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JANUARY 13, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO SINCE 1892

VOL. 128, ISSUE 19

TRAUMA CENTER HEAD ANNOUNCED

CHICAGOANS SAY GOODBYE TO OBAMA

BY CAMILLE KRISCH

BY SONIA SCHLESINGER

CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

DEPUTY NEWS EDITOR

Dr. Selwyn Rogers will head the University of Chicago’s new adult trauma center, the University of Chicago Medical Center (UCMC) announced Thursday morning. Rogers, a surgeon, was previously the chief medical officer of the University of Texas Medical Branch and has 16 years of trauma care experience. Through much of his career, Rogers has focused on addressing the health care needs of underserved communities. He traces his interest in health disparities back to his residency. “I was struck, taking care of critically ill patients, how it mattered if you were poor, black or Hispanic and lived in certain neighborhoods, compared to if you were white and wealthy and lived in different neighborhoods,” Rogers said. “And that didn’t strike me as a just system.” Rogers believes his experience addressing inequality in health care makes him uniquely qualified to head what will be the only Level I adult trauma center on Chicago’s South Side. “In some ways I feel I’ve been

Richard Brown, like many Chicagoans, came full circle last night. As he stood in line for the President’s farewell speech at McCormick Place, he compared the atmosphere to the iconic night in Grant Park in 2008, where he stood and watched Barack Obama give his victory speech. “The energy that night was so electric, so happy, so energizing,” he recalled. “And here we are, eight years later, still impressed by the man.” Pete Grieve

WATCH: Lester Holt’s interview with the President airs on NBC | 9:00 p.m. ET

training my whole life for this job,” he said. Plans for the University of Chicago Medicine Trauma Center were first announced in 2015. The campaign for an adult trauma center at the University began in 2010, after the death of 18-yearold activist Damian Turner. Turner was shot three blocks away from the UCMC but died in transit to Northwestern Memorial Hospital’s adult trauma center.

Brown, like many of the 18,000 guests who attended Tuesday’s speech, arrived before 6 a.m. on Saturday morning to stand in an hours-long line for tickets outside McCormick Place in the three-degree weather. “First my toes went numb, then the middle of my foot went numb, then my entire foot went numb, but after I was there for two hours I figured I just can’t leave,” Brown said. It was worth it though, said Brown, who grew up in Chatham and Bronzeville, because of the President’s connections to the city. “I’m a South Sider…and sometimes people give the South Side a bad rap…so it gives me a sense of pride to say that the leader of the free world is from the South Side.” Brown attended the speech with his sister and some of his fraternity brothers from college. Calae Perry, who came with Brown, observed that the the mood in the room had changed since Grant Park in 2008. “We know that there’s going to be something that will end that we love now, so it’s bittersweet; it’s somber. It’s a lot of spiritual reminiscing,” he said. Both Brown and Perry emphasized their appreciation for Obama’s work and legacy. The President’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative, which provides mentorship to young men of color, is particularly important to Brown,

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Zoe Kaiser

Zoe Kaiser

INSIDE: —84 Percent of U of C Students Surveyed Say Donald Trump Is Unfit to Be President (page 2) —Stanford Art Curator Named New Head of Art Museum (page 2) —Looking for something to do this long weekend? On and Around Campus: 1/13—1/16 (page 3) —U of C Astronomers Discover “Twin Star,” Develop Insight Into Planetary Movement (page 4)

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All the World’s a Stage

Maroons Gear Up for Phoenix Invitational

Page 7

Contributing to the Maroon

Page 11

Some may argue that celebrities should stick to their field and keep away from politics. However, Streep’s assertions were well founded and principled.

If you want to get involved in THE “This year, I want to improve my M AROON in any way, please email personal bests and try to take my apply@chicagomaroon.com or success to the next level by quali- visit chicagomaroon.com/apply. fying for the NCAA meet.”

UChicago Manual of Style Page 9–10 T HE M A ROON ’s fashion feature rigorously inquires: “Who are you wearing?” This issue: Spencer Kaplan and Priyanka Sethy.

Excerpts from articles and comments published in T he Chicago Maroon may be duplicated and redistributed in other media and non-commercial publications without the prior consent of The Chicago Maroon so long as the redistributed article is not altered from the original without the consent of the Editorial Team. Commercial republication of material in The Chicago Maroon is prohibited without the consent of the Editorial Team or, in the case of reader comments, the author. All rights reserved. © The Chicago Maroon 2017


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THE CHICAGO MAROON - JANUARY 13, 2017

84% of Surveyed UofC Students Say Donald Trump is Unfit to Be President BY ZACHARY ROBERTSON DATA ANALYST

Results from an online poll of 317 students showed that students on campus have an overwhelmingly negative view of Donald Trump, with most saying that the President-elect is not fit to be president. Non-white students viewed Donald Trump slightly less negatively than their white counterparts. In addition, many students said they felt somewhat reluctant to discuss their political views on campus. The poll was administered to undergraduate students from December 26 to January 4. The sample size was 5.8 percent of the total population of the University. The margin of sampling error for rating questions was ±0.5 for all student groups analyzed. The sampling error for the percentages mentioned was ±5 percent. Overall, 84 percent of students surveyed said that Donald Trump is not fit to be president despite his having won the election. Students were also asked to rate their view of Donald Trump overall on a scale from one to 10, with one being negative and 10 being positive. White students had a slightly more negative view of Trump (one out of 10) than non-white students on campus did (three out of 10). Trump did not fare much better when students were asked to rate what kind of impact the President-elect would likely have on social and economic issues in the United States. On the whole, students were pessimistic about a Trump presidency, with white students giving an average outlook of 2.2 on social issues and

3.4 on the economy. Non-white students were slightly more positive, assigning an outlook rating of 3.2 and 4.1 on these issue categories, respectively. The demographic profile of non-white students on campus could account for this break from the national trend—for instance, many non-white students on campus are international students, and thus may have different political opinions than their domestic counterparts. Students were also asked to rate how comfortable they were expressing their political views on campus and how strong those views were on a scale of one to 10. Despite over 90 percent of students saying they have strong political views, and 26 percent saying they have very strong political views, 27 percent of students said they were at least somewhat uncomfortable expressing their political views on campus. Democratic students said they were comfortable sharing their political views (7.8), which they identified as somewhat strong (8.1). Republican students were significantly less comfortable sharing their political views—one out of 10 —but also held slightly stronger political views, responding with 8.5. Tyler Araujo, who said he was fiscally Republican and socially liberal, said, “I’ve experienced a really high rate of dismissal…although I’m not married to anything I believe…people really seem to demonize opinions they don’t agree with.” Josh Parks, second-year and vice-president of College Republicans, reflected on his experience

in supporting and defending Trump. “I wasn’t exposed to so many liberals before,” he said. “I tested the waters debating on campus…. I didn’t expect people to get so hurt.” Regarding

the reaction of campus liberals to the election, he said, “Some would rather distract rather than debate.” The overwhelming majority of students polled identified

themselves as Democrats, with 10.1 percent saying they were Republicans. 6.8 percent said they were Libertarian, and 14 percent said they identified with another political party.

