Page 1

WOANDER curated by corey oberlander and lindsey stapleton

RAINA BELLEAU SHAMUS CLISSET M A R I A M O LT E N I ANDREA WOLF


DIRECTOR'S NOTE One of the most common questions we hear at the gallery is also the one we don't really have a simple answer to: How do you find your artists? The truth is - we're grateful that there is no formula. We

meet

our

artists

in

our

own

gallery,

at

shows,

on

the

internet,

at

art

fairs, with friends, at schools, and at the park. Via emails, submissions, phone calls, coffees, drinks, and studio visits. They

are

our

neighbors,

our

friends,

our

acquaintances,

our

social

media

stalkers, our partners, our support, and our heroes. We find them, and they find us. These

distinct

paths

cross

in

our

most

recent

curatorial

project,

Woander.

With artists from New York City, Boston, and Providence, we have managed to forge each relationship through a drastically different route... Corey & Lindsey

ABOUT GRIN GRIN

is

a

contemporary

art

gallery

located

at

The

Plant

in

the

historic

Olneyville District of Providence, Rhode Island. Directed by Corey Oberlander and Lindsey Stapleton, GRIN was founded in 2013 as a space for artists to develop and exhibit their work with a steady curatorial hand. Our intent is to develop an intellectually demanding yet aesthetically pleasing program, focusing on emerging artists working across mediums. Our hope is to

stimulate

fresh

dialogue

while

continuing

to

promote

the

development

of

the local creative community. Our mission is to support the careers of underexposed artists with a devotion to craft and conceptual advancement. To

purchase

any

available

works,

please

see

our

Artsy

page

or

contact

directly. All sales are Tax Free!

CONTACT 60 Valley Street, Unit 3, Providence, Rhode Island

02909

e. contact@grinprovidence.com p. 401 272 0796 Open Saturdays 12PM - 5PM by announcement, appointment and chance.

us


RAINA BELLEAU SHAMUS CLISSET M A R I A M O LT E N I ANDREA WOLF Woander confronts our heavily mediated relationship with nature. Works by Raina

Belleau,

Andrea

Wolf,

Shamus

Clisset,

and

Maria

Molteni

approach

the great outdoors by calling a keen attention to common cliches, taboos, disruptions, past-times, and memories associated with our organic surroundings.

By

configuring

selections

of

faux

materials,

documentations,

and

objects, the artists in Woander have produced works that mirror a traditional view

of

flora

and

encompassing

fauna,

these

while

subjects.

also

House

critiquing

plants,

our

home

archetypal

movies,

attitudes

astroturf,

faux

furs, recyclables, and digital screens are arranged as a sort of back-handed homage to our domestic actions in relation to our greater surroundings. Using

an

astute

combination

of

man-made

materials

and

anthropomorphism

in her character-driven installations, Raina Belleau is constantly alluding to the

human

simple

element

and

environmental

displays

through

Belleau's

video

its

effect

on

the

reminders

by

exquisite

selection

an

installation,

Brood,

natural

world.

orchestrating of

depicts

material

the

Belleau

aesthetically

artist

and

dressed

presents elaborate

composition. in

a

camou-

flage costume complete with whooping crane puppets on both hands. Based on outfits worn by conservationist biologists in an effort to avoid avian/human

bonding,

the

crane

puppets

pull

raspberries

from

a

bowl

to

feed

the

disguised mouth of the artist. Her sculptures and installations embody her awkward

feeling

towards

nature;

an

ache

to

connect

while

remaining

distanced and separate. Shamus Clisset's compositions question the impossible by using known imagery and objects in imagined space. Rendered natural materials and textures are frozen uncomfortably at disconcerting angles, defying traditional gravity and

adhering

America

instead

Clean)

is

a

to

Clisset's

life-sized

own

set

forces.

raytraced-image

Mr.

c-print

Realistic

of

a

(Keeping

homeless

Mer-

lin-type meets seaweed cosplay, set in a murder scene of a Law & Order episode. Grizzly Chair focuses on a meticulously rendered, larger than life Bear-Skin chair taken from Seth Kinman's 1865 version. Brute-force hunting tools the

as

well

as

chair

in

front

common of

items

whimsically

associated painted

with

floral

luxury

sit

wallpaper.

on The

and

around

piece

is

a

marriage of sought-out enjoyment and revelry of the natural world with the urge

for

re-organization

and

control

over

it.

