


Andrew Jameson, MD

Jessica Keto, MD

Nasir Khan, MD

Steve Klafeta, MD

Michelle Kosovec, MD

Jurgen Luders, MD

Gregory Miller, MD

Christopher Morgan, MD

John Morris, DO

James Passinault, MD

Eric Santos, MD

Bruce Shabahang, MD

Roger Shammas, MD

Ashley Therasse, MD

Steven Triesenberg, MD

Infectious Disease

Neurosurgery

Robert Riekse, MD

Breast Surgery

Cardiology

Geriatric Medicine

Hematology and Oncology

Herman Sullivan, MD

Melanie Taylor, MD

Neurology

Neurology

Internal Medicine

Sleep Medicine

Thoracic Surgery

Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism

Neurosurgery

Vascular Surgery

Cardiology

Internal Medicine

Vascular Surgery

Carey Krause, DO Psychiatry

Gregory Pellizzon, MD

Internal Medicine

Interventional Cardiology

Courtney Soubliere, DO

Mark Spoolstra, MD

Geron Turke, DO

James Twesten-O’Toole, MD

Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism

Obstetrics and Gynecology

Geriatric Medicine

Family Medicine


moments / events

Around town Enjoying city life

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50 Most Influential Women

WMCAT's iBall

The Grand Rapids Business Journal honored the city's "most influential women" in March. Keynote speaker Graci Harkema shared her personal story.

West Michigan Center for Arts+Technology honored community members and organizations that promote imagination, innovation and inspiration.

Pictured (left to right): 1 Graci Harkema 2 Khumbo Croft and Shaquanda Gordon 3 Mayor Rosalynn Bliss and Amy Ruis 4 Graci Harkema and Tasha Blackmon 5 Kiana Chrisholm and Mallary Malloy 6 Ashley Ward and Dawn Spaanstra 7 Andrea Straw, Alisha Andres, Graci Harkema, Justin Razmus, Rachel Watson and Charlsie Dewey

Pictured (left to right): 1 Ryan VerWys, Rachel VerWys and William Jackson 2 Kasondra Hershberger, Angela Cormier, Stephanie Newton, Tonya Spencer, Andrea Thurkettle and Megan Nguyen 3 Carlos Sanchez and Lynne Pope 4 Karen and Abby Krestakos 5 Mike Saunders, Jamon Alexander and Michael Williams 6 George Walker, Anthony Tuttle, Juan Garcia and Brandon Copeland

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INFLUENTIAL WOMEN JUSTIN RAZMUS WMCAT JOHNNY QUIRIN


You can find Black Book Exchange Boxes at multiple locations around town.

PROFILE

Celebrating Black literature The Black Book Exchange Box project encourages reading. BY PASHA SHIPP

// PHOTOS BY KELLY SWEET

You’ve probably seen them before — little wooden boxes, often resembling houses, mounted on posts in parks or neighborhoods. If you peer inside the little window, you’re sure to find an assortment of books. Cookbooks, fairy tales and paperback romance novels are just a few of the many literary odds and ends you’ll discover. One woman in Grand Rapids is making sure African American literature is on that list. GR M AG .CO M

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Aarie Wade, director of the Child Development Center at Baxter Community Center, launched the Black Book Exchange Box project in 2019 to celebrate Black authors and their stories. “I wanted a book house, and there was a book house around the corner from my house — I live in the Garfield Park neighborhood — and my daughters would visit it often,” Wade said. “Somebody donated a book house to the Baxter Community Center, and we were not really interested in having one of our own.” So, Wade happily adopted the book box. It was only when her brother was installing it in front of her house that she got an idea. “I decided that the books that go into my book house would represent people that look like me — represent our stories, Black authors and Black characters — so that when my daughters go to this book house, they don’t have to be let down because none of the books are interesting or represent them,” she said. “Our books matter, our language matters, our stories matter and it’s important that we are represented.” Soon, Wade’s book box wouldn’t be the only one representing African American stories. With a little help from the city, she was able to expand the project to include more neighborhoods. “This is a Grand Rapids Neighborhood Match Fund project, so it was funded through the city of Grand Rapids,” Wade said. “We apply for the grant through the city, and however much money they give you, you have to match it. Some of our donations came from the people who did the art and built the houses,” she continued. “We were also part of some fundraisers that gave us cash donations, and we had some volunteers come out and help sort books. There was a lot of support from the city with this project.” Wade enlisted a local artist to paint the boxes. Each one tells its own story through its colorful, unique design. “E’lla Luster Webber was the artist,” Wade said. “She asked what I wanted them to look like, and I said, ‘I want them to look Black, I want them to represent Black authors and be unapologetic,’ and that’s what she came up with.” The six Black Book Exchange Boxes can be found in Garfield Park, Eastown and Madison Square, and on Francis Avenue, Noble Street and Plymouth Avenue. While the boxes are intended to serve the 20

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Aarie Wade is passionate about sharing Black people's experiences through books.


people + places / p ofile

The Black Book Exchange Box project provides opportunities for people in the neighborhood to engage and explore through reading, and Wade is excited to be part of it.

Black Book Exchange Boxes are stocked with all types of literature, from books for kids to adults.

communities in which they’re located, folks from different neighborhoods are permitted to borrow books. “Anybody who pulls up to the book house and wants to get a book is welcome to do so,” Wade said. “You can return it to any of the other book houses. It doesn’t have to be that same house, but we just ask that you read, return and repeat.” The boxes are stocked with kid-friendly literature, but there are all kinds of books for adults, too. “We have biographies, novels, children’s books, poetry books — so many different types of genres and age groups and reading levels,” Wade said. “There’s a good book in there by Omise’eke Tinsley, called ‘Beyoncé in Formation.’ We have ‘The Hate U Give,’ ‘Bud not Buddy’ — that’s one of my favorites — and we also have some real oldschool Omar Tyree books.” The Black Book Exchange Box project provides opportunities for people in the neighborhood to engage and explore through reading, and Wade is excited to be

part of it. She always has been passionate about helping people in her community. “I grew up — all my life — blocks away from Baxter Community Center in the Baxter neighborhood,” she said. “I really am passionate about early childhood education. I’ve worked in early childhood education since I was a teenager. It’s really rewarding to come back to my neighborhood and work in the community that I grew up in and in a field that I love.” And since the project launched, Wade has noticed a change in that community. “One of the positives from the project has been a sense of pride that we have something out here in the community that represents us, and it’s done in excellence, and it is a very positive representation of Black people and their stories,” Wade said. “It’s also promoting literacy in the Black community that is so needed.” Wade hopes the Black Book Exchange Box project will continue to grow and even spread to other neighborhoods. “We have been awarded another city

of Grand Rapids grant to purchase more houses,” she said. “I’m hoping to do at least four more houses in the city.” She added, “I want to encourage my Latino community to get some book houses and get some Spanish books out there in the community. My children are bilingual and it’s hard to find Spanish books that they enjoy reading. It would be really cool if they do the same in their neighborhood.” Wade encourages people from different walks of life to explore the boxes. All are welcome. “We want people to know more about our culture and our people and what stories we have to tell — our experiences,” she said. “I don’t want people to think that this is a book house for Black people, but it is a space for our people to share our stories and share our culture. The book houses are for all people to use. Black people are dope, and we want to share that with the world. All cultures can come to these boxes and really learn something from the many stories that are there to be told.” GR M AG .CO M

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look+feel KEEPING YOUR MIND AND BODY HEALTHY

EXPERT

Declutter duo

page 31

Kate Wert and Susie Marsh founded Moxie Life Organizing to help people take control of their clutter.

» PLUS: FINDING A THER APIST BECOME A GRILL MASTER DIY HOME PROJEC TS P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E SY M I N DY P E T E R S O N GR M AG .CO M

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look + feel / wellness

WELLNESS

Finding a therapist Use these tips to find a therapist that works for you. BY MARIE HAVENGA

// ILLUSTRATION BY JAMES HEIMER

Looking for a therapist but not sure how to find the best fit? We talked with Mercy Health behavioral health specialists Rachel Lettinga, LMSW, CAADC, and Jacques Green, LMSW, CAADC, TPS, to get you in the know. What's the best way to search for a therapist? Ask your physician, family and friends for recommendations. Also, many private practice therapists have a Psychology Today or Good Therapist profile which allows you to search by insurance, gender, area of expertise, ZIP code, etc. “Call the practice and talk to the therapist if you can to get a feel for the office and therapist,” Green said. Pay attention to how you feel during the conversation. Are you comfortable? Nervous? Do they sound nervous? “Most therapists I know offer a short phone consultation prior to scheduling a first appointment,” Lettinga said. Are online reviews helpful? “These are not commonly used in the therapy world,” Lettinga said. “Typically, online reviews reflect the experiences of the most and least satisfied persons. Call a few therapists and speak to them to get a feel for their approach, rather than checking online reviews.” How important is insurance in choosing a therapist? “Therapy can be expensive,” Lettinga said. “Limit the search to in-network providers.” Many “experts” only accept cash-pay clients. “If you need an expert, ask if they will provide a 'super bill' that you can send to your insurance for reimbursement,” Lettinga said. “Many therapists offer a sliding scale for those who may not have insurance.”

What questions should you ask of the therapist before scheduling an appointment? According to Green: • Are they licensed? • What are their specialties? • Have they worked with people who have the issues that you do? • What is their training? You want to find someone who's gone through certified training in the specialties they have listed and not done an audit of a course or a couple-hour training. • Have they been through counseling before? • What insurances do they accept?

“Call the practice and talk to the therapist if you can to get a feel for the office and therapist.” Jacques Green

What questions should you ask of yourself? Do you want to be more patient with your kids? Kinder to your spouse? Want more self-confidence? “Many people come to therapy having identified what they want to experience LESS of but haven't started to think about what they want MORE of in life,” Lettinga said. “Ask yourself if you're ready for therapy. It can be a life-changing process, but also an intense process that some people may not be ready for.”

What should you expect during your first appointment? The initial therapy session is usually an assessment, according to Green. The therapist should ask you about your demographics and how you like to be identified and addressed, talk to you about the presenting problem, how long you've been dealing with that issue, symptoms, family background including where you're from, family history of mental health and substance use. The therapist will likely ask if you've had previous mental health treatment, including medications and therapy and if you've ever had suicidal thoughts. What are some tips on what to look/ listen for during the first appointment? “Do they really listen to you?” Lettinga said. “Are they distracted or appear to be disinterested? Are they non-judgmental? Do you feel comfortable talking with them openly?” Green said it's important that you feel comfortable. “Pay attention to how you feel/felt and if you felt comfortable opening up to them,” he said. “Are they communicating with you and talking to you in a way that makes sense?” How will you know if the therapist is a good fit? “I think this comes down to feeling comfortable talking with your therapist openly and their ability to effectively treat what is bringing you into treatment,” Lettinga said. “After a few sessions, you should have a good 'gut feeling' about whether this is the right therapist for you.'” What qualities would an “ideal” therapist have? “An ideal therapist will be the one who makes you feel comfortable and safe when you are talking, the person who has the training and specialties that fit your needs,” Green said. “An ideal therapist shouldn't just be convenient, they should be good. Don't just go to the therapist that comes up first in your insurance company's website because they are right around the corner from you. Do the research and find that therapist that is good at what they do, has checked all the boxes for you and answered the questions you have for them as well.” GR M AG .CO M

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look + feel / home

HOME

Get your home sell-ready Use these tips to get the best resale value. BY CHARLSIE DEWEY

Spring and summer are the busiest seasons for residential realtors in Michigan. Families are eager to take advantage of summer break to sell or buy a home and it’s the nicest time of year to show off your home to potential buyers. "While it is the busiest, spring and summer are also the most competitive times of year to sell,” said Walter Perschbacher, Greenridge Realty VP. “More listings mean more competition — so don't rule out the other seasons as a good time to make a move.” If you are looking to put your house on the market this season, Perschbacher said home improvement projects can be “an easy way to increase the listing price and the likelihood that a home will sell quickly." But, Perschbacher noted, your first priority before DIY upgrades should be cleaning, organizing and decluttering. Wallpaper removal and fresh paint are always strongly recommended as well. From there, improvements should be focused on your exterior and landscaping, to enhance curb appeal. Your next priority for upgrades and improvements should be in your kitchen and bathrooms. "While it's not likely that you'll receive a full return on the investment — you can recoup between 30-60% for a midrange update in your kitchen or bath,” Perschbacher said. Every year the National Association of REALTORS tracks these numbers. Its reporting shows that you will see an ROI of 38% on a minor kitchen upgrade and an ROI of 59% on a complete kitchen remodel. A bathroom renovation will have an ROI of 57%. “We also see some of the highest returns from adding or refinishing wood floors throughout your home,” Perschbacher said. 28

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“While it is the busiest, spring and summer are also the most competitive times of year to sell.” Walter Perschbacher

4 affordable DIY projects that make an impact Paint or replace your front door Curb appeal is vital for making a great first impression on potential buyers. Nothing makes a stronger first impression than your front door. If your front door is an outdated style, consider replacing it altogether. You don't have to be a master carpenter to swap an exterior door. There are many affordable options out there and most come pre-hung in weather-stripped frames. Painting your front door is another easy way to give your home a fresh look. This affordable update can be tackled in a day — but make sure you have a plan. Update hardware Replacing knobs and pulls in your kitchen and bathrooms is an easy way to modernize these rooms that are so important to buyers. Make sure to purchase modern styles that match your home décor and maintain some consistency from room to room — don't use aged bronze fixtures in your kitchen and stainless steel in the adjacent half bath. Re-caulk in your kitchen and bathrooms It may not be the most glamorous of DIY projects, but it really makes a difference in these rooms, which again, are so important for resale. Do your research and prep work, but don't be too intimidated — if you can pipe frosting on a birthday cake, you can caulk! Paint your unfinished basement Painting an unfinished basement's walls and floor in a neutral tan or gray makes the space look crisp and clean. What was once a dark, dingy area will feel welcoming and finished … it will smell better too! FRONT DOOR ISTOCK


look + feel / gea

GEAR

Grill 'em

Fire up the grill this summer with these great items. BY CHARLSIE DEWEY

Eureka Camping Grill, $189.95, Bill & Paul’s Sportshaus, billandpauls.com; Bitter Briques, $14.95, Spice Merchants, spicemerchants.biz; Bravado BBQ Sauce – Pineapple & Habanero, $11.99, Spice Merchants; Loose Peppers, Salts and Spices, prices vary, Spice Merchants; M Salt, $8.95, Mason Jones, masonjonesshops.com; White Ramekin, $18, Mason Jones; Feast From The Fire book, $21.95, Kennedy's Flowers & Gifts, kennedyfloral.com; Laguiole France Knives, $149, Mason Jones; Marble Cutting Board, $38, Mason Jones; Rack of Ribs, $30, Slows Bar BQ, slowsbarbq.com; Cherry Board with Glass Bowl, $150, Mason Jones; Marble Ramekins with Brass Spoons, $9.95 each Rebel, rebelgr.com; Slows BBQ Sauce – SC Mustard, $8.99, Slows Bar BQ; Bravado BBQ Sauce – Black Garlic, $14.99, Spice Merchants. BARBECUE ANGELA CICCU

// STYLED BY JENNIFER PICKERING

In Michigan, grilling out is a beloved pastime. While some hardcore grill masters grill year round, most of us are fair weather grillers. So indulge as much as you can this summer with these tools and flavorings. You can find them at retail stores around town. GR M AG .CO M

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look + feel / style Slouchy Suede Shoulder Bag, $58, Free People

STYLE

Happy hue

Leather Tassel Earrings,, $24.99, Adored Boutique

Brighten your wardrobe with this vibrant shade. WRITTEN AND STYLED BY JENNIFER PICKERING

Twig & Arrow Floral Knotted Headband, $8, Dry Goods USA

// PHOTOS BY ANGELA CICCU THML Dress, $74, Lennon & Willow

Yellow is a great spring color but saffron has a luminosity that’s fierce. It is universally chic. This brilliant shade of yellow-orange adds a daring touch to any outfit. Saffron is definitely one of the best spring color trends of 2020. Go head-to-toe in this hue for a courageous look. Or, if you want to be more subtle, choose a print featuring the color or add a pop of color with an accessory. Lane Tree Sweater, $49, Dear Prudence

Gabriela Hearst's Ready-to-wear Spring 2020 collection

TOMS Majorca Cutout Sandals, $89, Dry Goods USA

Fringe Earrings, $16, Dear Prudence Sage The Label Floral Crop Top, $54, Gina’s Boutique

Melie Bianco Anna Clutch, $46.25, Gina’s Boutique

Scarf, $24.99, Adored Boutique Necklace, $18, Lee & Birch

Sorel Kinetic Lite Lace Sneaker, $128, Lee & Birch

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Good American Good Waist Crop, $165, Evereve

Culver City Set, $98, Free People

RUNWAY COURTESY GABRIELA HEARST JEANS COURTESY EVEREVE HEADBAND, WHITE SANDALS COURTESY DRY GOODS USA SHOULDER BAG, CITY SET COURTESY FREE PEOPLE


look + feel / expe t Kate Wert and Susie Marsh are professional organizers who can help you overcome the clutter.

Get your kids involved

EXPERT

Spring cleaning Professional organizers share their tips for decluttering. BY CHARLSIE DEWEY

Spring is the perfect time to declutter your home, particularly a basement or garage that has become a dumping ground for items you just don’t know what to do with. Professional organizers Kate Wert and Susie Marsh, co-owners of Moxie Life Organizing, shared some tips to help you get organized without becoming overwhelmed by the process. The pair provide professional organizing services throughout Michigan, but particularly in West Michigan. Their services include interior decluttering and organizing, relocation services, spatial planning and aesthetic organizing, estate and project management, coaching and consulting, and more. Wert said the first step when starting any organizing project is to “manage your mindset.” “It’s always helpful to figure out a motivating force or household goal to keep you going when the project seems overwhelming,” she said. “For example, ‘getting the garage organized’ is a concrete goal but what’s going to be your driving force? Streamlining spaces and having less ‘stuff’ saves time and energy. Rather than viewing the task as a job to do, try thinking of it as an opportunity to spend more time at ORGANIZERS COURTESY MINDY PETERSON

“Season changes are a great time to sort through your clothing to see which ones you really love and represent your current self.” Kate Wert

the beach or playing outdoors with the kids, without the looming guilt or long to-do list.” Wert said you should also break the job up into small, achievable tasks. Maybe spend 30 minutes a day until a project is finished or dedicate three hours for several consecutive weekends until your goal is achieved. Also, take advantage of vertical space. “When putting items back into spaces, zone it out. The space between waist and shoulders is typically the target area for frequently used items. Use higher vertical spaces for lesser used items and lighter items that won't cause injury if they fall from that height. Use lower areas for cubes/shelving for storage of items and for kids to access easily.” Spring also is a great time to evaluate your winter wardrobe before you store it. “Season changes are a great time to sort through your clothing to see which ones you really love and represent your current self,” Wert said. “When working with clients, we like to go Marie Kondo on clothing, pulling items from the closet and storage spaces, grouping like clothing items together — it really helps gain perspective on how many similar items are owned and the overabundance of unused items.” Visit moxielifeorganizing.com.

Start good habits when they are young. Asking them to pick up their toys and putting them away when done with them helps them develop a sense of responsibility in the home and in the family unit. That goes for laundry, too. Show them how to fold laundry and how to put away clean clothes. Get visual! Using labels and pictures on drawers, in closets, pantry shelves, etc. will help them know where items go. And don’t be afraid to offer reinforcements. Our kids need regular reminders, but they will get there! Consider implementing an end of the day 15 minute clutter cleanup. The whole family participates. It will promote maintenance and help keep the clutter under control. Please never feel bad asking your kids to help! You are teaching them valuable skills that will carry on far into the future. Some day they will have roommates, spouses or partners — and they will thank you too!

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food+drink DIVE INTO THE CITY’S GREATEST EATERIES AND BARS Social House offers an upscale sports bar experience.

TABLE

American fare page 34

» PLUS: PRETTY BITTY BAR CO. DOG-FRIENDLY PATIOS SUMMER WINES

P H O T O G R A P H B Y S TA C Y F E Y E R - S A L O GR M AG .CO M

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Goat cheese fritters

TABLE

Social House

The new restaurant hopes to overcome the seemingly cursed location. BY AUSTIN LANGLOIS

// PHOTOS BY STACY FEYER-SALO

When I was growing up, there was a spot in my hometown that couldn't manage to keep tenants. It cycled through restaurants quickly — so you never really knew what was going to be there. It was a Chinese restaurant, then a Chinese buffet, then a Mexican spot, then a country cooking restaurant, and then I lost track. Now, it's an Indian food spot. But, from the outside looking in, we always wondered why restaurants couldn’t seem to make it there. 34

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food + drink / table

Bacon BBQ Burger (top); Social House has an industrial feel but plants and light woods give it a slight upscale vibe, as well (right).

Now that I'm older and I know more about the food industry, I can usually make pretty good assumptions about why restaurants fail: the menu is overpriced, the food is unapproachable, there wasn’t enough marketing, it didn't know its customer, the competition was fierce or the food was just bad. One or all may apply. Sometimes I think a restaurant can be a victim of the location's history; with so much turnover, perhaps new businesses fail to catch the attention of people who have lost track of what's there — and have forgotten about the location completely. I'm sure you know of a few places in Grand Rapids that fit that description, but for me, it's 25 Ottawa Ave., which sits directly across the street from the Van Andel Arena. You'd think with its proximity to the arena and downtown it would be prime real estate for a restaurant or bar, but it seems to be passed by for competitors off Ionia or closer to the city center. This location has seen many different concepts come and go. Most notably, it held the Margarita Grill, a rowdy college bar that closed in 2008. It was then flipped by Steve Brechting into 25 Kitchen and Bar, a bistro-style restaurant that played off its name, featuring a menu of 25 beers, cocktails and pizzas. After an unexpected closing, 25 Kitchen and Bar was followed by McKay's, a kindaFrench-restaurant-meets-sports-bar that closed after four months. Next, IRON at 25 Ottawa moved in following a building GR M AG .CO M

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food + drink / table

Bar area (left); hot chicken sandwich (above); Chicago deep dish pizza (below). Social House is a casual tavern with a menu that elevates the typical sports bar for the more sophisticated sports loving foodie.

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remodel and patio expansion (and a sizeable investment from Osteria Rossa owner Christopher Perkey) in 2016 and closed after two years. In August 2019, a new restaurant opened — Social House — described by owner Scott Esterline as “a tavern with a modern take on the new American fare.” Inside, it's a casual eatery meets sports bar. The bar lines the left side of the room facing four large TVs, and a scattering of high-tops and four-tops are arranged around the room. The open food windows peek into the kitchen from the dining room while the side doors open onto the restaurant’s outdoor patio. The restaurant has more of a bar, industrial feel (even with the plants hanging from the ceiling) than its menu suggests. The menu features the expected sports bar nosh (like burgers, wings and pizza) to the decidedly not sports bar food (like goat cheese fritters with apple chutney or a fried chickpea and wilted spinach power bowl). I found the food to be tasty and the portion sizes fair compared to price. And, with its proximity to Van Andel Arena, it's easy to see this spot becoming a go-to for a drink and a bite to eat before or after a Griffins hockey game, concert or other visiting event. And that is the goal. “With so many new upscale food venues going in, we wanted to cater to the crowd that wanted great food and drinks at a reasonable price,” said Esterline. The restaurant offers many weekly specials to drive traffic. Another unique benefit: for people who rideshare downtown for games or events, if you take an Uber or Lyft to the restaurant and spend more than $50 on food or drinks, Social House will give you $10 off your bill to help pay for your ride. A nice perk to encourage patrons not to drink and drive. Esterline said there are plans to renovate the restaurant to take advantage of its location. “We have one of the best patios in the city,” he said. “We're working on getting a retractable roof so we can have our patio open year-round. We are also looking into putting garage doors on the front for an open concept restaurant.” The biggest question is whether this restaurant, with its extensive events schedule and space update, can create a successful (and memorable) niche that caters to the Arena District and keeps patrons coming back.


Social House offers specials throughout the week to keep customers coming through the door: • Tuesdays: $1 tacos and $4 margaritas • Wednesdays: Family Feud night • Thursdays: Thirsty Thursdays (live music and half-off drinks) • Fridays and Saturdays: Live DJ and dancing • Sundays: 10 a.m. brunch with a DJ and "the biggest bloody mary, mimosa and white Russian bar in West Michigan"

On Tuesdays, score $1 tacos and $4 margaritas.

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food + drink / c eate

CREATE

Mild giardiniera Elevate your condiments with this recipe. BY CHARLSIE DEWEY

// PHOTO BY STACY FEYER-SALO

Don’t limit your condiment game to ketchup and mustard this Memorial Day. Two Scotts Barbecue owner and chef Scott Luecht shared his recipe for giardiniera (pronounced jar-din-era), an Italian condiment of pickled vegetables in a flavorful oil that will elevate your meal. Luecht said giardiniera is a great addition to sandwiches, pastas, roasted meats and sausages. Ingredients 1 cup carrots, small dice 1 cup cauliflower, small dice ½ cup celery, small dice ½ cup red bell pepper, small dice 1 jalapeno, small dice (add more if you like it HOT!) 1 garlic clove, small dice 2 tablespoons kosher salt ½ cup canola oil ½ cup white vinegar 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon Aleppo pepper or crushed red pepper flakes

Preparation: Mix vegetables and salt thoroughly in a non-reactive container (glass, plastic or ceramic). Let mixture sit at least 24 hours in the fridge, stirring at least once. The next day, rinse the vegetables and drain well in a colander. With a whisk — or in a blender — emulsify the oil and vinegar, then add oregano and Aleppo peppers. Pour over vegetable mixture and let sit for another 24 hours. Keep in an airtight container in your fridge for up to two weeks.

