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E S A C W O SH


SHOWCASE9


Gresham, Smith and Partners provides design and consulting solutions for the built environment that contribute to the success of national and international clients. For nearly 50 years, GS&P has focused on enhancing quality of life and sustainability within our communities. GS&P consists of industry-leading professionals practicing architecture and engineering design as well as scientists and highly specialized strategic and management consultants in Aviation, Corporate and Urban Design, Environmental Services, Federal, Healthcare, Industrial, Land Planning, Transportation and Water Resources. GS&P consistently ranks among the top architecture and engineering firms in the world.


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EVIDENCE OF SUCCESS. We have a tremendous responsibility and opportunity to directly impact people, our communities and our environment through our services. It is becoming increasingly important that we provide evidence of how our solutions are influencing positive social, economic and environmental change to help our clients achieve their goals. Our annual Showcase program continues to challenge our project teams to tell a compelling story about their design and consulting solutions. Selected projects excel at framing the “why” and then showing the ultimate value and positive impact the developed solutions have on a client or community through proof. The projects hit right at the root of our mission, to be the best consultant serving the built environment by focusing on the success of our clients. The projects featured in Showcase 9 illustrate how success is measured in a multitude of ways. Whether it’s through the implementation of innovative design and construction methods that drastically reduce project timelines, solutions that both transform and connect communities, or designs that result in an enhanced user experience, our teams show a clear understanding of their clients’ wants and needs, and have a passion for developing innovative solutions to address the design challenges faced in order for those to be attained. I hope you are inspired by the projects detailed here and are proud of the many ways in which we continue to evolve in order to help our clients and communities thrive. Showcase 9 serves as evidence of our collective success.

JAMES W. BEARDEN, aia C HIEF E XECUTIVE O FFICER


SHOWCASE9


PUT TING THE PIECES TOGE THER A NEW BRIDGE OVER OTTER CREEK


TDOT State Route 254 Over Otter Creek Accelerated Bridge Construction Project LOCATION

Nashville, Tennessee C L IENT

Tennessee Department of Transportation, Structures Division, Bridge Inspection and Repair Office SERVIC ES

Bridge Design Roadway Design


Before photos show how the bridge had become structurally deficient after more than 50 years of service. Central portions of the original abutments were the only components to stay.

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TD OT S R 254 OVE R OT TE R C RE E K ABC PROJ ECT

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high-traffic, two-lane crossing providing an east-west connection from the southwest section of Davidson and Williamson counties into Brentwood and Interstate 65, the existing bridge over Otter Creek on state Route 254 in Davidson County had become structurally deficient and functionally obsolete after more than 50 years of service. Too narrow for the traffic it was carrying, the deteriorating overpass was on the Tennessee Department of Transportation’s (TDOT) list to be upgraded as a repair project. Having worked on multiple projects together, TDOT solicited GS&P’s guidance in determining the most feasible approach for repairing the aging structure. After close collaboration with the Department regarding the bridge’s current condition and the possibilities for rehabilitation, GS&P advised that the timeworn crossing was beyond repair, and that replacing the portion of the bridge that supported the deck was the only viable option. This would involve removing the existing deck, beams and piers, and replacing them with a new single-span superstructure. “Like many bridges built around the same era, the existing structure was past the point of repair due to the amount of deterioration in the reinforcing steel,” explains senior structural engineer Ted Kniazewycz. “However, the substructures were in good enough condition to be preserved as part of the replacement. Reusing those in the new bridge configuration and replacing the existing superstructure presented the most cost-effective solution.”

“LIKE MANY BRIDGES BUILT AROUND THE SAME ERA, THE EXISTING STRUCTURE WAS PAST THE POINT OF REPAIR DUE TO THE AMOUNT OF DETERIORATION IN THE REINFORCING STEEL.”

TED KNIAZEWYCZ, SENIOR STRUCTURAL ENGINEER


Associates) used the site to construct the bridge superstructure using “match-cast” methods to insure that the units would join together once they were moved to the bridge abutment supports. Two precast units were fabricated adjacent to the bridge prior to the weekend. The cross section shows how the two units were joined in the center with a mechanical connection filled with high-strength, fast-setting, non-shrink grout to form the superstructure.

SR 254 Bridge over Otter Creek

Plan sheet of the superstructure with both units installed. The two units are joined in the center with a mechanical connection filled with high-strength, fast setting non-shrink grout. Old

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Blvd

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Showcase 9 Entry

Otter Creek

7 1-mile section closed during the replacement weekend

Because of the high volume of traffic along this stretch of Old Hickory Boulevard (SR 254), GS&P worked with the client to determine the most effective and expeditious means of carrying out the necessary and complex bridge repairs. It was ultimately decided that Accelerated Bridge Construction (ABC)—a process that dramatically reduces construction time as well as long-term inconvenience to motorists—provided the best solution. A first-of-its-type ABC method for TDOT, this short-term total closure of a 1-mile section of Old Hickory Boulevard would allow crews to carry out their work around

the clock without being encumbered by road traffic. To be completed within a single weekend, the fast-tracked project included minimal roadway widening, substructure modifications, and full superstructure replacement and widening for the existing two-span bridge. Along with significantly reducing the project’s schedule, the ABC process would also result in significant sustainable and environmental benefits, including less disruption to Otter Creek and reduced carbon emissions, as extended traffic gridlock would be reduced.

Senior transportation engineer Mark Holloran discusses the key benefit of applying ABC methodology to the project versus a traditional phased construction approach: “This section of Old Hickory Boulevard often carries up to 30,000 vehicles a day. Given the heavy traffic volume on-site, executing the project in a more traditional way would have been untenable, and most likely resulted in a three- to six-month project schedule. By employing this particular ABC technique, the entire superstructure could be replaced in just one weekend.”

“GIVEN THE HEAVY TRAFFIC VOLUME ON-SITE, EXECUTING THE PROJECT IN A MORE TRADITIONAL WAY WOULD HAVE BEEN UNTENABLE... BY EMPLOYING THIS PARTICULAR ABC TECHNIQUE, THE ENTIRE SUPERSTRUCTURE COULD BE REPLACED IN JUST ONE WEEKEND.” MARK HOLLORAN, SENIOR TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER

SHOWCASE 9

PLANNING THE REPLACEMENT


BUILDING A NEW BRIDGE

widened allowing for the addition of 6-foot shoulders on each side of the overpass to improve sight distance for residents of an adjacent subdivision. After demolition was complete, Starting Friday, September 12, 2014 at 8 p.m., TDOT closed Old the site was cleared. Concrete from Hickory Boulevard from Chickering Road to Hillsboro Road to allow crews to replace the former bridge the existing bridge was repurposed as GS&P WAS TASKED WITH DEVELOPING A PLAN over Otter Creek. fill material, while As part of the comrebar was collected TO UTILIZE PREFABRICATED SUPERSTRUCTURE and recycled. prehensive project, UNITS THAT COULD BE CONSTRUCTED OFFJust after 6 a.m. GS&P was tasked with developing Saturday, the first SITE, INSTALLED, AND THEN JOINED TOGETHER a plan to utilize superstructure DURING A SINGLE WEEKEND ROAD CLOSURE. prefabricated superunit—one of two that structure units that weighed approxicould be constructed off-site, installed, and then joined together mately 225,000 pounds each—was during a single weekend road closure. The team also created plans lifted off the ground by two cranes for precast approach slabs and sub-footings to transition the bridge and then transferred to a third crane to the approach roadway. Once the existing bridge and section of roadway was closed and traffic detoured, demolition commenced at 9 p.m. The only portion of the original structure to remain were the central portions of the original abutments. Prior to the closure, these surviving bridge supports were

START

FRI. 9 pm

Demolition of the existing bridge began at 9 p.m. Friday. After demolition was complete, the site was cleared. Concrete from the former bridge was repurposed as fill material while rebar was collected and recycled.

SAT. 6 am

Just after 6 a.m. on Saturday, the first superstructure unit— one of two that weighed approximately 225,000 pounds each—was lifted off the ground by two cranes and then transferred to a third crane that moved it across the creek.


that moved it across the creek. Once both precast units were set in place, the concrete bridge rail was poured. By 10:30 a.m. the units were joined together using high-strength grout. span of 75 years was opened to traffic by 8 p.m. Sunday, coming in Weathering steel beams, which 10 hours ahead of schedule. don’t require painting, as well as “Our design solution successfully integrated the bridge’s endepoxy reinforcwalls into the prefabricated ing steel that CONSTRUCTED WITH MINIMAL DISTURBANCE offers enhanced units,” explains protection in Holloran. “This TO OTTER CREEK, THE NEW SUPERSTRUCTURE freeze-thaw allowed the entire HAS A PROJECTED LIFE SPAN OF 75 YEARS. conditions were superstructure to used, providing be cast in only two a durable, low-maintenance and pieces, and also provided an economical and structurally sound sustainable structure. A deck seal detail for attaching the units to the existing substructures.” “The single-biggest challenge of this project was getting the superwas also utilized to further protect structure from Point A to Point B without imposing any unfavorable the bridge. loads to the structure itself,” adds Kniazewycz. “So we designed it to Constructed with minimal disbe self-supporting once the concrete was cured onto the steel beams. turbance to Otter Creek, the new This let it function as a separate unit and handle the load capacity as superstructure with a projected life it was being moved. It was a great moment to see those two pieces finally come together. Everyone involved was delighted that by Sunday evening there was a nice, smooth road to drive across.”

Once both units were set in place, the concrete bridge rail was poured. By 10:30 a.m. the units were joined together using high-strength grout.

SUN. 8 pm

By 8 p.m. Sunday evening, the bridge was opened to traffic, coming in 10 hours ahead of schedule.

SHOWCASE 9

SAT. 10:30 am

FINISH

9


SETTING THE PATH FORWARD

TD OT S R 254 OVE R OT TE R C RE E K ABC PROJ ECT

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Executed without major long-term impact to motorists, the Accelerated Bridge Construction process used in the new bridge over Otter Creek eliminated months of inconvenient traffic backups, resulting in a reduced carbon footprint, “ and saving end users in both fuel and maintenance costs. The innovative ONCE WE STARTED pilot project was awarded the Grand DEMOLITION OF Iris Award (Best in Show) in the ACEC of Tennessee’s 2015 Engineering THE BRIDGE, Excellence Awards program. THERE WAS NO “This project signifies a bold step forward in embracing construction TURNING BACK. methodologies that could forever change how complex transportation ” projects are delivered in Tennessee,” says Kniazewycz. “The amount of planning in design and construction that was required to ensure the project’s success was staggering.” In addition to working closely with the client, the project also represented a coordinated effort between GS&P and general contractor Bell & Associates. “Once we started demolition of the bridge, there was no turning back,” notes Kniazewycz. “I was amazed at the high degree of redundancy the contractor built into this project to allow for anything that could potentially go wrong on-site. If something broke down, he provided backup—extra equipment, extra personnel, and anything else you could think of to make sure the project went as smoothly as possible. This effort truly emphasizes how a team approach, from design through construction, sets the path forward for greater projects to come.” The existing bridge structure included a pier that was located within a stream bed. The updated design requires no pier, which limits the need for accessing the creek, and the potential for any disturbance during maintenance.