Dizzying

and

responsive,

the

individual elements of these compositions come alive and mirror our complex relationships with those elements in our traditional lives.


A site-specific installation by Maria Molteni is a projection room slowly pulsing

and

droning found a

transitioning cicadas.

objects

curtain

or

through

various

Complimenting

color

the

catch

the

reflected

through

a

peephole.

filters

immersive

light

of

Molteni

a

cued

to

a

installation,

tanning

views

bed

this

soundtrack sculptural

projection

pulse,

this

of and

behind

drone,

as

a reference to environmental and biological cycles; "the electromagnetic (visible)

spectrum,

sunrise/setting,

seasonal

recreation,

insect

mating

patterns"

to name a few. Andrea Wolf presents two prints of photographs of the moon alongside an intimate evokes

projection a

sense

of of

found-astronaut-footage nostalgia

while

from

triggering

a

1963.

Her

barrage

of

installation memories

surrounding the sky, the stars, the heavens, and the moon. The work calls attention through

to it's

the

absence

of

personal

presentation

as

ephemeral

experience material,

and

memory

while

also

of

the

moon

reminiscent

of

Mom and Pop's home movies or photo albums. She is considering memory as

both

a

personal

and

collective

experience;

wonder

that

is

transferred

and exchanged from person to person. Woander is a forced combination of the words Wonder and Wander, spawning from wanderlust as a yearned-for human experience with the universe. We were defining wonder as an opposite to wander, as the latter is a physical action and the former can be understood as procrastination in relation. Neither come to any tangible fruition, but both are integral to our experience and relationship to the outside world.

Raina Belleau, Brood, Video, 2015


RAINA BELLEAU rainabelleau.com Raina

Belleau

received

her

is

a

BFA

Minnesota

from

the

artist

currently

Minneapolis

based

College

of

in Art

Providence,

RI.

She

and

and

her

Design

MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. Raina is a 2012 recipient of the Minnesota Sate Arts Board Fellowship and a 2011 Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Adopt-a-River Artist.

How would you describe your relation-

about animals in their own way. I've

ship with nature? Is this something

always been drawn to animals wheth-

you often consider? Does living in a

er it's in fairytales, science, taxider-

city affect this relationship?

my,

the

zoo,

etc.

The

human

rela-

tionship with animals is long and has I'm

often

ship

bothered

with

lived

nature.

most

of

by

my

relation-

Especially

my

life

having

in

cities.

Nature feels precious in a way that isolates

it

from

me

most

of

the

time. I grew up loving wildlife documentaries and going on family camping

trips.

I

have

to

remind

myself

that nature is everywhere; that there are

urban

not

as

see

glamorous

on

poke

ecosystems.

TV.

fun

In

at

They're

as my

my

the

ones

work,

own

just

I

we

often

relationship

with nature, a relationship that feels very

American.

marshmallows work

have

when

it

The that

They

very

much

my

icons

for

me

thinking

very

tied

and

in

to

are

dogs

appear

become

comes

this.

hot

to

about

American nature

and

as

a

leisure commodity. Would you mind providing some back-

gotten more and more complicated. Companion animals cats,

familiar

closest

about us:

These

us

but

the

dogs, animals

also

to

Companion

creature

but

I

to

as

a

eat

very

other

is

gave

a

it

crea-

grotesque

marshmallows

gesture

of

kindness

totally

different

towards it. Brood

takes

kindness

on

a

towards

animals.