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PHOTO CONTENT PHOTO CREDIT


Alex Sepkus Trunk Show May 13-14

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www.wmyachtsales.com

Please join us for two days of beautifully handcrafted fine jewelry by New York designer Alex Sepkus. Contact us or check social for details. 978 Cherry St SE, GR MI 616-459-5075 shop@metalartstudioinc.com


food + drink / chee s

CHEERS

Bar on the go

Rent this 1950s camper for your next party. BY JAMIE DEGRAAF-TULISIAK

Looking for a practical way to add a dash of whimsy to your next event? Check out Pretty Bitty Bar Co., the cutest little 1950s camper turned mobile bar. The perfect bar rental solution for everything from weddings and graduation parties to corporate events and kids’ birthdays, Pretty Bitty Bar Co.’s offerings are completely customizable. Choose your own adventure from the theme to the menu, name your location, and you’ve got a memorable (and Instagram-worthy) party attraction. Owner Ali Bumstead has been in the service industry for over 20 years, so she knows a thing or two about serving up a quality experience, and with a background in design, she has a flair for the creative. When she first set her eyes on the vintage Dalton camper (at that time parked at Outside Coffee Co. off Wealthy Street) she knew she had to have it. After over a year of jokingly referring to it as “hers,” the coffee shop replaced the camper with a food truck. Bumstead made an offer and became the proud owner of the charming ’50s-inspired trailer. The next two years became a process of renovating and falling in love. As a creative who gets bored and likes to be on the move, designing a space that can go wherever the wind blows is the perfect venture for Bumstead. “It’s exciting to do something you love,” she said, “and also to be able to take it to a new location.” Since having the camper up and running for business last November, Pretty Bitty Bar Co. has bopped around to the Eastown Holiday Shop Hop and Grand Haven Jingle Bell Parade as a hot chocolate and cider bar, as well as a bar service for office and family Christmas parties. As she prepares for warm weather this summer, Bumstead looks forward to the bridal showers and weddings that the sunshine will bring, allowing her to travel throughout Michigan and be a tourist in her own state. Even more so, she looks forward to inventing new uses for the camper and making clients’ visions a reality — anything from building the space out for a photoshoot, to turning it into a pop-up art gallery with a wine bar, to converting it into a candy bar for a kid’s birthday party. Your event is Bumstead’s next passion project. Follow the camper on Instagram: @prettybittybarco 40

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Ali Bumstead fell in love with the 1950s camper and has since turned it into a mobile business venture.

The perfect bar rental solution for everything from weddings and graduation parties to corporate events and kids’ birthdays, Pretty Bitty Bar Co.’s offerings are completely customizable.

BAR COURTESY PRETTY BITTY BAR CO.


food + drink / top five

TOP 5

Summer wines Amy Ruis shares her top summer wines. BY CHARLSIE DEWEY

It’s the start of patio season and whether you are enjoying an afternoon soaking up the sun, grilling with friends or stargazing around a bonfire, Aperitivo and Art of the Table’s Amy Ruis has the perfect wine pairings for any summer activity. Villa Wolf Pinot Noir Rosé ($15) is the perfect rosé for early summer drinks. “One of our favorite rosé selections, it’s from Germany, it’s dry, crisp, lighter in body and swig-able but still elegant enough for having with any dinner on the patio — from salad to pasta to grilled delicacies,” Ruis said.

Point Ormond Nebbiolo ($16) pairs well with grilled items and is worth having on hand this summer. “Nebbiolo? The classic Italian grape? From Australia, you say? Why yes, due to cooler, higher altitude vineyards this wine gives enough structure and elegance and medium bold red fruits, but in a way that is versatile when grilling anything from veggies to chicken to steak.” Getrank Gruner Veltliner ($16 for a 1 liter bottle) will add to your summer brunch. “Gruner Veltliner, an Austrian grape that’s hard to pronounce

DRINKING ISTOCK DOG ISTOCK ILLUSTRATION RACHEL IDZERDA

but easy to drink,” Ruis said. “Its tongue tingling bright acidity with its lemon and nectarine notes and a nutty undertone make it perfect for drinking with a bunch of different breakfast to lunch foods. It also rings in at only 12.5% alcohol, so it’s a lower ABV, making it a great sipper for the day — that first spring Sunday is all we need.” Casa Silva Carmenere ($17.50) is the drink you’ll want to sip around the cottage bonfire. “I am frequently asked for Cabernet Sauvignon, a big, warm, cozy red wine, for summer outdoor activities like grilling

and ghost story telling around the bonfire,” Ruis said. “This is my amazing doppelgänger to Cab. It’s a Chilean grape called Carmenere that displays spicy, big red fruit, is a little growly but drinks really well on its own after dinner.” Northstar Galaxy Peach Seltzer ($2.25/ can) is a go-to option for the non-wine drinker this summer. “The best seltzer I’ve found to date, this peach gem is from Connecticut Brewing Co. and is only slightly sweet with a beautiful effervescence for sipping as you float down the Grand River on a sunny summer’s day,” Ruis said.

editor's pick It’s officially patio season, and one of my favorite places in the city to enjoy al fresco dining is Harmony Brewing in Eastown — and it’s not just for the pizza and beer. Harmony Brewing is one of only a few restaurants in town that offer a dog-friendly patio. I don’t have a dog of my own, but I love being able to meet up with my friends and their pooches during the warm months of the year. I also enjoy getting to meet strangers and their happy pups dining nearby. Dog-friendly patios hopefully will grow this summer as the Kent County Health Department approved its first variance last summer allowing for the first dog-friendly patio downtown — that recipient was One Trick Pony. Restaurants must be permitted through the health department to allow dogs to enjoy a sunny afternoon alongside their owners.

CHARLSIE DEWEY MANAGING EDITOR, GRAND RAPIDS MAGAZINE

GR M AG .CO M

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Workouts in the sun

There are plenty of opportunities to get fit outdoors this summer . By Robin Gould Illustrations by Michael Crampton

GR M AG .CO M

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Grab a paddle

GR Paddling helps you sunshine. enjoy the sunshine

Looking to rent equipment ? These places will outfit you for your summer excursion.

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From May through October, Kent District Library offers free bike rentals. The KDL Cruisers are Breezer Uptown EX 8-speed bicycles that come with a basket, lock and key. They are available for checkout at various library branch locations, such as Comstock Park, East Grand Rapids and Wyoming. Visit BikeKDL for more information and a full list of bike locations. At the DeVos Family Boathouse at Millennium Park, you can rent paddle boards. Season pass holders receive $2 off, while non-members pay $10 for the first hour and $8 per additional hour. Lifejackets are offered free of charge. With over 4 miles of shoreline to explore, this Grand Rapids beach is perfect for exploration in the summer months. Grand Rapids Bike Rentals is located at Embassy Suites Hotel, 710 Monroe Ave. NW. It is a small business that rents out five bikes at a time. The daily rate is $22 per bike. This is a great way to take a fun trip around the area on the trails through downtown and along the river. Book a bike at grbikerentals.com.

Kayaking and canoeing are popular activities to do with family and friends. With many lakes and rivers streaming through our backyards, summer rentals are a must. Jeff Neumann, a retired GRCC professor, knew exactly what Grand Rapids needed when he opened his business GR Paddling for the first time eight summers ago. Neumann and his wife Rita created the paddling experience because of their love and appreciation for the water that surrounds the city. Opening its doors for another season, this family-owned business strives to make renting canoes and kayaks more than a professional experience. The family tries to make paddling as personable and stress-free as possible. “We don’t just drop our paddlers off at the river or lake and drive away,” Neumann said. “We instead provide any necessary basic paddling instruction, check in when possible, take photos, provide all required amenities and are waiting for our paddlers when they arrive at their destination.” GR Paddlers also offers optional complimentary transportation to and from the river, saving visitors to the GR area an Uber ride. Another unique service is the business’s various paddling experiences, including: Paddle and Dine, Paddle and Picnic, and Sunset/Moonlight paddles. A fan favorite is the Paddle and Picnic option, which is an all-day paddling trip that includes Panera Bread lunch boxes and snacks for a riverside picnic. Look out for its most popular paddle rates on Reeds Lake and the Grand River, traveling downstream from Ionia to Ottawa County. Being a family-owned business, Neumann cares about the importance of family trips in nature. “Kayaking and canoeing are fantastic family activities and we’ve been fortunate to provide paddling experience for several multi-generational family groups,” he said. The minimum age GR Paddling is equipped and insured for is 12-years-old. This summer take advantage of this full-service paddling experience and head to grpaddling.com to sign your family up any time between May 1 and Oct. 31. Rates vary depending on group size. Happy Paddling!


Life Addicts wants to get you outside

Plan your summer workouts with these tips. Travis and Whitney Washington started their fitness business Life Addicts Studio in 2014. For them, the venture is about more than just working out; rather, it is about creating better life habits for a healthier lifestyle. Their summer fitness classes will include biking around the city and many outdoor workout sessions. The pair answered some questions and shared some tips on how you can create your own outdoor workout. Where are the best parks for outdoor workouts and why? Travis Washington: Truthfully, every park is unique in its own way. How one person uses a bench, a jungle gym or an open field could be completely different than how another person uses that same space, so to pick just one is hard. When it all boils down to doing workouts outdoors, just make sure you inspect the area for glass, hazardous debris or loose playground equipment before you begin, to ensure your own safety. Also, be mindful of your surroundings, especially if you choose to work out in the evenings — and inviting a friend to tag along is even better! What type of equipment do you recommend? Whitney Washington: For home workouts or even workouts in an open space at the gym, what people don’t talk about frequently is how great of a workout you can get simply using resistance bands and loop bands. They help with flexibility, strength, muscle toning and functional training. These items can fit in your gym bag, backpack or luggage, and come in a variety of resistance levels to customize your workout. What types of workouts would you suggest? Travis: The first step we suggest is for people to just get up and move consistently for a minimum of 30-minutes per day. In general, we’ve become so into our phones and electronic devices that we’re always unnaturally looking down and sedentary for hours. Getting up and simply moving our bodies consistently would make a real difference for so many. How can people add their kids to their workout? Whitney: Having your children see you work out is a great way to encourage them to be active as well. Including toddlers/younger children on your cardio days where you include body weight and cardio-centered exercises like jumping jacks, inchworms, push-ups, sit-ups, running and some mild plyometric movements

to get them jumping around as well (if there are no joint issues) can be fun for you both. You can even incorporate your stroller for smaller children or simply wear your baby (securely, of course, in the appropriate carriers) and do mild, low-impact movements (taking a walk, a light jog with the stroller) etc. How can I dress appropriately for the weather? Travis: When it comes down to dressing appropriately for warmer weather choose loose, breathable, light-colored, sweatwicking clothing. Stay away from cotton, wool or dark, heavy clothes that warm up your body. How can I beat the heat from working out outside? Whitney: Beating the heat can be as simple as working out earlier in the day or later in the evening, making space to do some workouts at home, finding a fitness studio with an indoor facility, going to the gym or choosing to go swimming at a pool/lake for that day’s workout. Regardless of the option you choose, be sure to keep hydrated, especially if your preference is still outdoors. What are some outdoor workout essentials? Travis: Make sure you have a gym bag with water bottle(s), towel (or cooling towel), change of clothes, resistance bands/loop bands, sunscreen and sunglasses. Our main tip is to listen to your body and make sure you don’t overexert yourself, especially when it’s hot outside. Also, before you start working out outdoors, again be sure to examine the area for anything that could hinder your workout (i.e., broken glass, broken equipment, sharp items, etc.) Does Life Addicts Studio have outdoor fitness classes in the summer? Whitney: Yes, we try to utilize the outdoors as much as the weather allows. We

offer bootcamps (personal training in a group setting), weightlifting, functional training and fitness challenges year-round, including the spring and summer months. Is it beneficial to have a workout buddy? Travis: Absolutely! One of four foundation practices we teach our LAS community is to engage their community and environment. We’ve heard from our clients time and again how having others on the same path toward better health, fitness and wellness has been a tremendous support as they strive to reach their goals. Working out can seem like another obligatory thing you have to check off “that one list” you really don’t want to look at ... but when you have others you can count on to just be present, it helps you not feel alone ... and not feel like you’re the only one in the world that needs to work on some things.

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Adult recess

Gather your friends for a night of sports and socializing.

Summer races abound

Run, bike or swim your way through summer . The Color Run once again will be making an appearance this summer in downtown Grand Rapids. It is known nationally as “the happiest 5K on the planet.” Runners wear white and at each mile get doused in colored powdered. At the end, continue the party with the Finish Festival. June 14 is the 10th annual Grand Rapids Triathlon, Michigan’s largest independent triathlon. From novice to seasoned, all skill levels can enter. This scenic riverside course is perfect for a variety of different lengths of swimming, biking and running. MSU Gran Fondo (Italian for "Big Ride") is a long-distance, mass participation event geared toward cyclists of all abilities. Be at the starting line on June 27 to join the fight against skin cancer. This event also recommends raising at least $50 in donations and has many impressive incentives.

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Do you ever wish you still had recess? Sitting at work for hours, email after email, it’s easy to catch yourself dreaming of a place where you can meet friends and play sports. Fortunately, at Grand Rapids Sport and Social Club (GRSSC), you can do both. From traditional sports such as flag football and softball to the unconventional like kickball and bar Olympics, this club practically invented “adult recess.” Chris Wessely started GRSSC in 2008. Wessely knew that many cities offered adult rec leagues and he wanted to start one on his own. He had a dream to make a “friend factory disguised as a sports club” right here in Grand Rapids. “The formula is quite simple: after every game, we all go back to the same bar and socialize over pre-negotiated food and drink specials,” Wessely explained. “And that's where the magic really happens. I didn't want to just sell sports, I wanted to sell experiences.” The club is coed and focuses mainly on the social side, but it does offer competitive leagues, too. This club welcomes all adults, young professionals and the young at heart. Many single individuals new to the city join to meet friends. When asked about the social aspect, Wessely said, “It’s also a great date night and we've seen a number of couples that play, but the majority of our players are single. I’ve seen multiple marriages come out of this club as well as lifelong friendships. Many have said that the friendships they've made through the club are stronger bonds compared to their college experience. That's just awesome.” Aside from the social aspects, adult recreation promotes a healthy lifestyle. Many companies in Grand Rapids have GRSSC listed on their wellness program and some register for leagues for team-building workshops. The club also is a huge supporter of mental health awareness. “We've had players thank us, saying that our club allows them to engage with others, aiding in their fight with depression. One went as far as saying it saved their life!” Wessely said. “That was really powerful to hear.” As Grand Rapids continues to grow, so does the club. According to Wessely, in the last year, there has been a 15-20% growth in player numbers. “We continue to sign on more venues/locations,” he added. “In fact, new this year, we teamed up with Studio Park downtown for a summer Tuesday night league, playing on the turf of their piazza.” You can register on the GRSSC website for a league as a free agent, full team or small group. Small groups are for friends who want to stick together, but do not have enough players to fill a team yet. Free agents are individuals signing up to participate and get added or choose their team through the website. Players also can unlock fun badges and awards based on how long they've been playing, how many leagues they've played in and by referring a friend or two to the club. Sign up today and #KeepPlaying.


Summer burn 4 opportunities for summer fitness.

KROC Center, 2500 South Division Ave., is the perfect place for outdoor activities. It offers outdoor yoga classes and many other fitness classes in the summer. The outdoor campus is open to the public and day camps are offered for families to enjoy the outdoors — including a giant slip ’n’ slide. Root Down in Muskegon describes itself as “an original yoga studio and juice bar, providing fitness and nutrition in one location.” This groovy yoga studio, 333 West Western Ave., hosts Yoga on the Ship every Sunday on the USS LST ship at the Mart Dock. Sessions are donation based.

At Beer City Barre, 820 Monroe Ave. NW, experience the unique barre workout. According to its website, “barre is a total body workout that incorporates elements of yoga, Pilates and dance into a fast-paced, 60-minute class set to upbeat music.” Now, imagine that on a rooftop. During the summer, Beer City Barre occasionally holds classes on its rooftop. New client rates include $20 for the first class with the next class free. If you love to run with friends, then Wednesday Nights Hills and Stairs running club is for you. This club meets at Founders Brewing Co. and runs the hills and stairs every Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m. during any weather. Check out its Facebook page.

Congratulations to West Michigan Dermatology’s Top Docs Your home for compassionate service and exceptional care. The partners of West Michigan Dermatology lead this charge: Gina C. Ang, M.D., Bridget A. Green, M.D., J. Gabriel Vasquez, M.D., and Douglas A. Winstanley, D.O. Our practice appreciates all of our ten providers across 3 locations who provide remarkable dermatology care. Serving our community for over 35 years, West Michigan Dermatology offers advanced diagnostic and treatment options for skin cancer, including the highly regarded Mohs micrographic surgery. Also, West Michigan Dermatology provides many effective treatments for conditions like acne, eczema, and psoriasis, as well as treatments for other skin, hair, and nail conditions.

Grandville

Pictured left to right: Douglas A. Winstanley, D.O., J. Gabriel Vasquez, M.D., Gina C. Ang, M.D., Bridget A. Green, M.D.

616-257-3344

Grand Rapids 616-942-9343

Holland

616-395-9379

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Harnessing the power of

technology GR doctors are utilizing cutting edge technology to diagnose, treat and innovate. photography by david sparks

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PHOTO CONTENT PHOTO CREDIT

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A closer look at heart defects

3D printing is changing congenital heart disease. By Megan Sarnacki EVERY YEAR, approximately 40,000 babies are born with a congenital heart defect in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Because children born with heart defects require ongoing monitoring and treatments, here in West Michigan, the Congenital Heart Center at Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital aims to establish a seamless transition of care for each patient from birth to adulthood. As co-directors for the Congenital Heart Center, Dr. Joseph Vettukattil and Dr. Marcus Haw say to improve these young patients’ lives it is necessary for hospitals to stay at the forefront of new technology. With recent additions to the Congenital Heart Center’s technological services, such as threedimensional printing and virtual reality, Vettukattil and Haw have the chance to gain a greater detailed comprehension of each patient’s unique, complex heart defect. “There are around 360 different diagnoses for congenital heart disease and there are about 360 different procedures that can be performed,” Haw said. “Within each diagnosis, there’s a spectrum and sometimes there can be multiple diagnoses in one patient, so there’s an infinite number of variations that can actually happen inside the heart. Even after 25 years, there are times where we haven’t seen these 50

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particular arrangements before. To actually print the heart out or have it polished holographically makes a critical impact on our performance.” When the heart can be viewed through a 3D lens or model, doctors, such as Vettukattil and Haw, can see the structure of the heart without having to open the patient’s actual heart. Not only does this enable them to frame any part of the patient’s heart and dissect the problem virtually or through a model, but 3D printing also allows doctors to practice procedures as well as train the next generation of surgeons. “It’s like a pilot flying in a simulation plane,” Haw said. “It allows us to take surgeons who are in practice and actually watch how they’re doing with these complicated surgeries that we do in congenital heart surgery.” It is not just the doctors who can learn from this new technology, either. Threedimensional visualization and prototypes also provide patients and their families with a comprehensive understanding of the problem and the plan of action. “It has a huge impact on how we deliver health care in Michigan now,” Vettukattil said. “In the past, you would need a highlytrained person to sit in front of a computer during a CT or MRI scan and try to find out what’s wrong. With 3D visualization, there is a new era of understanding medicine and simplifying complex conditions to people because once we can point out the issue, we can sit down with the patient and show them the whole scenario and how we will fix it. It demystifies the complexity of our conditions by just adding the visualization of things.” What it means the most to Vettukattil and Haw, though, is the fact that this technology is providing them with tools to help the families who have nowhere else to go. “It is so rewarding for us because these are real people who were told there is nothing more that can be done,” Vettukattil said. “There have been nine such cases where other centers or major units in the county have told families there is nothing that can be done, but with the innovation of new devices, we can now look them in their eyes and give them what they need.”

Dr. Joseph Vettukatti holds a 3D printed heart model (left); close up of a 3D printed heart (above); Dr. Marcus Haw (right) with a 3D printed heart.

While Vettukattil and Haw assure that future technological advancements will be even more unbelievable in terms of benefits, Haw states the effect in West Michigan already offers positive signs. “We’ve looked at a study out of Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and, sadly, congenital heart disease remains one of the major killers in early childhood and infancy,” Haw said. “Since we’ve instituted a comprehensive program here in Grand Rapids, though, the mortality (rate) in Muskegon, Ottawa and Kent counties has fallen from 11% at the age of two to 5%. We want to make sure everybody who has a problem with congenital heart disease can benefit from the highest quality of care closer to home.”


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Elevating stroke recovery New technology can mean the difference between walking or not. By Ann Byle BETTE ALEXANDER spent 18 days at Mary Free Bed Hospital and Rehabilitation Center after suffering a stroke and spending several days in the general hospital. She entered able to do very little; she left walking and talking. “I couldn’t do anything,” said Alexander, 74. “But by the time I left, I could talk and get around and move. That makes me feel wonderful.” She did hours of physical therapy, occupational and speech therapy daily, and recreational therapy twice a week. She played Jenga, swam, met with a therapy dog and played video games. The video games, however, were part of the technology so vital in returning stroke and traumatic brain injury patients back to at least partial functionality and often close to full recovery. The key to stroke recovery is repetition, according to Dr. Benjamin Bruinsma, stroke program medical director for Mary Free Bed. “Repetition enhances neuroplasticity,

and that repetition can be achieved through technology,” he said. Names such as the Hocoma ArmeoSpring, ZeroG Gait and Balance System, Bionik InMotion ARM Robot, and AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill belie the importance of these technologies for recovering use of arms and legs. Hocoma ArmeoSpring offers motor therapy to improve grasp and release. The Bionik InMotion ARM helps with delivering high repetition motor therapy to help patients regain motor function. According to Ken Smith, occupational therapy team leader for stroke victims, a machine can provide 600-700 reps compared to 200-300 reps that a therapist can do per session. The machine also provides immediate feedback that tracks every move, strength of movement, and range. That’s what Bette Alexander was doing when she popped balloons on the Hocoma ArmeoSpring screen: repetitive arm movements that retrained her muscles and brain. The brain, according to Bruinsma, will learn new pathways around the dead area caused by a stroke, and those new pathways are achieved through repetition made easier and more productive through technology. “There is much improvement in treatment because now people with less motor function have machines to help them improve neuroplasticity,” said Bruinsma. The ZeroG Gait and Balance System allows patients to begin practicing and re-learning to walk. The system offers body weight support and fall protection in a harness system connected to a track in the ceiling. Therapists can assist the patient’s legs on the treadmill as they are supported on the track; improving patients can move their legs on their own, increase intensity or learn from trial and error. Several ZeroGs exist in therapy gyms at MFB, and one track runs down a long hallway for patients who are beginning to walk on their own. Mary Free Bed offers a variety of tech therapies. Bionik InMotion ARM Robot offers motor therapy to teach graspand-release movements; the AlterG Pro Anti-Gravity Treadmill uses air pressure technology to reduce a user’s bodyweight so rehabbing, particularly for knee injuries, can start sooner. The LokomatPro provides gait therapy for brain and spinal cord injury patients. There’s also a mechanized golf cart to help those with spinal cord injuries stand

Patient Bette Alexander works with a therapist at Mary Free Bed to regain her abillity to walk.

and take a swing. A remodeled car, donated by community members including The Daniel and Pamella DeVos Foundation, sits in a sun-lit seating area. It’s surprising how many muscles it takes to get in and out of a car. Now patients can relearn these seemingly simple tasks in an actual vehicle retrofitted with technology to assist them. Mary Free Bed therapists still use old-school tech, too, of course. Walkers, crutches, gait belts, hand weights and exercise balls occupy space next to high-tech machines that take stroke, traumatic brain injury and amputation recovery to onceunheard-of levels. Patients still must do their exercises, said Bruinsma, and it’s still important to get patients to rehab as soon as possible to reap long-term benefits. But he sees no downside to high-tech rehab other than the cost of the machines, which can run $150,000 to $200,000 each and require training and occasional software updates. “It’s about better outcomes for patients,” he said. “When functional outcomes


improve, there are less outpatient therapies needed later, and less burden on the family or other caregivers. And the patient may be able to go home instead of to long-term care.” Bruinsma sees even more tech possibilities in the future. Mary Free Bed is looking at the possibility of a study on virtual rehab, where patients put on goggles and do rehab the same way gamers play virtual games. For now, Bette Alexander’s goal is to get back home to her 40 acres. “The technology was perfect for me and helped me get stronger. It got me out of the wheelchair and walking again,” she said.

Bette Alexander uses one of several therapy tools (above) to regain her independence after a stroke. The recreational therapy lab (left) at Mary Free Bed.