“ THE OTTER CREEK PILOT PROJECT WAS A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS DUE IN PART TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF DETAILED CONSTRUCTION PLANS AND THE CLOSE COORDINATION BETWEEN THE ENGINEER, OWNER AND CONTRACTOR. ” TERRY D. MACKIE, PROJECT MANAGER OF THE BRIDGE INSPECTION AND REPAIR OFFICE AT TDOT

TE A M

PIC Mark Holloran, p.e. PM /PP Ted A. Kniazewycz, p.e.

John D. Brew, p.e. Katherine Ham Rodney C. Palmer Larry Ridlen, p.e. Tom Tran, p.e. Gary Young

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SHOWCASE 9

A first-of-its-type ABC method for TDOT, the project served as the prototype for a much larger urban project in downtown Nashville—TDOT’s Fast Fix 8.

Terry D. Mackie, project manager of the Bridge Inspection and Repair Office at TDOT, confirms the project’s success: “The Otter Creek pilot project was a tremendous success due in part to the development of detailed construction plans and the close coordination between the engineer, owner and contractor. The positive results taken from the project will be applied to future efforts, further enhancing the transportation network and the environment. The main goal of this Accelerated Bridge Construction project was to significantly reduce the impact to the motoring public. By replacing this bridge in a single weekend closure, we accomplished that key objective.”


TRANSFORMING A NEIGHBORHOOD


222 Second Avenue South LOCATION

Nashville, Tennessee C L IENT

Hines SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design Planning Sustainability Urban Planning and Design


The shear facade along Second Avenue is broken into three zones: The lobby/retail band at the street; the parking band; and the tower band. An offset in the parking garage massing allows for a signature address graphic.

SECOND AVENUE SOUTH FIRST AVENUE SOUTH

222 SEC O ND N D AVE N NU U E SO U TH

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S

ince 1957, international real estate firm Hines has been developing landmark real estate projects that deliver lasting value to investors and communities. The company had been exploring new opportunities in Nashville’s booming commercial real estate market for several years and sought to capitalize on downtown Nashville’s popular and evolving SoBro neighborhood just south of Broadway. In the fall of 2014, Hines selected GS&P to provide architecture and interior design services for a new 390,000-square-foot, 25-floor mixeduse tower at 222 Second Avenue South that offered sweeping views of the Cumberland River and West Riverfront Park. The development comprised 25,000 square feet of ground-level retail and restaurant space and 360,000 square feet of Class-A office space situated above a 10-story, 1,100-space parking garage.

“This project was very much a collaboration between Hines and GS&P,” explains senior architect and principal Jeff Kuhnhenn. “They are a very sophisticated client who develops these building types all over the world and at different price points. While they had a certain vision for the end product and its place in this particular market, they were also very interested in what GS&P brought to the table. And there was much we had to do and consider as a team to create a building that was right for the market. “Just by virtue of its location, this building brings a lot of interest. You couldn’t ask for a more prominent site in the city with its special relationship to the Cumberland River and West Riverfront Park, and its high visibility from Ascend Amphitheater, nearby freeways and Nissan Stadium.”


222 SECOND AVENUE SOUTH

BROADWAY

JOHN SEIGENTHALER PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

WEST RIVERFRONT PARK CUMBERLAND RIVER

ASCEND AMPHITHEATER

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SHOWCASE 9

“You couldn’t ask for a more prominent site in the city with its special relationship to the Cumberland River and West Riverfront Park, and its high visibility from Ascend Amphitheater, nearby freeways and Nissan Stadium.” JEFF KUHNHENN, SENIOR ARCHITECT, PRINCIPAL


MAXIMIZING THE SITE Hines’ development sits atop a 25,527-square-foot floor plate situated between downtown’s First and Second avenues. The design team was challenged by the constraints this presented, as well as a small, old warehouse building that prevented the development from covering the entire block. “Getting the program to fit and operate a certain way while maximizing the available retail area was akin to a jigsaw puzzle,” says Kuhnhenn. “One of the biggest factors was how to accommodate parking. Downtown Nashville is close to land-rich suburbs that tend to offer more parking. So we needed to provide a certain ratio of parking to office space to remain competitive.” To achieve this, the design team stacked 10 floors with 1,100 available parking spaces on top of the allotted retail tenant space. “After we’d determined how to stack the parking garage, we had to figure out how the parking would distribute itself onto two different roadways so that traffic was diffused into the downtown environment,” says Kuhnhenn. “We made the circulation work by designing the internal Getting the program ramps to distribute trafto fit and operate fic through two separate entrances and exits on First a certain way while and Second avenues.” maximizing the Topping out the buildavailable retail ing massing, a 14-story glass office tower that area was akin to rises above the parking a jigsaw puzzle. floors will provide 26,500 rentable square feet per floor. A subtle pattern of offset pairs of bright, white mullions animate the tower’s glass curtain-wall facade. “We designed a pattern for the glazing that was orderly but not a standard grid,” says senior architect Eric Bearden. “So it sets itself apart from what you typically see on other office buildings in the Nashville area.”

“ ”

“We designed a pattern for the glazing that was orderly but not a standard grid... So it sets itself apart from what you typically see on other office buildings in the Nashville area.” ERIC BEARDEN, SENIOR ARCHITECT

THE PARKING GARAGE CLADDING IS INSPIRED BY AIRDENSITY PATTERNS IN SOUNDWAVES.

DUE TO THE SIZE OF THE GARAGE, IT WAS IMPORTANT TO DEVELOP A PATTERN THAT WAS COST EFFECTIVE AND EASY TO INSTALL, YET STILL PROVIDED A SENSE OF MOTION AT THE BASE.


A CLASS-A CREATIVE DESIGN

222 SEC O ND AVE N U E SO U TH

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While designing a Class-A building, GS&P aimed to strike a balance between the distinctive attributes of this building type and something a little less traditional. Jack Weber, senior vice president of GS&P's Nashville Design Studio explains: “The client desired something slightly different from your typical Class-A space. They wanted it to be more ‘Nashville,’ and a bit more playful and lively. So we arrived at a natural stone tile in the lobby that’s slightly more subdued than some of Hines’ other lobby areas. We then added an internally illuminated feature wall that gives warmth to an otherwise crisp, white space, and provides a little more grit rather than polish.” “In the office world, there are terms for aesthetic approaches to buildings,” notes Kuhnhenn. “We typically use ‘Class A’ to refer to a very corporate feel that’s accented by high-end finishes and a fairly conservative design. On the other end of the spectrum is the ‘Creative’ office, which often incorporates street art and more urban qualities on the inside. This building attempts to keep a foot in both worlds. It has an element of ‘Creative’ office, but it’s a Class-A office building. So it’s essentially ‘Class-A Creative.’” Beyond its variety of aesthetic forms and textures, the office tower’s amenities are what make the building a truly exceptional draw on the market.

The feature wall is composed of a series of rotated wood fins with continuous LED lights backlighting the wall behind. This results in an ever-changing perception of the patterns and openings as one moves past the wall.

“The 12th floor of the building, which is the floor above the parking structure, incorporates several different amenities that will support the tenants,” says Weber. “This level features a work café with Wi-Fi that will be open to all tenants as an alternative work area so they won’t have to leave the building. The space provides multiple variations of seating that will support small meetings, group interactions or social functions, and offer food and beverage options that include healthier choices. There’s also a large, shared conference room just off the work café that is extremely flexible in how it can be arranged and used.” The 12th floor also includes a 2,272-square-foot, club-quality fitness center appointed with lockers and showers, which will be available to all tenants. On the outside of this amenity space, a 3,653-squarefoot green roof terrace will offer stunning views of the Cumberland River. A rooftop bar, fire pits, a variety of outdoor seating, and grassy spaces for games and activities are all features of this unique outdoor amenity. “The rooftop terrace is one of the defining characteristics of this development,” says architect Danny Ruberg. “It faces east toward Ascend Amphitheater and West Riverfront Park, and will be a prime viewing spot for festivals and fireworks. What’s really great about this terrace is that it will extend the use of the building beyond a workplace into a magnet for after-work and weekend events.”


“The client desired something slightly different from your typical Class-A space. They wanted it to be more 'Nashville,' and a bit more playful and lively.” JACK WEBER, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT,

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CORPORATE + URBAN DESIGN SHOWCASE 9 The building features an extensive amenity level including this lounge space, which is open to all tenants as an alternative work area.


A PEDESTRIANFRIENDLY STREETSCAPE

222 SEC O ND AVE N U E SO U TH

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During the early stages of design, GS&P worked with the Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency Design Review Committee to enhance the area’s pedestrian focus. The design team also worked closely with key stakeholders to maximize active ground-floor uses and design a generous, pedestrian-friendly streetscape, with a goal of creating the most vibrant retail block in the SoBro district. “One of our biggest contributions to downtown Nashville was providing sidewalks around the building that are equal to or bigger than the city’s street plan,” says Kuhnhenn. “Considering its relationship to First and Second avenues and the hundreds, if not thousands, of events that will take place in the downtown area over the next 20 to 30 years, this design will create a synergy between the pedestrian experience and local activities. “Although the whole area is rocketing skyward, people will still remain engaged at the pedestrian level through the streetscape and sidewalks, and the quality of retail offerings planned for that level.”

One of our biggest contributions to downtown Nashville was providing sidewalks around the building that are equal to or bigger than the city’s street plan.


The amenity level features a large, landscaped terrace. It provides a key sustainability feature and extends the idea of business beyond the office.

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“A key sustainability feature of the design is the green roof outdoor terrace area with its turf lawn and plantings... Through the various sustainable design strategies we’ve incorporated into the project, the building will be 14 percent more efficient than other buildings of its type and size.” ANN MCGEE, SENIOR ARCHITECT

Pre-certified LEED Silver, sustainability goals were a key driver in the office tower’s design. “We set a target that 20 percent of the value of building materials would consist of recycled content and regional materials,” explains senior architect Ann McGee. “To increase energy efficiency and occupant comfort, we used high-performance glass on the skin of the building. A key sustainability feature of the design is the green roof outdoor terrace area with its turf lawn and plantings. Using bright colors along with the white roof membrane, the heat of the sun is not absorbed and the building won't contribute to the heat-island effect of the urban environment. Through the various sustainable design strategies we’ve incorporated into the project, the building will be 14 percent more efficient than other buildings of its type and size.” Further contributing to a sustainable building, the design team developed a set of tenant guidelines to help future occupants achieve LEED certification. “By virtue of our building being a LEED Silver certified core and shell, tenants will have a much better opportunity of achieving LEED for commercial interiors,” notes McGee.