It

was

inspired by the costumes conservation biologists gered don't

wear

baby

when

the

so

strange

costumes

mother

the

chicks.

they

to

dress and

birds

to

There

is

endan-

cranes.

birds

humans the

raising

whooping

want

feed a

They

bond in

with these

impersonate and

teach

dependency

that is literally masked. I was interested could

ideas

pets.

to

relationship

tures.

Woander?

these

much among

different from us. They are often our

and

do

very live

household

are

ground information about the works in Where

is

that

in as be

the

bird

an

animal

both

puppet and

as

a

how

simultaneously.

tool they I'm

germinate, and why have they held

interested in the moments when they

your attention?

shift in between utilitarian object and animate creature.

The three works in Woander are about

animals

but

they

are

all

each

Porcupine and the Ghost Flag sits


Com pani on 2014 Faux Fu r, P o l ym e r Cla y , F o a m, A c r y lic P a in t, Re s i n, Col l ar s , Dog T ag, M us i c S t and 40 x 18 x 12 i nc hes

somewhere in between the other two

I

works. It's about the connections we

nature.

look

at

human

relationships

to

feel towards animals and the disconnects. It embodies many frustrations

Do you find that materials inform your

I

have

about

animals

and

how was

humans a

way

look

at

work? Is it the other way around? Or is

me

to

it in constant motion?

for

work through them. The tendency we have as humans to anthropomorphize

As an artist working with images and

rubs

forms

me

spurred

the my

wrong

way

decision

to

and give

it the

from

natural

nature,

objects.

try

constructed

me

to

when making into more of a charac-

look and think about these to seemly

ter.

The

ties.

I'm

my

ideas

a

way

for

on

how

we

are

zip

opposing realms. I like to use materi-

made

the

als that mimic nature or the realistic,

quills I

is

from

the

how

world

things

took my own ignorance into account

sure

of

use from

seen a porcupine in the wild and I

present

out

to

the

porcupine

world

not

things

porcupine a hotdog stick. I've never

not

natural

I

Making

mental leap from zip ties to porcu-

like

pine

a

on the porcupine or the clay hotdogs

for

our

and foam marshmallows. I just made

The

porcu-

quills,

material

but

they

connection

human-centric

attitudes.

bring

in

pine has become a mascot for how

a

the

turkey

feathers.

quills

with

made

out

window

of

zip

blinds

ties

for


In

Brood

I

knew

I'd

be

filming

I'm

not

against a white wall so I found hunt-

story

ing

background.

looked

The idea of camouflaging against the

stories

camo

wall on

was the

with funny

fabric

a to call

white me

but

the

the

bluff.

twigs Some-

times I'm drawn to materials because of their ability (intentional or not) to mimic other materials and other times because I find them humorous. You've

created

a

pretty

charismatic

cast of characters with your work over the last few years. Do any of these characters have a story? If so, do you consider yourself a story teller?

how

Perhaps

at

like

a

with

continuous

my

work

collection

the

can of

reoccurring

be

short

themes.

There definitely are a lot of characters.

Some

are

related,

some

aren't.

Porcupine and the Ghost Flag is the most connected to other works as a character. scout in

to

revisit.

a

I

I

reappeared

a

is

two

character a

few

started

character.

couple

my stand

conservationist a

have

have

vulture

about

other

the

clothing

percolating. with

thinking The

Although,

bird's

like

I'm

videos.

alone.

of

to

work

He

times

I'd

ideas has as

a

kind of defender or conqueror. Often I

I do consider myself a storyteller but

sure

is.

feel

like

I

might

be

one

of

the

characters!