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Peering into proteins Cryo-electron microscopy is changing medical research. By Sam Easter JUAN DU and her husband Wei Lu are two of the pioneers at Grand Rapids’ Van Andel Institute, peering into the tiniest recesses of molecular structure — in search of both better medicines and a better understanding of precisely how the body works. The duo have been at Van Andel Institute since late 2017, by way of Germany and later western Oregon. Their research in Michigan focuses on fine, molecular processes within the body; like Lu’s work on taste, the processes behind which might reveal better medicines for certain kinds of diabetes or metabolic disorders. "Drugs that we're using, taking now, they're binding to certain proteins, right? If you know how the drugs bind to the protein, it'll help people design drugs that have higher potency, higher efficacy and are more specific to that kind of protein," Du said. "That's why understanding those protein structures at the molecular level and how they bind to drugs is so important." Du’s research in particular focuses on temperature-sensitive proteins. Understanding exactly — in fine, molecular detail — how the body’s temperature sensations work can mean better, more chemically precise treatments for ailments like fevers, and even more serious maladies, too. Perhaps one of the biggest advances in Du and Lu’s field is the development of new techniques to see those proteins. Called 54

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cryo-electron microscopy — or cryo-EM, for short — it’s giving scientists a more powerful magnifying glass to stare into the tiniest corners of the natural world. The advance comes over earlier x-ray crystallography techniques that were unable to render images of certain complex protein molecules; what cryo-EM does is freeze those molecules instead, take thousands of pictures, and render a three-dimensional image of the results. The new technique has been so powerful, in fact, that the developers won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. A report from Nature points out that a database tracking molecular shapes discovered with the method reached 10,000 entries in February, and appears on pace to surpass the older, crystallographic method by the mid-2020s. Du refers to it as the “so-called ‘resolution revolution.’” But there are still some hang-ups. Van Andel Institute’s researchers are remarkably lucky to have access to cryo-EM technology, which Du said is only present in two places in Michigan — Grand Rapids and at the University of Michigan. The cost of the technology ranges well into the millions, and according to Science Magazine, it can be remarkably difficult to access, with even the most privileged of researchers often forced to wait for time on a relative gem of a machine. “The wait (to use cryo-EM) can be from three months to infinity,” Bridget Carragher, a co-director of New York City’s Simons Electron Microscopy Center, told Science. “It’s becoming the haves and the have-nots.”

Juan Du and Wei Lu are using cryoelectron microscopy to research fine, molecular processes within the body.

Efforts are underway to build a more affordable technology, but plenty of scientists are still tapping their feet. Not so at Van Andel Institute, which lists its own pantheon of discoveries made via cryo-EM on its website, including a remarkable one from both Du and Lu — co-senior authors on a study that lays out the structure of a temperatureregulating protein. “You can test different drugs to see where those drugs bind to your protein, without creating or producing any crystal,” she said. “(CryoEM is) a big deal.”



Robots in the operating room Robots are allowing

rural patients to receive care more easily. By Megan Sarnacki

DESPITE THE CINEMATIC depiction of robots taking over the world, there is one place where the increase of robotic programming is making a key difference — the operating room. According to Dr. Erich Schafer, who performs general surgeries at Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial Multispecialty Clinic in Fremont, the most common question patients have is: “What role does the doctor play in robotic surgery?” While many people may be wary of entrusting their life to a machine, Schafer wants the community to understand that just because there is a machine in the room does not mean the surgeons are sipping coffee and reading magazines. “The biggest thing is to know that the surgeon is in control of everything that is going on in that room — no different than prior to the advent of this technology,” Schafer said. “The biggest change is how that surgery is delivered. The robot, itself, is nothing more than a tool.” With around 12% of all robots in Michigan, Spectrum Health has recently expanded its use of robotic programming to not only the large hospitals in downtown Grand Rapids, but also smaller ones in the more rural communities of West Michigan. For Schafer, the advancement of robotic technology is a game changer. Because 56

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robotic surgery is minimally invasive and involves smaller incisions and less tissue trauma, the recovery rates for patients are much faster. “Colon surgeries 20 or 30 years ago required an average of a seven-to-10-day hospital stay,” Schafer said. “But for the last four colon surgeries I have done with the robot, the patient only stayed in the hospital for an average of one-and-a-half days.” Shorter stays may not only mean reduced pain and faster recovery to normal activities for the patient, but also significant savings for both the patient and health care system. According to the American Hospital Association, the average hospital expenses per inpatient day range from $1,366 to $2,298 in Michigan. Schafer explained the difference between having to pay that much for seven to 10 days versus a day and a half would ease the financial burden for many patients and their families. Adding robotics to smaller hospitals, such as Spectrum Health Gerber Memorial, also creates more access to care in populations outside of the Grand Rapids metropolitan area. “Rural populations don’t have access to this kind of technology normally, so people have to have the means to travel those distances,” Schafer said. “In Newaygo County, which we handle, the vast majority of our population is elderly and those who have limited means to make the pilgrimage to Grand Rapids to seek out this technology. It’s not possible for many people to make that long drive. Bringing this technology locally allows us to continue that community-centered care with the latest technology to ensure that our patients are going to get the same outcomes that they would if they were traveling an hour or two away to the major metropolitan areas.” It’s not just the patient who may benefit from robotic surgery, however. Surgeons, such as Schafer, see the difference it has made in their own lives. By using robotics, surgeons are not only given a greater visualization, enhanced dexterity and greater precision, but also suffer less fatigue after completing the surgery. “Laparoscopic (small incision) involves me contorting myself into odd positions in order

Dr. Erich Schafer (above and right) uses robotic technology to complete surgeries. This technology reduces patients' hospital stays. The robotic technology (left) is important for rural hospitals.

to accommodate the equipment, which is incredibly fatiguing,” Schafer said. “I used to go home after doing five or six cases laparoscopically in the operating day and not have any energy to spend time with my family.” But by placing the robotics in those contorting poses, instead of himself, Schafer can control the tiny incisions in the patient from a comfortable ergonomic position, giving him more energy at the end of the day. “Now, I feel good at the end of the day. I’m ready to keep going. Yesterday was a perfect example — I did five cases, went home and took my son out for small game hunting — that’s something that before robotics was not possible for me to do.”


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Beating breast cancer AI technology enhances cancer screenings.

By Justin Dawes NEW ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE software is significantly improving the way doctors at Metro Health-University of Michigan Health diagnose breast cancer. Late last year the health system fully implemented the FDA-approved ProFound AI product developed by New Hampshirebased medical technology company iCAD, according to Dr. Mark Traill, a radiologist at Metro Health. Prior to Metro Health’s implementation, iCAD had donated the technology so Traill could use it on a research basis with the University of Michigan. Now, iCAD has the technology at more than 600 sites in the country — only a few of which are in Michigan. The software uses an algorithm to spot abnormalities in 3D mammography images more accurately than doctors, reducing false positives, false negatives and unnecessary patient callbacks for additional testing. Doctors detect cancers about 80% of the time, Traill said, or much worse depending on the doctor or any number of factors. The algorithm can detect malignant and nonmalignant tumors about 7%-9% more often, he said. For this reason, Traill expects the technology to be “massively disruptive” in the field. “It's made my job a lot easier,” he said. Spotting abnormalities is more of a reflex than a cognitive process, kind of like playing “Where’s Waldo?” he said. “It's like when you see your friend on the street. When you see them, the process of recognizing them occurs in a tenth of a second. If he's got a hat on and it's out of context, you may or may not recognize him,” Traill said. “That's exactly the same process that we deal with finding these cancers.” He said it’s easy for even several doctors to completely overlook abnormalities in a screening — and staring at the images longer 58

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typically doesn’t help much. “Nobody finds them all,” he said. “One, in particular — I really don't think I ever would have seen it.” While the patients may not understand the difference in what tools are being used, they appreciate hearing that AI and other advancing technologies are elevating what providers can do, Traill said. “These patients are moms with kids, and wives. There's something about breast cancer that is just a little more rotten than other cancers, I think, because of the people that it takes out,” Traill said. “So, you want to do the best you can, and this technology is helping.” Traill said he remembers the excitement when MRI technology was introduced because of the changes it brought in diagnoses. “This is going to be a lot bigger than that,” he said. “There's been a lot of hype, but I don't think it's overdone for this. I think this is something that is really going to have a huge impact on radiology and across the board in medicine.” Google Health developed a similar system and had its performance results published in the science journal Nature. Though Google’s system is based on the same model as ProFound AI, Google’s isn’t quite ready for clinical use. “I think because they're Google, they're able to present it as they're the first ones to do this, but that's not the case,” Traill said. “We're doing it now.” When iCAD rolled out the technology in 2018, Forbes called it one of the year’s biggest moments in AI. Other companies have developed similar systems for diagnosis of lung, brain and other cancers. Systems are regularly being granted FDA approval, and the results of some have been published in Nature. Traill said he has been attending conferences

Dr. Mark Traill uses new AI technology to diagnose breast cancer.


and following advances in this technology for about four years, and the progress has been “surprisingly fast” and seems to be somewhat outpacing its utilization for now. The technology overall is in the early stages. In the next decade, he said he expects it may even be able to make diagnoses, not just find

abnormalities that radiologists then diagnose. He sees this as a solution to the developing shortage of radiologists nationally, especially in rural areas. The reason for the shortage in this area of practice may come in part due to development of this technology, however, he said, citing a recent study.

“It's scared some people away because it basically has potential to automate what you do,” he said. Despite that apprehension, Traill doesn’t see the advancing technology displacing radiologists but rather changing their role a bit. He argues that radiologists who use the technology no longer have to spend time reading mammograms but instead will be able to offer more valuable care. “AI is not going to replace radiologists, but radiologists who use it and embrace it are going to replace those that don't,” Traill said. GR M AG .CO M

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Javery Pain Institute, the place where chronic pain meets its match! Over 40 years of combined experience devoted exclusively to the treatment of chronic pain has laid the foundation of our treatment philosophy: Our treatments at JPI are based on a personal, trusting relationship with each patient. The philosophy is simple, but essential - Two fundamental components that are required to successfully treat chronic pain are: 1) Empathy, true listening, and a deep professional patient-physician relationship. Javery Pain Institute employs these elements through its unique patient care model to improve the lives of those living with chronic pain in a manner different from any other pain management practice in West Michigan. 2) A blend of experience, technology and teamwork, working collaboratively, with the focus always being the relationship with the patient. No amount of technology can ever take the place of these two concepts. The physicians and staff at Javery Pain Institute strive to be your number one choice for referring your patients who suffer from chronic pain. Due to the complexity and time-consuming nature of managing chronic pain, Drs. Javery and Suderman invest the required time and effort from that very first patient’s visit to develop a personal connection with your patient. This deep connection developed in a thorough and compassionate initial visit is absolutely necessary to develop a trusting connection that allows us to diagnose and subsequently treat the patient’s chronic complex pain problems. At Javery Pain Institute we have a treatment model unique from any other pain management practice in West Michigan that utilizes the combined patient care experience of over 40 years between Drs. Javery and Suderman in a one-on-one visit between the physician and patient at the first encounter. This provides our physicians the time necessary to develop a trusting interpersonal and empathetic connection with the patient in order to develop a personalized, comprehensive treatment plan that yields a more satisfied patient with better functional outcomes. Our mission is to effectively improve the lives of those living with chronic pain to help them get their life back! Your patients that you refer to us will sit down directly with Dr. Suderman or Dr. Javery and from the very first visit onward the physicians and their entire staff will develop a mutually trusting connection between the patient, the physician and the JPI team. Unfortunately, in our healthcare system there is pressure to see as many patients as possible each day. This makes it difficult to develop a trusting, personal connection with patients. Yet if this doesn’t occur the patient’s pain and function will not improve no matter the technique, technology or other treatment modality utilized. JPI’s focus on the development of a deep, interactive, trusting connection between the physician and patient from the very first appointment onward will provide your patients with a better experience, better outcomes and better overall management while saving you time and resources required to manage the complex, challenging diagnosis of chronic pain. We believe that chronic pain is best managed chronically and we understand that patients will need to trust their physician and team at JPI over many years to collaborate on the development and refinement of their treatment plan for a condition the patient will be managing for the long term. In this day and age of computers that distract from the patient encounter, outsourced care and treatment, and metrics of value that don’t reflect the individual patient’s needs, Drs. Javery and Suderman will do the one thing that many other specialists aren’t capable of – sitting and listening with an empathetic ear and formulating a plan over the long term. Since CHRONIC PAIN can only be treated CHRONICALLY in a mutually developed plan that comes about ONLY by a trusting and interactive relationship between doctor and patient, JPI is different because our doctors and staff take the time and make the effort to truly listen to the patient and help them improve their function with chronic pain so they can get their life back. Sincerely, Dr. Keith Javery Dr. Josh Suderman LOGO COLORS


Grand Rapids Magazine’s exclusive list of top doctors

The following pages contain the doctors in adult and pediatric specialties, as voted by their peers.

Professional Research Services (PRS) is a research company located in Troy, Mich. They specialize in conducting peer review surveys of different professionals within markets nationwide. A large part of their research focuses on the medical field, specifically M.D. and D.O. physicians. PRS reaches out to both physicians and health systems within a specific area, encouraging them to vote for their peers who they believe deserve the honor of being a “Top Doctor” for their geographical area. These physicians excel within their medical specialties and positively contribute to the medical profession as well as the community at large. The research for Grand Rapids Magazine’s Top Doctors was conducted from November 2019 to December 2019. Physicians throughout Kern, Ottawa, Muskegon, and Allegan counties were contacted by email and/or postcard, and they were encouraged to log onto the PRS survey site and cast their votes. PRS also contacted hospitals and medical clinics, informing them about the research. Some health groups joined in the effort by distributing the survey to their practicing physicians. For the survey itself, each doctor was able to log on and vote for up to three physicians within 71 board-certified specialties. The physicians with the highest number of votes within each of the specialties were the ones who were fact-checked further with the state of Michigan, as well as their individual practices. Each name that is published as part of Grand Rapids Magazine’s Top Doctors list is an active and practicing physician in the area who is in good standing with the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs. The final list of winners reflects extremely talented and esteemed physicians practicing in the Grand Rapids area. Professionals may be screened and selected through the verification of licensing and review of any infractions through various applicable boards, agencies, and rating services. For further information, visit prscom.com or email PRS at sshevin@prscom.com.

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2020 FEATURED PHYSICIANS Dr. Frank W. Garber, M.D.

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Dr. David Barrett, M.D.

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Dr. Marcus Muallem, M.D.

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Dr. Yosef Gindzin, M.D.

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Dr. Thomas Cowden, M.D.

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Dr. Michael Boyle, M.D.

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Dr. Parin Gohel, M.D.

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Dr. Ryan Freeland, M.D.

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Kristi B. Hawley, D.O., F.A.A.D.

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Thomas N. Balaskas, M.D. .

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Dr. Dena Thayer, D.O.

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Dr. Lawrence Mallon, M.D.

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Dr. Stephen Zonca, M.D.

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Dr. Diana Bitner, M.D.

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Dr. Gregory J. Artz, M.D.

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Dr. Joseph C. Taylor, M.D.

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Anesthesiology

Matthew Armstrong M.D. West Michigan Anesthesia PC

Matthew W. Sevensma D.O. Heart & Vascular at Metro Health Village

Donald D. Downs M.D. "Anesthesia Practice Consultants, PC"

Roger Shammas M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Cardiovascular

Nicholas A. Foster M.D. "Anesthesia Practice Consultants, PC"

Michael Vredenburg D.O. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Phillip R. Hage D.O. "Anesthesia Practice Consultants, PC"

Eric T. Walchak D.O. Heart & Vascular at Metro Health Village

Paul Jaklitsch M.D. West Michigan Anesthesia PC

David H. W. Wohns M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Eric L. Larson M.D. West Michigan Anesthesia PC

Colon and Rectal Surgery

Mark P. Laughlin M.D. "Anesthesia Practice Consultants, PC" Matthew Reynolds M.D. West Michigan Anesthesia PC Shanna C. Tenclay M.D. "Anesthesia Practice Consultants, PC"

Theodor Asgeirsson M.D. West Michigan Surgical Specialists PLC Nadav Dujovny M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Ryan Figg M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Rebecca Hoedema M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Addiction Medicine

Breast Surgery

Colleen A.C. App M.D. "The Breast Health & Wellness Center, PC"

Donald Kim M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Cara Poland M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Jamie Caughran M.D. Mercy Health Comprehensive Breast Center

Martin Luchtefeld M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Bruce C. Springer M.D. Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services

Jessica Keto M.D. Mercy Health Comprehensive Breast Center

Adolescent Medicine

Jayne Paulson M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Sandy Kay Dettmann M.D. Mercy Health

Lisa M. Lowery M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Allergy and Immunology

Cardiology

Nagib Chalfoun M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Frederick DeTorres M.D. Shoreline Allergy

J. Stewart Collins M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Karyn Gell M.D. Grand Rapids Allergy

Barbara A. Karenko D.O. Heart & Vascular at Metro Health Village

Nicholas Hartog M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Ryan Madder M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Theodore Kelbel M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Michael McNamara M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Mark M. Millar M.D. Allergy & Asthma Care of Western Michigan Sara J. Uekert M.D. Grand Rapids Allergy

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Richard McNamara M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Gregory Miller M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Cardiovascular

Critical Care Medicine and Pulmonary Disease Terrance W. Barnes M.D. Metro Health Pulmonology

Wael Berjaoui M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Timothy E. Daum M.D. Metro Health Sleep Disorders Center Stephen Fitch M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Mounir Ghali M.D. Metro Health Pulmonology James K. Hoekwater D.O. Metro Health Pulmonology Marc McClelland M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Glenn VanOtteren M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Critical Care Surgery

Alistair Chapman M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group


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featured Physicians Charles Gibson M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Andrew Heaford M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Gaby Iskander M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

John M. Kosta M.D. Ear Nose & Throat Center PC

Dermatology

Keith Postma M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Gina C. Ang M.D. West Michigan Dermatology Richard J. Ashack M.D. Dermatology Associates of West Michigan Daniel C. Dapprich M.D. Dermatology Associates of West Michigan Michelle M. Emery M.D. Dermatology at MidTowne, PC Ryan Freeland M.D. Wolverine Dermatology Brian J. Gerondale M.D. Dermatology Associates of West Michigan

Sherman A. Sprik M.D. Ear Nose & Throat Center PC Joseph C. Taylor M.D. Grand Rapids Ear Nose & Throat Veronique Wan M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Mark R. Winkle M.D. Ear Nose & Throat Center P.C.

Emergency Medicine Colleen Bush M.D. Emergency Care Specialists

Bridget A. Green M.D. West Michigan Dermatology

Erica Michiels M.D. Emergency Care Specialists

Kristi B. Hawley D.O., F.A.A.D. The Derm Institute of West Michigan

Gary R. Mikula D.O. Emergency Care Specialists

Rebecca M. Jansen M.D. Dermatology Associates of West Michigan

Melissa Taylor M.D. Emergency Care Specialists

John E. Miner M.D. Dermatology Associates of West Michigan

Eric VanDePol M.D. Emergency Care Specialists

Dipa S. Patel M.D. Dermatology at MidTowne, PC Marek A. Stawiski M.D. Marek A. Stawiski Dermatology J. Gabriel Vasquez M.D. West Michigan Dermatology Mary A. Yurko M.D. Mary A. Yurko, MD, Dermatology PLC

Ear, Nose, and Throat

Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism

Ruggero Battan M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Diabetes and Endocrine Center

Emilie Collins M.D. Mercy Health Physicians Partners Diabetes and Endocrine Center Edward J. Kryshak M.D. Metro Health Endocrinology

Chad Afman M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Karl Nadolsky D.O. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Gregory J. Artz M.D. Grand Rapids Ear Nose & Throat

Nathan Pomeroy M.D. " Spectrum Health Medical Group

Andrew Behler D.O., M.P.H. Michigan ENT & Allergy Specialists

Courtney Soubliere D.O. Mercy Health Physicians Partners Diabetes and Endocrine Center

Jeanne Eyde D.O. Jeanne Eyde, DO, Grand Pearl Spa Francis Hart M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Dr. Frank W. Garber, M.D.

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R. FRANK GARBER is a vitreoretinal surgeon who specializes in retinal diseases, including retinal detachments, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other disorders of the retina, vitreous, and macula. Dr. Garber and the physicians at Vitreo-Retinal Associates have participated in more than 60 clinical trials in an effort to provide their patients with cutting-edge treatments for retinal diseases, and played a role in testing several of the drugs that are being used to treat wet macular degeneration today. Dr. Garber received his undergraduate degree from Carleton College, graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School and completed his ophthalmology residency and a fellowship at the University of California-Los Angeles Stein Eye Institute. He currently serves as an assistant clinical professor at Michigan State University. Vitreo-Retinal Associates is West Michigan’s most experienced ophthalmology practice for state-of-the-art specialized eye care with convenient locations in Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo and Muskegon.

Vitreo-Retinal Associates PC 2505 East Paris Ave. SE, Suite 100 Grand Rapids, MI 49546 616-285-1200 vrapc.com

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featured Physicians

Dr. David Barrett, M.D.

Dr. Marcus Muallem, M.D.

Dr. Yosef Gindzin, M.D.

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Grand Rapids Ophthalmology Eleven convenient locations in West Michigan 616-949-2600 seeitclear.com

Grand Rapids Ophthalmology Eleven convenient locations in West Michigan 616-949-2600 seeitclear.com

Grand Rapids Ophthalmology Eleven convenient locations in West Michigan 616-949-2600 seeitclear.com

R. DAVID BARRETT is a board-certified ophthalmologist with decades of experience and provides an extensive range of eye-care services, from routine eye exams to medical and surgical procedures. He has performed thousands of cataract surgeries using both traditional and advanced technology intraocular lenses to help patients regain the clear vision they deserve. Dr. Barrett received his undergraduate degree from Michigan State University, graduated from the Wayne State University School of Medicine, and completed his residency at the University of California – Los Angeles Stein Eye Institute. He’s a member of the AAO, AMA, Michigan State Medical Society, and Kent County Medical Association. Dr. Barrett is dedicated to Grand Rapids Ophthalmology’s mission: “To Lead the Way, Improve Sight, and Change Lives.” Grand Rapids Ophthalmology has served West Michigan patients since 1982 and continues to keep pace by offering innovative technologies delivered by expert, compassionate, and caring doctors.

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R. MARCUS MUALLEM is a board-certified ophthalmologist who is fellowship-trained in both glaucoma and cornea. In addition, Dr. Muallem has performed thousands of LASIK procedures, and has decades of experience treating glaucoma and corneal disease. He stays at the forefront of technology and the latest procedures, to ensure his patients are in the best hands possible. Dr. Muallem received his undergraduate degree from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and his medical degree from the Hadassah Schools of Medicine and Health. He completed residencies at the HaEmek Medical Center and the University of Illinois – Chicago, and received a master’s in ophthalmology from Tel-Aviv University. He also completed two fellowships in external-corneal disease and glaucoma at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He’s a member of ASCRS, ARVO, the Israel Ophthalmology Society, and the Israel Society for Eye & Vision Research. Dr. Muallem’s surgeries are performed at Grand Rapids Ophthalmology’s AAAHC-certified surgery center, Surgical Care Center of Michigan, utilizing the most advanced technologies available in an environment that’s dedicated 100 percent to the treatment of your eyes.

R. YOSEF GINDZIN is a fellowship-trained, board-certified retinal specialist. He’s known for his compassion, sincerity, and reliability. Dr. Gindzin once opened his office and carried an elderly patient through the snow in order to provide emergency treatment to save her vision. This is a testament to Grand Rapids Ophthalmology’s mission: “Eye care you trust, for the ones you love.” Dr. Gindzin received his undergraduate degree from the University of California at Irvine, graduated from the University of Michigan School of Medicine, and completed his residency and fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation’s Cole Eye Institute. He has decades of medical, laser, and surgical experience in macular degeneration, diabetes, macular pathologies, and retinal detachments, and is a member of the ARVO. He’s also conversant in Spanish. With many years of specialized training, the retina doctors at Grand Rapids Ophthalmology provide one of the most highly-qualified and experienced retina groups in West Michigan.


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featured Physicians

Dr. Thomas Cowden, M.D.

Dr. Michael Boyle, M.D.

Dr. Parin Gohel, M.D.

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R. THOMAS COWDEN is a fellowship-trained, board-certified corneal specialist with decades of experience. He specializes in LASIK, corneal transplants, and cataracts, including advanced technology and traditional intraocular lenses. He was involved in the Food and Drug Administration’s clinical trials for LASIK and has since performed thousands of laser vision correction procedures. Dr. Cowden received his undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan and graduated from the Wayne State University School of Medicine. His residency was completed at the University of Wisconsin, and he did his corneal fellowship at the University of Minnesota. Grand Rapids Ophthalmology is the largest fully-integrated eye care medical group in the area, and Dr. Cowden offers the most technologically advanced treatment available. Whether it’s an elective or medical procedure, Dr. Cowden helps patients make the best-informed decisions for their unique eyes.