Stanford Art Curator Named New Head of Smart Museum BY JORGE ERNESTO CLAVO ABBASS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

A top curator from Stanford University’s arts center has been named the new director of the Smart Museum. Alison Gass will be replacing Interim Director Bill Michel effective May 1, departing her position as the chief curator and associate director for exhibitions and collections at Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center, a position she has held since 2014. Gass previously served as the acting director of the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University, where she was also a member of the leadership team that opened the museum. “I think that the Smart is really poised to be part of a great conversation of what a world-class university museum should be in the 21st century,” Gass told THE MAROON in an interview. “While I want to take my time once I get there, my goals are to continue the impact of the Smart, not just on an academic level, but also by connecting with the Hyde Park community and beyond.” As a curator, Gass has over-

seen exhibitions at the Cantor Arts Center, the Broad Art Museum, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. She has also taught at City College of New York and the California College of the Arts. Gass holds a bachelor’s degree from Columbia University and a graduate degree in art history from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. Gass emphasized that she is optimistic about the museum’s future. “It’s an exciting moment to think about building the collection, and it’s really important to think about how the Smart fits into the context of great art institutions, not just on campus, but also in the city of Chicago at large. The Smart has a wonderful collection and they are already thinking so clearly about the question regarding how to be accessible to a richness of diverse audiences, and about building the next generation of art lovers and supporters,” she said. Gass will be on campus February 22 for the opening reception of Classicisms, an upcoming exhibition at the Smart Museum which “explodes the idea of classicism as an unchanging ideal,” according to the museum’s website.

Courtesy of University of Chicago


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THE CHICAGO MAROON - JANUARY 13, 2017

Friday, January 13 Memorial Program for Professor Richard L. Chambers Saieh Hall, 4:30–5:30 p.m. R icha rd L . Chambers helped found the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Chicago and ran the center from 1979 to 1985. Linda Darling—like Chambers, a scholar of Turkey and the Ottoman Empire — will deliver a lecture titled “Richard L. Chambers: A Life in Turkish Studies” in his memory.

On & Around Campus 1/13 — 1/16 Situating the Kashmir Crisis Stuart Hall, 3:30–5 p.m. Chicago Stands with the Indian Academy will host a discussion panel about the long-term military tension between India and Pakistan around Kashmir. Panelists leading the talk will be UChicago political science professor Paul Staniland and DePauw University professor Mona Bhan. The Path to Peace for Colombia: What’s Next Saieh Hall 21, 9 a.m.–12 p.m. If it holds, Colombia’s peace deal with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia guerrilla group will represent the end of one of the last hot confl icts of the Cold War. At this two-panel conference, people familiar with the deal will consider its future. Resisting Trump: Where Do We Go From Here Kent Hall, 4–6 p.m. Anti-Trump forces on campus gather as his presidency approaches. During the fi rst hour, representatives of different activist groups will present their approaches to the questions posed by a Trump presidency; during the second hour, attendees will give their own thoughts and concerns. Saturday, January 14 MLK Day of Service University Community Service Center, 8:30 a.m.– 1:30 p.m. To honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. UCSC will offer opportunities for students to

volunteer for more than a dozen community service organizations. Luncheon will take place at the Cloister Club and professor Charles M. Payne will deliver a keynote address. South Side Weekly Winter Open House The Experimental Station, 2–4 p.m. The South Side Weekly welcomes new writers, reporters, designers, illustrators, photographers, and more to become involved with the publication. Potential contributors from across the city are encouraged to attend. CUSA Show Mandel Hall, dinner, 6 p.m.; show, 7–9:30 p.m. C h i ne s e Under g r aduate Student Association (CUSA) will present a play in which ancient Chinese legend, the Butterfly Lovers, is transformed into a story of time travel. Dinner will be provided in Hutchinson Commons at 6 p.m. and doors open at Mandel Hall at 7 p.m. Emancipation Proclamation Pageant at the Unitarian Church First Unitarian Church, 7–8:30 p.m. The Unitarian Church’s Racial Justice Task Force will be holding an Emancipation Proclamation Pageant to celebrate the 154th anniversary of the signing of the proclamation and the anniversaries of the 14th and 15th amendments, which gave male former slaves citizenship and the right to vote. The pageant is three acts long and explores the role which multi-racial unity played in demolishing slavery in the United States. Sunday, January 15 Clint Smith – “Counting Descent” Seminary Co-Op, 3–4:30 p.m. Harvard University doctoral candidate Clint Smith will read from Counting Descent, his debut poetry collection, in which he explores the contrast between the celebration and stigma of black culture through personal stories. Monday, January 16 Martin Luther King Jr. Day Hyde Park Art Center, 11 a.m.–5:30 p.m. The Hyde Park Art Center will reflect on the issues from the Civil Rights Movement that are still present in America today through watching various fi lms. The fi lm line-up includes 13th from 11 a.m. to 12:45 p.m., Brother Outsider from 1:30 to 3 p.m., and Black Power Mixtape from 3:30 to 5:15 p.m.

NEWS IN BRIEF After Taking Heat at Harvard Event, CNN President to Speak at IOP CNN President Jeff Zucker will speak at an Institute of Politics (IOP) panel at the end of the month on the American public’s distrust of the media. Zucker caused a stir at his November visit to Harvard’s IOP, where a formal dinner erupted into loud public criticism by Republican presidential campaign operatives outraged at CNN’s extensive coverage of Donald Trump. The rival strategists argued that the network denied their candidates air time in favor of live streaming footage of empty podiums at Trump rallies. The event will be an installment in the IOP’s America in the Trump Era series. Zucker has admitted that the exhaustive cov-

erage was “a mistake” but argued that Trump frequently agreed to come on the air for interviews, whereas other candidates were often unavailable. His claim that candidates turned down offers to come on air was met with booing and heckling. The panel will also include CBS News President David Rhodes and Ann Marie Lipinski, curator of Harvard’s Nieman Foundation for Journalism and former vice president of civic engagement at the University of Chicago. It will be moderated by IOP Visiting Fellow Matt Bai, national political columnist at Yahoo News. The event will be on January 26 at 6:15 p.m. —Lee Harris

Student Group Collected 150 Books for Women Prisoners S t ud e nt s Wo rk i n g Against Prisons (SWAP) collected over 150 books along with $100 in donations at the end of a recently conducted book drive. In partnership with the Chicago B ooks to Women in Prison (BWP) organization, SWAP will ship the collected books to women in prisons nationwide. A nna Nathanson, a fourth-year undergraduate who staffed SWAP’s table in Reynold’s Club, e x p r e s s e d g r at i t ud e , thanking those who donated books, money, and time to the drive. T hroughout the rema i nder of th is yea r however, SWAP will be dedicated to organizing additional events to further their cause, including

a fi lm screening of 13th, a documentary drawing a connection between the abolition of slavery in the U.S. and today’s disproportionate incarceration of African Americans. In addition, there will be a workshop on alternatives to calling the police. According to SWAP, involving the police can potentially escalate a situation, resulting in police brutality or prisoner maltreatment once the accused is incarcerated. Being able to avoid the potential effects of calling the police will be the focal point of the workshop. SWAP meets weekly on Mondays at 7 p.m. in the Center for Identity and Inclusion. —Tyrone Lomax