P o r c u p in e A n d Th e G h o s t Fla g 2014 Zip- t i e s , F o a m , F a u x F ur , P ol y m er Cl ay , Dowel s , T r a s h B a g s , N y lo n R o p e , P ly wo o d , Chi p B oar d, Gl as s E y es , Te n t S ta k e , A c r y lic P a in t, S p ik e Dim e n s io n s V a r ia b le


SHAMUS CLISSET fakeshamus.com Shamus Clisset lives and works in Hell’s Kitchen, NY. FakeShamus is a sort of

imaginary-friend

character

who

lives

and

explores

these

alternate

realities

- a digital golem wreaking havoc on everything around him. He morphs from scene

to

scene,

melding

with

objects

of

my

own

mental

obsessions

and

personal history: the Lamborghini Countach that I drew compulsively as a kid; the

nature

and

subwoofers

that

suburban I

lusted

landscapes

of

after

before

even

my

upbringing I

owned

in

a

Colorado;

car

to

Bazooka

put

them

in;

the aesthetics of beer, guns and violence.

How would you describe your relation-

in

ship with nature? Is this something

But

you often consider? Does living in a

detritus from the suburban wasteland

city affect this relationship?

that's I

the

mountains

along

with

replaced

think

my

began that

what

to

filter

came was

parents'

a

in.

lot

once

of

here.

fleeing

Long

My family is from Brooklyn and Long

Island

Island,

big

natural reaction. But there is a scari-

hippies and moved us out to Colora-

ness to both extremes - the rawness

do

a

of nature vs. the emptiness of what's

lot of time in the mountains growing

left after it's been paved over - and

up,

that

but

when

I

even

my was

lived

parents young. in

a

were

We

spent

teepee

for

a

summer. But, like a lot of kids, my trajectory anything hippy,

was my

to

go

parents

opposite

had

back-to-nature

done.

is

the

Rockies

pretty

central

was

to

a

very

what

I'm

making.

to The

embar-

Would you mind providing some back-

rassed me for a long time. I'm not

ground information about the works in

embarrassed

Woander? Where do these ideas germi-

anymore

stuff

for

(usually),

but

I did end up in New York and not

nate,

on a commune.

attention?

What

I've

become

fascinated

by

as

and

Mostly

why

the

have

images

they

held

spread

your

out

as

a result of all that, however, is our

tangents

modern relationship to nature, espe-

lot of the objects, ideas, and compo-

cially as Americans, and in light of

sitions get reused, recycled or trans-

how real wilderness has been practi-

formed from one picture to the next.

cally

And

removed

from

our

daily

lives.

from

their

what

meanings

came

before.

transform

A

along

Working in 3D, one of my first reali-

with the context. The "Grizzly Chair",

zations was to treat digital space as

for

an empty new world, an unexplored

first

frontier - but one that is more inter-

FakeShamus

nal

the

(a

projected

mental

space),

so

a lot of imagery from my childhood

example, images full

body

is in

tied the

wearing of

a

to

one

series, (or

of

the

depicting inhabiting)

defeated

Grizzly

bear. And the figure in "Keeping


America Clean" is an offshoot of an

A lot of times the compositions start

earlier composition of a deconstruct-

from

ed

go

camouflaged

creature

embedded

a

to

single work

object

in

modeling

it

puter

and

other

elements

istic"

abstraction

and

But

tioned above, a lot of times the com-

of

the

thing

previous is

things

also

I

to

the

picture).

generally

see

or

every-

informed

remember.

I

by

spend

it

ever

follows,

element the

to

build

in

3D

and

from

of

next

it

or

But

of

almost

go

from

that

I

many

encounter.

Google

Tumblr

goldmines

are

random

different

otherwise

imagery

would

images of

you

the

can

always

not

variations

and

elements,

most

imagine,

head

there.

As

men-

and

at

through

transformation.

imagery

my

becomes

one

that tends to present me with a lot sources

unfolds

into

position I'm working on sparks what-

objects

want

jump

builds

a lot of time researching images of I

process

I

com-

ment (hence, I called him "Mr. Realcontrast

the

head. the

in a dense video game like environin

as

my in

as

the

add

for

sort

dozens or

the

and

basis

of

compositions

through

I

some

some

the

change

lighting,

least

of

remove

environments

virtual

camera

angle. So what you see in the final

and that tends to be what drives me

version

forward.

outcome that

I

is of

really

choose of

just

many. the

It

to

one is

call

picture

possible

decided a

Do you find that materials inform your

version

work? Is it the other way around? Or is

also like the idea that each variation

it in constant motion?

could live on as an alternate reality to all of the others.