Grand Rapids Ophthalmology Eleven convenient locations in West Michigan 616-949-2600 seeitclear.com

R. MICHAEL BOYLE is a fellowship-trained, board-certified oculoplastic surgeon who holds the prestigious ASOPRS accreditation. He has restored confidence in thousands of patients, performing both cosmetic eyelid surgery for patients interested in a more youthful appearance and reconstructive eyelid surgery for patients with medical problems that affect their eyes, including thyroid eye disease, orbital tumors, and more. Dr. Boyle received his undergraduate degree from Saint Xavier University, graduated from the University of Illinois College of Medicine, completed his residency at Indiana University, and did his ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery fellowship at the University of Alabama Birmingham. He’s a Fellow of the AAO and ASOPRS, and currently serves as an assistant professor of clinical ophthalmology at Michigan State University. Dr. Boyle performs cosmetic and reconstructive eyelid surgeries at the AAAHC Walker Surgical Center. Grand Rapids Ophthalmology has 11 locations throughout West Michigan, so excellent care is never far from home.

Grand Rapids Ophthalmology Eleven convenient locations in West Michigan 616-949-2600 seeitclear.com

R. PARIN GOHEL is a fellowship-trained, board-certified retinal specialist. His outstanding, specialized training and extensive experience with medical, laser, and surgical treatments for macular degeneration, diabetes, macular pathologies, and retinal detachment provides patients with the best possible options for their unique diagnosis. Dr. Gohel received his undergraduate degree from Michigan State University, graduated from the Wayne State University School of Medicine, and completed an internship at the Lahey Clinic at Tufts University. He completed his residency at the University of Colorado Rocky Mountain Lions Eye Institute, and did fellowships at Associated Retina Consultants and Henry Ford Hospital. He previously worked for Boeing and Ford Motor Co., and is currently a member of the ASRS and ARVO. With specialties ranging from routine eye exams to contacts, glasses, LASIK, medical, and surgical treatment, Grand Rapids Ophthalmology offers the greatest depth of medical eye services available in the area.

Grand Rapids Ophthalmology Eleven convenient locations in West Michigan 616-949-2600 seeitclear.com

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Ashley Therasse D.O. Mercy Health Physicians Partners Diabetes and Endocrine Center

Family Medicine

Beth Ann Peter M.D. Lakewood Family Medicine PLC

Stephen T. Webster M.D. Grand River Gastroenterology

Brian Phillips M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

General Surgery

Steven T. Bargwell D.O. Metro Health Cedar Springs

Rose Ramirez M.D. Jupiter Family Medicine, P.C.

Christopher Barnes D.O. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Hilary A. Schmid D.O. Metro Health Cedar Springs

David Booth M.D. Mercy Health Physicians Partners Norton Family Practice

Mark A. Stid M.D. Lakeshore Health Partners Family Medicine - South Washington

Iain Charnley M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Southeast

James Twesten-O'Toole M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Norton Family Practice

Wayne Christenson D.O. Metro Health Lowell Margret Duncan M.D. Holland Community Health Center John T. Dykstra D.O. Metro Health Hudsonville Karen L. Foulds M.D. Lakeshore Health Partners Family Medicine - South Washington John W. Hamersma M.D. Grand Valley Medical Specialists, P.L.C. Daniel Harro M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Southeast Marc A. Helzer M.D. Metro Health Rockford Brian J. Hinkley D.O. Metro Health Cascade Kaushal Kalra M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Kristi S. Kern D.O. Metro Health Cascade Kara Krol M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group David F. Lieuwen M.D. Grand Valley Medical Specialists, P.L.C. Glenn E. Merz M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Harborwood Family Medicine Angela Oostema M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Lance M. Owens D.O. Metro Health Southwest

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Jaret Beane D.O. West Michigan Surgical Specialists PLC Daniel Borreson M.D. West Michigan Surgical Specialists PLC Alistair Chapman M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Mathew Chung M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Michael J. DeJong M.D. West Michigan Surgical Specialists PLC

Janice K. Wabeke D.O. Metro Health Comstock Park

Jeffrey Gawel M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Gastroenterology

Joel A. Green M.D. West Michigan Surgical Specialists PLC

Jeremy Barber D.O. Spectrum Health Medical Group Steven R. Fox M.D. G West Michigan Gastroenterology Armita Ghoddousi D.O. Metro Health Gastroenterology Ryan D. Hamby D.O. Metro Health Gastroenterology Ammar Z. Hassan M.D. Metro Health Gastroenterology Srinivas K. Janardan M.D. Grand River Gastroenterology Susan S. Kais M.D. Grand River Gastroenterology Lia Kaufman M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Randall Meisner M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group J. Bradley Morrow M.D. Grand River Gastroenterology

Michael Leahy M.D. West Michigan Surgical Specialists PLC Kenneth Minks M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Eric J. Mitchell M.D. West Michigan Surgical Specialists PLC Kerent D. Pihl D.O. Grand Rapids Surgical Associates PLLC David Scheeres M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Wayne E. VanderKolk M.D. West Michigan Surgical Specialists PLC

Genetics

Caleb Bupp M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Geriatric Medicine

Mark Bates M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Gregory Osborne M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Iris Boettcher M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

John Papp M.D. Gastroenterology Specialists

Ronald Duemler M.D. Mercy Health Geriatrics

Michael Puff M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Kevin Foley M.D. Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences

Curtis R. Weaver M.D. Grand River Gastroenterology

James Passinault M.D. Mercy Health Internal Medicine and Residency Center


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featured Physicians

Featured Physicians // GRAND RAPIDS MAGAZINE

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FTER 16 YEARS of devoted service in the U.S. Air Force as a Special Operations Flight Surgeon, Assistant Professor at the Uniformed Services University, and dermatology faculty member at Walter Reed Medical Center, Dr. Ryan Freeland has

Dr. Ryan Freeland, M.D. chosen his new mission — to return home to West Michigan to care for you and your family. As a decorated Air Force officer and combat veteran, he brings years of highest quality training and experience from our nation’s top military hospitals. Dr. Freeland’s patriotism

and motivation to care for others has been galvanized in the leadership, humanitarian, and battlefield experiences he collected during five assignments and 10 deployments in the service of our great nation. Following his homecoming in 2017, Dr. Freeland now focuses his passionate, professional energies into building up his team and caring for patients in West Michigan - the place he has always considered his home. “No matter where I was stationed or deployed, I always considered West Michigan home,” he says. “And the idea of coming home expanded in my mind during my years in the military supporting colleagues who fought for someone else’s idea of home.” Dr. Freeland is now building a regional center of excellence by assembling an elite team of dermatologists whom he met during his military days. Dr. Luke Nicholas, a former U.S. Navy dermatologist and fellow West Michigan native, is a Mohs surgeon who daily works to meticulously remove skin cancers at Wolverine Dermatology. The pair of physicians have joined forces to care for the communities that raised them. This summer, Wolverine Dermatology welcomes two dermatologists to their growing team with the addition of Dr. Patrick Brown, a gifted general dermatologist and Dr. Brandon McNally, a highly-trained dermatopathologist. “I am supremely proud of the reality that by July, Wolverine Dermatology will boast Featured Physicians dermatologists who have served in the Army, Dr. Name Here Navy, and Air Force. I’m not sure that there is another practice in the nation that can boast this most unique and patriotic credential.” SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

// GRAND RAPIDS MAGAZINE // TOP DOCS

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Name Address Address Phone website.com

ligula arcu. Etiam aliquet vestibulum suscipit. Donec vel libero accumsan, aliquam orci sit amet, bibendum libero. Integer a erat a est lacinia ornare. Curabitur commodo nisi in nunc interdum sodales. Sed non iaculis ipsum. Maecenas dolor dui, malesuada vel lectus vitae, semper sodales diam. In ultricies scelerisque massa in ornare. Sed fermentum erat nunc, sed egestas nunc rutrum id. Morbi nec neque dui. Vivamus varius gravida mi nec accumsan. Duis euismod hendrerit tortor, in el-

Wolverine Dermatology 1673 Gezon Parkway Wyoming, MI 49519 616-243-3376 wolverinedermatology.com GR M AG .CO M

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Robert Riekse M.D. Mercy Health Geriatrics

Amy C. Vander Woude M.D. Cancer & Hematology Centers of Western Michigan

Gynecologic Oncology

Michael H. Zakem D.O. The Cancer Center at Metro Health Village

Kevin R. Brader M.D. Metro Health OB/GYN

Charles Harrison M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Leigh Seamon D.O. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Hand Surgery

Hospice and Palliative

Bradd Hemker M.D. Medicine Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital John A. Mulder M.D. Holland Home

Shannon Armstrong M.D. Elite Plastic Surgery

Gretchen Roe M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Scott Burgess M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Infectious Disease

Donald P. Condit M.D. Condit Hand Clinic Viet Do M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan Ronald D. Ford M.D. Elite Plastic Surgery Levi Hinkelman M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Julian Kuz M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan Steven Naum M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Hematology and Oncology Brett T. Brinker M.D. Cancer & Hematology Centers of Western Michigan

Stephanie A. Dublis D.O. The Cancer Center at Metro Health Village Thomas E. Gribbin M.D. Cancer & Hematology Centers of Western Michigan Sulsal-Ul Haque M.D. The Cancer Center at Metro Health Village Nehal Lakhani M.D. Cancer & Hematology Centers of Western Michigan Erin M. Pettijohn M.D. Cancer & Hematology Centers of Western Michigan Eric Santos M.D. Mercy Health Lacks Cancer Center 68

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Anamaria Bondici M.D. Mercy Health Infectious Disease Jorgelina de Sanctis M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Roni Devlin. M.D. Mercy Health Infectious Disease Nnaemeka Egwuatu M.D. Mercy Health Infectious Disease Mohamad E. El Mortada M.D. Metro Health Infectious Disease Minerva Galang M.D. Mercy Health Infectious Disease Andrew Jameson M.D. Mercy Health Infectious Disease Russell Lampen D.O. Spectrum Health Medical Group Rosemary Olivero M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Liam Sullivan D.O. Spectrum Health Medical Group David J. Albrecht D.O. Metro Health Southwest

Internal Medicine

Michael J. App M.D. Internal Medicine and Pediatrics West Michigan William Baer M.D. Mercy Health Concierge Medicine Thomas V. Bilisko M.D. Grand Valley Medical Specialists, P.L.C.

Jennifer A. Cory D.O. Metro Health Cascade Richard Feenstra M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Kevin M. Furlong D.O. Metro Health Hospital Sam Giovannucci M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Robert F. Gleffe D.O. Metro Health Community Clinic Ryan A. Hop D.O. Metro Health Hospital Benjamin Horn M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Bryan Hull M.D. Mercy Health Internal Medicine and Residency Center Gary N. Humphries M.D. Grand Valley Medical Specialists, P.L.C. Natalie F. Kent D.O. Metro Health Hospital Nasir Khan M.D. Mercy Health Internal Medicine and Residency Center Bruce A. Langerak D.O. Grand Valley Medical Specialists, P.L.C. Natalie J. Parr D.O. Metro Health Southwest Leslie Pelkey M.D. Heart of the City Health Center Eryn C. Quinn D.O. Metro Health Southwest Robert Riley M.D. Metro Health Rima Shah M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Mark Spoolstra M.D. Mercy Health Internal Medicine and Residency Center Steven Triesenberg M.D. Mercy Health Concierge Medicine Michael R. Wiltrakis D.O. Metro Health Hospital Adam T. Wolfe D.O. Metro Health Cascade


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Featured Physicians // GRAND RAPIDS MAGAZINE

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RISTI B. HAWLEY, D.O., F.A.A.D., believes “skin treatment is never just skin deep.” Dr. Hawley, a board-certified dermatologist and associate clinical professor at Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine, has been

Kristi B. Hawley, D.O., F.A.A.D. treating patients in the community for more than four years. She recently opened The Derm Institute of West Michigan — a full-service dermatology clinic that offers medical, cosmetic, and surgical dermatologic services — in south Grand Rapids.

The Derm Institute of West Michigan believes in tackling a patient’s skin condition as a team. Their experienced medical staff, along with their “patient-first” mindset and dedication to providing the latest treatments, helps ensure that even the most unique skin concerns are diagnosed and resolved — not just on the surface, but at their source. Dr. Hawley believes in partnering with her patients to help provide the best and longest-lasting solutions to chronic skin conditions including skin cancer, eczema, rashes, acne, warts, and psoriasis. She’s also highly skilled at aesthetic and surgical procedures. “I believe in working together with my patients to come up with a treatment plan that best fits their lifestyle and goals,” says Dr. Hawley, who treats patients like they’re a member of her family. “We’re treating the whole person, not just the disease. We take pride in our warm, gentle, and thoughtful approach to patient care.” Dr. Hawley, a national psoriasis and eczema expert and a leader in her field, is often asked to speak on these topics across the country and has written for several publications on these subjects. She strives to bring the most innovative and up-to-date treatments to the area. Clearly, there’s no need to travel to the best, because the best is right here in West Michigan.

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Dr. Name Here LOREM IPSUM DOLOR sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent sit amet elementum velit. Donec at rhoncus tortor, vel vehicula elit. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nam tincidunt sagittis turpis, in viverra erat pellentesque in. Curabitur mollis turpis ligula, vitae sodales orci tempus ut. Duis ut laoreet libero, in malesuada ex. Integer aliquam vel nunc a consectetur. Nam

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Name Address Address Phone website.com

ligula arcu. Etiam aliquet vestibulum suscipit. Donec vel libero accumsan, aliquam orci sit amet, bibendum libero. Integer a erat a est lacinia ornare. Curabitur commodo nisi in nunc interdum sodales. Sed non iaculis ipsum. Maecenas dolor dui, malesuada vel lectus vitae, semper sodales diam. In ultricies scelerisque massa in ornare. Sed fermentum erat nunc, sed egestas nunc rutrum id. Morbi nec neque dui. Vivamus varius gravida mi nec accumsan. Duis euismod hendrerit tortor, in el-

The Derm Institute of West Michigan 6750 Kalamazoo Ave. SE, Ste. D Grand Rapids, MI 49508 616-326-0114 derminstituteofwmi.com GR M AG .CO M

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R. THOMAS BALASKAS is a Maternal-Fetal Medicine specialist who has been providing high quality, compassionate and personalized care to high-risk pregnant women for 25 years in Grand Rapids. The goals of Dr. Balaskas and his highly trained staff at Maternal-Fetal Medicine Associates, P.C. are to help those

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Thomas N. Balaskas, M.D. pregnant women with medical disorders, pregnancy complications, and those who are carrying babies with complications achieve successful pregnancy outcomes for mothers and babies. This is accomplished with continued patient education, counseling, state of the art medical care, compassion, and dedicated patient care. “There is no patient who leaves our office

without a clear understanding of her diagnosis and a detailed management plan. No visit is ever too long,” said Dr. Balaskas who gives all his patients the time and attention each one needs to provide this comprehensive care. Dr. Balaskas received his medical degree from the Chicago Medical School, performed his residency training in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago, and completed fellowship training in Maternal-Fetal Medicine at the University of Louisville. He has practiced MaternalFetal Medicine with his partner and wife, Dr. Karen Cummiskey, since their residency training in Illinois. Drs. Balaskas and Cummiskey are clinical associate professors at Michigan State University providing education for Obstetric residents and medical students from MSU. Dr. Balaskas and his team at MaternalFetal Medicine Associates have helped women achieve excellent outcomes during their many years of practice. “With continued meticulous prenatal care and with co-management and prenatal consultations, we’ve been able to achieve successful pregnancy outcomes in many high-risk patients,” Dr. Balaskas says. “It is personally satisfying and a great sense of accomplishment to help patients get through very difficult pregnancies Featured Physicians ultimately Dr. Name Here leading to healthy mothers and babies at the end of the journey.” SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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Name Address Address Phone website.com

ligula arcu. Etiam aliquet vestibulum suscipit. Donec vel libero accumsan, aliquam orci sit amet, bibendum libero. Integer a erat a est lacinia ornare. Curabitur commodo nisi in nunc interdum sodales. Sed non iaculis ipsum. Maecenas dolor dui, malesuada vel lectus vitae, semper sodales diam. In ultricies scelerisque massa in ornare. Sed fermentum erat nunc, sed egestas nunc rutrum id. Morbi nec neque dui. Vivamus varius gravida mi nec accumsan. Duis euismod hendrerit tortor, in el-

Maternal-Fetal Medicine Associates, PC 1000 East Paris SE, Suite 210 Grand Rapids, MI 49546 616-285-3310 maternalfetalmedicinemi.com 70

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Joseph P. McKenna M.D. West Michigan Nephrology

Interventional Cardiology

Brett W. Plattner M.D. Renal Associates of West Michigan, P.C.

David M. Ehrhardt D.O. Metro Health Hospital

Marcos Cordoba Munoz M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Muhammad Farooq M.D. Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences

Erin Fricke M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Christopher Goshgarian M.D. Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences

Vivian Romero M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Jessica Hedeman D.O. Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences

Lisa Thiel D.O. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Muhib Khan M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Michael Tsimis M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Herman C. Sullivan M.D. Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences

Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine

Jordan J. Taylor D.O. Metro Health Neurosciences

Mitchell DeJonge M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Melanie Taylor M.D. Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences

Benedict Doctor M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

John Visser M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Claudia Nadernejad M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Neurosurgery

Nephrology

Mark R. Boelkins M.D. Renal Associates of West Michigan, P.C. Gregory Downer M.D. West Michigan Nephrology Kseniya V. Filippova M.D. Renal Associates of West Michigan, P.C. Daniel J. Legault M.D. Renal Associates of West Michigan, P.C.

Justin C. Clark M.D. Great Lakes Neurosurgical Associates, P.C. Rick Edgar M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Neuroscience Specialists Konstantin Elisevich M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Bryan E. Figueroa M.D. Great Lakes Neurosurgical Associates, P.C. John F. Keller M.D. Great Lakes Neurosurgical Associates, P.C. Steve Klafeta M.D. Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences

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James Visser M.D. Renal Associates of West Michigan, P.C.

David Colombo M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

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Mark Staniforth M.D. West Michigan Nephrology

David H. W. Wohns M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Thomas N. Balaskas M.D. Maternal Fetal Medicine Associates, PC

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Gregory Pellizzon M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Cardiovascular

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Byron T. Slaton M.D. Renal Associates of West Michigan, P.C.

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Ryan Madder M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

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Jeffery Woo M.D. Christian Healthcare Centers

Our doctors provide personal Ear, Nose, and Throat care that includes Adult and Pediatric ENT, complex sinus and rhinology, deviated nasal septum, chronic sinusitis, chronic otitis, hearing loss, tinnitus, nasal obstruction, nasal polyps, voice hoarseness, trouble swallowing, thyroid, parathyroid, and allergies.

Michigan ENT & Allergy Specialists 3322 Beltline Court NE Grand Rapids, MI 49525 3501 Rivertown Point Ct. SW Grandville, MI 49418 616-994-2770 michiganentallergy.com GR M AG .CO M

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Jurgen Luders M.D. Mercy Health Hauenstein Neurosciences

Paul A. Brown D.O. Metro Health Ophthalmology

Kendall Hamilton M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Paul Mazaris M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Thomas Cowden M.D. Grand Rapids Ophthalmology

Tim Henne M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Justin Singer M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Douglas A. Doyle D.O. Metro Health Ophthalmology

Michael Jabara M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Todd Vitaz M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Patrick J. Droste M.D. Pediatric Ophthalmology

Kory Johnson D.O. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Todd D. Vogel M.D. Great Lakes Neurosurgical Associates, P.C.

Frank W. Garber M.D. Vitreo-Retinal Associates, P.C.

Kevin Kane M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Obstetrics and Gynecology

Brooke Geddie D.O. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Matthew Karek M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Jeffrey Dood M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Monica Gary M.D. Grand Rapids Women's Health

Yosef Gindzin M.D. Grand Rapids Ophthalmology

Robyn Hubbard M.D. Grand Rapids Women's Health

Christopher Glisson D.O. Mercy Health - Hauenstein Neurosciences Neuro-Ophthalmology

Melinda Johnson M.D. Spectrum Health

Parin Gohel M.D. Grand Rapids Ophthalmology

Jessica Lalley M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Marko Habekovic M.D. Marko Habekovic Ophthalmology

Elizabeth Leary M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Adam S. Hassan M.D. Eye Plastic & Facial Cosmetic Surgery

Steven J. Lown D.O. Metro Health OB/GYN at Metro Health Village

Elizabeth H. Henry M.D. Cascade Ophthalmology, P.C.

Geron Turke D.O. Mercy Health Physician Partners OB/GYN Suzanne West M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Occupational Medicine

Melissa Meldrum-Aaberg M.D. Eye Plastic & Facial Cosmetic Surgery Marcus Muallem M.D. Grand Rapids Ophthalmology Ann M. Renucci M.D. Verdier Eye Center

Thomas Malvitz M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan Thomas Matelic M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan Blake Miller D.O. Spectrum Health Medical Group Bryan Pack M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan Karl Roberts M.D. West Michigan Orthopaedics Matthew Steensma M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Peter Theut M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan Carl Wierks M.D. West Michigan Orthopaedics

Pain Medicine

Diane Czuk-Smith M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Thomas D. Collins M.D. Perrigo Medical Center

Liliya Sutherland D.O. Retina Specialists of Michigan

James D. Hudson M.D. Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital

Ophthalmology

Karl J. Siebert M.D. Verdier Eye Center

Keith Javery D.O. Javery Pain Institute

David D. Verdier M.D. Verdier Eye Center

Joshua Suderman M.D. Javery Pain Institute

Scott Westhouse D.O. Retina Specialists of Michigan

Stephen Winston M.D. Michigan Pain Consultants, PC

Orthopedic Surgery

Pathology

Terrence Endres M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

William V. Chopp M.D. Michigan Pathology Specialists, PC

Thomas M. Aaberg Jr. M.D. Retina Specialists of Michigan Eiyass Albeiruti M.D. Eye Center of Grand Rapids David Barrett M.D. Grand Rapids Ophthalmology Richard H. Benninger M.D. Michigan Street Optical Michael Boyle M.D. Grand Rapids Ophthalmology 72

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John Anderson M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Alyson M. Booth M.D. Michigan Pathology Specialists, PC


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featured Physicians

Featured Physicians // GRAND RAPIDS MAGAZINE

D

ENA THAYER, D.O board certified in plastic and reconstructive surgery, received her medical degree from Des Moines University in 1997 and completed her training in general and plastic surgery at the Philadelphia College of

Dr. Dena Thayer, D.O. Osteopathic Medicine in 2004. During her time in Philadelphia, she cared for melanoma patients at the world-renowned Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and spent six months at the Burn Center at Westchester Medical Center in New York.

Dr. Thayer has been practicing in West Michigan for 15 years. She is passionate about breast cancer treatment and reconstruction. She enjoys guiding patients through the process of breast reconstruction. MSA incorporates the latest technology in breast cancer reconstruction, including intraoperative audiography (to improve postoperative healing and outcomes), prepectoral reconstruction with acellular dermal matrix grafts, and oncoplastic reconstruction using the patient’s own tissue. She works with a team of dedicated breast surgeons and oncologists to deliver the best possible care and outcome for her patients. Dr. Thayer performs surgery at Mercy General Health Partners, North Ottawa Community Hospital, and the Muskegon Surgery Center. She is the co-director of wound care at Select Specialty Hospital and the Mercy Wound Care Center. In her free time, she’s all about the outdoors. Her interests include triathlons, running, hiking, camping and sailing. She has three teenage daughters and as a family they enjoy soccer, ice hockey and track. Muskegon Surgical Associates (MSA) is a multispecialty surgical group that has been serving West Michigan since 1972. MSA offers an extensive range of services including general surgery, plastic surgery, hand surgery and vascular surgery. MSA Plastic Surgery and Pure Medical Spa offers many cosmetic and reconstructive services including: CoolSculpting, laser, skincare and more. SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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Dr. Name Here LOREM IPSUM DOLOR sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent sit amet elementum velit. Donec at rhoncus tortor, vel vehicula elit. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nam tincidunt sagittis turpis, in viverra erat pellentesque in. Curabitur mollis turpis ligula, vitae sodales orci tempus ut. Duis ut laoreet libero, in malesuada ex. Integer aliquam vel nunc a consectetur. Nam

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tortor sit amet nisi accumsan congue. Pellentesque sed dolor quis mi dapibus vestibulum. Curabitur porta id orci eu interdum. Nunc eu ullam neque, quis porta justo. Quisque.