SHOWCASE 9

A BETTERPERFORMING BUILDING


222 SEC O ND AVE N U E SO U TH

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SETTING A PRECEDENT Creating a unique environment that will attract and serve target tenants while contributing to the pedestrian experience at street level, GS&P’s design solution neatly stacks and integrates the required uses into a clean and efficient design. Set to transform the city’s skyline and the SoBro neighborhood, the state-of-the-art building is slated to open in 2017. “This project really has a home-grown, Nashville vibe to it,” says McGee. “It sets a precedent for what Class-A office space in Nashville is evolving into in terms of its amenities and how it contributes to the urban fabric.”

“What makes this project stand out from other mixed-use buildings is the degree of efficiency it will offer tenants, which will allow them to be more flexible and to do more with their space over time,” concludes Kuhnhenn. “It will also provide a collection of amenities that you really can’t find anywhere else downtown. It’s something that’s incredibly unique for the market.


TE A M

PIC /PD Jeffrey W. Kuhnhenn, aia, leed ap PM Ann McGee, aia, ncarb, leed ap AOR Eric Bearden, aia, ncarb PP Adrienne Ciuba, aia, ncarb PC Daniel M. Ruberg, aia, ncarb ID Jack E. Weber, iida, mcr, leed ap ID Amy Klinefelter, iida, leed ap ID Amanda Coulter

Brandi Amos Adam Bates Helga Bolyard Emaline Brady Jerry L. Culp Nico Forlenza Martha T. Fox, iida, ncidq, leed ap Clint H. Harris, aia Brandon M. Harvey, associate aia, cdt

“

This project really has a home-grown, Nashville vibe to it. It sets a precedent for what Class-A office space in Nashville is evolving into in terms of its amenities and how it contributes to the urban fabric.

�

Brian Hubbard, aia Meredith Jacobs Abigail Kursave Carole Liso Diane Marable William C. Mays Elaine McDowall Louis Medcalf, fcsi, ccs Phillip Petty Julie D. Roquemore, iida, leed ap Jared Younger


A DELICATE

BALANCING ACT


ACRP: Balancing Airport Stormwater and Bird Hazard Management LOC ATION

United States C L IEN T

Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) SERVIC ES

Stormwater Planning, Modeling and Management


AC RP : BAL ANCI NG AI RP O RT STO RMWATER A ND B I RD HA Z A RD MA NAG E ME NT

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A

irports across the United States are required to manage the quantity and quality of stormwater on-site while safeguarding aircraft operations. However, many stormwater management options, such as stormwater detention ponds, can attract a diversity of birds creating potential aviation wildlife hazards. In addition, airports are often faced with conflicting federal, state, and local stormwater and wildlife management regulations and guidance. Given these vital issues, research was needed to develop a user-friendly tool to assist airports in making decisions that balance both stormwater and wildlife hazard management.

In 2012, GS&P—as part of a team led by Environmental Resource Solutions (ERS)—was awarded a contract from the Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) to develop a bird strike risk analysis and stormwater management decision tool that would enable airports to methodically and critically assess their wildlife hazard risk against existing and proposed stormwater management facilities. “Airports are challenged with implementing required stormwater best management practices [BMPs] while maintaining safe aircraft operations in accordance with FAA regulations,” says senior environmental engineer Melanie Knecht. “Our overarching goal “Our overarching goal for this for this project was to provide project was to provide airport airport operators with the tools to make informed decisions that operators with the tools to make best address the needs of their informed decisions that best particular airport, while also address the needs of their particular meeting federal, state and local regulations related to stormwater airport, while also meeting federal, and wildlife hazard management.”

state and local regulations related to stormwater management.”

MELANIE KNECHT, SENIOR ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER


GLOBALLY, WILDLIFE STRIKES

HAVE KILLED MORE THAN 250 PEOPLE AND DESTROYED OVER

220 AIRCRAFT SINCE 1988. T H I S R E P R E S E N T S A D R A M AT I C INCREASE IN THIS TYPE OF INCIDENT OVER THE LAST 50 YEARS. PART OF THIS UPSURGE CAN BE

ATTRIBUTED TO ENVIRONMENTAL LEGI S L ATI O N THAT RES ULTED I N SUCCESSFUL POPULATION RECOVERY F O R G E E S E , P E L I C A N S , E AG L E S

A N D OT H E R W I L D L I F E .

INCREASED AIR TRAVEL

IS ALSO A CONTRIBUTING FACTOR.

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SHOWCASE 9

Since the "Miracle on the Hudson" incident in 2009, bird strikes are more high profile than ever.


IDENTIFYING THE “WHAT-IFS”

AC RP : BAL ANCI NG AI RP O RT STO RMWATER A ND B I RD HA Z A RD MA NAG E ME NT

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The ACRP is an FAA-funded, airports of different sizes and activity levels and with applied-research program that devel- differing amounts of available data. ops near-term, practical solutions to Based on extensive research, user input and direction problems faced by airport operators. from the ACRP project panel, the team developed its final During its annual solicitation of bird strike risk analysis and stormwater management research needs for airports, the ACRP decision tool. The proactive tool allows users to review identified a desire to better under- the bird strike risk associated with an existing or planned stand how airports should deal with BMP and identify ways to reduce risk via alternative BMP wildlife when developing stormwater design characteristics or bird strike mitigation measures. management facilities. “Selecting BMPs that mitigate wildlife risk can be difficult GS&P approached Environmental because each airport is unique,” says Lengel. “Our tool addresses this by including airport-specific information Resource Solutions to partner on a response to the problem statement such as bird observation data, bird strike data, and airport by pairing ERS’s expertise on wild- operations in the bird strike risk calculations.” Another challenge was addressing the inherent ambilife hazards to aircraft with GS&P’s stormwater management skills. guity of some of the requirements, as well as the non-linear “ERS’s role was on the bird-hazard and non-quantifiable data available. management side, and looking at the “We contended with the various ‘what-if’ questions, different species to determine which which could be endless,” were hazardous and why. GS&P’s work was more on the stormwater BMP side explains John Lengel, execuand managing the FAA requirements,” tive vice president of GS&P's notes senior environmental engineer Environmental Services market. Devon Seal. “We asked ourselves: What if The ERS/GS&P team identified there is a naturally occurring several key objectives as they prebody of water that pared for the project. The first step attracts wildlife “We contended with the was to review bird hazard managenearby? What if the ment and stormwater management airport is next to a various 'what-if' questions, regulations and provide guidance heavily treed area? which could be endless... documents and relevant research Since it’s impossiSince it's impossible to noting any ambiguities or potential ble to predict every conflicts. Next, the team identified potential situation predict every potential airport stormwater management that exists outside situation that exists outside options and assessed their potential of airport grounds, effect on wildlife behavior, specifically we had to do a fair of airport grounds, we waterfowl. Using this analysis, they amount of brainhad to do a fair amount of developed a matrix for the likelihood storming to cover as brainstorming to cover as and severity of bird strikes across a many eventualities variety of stormwater design sce- many eventualities as possible.” narios and built a draft tool using as possible.” aviation safety management systems (SMS) framework. The team then JOHN LENGEL, conducted two airport case studies EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, to obtain input from initial users and to learn how the tool performed at ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES


The team developed a brochure that describes wildlife hazard issues relative to stormwater management at airports.

29

SHOWCASE 9

BIRD STRIKE RISK ANALYSIS 1

IDENTIFY BIRD SPECIES, HISTORY OF STRIKES AND OBSERVATION DATA

2

IDENTIFY EXISTING BIRD MITIGATIONS

3

DEFINE INITIAL STORMWATER BMP CHARACTERISTICS

4

REVIEW INITIAL RISK AND IDENTIFY ADDITIONAL BIRD MITIGATIONS

5

DEVELOP PROPOSED BMP OPTIONS AND REVIEW RESIDUAL RISK


Each airport is unique, making the selection of BMPs that mitigate bird strike risk difficult. The tool addresses this by including airportspecific information such as bird observation data, bird strike data, and airport operations in the bird strike risk calculations.

DEVELOPING AN EASY-TO-USE, ACCESSIBLE TOOL

AC RP : BAL ANCI NG AI RP O RT STO RMWATER A ND B I RD HA Z A RD MA NAG E ME NT

30

Since ACRP does not support web-based tools, Designed on various tabs in the Excel spreadthe tool needed to be in a downloadable format sheet, the tool allows users to enter different that users could install on their computers or categories of data—for example, bird data and open with software that would be available stormwater BMP data—on separate tabs for to any airport user. The clarity. This serves to simplify the inputs, team chose to design the and helps users understand the flow of the tool in Microsoft Excel tool. Each tab includes “hot buttons” that to allow users to enter facilitate navigation through the tool by allowing users to go from one step to the information—such as FAA strike data and stormwater next, access relevant additional resources, design criteria—into an and go back to the main menu. Drop-down Excel spreadsheet. While lists simplify the selection of tool inputs, this solution presented while risk analysis steps are numbered some challenges in develand color-coded for oping the logic behind the “We explored various options and additional clarity. tool, the research team “Once the tool was ultimately decided on Excel because utilized the unique attriready, the team visited it's widely used across the board.” butes of Excel to make the specific airports to discuss tool more user friendly. their stormwater BMPs DEVON SEAL, “ACRP desired a tool and walked through the SENIOR ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER that could be downloaded data-collection process and easily disseminated, with them,” says Lengel. so it had to be a program that most people have,” “I think it left the team with a whole new awareness explains Seal. “We explored various options of the wildlife issue. It was quite interesting to see and ultimately decided on Excel because it’s the number of bird strikes that occur and how they affect the airport environment.” widely used across the board. Users aren’t expected to see or modify the tool, but they The Excel-based tool was also introduced need to have Excel 2010 or a later version to to stakeholders through outreach materials, use the application.” webinars and presentations designed for airport personnel, wildlife regulators, stormwater regulators, and the general public at aviation-associated conferences and committee meetings.


31

SHOWCASE 9

Providing airports with an opportunity to streamline their decision making with confidence, the bird strike risk analysis and stormwater management decision tool fosters interaction between airport industry practitioners and environmental regulators, while helping them reach implementable solutions that meet their respective objectives and missions. Lengel comments on the project’s success: “The old saying goes, ‘If you’ve seen one airport, you’ve seen one airport.’ I am proud of our team’s ability to synthesize the unique attributes, identify common elements, and develop a risk assessment approach applicable to all airports across North America where no similar tool exists today.”

TE A M

PIC John A. Lengel, Jr., p.e., env sp PM Devon E. Seal, p.e., env sp PP Melanie C. Knecht, p.e., env sp


AN FL AG SHIP FACILIT Y


Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at Naples LOCATION

Naples, Florida C L IENT

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine| Bascom Palmer Eye Institute SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding


R

anked the No. 1 eye hospital for 12 consecutive years by U.S. News & World Report, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute (BPEI) boasts an international reputation as one of the premier providers of eye care in the world. With patient visits tripling in just eight years, BPEI’s Naples, Florida, location was rapidly outgrowing its existing space. To accommodate both current and anticipated patient volumes, the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine|Bascom Palmer Eye Institute partnered with GS&P to design a new two-story, 21,200-square-foot eye clinic and ambulatory surgery center that would support and reflect the client’s culture of retaining internationally acclaimed physicians in every subspecialty in ophthalmology.