Chicago Economics Forum Panel on Trump An economist, a historian, and a political scientist met Tuesday to discuss the economic consequences of the impending Trump presidency. Historian of American capitalism John Levy joined political scientist Robert Gulotty and economics professor Kevin Murphy for the panel discussion. T he panelists f irst turned their attention to the populist grassroots movement Trump harnessed to win the election. Levy remarked that populism is ideologically flexible, an idea Gulotty echoed, calling populism, “such an amorphous concept,” which is not tied to a political ideology in the United States. Murphy also examined the populist psyche in the United States, explaining

that it was a product of the “visible” and “invisible.” As he explained, “When things are tough, people look for reasons why it’s tough.” In response to a following question, Murphy attacked Trump’s immigration policies. He explained it was once again a problem of the visible and invisible. What was visible to most people was that immigrants had jobs, and Americans did not. But Murphy emphasized that immigrants “don’t just produce labor, they demand labor.... What’s invisible is the jobs that are created” when immigrants take their earnings and spend them. The panelists also discussed Trump’s tariff proposals and how they aim to return overseas jobs to America. Levy explained that this was the wrong

approach; the fundamental driver of the loss of manufacturing jobs in America was automation, and “those jobs aren’t necessarily coming back.” The panelists generally agreed that trade agreements are simply “easy to attack” for Trump, as a “visible” sign of economic decline, but do little to solve the core problems in the American economy. Instead of limiting trade and immigration, Murphy especially seemed to advocate for education initiatives as the solution to America’s current economic woes, explaining that the economy right now was experiencing a dearth of high skill labor. The populist movement that elected Trump was part of a broader wave of populist movements across the world. “The clearest

place [populism] is growing right now is in Europe,” Gulloty said, before cautioning that visa-free Schengen area might soon break up. Levy concurred, explaining that “nationalism has a lot of wind at its back,” and the current discontent isn’t likely to be alleviated soon. Murphy offered one silver lining: the tendency of populism to latch onto the visible rather than invisible means populism cannot attach to real issues and become an enduring movement. He also offered perhaps a more subjective view of Trump’s recent electoral success, explaining that “people don’t get nearly as mad at billionaires, as they do at young whippersnappers.... You guys don’t know shit.” —Solomon Dworkin

New Student Discounts Come to Hyde Park E i g ht e en new d i s counts have been added to the Student Government (SG) local business discount program. New busi nesses on the list include Dollop Coffee in Campus North, Native Foods Cafe, New B a l a nc e , 57t h S t r e et Books, H&R Block, and The Revival. Upon presenting valid UCI D to the cash ier or ser ver,

students and staff can receive discounts ranging from 10 – 50 percent off. For K ilwins, a daily 10 percent discount will replace the existing $5 discount on fudge for students wea r i ng maroon apparel on Maroon Mondays. T he S G lo ca l business discount initiative is executed in conjunction with Office of Civic

Engagement’s UChicago Local initiative, a University partnership that connects businesses and job seekers in the mid– South Side. At the S G G enera l A s s embly me et i ng on Monday night, Commun it y a nd G over n ment Liaison Cosmo Albrecht ex pr e s s ed i nt er e st i n bring ing discount programs to businesses out-

side of Hyde Park. “I look forward to continuing to take steps to make life in Hyde Park more affordable and enjoyable for students and anticipate taking the discount program outside of our neighborhood in the quarter ahead,” Albrecht said in an e-mail to The Maroon. —Emily Feigenbaum


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THE CHICAGO MAROON - JANUARY 13, 2017

U of C Astronomers Discover “Twin Star,” Develop Insight Into Planetary Movement fairly prevalent in this star compared to other solar twin stars and the Sun, especially.” Therefore, Bedell’s group, under the mentorship of her thesis adviser Jacob Bean, assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of Chicago, and collaborating with a team of international scientists, including Brazilian scientist and lead author Jorge Melendez, came to the conclusion that star HIP68468 actually devoured nearby planets, which would explain the inconsistencies in the composition of the star. Bedell’s discovery of two nearby planets, a “super Earth” and a “super Neptune,” also supports this hypothesis, as they seem to have migrated closer to the star over time. “We can guess that the ‘super Earth’ formed somewhere close to where the Earth did [in our solar system] and the ‘super Neptune’ probably formed much further away,” Bedell said. “In both cases today, we see them in a place where they’re so close to the star and so hot that it just wouldn’t have been possible for the material to condense in that place in the early solar system.” Bedell observed these planets with a Chile-based spectrograph called High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher (HA RPS). This instrument breaks down light from stars into the component colors, and researchers then use

BY STEPHANIE PALAZZO STAFF REPORTER

University of Chicago researchers have discovered a planetary system based around “solar twin” HIP68468, a star that shares many similarities with the Sun. Unlike the Sun, this star contains abnormal amounts of lithium, levels that would be more common in a much younger star, as lithium gets consumed by a star during its lifetime. “Lithium is like the ‘smoking gun’ evidence in this case that there’s something unusual about this star,” said Megan Bedell, a UChicago graduate student and leader of the planet search portion of this project. “[It’s] kind of an unusual element in that it actually gets consumed by the star during the course of its lifetime, so as [the star] grows older, the lithium gets eaten up in the same process that fuses the hydrogen to create energy in the star.” High levels of lithium in HIP68468, which usually indicates a young star, contradicts its actual age — 6 billion years compared to the Sun’s 4.5 billion years. “ Planets have lithium, so we inferred that the extra lithium [is due to] planetary pollution on the outside of the star,” Bedell said. “We also see that extra rocky material—iron and things that make up the Earth—tend up to be

the spectrum it creates to find planets and discover the composition of stars. “We have to keep using HARPS to observe the star many times over a period of years because you want to see the small changes that happen in the star during the time it takes for the planet to do an orbit around the star,” Bedell said. “I’ve been going to Chile about three times a year or so for the past few years and using the same instrument to keep track of how the stars are changing through time. Using that, I can then find out whether or not they have planets and what the planets are like.” By looking at “solar twins” like HIP68468, researchers gain insight into the future of our own solar system. “It’s kind of cool to see what the planetary systems of these stars are like, especially if there’s a lot of debate about how planet migration might happen over time—maybe the system that’s born around a young star doesn’t stay stable like that, and it’ll get rearranged over the star’s lifetime,” Bedell said. “So if you see a really old solar twin, maybe that’s what the Sun will end up looking like.” In addition, looking at systems like the one surrounding star HIP68468 provides a “stepping stone” to questions about other Earth-like planets, Bedell said. “[It’s] got a lot of implications for the

solar system and especially how common an Earth-like sy stem is, whether other Earths out there are habitable or whether a lot of stars have this migration event that renders everything too hot to be inhabited,” Bedell said. “It’s nice evidence that we’re on the right path for what the current theory is to explain these systems.” The group plans on continuing their research on the star system to verify their findings. “We would like to keep taking measurements of the star’s radial velocity to confirm the planet candidates that we identified and to search for additional planets,” Bean said. “We also want to compare the star’s unusual abundance pattern to that of other similar stars to determine how common this sort of phenomenon is.” However, even though solar twin HIP68468 might be engulfing nearby planets, Bedell dismisses fears about Earth being similarly destroyed by the Sun any time soon. “ I mean, if we’re going to stick around for 5 billion years, we’ll have to worry about the Sun devouring the Earth because eventually the Sun will swell up into a red giant, but I think this points to us being safe until the next phase of the Sun’s life starts,” Bedell said. “We’re probably not going to go spiraling into the Sun at any moment.”