Mostly,

with

digital

concerned

with

perceived

in

materials,

the

the

level

image.

of

I

am

reality

For

many

objects, I just want the materials to be

convincing

space

and

enough.

things

to

I

be

want

the

believable,

but I'm not always interested in fully photo-realistic materials because that defeats the purpose for me. I don't want surfaces to be glaringly digital either, so I tend to avoid the digital trick of making some ordinary object appear like it's made of some weird material. It's a balancing act and h i t t i n g that

in-between

space

of

real

and

fake is what I'm most interested in. Based on the objective output, your process seems in some ways, decided. Would you mind providing some additional insight into the compositions of your images?

"done"

in

certain but

I


Griz z ly Chair 2014 Ray trac ed I m age / C- P r i nt 72 x 4 5. 375 inches (prev ious)

M r . Re a l i sti c (Ke e p i n g Ame ri ca Cl e a n ) 2014 Ra ytra ce d Ima g e / C-Pri n t 7 2 x 5 0 .5 i n ch e s (a b o ve )


M A R I A M O LT E N I maria-molteni.squarespace.com Maria Molteni is a Nashville-to-Boston-based multimedia artist, beekeeper, and educator. Having completed rigorous studies in drawing, painting and printmaking

at

Boston

University

her

practice

sprang

from

roots

in

observation

and

formalism. Over time, it expanded to incorporate performance, research, and participation. In

the

spirit

of

early

puppeteers,

with

roots

in

religion

and

radical

politics,

she attempts to extract or embellish psychic energy in urban and natural environments. Exploring iterations of sport, craft, feminism, spiritualism, animism, utopia, pop-culture, cryptozoology, and queerness, her work seeks to embody or

expose

unseen

presences

or

predicaments,

whether

cosmic

or

practical.

She enjoys problem solving via traditional methods of craft, employing original or absurdist tactics as applied aesthetic solutions.

How would you describe your relation-

artists

are

ship with nature? Is this something you

ished,

they

often consider? Does living in a city

habits

for

affect this relationship?

describe elty

or

economically tend

to

survival.

art-making profession,

undernour-

reshape Many

in

people

terms

but

I

their

of

nov-

believe

the

This is something I often consider. I

artistic

necessity

feel I have a strong relationship with

certain

primal

nature,

in

easily be explained or shed. It's just

and

something you do, or have to do, or

though

cities.

I

moved

to

but

grew

both

close

mostly in

Boston cities

to

I've up

as

lived

Nashville a

young

adult,

quite . lush

are

mountains,

fields,

Some

of

between

who were I've

were a

in

creeks,

visiting

my

strawberry

lot

of

always

those

wanted

climbing

grandparents

farmers.

There

influences more

of

instincts.

the

digging

around

likened They

to

can't

and

forests,

socialized

and

be

know how to do.

etc. As a child I spent a lot of time trees,

can

in

that my

life.

animals who

be

designs

Many

'civilized'

try

their

her

life less

lifestyles whom

or

forge other

by

an

artist

around

available

live

for

to and

closed

and

artists

animals

that

themselves may

necessities and

gaps

humans

these

resources.

conventionally

reflect

those

productivity

of and

I have other thoughts about the rela-

play haven't been stan dardized. I've

tionship that artists have to nature...

shared

whether they're situated rurally or in

organisms

one

tendencies.

of

Jane

“diverse adhere

urban to

similar

Jacob's

described

ecosystems� rules

of

that coexis-

tence. Because many contemporary

in

an

enjoyed

studios who I

Allston

with share

worked

all

among

basement

watching

sorts

some and

them

of

of my

spiders much weave

between my sculptures as I crocheted.