The cantilevered second floor required the structural engineers to push the limits of their load calculations to create a sleek, concealed, yet complex design.

BASC O M PA LME R E Y E I N STIT U TE AT NA PL ES

34

“Bascom Palmer’s existing Naples practice, which was in a leased space, was experiencing dramatic growth in patient numbers, and that meant extended wait times,” explains project manager Shauna Carpenter. “In addition, surgeries were either being performed off-site or at the institute’s Miami facility, which was inconvenient for both patients and staff. In response to their growth, the client invested in a 1.5-acre parcel of land just 4 miles north of downtown Naples, with the goal of building their own stand-alone facility that would accommodate the community’s ophthalmology needs while allowing them to improve their service lines and overall level of care.”


MAXIMIZING SQUARE FOOTAGE After completing studies related to the institute’s existing and projected patient volumes, the design team discovered that the property the client had purchased presented a challenge when it came to accommodating the programmed building’s square footage, as well as parking and LEED certification requirements. “When we began the schematic design, we quickly realized that the client needed more exam rooms, more offices, and subsequently more square footage than they had originally planned for,” explains Carpenter. “Although we initially thought the location was too small for their needs, with some out-of-the-box thinking, we were able to fit the building and all of its programming requirements onto the site. “To achieve the maximum square footage, we made the footprint of the first floor smaller than the second floor, which created a cantilevered second story. So, where there wasn’t enough physical space on-site for a porte-cochere, the second-story overhang provided a covered drop-off area for patients. This not only gave us the square footage needed, but also created the unique, contemporary look the client was seeking.” “First impressions mean a lot,” adds principal-in-charge Luis Cano. “If a patient drives up to a building that looks like it was built in the 1970s, even though it might

were able to fit the building and all of its programming requirements onto the site. To achieve the maximum square footage, we made the footprint of the first floor smaller than the second floor, which created a cantilevered second story.” SHAUNA CARPENTER, PROJECT MANAGER

By standardizing the eye lane /exam rooms, the practice is now able to utilize the same room for multiple specialties and subspecialties, which helped us save valuable space for other programming needs.

35

SHOWCASE 9

“...with some out-of-the-box thinking, we

house the world’s finest doctors, that patient is never going to feel that they’re getting the best care possible. Our goal was for the new facility to reflect the cutting-edge technology that’s being used on the inside through the architectural design of the exterior. We wanted it to look 21st century, modern and high-tech, and this building sets the tone before a patient even walks through the door.” Another way the design team maximized the overall square footage for the distinctive building was by standardizing the facility’s treatment rooms. Carpenter explains: “We worked with BPEI to bring their standard eye lane design from the medical campus to Naples. By standardizing the eye lane/exam rooms, the practice is now able to utilize the same room for multiple specialities and subspecialties, which helped us save valuable space for other programming needs.” “The client was also receptive to investing in technology that monitors room usage,” notes Cano. “This allows them to schedule their treatment rooms to the various specialities at different peak times of the day, which means reduced wait times for patients.”


To satisfy LEED requirements, direct access and walkways from the main road and its bus stop had to be incorporated early in the design phase.

REAPING THE BENEFITS Along with site limitations, another key challenge for the design team was implementing new building information modeling (BIM) software during the contract documentation phase. “At the beginning of the project, GS&P introduced Revit, which was a new drafting software to our company at the time,” says Carpenter. “Because it was a new experience for everyone involved, that meant a learning curve—especially when it came to applying a new program to an entire building. However, we quickly learned the BIM process and found that the benefits far outweighed the unknowns by enabling us to minimize conflicts and maximize design coordination with our consultants. For example, our waterproofing consultant was able to review a digital model of the building and run studies for us to make sure water didn’t penetrate through some of the custom details and connections, which can sometimes create the opportunity for water intrusion.” “We weren’t designing your typical square building,” says Cano. “It was extremely complex, with lots of angles and unusual details that we had to make sure would work. It had to be buildable. Revit and other programs such as Newforma—a document management program that allowed us to quickly make electronic markups—were invaluable tools that greatly enhanced the overall level of communication between the design team and the various project professionals.”

“We weren't designing your typical square building. It was extremely complex, with lots of angles and unusual details that we had to make sure would work. It had to be buildable.” LUIS CANO, PRINCIPAL-IN-CHARGE


Designed to provide a better patient experience, the new state-of-the-art facility accommodates twice the number of on-staff ophthalmologists than its predecessor. It also provides more than six times the amount of clinical space, allowing BPEI to expand the number of clinical research trials offered to patients. “We worked closely with ophthalmology expert Julio Ripoll, who brought his ophthalmology design and space-planning expertise to the project,” notes Cano. “This partnership was vital in programming a world-class facility and in supporting the level of care that Bascom Palmer is known for both locally and internationally.” Providing more streamlined services to the southwest Florida community, the long-awaited eye clinic and ambulatory surgery center features 20 standardized eye lane/exam rooms, an imaging suite, optical services, physicians’ offices and a full surgical suite with two operating rooms and associated preparation and recovery areas. The practice also provides clinical space

for the treatment of virtually all eye diseases, including macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts and pediatric eye disorders. GS&P’s patient-centered design includes intuitive reception, registration and lobby areas that blend futuristic and classic design to enhance the visitors’ first impression. A two-story atrium space serves as the main lobby, enabling visitors to easily locate the treatment rooms, nurse station and reception area upon entry. The atrium is fully enclosed in clear glass to maintain an open feel, while the cantilevered design shades the interior and patient-drop-off area. “Creating a patient-friendly atmosphere was a central focus of the project,” says Carpenter. “We worked closely with the client’s interior design team, and we placed a particular emphasis on aesthetics, lighting, exterior views, seating, furnishings, indoor climate control and accessibility. From the special features in the interior design, including custom sculptural pendant lighting that was inspired by the shape of an eye, to the exteriors that offer views of the surrounding tropical landscape, it all added up to the most comfortable physical environment for the patient as possible.”

A PATIENTCENTERED DESIGN

37

SHOWCASE 9


The client inspired and challenged us with creating an eye-catching, iconic building that made people do a doubletake as they drove by.

A ONE-OF-A-KIND FACILITY

The design team utilized an unusual geometry for the building shape to achieve optimal layouts for clinical and non-clinical spaces.

Opened to the public in 2015, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute’s iconic new Naples’ facility reinforces the client’s role as the country’s leading eye-care organization while supporting their growing presence in southwest Florida. Recipient of the Collier Building Industry Association’s 2015 Sand Dollar Award for Best Healthcare Facility Over $5 million, as well as IIDA South Florida Chapter’s Best of Healthcare Award at its 2016 BRAGG Awards, the leading-edge facility was designed to meet a minimum certification level of LEED Silver status. Sustainable initiatives include low-flow/waterless fixtures, rainwater harvesting, automatic lighting control systems, high-performance mechanical and electrical systems, and water-efficient landscaping. Renewable, sustainable and low-VOC materials were also incorporated into the building's interiors. “The client inspired and challenged us with creating an eye-catching, iconic building that made people do a double-take as they drove by,” says Cano. “It took a combination of teamwork, coordination, ingenuity and the use of available technology to achieve such an intricate, atypical design that sets a new architectural standard for the community. The feedback and design process were so positive that UM|BPEI approached GS&P to partner with them to design their first international facility, located in Abu Dhabi.” “With this new facility, we have expanded the institute’s capacity and service lines in the Naples region of the Gulf Coast of Florida,” notes Edward Hengtgen Jr., Assistant Vice President of Facilities Design & Construction at the University of Miami. “We have added new subspecialties, surgical procedures and other treatments not previously available to our West Coast patients. We were looking to create a premiere eye-care destination. GS&P helped us combine our many and varied clinical needs, and our desire for high-end aesthetics and patient care, into a unique, one-of-a-kind facility. This building is a tribute to our exceptional team of Bascom Palmer staff and faculty members who deliver excellent, personalized and compassionate care for each of our patients.”


GS&P helped us combine our many and varied clinical needs, and our desire for high-end aesthetics and patient care, into a unique, one-of-a-kind facility. This building is a tribute to our exceptional team of Bascom Palmer staff and faculty members…

EDWARD HENGTGEN JR., ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT OF FACILITIES DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION, UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI

TE A M

PIC Luis J. Cano, aia, leed ap, edac, ncarb PM Shauna L. Carpenter, ncidq, rid, leed ap, iida PC Guiovani Caceros

Brian J. Schulz, aia, leed ap Mike Summers Ashley S. Wood, rid, ncidq, iida


EFFICIENT, O PEN and ENERGETIC


Eco-Energy — New Corporate Headquarters LOCATION

Franklin, Tennessee C L IENT

Eco-Energy SERVIC ES

Interior Design Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding


EC O -E NE RGY — N E W C O RP O R ATE H E A D Q UA RTE RS

42

F

ounded in 1992, Eco-Energy is an end-to-end midstream alternative energy company, and the No. 1 biofuel logistics and supply-chain company in the world. Following a real estate evaluation, the firm decided to relocate its corporate headquarters to one floor in a first-generation, Class-A office building in the popular Cool Springs area of Franklin, Tennessee. The move would allow the firm to design a space that accommodated rapid growth, collaboration and flexibility, while incorporating technology and the company brand. GS&P was solicited by Eco-Energy to provide interior design and environmental graphics services for the 32,000-square-foot buildout. Kelly Hodges, vice president of GS&P's Corporate + Urban Design market comments on the firm’s former office space: “Eco-Energy’s executives and employees were well aware that their previous headquarters didn’t support future growth, work flow, or emphasize the image the company wanted to convey—both internally and externally. The space wasn’t contiguous, and it restricted the various divisions from

growing and collaborating. We worked closely with company leadership to understand their goals and vision, and to bring those to life through our design solution.”

“We worked closely with company leadership to understand their goals and vision, and to bring those to life through our design solution.” KELLY HODGES, VICE PRESIDENT, CORPORATE + URBAN DESIGN


Eco-Energy’s previous office environment was divided into suites by solid walls, making it difficult for the various teams to interact. With the entire company situated on one floor, the new headquarters could better embody what had become a much more open and transparent corporate culture. “The new space features an open floor plan with all-glass front offices and meeting rooms situated along the east and west ends of the building,” explains Hodges. “This allowed the workspace to flow more freely between the different groups within the company, and offered more flexibility for future growth.”

The new space features an open floor plan with all-glass front offices and meeting rooms situated along the east and west ends of the building. This allowed the workspace to flow more freely between the different groups within the company, and offered more flexibility for future growth.