“It’s time to reset, reboot, look forward,” Rogers said. Rogers acknowledged that there is a complex history between the South Side and the University, but said he is committed to earning the trust of local residents. “It’s time to reset, reboot, look forward,” Rogers said. “We’re going to do this the right way to create a sustainable trauma center that serves the communities in the South Side.” In addition to leading the new trauma center, Rogers will serve as the University’s executive vice president for community health engagement. In that role, he will be responsible for community-based programs to improve public health and reduce violence. “With all the wealth of resources at

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The South Side of Chicago has lacked an adult trauma center since the UCMC shut down its trauma center in 1988. Turner’s death sparked complaints that the UCMC was not serving the largely black and low-income communities that surround it. Rogers said that changing that perception is one of his primary goals for the job. “I want to start with listening [to community members], and listening with attention,” he said. “And through listening, I am hoping to increasingly partner with the community as they one by one drop the shroud of skepticism and see the University’s commitment to the communities that we serve,” he said.

the University of Chicago, there’s a tremendous opportunity for us to think differently about intentional trauma,” Rogers said. “I plan to look at violence prevention programs, violence intervention programs, violence interruption programs, and think of intentional violence as a public health issue.” Rogers said he was drawn to the job because it seemed like an opportunity to make a substantive, positive difference for underserved communities. He cited an experience he had as a young doctor that inspired him to tackle gun violence. Rogers was serving as the trauma surgeon on call when a 28-year-old man was brought in with a gunshot wound to the

head. The man was brain dead, and there was nothing Rogers could do other than break the news to his family. Against Rogers’s advice, the man’s mother brought his daughter to see him before he was taken off life support. It was the first time the girl had seen her father since he had gone to prison. Rogers was moved by the mother’s composure in the face of this tragedy, and asked her how she could remain so calm. “I pulled her aside and I said, ‘I just saw something amazing,’” Rogers said. “‘Can you tell me of the source of the strength that you had to do this?’ And she said, ‘I had to do this for my other son two years ago.’”

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who runs a nonprofit for young men on the South Side. “He’s a quintessential model of what you can be if you work hard,” Brown said. “Right here from our

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he apologizes to the immigrants because he didn’t pass any law. I hope he apologizes for the families that had to leave the rest of their family here because they were deported, because there were more de-

“It gives me a sense of pride to say that the leader of the free world is from the South Side.” neighborhood, right here from our town, and he’s a really good example for the people I work with of how anything’s possible.” Per r y st at e d t h at Obama’s presidency has been “by no means perfect,” and that he wished the President had worked more on criminal justice reform, but that he is “happy on him for Cuba, for civil rights, for trying to make the economy better for everybody.” Others in line expressed greater dissatisfaction with Obama’s record. Marilu Vazquez explained that while she liked Obama during his fi rst term, she has been disappointed by his second. She stood in line for tickets with her daughter on Saturday because she wanted to hear the President speak about what he has done for the country. “I guess he’s gonna say thanks for supporting me,” she said. “But I hope

portations in his presidency than anyone else’s.” Melissa Torres, her 17-ye a r - old d aught er, agreed. “I guess I was a little bit disappointed about immigration reform and now that Trump is going to be president it’s a little bit more worrying because I think there will be more deportations and more disappointments,” she said. Another Chicago high school student in line, Graeme Phillips, discussed the iconic role he believes Obama has played over the course of his presidency. “People love this guy,” Phillips said. “You know how the Democrats are always looking for the next Jack Kennedy and Republicans are looking for Ronald Reagan? I feel like Obama’s the closest thing to Jack Kennedy.” Four hours away from the start of the President’s remarks, Phillips added, “This is his last speech; it’s gonna be emotional; it’s gonna be

Zoe Kaiser


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THE CHICAGO MAROON - JANUARY 13, 2017

Zoe Kaiser

BJ The Chicago Kid and Eddie Vedder perform at the President’s Farewell Address.

Pete Grieve

A Valois employee cleans the restaruant shortly after closing for the interview.

Yao Xen Tan

Hyde Parkers take pictures of moricade as the President arrives at Valois around 6:50 p.m.


THE CHICAGO MAROON - JANUARY 13, 2017

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VIEWPOINTS All the World’s a Stage Should Actors Be Allowed to Talk Politics?

Soulet Ali The line between politics and pop culture has become increasingly blurred throughout the 2016 election, with not only politicians using social media and internet platforms to spread a message, but also celebrities, who use their platform of fame to advocate for particular policies or politicians. In particular, Meryl Streep’s stunning acceptance speech for the Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 2017 Golden Globes has made headlines within the last week. Streep took her time on the stage, not only to reaffirm the value of the arts, but also to highlight their connection to politics. In a sense, her speech was a type of art; while some may claim that she was abusing her fame to forward her own agenda, in reality she was doing what actors do best—evoking empathy from an audience to effectively argue a point. Although never directly naming the President-elect, Streep clearly alluded to Trump through his past mockery of a disabled reporter. She compared the incident to a scene from a movie, as if Trump and the reporter were two actors, entering our lives to offer us a different perspective on life. “There was one performance this year that stunned me,” she said in her speech. “It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled re-

porter, someone he outranked in privilege, power, and the capacity to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it, and I still can’t get it out of my head, because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life.” Streep continued her fierce denouncement of Trump’s character, saying “Disrespect invites disrespect. Violence incites violence. When the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose.” Some may argue that celebrities should stick to their field and keep away from politics. However, Streep’s assertions were well founded and principled. The usage of a celebrity’s fame as a platform to raise significant matters, matters of which impact their life and society, is totally valid. Just as any other citizen, freedom of speech is a natural human right. In addition to this, the work of an actor, or any other type of artist, is to bring forth expression and perspective to the public eye. Streep was within her right as a citizen and as an artist to critique Trump. This phenomenon of liberally inclined Hollywood celebrities, vocalizing their views and utilizing their influence on the masses has raised the concern of some conservatives. As is typical of Trump, he responded to Streep through a series of asinine tweets stating, “Meryl Streep, one of the most over-rated ac-

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Sofia Garcia

tresses in Hollywood, doesn’t know me but attacked last night at the Golden Globes. She is a… Hillary flunky who lost big.” Trump’s senior advisor, Kellyanne Conway, agreed and expressed her disapproval of Streep’s speech saying, “I’m just merely saying when you tune into the Golden Globes award show, is it always appropriate to talk politics?” Since Streep’s address at the Golden Globes, a storm of celebrities has publicly announced their support for Streep, including George Clooney, J.K. Rowling, and Ben Affleck. After Trump’s Twitter frenzy, Affleck stated, “[Trump] picks on Meryl Streep, it’s like [saying] Gandhi: terrible leader!” But what Trump, conservatives, and even Ben Affleck don’t understand is that Streep isn’t trying to be a leader. She isn’t trying to incite a grassroots campaign to overthrow the President-elect. She recognizes her privilege and her constraints as an actor, saying in her speech that she agreed with Tommy Lee Jones that she is “just an actor.” But she went on to remind

the audience what it truly means to be “just an actor.” The profession at its core, forgetting the frivolous and vapid elements that go along with stardom, is meant to allow performers, as Streep says, “to enter the lives of people who are different from us, and let [the audience] feel what that feels like.” Now, more than ever, we need to remember the importance of empathy; it is the only way we can even try to understand what it would be like to be oppressed and marginalized, to live under fear that the new government and its supporters will try to hurt you, deport you or invalidate or mock your existence. Without understanding, it is impossible to be an ally to those most vulnerable under a Trump presidency. However, understanding others isn’t only reading well-written think pieces on race relations or watching a news report on the new policies Trump will try to pass. To be clear, these are extremely important components to understanding the complexities of a systemic problem and essential to resisting Trump in the future.