Name Address Address Phone website.com

ligula arcu. Etiam aliquet vestibulum suscipit. Donec vel libero accumsan, aliquam orci sit amet, bibendum libero. Integer a erat a est lacinia ornare. Curabitur commodo nisi in nunc interdum sodales. Sed non iaculis ipsum. Maecenas dolor dui, malesuada vel lectus vitae, semper sodales diam. In ultricies scelerisque massa in ornare. Sed fermentum erat nunc, sed egestas nunc rutrum id. Morbi nec neque dui. Vivamus varius gravida mi nec accumsan. Duis euismod hendrerit tortor, in el-

MSA Plastic Surgery A division of Muskegon Surgical Associates 1675 Patriot Drive Muskegon, MI 49444 231-739-1933 msapc.com GR M AG .CO M

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Meryem M. Langenbach M.D. Michigan Pathology Specialists, PC

Pediatric Cardiology Ronald G. Grifka M.D. Metro Heart & Vascular

Jeffrey Schneider M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Heather Sowinski D.O. Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Robert Fitzgerald M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Richard Hackbarth M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Rajat Pareek M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Elizabeth Prentice D.O. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Pediatric Hematology and Oncology

Pediatric Sleep Medicine

James Fahner M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Pediatric Surgery

Albert Cornelius M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Beth Kurt M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Deanna Mitchell M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Pediatric Infectious Disease George Fogg M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Rosemary Olivero M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Pediatric Nephrology

Alejandro Quiroga M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Dominic Sanfilippo M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Julia Steinke M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Pediatric Dermatology

Steven DeRoos M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Rachel Laarman M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Mary A. Yurko M.D. Mary A. Yurko, MD, Dermatology PLC

Pediatric Endocrinology

Yaw Appiagyei-Dankah M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Pediatric Gastroenterology Deborah Cloney M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Ryan Cox M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Peter Freswick M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

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Hovig Artinian M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

James M. DeCou M.D. Pediatric Surgeons of West Michigan, P.C. Emily Durkin M.D. Pediatric Surgeons of West Michigan, P.C. Marc G. Schlatter M.D. Pediatric Surgeons of West Michigan, P.C. Daniel Watkins M.D. Pediatric Surgeons of West Michigan P.C.

Pediatric Urology

Theodore D.Barber M.D. Urologic Consultants, PC Brian A. Roelof M.D. Urologic Consultants, PC

Pediatrics (General)

Esmerelda Cadena M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Downtown Ronald Hofman M.D. Alger Pediatrics Rebecca Huizen D.O. Christian Healthcare Centers Greg Jereb M.D. Cascade Pediatrics

Daniel Fain M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Jeri Kessenich M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Jena Krueger M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Tiffany A. Letts M.D. Metro Health Southwest

Olufemi Soyode M.D. Center for Adolescent and Child Neurology

Pediatric Neurosurgery

Casey Madura M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Pediatric Pulmonology

Susan Millard M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital John Schuen M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital

Ruel Lirio M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Kurt J. Meppelink D.O. Metro Health Hudsonville Lauren A. Mortensen M.D. Holland Pediatric Associates Elizabeth Fisher Pallante M.D. Port City Pediatrics PLC Alaa E. Salhadar M.D. Metro Health Southwest Robert Veenema D.O. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital


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featured Physicians

Featured Physicians // GRAND RAPIDS MAGAZINE

Dr. Lawrence Mallon, M.D.

D

R. LAWRENCE MALLON is is a Michigan native who has practiced in West Michigan for more than 20 years. He received his undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Michigan. He’s a board-certified vascular surgeon who was trained at the University of Kentucky, with additional endovascular training at the Arizona Heart Institute. Dr. Mallon is also a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a member of the Society of Vascular Surgery. Dr. Mallon’s practice involves a wide range of vascular and minimally invasive, endovascular procedures to treat carotid and peripheral vascular disease, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and deep venous thrombosis. He also performs dialysis access procedures and anterior spine exposures. Dr. Mallon is a member of Muskegon Surgical Associates (MSA). MSA is a multi-specialty surgical group that has been serving West Michigan since 1972. MSA offers an extensive range of services including general surgery, plastic surgery, hand surgery and therapy, and vascular surgery. MSA Vascular Services includes a Vein Care Center, Office Based Lab, and a Vascular Lab.

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Dr. Name Here LOREM IPSUM DOLOR sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent sit amet elementum velit. Donec at rhoncus tortor, vel vehicula elit. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nam tincidunt sagittis turpis, in viverra erat pellentesque in. Curabitur mollis turpis ligula, vitae sodales orci tempus ut. Duis ut laoreet libero, in malesuada ex. Integer aliquam vel nunc a consectetur. Nam

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tortor sit amet nisi accumsan congue. Pellentesque sed dolor quis mi dapibus vestibulum. Curabitur porta id orci eu interdum. Nunc eu ullam neque, quis porta justo. Quisque.

Name Address Address Phone website.com

ligula arcu. Etiam aliquet vestibulum suscipit. Donec vel libero accumsan, aliquam orci sit amet, bibendum libero. Integer a erat a est lacinia ornare. Curabitur commodo nisi in nunc interdum sodales. Sed non iaculis ipsum. Maecenas dolor dui, malesuada vel lectus vitae, semper sodales diam. In ultricies scelerisque massa in ornare. Sed fermentum erat nunc, sed egestas nunc rutrum id. Morbi nec neque dui. Vivamus varius gravida mi nec accumsan. Duis euismod hendrerit tortor, in el-

Muskegon Surgical Associates 1316 Mercy Drive Muskegon, MI 49444 231-739-9461 msapc.com GR M AG .CO M

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Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Kelly Armstrong M.D. Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital Benjamin J. Bruinsma M.D. Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital James Ellis M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan James J. Lee M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan Christopher Morelli D.O. Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital Randal Palmitier M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan Randolph Russo M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan W. Christian VandenBerg M.D. Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital Carolyn Vollmer M.D. Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital Lisa Voss D.O. Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital Michael W. Wheaton M.D. Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Dennis Hammond M.D. Partners in Plastic Surgery of West Michigan

Carey Krause D.O. Mercy Health Saint Mary's

Johanna R. Krebiehl M.D. Plastic Surgery Associates

Aaron Plattner M.D. Michigan State University College of Human Medicine

Douglas Leppink M.D. Centre for Plastic Surgery Andrew Livingston M.D. Plastic Surgery Specialists, PLLC Robert Mann M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital Matthew Martin M.D. Elite Plastic Surgery Mithilesh Mishra M.D. West Michigan Plastic Surgery Clinic Steven Naum M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan Andrei Ostric M.D. Muskegon Surgical Associates, P.C. Benjamin Rechner M.D. Centre for Plastic Surgery John D. Renucci M.D. Plastic Surgery Associates Steven L. Ringler M.D. Center for Aesthetics and Plastic Surgery

Marguerite E. Aitken M.D. Plastic Surgery Associates

Robyn Sackeyfio M.D. R. Sackeyfio Plastic Surgery

David R. Alfonso "M.D., FACS" Bengtson Center for Aesthetics & Plastic Surgery

Dena Thayer D.O. Muskegon Surgical Associates, P.C

Shannon Armstrong M.D. Elite Plastic Surgery Bradley P. Bengtson "M.D., FACS" Bengtson Center for Aesthetics & Plastic Surgery Scott R. Brundage M.D. Centre for Plastic Surgery William T. Cullen M.D. Elite Plastic Surgery

Ewa Timek M.D. Advanced Plastic Surgery Andrea Van Pelt M.D. Partners in Plastic Surgery of West Michigan Stephen N. Zonca M.D. Muskegon Surgical Associates, P.C.

Podiatry

Michael G. David D.P.M Foot & Ankle Specialists

Viet Do M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Timothy J. Hulst D.P.M Foot & Ankle Specialists

Ronald D. Ford M.D. Elite Plastic Surgery

Psychiatry

John Girotto M.D. Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital 76

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Eric Achtyes M.D. Pine Rest Denise Gribbin M.D. Mercy Health Saint Mary's

William Sanders D.O. Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services

Radiation Oncology

Terri L. Bott-Kothari M.D. The Cancer Center at Metro Health Village Eric Buth M.D. Spectrum Health Hospitals Julie M. Forstner M.D. The Cancer Center at Metro Health Village James M. Kane Jr. M.D. Mercy Health Radiation Oncology Michael Mahacek M.D. Spectrum Health Hospitals

Radiology

Joseph Junewick M.D. Advanced Radiology Services PC Charles Luttenton M.D. Advanced Radiology Services PC Chris Therasse M.D. Advanced Radiology Services PC Stuart Vollmer M.D. Advanced Radiology Services PC

Reproductive Endocrinology / Infertility William G. Dodds M.D. The Fertility Center Valerie I. Shavell M.D. The Fertility Center James E. Young M.D. The Fertility Center

Rheumatology

James D. Birmingham M.D. Metro Health Rheumatology Aaron T. Eggebeen M.D. West Michigan Rheumatology PLLC Richard Martin M.D. West Michigan Rheumatology PLLC


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featured Physicians

Featured Physicians // GRAND RAPIDS MAGAZINE

D

R. STEPHEN ZONCA, a board-certified plastic surgeon with a background in general surgery, specializes in cosmetic and reconstructive procedures. He brings his wide range of surgical knowledge and experience to help his patients.

Dr. Stephen Zonca, M.D. “My goal is to help patients look and feel their best,” says Dr. Zonca, “including changes after cancer treatment, pregnancy, and weight loss”. After attending Wayne State University Medical School, Dr. Zonca completed seven

years of surgical training in general and plastic surgery at Wake Forest University. During his training, he won multiple awards for his work with medical research projects. Dr. Zonca is passionate about finding better ways to help patients, and that’s why he continues to participate in several research efforts. In addition, he is the co-director of wound care at Select Specialty Hospital and the Mercy Wound Care Center, as well as a diplomat of the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Dr. Zonca performs a full spectrum of surgical procedures with special interest in breast augmentation, tummy tucks, and comprehensive facial rejuvenation, including minimally invasive office procedures. Muskegon Surgical Associates (MSA) is a multi-specialty surgical group that has been serving West Michigan since 1972. MSA offers an extensive range of services including general surgery, plastic surgery, hand surgery and therapy, and vascular surgery. MSA Plastic Surgery and Pure Medical Spa offer many cosmetic and reconstructive services including: CoolSculpting, laser procedures, skincare treatments, massage and much more.

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Dr. Name Here LOREM IPSUM DOLOR sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent sit amet elementum velit. Donec at rhoncus tortor, vel vehicula elit. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nam tincidunt sagittis turpis, in viverra erat pellentesque in. Curabitur mollis turpis ligula, vitae sodales orci tempus ut. Duis ut laoreet libero, in malesuada ex. Integer aliquam vel nunc a consectetur. Nam

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tortor sit amet nisi accumsan congue. Pellentesque sed dolor quis mi dapibus vestibulum. Curabitur porta id orci eu interdum. Nunc eu ullam neque, quis porta justo. Quisque.

Name Address Address Phone website.com

ligula arcu. Etiam aliquet vestibulum suscipit. Donec vel libero accumsan, aliquam orci sit amet, bibendum libero. Integer a erat a est lacinia ornare. Curabitur commodo nisi in nunc interdum sodales. Sed non iaculis ipsum. Maecenas dolor dui, malesuada vel lectus vitae, semper sodales diam. In ultricies scelerisque massa in ornare. Sed fermentum erat nunc, sed egestas nunc rutrum id. Morbi nec neque dui. Vivamus varius gravida mi nec accumsan. Duis euismod hendrerit tortor, in el-

MSA Plastic Surgery A division of Muskegon Surgical Associates 1675 Patriot Drive Muskegon, MI 49444 231-739-1933 msapc.com GR M AG .CO M

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Sleep Medicine

Urology

Vascular Surgery

Timothy E. Daum M.D. Metro Health Sleep Disorders Center

Jonathan Bolthouse M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Albert Ho M.D. Mercy Health Neurosciences Sleep Center

Christopher Brede M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Joshua Greenberg M.D. Mercy Health Physician Partners Vascular and Vein Specialists

Lee Marmion M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Michael Kozminski M.D. Urology Associates of Grand Rapids, P.C.

Christopher Morgan M.D. Mercy Health Sleep Center Saint Mary's Campus

Randall S. Kuntzman M.D. Urology Surgeons, P.C.

Jason Coles M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Kelly Waters M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Sports Medicine

John G. Anema M.D. Urologic Consultants, PC

Brian Lane M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group John R. Lobo M.D. Urology Surgeons, P.C.

Tim Henne M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

John Ludlow M.D. Western Michigan Urological Associates

Michael Jabara M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Erik M. Ratchford D.O. Urology Associates of Grand Rapids, P.C.

Edwin T. Kornoelje D.O. Metro Health Cascade

Paul N. Rodriguez M.D. Urology Associates of Grand Rapids, P.C.

Thomas Matelic M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Kenneth F. Shockley D.O. Michigan Urological Clinic

Peter Theut M.D. Orthopaedic Associates of Michigan

Jannah H. Thompson M.D., F.P.M.R.S. Urologic Consultants, PC

Thoracic Surgery

Vascular / Interventional Radiology

Edward Murphy M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Bruce Shabahang M.D. Mercy Health Lacks Cancer Center Charles Willekes M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Trauma Surgery

Cathryn Chadwick M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Alistair Chapman M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Luke Durling M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Charles Gibson M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Eric J. Mitchell M.D. West Michigan Surgical Specialists PLC

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Baljit Singh Deol M.D. Kent Radiology, P.C.

Michael Doherty M.D. Advanced Radiology Services PC Michael Knox M.D. Advanced Radiology Services PC Jarrod MacFarlane D.O. Advanced Radiology Services PC Guillermo R. Sanchez M.D. Metro Health Interventional Radiology Matthew A. Tiede M.D. Metro Health Interventional Radiology Jeffrey VanErp M.D. Advanced Radiology Services PC Manish K. Varma M.D. Advanced Radiology Services PC

Robert Cuff M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group

Michelle Kosovec M.D. Mercy Health Physicians Partners Vascular and Vein Specialists Lawrence Ian Mallon M.D. Muskegon Surgical Associates, P.C. M. Ashraf Mansour M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group John Morris D.O. Mercy Health Wound Care Clinic Jason Slaikeu M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Peter Wong M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group Eanas Yassa M.D. Spectrum Health Medical Group


S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S ECT I O N S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S ECT I O N

featured Physicians

Featured Physicians // GRAND RAPIDS MAGAZINE

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IANA BITNER, M.D., Midlife, Menopause & Sexual Health Expert, is starting true. Women’s Health in Grand Rapids because she loves working to improve the lives of women. For 25 years, she delivered babies and provided general

Dr. Diana Bitner, M.D. OB/GYN and surgical care. Now, she’s decided to move her career in another direction. “Women over 45 want to live a full life as they age, and not be limited by menopause symptoms or illness,” she says. “true. Women’s Health will offer women all-around, women-specific care.”

Dr. Bitner believes symptoms such as hot flashes and low sex drive, and signs such as weight gain and high cholesterol, can be used by women as a wake-up call. Women age differently than men. Dr. Bitner has used up-to-date knowledge to create a program that puts each woman in the middle of her own personalized health care team. “At true., we want to know each of our patients and provide care and treatment options that are personalized, based on their goals. We’re proactive and can prevent problems.” Menopause happens to everyone and shouldn’t be taboo, miserable, or a mystery. It can happen early, due to cancer treatment, or naturally, around age 52. In her book, “I Want to Age Like That! Healthy Aging Through Midlife and Menopause,” which has sold more than 4,000 copies, Dr. Bitner outlines the stories of women who have succeeded with her program. Patients at true. will have access to the true. app to track symptoms and their seven essential elements of daily success (SEEDS). Dr. Bitner is excited to bring world-class, benchmark care to West Michigan. “Because women are busy, we’ll be open early and late to accommodate their schedules,” she says. “Our opening day cannot come soon enough!” Membership to Dr. Bitner’s unique concierge midlife care model can be explored at www.truewomenshealth.com/new-patients. Featured Physicians SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

// GRAND RAPIDS MAGAZINE // TOP DOCS

Dr. Name Here LOREM IPSUM DOLOR sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent sit amet elementum velit. Donec at rhoncus tortor, vel vehicula elit. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nam tincidunt sagittis turpis, in viverra erat pellentesque in. Curabitur mollis turpis ligula, vitae sodales orci tempus ut. Duis ut laoreet libero, in malesuada ex. Integer aliquam vel nunc a consectetur. Nam

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tortor sit amet nisi accumsan congue. Pellentesque sed dolor quis mi dapibus vestibulum. Curabitur porta id orci eu interdum. Nunc eu ullam neque, quis porta justo. Quisque.

Name Address Address Phone website.com

ligula arcu. Etiam aliquet vestibulum suscipit. Donec vel libero accumsan, aliquam orci sit amet, bibendum libero. Integer a erat a est lacinia ornare. Curabitur commodo nisi in nunc interdum sodales. Sed non iaculis ipsum. Maecenas dolor dui, malesuada vel lectus vitae, semper sodales diam. In ultricies scelerisque massa in ornare. Sed fermentum erat nunc, sed egestas nunc rutrum id. Morbi nec neque dui. Vivamus varius gravida mi nec accumsan. Duis euismod hendrerit tortor, in el-

True Women’s Health. 2144 East Paris Ave. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49546 616-330-1700 truewomenshealth.com GR M AG .CO M

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featured Physicians

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Dr. Gregory J. Artz, M.D.

R. GREGORY J. ARTZ, M.D., who has treated patients with all forms of hearing and balance disorders since 2008, is one of only two ENT surgeons in West Michigan who is fellowship-trained in ear and skull-base surgery (neurotology). Dr. Artz completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Michigan and received his medical degree from the Wayne State University School of Medicine in 2001. In 2008, after completing a five-year otolaryngology residency at Thomas Jefferson University in

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R. JOSEPH C. TAYLOR says he feels a great responsibility when a patient puts their trust in his hands. “Having their trust is a very important part of my practice, and one I never take for granted,” he says. “You earn that trust by doing everything you can to find solutions that best suit them.”

Philadelphia, Dr. Artz was accepted into a prestigious two-year fellowship training program at the Michigan Ear Institute in Farmington Hills. Education and mentoring young physicians has always been a passion for Dr. Artz, who has frequently been involved in medical student and residency training and education. Dr. Artz provides a long list of services and specialties including skull-base surgery, acoustic neuromas, vestibular schwannomas, meningioma, endoscopic sinus surgery, cochlear

implantation, ear drum perforation repair, and laser stapes surgery.

Grand Rapids Ear Nose & Throat 1555 44th St. SW Wyoming, MI 49509 616-249-8000 1425 Michigan St. NE, Ste. A Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616-459-4514 grentpc.com

Dr. Joseph C. Taylor, M.D. Dr. Taylor, who specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of ear, nose, and throat disorders of children and adolescents, joined Grand Rapids Ear Nose & Throat more than 10 years ago. “For me, it’s about relating to the patient and understanding the blessing they’re giving me by allowing me to take care of them or their

children,” he says. A native of Charlotte, Mich., Dr. Taylor attended the University of Michigan for both undergraduate and medical school. He also completed his otolaryngology residency and a pediatric otolaryngology fellowship at U-M. Grand Rapids Ear Nose & Throat 1555 44th St. SW Wyoming, MI 49509 616-249-8000 1425 Michigan St. NE, Ste. A Grand Rapids, MI 49503 616-459-4514 grentpc.com

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THANKS FOR CONTINUING TO GIVE US HOPE. 1

2

3

6 4

5 8

1 Lisa Voss, DO 2 W. Christian Vandenberg, MD 3 Kelly Armstrong, MD 4 James Hudson, MD 5 Carolyn Vollmer, MD

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6 Benjamin Bruinsma, MD 7 Christopher Morelli, DO 8 Michael Wheaton, MD


EXPERT Q&A

Women’s Health

What better time than now to take important steps that could potentially save your life? Eating right, getting proper exercise, and getting enough sleep have never been more vital than they are right now. Other critical factors include being informed, following health guidelines such as washing your hands and drinking plenty of water, and

getting regular checkups to help you stay in tune with your health and your goals in life. Are you constantly working out but still not losing weight? Do you suffer from dry skin or eczema? What are the warning signs and/or risk factors for skin cancer? If you’re looking to start a family, when is the best time to attempt to conceive?

Throughout the pages of Grand Rapids Magazine’s Expert Women’s Health section, you’ll hear from doctors and experts right here in West Michigan who have inside knowledge about what it takes to help you feel healthy and confident, both today and tomorrow. ■


EXPERT Q&A Q:

Is it important for women to add strength training to their workout routine?

A: Weight training is an extremely effective way for women to get in great shape. Women who include strength and resistance training in their workouts have stronger, more toned, and healthier bodies. The benefits of weight training for women include reducing the risk of osteoporosis. As women get older, they naturally lose bone density, putting them at risk for developing osteoporosis. Routinely lifting weights slows bone deterioration, helps maintain strength, and reduces the chance of developing osteoporosis.

Q:

MVP Athletic Clubs Rachel Verdusco, MVP Director & Fitness Manager mvpsportsclubs.com

What can I do to improve my fertility?

A: Ovulation is when a woman releases an egg from her ovary. The best time to attempt to conceive is one to two days prior to ovulation, and on the day of ovulation. Tracking menstrual cycles, basal body temperature charting, and using urinary ovulation predictor kits can help identify this fertile window. If a woman isn’t ovulating consistently, it becomes very difficult to conceive, and consultation with an OB/GYN or fertility specialist is recommended. For a young, healthy woman, the chance

Q:

Weight training also lowers body fat. Studies have shown that strength training is more effective at reducing abdominal fat than cardiovascular exercise. When strength training is incorporated into their exercise routine, women burn calories and increase lean muscle mass, which stimulates their metabolism. Weight training also reduces the risk of injury. Strength training helps increase the strength of your connective tissue, muscles, and tendons, which improves your range of motion and helps reduce the risk of injury.

of conceiving within one year exceeds 80 percent. Unfortunately, age affects fertility. While a woman in her 30s has a 20 percent chance of getting pregnant each month, this rate drops to 5 percent for a woman in her 40s. Although we can’t turn back the clock, healthy eating, moderate exercise, not smoking, limiting excess alcohol (less than two drinks per day) and caffeine (less than 200 mg per day) intake, and minimizing exposure to toxins in the environment (e.g. BPA) will improve a woman’s chance of conceiving.

The Fertility Center Dr. Valerie I. Shavell 3230 Eagle Park Drive, Ste. 100 Grand Rapids, MI 49525 616-988-2229 fertilitycentermi.com Advertisement on page 87

Is it still important to wear sunscreen?

A: The American Academy of Dermatology is reminding the public that sunscreen remains an important way of protecting yourself from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays. Scientific evidence supports the benefits of sunscreen to prevent sunburn and reduce the risk of skin cancer, the most common cancer in the United States. Dermatologists know that unprotected exposure to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays is the most preventable risk factor for skin cancer, including melanoma — the deadliest form of the disease. Sunscreen can help protect you from harmful UV rays, making it a useful tool in the fight against skin cancer. To protect your skin and reduce your

risk of skin cancer, the AAD recommends that everyone seek shade; wear protective clothing including a lightweight, longsleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat, and sunglasses; and generously apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher to exposed skin. Preferably, this sunscreen would have a physical blocker such as zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. If you have questions about how to select a sunscreen for you and your family, schedule an appointment for a skin check with a boardcertified dermatologist. AAD statement modified by Dr. Ryan Freeland, F.A.A.D.

Wolverine Dermatology Dr. Ryan Freeland, M.D. 1673 Gezon Parkway Wyoming, MI 49519 616-243-3376 wolverinedermatology.com Advertisement on page 67


THANK YOU,

GRAND RAPIDS

Grand Rapids Magazine supports our medical community, grocery industry, non-profits, retail and restaurant workers, truck drivers, mail carriers, and teachers. To all of our neighbors on the front lines, you are our heroes — with gratitude,

THANK YOU!


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OUR STAFF'S GUIDE TO THE AREA'S BEST EATERIES For any additions or changes: // Please email cdewey@geminipub.com or write to Grand Rapids Magazine, c/o Dining Guide, 401 Hall St. SW, Suite 331, Grand Rapids, MI 49503.