AN OPEN, TRANSPARENT LAYOUT


EC O -E NE RGY — N E W C O RP O R ATE H E A D Q UA RTE RS

44

GS&P’s design solution also created clear sight lines across the office, providing access to daylight and views for all employees, and a new transparency between general employees and senior leadership. “The CEO and CFO still have corner offices, but their offices have all-glass fronts with no film, so it’s just as wide-open as the rest of the floor,” notes Hodges. Further reflecting the company’s changing corporate culture, a large, airy break room open to the entire floor allows employees to see activity throughout the day and provides a casual environment for social interaction. Collaborative spaces featuring high-top tables and stools are mixed in with the open-office workstations to allow quick meetings, impromptu conversations, or alternative work places for staff.

“...we determined they wanted a clean, modern and flexible workspace that reflected their industry.” AMY KLINEFELTER, INTERIOR DESIGNER


Break Room

Reception

The previous office was divided into areas with hardwall spaces. This made it difficult for the company to feel unified. The new, open layout provides transparency between employees and senior leadership.

Collaborative Zones All-glass offices and meeting rooms were pushed primarily to the plan east and west ends of the building to maximize 45 daylight access and increase visibility for all employees. This also allowed the space to flow more freely between different groups within the company giving them more flexibility for the future. Eco Energy’s previous office was divided into areas with hard wall spaces. That setup made it hard for the company to feel unified. This new layout provided transparency between general employees and senior leadership as they moved out of their executive suite. Showcase 9 Entry To define the conceptual design and rest of the space, and bring a touch of scope of the project, GS&P led an nature indoors. Along with the wood image survey with Eco-Energy exec- elements, the company’s blue and utives to form a clear understanding green logo colors were used as bright of their vision for the new corporate accents throughout the floor to reflect headquarters. Interior designer Amy the company’s sustainability principles. Klinefelter explains the process: “We were working with a modest budget, so we used simple materials “At the beginning of the schematic design phase, we gathered a number and focused on making the biggest of images featuring different types of impact in the lobby and break room,” spaces and grouped them by usage. says Hodges. “All the wood accents We then had leadership review the were made of engineered wood to images and discussed why certain save on costs.” ones appealed to them. Through this Adopting another key client goal, method, we determined they wanted a GS&P seamlessly integrated technology clean, modern and flexible workspace as a tool throughout the work envithat reflected their industry.” ronment. Large-screen monitors were To introduce the Eco-Energy brand, incorporated into the design of the the design team incorporated a wood exterior columns and main circulation feature wall in the elevator lobby to path, keeping traders up to date with convey the client’s environmental the most recent news, trading data and stance in the biofuel industry. goals. Conference rooms and teaming Once inside, the waiting area at spaces were also equipped with the reception is accentuated by wood latest flat-screen monitors and digital features that help set the tone for the displays for easy viewing.

REFLECTING MISSION, VALUES AND BRAND

SHOWCASE 9


GS&P took an imaginative approach to communicating EcoEnergy’s core values—including Innovation, Customer Focus and Integrity—in strategic places around the office. A dimensional label and stenciled description of each core value were integrated into columns throughout the space. Graphics of the company’s goals were also featured in a film pattern on a conference room adjacent to the break area, providing privacy for occupants without stifling the transmission of light. “The original goal with Eco-Energy was to incorporate their core values and mission statement so they were visible to their employees and clients from any perspective within the space,” says environmental graphic designer Deanna Kamal. “The conversation grew from there into how we could represent the Eco-Energy brand through larger environmental graphics.”

The outcome is a striking feature graphic that highlights Eco-Energy's identity, placing particular emphasis on their process, including the distribution of biofuels both nationally and internationally. “We pulled together artwork and relevant imagery— including fuel trucks, production plants, train tracks, corn fields and clean air—and placed the firm’s mission statement in dimensional letters in the center of the graphic,” says Kamal. “It was extremely beneficial to go through the core values and mission statement graphic exercises with the client and develop those into artwork. It helped us gain a firm understanding of their brand and who they are as a company, and culminated in a feature graphic that successfully conveys EcoEnergy's story and what they're trying to accomplish.”

“We pulled together artwork and relevant imagery— including fuel trucks, production plants, train tracks, corn fields and clean air—and placed the firm's mission statement in dimensional letters in the center of the graphic... [It] culminated in a signature graphic that successfully conveys Eco-Energy's story and what they're trying to accomplish.” DEANNA KAMAL, ENVIRONMENTAL GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Feature wall graphics help provide a branded experience for employees and clients as they move through the space.


The design team has created an efficient, open and energetic office that we needed to facilitate our continued growth and enhance our employees' satisfaction and productivity.

JOSH BAILEY, CEO, ECO-ENERGY

47

Utilizing open-workplace concepts and advanced technology, GS&P’s design solution successfully accommodates Eco-Energy’s growing global business while fostering teamwork and innovation among their employees. Hodges comments on what differentiates this project from other efforts of a similar scope: “While this project could be viewed as a typical interior buildout, we worked closely with the client to design a space that would truly reinforce their brand and reflect their corporate mission and core values. The end result is a space that really makes an impact—even in the smallest details. The open layout feels active, and it immerses employees, customers and guests into the Eco-Energy culture. We’re all excited about the final product.” “This effort represents interiors and environmental graphics working incredibly well together to showcase a branded environment,” adds Klinefelter. “It’s something we can proudly show to other clients who are trying to achieve the same thing.” “Eco-Energy is a leader in alternative energy, and we desired a headquarters that reflected our position in this forward-thinking industry,” says Josh Bailey, CEO of Eco-Energy. “Our real estate professionals and GS&P

Eco-Energy's mission statement and core values are integrated into the columns throughout the space to help communicate the company's culture and goals.

SHOWCASE 9

NOT YOUR TYPICAL INTERIOR BUILDOUT

worked with us to strategically define and build a space that not only accommodates our current business operations, but also provides flexibility for our evolving needs. The design team has created an efficient, open and energetic office that we needed to facilitate our continued growth and enhance our employees' satisfaction and productivity.”

TE A M

PIC Jack E. Weber, iida, mcr, leed ap

PM Kelly Knight Hodges, ncidq, leed ap

PD Amy Klinefelter, iida, leed ap PD Afton Mooney, iida, leed ap id+c

PC Ashley S. Wood, ncidq, iida

PC Emaline Baker AOR Eric Bearden, aia EGD Deanna Kamal


A NEW KIND OF

FREESTANDING


Baptist Emergency at Town Center – Freestanding ED LOCATION

Jacksonville, Florida C L IENT

Baptist Health SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design


S

BAP TIST EME RGENCY AT TOWN C E NTE R – FRE ESTA N D I NG E D

50

ince 1955, Baptist Health has had a strong presence in Jacksonville, Florida, with hospitals, medical centers, imaging centers and outpatient locations serving thousands of patients across the area. In 2013, with a desire to reach out specifically to young families, Baptist Health commissioned GS&P to design a 26,000-squarefoot freestanding emergency department and ambulatory center in Clay County that incorporated dedicated care for pediatric cases. As a direct result of the project’s success, the client greenlit a series of freestanding EDs based on the Clay County model. The first was a 17,000-square-foot building located in the upscale urban retail center of St. John’s Town Center located directly off Interstate 295. The facility would also incorporate specialized emergency services for children provided by Wolfson Children’s Hospital. “Baptist Health is moving the front door of its hospitals into the communities it serves,” explains senior interior designer Elisa Worden. “St. John’s Town Center is an established hot spot in Jacksonville that features shopping, restaurants and entertainment. It’s within arm’s reach of the University of North Florida as well as families who travel to the area on a daily basis. This particular location was selected as a direct response to the community voicing the need for emergency care close to home for both adults and children.” “Freestanding emergency departments offer a level of care beyond what an urgent care clinic or physician’s office can provide,” adds project manager and principal at GS&P Stephan Gartman. “The idea was to provide convenient access to medical care for residents who have life-critical situations so they wouldn’t have

to rely on EMS or have to travel far to receive emergency care. In the past, if a family in the St. John’s Town Center area sought emergency pediatric services, they would have to drive 30 to 45 minutes to get to Wolfson Children’s Hospital in downtown Jacksonville. This new facility brings both pediatric and adult emergency services right into their neighborhood.” The site’s close proximity to and visibility from I-295 was also key. Not only would it give the community quick and easy access to the facility, it would also allow the hospital to serve as its own billboard and announce to drivers the specialized emergency services it provides.

The client greenlit a series of freestanding EDs based on the Clay County model. The first was a 17,000-squarefoot building located in the upscale urban retail center of St. John’s Town Center.


“THIS NEW FACILITY BRINGS BOTH PEDIATRIC AND ADULT EMERGENCY SERVICES RIGHT INTO THEIR NEIGHBORHOOD.” STEPHAN GARTMAN, PRINCIPAL

The material choices, architectural details, and scale of the building are designed to reassure patients they’ll receive the same high-quality care as at any of the system’s hospitals.


Brand recognition through the paired Baptist Health/ Wolfson Children’s Hospital logos as well as iconic architectural elements showcase the premiere emergency services provided within.

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52

STANDING APART FROM THE CROWD

To create a building design that distinguished itself from other area retail health facilities and identified with the client’s highest level of hospital services, the design team studied Baptist Health’s other local campuses—as well as other urgent care facilities in the area—and evaluated the new facility in relation to its scale in the growing retail community. “We determined that the building needed to be of a similar scale to other Baptist Health facilities so the size of the entry would communicate to the public that this was an urgent care center with the full backing of hospital services—not just another ‘doc-in-the-box’ walk-in clinic,” says Worden. “We wanted to reassure visitors


“BAPTIST’S BLUE WALL IS BECOMING AN ICON FOR THE SYSTEM... ITS INTRODUCTION INTO THIS FACILITY FURTHER STRENGTHENS BAPTIST’S BRANDED MESSAGE.”

ELISA WORDEN, SENIOR INTERIOR DESIGNER

53

SHOWCASE 9

that they’d receive the same high-quality care as at any of the system’s hospitals. In addition to the building’s scale, we achieved this through the material choices and sophisticated design details that were more in keeping with hospital settings and some of Baptist’s other healthcare campuses than your typical urgent care facility that exists in the community.” Distinguishing the facility in terms of services provided is the specialized emergency pediatric care offered by Wolfson Children’s Hospital—a part of the Baptist Health system. “This was an important corner of the market that Baptist and Wolfson wanted to capture,” says senior architect Bruce Pitre. “One of the client’s main goals was for the new facility to clearly broadcast to passersby that pediatric emergency services were provided within. It’s something that truly sets them apart from

the competition. To make this distinction, we paired the Baptist Health logo with the Wolfson Children’s Hospital insignia and displayed them prominently on two different sides of the exterior where they’re easily visible from the interstate via multiple directions of approach.” Another distinctive architectural element that draws the eye to the exterior, while at the same time reinforcing the Baptist Health brand, is the solid feature wall in the organization’s signature shade of blue. “Baptist’s blue wall is becoming an icon for the system,” says Worden. “It’s been heavily featured in their marketing campaigns, and its introduction into this facility further strengthens Baptist’s branded message. Because of its orientation, it serves as a striking backdrop to the building that can be easily seen from the nearby highway.”