But, it is impossible to deny that another key component in becoming or wanting to become a good ally is empathy—trying to truly feel others’ pain and struggles. That’s where acting can help, even if marginally. Of course, this is not to overly glorify the acting profession or actors in general, but it is to defend celebrities like Streep who can understand the potential of their career, beyond large salaries and fame. Acting, and art more generally, can help bridge the gap between those with different political affiliations through the use of emotion. When you are able to really see, hear, and feel somebody’s experiences, you’re more inclined to understand them better and, quite possibly, more inclined to want to help. If more actors, especially those who are minority and female, are able to express themselves and their stories through their art, it could have the potential to evoke compassion and sympathy from those so resistant to their cause. Soulet Ali is a first-year in the College.


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THE CHICAGO MAROON - JANUARY 13, 2017

Trump Talk The President-elect Uses Speech That Works to Vilify and Alienate Minorities

Andrew Nicotra Reilly On the eve of a Donald Trump presidency, it is important to consider the implications his presidency will have and what kind of marked shift it will be from the Obama presidency. We have already seen and discussed his cabinet appointments, which will influence the type of policy he will pursue in office. But perhaps another element worth thinking about are the ways in which he interacts with the public and the language he uses when referring to his constituency. Unlike legislators, who are charged with representing their home state constituencies, the president represents the American people as a whole to the rest of the world. However, through his language and public interactions, it is clear

that Trump has no interest in working for and representing all Americans, but only those who support him. One of Trump’s more insidious language patterns is the use of “the” before referencing a minority group. “I have a great relationship with the blacks,” he said, for example, back in 2011. “We’re going to have great relationships with the Hispanics,” he later said in 2016, after winning the Indiana primary. “The Hispanics have been so incredible to me. They want jobs. The African Americans want jobs.” This type of othering language works to create an usthem dichotomy, pitting his supporters—who are predominately white and middle class—against

marginalized demographics. This is a popular tactic, used by racists, Nazis, and homophobes and is meant to separate those who are considered “normal,” from “the others,” those that are different and against us. Looking at Nazi propaganda from the 1930s, for example, one can find these common slogans: “The Jews are our misfortune,” “Where one is ruled by the Jews, freedom is only an empty dream,” etc. This type of political distancing from a minority group shows where his true loyalties lie. He believes these groups are outside the realm of his support and his responsibility. He would never refer to the American people as “the Americans,” as that would sound as if he is not an American and outside that group of people. So, by saying “the Hispanics” or “the blacks,” it is as if they constitute a group that Trump doesn’t represent, as if they are not American or part of the country. Rather, they are something other, possi-

bly even antithetical to the group he does work to represent—white citizens primarily in Middle America. To distance himself from groups outside of his support network is to suggest that they are not worthy of his time or his respect. But this kind of insulting and belittling language also strips these minority groups’ humanity, turning them into a type of monolith and reducing the experiences they face into a single, simple set of issues. It goes without saying that any group does not have a single set of issues, and more importantly, a single political ideology. There is a spectrum of experiences that a minority group can face so to talk about what “the blacks” or “the Hispanics” or “the Muslims” want is to make them into an undifferentiated whole, ignoring a wide array of complex experiences and desires a POC can experience. Overall, he uses this language to create a clear dividing line; it’s

a thinly veiled form of bigotry and it shows a willful attempt to represent only people who agree with him and who support his own interests. This is also blatant in his Twitter insults of anybody who speaks unfavorably of him. In a December 31 tweet, he wishes everybody a happy New Year, even those who have “fought [him] and lost so badly they just don’t know what to do.” It’s clear he has little respect for his dissidents, even though, as president, he is also supposed to represent and fight for their rights and interests. To best resist Trump, it’s essential to not only vigilantly watch the news and protest his policy decisions, but to also analyze the ways his language functions as a type of microaggression, perpetuating a narrative that distances millions of Americans and makes them appear less than human. Andrew Nicotra Reilly is a third-year in the College majoring in economics and political science.

ARTS

Maya’s Beacon Sheds Light on Interpretive Dance BY NICK OGILVIE MAROON CONTRIBUTOR

The program offered few clues: a simple act list, a selection of provocative quotes, and nothing much in between. The name of Maya’s latest show, Beacon, was specifically chosen for its ambiguity. Fourth-years Christine Chin and Crystal Ma, artistic directors of the campus fusion dance group, explained that a beacon can either guide or warn—a lighthouse or an alarm. A series of 14 original pieces, Beacon ran for three shows from January 6–7 in Logan’s Theater West.

Throughout its run, seven student choreographers explored this liminal space: It was never clear who or what or where the audience was. The ambient beach noise between acts and occasional blue lighting suggested the sea. But where were the dancers leading the audience: to the rocks or to the shore? Some may wonder how interpretive dance fits into modern culture. It’s always been abstract—something ethereal, less tangible. Hip-hop or ballet, meanwhile, respond to concrete narratives or traditions. While Beacon included musical elements familiar to the audience—EDM and folk, for example—these elements were secondary to

the unfamiliar. The dancing itself was a unique blend of contemporary, cheerleading lifts, and stepping, grafted onto foundational ballet. It flowed—point and counterpoint, synchronization and syncopation, unison and harmony. Yet as soon as tangibility began to emerge, meaning disappeared again in a twirl. The performance embraced a strong minimalistic aesthetic, both in design and execution. Dancers glided in subdued colors, lit elegantly against a billowing off-white backdrop. What few props there were felt like extensions of the design, chosen to blend

in with the surroundings. The square thrust of the Theater West stage wrapped the audience around the performance, encouraging them to embrace, to interact, to engage. From an initial flicker, Beacon crescendoed into an abstract light. From the shimmering variety of the first act, the second act returned distant and unclear. But as the dancers started to build towards a stronger and more unified coda, and more and more clips of human voices started to ring through the music, one thing suddenly became clear: This Beacon, whatever it was, whatever it may be, was leading the audience somewhere.

Newberry Consort Performs the Music of Oswald von Wolkenstein BY REBECCA JULIE ASSOCIATE ARTS EDITOR

The Newberry Consort is continuing its 30th anniversary season with the music of a true Renaissance man: Oswald von Wolkenstein, a poet, composer, and diplomat from the late 1300s. On January 14, this University ensemble-in-residence will be at the Logan Center to share the music and words of this important historical artist. Von Wolkenstein’s music, which he wrote to accompany his poems, falls just between the Medieval and Renaissance periods, says David Douglass, co-director of the Consort along with Ellen Hargis. Unlike that of his contemporaries, von Wolkenstein’s music plays with dissonance in a strikingly progressive way for its time. Douglass curated Saturday’s arrangements, all of which are from von Wolkenstein’s original manuscripts, to help the audience hear how this music paved the way for Renaissance music. He sought to emphasize polyphony, a feature of Renaissance music that separates it from its Medieval predecessor. He also wrote parts for musicians—who will be using period instruments—that will allow them to improvise in a Renaissance-appropriate style. Improvisation, a feature commonly associated with jazz, is actually a defining characteristic of early, pre-Baroque music.