I

worked

out

of

a

honey

warehouse

in Leominster where bees often snuck in.

It's

great

productive,

to

be

around

matriarchal

such

communities

like honeybees as you're hustling and working

your

butt

off.

I

did

a

resi-

dency in Pennsylvania that was overrun

with

bats

(one

of

my

spirit

animals). We had regular interactions because

our

similar.

And

live/work

sleeping now

I

building

patterns

live

in

a

in

were

fancier

downtown

Boston. Midway Studios used to be a wool factory and there are still what I

like

to

call

"heirloom"

clothing

moths that make messes of my fiber pieces! People living in denser cities aren't

as

removed

from

"nature"

as

they may think. But what I miss most about Tennessee, besides being able to

see

night

more calls

stars, of

are

cicadas

the

powerful

and

other

insects. Those sounds really massage the soul. Would you mind providing some background information about the works in

Woander? Where do these ideas germinate,

and

why

have

they

held

your

attention? I’m interested aesthetically and philosophically

in

acts

the

with

become

how

the

artificial

organic

separated

and

as

inter-

how

they

“natural”

and

“unnatural”. I’m as heavily influenced by pop-culture as ecology, particularly when

queer

culture

appropriates

it.

I’m drawn to this tanning bed image, like

a

moth

appears

to

both

threatening

a

flame,

toxic and

because

and

it

alluring,

nourishing.

It’s

placed in the front window of a salon as an advertisement, but the rhythmic rise

and

fall

of

color

shifts

remind

me of droning insect calls or animals that

change

color

with

I

paired

surroundings. cicada

call

varying

natural

magnetic

because

it it

cycles-

(visible)

their

moods/with

a

juxtaposes the

electro-

spectrum,

sun-

rise/etting, seasonal recreation, insect mating

patterns,

etc.

People

work

these tidy 9-5 jobs so they can go


and

“work”

on

their

tans

every

5

graceful

way

between

for

13

to

have

under. many

and

only

see

before

Circadian

rhythms

different

ways,

the

sun

going

back

manifest

but

we

in

often

think there is this one “natural” way to exist. The

installation

drone is

a

you

field

hear

in

recording

my from

a trip I took to Texas. The Cacama named

and

or after

“Cactus

Dodger”

the

of

lord

tactical

following

solutions

to

my vari-

ous irresistible stimuli. I like to move between

media

that

seem

more

and

less concrete or ephemeral. Much of that

is

about

experiential

Cicada

valvata,

tactile

much

them,

instincts/intuition and responding with

babies

very

work

but

years

I’m

to

days. Some cicadas stay in the earth

life,

art,

experimentation

research.

and

nature

I are

believe tangled

and that up

and I’m trying to tease this all apart. I’ll basically try anything.

was

the

Aztec

kingdom Tezcuco. Cacama was killed by Spanish conquistadors and is supposed to live on in these creatures. Do you find that materials inform your work? Is it the other way around? Or is it in constant motion? It

is

in

very In

constant

tactile, this

motion,

but

I’m

material-oriented

way

I'm

like

a

person.

a

Magpie,

collecting shiny objects and hoarding them into my space. Half of my practice

is

playing

Tetris

and

finding

ways to build them into my apartment layout. Sometimes I wish I were less of

a

"pack

that

my

this

whole

rat"

but

materials

I

find

process

ties

also me

believe and

daily

that

life

to

a finally arranged piece. The objects, then, a

are

also

previous

kind

history

of or

charged energy

with

that

I

think makes its way in psychically. From paintings, to video installations, to interactive performance, your work has its own sort of spectrum. How do these projects inform each other and how do you transition between them? I’ m

not

sure

I’ve

found

the

most

Maria Molteni The Rise and Fall of Calcama Video Projection, Field Recording of Cacalama Valvata (Cactus Dodger) Cicada, Stones, Shells, Bones Plastic, Plaster 2015 Installation


ANDREA WOLF andreawolf.org Andrea

Wolf

is

a

Brooklyn-based

interdisciplinary

artist

from

Chile.