A FLEXIBLE, PATIENT-CENTERED DESIGN

BAP TIST EME RGENCY AT TOWN C E NTE R – FRE ESTA N D I NG E D

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Easily adapted to any number of sites throughout the Baptist Health system, GS&P’s design provides separate waiting and treatment zones for adult and pediatric populations. Sixteen beds are divided equally between each unit in separate pods connected by a single, centralized nurse station that allows staff to serve both units with ease and efficiency. Exam rooms are laid out to streamline patient flow and allow fast tracking when necessary. Acknowledging its proximity to high-end shopping and the University of North Florida, GS&P designed the building to provide a retail experience that appeals to busy families and students alike. Transparent glazing allows unobstructed views of both pediatric and adult waiting areas from the outside, projecting a sense of openness and convenience. Inside the building, the adult and pediatric units each have a distinct look and feel that caters to their patient demographics. The children’s center features colorful ocean-themed interiors to create a welcoming atmosphere and reduce patient stress. The design of the adult unit highlights the high-quality materials and stylish details present throughout the building. High ceilings, extensive glazing and warm tones give the waiting and registration areas a soothing aesthetic. “Our interior design team worked closely with our architects to make sure there was a cohesive link between the interior and exterior,” notes interior designer Jackie Maslan. “For example, the lobby has a 24-foot ceiling that’s capped with a metal wood plank. Inset in the plank are 2-inch linear LED lights. It’s a very clean design feature that’s carried through from the exterior canopies, so you see that same ceiling as you’re walking into the building. We also carried Baptist’s blue feature wall into the interior.”

A solid feature wall in Baptist Health’s signature shade of blue extends from the outside of the building to the interior reinforcing the organization’s brand.

“GRESHAM, SMITH AND PARTNERS WAS VERY ENGAGED IN OUR PROJECT FROM START TO FINISH... THEY LISTENED TO OUR NEEDS AND HELPED US TO BUILD A TRULY ICONIC STRUCTURE THAT FITS WITH THE LOCAL HIGH-END RETAIL ENVIRONMENT, YET IS CLEARLY IDENTIFIABLE AS A FREESTANDING EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT. THEIR ATTENTION TO EVERY DETAIL WAS APPARENT THROUGHOUT THE PROCESS.” DARIN C. ROARK, BAPTIST HEALTH ADMINISTRATOR


AN ICONIC STRUCTURE

Opened to the public in April 2016, Baptist Emergency at Town Center not only brings much-needed emergency services for children and families closer to a growing local community but also provides a facility that successfully communicates Baptist Health’s distinctive brand. “Helping bring innovative healthcare solutions like this to life is one of the reasons I truly love what I do,” says Gartman. “We worked hard as a team and also with the client to develop an eye-catching design that’s going to be a strong selling point for the quality of care that Baptist Health provides.” “Gresham, Smith and Partners was very engaged in our project from start to finish,” notes Baptist Health Administrator Darin C. Roark. “They were there every step of the way. During design, they listened to our needs and helped us to build a truly iconic structure that fits with the local high-end retail environment, yet is clearly identifiable as a freestanding emergency department. Their attention to every detail was apparent throughout the process.”

TE A M

PIC Joseph F. Thompson, AIA, LEED AP PM Stephan K. Gartman, RA, LEED AP PP Bruce M. Pitre, AIA, LEED AP PC Ledia Durmishaj PD Trevor S. Lee, AIA, NCARB ID Jacqueline Maslan, IIDA, LEED AP ID Elisa A. Worden, IIDA, EDAC, LEED AP

Larry D. Leman Jenna Lychako Lisa M. Marston, IIDA, LEED AP Mayur Patel LouAnn Skinner


A NEW ROUTE FORWARD


Louisville Urban Bike Network — 6th Street Corridor LOCATION

Louisville, Kentucky C L IENT

Louisville Metro Department of Public Works & Assets

SERVIC ES

Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Audits Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning Complete Streets Transit Facilities Design Wayfinding


LO U ISVIL L E U RBAN BIKE N E T WO RK – 6TH STRE E T C O RRI D O R

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T

he mission of the Department of Public Works in Louisville, Kentucky, (Louisville Metro) is to maintain the city’s infrastructure, support initiatives that foster a healthy environment, and improve public services to ensure a higher quality of life for the community. As densities in the city’s urban core continue to rise and more of the populace seek alternative means of transportation, Louisville Metro has recognized the need to connect and expand its current network of bicycle lanes into a cohesive, safe and accessible Urban Bike Network (UBN). The City asked GS&P to help plan and design the UBN’s routes and bike facilities. “GS&P has been providing Louisville Metro with alternative transportation options as part of a five-year task-order contract,” says

senior transportation engineer Mike Sewell. “We were the idea partner for this project because outside of our design experience, a third of our staff commute to work by bike. So we know the needs of cyclists firsthand. We are cycling advocates in the community, and our outreaches in this area precede our work as engineers.” With a bike-share program planned for key locations around downtown in 2017, the design for the UBN has focused on connecting Louisville’s central business district

“A THIRD OF OUR STAFF COMMUTE TO WORK BY BIKE. SO WE KNOW THE NEEDS OF CYCLISTS FIRSTHAND.” MIKE SEWELL, SENIOR TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER to nearby neighborhoods and points of interest. A recent example of routes on the UBN, the 6th Street corridor is the first major north-south passageway built to the new local bike lane standard developed by the GS&P team. The 6th Street corridor links downtown to major east-west connections on Kentucky Street and Breckenridge Street that lead to high-density residential neighborhoods like Old Louisville, Smoketown and the Highlands.


AN EXPEDITED WORK FLOW

PLANS FOR THE LOUISVILLE UBN INCLUDE ROUTES COVERING A TOTAL OF

Plans for the Louisville UBN include routes covering a total of 80-plus miles around the city. The client tasked GS&P with selecting and designing routes, collecting relevant transportation data, and managing input from the general public as well as stakeholders such as Louisville Metro, Transit Authority of River City, bicycling advocates Bicycling for Louisville and Louisville Bicycling Club, and the Louisville Downtown Partnership. To expedite delivery and execution on designs, GS&P formulated a streamlined approval process to allow relevant parties to weigh in at different points based on the project’s complexity. “We proposed a process map wherein if we don’t take away any motorist lanes, then there’s no reason for public involvement,” explains Sewell. “Rather than affect capacity, we’re merely reallocating width and targeting different creative fixes. Since this scenario is the most common, it expedites approval. Thanks to the improved work flow, we can create constructible plans for a project in about a week.”

80-PLUS MILES AROUND THE CITY.

.

PROCESS MAP


SETTING A NEW STANDARD

LO U ISVIL L E U RBAN BIKE N E T WO RK – 6TH STRE E T C O RRI D O R

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The 6th Street corridor, which runs nearly 1.5 miles, varies in width, number of lanes and parking arrangements, as the corridor transitions from the city’s commercial center to more residential neighborhoods toward the south. The design team used green paint to highlight zones of potential conflict between cyclists and drivers, and to mark transitions as the street width and number of lanes change. The green paint is part of the new local bike lane standard developed by GS&P with input from the National Association of City Transportation Officials and sister cities around the region. “Prior to this project, there were no uniform standards for bike lanes around Louisville, and national guidelines are constantly in flux,” says transportation engineer intern Katie Shaw. “We evaluated which routes were most effective and how we could improve bike lanes and transitions at certain intersections. The result was a set of drawings that communicated the new standards to contractors and others involved in implementing the facilities.”

“PRIOR TO THIS PROJECT, THERE WERE NO UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR BIKE LANES AROUND LOUISVILLE... THE RESULT WAS A SET OF DRAWINGS THAT COMMUNICATED THE NEW STANDARDS TO CONTRACTORS AND OTHERS INVOLVED IN IMPLEMENTING THE FACILITIES.” KATIE SHAW, TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER INTERN

The new standards promote the clear and consistent use of green paint in bike lanes, specify the anticipated motorist reaction to the paint, and recommend consistent design and markings for transitional zones where bikes and cars will mix—especially areas that have a higher risk of adverse interactions. “We’re right here in the city commuting along this same network,” notes transportation engineer Jeremy Kubac. “We bike these facilities and drive alongside them, and we see exactly how they’re operating in terms of what works well and what needs to be changed for the next project.” “Design standards on 6th Street have worked so well that we’re using them to update old projects or execute complete redesigns on previous facilities that don’t fit the new vision for the UBN,” adds Shaw. Another client goal was managing community awareness and understanding of the lanes and markings. “We’ve had to educate the public as to what the lane markings mean, when to cross green paint and how to yield to bikes,” says Shaw. “The public meetings on this project have been a success, and our client has created extensive signage along new routes so pedestrians and cyclists know what to do. At the same time, we’ve found the designs were intuitive to motorists even before we gave explicit instructions.”


THE DESIGN TEAM USED GREEN PAINT TO HIGHLIGHT ZONES OF POTENTIAL CONFLICT BETWEEN CYCLISTS AND DRIVERS, AND TO MARK TRANSITIONS AS THE STREET WIDTH AND NUMBER OF LANES CHANGE.

INVESTING IN THE FUTURE

THE INTENT OF THE GUIDELINES: Clarify the use of green paint and the intended motorist reaction Consistent use of green paint to promote compliance Promote community acceptance of green paint use Promote consistency in lane marking transitions and mixing zones across entire local network

REFERENCES FOR THE GUIDELINES INCLUDED: National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) Urban Bikeway Design Guide Sister cities currently using green bike lane markings

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GS&P assisted in the writing and implementation of a set of standardized bike lane guidelines.

More bicyclists traveling around Louisville equals less fuel consumption and resulting pollution, and increased bike ridership encourages an active, healthier community. Beyond the environmental benefits, the UBN will also have a positive impact on the local economy. “Studies have shown net revenue increases in retail spending can be as high as 35 percent in pedestrian- and bike-friendly business zones,” says Sewell. “GS&P sponsors a number of biking events, including an open streets program called CycLOUvia that temporarily closes the roads to vehicular traffic. The thousands of pedestrians and cyclists who attend this event spend a lot more money at local businesses than they do when they’re in a car.” “Another financial benefit to the city is that younger generations—who choose where they want to live first, and then choose where they’ll work— are looking to move to places with alternate modes of transport,” adds Joel Morrill, senior transportation engineer. “These types of facilities will attract and retain young, competitive talent, which will be a boon to the city’s growing economy in the long term.”