As with many Newberry Consort concerts, Saturday’s performance will feature supertitle translations of the corresponding poetry. The poetry provides listeners a keen view into von Wolkenstein’s personal life. “Oswald is very special in that he wrote poetry and songs about the battles he was in, his love affairs, times that he was betrayed by his lovers; a lot of it would make for good television,” Douglass said. “He was an important historical figure, being a diplomat and a soldier, and he was at a number of important events of the time, which are all chronicled. In the songs, you can find out how he felt about it all.” As part of the Consort’s 30th anniversary celebrations, the concert will feature two special guests: founding members Mary Springfels and David Minter. “Mary was in the original incarnation of the ensemble, and [at the time] put together a German program called ‘Wanderers’ Voices’ that included a lot of Wolkenstein. That was one of my first opportunities to work on that repertory, so I thought this was appropriate repertory to bring her back for,” Douglass said. This special anniversary season has abounded with guests, including a collaboration with renowned Elizabethan performance expert Steven Player earlier this year. Douglass said the Consort is looking forward

to increasingly elaborate performances in the coming years. As awareness and demand for early music has increased, the Consort is putting on concerts that are much more theatrical, creating a more complex viewing and listening experience for eager audiences. Earlier this fall, the Ear Taxi festival, a multi-day celebration of Chicago’s new music scene, achieved stunning success. Yet it would appear that Chicago music lovers have an equally ravenous appetite for early

music—an appetite that spans the centuries. “There’s been a definite trend [toward increased interest in early music] all over the country, and we’ve seen that in Chicago as well,” Douglass said. “In many ways, early music is new music. It’s not really of our time, it’s just something new that’s being done that just happens to be old. In fact, there are a lot of composers now writing for early instruments, which is a really happy thing to see.”

Newberry Consort Founding members of the Newberry Consort reunite for a concert at Logan Center.


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THE CHICAGO MAROON - JANUARY 13, 2017

uchicago MANUAL OF

STYLE

with layering knits to make it interesting.

SPENCER K APLAN / FOURTH-YEAR

I like to work within a more rigid structure. If you have a lot of clothes that are very different, very embellished, you could put them together in wild new possibilities…but that feels too open for me. I’m more comfortable and productive if I set certain structures for myself—for example, sticking to neutrals. If I had all these wild pieces of clothing, then I feel like I would just gravitate toward the same combinations just out of habit. I’m taking out distractions, which gives me more focus.

I’m Spencer, an International Studies and Economics major. I’m on the board of the UChicago LGBT Business Alliance.

“My style...is

My hobbies inspire my dress. I mentioned photography before and how that’s informed the sense of structure to my wardrobe. I make ceramics as well, which is all about form. Geographically I gravitate towards Scandinavian or northern French styles. The color palette is very similar across both—cloudy days, in a sense. I like cloudy days, and I dress for cloudy days.

more of a private creative exercise.”

Spencer is wearing a cardigan by COS, a Breton T-shirt, and windowpane-checked pants by Uniqlo.

by david farr, christian hill, & mj chen

That style feels more comfortable to me, especially with its relaxed, structured fits. Funny thing is, I’ll go out in clothing I consider comfortable, and people will comment that I’m dressed so formally, even though I’m in a casual cotton sweater. I was at the dentist over winter break, and she asked me if I was going anywhere special after—apparently I overdress for the dentist’s. I’m also really inspired by Christophe Lemaire, the French designer. His clothes are very simple and capture what I like about form, innovating on traditional shapes or making clothes that look very comfortable to wear. I’m also into Issey Miyake. My interest in geometric prints comes from Japanese design. I love that he has a specific focus—fabric innovation—and all of his lines address how he works with fabrics differently. He’s known for pleats…I think pleats are so cool! It’s a pattern on clothing but in three dimensions, and it changes how the clothes sit on your body. Speaking of pleats, I put these in myself [second outfit]. They didn’t fit quite right when I got them from Uniqlo, so I practiced some of my new MODA designing skills and added pleats. I think that makes them unique and I like them more now. I’m not in a financial situation where I could buy all these custom-made clothes or clothing made in batches so small you can feel the aura of the designers. So, I am grounded financially in fast fashion, but I do try to pick pieces that I know will last a little longer. I want to be as responsible a consumer as I possibly can. I know that I have to buy clothes made in factories, probably made under poor conditions—but if I don’t buy as often, if I buy for the long term, it feels more authentic to me. —SPENCER

My outfits represent the very limited color palette of my wardrobe—I really only wear gray, black, cream, and navy. It places a lot of limitations on my style, which I like. I’ve been doing photography for many years now. In high school, I only did black-and-white film photography. That practice resonated with me because when you take out all the color, you get a lot more freedom to work with other aspects—say, pattern, form, shape, or line— within that limitation. With my style, I’ll take out the colors and work in other dimensions to keep the outfits interesting. For example, the textures that I pick. They all go together: very geometric and not too loud. In my first outfit, I’m wearing a Breton stripe tee and pants with a windowpane check—I don’t think they clash because windowpane is just two sets of stripes at once.

“I like cloudy

Material is another really interesting dimension I tend to think is overlooked by a lot of people. I’m very interested in architecture, especially modernist architecture which stresses material form versus embellishment. I think that characterizes my style pretty well. Instead of choosing clothing that speaks very loudly based on visual cues or details, I see the value of the clothing as something more holistic and intrinsic—a sense you get of how shapes, materials, and textures interact. I think it’s just a different way to look at clothing. My style isn’t really a means for me to express myself; it’s more of a private creative exercise where I’m not necessarily trying to show anyone anything. I’m trying to find myself in how I choose my clothing. It’s more of a practice of self-discovery. I look at the same wardrobe every day—we all do—and the fun is making something new with it. Everything matches with everything else, since my clothes have no color! Maybe I’ll put a knit cardigan and over a knit turtleneck and play

days, and I dress for cloudy days.”

Spencer is wearing a sweater by COS, an undershirt by COS, pants by Calvin Klein, and a watch by Shore Projects.


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THE CHICAGO MAROON - JANUARY 13, 2017

uchicago MANUAL OF

STYLE

PRIYANKA SETHY / FOURTH-YEAR My name is Priyanka and I’m a political science major from India. I’m in ChoMUN and MUNUC, as well as AOII.

“My style is pretty EastmeetsWest.”

Priyanka is wearing a blazer by Zara, a velvet top from her mom’s closet, tights by Miss Selfridge, and shoes by Ralph Lauren.

I think two basic aspects come to mind about the way I like to dress. One, I went to a school with a uniform. For 16 years of my life I wore the same thing every day, and my school was very particular about the dress code. I still find it very weird to leave the house without a blazer. Two, growing up in India—around Indian fabrics, Indian clothes—influenced the way I think about silhouettes. What I’m wearing now I wore as a student as well. The velvet top is actually from my mom. Velvet was big this season—it was also big when my mom was a teenager, so I raided her closet instead of buying a whole new wardrobe. The edges are similar to Indian kurtas with the slit and relaxed fit, which places more emphasis on the fabric. I could literally wear this with Indian clothes and it would look normal! I’m wearing a blazer as well—I had to wear one every single day to school. I feel naked without it. My style is pretty East-meets-West. Even if I’m dressing for work, I don’t feel complete unless put on Indian earrings, for example. There has to be something that reminds me of my ancestry. When the West thinks about India, they think of saris, right? Growing up in India, you typically wear Western clothes as a kid and dress more Indian when you become an adult. Saris are not a big thing for younger people in Punjab, where I’m from: They’re for when you get married. Young people wear salwar kameez—a longish shirt with slits up the side and loose pants—which the West doesn’t really know about. The fashion in India right now is moving towards straight, flowing, almost skirt-like pants made of silk—I’ve started wearing them here with t-shirts and turtlenecks. The styles from northern India, and especially the silhouettes, influence the way I dress. I like to mix and match: The velvet top has a very Indian cut, and the skirt with tights is very Western. My general rule is if I can wear it for work, I can wear it for life—otherwise I just