Her

work

consists of ongoing research on time, memory, and image. Wolf’s practice focuses in memory objects we produce (photos, home movies, postcards) and the relation

between

creates

personal

video

memory

installations

and

and

cultural

video

practices

sculptures

to

of

tackle

remembering.

these

Wolf

matters,

repre-

senting the tension between remembering and forgetting. Working with found footage - with anonymous stories - she leaves an open space to be filled by the meaning that each of us brings through our personal experiences. Wolf holds MFAs in Documentary Filmmaking (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona) and Digital Arts (Universidad Pompeu Fabra), and a MPA in Interactive Telecommunications

(NYU).

She

was

a

resident

of

the

AIM

Program

at

the

Bronx

Museum in 2013 and is currently an artist in residency at the New York Media Center. Wolf has shown her work and given lectures and workshops internationally in venues like the Museum of Memory and Human Rights and the Contemporary Art Museum in Santiago Chile, Dumbo Arts Festival, White Box, The Paley Center for Media and Wave Hill in New York, MIT Media Lab in Boston, Digital Culture

Center

Andrea

is

in

Mexico

founder

and

City,

VIZZI

director

of

Festival

in

Kiev

REVERSE,

a

non-profit

and

Media

Lab

workspace

Madrid. and

art

gallery in Brooklyn.

How would you describe your relation-

Would you mind providing some back-

ship with nature? Is this something you

ground information about the works in

often consider? Does living in a city

Woander? Where do these ideas germi-

affect this relationship?

nate, and why have they held your attention?

I

don't

think

being

in

nature,

interesting

you

you

(even say

it's

though,

person. our

I

to

a

images

I'm

space find

we

I

in.

and Then,

it

Last

December

make

happen,

contained

to

get

trip).

link

find

I

I

there

have

much

a

more

nature

the

like

become

think

observe

ourselves

to

I

has

very of

it;

also

travel

guess

of

I

short

mediation

often.

that

have

have

if

this

but

that

something like

about

I

was

beautiful

collection

of

in

Chile,

album high

that

resolu-

tion photographs of the moon, part of a

research

developed

by

a

Chilean

about

vatory in Chile or Brazil between 1961

one

think

a

when a

astronomer presumptively in an obser-

and

the

across

city

between I

to

came

the

and

the

photos overlaid by a velum paper with

we

very

specific

about

the

more

1962.

Most

pages

technical

conditions

and

have

two

information lenses

in

about landscape, or the concept of it.

which the images where taken. Inside

A

the album, I found two essays written

but

landscape also

its

is

not

image.

merely It

does

a

place,

not

only

reside in nature but also in culture.

by

the

same

scientist

"Observaciones

del Desvanecimiento del Brillo de s


Mis s ion 22 Orbits 2015 V i d e o S cu l p tu r e , Fo u n d Fo o t a g e Pr o ye ct e d o n to a Solid Rec tangular Plex i-glas s Variable Dimens ions

M o o n N. 1 1 2015 Gi cl é e Pr i n t 2 6 x 3 7 i n ch e s

Moon N.12 2015 Gic lée Print 26 x 37 inc hes


Algunas

Estrellas

ciones

Por

La

en

Sus

Luna"

and

Oculta-

white. How do you imagine progress?

"Destellos

Luminosos en La Luna".

Do you find that materials inform your work? Is it the other way around? Or is it

I was completely mesmerized by this discovery. are

The

images

breathtaking,

mation

of

makes

it

how of

the

moon

detailed

infor-

I work mostly with found footage home

taken

movies,

they

even

regardless

of

the

were

more

the

in constant motion?

compelling,

technicality

postcards

photos

that

were

and

once

vintage

written

and

it.

mailed.

I

This album, with all its research and

memory

objects

science,

and

relation between personal memory and

just

cultural practices of remembering.

seemed

reflected

so

so

much

of

found

personal

caring.