G R E E N PA I N T I M P L E M E N TAT I O N D I A G R A M

IS THERE A BIKE LANE? Yes

No No green color IS THERE A RIGHT-TURN LANE? Yes

No No green color

IS THERE AN OPPOSING LEFT-TURN OPPORTUNITY? Yes

No green color

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LO U ISVIL L E U RBAN BIKE N E T WO RK – 6TH STRE E T C O RRI D O R

No

IS 25% OF THE OPPOSING TRAFFIC MAKING A LEFT TURN? Yes

No No green color

IS THERE A BUS STOP? (THEN BIKE LANES DO NOT CHANGE) No green color IS THERE A PUBLIC ENTRANCE? (THEN BIKE LANE LINES BECOME SKIP IN FRONT OF ENTRANCE) No green color DOES THE BIKE LANE CONTINUE AFTER THE INTERSECTION? Yes

No No green color


Pedestrian crosswalk length is reduced by the use of paint and post-curb extensions.

FOR THE LOVE OF A CITY The 6th Street corridor of the Louisville UBN demonstrates the future of transportation infrastructure, and GS&P has established itself as a leader in the efficient planning, effective design and swift implementation of a successful network. GS&P’s staff not only spearheaded the network’s creation, but also use it on a daily basis. “We helped Metro write their application for Bicycle Friendly Community, and then submitted one of our own for Bicycle Friendly Business,” notes Sewell. “Louisville ranked Silver as a Bicycle Friendly Community, and the designating agency, The League of American Bicyclists, recognized us as a Gold-level Bike Friendly Business. They WE'RE CHANGING told us it was unheard of to reach that level on a first submission. I especially credit THE WAY FUTURE our advocacy for bicycle commuting among our staff and throughout the community.” GENERATIONS WILL Bike lanes and facilities in the 6th INTERACT WITH Street corridor were completed in the fall of 2015. Based on a citywide survey, public LOUISVILLE. response to the developing UBN has been positive and affirms that GS&P’s choices are producing safe and useful facilities that will lead to increased ridership. Besides the 6th Street corridor, seven other routes to the UBN have also been completed, and 10 more are underway. “We’re changing the way future generations will interact with Louisville,” says Sewell. “I love this city, and there’s no better way to take it in than by bike. You pay attention to your environment, and it gives you a greater appreciation of what the community has to offer. I'm proud that we are a part of that. It's a great feeling to be implementing the change that will allow others to take in this awesome city.”

TE A M

PIC Michael Sewell, p.e. PM Joel Morrill, p.e. PP Katie Shaw, eit PC Shawn P. Riggs, p.e. PD Jeremy Kubac, p.e.

SHOWCASE 9

63


A BEACON FOR THE COMMUNITY


Kaiser Permanente North Arundel Medical Center LOCATION

Glen Burnie, Maryland C L IENT

Kaiser Permanente SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design Structural Engineering Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing Engineering Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding


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F

ounded in 1945, Kaiser “As a result of the Southwood project, Kaiser Permanente named Permanente is recognized GS&P a member of its Preferred Provider program, which opened as one of the nation’s leadthe door for additional projects like the North Arundel replacement ing healthcare providers facility,” explains senior architect and principal Brent Hughes. and not-for-profit health plans. “Kaiser Permanente wanted to make the new facility a community focal point that embodied the core values expressed in their ‘Total Following GS&P’s successful expansion and renovation of Kaiser Health’ and ‘Thrive’ initiatives. Our overarching objective Permanente’s Southwood was to communicate those values on the interior of the Comprehensive Medical building while using the exterior to engage members from Center in Jonesboro, the moment they entered the site.” Georgia, the organization selected GS&P to design a replacement facility in the Baltimore, Maryland, sub- “Kaiser Permanente wanted to make the urb of Glen Burnie. The new new facility a community focal point that 25,000-square-foot medical office building will be strate- embodied the core values expressed in gically located to fill a void their ‘Total Health’ and ‘Thrive’ initiatives.” in the regional availability of Kaiser Permanente facilities. BRENT HUGHES, SENIOR ARCHITECT, PRINCIPAL


The vegetated 13-acre site bounded by wetlands, public arterial roads, private streets, utilities and property lines created a challenge for the design team.

“Not only did we have to meet zoning requirements that limited our options for siting the building, but we also had to fit a 25,000-squarefoot program onto the restricted site.”

A CAREFULLY CALIBRATED SITE PLAN Planning for the new medical office building on a vegetated 13-acre site bounded by wetlands, public arterial roads, private streets, utilities and property lines proved to be the project’s biggest challenge. “Not only did we have to meet zoning requirements that limited our options for siting the building, but we also had to fit a 25,000-square-foot program onto the restricted site,” says architect Corie Baker. “It certainly took some creativity to get the footprint to fit, but the end result worked incredibly well.”

Making the most of limited site space, GS&P’s three-story design efficiently stacks the clinical and retail functions to reduce the building’s footprint while increasing visibility from nearby streets and the adjacent highway. The organization of program elements creates a clean and defined circulation system that supports a patient-friendly environment and provides views to exterior amenities. The design team also had to contend with parking ratios and the adjacent wetlands’ associated forest conservation regulations.

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SHOWCASE 9

CORIE BAKER, ARCHITECT

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68

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M s tb utilities and property lines led the wahcks reg Parkin required g thes parking maqinutiraedefetin eorial ilePermanente’s g Rewqa buildinga,rtKaiser limited area for building siting. f r in o restrrynotes ing m we eSmith. oacds, architect uteirrem aatndratio,” me ws tland , ann onseprvrivat vieAdam p s g r r e e o public m q p acompeting uireme are “By ebalancing tioen, sstreteositesand Couple nt eartny lithe a n n d d w t e s f s pritohjec wao r abuild strict led tormts, utilities s Kaiser pawe tmaximized th. e rliequprogram prrequirements, og a rkin iminag s Perma m ir limite ee requir dmesn ts whrily gitoinagl . of Mee the itbthe it emen nente m e ting th d t use of an extremely constrained e h u e il a a m d in r e a in t t intainin ains ag, for a, e buil/d/in o g view15 se salso g eaar f 1 spawcaetersite. parkein tgry cable to preserve aWe onse s to pem nagwere . kin to bala arP r T r g e r e h v 5 m q R e a 0 tionatural ensurrounding n ire be ilu em n, st t a ments0ofsfthe percent duir in progra ce these cr purq g deensig tsnwahs oaf p nd strict pa orm iteriaoje mmaCt cforest t . w a r rk ic im o the from d ith ma by expanding structu u arysetback goal o ing ximizin re. Ka pleedlemweitnhts f g iser P thae t the adjacent wetlands and making hw // ermanent e ithliinmitetdhe s requ The r ir e it toemitigate emenParkin concerted es aintaeffort area, disturbance t g Rm ins a e balanc ultbuisildin qu ang aerffi of 1 to spthe ir p north property boundary.” a e a c es thto r m e e e c aie per 5nts king . Tt he e c la requir debsig 00 sf pcee Ctghoupnle n emenp boam u Further maintaining t il in n d in of the site’s t e s h g drit wit trso ad te canno dep Kttaicisesitre acn riarohw t incrse tgoraampm oin thhme sliign hthe a natural ecosystem, g a d design incorr t it a h P t a a r e uscetuinre re upsett t hem maxm rm itiz ein d g sitefor use as im setn .siz qu etle in rautnscetnuon-site tree porates bioswales m w e a the pa g this balan beu byire6m area, n in 0 sft wof 1 ithin tains rkingTr dd the a pato ithoust pamanagement ing astormwater avoid heequriree cte ailn c r kin r e e n a o per 5 g sultenotis.bala t m.eeTt he 00 sf balanc m ncerunoff in uilding areas. g bwetland into a n t h o e e e f p ffi s s r o e c // t d g h ie e c e r n s a r ign ha c m at t it ria w requir ics e deesig emenstrucompemtin PARKING REQUIREMENTSEnviron d it n h g thatmaxim ts toture mecn ite aleme antanloC izing Coupled with the limited site area, to rotsgram innccreea a p.oint tha nd pn within u t r s n e p t h s setting Th e struc In ad in size the Kaiser Permanente maintains ad t t e itionthte b opathrkein bhais barelasnuclte is y 60 sf wit ure reqspace parking requirement of one uiremper a la g and nn effic hout zornein en qngcire 500 square feet of building ot mie envarea. easm ntt de ntdehnep ironme ts of the rseitquiru ee t.caorkminpetin in e e m n t e a p des/ig nts to g g site ag sign that / n prio l concercnasnnotlannin g a p e Eritnyv. irBoy u wereincreas ffort,oint that nd program from t nemeanpnsettin kept ea in siz th he ad tdin jacent xp l Cgogthnecthis b s a e by 60 e structure conce tthlae a w a rted In e s e p la e r sf with ndaarkning re ntbsacknce and effo from out d makquire toitio n lim the nre ardt d o n t it m in meetin td ois hreb g e oqr were g aznocneina a nt. roepnetsrt tu able et /tu/hirepm gwaaynd yofbtohue onvm forestr n p d taeinnEt1n s a a y codn iroaninm it r v k r e y ing ,pla a5l %ir wnenin esseig co swales oonmrn r tiorio g effo rnsstitaw n.rity.A nf coeue werferou vnap o el eC rt, n f c r o d e B e r water m d setdhe y r keptns eioxp Inin nallnyd,in witahd mancaog a ahededititio s ja a c t b g iothe s necm into th ee rtnetd treoequirntsitweenfto etback e adja latro hrm nsdtota e ffoarvtoe frcoemnt m z o n e n “By the o liamnts f d main gg abalancing tw hetlanenonviro tid kin trhff is utnuo dr sh. npmennity dro and parkin were beanscitee pla ropetratl co able dt estig g n a wayning e site and nu competing o maninprio y bo ce forestr ffort, nrdnasryw tainrity. y fr , ewre e kept as swales conosm ervtahteioadja15%Boyfeoxupraprogram n d requirements, in a n. cAent w werceounce s g it water sedrtw edit eff dditioentalande fotrhe setback o manfaro ll a h r y n t in , m d thetositlimit bio maximized makin ge th into th the e d we e adja wceremenet tnoorath rbance g a propefor sistoturm ent awbele to void a r way an ty use boounof forestr tlandm s. aintain y run ff daran extremely y swales conservatio 15% of our y, we n. A constrained were u site fo ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS dd r site.” water s manag ed within th itionally, b By expanding the setback from the io e site into th emen for sto t e adja adjacent wetland and making a rmSMITH, cent w to avoid a ADAM ny run etland concerted effort to limit disturbance s. o ff ARCHITECT away from the north property boundary, 15 percent of the site was maintained for forestry conservation.


Through many iterations of conceptual design, the team focused on varying exterior expressions of the programmatic elements.

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SHOWCASE 9

DESIGNED TO BE SEEN Despite the site constraints, the property that Kaiser Permanente selected for its new medical office building offered one major advantage—location. “Kaiser Permanente places a great deal of emphasis on the view of a facility from a distance and on approach,” notes architect Clint Harris. “They purchased this particular property so the building would be visible from as many vantage points as possible— especially the freeway and Quarterfield Road, a secondary thoroughfare that runs close by. We studied various elevations and view corridors along the freeway to make sure drivers would be able to see the facility from those points. These efforts were integral to how we positioned the building and determined its height.