Downtown GR ANGEL’S THAI CAFÉ Extensive Thai fare. Menu includes your-choice stir-fry option. Vegetarian friendly. No alcohol. Open daily. // 136 Monroe Center NW, 454-9801. angelsthaicafe.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ BANGKOK TASTE CUISINE Thai fare with lunch buffet and kids menu. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 15 Jefferson Ave SE, 356-5550. bangkoktastegr.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ BEIJING KITCHEN Hunan, Szechuan and Cantonese cuisines. Lunch and dinner specials. No alcohol. Open daily. // 342 State St SE, 458-8383. beijingkitchenmi.com. Lunch (SunFri), Dinner $-$$

2020 DINING AWARD WINNER BISTRO BELLA VITA Big-city casual; modern French and Italian cuisine, locally sourced and prepared over a wood fire. Mammoth martini bar, nice wine selection. Open daily. // 44 Grandville Ave SW, 222-4600. bistrobellavita.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ BOBARINO’S AT THE B.O.B. Grill on second floor of The B.O.B. offers everything from wood-fired pizza to upscale entrées. Lunch menu has deli sandwiches, salads, burgers. Full bar. Outdoor seating. Closed Sun. // 20 Monroe Ave NW, 356-2000. thebob.com/bobarinospizza. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ BRICK & PORTER Appetizers, burgers, salads, sandwiches and a nice selection of entrées; 20 beers on tap (“the darker, the better”). Open daily. // 47 Monroe Center NW, 226-6928. brickandportergr.com. Brunch (Sat-Sun), Lunch, Dinner $-$$ BRICKYARD TAVERN Located inside the historic Boardwalk Building, BrickYard Tavern offers a varied menu with items including a selection of burgers, sandwiches and entrées such as beer-battered salmon and chips, fish tacos and rib eye. Enjoy cocktails and 24 beers on tap. Open daily. // 940 Monroe Ave NW, 805-3280. brickyardtaverngr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ BULL’S HEAD TAVERN Large selection of appetizers, soups and salads. Entrées

include pasta, fish, chicken and steak along with burgers and sandwiches. Full bar. Closed Sun. // 188 Monroe Ave NW, 454-3580. thebullsheadtavern. com. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $$-$$$ CHARLEY’S CRAB Fresh seafood in a fine dining atmosphere with views of the Grand River. Gluten-free menu. Beer and extensive wine list. Sun brunch 10-2:30. Open daily. // 63 Market Ave SW, 459-2500.muer.com/charleyscrab. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $$-$$$ THE CHOP HOUSE Aged prime beef, seafood, pork, lamb chops, chicken and more. Downstairs is La Dolce Vita dessert and cigar bar. Closed Sun. // 190 Monroe Ave NW, 451-6131. thechophousegrandrapids.com. Dinner $$$ CITY BUILT BREWING CO. Taproom featuring a variety of craft beer. Plus, Puerto Rican-inspired appetizers, small plates, entrées, soups and salads. Closed Mon. // 820 Monroe Ave NW, 805-5755. citybuiltbrewing.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ CINCO DE MAYO Offers the usual Mexican fare plus carnitas and steak asada. Full bar. Open daily. // 114 Monroe Center NW, 719-2401. cincodemayogr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ CITYSEN LOUNGE Soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers and small-plate creations. Beer and wine; happy hour 4-7 pm. Open daily. // CityFlatsHotel, 83 Monroe Center NW, 6081725. cityflatshotel.com/location/grand-rapids. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$ COTTAGE BAR Longtime favorite since 1927. Famous Cottage burgers and fries, signature chilis and more. Full bar. Closed Sun. // 18 LaGrave Ave SE, 454-9088. cottagebar.biz. Lunch, Dinner $ DIVANI European-inspired food includes small plates for sharing and a variety of entrées. Full bar. Closed Sun. // 15 Ionia Ave SW, 774-9463. divanigr.com. Dinner $$-$$$ FLANAGAN’S Downtown Irish pub features imported beers, entrées with Irish influence. Frequent live music. Closed Sun. // 139 Pearl St NW, 454-7852. flanagansgr.com. Lunch, Dinner $ FORTY PEARL A wine bar serving oysters, cured meats and cheeses, baked goods and sweets, soups and salads, shareables, sandwiches, rice bowls and entrées like salmon, seared scallops and Cornish hen. Open daily. // 40 Pearl St. NW, 608-7741. fortypearl.com. Lunch, Dinner $$$

$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)

FOUNDERS BREWING CO. Spacious taproom, serpentine bar and live music Thu and Sat. Menu features appetizers, deli sandwiches. Outdoor beer garden. Open daily. // 235 Grandville Ave SW, 776-1195. foundersbrewing.com. Lunch, Dinner $ FRIESIAN GASTRO PUB A cozy neighborhood eatery offering comfort food items with an eclectic twist. Menu items include handhelds like the harissa hot chicken sandwich and vegan Rueben, as well as entrées including ramen bowls and Korean short ribs. Full bar. Patio and rooftop deck. Open daily. // 720 Michigan St NE, 825-3001. friesiangr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ GILLY’S SMOKEHOUSE Twelve rotating craft beers from The B.O.B’s Brewery paired with smokehouse fare, including smoked beef brisket, Amish chicken, pork butt and more. Closed Sun-Mon. // 20 Monroe Ave NW, 356-2000. thebob. com/gillysrestaurant. Dinner $-$$ GINZA SUSHI & RAMEN BAR Wide selection of authentic Japanese cuisine, sushi, ramen, poke bowls, hibachi dinners, appetizers, soups and salad. Open daily. Catering available. // 1015 Michigan St NE, 272-4116. ginzasushiramen. com. Lunch, Dinner $$ GP SPORTS Sports bar and restaurant. Menu features create-yourown pizzas and burgers, salads and sandwiches. Open daily. // Amway Grand Plaza, 187 Monroe Ave NW, 776-6495. amwaygrand.com/dining/gp-sports. Lunch, Dinner $$ GRAND RAPIDS BREWING CO. Organic brews, hard cider, wine and spirits. Farm-totable menu includes sharable plates, sausages, soups, salads, sandwiches, entrées. Open daily. // 1 Ionia Ave SW, 458-7000. grbrewingcompany.com. Lunch (SatSun), Dinner $-$$ GRAND RAPIDS GARAGE BAR AND GRILL “All-American grub” includes burgers, nachos, sandwiches, soups and salads, full bar. Live entertainment Fri and Sat. Open daily. / 819 Ottawa Ave NW, 454-0321. garagebargr.com. Lunch, Dinner $ GRAND WOODS LOUNGE Eclectic menu with upscale comfort foods. Live entertainment, pool tables, spacious full bar. Yearround alfresco dining with fireplace. Open daily. // 77 Grandville Ave SW, 451-4300. grandwoodslounge.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ HERITAGE HILL PIZZA Offers traditional, stuffed and specialty pizzas. No alcohol. Open daily with a few tables for dining in. // GR M AG .CO M

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340 State St SE, 742-4773. grandrapidspizza.net. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ THE HERITAGE GRCC culinary students prepare gourmet dishes from steaks to vegan. Menu changes weekly. Wine and beer. Open Tue-Fri during school year. // Applied Technology Center, 151 Fountain St NE, 234-3700. grcc.edu/heritage. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ HONG KONG EXPRESS Szechuan and Cantonese. All-you-can-eat lunch buffet. No alcohol. Open daily. // 150 E Fulton St, 235-2888. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ JAMAICAN DAVE’S Chicken, goat, oxtail, beef, fish and vegetarian fare in Jamaican style. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 530 S Division Ave, 458-7875. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $ J. GARDELLA’S TAVERN Massive full bar and gargantuan menu includes hearty appetizers, salads, burgers, entrées. Three floors of seating. Closed Sun. // 11 Ionia Ave SW, 459-8824. jgardellastavern.com. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $ JUDSON’S AT THE B.O.B. Award-winning steakhouse offers steaks, seafood and chops. Notable wine list. Closed Sun. // 20 Monroe Ave NW, 3562000. thebob.com/judsonssteakhouse. Dinner $$$ THE KITCHEN BY WOLFGANG PUCK Comfort fare and global classics in a casual atmosphere overlooking the Grand River. Menu includes appetizers, gourmet pizzas, salads and entrées. Full bar. Open daily. // Amway Grand Plaza, 187 Monroe Ave NW, 776-3230. amwaygrand.com/dining/the-kitchen-bywolfgang-puck. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ LEO’S Fresh seafood, soups, salads and more in elegant yet casual atmosphere. Early dinner menu 4:30-6 pm MonFri. Closed Sun. // 60 Ottawa Ave NW, 454-6700. leosrestaurant.com. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $$-$$$

2020 DINING AWARD WINNER LINEAR Riverfront eatery featuring seasonal menu with fresh modern American fare and outdoor-seating options; plus, a display of rotating works by local artists. Full bar. Closed Mon. // 1001 Monroe Ave NW, 200-4343. linearrestaurant.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ LITTLEBIRD Café-style restaurant featuring made-from-scratch breakfast and lunch, including a full coffee menu, house-made sodas and egg creams, and pastries. Full bar. Open daily. // 95 Monroe Center NW, 419-4168. thelittlebirdgr.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner (Tue-Sat) $ LUNA TAQUERIA Y COCINA Upscale Latin American menu pairs with locally sourced meat and produce. Full bar. Closed Sun. // 64 Ionia Ave SW, 288-6340. lunagr.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

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2020 DINING AWARD WINNER

2020 DINING AWARD WINNER

MARCONA ON LYON “Modern” Mediterranean cuisine, including appetizers, grilled skewers, falafel and more, as well as vegetarian- and vegan-friendly options. Full bar. Closed Mon. // 623 Lyon St NE, 828-1228. marconaonlyon.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$

OSTERIA ROSSA Casual Italian-inspired cuisine with Michigan roots from executive chef/owner Chris Perkey. Wood-fired pizzas, handmade pasta. Full bar. Open daily. // 16 Monroe Center NE, 988-9350. osteriarossa.com. Lunch (MonFri), Dinner $-$$

2020 BEST NEW RESTAURANT

PALACE OF INDIA Indian cuisine with a sizeable menu including vegetarian selections. Lunch buffet 11-3. Open daily. // 138 E Fulton St, 913-9000. palaceofindiarestaurant. com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

MARGAUX A contemporary French bistro. Fine wines and cocktails. Alfresco dining overlooking the Grand River. Open daily. // JW Marriott, 235 Louis St NW, 242-1448. ilovethejw.com/dining. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$$ MAX’S SOUTH SEAS HIDEWAY A tiki-themed restaurant that includes a raw bar, hot appetizers, salads, sides, land and sea dishes, and vegan options. Appetizers include ceviche and puhahana rock shrimp, and entrées include a poke bowl, citrus-glazed faroe and an island lobster roll. Full bar. Open daily. // 58 Ionia Ave SW, 551-0016. maxstiki.com. Dinner $$-$$$ MEXO Features tequila/mezcal bar and a modern touch on classic pre-Hispanic foods of Mexico. Full bar. Open daily. // 118 E Fulton St, 828-4123. mexogr.com. Breakfast (Sun), Lunch, Dinner $$ MOJO’S DUELING PIANO BAR & RESTAURANT Lively downtown spot opens for dinner at 5 pm Wed-Sat. Appetizers, sandwiches, salads, flatbread pizzas, full bar. Shows start at 8 pm Wed-Fri, 7 pm Sat. Closed Sun-Tue. // 180 Monroe Ave NW, 776-9000. mojospianobar.com. Dinner (Wed-Sat) $$-$$$ MUDPENNY Coffee bar with all-day breakfast, sandwiches, burgers and salads. Catering available. Closed Sun. // 570 Grandville Ave SW, 259-5353. mudpenny.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $

2020 DINING AWARD WINNER NEW HOTEL MERTENS French-inspired, upscale dining on restored historic site of original, early-20th-century-era New Hotel Mertens. Seafood, pasta, entrées and small plates. Local wine options. Open daily. // 35 Oakes St SW, 551-1713. newhotelmertens.com. Brunch (Sat-Sun), Breakfast (Mon-Fri), Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $-$$ ONE TRICK PONY GRILL & TAPROOM Eclectic menu with vegetarian, Mexican and European cuisines. Dine alfresco on street-front, dog- friendly patio. Full bar. Closed Mon. // 136 E Fulton St, 2357669. onetrick.biz. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ ONE TWENTY THREE TAVERN Part of Studio Park, One Twenty Three Tavern offers starters, small plates and handhelds, large plates, and a kids menu. Offering elevated American fare, including a fried chicken sandwich, jackfruit carnitas, meatloaf, veggie meatballs, quinoa bowl and more. Full bar. Open daily. // 123 Ionia Ave SW. 123tavern.com. Lunch, Dinner $$$

PARSLEY MEDITERRANEAN GRILLE Appetizers, salads, soups, pitas, combos. Catering available. No alcohol. Open daily. // 80 Ottawa Ave NW, 776-2590. parsleymg.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ PIND INDIAN CUISINE A fine-dining Indian restaurant offering traditional dishes, such as tandoori, biryani, chicken tikka masala, malai kofta and samosas with gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian options. No alcohol. Open daily. // 241 W Fulton St, 805-4767. pindgr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$$ RESERVE Wine bar offers extensive by-the-glass selections and culinary options to match, including charcuterie. Closed Sun. // 201 Monroe Ave NW, 855-9463. reservegr.com. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $$-$$$ ROAM BY SAN CHEZ BISTRO The San Chez Bistro team introduces global street food, including cuisine from China, Morocco, Spain, France, Poland, U.K., Indonesia and more. Full bar. Closed Sun. // 250 Monroe Ave NW, 288-9129. roambysanchez.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $$ ROCKWELL REPUBLIC Diverse menu emphasizes local ingredients from sushi to comfort food. Upper-level outdoor seating. Full bar. Open daily. // 45 S Division Ave, 551-3563. rockwellsrepublic.com. Dinner $$-$$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE Classic American steakhouse in the Amway Grand Plaza. Serves alcohol. Closed Sun. // 187 Monroe Ave NW, 776-6426. amwaygrand.com/dining/ruthschris-steak-house. Lunch, Dinner $$$ SAN CHEZ BISTRO Spanish fare focusing on tapas-style small plates; sides and entrées. Wine and beer list includes Spanish varieties and sherry. Open daily. // 38 W Fulton St, 774-8272. sanchezbistro.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ SANDY POINT BEACH HOUSE GR Originating in West Olive, dishes include “traditional beach house favorites,” such as prime beef burgers, fresh halibut, steak and frites, and roasted chicken and mussels. Full bar. Open daily. // 822 Ottawa Ave. NW, 828-1118, sandypointbeachhouse.com. Brunch (SatSun), Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$

$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)


SLOWS BAR-B-Q Detroit-based restaurant offers extensive menu, including barbecue, sandwiches and sides. Michigan and national craft beers on tap. Open daily. // Downtown Market, 435 Ionia Ave SW, 454-1588. slowsbarbq.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ SOCIAL HOUSE A casual pub serving American-style food. Menu features a variety of offerings: starters such as veggie, meat and cheese shared platters, goat cheese fritters, spicy tuna wontons and avocado toast; soups and salads; burgers and sandwiches; and pizza. Full bar. Closed Mon. // 25 Ottawa Ave. SW, 551-1412. socialhousegr.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $$$ SOCIAL KITCHEN & BAR Refined comfort food, sandwiches, pizzas, extensive cocktail menu. Vintage décor, patio. Open daily. // Downtown Market, 435 Ionia Ave SW, 724-4464. socialkitchenandbar.com/grand-rapids.html. Brunch (Sat-Sun), Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ SPARKS BBQ Offering barbecued meats by the pound, à la carte, sandwiches, appetizers, salads, sides, specialty entrées and desserts. Sparks BBQ originated in Traverse City. Full bar. Open daily. // 15 Ionia Ave. SW, Suite 140, 8882170. home.eatsparksbbq.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ SPEAKEZ LOUNGE Casual pub setting with eclectic menu, including vegan and gluten-free. Creative starters, soups, salads, entrées (after 4 pm). Full bar. Open daily. // 600 Monroe Ave NW, 458-3125. speakezlounge.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ STELLA’S LOUNGE Award-winning stuffed burgers, plus vegan and vegetarian items. Full bar, known for its whiskey selection. Open daily. // 53 Commerce Ave SW, 7424444. stellasgr.com. Lunch (Fri-Sun), Dinner$-$$ TAVERN ON THE SQUARE Tapas-style fare, plus house specialties. Patio seating. Full bar, happy hour 3-7 Mon-Fri. Open daily. // 100 Ionia Ave SW, 456-7673. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ WHEELHOUSE KITCHEN AND COCKTAILS Eclectic American bistro fare with seasonal recipes using Michigan ingredients. Large bar and porch. Open daily. // Arena Place, 67 Ottawa Ave SW, 226-3319. wheelhousegrandrapids.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ Z’S BAR & RESTAURANT Sports-themed eatery known for its BBQ ribs. Soups, salads, sandwiches, entrées. Carry-out available. Open daily. // 168 Louis Campau Promenade NW, 4543141. zsbar.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

West Side ANDO SUSHI + BAR Asian fusion eatery featuring small plates, bentos, rice

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bowls, raw bar, noodles, soup, salad and more. Wide selection of wine, plus local, domestic and international beer. Full bar. // 415 Bridge St NW, 608-0789. andosushi.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ BLUE DOG TAVERN West Michigan craft brews on tap. Good selection of tots, dogs and burgers. Open daily. // 638 Stocking Ave NW, 608-6050. bluedogtaverngr.com. Lunch, Dinner $ BROADWAY BAR & GRILL Neighborhood bar known for burgers and holiday decorations, especially at Christmas. Outdoor grilling during summer. Hours change seasonally. // 740 Broadway Ave SW, 454-0565. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $ BUTCHER’S UNION Meat-and-whiskey-centric gastro pub. Full bar. Outdoor seating available. // 438 Bridge St NW, 551-1323. butchersuniongr.com. Brunch (Sun), Lunch, Dinner $$ EL GRANJERO Mexican fare from steak and shrimp to menudo on weekends. No alcohol but tasty virgin coladas. Open daily. // 950 Bridge St NW, 458-5595. Facebook. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $ EL SOMBRERO Offers “the original” wet burrito. Weekly specials. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 527 Bridge St NW, 451-4290. elsombrerorestaurantmi.com. Lunch, Dinner $ FRATELLI’S KITCHEN & BAR Italian cuisine based on family recipes from Sicily with a “modern twist.” Full service bar. Open daily. // 443 Bridge St NW, Suite 2. 389-4963. fratellisgr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ HARMONY HALL West Side brewpub with a German beer hall atmosphere serves pizza, sandwiches, salads and appetizers. Open daily. // 401 Stocking Ave NW, 233-9186. harmonybeer.com/harmony-hall. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ THE HOLIDAY BAR Established in 1905, menu features appetizers and sandwiches. Seating includes 40-foot horseshoe bar, tables and a beer garden in warm months. Open daily. // 801 Fifth St NW, 456-9058. theholidaybargr.com. Lunch, Dinner $ JOLLY PUMPKIN PIZZERIA & BREWERY Dexter-based brewery offers salads and sandwiches in addition to pizza. Kids menu available. Open daily. // 428 Bridge St NW, 419-4676. jollypumpkin.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ THE KNICKERBOCKER – NEW HOLLAND BREWING Craft brewery featuring a variety of locally sourced shared plates, sandwiches, soups, pizzas, barbecue and more. Open daily. // 417 Bridge St NW, 3455642. newhollandbrew.com/knickerbocker. Brunch (Sun), Lunch, Dinner $-$$

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LONG ROAD DISTILLERS Craft, small-batch distillery featuring variety of housemade snacks, sandwiches and entrées. Open daily. // 537 Leonard St NW, 228-4924. longroaddistillers.com. Brunch (Sat-Sun), Dinner $-$$ MAGGIE’S KITCHEN Mexican fare in café setting, cafeteria-style ordering. No alcohol. Closed Sun and Mon. // 636 Bridge St NW, 458-8583. Facebook. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $ THE MITTEN BREWING CO. Vintage baseball-themed nanobrewery pairs handcrafted beers with gourmet pizzas. Open daily. // 527 Leonard St NW, 608-5612. mittenbrewing.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ MONARCHS’ CLUB Starters, sausages, hot dogs, panini, Italian beef sandwiches and Grand Rapids Stackers. Michigan beer on draft. Open daily. // 646 Stocking Ave NW, 2339799. monarchsclubcornerbar.com. Lunch, Dinner $ ONE BOURBON Trendy, two-level restaurant serving creative shareable plates, burgers, hot sandwiches and entrées. Full bar features more than 120 whiskies. Closed Sun-Mon. // 608 Bridge St NW, 608-5766. onebourbongr.com. Dinner $-$$

WESTSIDE SOCIAL “Reimagined” American-style tavern with locally sourced, house-made appetizers, burgers, seafood and other entrées. Full bar. Happy hour specials available Mon-Fri. Open daily. // 2802 Lake Michigan Dr NW, 453-5877. westside.social. Lunch (Tue-Sun), Dinner $-$$

Uptown BOMBAY CUISINE Traditional Indian dishes with spices and flavors from northern India. Full bar. Open daily. Takeout available. // 1420 Lake Dr SE, 456-7055. eastownbombaycuisine.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ BREWERY VIVANT Beer and food in tradition of French and Belgian country dishes. Housed in a renovated funeral chapel. Most dishes made with locally sourced ingredients. Open daily. // 925 Cherry St SE, 719-1604. breweryvivant.com. Lunch (Sat-Sun), Dinner $$-$$$ BRICK ROAD PIZZA Traditional, gourmet and vegan pizzas (gluten-free crusts available); also soups, salads, pastas, sandwiches. Sun Brunch Bar. Full bar. Closed Mon. // 1017 Wealthy St SE, 719-2409. brickroadpizza.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

O’TOOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE Pub grub includes appetizers, sandwiches and burgers served on a mountain of fries. Open daily. // 448 Bridge St NW, 742-6095. otoolesgr.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

BROWN BUTTER CREPERIE & CAFÉ Locally sourced, made-from-scratch sweet and savory crepes and liege waffles. // 1436 Wealthy St SE, 2885038. brownbuttercrepes.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner (Wed-Sat) $

PEARL STREET GRILL Bright, contemporary restaurant features diverse menu in downtown Holiday Inn. Full bar. Open daily. // 310 Pearl St NW, 235-1342. higrdt.com/dining/ pearl-street-grill. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $$

CHEZ OLGA Caribbean and Creole fare. Veggie/vegan options. Takeout available. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 1441 Wealthy St SE, 233-4141. chezolga.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

SALVATORE’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT Sicilian and southern Italian fare. Separate sports bar; patio seating. Food, beer and wine available to go. Delivery and catering. Open daily. // 654 Stocking Ave NW, 454-4280. salvatoresgr.com. Lunch (MonFri), Dinner $-$$

2020 RESTAURANT OF THE YEAR THE SOVENGARD Midwest heart meets New Nordic spirit. This cozy West Side farm-to-table restaurant focuses on seasonal and local sourcing and offers two separate dining spaces/menus with an outdoor biergarten. Open Tues-Sun for lunch and dinner. Brunch on Sundays. Reservations accepted. // 443 Bridge St NW, 2147207. sovengard.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ TWO SCOTTS BARBECUE Authentic barbecue smoked in-house daily with homemade sides and sauces. Features draft root beer and weekly specials. Catering and food truck available. Closed Sun. // 536 Leonard St NW, 608-6756. twoscottsbbq.com. Lunch $-$$

2020 DINING AWARD WINNER THE COMMONS 1970s-themed restaurant with “retro comfort food.” Full bar, including craft beer and ’70s-inspired cocktails. Takeout available. Closed Mon. // 547 Cherry St SE, 458-2704. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $$ CURRY KITCHEN Authentic Indian cuisine. Daily lunch buffet. Kids menu. Takeout. Open daily. No alcohol. // 961 E Fulton St, 242-1300. currykitchengr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ DANZÓN CUBANO Authentic Cuban fare, including vegetarian and vegan options, as well as locally made and Cuban sodas. Full bar; happy hour specials Mon-Thu. Open daily. // 1 Carlton Ave SE, 988-9788. danzoncubano.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ DONKEY TAQUERIA Authentic Mexican food, including tacos, tostadas, botanas and tortas in a former 1920s service station. Full bar. Open daily. // 665 Wealthy St SE. donkeygr.com. Breakfast (Sat-Sun), Lunch, Dinner $-$$

$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)


EAST WEST BREWING CO. Traditional American-style beers. Fresh, made-to-order American-style food and seasonal vegetarian menu items from local vendors. Open daily. // 1400 Lake Dr SE, 288-5250. eastwestbrewingcompany.com. Lunch (Fri-Sat), Dinner $-$$

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ELECTRIC CHEETAH Eclectic menu with an emphasis on locally grown fare and creative combinations. Beer and wine available. Open daily. // 1015 Wealthy St SE, 451-4779. electriccheetah.com. Brunch (Sun), Lunch, Dinner $-$$ ELK BREWING CO. Brewery with rustic industrial interior. Menu includes innovative sandwiches and snacks. Open daily. // 700 Wealthy St SE, 238-5227. elkbrewing.com. Lunch (Fri-Sun), Dinner $ ERB THAI Thai fare; will accommodate vegetarian, gluten-free, no MSG. No alcohol. Open daily. // 950 Wealthy St SE, 356-2573. erbthaigr.com. Lunch, Dinner $

INVEST IN WHAT THEY’RE BUYING!