by david farr, christian hill, & mj chen

can’t wear it. My basic color palette is very sober. But I always have one brightly colored piece with what I’m wearing—monochromatic grey or black doesn’t feel right, given that my culture really values color and vibrancy. So I carry a lot of Indian silk scarves in bright blues, reds, purples, which I’ll pair with my grey or black outfits. Earrings are my preferred choice of statement. The good thing about living in the U.S. is that I can wear a lot of heavy Indian jewelry that would look out of place if worn as an everyday look in India. It’s like wearing a tiara around—that would look very strange! But people here aren’t familiar with what’s normal in India, so I can exaggerate. I’ll wear a lot of heavy jewelry that typically fits in with functions like weddings—but with a black dress or blazer. In India, jewelry with a lot semi-precious and imitation stones is popular. People keep their real jewelry at home unless you’re going to a wedding. I really like kundan polki—kundan refers to uncut semi-precious stones set in a gold base, and polki is the same, with uncut diamonds. Of course, I’m not going to go around campus wearing diamonds! The necklace I’m wearing is a polki, but not the real stuff. I’m going to back to India this weekend, actually, for a wedding. I’m super excited about what I’m wearing—I haven’t seen it complete, because I did the fittings over winter break while it was still being made. It’s a like a green crop top with traditional Kashmiri embroidery and a long, flowing skirt. Going back is really the one chance I get to wear Indian clothes— and I like wearing Indian clothes! There’s usually a point where my parents tell me, “Stop dressing like a hobo or else we can’t go out with you.” But I really like the way it looks: A lot of it is silk, and I love the way silk falls. I can mix and match Indian and American stuff, but I can’t walk out fully dressed in Indian clothes, so I enjoy doing that when I can. —PRIYANKA

“If I can wear it for work, I can wear it for life.”

Priyanka is wearing a black turtleneck by Zara, white pants by Zara, shoes by White House Black Market, and a hat by Deben ha m s.


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THE CHICAGO MAROON - JANUARY 13, 2017

Chicago Gets Scrappy at Al Hanke Invitational WRESTLING

BY ALYSSA RUDIN SPORTS STAFF

This weekend, the Maroon wrestling team heads to Elmhurst College for the Al Hanke Invitational. The squad will face off against Elmhurst, University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point, North Central College, Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE), Lincoln College, Harper College, Triton College, and Henry Ford College. The team is looking to build on recent squad and individual success. Last Saturday, the team, hosting the Chicago Duals, went undefeated, beating Trine, Dubuque, and Manchester, despite losing four of 10 starters to injury. In their final two match-ups, the Maroons came from behind to win, solidifying their mental strength to complement their physical

strength. Reflecting on the team’s experience at the Chicago Duals, thirdyear Nick Ferraro credited the team’s “next man up mentality” with allowing it to overcome obstacles. “The team really came together last weekend at the Chicago Duals where several wrestlers stepped up and delivered. We had four starters out with injuries, and with the next man up mentality we didn’t let that stop us en route to a 3–0 day.” The team also has enjoyed high fi nishes at recent invitationals. In December, the Maroons placed 16th out of 43 teams at the Wilkes Open and placed fourth at the Milwaukee School of Engineering Invitational. Individually, wrestlers across all years have enjoyed many victories as well. Six members of the team have already reached double digits in victories. The nine-person first-year class

has proved its worth and depth, with several wrestlers consistently winning. First-years Kahlan Lee-Kermer and Steve Bonsall each post frequent individual victories, with Lee-Kermer finishing sixth at the MSOE Invite, going 2–2 at Wilkes, and winning his three matches in the Duals. Bonsall went 2–0 at the Duals and won the 157-pound title at the MSOE Invite. Additionally, first-year Kyle Peisker won the Trine University Invite at 157 pounds and was named UA A Athlete of the Week in wrestling. Bonsall believes that “grit and refined technique from their coaches” have played major roles in easing the transition to college wrestling for the first-years and allowing them to succeed. Upperclassmen have also been competing ferociously. Third-year Nick Fer-

raro reached the consolation semifinals of Wilkes, also won the MSOE Invite at 174 pounds, and beat second-year teammate Jason Lynch in the finals to win the Concordia University Wisconsin Open. He, too, was named UAA Wrestling Athlete of the Week. Fourth-year Michael Sepke has also enjoyed success at 165 pounds this season, defeating a Division I opponent at the Ken Kraft Midlands Championships and going 2–2 at the Wilkes Open. Looking ahead to this weekend, Ferraro expects “some strong competition and look[s] forward to seeing how we perform after last week’s excellent start to the new year.” According to Bonsall, “If the team outworks and wears down each of our opponents like we’ve been conditioned to do, I’m sure we’ll see success across the board.” The Maroons will begin competing at 9 a.m. on Sat-

South Siders Return to the Water SWIMMING & DIVING

BY SIDDHARTH KAPOOR ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR

For the first time since November, the Maroons are going to be involved in competitive swimming and diving action. They begin with a tri-meet with Lewis University and Olivet Nazarene University on Friday night. After this, the South Siders head north to face NCA A DI rival University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee in what promises to be a dramatic meet. In the same tri-meet event last year, UChicago had a strong showing. While the Maroon women went 2–0, the men’s team had a 1–1 record. This strong showing was further established by the fact that while the women won seven

events, the men won six. However, the Maroons did not have as strong a showing in last year’s faceoff against UW–Milwaukee. The Panthers won the men’s event 151–147 and the women’s meet 182–118 in a rather convincing fashion. They will be looking to improve on this and, with a good rest behind them, the team members are set for a competitive dual. This year they will look to improve upon last year’s results. They will continue to improve upon their good performance in the tri-meet and try to replicate this against Milwaukee to establish some consistency against top opposition. Because of the long break, there should be few signs of fatigue and the Maroons will hopefully go into the

event all guns blazing. The Maroons will also be boosted by the fact that before the break, they had a very positive showing at the Phoenix Fall Classic. They finished first, with 1,022 points, out of the 12 teams that participated. The South Siders registered four men’s wins, four women’s wins, and nine NCA A B-Cut times. To put the icing on the cake, first-year Lance Culjat broke the pool record with a time of 2:01.60. In addition, fourthyear Maya Scheidl dominated the women’s freestyle events. Along with the long break, the Maroons have momentum on their side. While there is a chance that rustiness might creep in, the men and women of the team have not stopped working with

rigorous training schedules and adherence to the task. Regarding this tough training schedule, Scheidl said, “ The unique thing about swim season is that while we are listed as a winter sport, our season starts at the beginning of fall quarter. I would say this is championship season. Our winter training trip in Puerto Rico was tough but defi nitely helped to propel us as we prepare for the fi nal weeks of training before conference.” W hile the Maroons are far away from home, their regularity and endurance has prepared them for the difficulties that come. The first meet is set to start at 6 p.m. on Friday night and the next meet begins at 1 p.m. the following afternoon.

Maroons Gear Up for Phoenix Invitational TRACK & FIELD

BY MICHAEL PERRY SPORTS STAFF

The University of Chicago Men’s and Women’s Indoor Track teams kick off their seasons this weekend in the Phoenix Invitational, a track meet hosted by UChicago at the Henry Crown Field House. The meet starts Saturday at 11:30 a.m. for both teams. A year ago at the Phoenix Invitational, the Maroons racked up an eye-popping 20 victories between the men (9) and women (11). They are hoping to repeat their impressive performance this year. Fourth-year thrower Andrew Maneval commented on the importance of setting the tone for the season with this fi rst meet. “The team wants to set ourselves up for success in the rest of the season by shaking off the rust and competing with good technique in this meet,” Maneval said. “It’s a long season, so we have to try to stay calm in the opener despite being anxious to compete.” Amongst other things, it is also important for the fi rst-years to get acclimated to the collegiate level of play, but expectations are still high, even in their fi rst-ever meet.