It

am

interested we

in

produce

these

and

the

made me think about my memories of the

moon,

minutes have

just

later

any.

mine.

Yet

These

thick

to

that

realize I

again,

paper

like

few

actually

they

For years now, I have been collecting super8

and

8mm

films,

creating

home

movies

my

felt

like

own

to

the

found

album

are

flea markets in different countries and

space and probably

have collected some from friends or in

photos, a

how I remember

a

don't glued

family

how you do too.

archive

of

footage.

I

buy

these

and

films

in

random circumstances. One could say, I

work

with

other

peoples

memories.

And then I remembered this super 8

The archive appears then as a poten-

film

tially

of

I

found

years

travel I

in

New

ago.

and

looked

It

was

progress

it

up

York

in

a

couple

about

space

and my

dreams.

found

So

footage

successful

past.

But

what

re-appropriate material,

the

space

flight

of

astronaut Gordon Cooper in 1963 and

through

his

public

collage.

The

film

Orbits!

reception is

after

called

Flight

of

landing.

"Mission:

Astronaut

Gordon

(actual

both

that

makes

you

must

form

of

your

memories.

It

and each

other,

shaped.

events with

in

history

certain

about

the

outer

space

that

aesthetic.

moon I

and think

concepts are

and

imprinted

When

I

think

and each

remembrance

some

new

me that

narratives

juxtaposition,

the

In

work,

other.

memory

then

are

to

re-interpret

montage,

has the texture of remembrance. and there

and create

inform

media

part

to

materials

feel that everything you are watching be

interesting

and

So I think it is a dialogue between the

film)

is

22

Cooper". I think it ithe quality of film analog

accessing

about the archive is the possibility to

of

about

of

what has been lost, reconstructing the

archive. It's a media production kind film

means

which

Technology,

affect

and

creating

that some

in

are

ways,

trans-

models

of

culturally my

work

is

about making that evident and, in the process,

the

memories

that

I

collect

the

stars

and

are

in

black

and

ence the way I think about my work.

transformed,

but

they

also

influ-


Do you have specific intentions for your

birthday could be the memory of any

viewers? Do you see disparity between

other,

the

the visceral and intellectual reactions,

ritual

and

or do they go hand-in-hand?

remains

person the

the

changes, story

same.

but

being

Home

the told

movies

become cultural products and cultural In my work I try to create an experi-

practices

ence

memories.

in

which

memory

becomes

an

action that is constantly actualized in

never

the

past:

present,

system

in

while

which

recognizing

the

function

a

of

the

past is not that of truth but of desire. Working

with

anonymous

found

stories

-

footage I

leave

-

with

an

open

space to be filled by the meaning that each of us brings through our personal experiences. If we understand memory as a narrative

construction,

we

can

say

that

there is a constant re-writing; there is no final text, but a continuous/infinite non-linear ways

one,

endlessly

reversible:

every

repeated,al-

memory

is

a

new memory. With

so

many

works

confronting

memory, do you ever insert your personal ephemera or memoirs, or are they only intended for the collective? I

do

have

movies when

some

as I

part

use

remove

of of

this

myself

my my

own

material,

and

not

home

archive, I

but

tend

think

of

to

them

so much as mine. Continuing with the idea

that

memory

construction,

we

is

a

can

narrative

find

similar

elements in the stories that we create when we say who we are and in the memory tend

objects

to

that

record

and

rituals

time

and

that the

we

produce.

some

specific

mark

the

unfolding

We

events

passage

of

our

of

lives:

birthdays, vacations, graduations, weddings:

mostly

Therefore, of

our

we

happy can

memories

moments think

of

indeed. the

becoming

idea inter-

changeable; the photograph of one’s

set

simply each

the

But,

tone home

found

time

of

the

movies

footage

they

their meaning changes.

are

of

ideal are the

reviewed,


WOANDER  

A group exhibition featuring Raina Belleau Shamus Clisset Maria Molteni Andrea Wolf

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you