2020 DINING AWARD WINNER FORTY ACRES SOUL KITCHEN “Authentically American” southern comfort food, featuring po’boys, grits, gumbo and more. To-go catering available. Closed Mon. // 1059 Wealthy St SE, 481-6971. fortyacresgr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ GOJO ETHIOPIAN CUISINE & DELI Authentic dishes including vegetarian options. Watt (stew) dishes served with injera flatbread. Carry-out available. No alcohol. Closed Sun and Mon. // 421 Norwood Ave SE, 459-3383. gojoethiopian cuisine.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ THE GREEN WELL GASTRO PUB Not your run-of-the-mill New American fare. Full bar with more than 20 rotating draft beers, many from local breweries. Open Tue–Sun. // 924 Cherry St SE, 8083566. thegreenwell.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$

2020 DINING AWARD WINNER GROVE A cuisine focused on “comfort redefined, a tribute to your favorite nostalgic meals from childhood.” Full bar. Open Tue–Sat. // 919 Cherry St SE, 454-1000. groverestaurant.com. Lunch, Dinner $$$ HANCOCK Nashville hot chicken restaurant with sandwiches, fried chicken, an assortment of Southern picnic sides, salads and desserts. Also serves breakfast. Open daily. // 1157 Wealthy St. SE, 805-4232. hancockgr.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$ HARMONY BREWING CO. Custom brews with a full bar, wine and wood-fired pizzas. Sandwiches served 11 am-4 pm. Dog-friendly patio. Open daily. // 1551 Lake Dr SE, 233-0063. harmonybeer.com. Lunch, Dinner $$

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$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)

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KINGFISHER RESTAURANT & DELI This “vegetable-forward,” Mediterranean-influenced restaurant offers starters, omelets, bowls and hash, soups and salads, toast and sandwiches, sweets and pastries, and sides. Many of the offerings are available to be made vegetarian-, vegan- or gluten-free. No alcohol. Open daily. // 1001 Lake Dr SE, 734-6833. kingfishergr.com. Breakfast, Lunch $$

ZIVIO Modern European tavern and grill serving Bosnian cuisine melded with Turkish, Greek and other Central European countries' cooking traditions. Salads, wraps, gyros, dinner entrées. Full bar. Open daily. Catering available. // 724 Wealthy St SE, 608-3534. ziviogr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$$

LITTLE AFRICA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE Hearty vegetable stews; sauces and fixings served on Ethiopian flat bread. No alcohol. Cash or checks only. Closed Sun and Mon. // 956 E Fulton St, 222-1169. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $

East Grand Rapids

MARU SUSHI & GRILL Large menu of Japanese cuisine with a twist, from sushi to hibachi grilled items. Vegetarian options. Full bar. Open daily. // 927 Cherry St SE, 458-1900. marurestaurant.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ MATCHBOX DINER & DRINKS Breakfast all day, deli sandwiches, burgers, appetizers and seasonal entrées. Also, milkshakes and malts. Carryout available. Open daily. // 1345 Lake Dr SE, 7748641. matchboxdiner.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $$ THE PUB AT PADDOCK “Happy hour all the time” with elevated pub fare. Full bar. Closed Mondays. // 1033 Lake Dr SE, 356-2627. thegilmorecollection.com/pubatpaddock. Dinner $-$$

2020 DINING AWARD WINNER TERRA Eastown eatery features food from local, ethically raised and sustainable sourcing. Specialty cocktails, Michigan craft beers, wines from small wineries. Open daily. // 1429 Lake Dr SE, 301-0998. terragr.com. Brunch (SatSun), Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $$-$$$ WEALTHY STREET BAKERY Breakfast pastries; sandwiches, salads and soup; pizza available after 4 pm. Beer and wine. Kids menu. Closed Sun. // 610 Wealthy St SE, 301-2950. wealthystreetbakery.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$ WIKIWIKI POKE SHOP Fast-casual seafood restaurant featuring customizable poke bowls, plus oyster bar and rotating specials. Carryout available. Closed Sun. // 1146 Wealthy St SE, 2885646. wikiwikipokeshop.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ THE WINCHESTER Locally sourced menu includes sharable plates in century-old space. Craft brews on draft. Full bar. Open daily. // 648 Wealthy St SE, 451-4969. winchestergr.com. Breakfast (Sat-Sun), Lunch, Dinner $-$$ YESTERDOG Specializes in the “good old-fashioned hot dog.” Cash or check only. Catering available. Open daily. // 1505 Wealthy St SE, 336-0746. yesterdog.com. Lunch, Dinner $

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BIG BOB’S PIZZA Neighborhood pizza parlor in EGR’s Gaslight Village also offers appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, subs. Full bar. Open daily. // 661 Croswell Ave SE, 233-0123. bigbobspizza.com. Lunch (Tue-Sun), Dinner $-$$ BOWDIE’S CHOPHOUSE An upscale steakhouse “perfect for date nights, business dinners and late-night cocktails.” The restaurant serves various items: starters; soups and salads; shareables; and entrées, including chicken, salmon and steak. Full bar. Open daily. // 2237 Wealthy St. SE, 805-5044. bowdieschophouse.com. Dinner $$$ CAROLINA LOWCOUNTRY KITCHEN Coastal South Carolina-inspired fare, including seafood, chicken, pork, beef and greens. Full bar. Open daily. // 2213 Wealthy St SE, 805-5231. carolinalck.com. Dinner $$ JOSÉ BABUSHKA’S Starters, salads, burritos, chimichangas, flaming fajitas, tacos and special plates. Full bar. Open daily. // 2232 Wealthy St SE, 272-4472. josebabushkas.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ OLIVE’S Seasonally inspired menu of creative fare and comfort foods featuring local produce and meats. Full bar. Alfresco balcony. Closed Sun. // 2162 Wealthy St SE, 451-8611. eatatolives.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ OSTA’S LEBANESE CUISINE Large selection of Lebanese and Mediterranean cuisine. Serves beer and wine. Takeout and catering available. Closed Sun-Mon. // 2228 Wealthy St SE, 456-8999. ostaslebanese.com. Lunch (Tue-Fri), Dinner $-$$ ROSE’S Dockside dining on Reeds Lake with varied menu, including pastas and wood-fired pizzas. Three-season porch. Serves beer and wine. Open daily. // 550 Lakeside Dr SE, 458-1122. thegilmorecollection.com/ roses. Lunch, Dinner $$

Northeast GR 7 MONKS TAPHOUSE Beer bar with more than 50 taps and gastropub food, including pretzel bites, burgers, salads. Open daily. // 740 Michigan St NE, 265-5417. 7monkstap.com/ grand-rapids. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

BIRCH LODGE Menu includes wet burritos, sandwiches, burgers, gyros, fish baskets. Daily specials. Full bar. Open daily. // 732 Michigan St NE, 458-1918. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $ BLUE WATER GRILL Entrées include steaks and fish, wood-fired pizzas. Nice wine selection. Lakeside views, outdoor patio. Beer, wine and cocktails. Open daily. // 5180 Northland Dr NE, 363-5900. thegilmorecollection.com/bluewater. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ BUD & STANLEY’S Extensive menu includes Mexican specialties, pasta, burgers and more. Daily specials. Takeout available. Serves alcohol. Open daily. // 1701 Four Mile Rd NE, 361-9782. budandstanleys.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ CHARLIE’S BAR & GRILLE Well-rounded menu features dinners from ribs, steaks and seafood to kielbasa and kraut. Also, Mexican fare and sandwiches. Full bar. Closed Sun. // 3519 Plainfield Ave NE, 364-0567. charliesbarandgrille.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$ CHEER’S GOOD TIME SALOON Menu offers something for everyone in a log-cabin environment. Takeout available. Full bar. Open daily. // 3994 Plainfield Ave NE, 363-1188. cheersgrandrapids.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $ CHESHIRE GRILL Sandwiches, soups, salads, creative burgers. Open daily for breakfast (served all day) and lunch. No alcohol. // 2162 Plainfield Ave NE, 635-2713. cheshiregrill.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner (Tue-Sat) $-$$ CRESTON BREWERY More than a dozen house-brewed beers on tap at all times; plus, seasonal menu, featuring chicken, pork and beef entrées; tacos, burritos and quesadillas; soups and salads. // 1504 Plainfield Ave NE, 805-4523. crestonbrewery.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ DETROIT WING CO. Serves classic wings, boneless wings and chicken tenders with 19 house-made sauces. Its menu also includes mac n’ cheese, poutine, coleslaw, cornbread muffins and cheesecake. Detroit Wing Co. was founded in Detroit. Open daily. // 2004 East Beltline Ave. NE, 214-8331. detroitwingco.com. Lunch, Dinner $ FLO’S PIZZERIA RISTORANTE & SPORTS BAR Pizzas, sandwiches, salads, Italian and Mexican entrées, full bar. Big screen TVs; takeout available. Open daily. // 1259 Post Dr NE, Belmont, 785-1001. flossportsbar.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ FRED’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT Longtime favorite offers Italian fare, including fresh pasta and gourmet pizza. Full-service bar. Closed Sun. // 3619 Plainfield Ave NE, 361-8994. fredsitalian.net. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)


FUJI YAMA ASIAN BISTRO Hibachi grill tables or eat in dining room with Chinese, Japanese and Thai selections. Full bar. Open daily. // 1501 East Beltline Ave NE, 719-1859. fujiyamabistro.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

MILL CREEK TAVERN Comstock Park eatery offers appetizers, soups, sandwiches, full dinner options. Full bar with separate dining room. Closed Sun. // 3874 West River Dr NE, Comstock Park, 784-3806. millcreektaverngr.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

GOLDEN WOK Chinese cuisine with some Hunan-spiced dishes. Sunday specials. Full bar. Open daily. // 1971 East Beltline Ave NE (Knapp’s Corner), 363-8880. goldenwokgrandrapids.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

MING TEN All-you-can-eat Japanese/Chinese buffet, sushi bar, hibachi grill and American selections. No alcohol. Open

daily. // 2090 Celebration Dr NE (2nd floor), 3653989. mingtenrestaurant.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ MORNING BELLE This “garden-themed” brunch spot is part of Meritage Hospitality Group. Its menu features breakfast entrées; lighter options, such as salads and grain bowls; glazed doughnut waffles; specialty beverages, such as freshly squeezed orange juice and breakfast cocktails; and more.

GRAVITY TAPHOUSE GRILLE Menu items pair with craft beer suggestions. 64 craft beers on tap. Open daily. // 3210 Deposit Dr NE (East Beltline at I-96), 719-4944. gravitytaphouse.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ GRAYDON’S CROSSING Global pub serves traditional English pub food and world-inspired dishes. Full bar with large selection of microbrews and imported beers. Open daily. // 1223 Plainfield Ave NE, 726-8260. graydonscrossing.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ JAKU SUSHI Japanese and Korean fare, including a large selection of sushi; plus, bento, bibimbap, hibachi, katsu, udon and more. Open daily. // 2289 East Beltline Ave NE, 6490407. jakusushi.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ KITCHEN 67 Large menu uses Michigan ingredients and includes Brann’s sizzling steaks, sandwiches, salads, small plates, pasta and more. Full bar with craft beers. Open daily. // 1977 East Beltline Ave NE, 272-3778. kitchen67.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ LA HUASTECA Homemade recipes, vegetarian options. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 1811 Plainfield Ave NE, 447-7733. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $

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Step into Spring

LAI THAI KITCHEN Vietnamese, Thai and Japanese fare. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 1621 Leonard St NE, 456-5730. laithaikitchen.net. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ LICARI’S SICILIAN PIZZA KITCHEN Specialties include thick-crust Sicilian pizza and stuffed pizza with a crispy crust. Also pasta, entrées, calzones and desserts. Full bar. Open daily. // 2869 Knapp St NE, 608-6912. licarispizzakitchen.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ LUCY’S CAFÉ Family café offers breakfast, lunch and baked goods. Crepes, omelets, deli sandwiches and build-your-own breakfast plates. Open daily. // 1747 Plainfield Ave NE, 591-3149. lucyscafegr.com. Breakfast, Lunch $$-$$$

Since 1968... MAI’S THAI Thai fare for counter service only. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 820 Michigan St NE, 451-3441. maisthaigr.com. (Mon-Fri), Lunch, Dinner $

4353 Three Mile Road N.E.

$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)

Grand Rapids

616-363-6400

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Limited bar. Open daily. // 1600 East Beltline Ave NE, 301-8171. morningbellebrunch.com. Breakfast, Lunch $$ NICK FINK’S Mexican fare and burgers in historic tavern. Draft beer, wine, sangria and cocktails. Closed Sun and Mon. // 3965 West River Dr NE, 784-9886. thegilmorecollection.com/nickfinks. Dinner $$ POKE TOKI Build-your-own bowls featuring a fusion of Hawaiian, Japanese and Korean cuisine. Catering available. Closed Sun. // 5150 Northland Dr NE, 729-4414. poketoki.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ PALIO Ann Arbor-based eatery with an expansive menu of Italian fare. Full bar and happy hour. Open daily. // 545 Michigan St NE, 719-0660. paliograndrapids.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ REDS AT THOUSAND OAKS Large menu features sandwiches, salads, artisan pizza and entrées. Extensive wine list, craft beers, full bar. Patio with fire pits and covered deck. Open daily. // 4100 Thousand Oaks Dr NE, 447-7750. eatatreds. com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ REZERVOIR LOUNGE Full menu of appetizers, pizzas, sandwiches and entrées, some with Cajun flavor. Serves alcohol. Open daily. // 1418 Plainfield Ave NE, 451-0010. rezlounge.com. Lunch (Tue-Sun), Dinner $-$$ RIO GRAND STEAK HOUSE & SALOON Texas-style barbecue ribs, steaks and more. Full bar. Open daily. // 5501 Northland Dr NE, 364-6266. riograndsteakhouse.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ RIVER NORTH PUBLIC HOUSE A “family-friendly” pub serving a variety of shareables, burgers and sandwiches. You’ll also find entrées, including Knapp Mac & Cheese and grilled sirloin tip steak. Full bar. Open daily. // 2115 Plainfield Ave NE, 288-7888. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $$$ THE SCORE Restaurant and sports bar with large menu, more than 100 beers on tap. Open daily. // 5301 Northland Dr NE, 3010600. thescore-restaurant.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ SHESHCO GRILL Mediterranean cuisine, including surf, turf and vegetarian options. No alcohol. Open daily. // 2121 Celebration Dr NE (Knapp’s Corner), 364-0600. sheshcogrill.net. Lunch, Dinner $$ THAI CHEF Knapp’s Corner restaurant has large menu, including duck, seafood and vegetarian options. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 1971 East Beltline Ave NE, 570-0032. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $$

VANDER MILL Seasonal menu with locally sourced ingredients. Starters, salads, entrées and large plates served family style. Hard ciders on tap. Open daily. // 505 Ball Ave NE, 2598828. vandermill.com. Lunch, Dinner (Mon-Sat) $$-$$$

Northwest GR

G R A N D R A P I D S M A G A Z I N E / M AY 2 0 2 0

THE LANDING Casual atmosphere with views of the Grand River. AllAmerican favorites and monthly specials. Full bar. Open daily. // 270 Ann St NW (Riverfront Hotel at U.S. 131), 363-9001. riverfronthotelgr.com/dining/the-landingrestaurant. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $$

2020 DINING AWARD WINNER AMORE TRATTORIA ITALIANA Regional Italian dishes using local products and Italian imports. Italian wines and liqueurs. House-made desserts. Banquet facility. Closed Mon. // 5080 Alpine Ave NW, 785-5344. amoretrattoriaitaliana.com. Dinner (Tue-Sat) $$ CHINA CHEF Family-style restaurant with Szechuan-style entrées and Hunan choices. No alcohol. Open daily. // 4335 Lake Michigan Dr NW, 791-4488. chinachef49534.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ CHINA CITY Chinese cuisine; lunch prices all day. No alcohol. Open daily. // 1140 Monroe Ave NW, 451-3688. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ DEHOP’S BREWING CO. AND CAFÉ Specialty and build-your-own burgers, “authentic Mexican” tacos, salads and sharable appetizers. Closed Sun-Mon. // 363 Cummings Ave NW, Walker, 805-3363. dehops.com. Dinner $$ EMPIRE CHINESE BUFFET II All-you-can-eat buffet. Seafood buffet Sat-Sun. No alcohol. Open daily. // 4255 Alpine Ave NW, 7858880. empirechinesebuffet2.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ FRANCO’S PIZZA Italian entrées, stromboli, pizza and subs. Takeout available. No alcohol. Open daily. // 2103 Alpine Ave NW, 361-7307. Dinner $-$$ FRICANO’S PIZZA RESTAURANT Famous for its thin-crust pizza. Pasta dinners with sauce that made its way to the retail market. Full bar. Closed Sun. // 5808 Alpine Ave NW, 785-5800. fricanospizza.com. Dinner $-$$ HIBACHI GRILL & SUPREME BUFFET Pan-Asian cuisine, including Chinese, Japanese, Mongolian and American. No alcohol. Open daily. // 785 Center Dr NW (Green Orchard Shopping Center), 785-8200. hibachigrillsupremebuffet.letseat.at. Lunch, Dinner $$ HOME TEAM GRILL Sports-themed eatery with a selection of local, domestic and international beers. Open daily. // 4322 Remembrance Rd, 551-3457. hometeamgrill. wordpress.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ HUNAN CHINESE RESTAURANT Full menu of Chinese options. No alcohol. Open daily.

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// 1263 Leonard St NE, 458-0977. hunangrc.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

MR. GYROS Family-owned restaurant offers Mediterranean specialties. Drive-thru, takeout, delivery and catering available. Closed Sun. // 2260 Alpine Ave NW, 7916660. mrgyrosdrivethru.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ PERRIN BREWING CO. Comstock Park craft brewery/taproom menu includes tacos, salads, burgers, panini and more. Kids menu available. Open daily. // 5910 Comstock Park Dr, 5511957. perrinbrewing.com. Lunch, Dinner $ STAN DIEGO BAJA TACO KITCHEN Baja California-inspired menu, featuring a-la-carte taco menu, chorizos, tamales, handcrafted margaritas and kids menu. Full bar. Open daily. // 355 Wilson Ave NW, 591-9806. standiegogr.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ SWAN INN RESTAURANT Home-cooked meals, huge breakfasts. Cygnet Lounge offers cocktails and nibbles. Open daily. // 5182 Alpine Ave NW, 784-1245. swaninnmotel.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$ THREE HAPPINESS RESTAURANT Cantonese, Mandarin and Szechuan fare. Daily specials. No alcohol. Open daily. // Green Ridge Square, 3330 Alpine Ave NW, 785-3888. threehappinessgr.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ WALKER ROADHOUSE Diverse menu with interesting twists on classic fare. Full bar. Closed Sun. // 3272 Remembrance Rd NW, 791-9922. thewalkerroadhouse.com. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $$

Southeast GR 7 MARES Authentic Mexican dishes including breakfast. No alcohol. Closed Mon. // 1403 Kalamazoo Ave SE, 301-8555. Facebook. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$$ AL-BOS EUROCAFE-BAKERY Authentic southeastern European cuisine. Menu includes appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, pasta, entrées and kids options. Daily specials. Open daily. // 2930 Shaffer Ave SE, 325-2800. al-bos.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ ASIAN PALACE Chinese and Vietnamese fare with extensive menus for each. No alcohol. Closed Mon. // 141 28th St SE, 5347770. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)


BELTLINE BAR Americanized Tex-Mex menu, including wet burritos. Full bar. Curbside service. Open daily. // 16 28th St SE, 245-0494. beltlinebar.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ BRASS RING BREWING Small-batch, style-specific brewery in the Alger Heights neighborhood. // 2404 Eastern Ave SE, 460-1587. brassringbrewing.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ BROAD LEAF LOCAL BEER Pub fare including snacks, meat and veggies on a stick and entrées like drunken noodles, burgers, tempeh and more. Open daily. // 2885 Lake Eastbrook Blvd. SE, 803-0602. broadleafbeer.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ CABANA TRES AMIGOS Authentic Mexican fare including vegetarian selections. Full bar. Takeout available. Open daily. // 1409 60th St SE, 281-6891. cabanatresamigos.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ CAFÉ DE MIRO A café offering Kurdish, Armenian and Greek foods. The menu consists of traditional Mediterranean breakfast and side dishes, such as skillets, scrambles and acai bowls; pastries; toasts; soups; sandwiches; salads; Turkish coffee; tea; desserts; and more. No alcohol. // Breton Village Shopping Plaza, 1878 Breton Rd SE, (616) 7191462. Facebook. Open daily. Breakfast, Lunch $ CANTINA MEXICAN GRILL Menu offers extensive Mexican specialties. Full bar. Drivethru window. Outdoor patio. Open daily. // 2770 East Paris Ave SE, 949-9120. cantinamexicangrill.biz. Lunch (Sun-Thu), Dinner $$ DADDY PETE’S BBQ Slow-smoked ribs, pulled pork, brisket and other meats. No alcohol. Catering available. Closed Sun and Mon. // 2921 Eastern Ave SE, 818-5522. daddypetesbbq.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ EAST GARDEN BUFFET Cantonese, Hunan, Szechuan cuisine. Daily buffet. No alcohol. Open daily. // 6038 Kalamazoo Ave SE, 6988933. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ EL ARRIERO MEXICAN GRILL Extensive menu offers specialty dishes, à la carte selections. Mexican and domestic beers, margaritas. Open daily. // 2948 28th St SE, 977-2674. elarrieromexicangrill.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ EL GLOBO RESTAURANT Authentic Mexican fare; weekly specials. No alcohol. Closed Mon. // 2019 S Division Ave, 734-6869. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ FIREROCK GRILLE Guests can cook signature dishes on 500-degree lava stone. Offers soups, salads, sandwiches and entrées. Full bar. Brunch on Sundays. Open daily. // 7177 Kalamazoo Ave SE, 656-9898. firerockgrille.com. Lunch, Dinner $$

FLORENTINE PIZZERIA RISTORANTE & SPORTS LOUNGE Italian fare with American and Mexican choices and thin-crust pizzas. Full bar. Open daily. // Towne & Country Shopping Center, 4261 Kalamazoo Ave SE, 455-2230. florentinespizza.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ GANDERS Features American cuisine with a twist and Michigan products, including craft brews. Open daily. // 4747 28th St SE (inside DoubleTree Hotel), 957-1111. Facebook. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$$ GOLDEN GATE Chinese fare with all-inclusive lunch combination plates, some hot and spicy choices. No alcohol. Open daily. // 4023 S Division Ave, 534-7087. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $ GURSHA ETHIOPIAN RESTAURANT Authentic Ethiopian dishes, traditional Ethiopian coffee ceremony. Buffet lunch and dinner on Sat. No alcohol. Open daily. // 4301 Kalamazoo Ave SE, 350-0009. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $$ HALL STREET BAKERY Breakfast pastries; sandwiches, salads and soup served for lunch and dinner. Beer and wine. Kids menu. Closed Sun. // 1200 Hall St SE, 214-7604. hallstreetbakery.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$ INDIA TOWN Indian fare including vegetarian and vegan. Lunch buffet Mon-Sat. No alcohol. Open daily. // 3760 S Division Ave, 243-1219. indiatowngrr.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ LA TAQUERIA SAN JOSE Authentic Mexican fare in a casual, takeout setting. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 1338 S Division Ave, 2842297. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $$ LAST CHANCE TAVERN AND GRILL Appetizers, soups, burgers and sandwiches and a huge selection of Michigan craft beers. Open daily. // 1132 Burton St SE, 719-4270. thelastchancetavern.com. Lunch, Dinner $ LE KABOB Soups, salads, sandwiches, large choice of entrées and combos. Kids menu. Carry-out available. No alcohol. Open daily. // 3122 28th St SE, 272-4135. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

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MI TIERRA Traditional Mexican, eat in or drive-thru. No alcohol. Open daily. // 2300 S Division Ave, 245-7533. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $ MIKADO SUSHI Sushi and sashimi à la carte. Dinners offer full range of Japanese cuisine. Lunch specials. Serves alcohol. Closed Sun. // 3971 28th St SE, 285-7666. mikadogr.com/main. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $-$$

$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)

319 Sheldon Blvd SE. Grand Rapids, MI 49503 GRCatholicCentral.org 616.233.5800

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NU-THAI BISTRO Appetizers, soups, Thai salads, fried rice, seafood, duck, curries. No alcohol. Open daily. // 2055 28th St SE, 452-0065. nuthaibistro.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ THE OLD GOAT Creative cuisine from Electric Cheetah owner Cory DeMint includes appetizers, entrées, sandwiches and salads. Kids menu. Full bar. Open daily. // 2434 Eastern Ave SE, 288-6976. baaaaaaaa.com. Breakfast (Mon-Fri), Lunch, Dinner $-$$ PAL’S INDIAN CUISINE Authentic Indian food, including lunch buffet 11-3. No alcohol. Open daily. // 2915 28th St SE, 957-2271. palsindiancuisine.com. Lunch, Dinner $ PHO ANH TRANG Vietnamese, Chinese, Thai cuisine. Daily specials. Catering. Open daily. No alcohol. // 3633 Eastern Ave SE, 246-9966. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ PHO SOC TRANG Wide selection of Vietnamese offerings. No alcohol. Open daily. // 4242 S Division Ave, 531-0755. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ PIETRO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT Regional and contemporary Italian cuisine. Tuscan wines, desserts and cappuccinos. Kids menu. Takeout available. Open daily. // 2780 Birchcrest Dr SE, 4523228. pietrosgr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ SHANGHAI ICHIBAN Chinese and Japanese cuisine. Food prepared tableside by hibachi chefs in Japanese area. Serves alcohol. Open daily. // 3005 Broadmoor Ave SE, 942-5120. shanghaiichiban.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ SHIRAZ GRILLE Authentic Persian cuisine: fire-grilled kabobs, vegetarian options. Full bar. Closed Mon. // 2739 Breton Rd SE, 9497447. shirazgrille.com. Lunch (Fri-Sun), Dinner $$-$$$ SUSHI KUNI Japanese and Korean cuisine, Asian fusion fare. Traditional Japanese tatami room for groups. Serves alcohol. Closed Mon. // 2901 Breton Rd SE, 2414141. sushikuni.net. Lunch, Dinner $-$$$ TAQUERÍA EL RINCÓN MEXICANO Wide variety of Mexican breakfast, small plates, dinner dishes and soups, including several vegetarian options. No alcohol. Closed Mon. // 2055 28th St, 246-7000. Facebook. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $ THAI EXPRESS Thai specialties, spiced to customer specification. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // Towne & Country Shopping Center, 4317 Kalamazoo Ave SE, 827-9955. thaiexpressgr.com. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $

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$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)


THAI FUSION Thai cuisine and fusion specials with good selection of starters and salads. Kids menu. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 3097 Broadmoor Ave SE, 301-8883. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ TOKYO GRILL & SUSHI Tatami rooms, sushi bars. Hibachi, teriyaki, Udon, tempura. Sake, Japanese and American beer and wine. Open daily. // 4478 Breton Rd SE, 455-3433. tokyogrillsushi.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

THERE’S NEVER E N O U G H T I M E.