“The fi rst meet will be a great chance to showcase our new freshmen,” said second-year sprinter Emma Koether, who was an All-American in the indoor distance medley relay last season. “We’ve brought in a lot of talent this year, so it’ll be exciting to see them race. I think this meet will be a comfortable one for both men’s and women’s teams—we have a lot of talent across event groups, more so than the other teams coming to compete this Saturday.” Koether, who was part of the 4x400 indoor meter relay team that broke the University of Chicago record with a time of 3:53.97 last season, is the only returning member of that team. “Our women 4x400 will defi nitely be different this year,” Koether said. “We lost three of the four runners—I’m the only one left—so the rest of the team is in the running to fi ll those spots. Senior Eleanor Kang, who was an alternate 4x400 girl, and I are excited to see what everyone runs this weekend. A lot of women have the ability, so it’ll be interesting to watch and see how the times play out in the beginning stages of the season as we prepare for the postseason and nationals.” When asked what the season goals were for the team, Maneval did not

University of Chicago Athletics Department

Third-year Will Ackerman vaults over the bar.

mince his words, saying, “The season goal would be to win a UAA title on the men’s and women’s side.” Maneval was All-UAA in the indoor weight throw last year and has thrown the fourth longest indoor shot put and sixth longest indoor weight throw in school history. The three-sport athlete, who was named UA A Outdoor Men’s

Most Outstanding Field Performer and First Team All-SAA, Second Team AllUAA in football, has high expectations for himself: “As for my own goals this year, I have had a lot of success competing at the conference level, so this year, I want to improve my personal bests and try to take my success to the next level by qualifying for the NCAA meet.”


12

THE CHICAGO MAROON - JANUARY 13, 2017

SPORTS IN-QUOTES... “Trust the Process.” —NBA starter Joel Embiid

Chicago Searches for First Conference Win MEN’S BASKETBALL

BY MAGGIE O’HARA SPORTS STAFF

T his weekend, the men’s ba sketba l l t e a m w i l l lo ok for its first UA A wins of the young season as it heads out east to play No. 3 University of Rochester (12– 0, 1– 0 UA A) and Emory University (9 – 3, 0 –1 UA A). T he M a ro ons (8 – 4 , 0 –1 UA A) have had a solid start to the season with all of the losses coming at the hand of nationally ranked teams. That being said, the South Siders will have another chance to knock off a ranked opponent this weekend after the heartbreaking 70 – 68 loss to Wash U. As conference play kicks into high gear, four th-year Alex Gustafson remarked on the challenges that br ings. “Going on the road against two of the top teams in our conference is going to be tough, but I think we’re hungry for two bounce-back wins,” Gustafson said. Conference road games are always testing and challeng ing as they necessitate

a lot of travel and match-ups against tough teams. The key to getting through the conference schedule is to protect you r home cou r t a nd snag a few wins on the road. The Maroons are ready to compete this weekend and make things interesting atop the UA A standings. Friday night’s game poses a tough matchup, pitting the Maroons against the No. 3 team in the country, Rochester. The undefeated Yellow Jackets a re cu r rently pro jected to win the UA A. Both Chicago and Rochester have boasted phenomenal offensive statistics thus far and enter the match with similar offensive efficiencies (1.18 points per possession vs 1.11 respectively). Chicago and Rochester also top the conference in points per game with 83.7 and 79.4 respectively. Beating Rochester would be a big win for the Maroons, as it would set them up in a good place for the UA A conference season and also give them a win over a ranked team on their résumé.

University of Chicago Athletics Department

Fourth-year guard Tyler Howard looks to start a drive on the basket.

While Rochester is the big name for the weekend, Emory is a force to be reckoned with on its own merit as well. Emory is always a competitive team, having appeared in the NCA A Tournament for the past three years. Emory is right up there with points per game at 79.3, posing the question this weekend of whose defense can force stops.

T he M a ro ons a re ready to get back to their winning form, having lost three tough games in a row. T he squad has been hard at work this week, prepping for the first doubleheader weekend. “ We dropped an unfortunate one last weekend, but we’ve had a great week of practice with a lot of pace and energy and are hoping to get off to a hot start

against both teams this weekend,” Gustafson said. This weekend will be a good indicator of where the Maroons stack up in terms of UA A competition as after this weekend they’ll have faced up against three of the top teams. Tip-off for Friday’s matchup at Rochester is set for 7 p.m., while Sunday’s game will begin at 11 p.m. at Emory University.

Maroons Face Tough Road Schedule WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

BY BRITTA NORDSTROM SENIOR SPORTS EDITOR

The Maroons get a chance to step away from the cold weather this weekend, as they head to Rochester, NY, and Atlanta, GA, to take on two UAA opponents. The squad is coming off a solid win against No. 5 Wash U, but the level of competition is not going to decrease much this weekend. Kicking off the first away UAA weekend of the year, the South Siders are facing off against No. 22 Rochester. The Yellowjackets are also cruising into this game; they defeated their travel partner, Emory, this past weekend by 11. Furthermore, the Rochester squad is on a four-game win streak where no team has gotten within 10 points. “Rochester is a really solid team,” fourth-year Stephanie Anderson said. “It is especially difficult to go on the road during one of these weekends when we haven’t played them yet. In the second round, it’s usually easier to figure out what the team is going to do, but for now we are just

relying on our principles to carry us through.” The Yellowjackets will be relying primarily on the thirdyear duo of Alexandra Leslie and Lauren Deming, who are averaging more than 35 points and 18 rebounds per contest, which is almost half of the 75 points per game that Rochester averages. However, the dynamic pair of post players for the Maroons will have something to say about those averages. First-year Taylor Lake, who scored a career-high 23 points against Wash U, and second-year Ola Obi, who was the UAA Rookie of the Year last year, are going to be charged with these important defensive assignments. “We have been working on our defense a lot this week in practice,” Anderson said. “We’re definitely not going to change our scheme just for two players, especially since the defense has shown to be very effective this year.” She is spot-on; the Maroons have only allowed an average of 60 points per contest. The squad faces a different sort of test on Sunday, when they head to Atlanta to take on

the Eagles of Emory. Not only will the weather be significantly warmer, but the shooting should also heat up as well. The Eagles are averaging almost 40 percent from three-point range and 44 percent from field goal range. After playing these teams for four years, Anderson has a feel for what each squad will bring to the table. “Emory is really scrappy,” she said. “They will always be in games because they work incredibly hard and always want to win. We just have to be tougher and really fight if we want to get a win on the road against them.” Also important is the fact that Emory plays Wash U on Friday, and if history is any indication, Wash U is the favorite. Since the Eagles fell to Rochester this past Saturday, they have extra motivation to get a win against the Maroons on Sunday. The squad fi rst heads north to Rochester to play the Yellowjackets and will then switch with Wash U and take on Emory on Sunday. Friday tip-off is set for 6 p.m. Eastern Time, and the Sunday game will begin at 2 p.m. Eastern.

University of Chicago Athletics Department

Third-year guard Elizabeth Nye executes a crisp pass.


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