VILLAGE INN PIZZA & SPORTS GRILLE Longtime favorite for pizza, pasta, burgers, chicken, Mexican. Daily specials. Mon-Fri pizza lunch buffet. Full bar. Open daily. // 2215 44th St SE, 281-1444. vipizza.net. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ WEI WEI PALACE Chinese seafood restaurant features Cantonese cuisine, dim sum and barbecue. No alcohol. Open daily. // 4242 S Division Ave, 724-1818. weiweipalace.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ YUMMY WOK Cantonese, Hunan and Szechuan dishes. No alcohol. Open daily. // 4325 Breton Rd SE, 827-2068. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

Southwest GR 84TH STREET PUB & GRILLE American fare from pizzas to steaks. Full-service bar. Kids menu. Daily specials. Open daily. // 8282 Pfeiffer Farms Dr SW, 583-1650. 84thstpub.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ ALEBIRD TAPHOUSE AND BREWERY Community-focused brewery offering creative sandwiches along with a variety of burgers and entrées, including summer chicken and pea ravioli. Open daily, lunch on weekends. // 2619 84th St SW, 288-7888. alebird.com. Lunch, Dinner $$$ BLUE GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN Noodle-based Thai dishes, chicken, seafood, beef and pork entrées, curries. Vegetarian options. No alcohol. Open daily. // 5751 Byron Center Ave SW (Bayberry Market), 261-8186. bluegingerkitchen.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ FAR-EAST CHINESE RESTAURANT Chinese, Vietnamese and Korean dishes. Carry-out and catering available. No alcohol. Open daily. // 3639 Clyde Park Ave SW, 531-7176. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ FRANKIE V’S PIZZERIA & SPORTS BAR Appetizers, subs, stromboli, pizza, pasta, burgers and Mexican. Outdoor patio. Full bar. Open daily. // 1420 28th St SW, 532-8998. frankievs.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ GOLDEN 28 Szechuan, Hunan, Mandarin, Vietnamese cuisine. No

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$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)

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alcohol. Open daily. // 627 28th St SW, 531-2800. Lunch, Dinner $$ KITZINGEN BREWERY German-style appetizers and entrées, plus kids menu and some American classics. Selection of wine and locally made German craft beer. Closed Sun-Mon. // 1760 44th St SW, 805-5077. kitzingen-brewery.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ LINDO MEXICO RESTAURANTE MEXICANO Fresh food with “real Mexican flavor.” Kids menu. Serves alcohol. Open daily. // 1742 28th St SW, 2612280. lindomexicogr.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ LITTLE BANGKOK Extensive Thai standbys plus some unique items. Kids meals available. Serves beer and wine. Closed Sun. // 2359 Health Dr SW, Suite 140, 929-2306. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $-$$ MAIN STREET PUB Varied appetizers, salads, soups, sandwiches and entrées. Full bar. Open daily. // 1730 28th St SW, 5322510. mainstpub.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ MI CASA RESTAURANTE Fresh, authentic Dominican appetizers, dishes and seafood, plus weekly specials, in Dominican-themed, family-friendly atmosphere. No alcohol. Closed Mon-Tues. // 334 Burton St SW, 350-9123. micasagr.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ MONELLI’S ITALIAN GRILL & SPORTS BAR Southern Italian cuisine. Sports bar plus family-friendly dining room with fireplace. Open daily. // 5675 Byron Center Ave SW, 530-9700. monellis.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ NOBLE Breakfast favorites along with vegan and gluten-free options, handhelds, burgers and small bites. Open daily. // 1851 44th St SW, Wyoming, 530-8750. eatnoble.com. Breakfast, Lunch $$ PETE’S GRILL & TAVERN Casual bar and grill with tavern burgers, Detroit style pizza, sandwiches and entrees. Open daily. // 2588 84th St SW, Byron Center, 878-9582. petesgrillandtavern.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ TAMALES MARY Tamale-centered Mexican restaurant featuring 15 types of tamales, plus other Mexican dishes and daily buffet specials. No alcohol. Open daily. // 1253 Burton St SW, 288-5007. tamalesmarygr.com. Lunch, Dinner $ WOODY’S PRESS BOX Complex includes two bars, patio and bowling. Sandwiches, pizza, Mexican and more. Full bar. Open daily. // 5656 Clyde Park Ave SW, 530-2400. spectrumlanes.com. Breakfast (Mon-Sat), Lunch, Dinner $$

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Ada/Cascade/Lowell Area ARYANA RESTAURANT & BAR Comfortable dining room in Crowne Plaza Hotel offers breakfast buffet, lunch and dinner selections from a seasonal menu and a full bar. Open daily. // 5700 28th St SE, 957-1775. hiaryana.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ BIG BOILER BREWING Brewpub features a wide selection of original beer and cider. Plus, new American cuisine, including burgers, fish, sandwiches and kids menu. Open daily. // 318 E Main St, Lowell, 987-3155. bigboilerbrewing.com. Dinner $$ CASCADE ROADHOUSE Relaxed atmosphere with a diverse menu of traditional fare. Full bar. Closed Sun. // 6817 Cascade Rd SE, 2597439. cascaderoadhousemi.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ CORK WINE & GRILLE Contemporary dining with indoor and outdoor seating. Seafood, steaks, burgers, fish, sandwiches, salads. Extensive wine list, specialty cocktails. Open daily. // 5500 Cascade Rd SE, 949-0570. corkwineandgrille.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ DAN’S DINER Formerly Pal’s Diner. Retro-style diner with both classic and upscale breakfast and lunch options; breakfast served all day. Full bar. Closed Mon. // 6503 28th St SE, 7190304. dansdinergr.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$ EMONAE KOREAN BBQ Korean delicacies and tabletop grills allow patrons to grill meats and veggies to their liking. Soups, chicken, beef, pork, vegetarian, seafood. No alcohol. Delivery available. Closed Mon. // 6246 28th St SE, 649-3984. emonaekoreanbbq.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ THE EURO BISTRO European bistro fare includes entrées, small plates, salads, wood-fired pizzas. Takeout available. Full bar. Closed Sun. // 6450 28th St SE, 719-2017. eurobistrogr.com. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $$-$$$ FLAT RIVER GRILL Casual atmosphere in turn-of-century building. Comfort food, wood-fired pizzas. Full bar plus The B.O.B.’s House of Brews beers. Alfresco dining on patio. Open daily. // 201 E Main St, Lowell, 8978523. thegilmorecollection.com/flatriver. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ JU SUSHI & LOUNGE Sushi and sashimi, Japanese hibachi, tempura, soups, salads and entrées in elegant surroundings. Full bar, huge sake selection. Takeout, catering and banquets. Open daily. // 1144 East Paris Ave SE, 575-5858. jusushi.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$$ LA LAGUNA Authentic Mexican dishes including shrimp, wraps,

salads, kids menu. No alcohol. Open daily. // 6250 28th St SE, 805-8821. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ LITTLE BANGKOK Extensive Thai standbys, plus some unique items. Kids meals available. Serves beer and wine. Closed Sun. // 850 Forest Hill Ave SE, 808-3153. littlebangkokgr.com. Lunch (Mon-Fri), Dinner $-$$ MAIN STREET BBQ Wood fire used to smoke ribs, brisket, chicken, sausage and pork. Rubs and sauces are gluten-free. Also serves sandwiches, wings, salads and soups. Catering. Takeout/delivery at 1539 Plainfield Ave NE. Full bar. Open daily. // 210 E Main St, Lowell, 987-3352. bbqlowell.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ MARCO NEW AMERICAN BISTRO French country casual offers small, medium and large plates for dinner fare; salads, sandwiches and mains for lunch. Full bar. Takeout menu. Closed Sun. // 884 Forest Hill Ave SE, 942-9100. marcobistro.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ MYNT FUSION BISTRO Thai, Korean and Chinese. Renowned for its curries. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 800 W Main St, Lowell, 9879307. myntfusion.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ NOCO PROVISIONS Laid-back, regionally inspired comfort cuisine. Outdoor seating on the patio. Full bar. Open daily. // 4609 Cascade Rd SE, 747-0300. nocogr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ NONNA’S: THE TRATTORIA Fresh, European-style pastries, salads, soups and entrées made from scratch. Breakfast and lunch served seven days a week. Pizza available during lunch TuesSat. Brunch specials available Sat-Sun. // 584 Ada Dr SE, Ada, 920-7028. eatwithnonna.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner (Tue-Sat) $-$$ NOTO’S OLD WORLD ITALIAN DINING Elegant décor, extensive classic Italian menu. Special wine cellar dinners. Lounge menu features lighter fare. Closed Sun. // 6600 28th St SE, 493-6686. notosoldworld.com. Dinner $$-$$$ OSAKA STEAKHOUSE & JAPANESE RESTAURANT Asian fare, including sushi, hibachi, shabu-shabu and more. Full bar. Open daily. // 4977 28th St SE, 4194628. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $$ SAPPORO RAMEN & NOODLE BAR Fresh, traditional Japanese “soul food” with an innovative twist. GF options available. No alcohol. Takeout available. Closed Mon. // 5570 28th St SE, Cascade, 608-6657. sappororamenbar.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ SCHNITZ ADA GRILL Schnitz Deli by day, casual fine dining by night. Full bar, happy hour 3-6. Closed Sun. // 597 Ada Dr

$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)


SE, Ada, 682-4660. schnitzadagrill.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$$ SHEPARDS GRILL & TAVERN Bar food with flair, from appetizers to sirloin. Open daily. // 6246 28th St SE, 350-9604. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ THORNAPPLE BREWING CO. Brewpub features a wide selection of original beer, cider, wine and spirits brewed in seven-barrel brewing system. Plus, artisan pizza, appetizers and dessert. Brunch on Sun. // 6262 28th St SE, 288-6907. thornapplebrewing.com. Lunch (Sat), Dinner $$ TRAILHEAD CAFÉ Family-owned and -operated café with specialty breakfast items, plus gourmet burgers, wraps, sandwiches, salads, soups and more. // 1200 East Paris Ave SE, 284-3664. trailheadcafegr.com. Breakfast, Lunch $ VINTAGE PRIME & SEAFOOD Intimate setting with upscale menu that includes prime steaks and fresh seafood. International wine list. // 5500 Cascade Rd SE, 949-0570. vintageatcork.com. Dinner $$$ ZEYTIN Turkish and Mediterranean cuisine. Full bar, beer and wine lists. Takeout. Open daily. // 7437 River St, Ada, 6822222. zeytinturkishrestaurant.com. Lunch, Dinner $$

Grandville/Hudsonville Area BANGKOK TASTE Thai fare. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 674 Baldwin St, Jenison, 667-8901. bangkoktaste.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ THE DUNGEON Mexican food and American favorites. Specialty burgers. Full bar with Michigan craft beers. Kids menu. Open daily. // 3594 Chicago Dr SW, Grandville, 5381360. villadungeon.com. Lunch (Fri-Sun), Dinner $-$$ EL BURRITO LOCO More than 70 Mexican selections, plus a few American options. Daily food and drink specials. Full bar. Open daily. // 4499 Ivanrest Ave SW, Grandville, 5309470. elburritoloco4.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ GRANDVILLA Steaks, all-you-can-eat fish, specialty burgers, daily specials, salad bar. Kids menu. Full bar. Open daily. // 3594 Chicago Dr SW, Grandville, 538-1360. villadungeon.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ HUDSONVILLE GRILLE Varied menu includes Mexican favorites and breakfast. Full bar, catering and banquet services. Closed Sun. // 4676 32nd Ave, Hudsonville, 662-9670. hudsonvillegrille.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$ $ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)

When the time is right, we are here to make your travel dreams come true. You are the reason we continue to be here, providing exceptional travel experiences for individuals and groups in West Michigan and beyond, for more than 45 years. We value you, and we are grateful for your business and your continued support.

www.wittetravel.com

3250 28th St SE, Grand Rapids • 616.942.5112 GR M AG .CO M

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OSGOOD BREWING CO. Craft brewery serves shareables, specialty pizzas, sandwiches, pasta and salads. Kids menu. Open daily. // 4051 Chicago Dr SW, Grandville, 432-3881. osgoodbrewing.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ PIKE 51 BREWING CO./ HUDSONVILLE WINERY Craft brewery and winery under one roof. Appetizers, salads, sandwiches and entrées. Open daily. // 3768 Chicago Dr, Hudsonville, 662-4589. hudsonvillewinery.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ RAINBOW GRILL Breakfast, soup and sandwiches, daily lunch specials, chicken, fish and other dinner staples. No alcohol. Closed Sun. // 4225 32nd Ave, Hudsonville, 8960033; 4158 Chicago Dr SW, Grandville, 534-8645. rainbowgrillmichigan.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $-$$ RUSH CREEK BISTRO Diverse menu in club-like surroundings. Weeknight and happy hour specials at full-service bar. Open daily. // Sunnybrook Country Club, 624 Port Sheldon Rd, Grandville, 457-1100. rushcreekbistro.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ SONDER EATERY Focused on fresh foods including greens, sandwiches and shareables. Items include deviled eggs, chicken and waffles, sloppy Joes and more. Full bar. Daily specials and weekend brunch. Closed Mondays. // 3380 Chicago Dr, Hudsonville, 616-202-6379. sondereatery.com. Breakfast, Lunch $$ WHITE FLAME BREWING CO. Small production brewery with taproom. Sandwiches, wraps, appetizers and a couple twists on the classic macaroni and cheese. Open daily. // 5234 36th Ave, Hudsonville, 2095098. whiteflamebrewing.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ THE WIN TAVERN A family-friendly restaurant offering fresh ingredients and cooked-to-order meals, including starters and salads, burgers, sandwiches, and steak and onion meals. It also offers a Sunday breakfast from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. with a build-your-own hash bar and more. Full bar. Open daily. // 7628 Georgetown Center Dr, Jenison, 734-6724. thewintavern33.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $$

Rockford Area BOSTWICK LAKE INN Menu includes steaks, pork, fish, chicken, mac and cheese, pizzas, sandwiches, soups and salads. Large deck. Full bar. Open daily. // 8521 Belding Rd, 8747290. thegilmorecollection.com/bostwick. Lunch (Sat-Sun), Dinner $$-$$$ BOULDER CREEK RESTAURANT Golf Club restaurant has varied menu. Golf course views from inside or deck. Serves alcohol. See website for seasonal hours. // 5750 Brewer Ave NE, Belmont, 363-1330, ext 2. bouldercreekgolfclub.com/ restaurant. Lunch, Dinner $-$$

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CEDAR SPRINGS BREWING CO. German-style brewery features American pub and traditional Bavarian menu. Open daily. // 95 N Main St, Cedar Springs, 696-2337. csbrew.com. Lunch, Dinner $$ GRILL ONE ELEVEN American-with-a-twist menu, full-service bar and lounge. Open daily. // 111 Courtland St, 863-3111. grilloneeleven.com. Lunch, Dinner $$-$$$ HONEY CREEK INN Pub setting offers beyond pub fare and daily specials. Closed Sun. // 8025 Cannonsburg Rd NE, Cannonsburg, 874-7849. cannonsburgvillage.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ HOT BOX BBQ Smoked brisket, pork, ribs, chicken, brisket and more. Closed Sun. // 110 Courtland St, 951-7160. Facebook. Lunch, Dinner $$ MARINADES PIZZA BISTRO Wood-fired pizzas, salads, pastas, sandwiches. Michigan craft beer. Catering. Open daily. // 109 Courtland St, 863-3300. marinadespizzabistro.com. Lunch, Dinner $ RAMONA’S TABLE Gourmet sandwiches, salads, soups, burgers, small plates, homemade desserts. Farm-to-table specials. Michigan beers, wine. Kids menu. Open daily. // 17 Squires St Square NE, 951-7100. ramonastable.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ ROCKFORD BREWING CO. Located alongside Rogue River. Menu features wings, salads, gyros, burgers, as well as gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian options. Handcrafted brews on tap. Open daily. // 12 E Bridge St, 951-4677. rockfordbrewing.com. Brunch (Sun), Lunch, Dinner $-$$

ARNIE’S BAKERY & RESTAURANT Breakfast, burgers and sandwiches. Menu includes extensive gluten-free, dairy-free and vegetarian options. No alcohol. Open daily. // 722 Leonard St NW, 454-3098; 2650 East Beltline Ave SE (Centerpointe Mall), 956-7901; 777 54th St SW, 532-5662; 34 Squires St, Rockford, 866-4306. arniesrestaurant.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $$ BAGEL BEANERY Bagel and coffee cafè offering healthy whole grain and sugary sweet bagels, breakfast and lunch sandwiches. Magnum coffee. No alcohol. Open daily. Catering available. // 455 Michigan St NE, 235-7500; 2845 Breton Rd SE, 245-4220; 5316 Clyde Park Ave SW, 2499500. bagelbeanery.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $ BIG E’S SPORTS GRILL Sports lounge serving pizza, classic American appetizers and other entrées. Full bar includes a variety of Michigan-made beer and cider. Happy hour specials available Mon-Fri. Open daily. // 2321 East Beltline Ave SE, 608-8825. 710 Monroe Ave NW, 512-5716. bigessportsgrill.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ BRANN’S STEAKHOUSE & SPORTS GRILLE Famous sizzler steaks, small plates, sandwiches, salads, gluten-free and vegetarian choices, bar munchies. Full bar. // 401 Leonard St NW, 454-9368; 3475 Fairlanes Ave SW, Grandville, 531-6210; 4157 S Division Ave, 534-5421; 5510 28th St SE, 285-7800. branns.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ FIRST WOK Mandarin, Hunan, Szechuan cuisine. Full bar. Open daily. // 2207 44th St SE, 281-0681; 6740 Old 28th St SE, 575-9088; 3509 Alpine Ave NW, 784-1616. firstworkgr.com. Lunch, Dinner $$

TIMBERS INN Appetizers to meat ’n’ potatoes fare in lodge-like surroundings. Full bar. Open daily. // 6555 Belding Rd NE, 874-5553. timbersinn.net. Lunch (Wed-Sun), Dinner $-$$

GRAND CONEY Classic diner offering custom hot dogs, traditional breakfast items and comfort foods. No alcohol. Open daily. Downtown location open 24 hours. // 809 Michigan St NE, 776-5580; 5121 28th St, 9303596; 6101 Lake Michigan Dr, Allendale, 895-9999. thegrandconey.com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $

THIRD NATURE BREWING COMPANY Located near the White Pine Trail and the Rogue River, Third Nature Brewing is a rustic brewery and taproom offering “comfort foods” such as pizzas and hot sandwiches, as well as healthier options like power bowls and salads. Open daily. // 7733 Childsdale Ave. NE in Plainfield Township, 616-512-9314. thirdnaturebrewing.com. Lunch, Dinner $$

HERB & FIRE PIZZERIA Fast-casual atmosphere with Italian accent. Signature and create-your-own pizza options, flatbread sandwiches and salads. // 3180 44th St SW, Grandville, 773-1443; 2121 Celebration Dr NE, Suite 250, 7731895. herbandfirepizzeria.com. Lunch, Dinner $$

Multiple Locations ANNA’S HOUSE Breakfast, sandwiches, baked goods and exceptional desserts; dinner menu, too. No alcohol. Open daily. // 3766 Potomac Circle, Grandville; 3874 Plainfield Ave NE; 2409 East Beltline Ave SE, (866) 672-6627. annashouseus.com. Breakfast, Lunch $$

HOPCAT Crafted brews with some 50 beers on tap and 150 bottled. Full bar and creative fare, including sharables, signature fries, burgers, wraps and more. Open daily. // 25 Ionia Ave SW, 451-4677; 84 W. Eighth St in Holland, 965-9780; 2183 East Beltline Ave NE. hopcatgr.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ PEPPINO’S PIZZERIA AND SPORTS GRILLE Italian/American menu. Full bar. Open daily. // 130 Ionia Ave SW, 456-8444; 1515 Eastport Dr SE,

$ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)


Kentwood, 554-8880. peppinospizza.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$$ PITA HOUSE Sami’s gyros, Middle East specialties. No alcohol. Open daily. // 1510 Wealthy St SE, 454-1171; 3730 28th St SE, 940-3029. thepitahouse.net. Lunch, Dinner $ REAL FOOD CAFÉ Fresh, locally sourced traditional favorites, scrambles and made-from-scratch baked goods; plus, soups, sandwiches and salads for lunch. Cash only. Closed Mon. // 2419 Eastern Ave SE, 241-4080; 3514 Plainfield Ave NE, 361-1808. Facebook. Breakfast, Lunch $ RED GERANIUM Breakfast and lunch favorites, omelettes, pancakes and burgers. No alcohol. Open daily. // 6670 Kalamazoo Ave SE, 656-9800; 5751 Byron Center Ave SW, 5328888. redgeraniumcafe.com. Breakfast, Lunch $ SUNDANCE BAR & GRILL Southwestern-infused cuisine, margarita bar. Open daily. // Waters Building, 151 Ottawa Ave NW, 776-1616; 5755 28th St SE, Cascade, 956-5644. sundancegrill. com. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner (Mon-Sat) $$ TACOS EL CAPORAL Mexican fare, with menudo Sat and Sun. No alcohol. Open daily. // 1260 Burton St SW, 246-6180; 1717 28th St SW, 261-2711. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner $ TACOS EL CUÑADO Fajitas, tacos, burritos and other Mexican fare. No alcohol. Locations are individually owned and operated. // 1342 Grandville Ave SW, 452-1266; 455 Burton St SW, 248-9099; 1024 Bridge St NW, 475-800. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ THE OMELETTE SHOPPE Fourteen signature omelettes, selection of quiches and baked goods. No alcohol. Open daily. // 545 Michigan St NE, 726-5800; 1880 Breton Rd SE, 7267300. omeletteshoppe.com. Breakfast, Lunch $ UCCELLO’S RISTORANTE, PIZZERIA & SPORTS LOUNGE Italian specialties, including pizza, entrées, burgers, sandwiches. Full bar. Open daily. // 122 Monroe Center NW, 773-1687; 2630 East Beltline Ave SE, 954-2002; 3940 Rivertown Pkwy SW, Grandville, 249-9344; 4787 Lake Michigan Dr NW, Standale, 735-5520; 8256 Broadmoor Ave SE, Caledonia, 8911100; 19 N Main St, Rockford, 866-0666. uccellos. com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ VITALE’S PIZZERIA Multiple locations serving pizza, pasta and more from family recipes. Full bar. // 6650 E Fulton St, 676-5401, vitalesada.com; 5779 Balsam Dr, Hudsonville, 662-2244, vitaleshudsonville.com; 834 Leonard St NE, 458-8368, theoriginalvitales. com; 3868 West River Dr NE, Comstock Park, 7845011. vitalessportsbar.com. Lunch, Dinner $-$$ $ INEXPENSIVE (UNDER $10) $$ MODERATE (BETWEEN $10 – $20) $$$ EXPENSIVE (OVER $20)

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gr gems / histo y Lorrie’s Button by Hy Zelkowitz, at Festival of the Arts in 1976.

Play time Mary Gardner Premington created a “public art playground.” BY JULIE TABBERER, GRAND RAPIDS PUBLIC LIBRARY

Grand Rapids native Mary Gardner Premington created works meant for tactile exploration and play.

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Outdoor art has a long history in Grand Rapids, with a particular bright spot in the 1970s, following the installation of Alexander Calder’s “La Grande Vitesse.” Festival of the Arts participated in the movement by sponsoring a playground sculpture contest. Each year the winning design was produced by Festival and the piece was enjoyed by crowds throughout the weekend. Although most of the winning sculptors were men, the 1974 playground sculpture, “Recreform,” was designed by

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internationally known artist Mary Gardner Premington. Born in Grand Rapids, she worked out of New York City and Santa Monica. The red, blue and orange metal piece was part of a series of works she created for parks and shopping malls. After their life at Festival, the playground sculptures were placed around the city, including at Ah-Nab-Awen, Sixth Street, Mulick, John Ball and Riverside parks. Most of the playground sculptures no longer are around, but at least two remain: Lorrie’s Button by Hy Zelkowitz (1976) in Ah-Nab-Awen Park and Kid Katwalk by Joseph Kinnebrew (1975) in Sixth Street Park. Take some time this spring to visit (or revisit) these sculptures and impress your friends with your knowledge of their history. LORRIE'S BUTTON COURTESY GRAND RAPIDS PUBLIC LIBRARY


city strolls and country rides

Experience the blooming season in Traverse City. It’s where cherry blossoms roll by storefronts, through vineyards, and into freshwater sunsets. And whether you’re exploring downtown or hi ing the trails, you know you’re in a pre y great place.

TraverseCity.com


Drew Cooper & Anding DCA is an elite group of attorneys specializing in complex litigation. DCA recently secured a historic multi-million dollar settlement on behalf of survivors of sexual abuse which helped increase national awareness of institutionalized and culturally-normalized abuse. DCA’s commercial clients range from entrepreneurial start-ups to multi-billion dollar corporations. Across its diverse practice areas, DCA has a singular goal: Achieve optimal and Just Results for its clients.

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