“There aren’t many other medical office buildings in the area, so we wanted this building to stand out as a beacon for the community—something both memorable and identifiable. We want it to catch your eye as you drive by. That’s one of the reasons we selected a metal-clad building type with a wood-grain texture. It stands apart from the local context, and the wood finish also conveys a feeling of warmth that draws people in, giving them a sense that this facility will provide the very best of care.”

“... we wanted this building to stand out as a beacon for the community—something both memorable and identifiable.” CLINT HARRIS, ARCHITECT


THE FLEXIBILITY TO GROW AND ADAPT Given the program requirements and limited available square footage, space planning also posed a significant challenge that resulted in some innovative design solutions. “Because of the small building footprint, we created a layout that allows clinics to share space rather than be isolated,” says Smith. “This increases the efficiencies of the programmable space while giving clinics the support and flexibility to handle varying quantities of patients.” To provide flexibility for future growth, GS&P incorporated demountable interior partition walls into the

design that allow for the adaptation of space as program needs change. The building’s upper stories include 6,000 square feet of reprogrammable floor space. “The principle behind these demountable walls is they can be easily rearranged for future renovations,” notes interior designer Ashley Wood. “This is an innovation initiative for the Kaiser Permanente mid-Atlantic states region, and became a successful design challenge for our team.”

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K AISE R PERMAN ENTE NO RTH A RU N DE L ME D I CA L C E NTE R

PRIMARY CARE

PEDIATRICS

OB/GYN

FLEX EXAMPLE 1

THIRD FLOOR

By providing a layout that allows for clinics to share space rather than be isolated, the team increased the efficiency of programmable space while giving clinics the support and flexibility to handle varying quantities of members.

FLEX EXAMPLE 2

FLEX EXAMPLE 3


COMFORT THROUGH CLARITY

Entry portals, graphics and directional signage coupled with color-coded walls denoting different functional programs allow the user to easily process spatial functions and quickly traverse the necessary areas to arrive at their destination.

As a cornerstone of its brand, Kaiser Permanente embraces the idea of a “Total Health Environment” that comforts members during the entirety of their visit through design and the branding of key experiences. With three floors and nine different clinics, GS&P focused on creating comfort through clarity with intuitive circulation and wayfinding. Entry portals, graphics, directional signage and color-coded walls that denote different functional programs allow users to easily navigate their way through the facility and to their final destination. “Although the program is only 25,000 square feet, it contains multiple clinics located in different directions,” notes Wood. “We want patients to feel comfortable and at ease when they enter the building without any added stress or confusion from trying to find their way. One way we made wayfinding more intuitive for visitors was by the use of color. We associated each floor level and each clinic with a different color to create a rhythm and a meaning every time you see that certain color.”

“We want patients to feel comfortable and at ease when they enter the building without any added stress or confusion from trying to find their way.” ASHLEY WOOD, INTERIOR DESIGNER


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“Thrive,” a subset of Kaiser Permanente’s Total Health initiative, focuses on encouraging physical fitness. GS&P incorporated this idea in the facility’s design through the use of wall graphics, color and strategically placed signage. “Kaiser Permanente does a lot to educate their members about staying healthy,” explains Smith. “One way we helped support their mission was by making the stairs more inviting. We brought them out into the main entrance lobby and made them feel more like a monumental stair and not just a means of egress. The windows, the lighting and the flooring all make the stairway more enticing, and nearby signage encourages users to ‘burn calories, not electricity’ by taking the stairs instead of the elevators.

“Kaiser Permanente does a lot to educate their members about staying healthy. One way we helped support their mission was by making the stairs more inviting.”


Kaiser Permanente North Arundel Typical MOB

% 36% LESS BTU PER YEAR

28% LESS LIGHTING POWER DENSITY

31% REDUCTION IN ENERGY USE INTENSITY vs. AIA 2030 benchmark

vs. ASHRAE 90.1 - 2007 baseline

GOING FOR GOLD Kaiser Permanente North Arundel Medical Center is on track to become the first LEED Gold certified facility in Kaiser Permanente’s mid-Atlantic region. Sustainable features include Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) mechanical systems, 100 percent LED lighting, instantaneous water heaters, occupancy sensors, full energy monitoring reported to Kaiser Permanente’s regional offices, and a more efficient building envelope than the 2015 energy code required. “With careful planning and client guidance, we drastically improved the facility’s environmental impact

by reducing its total water and energy consumption, carbon footprint and demand for construction materials,” says project coordinator Terrance Perdue. “Energy model calculations project the building to perform 36 percent better than AHSRAE 90.1 standards, which is the benchmark for energy consumption building codes across the U.S. Water consumption will be more than 20 percent lower than federal government standards, and regionally sourced materials with high-recycled content and low-VOC emissions will promote a healthy interior environment.

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SHOWCASE 9

Kaiser Permanente North Arundel Medical Center is on track to become the first LEED Gold certified facility in Kaiser Permanente’s midAtlantic states region.


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HIGH-PERFORMANCE, HIGH DESIGN Designed to provide the Baltimore Metropolitan region with vital GS&P, we have accomplished this healthcare services including primary care, obstetrics, pediatrics, and more. The exterior of the building optometry, ophthalmology and imaging, the new Kaiser Permanente projects a distinct character and strong North Arundel Medical Center is slated to open in the presence that captures spring of 2017. Celebrating the connection between patient your attention with a “This project was health and the built environment, GS&P’s high-performing, contemporary look that about creating energy-efficient, flexible and identifiable design solution will remain timeless. I something for the believe that once our provides a state-of-the-art facility that meets the needs of the client as well as the growing community. members and staff have community that “This project was about creating something for the a chance to experience was desperately community that was desperately needed,” says Hughes. the facility they will be “I am incredibly proud of how our team worked within both motivated and needed.” the constraints of one of the last undeveloped properties inspired by the interior in the area and delivered a vertical, compact and elegant design design. I can’t say enough about the solution that will serve the surrounding community as well as Kaiser positive experience I’ve had working Permanente’s growing membership.” with the entire GS&P team and look “Our goal was to create a space that not only sets a new standard forward to working with them on many for Kaiser Permanente going forward but also for the region,” says great projects in the near future.” Taj Brown, Senior Medical Architect Planner/Interior Designer at Kaiser Permanente. “Working with the exceptional team at


The North Arundel medical office building is strategically located to fill a current void in the regional availability of Kaiser Permanente facilities.

“Our goal was to create a space that not only sets a new standard for Kaiser Permanente going forward but also for the region. Working with the exceptional team at GS&P, we have accomplished this and more.” TAJ BROWN, SENIOR MEDICAL ARCHITECT PLANNER / INTERIOR DESIGNER,

TE A M

KAISER PERMANENTE PIC Brent Hughes, aia, ncarb, edac, leed ap PM John R. Horst, p.e., leed ap, cpd PA Adam Smith, aia, ncarb, leed ap PA Corie E. Baker, aia, leed ap bd+c, edac, ncarb PD James V. Brennan

“I am incredibly proud of how our team worked within the constraints of one of the last undeveloped properties in the area and delivered a vertical, compact and elegant design solution that will serve the surrounding community as well as Kaiser Permanente’s growing membership.” BRENT HUGHES

ID Ashley S. Wood, rid, ncidq, iida

Brett Anderson Kelly Babcock Bill Butler Joyce Ferguson Jason B. Fukuda, p.e., s.e. Clint H. Harris, aia Justin Hethcote, p.e., leed ap bd+c, cxa Steven P. Johnson, aia, ncarb Deanna Kamal Melissa Long, eit Deron McIntosh, p.e. David V. McMullin, p.e., leed ap Terrance Perdue Jimmy Perrin R.J. Tazelaar, p.e. Grace Vorobieff Rob Whitson, p.e.


PR ES TH ER E P VIN AS G T,


SR 10/US 78 Westbound Bridge Replacement LOCATION

Walton-Oconee County Line, Georgia C L IENT

Georgia Department of Transportation SERVIC ES

Bridge and Structural Design Bridge Hydraulics Environmental Services and NEPA Roadway Design Transportation Engineering

ME FU ET TU ING RE NE

ED

S


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uilt in 1938, the westbound bridge for state Route 10/US 78 over the Apalachee River at the Walton-Oconee county line was deemed eligible for preservation by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Historic Preservation Division. Having worked extensively with Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) on past projects, GS&P was solicited by the Department in 2007 to investigate rehabilitation alternatives for the existing arch bridge. “Very few bridges of this type remain in the United States, so preserving the historic structure was GDOT’s greatest concern,” explains senior transportation engineer Scott Shelton. “We were tasked with exploring all possible options for its rehabilitation and reuse. If none of those proved viable, we would then need to propose an alternate solution.” “This kind of historic arch structure is rare because of the complexity of construction and the amount of labor required compared to other bridge types,” adds senior structural engineer Ted Kniazewycz. “It’s something that’s

not built today due to the cost involved and the impact it would have on the surrounding environment. It took a tremendous amount of research just to find the proper technique to analyze the bridge for its adequacy and load-carrying capacity. Fortunately, we were able to locate the existing historic arch bridge plans that were put together by the engineer who originally designed the overpass. This allowed us to create a model to evaluate the load-carrying ability of the original structure. We also completed hand calculations at key support areas to assess the bridge’s overall sufficiency.”

“Preserving the historic structure was GDOT's greatest concern.” SCOTT SHELTON, SENIOR TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER


WEIGHING THE OPTIONS

JODY BRASWELL, SENIOR TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER

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GS&P’s analysis of the existing bridge revealed that it “With the first proposed alternative, the width of the was constructed with reinforced concrete-deck girder bridge wasn’t sufficient to meet GDOT’s dimensional spans that had a live-load capacity below the current requirements,” says Kniazewycz. “One idea was to build AASHTO design standard for bridges. Moreover, the bridge a third arch element to give the bridge the added width components throughout the structure exhibited cracks needed. But the way the structure was configured would and the substructure showed numerous surface failures, have meant placing the support in the middle of the river, which exposed the reinforcing steel to the environmental which would have interfered with the river hydraulics at elements leading to section loss. the site. To meet the load stipulations, we would have had to reinforce the bridge. That involved encasing it in “We spent a great deal of time determining if the existing bridge could be salvaged yet still bear the loads concrete, which would have changed the aesthetics of of modern-day traffic,” says the historic structure and defeated the entire purpose of senior transportation engineer the preservation. It would have also created a financial burden that was simply not viable for the project.” Jody Braswell. “We explored various options for preservation, Another issue with rehabilitating the existing bridge was its including building a new bridge sufficiency rating of only 36 out of 100. Kniazewycz explains: above the existing structure and “A sufficiency rating is purely a mathematical calcukeeping the historic arches lation of various elements, including the superstructure, substructure, functional width, age and conditions. If a in place. However, all of the options would have resulted sufficiency rating is above 50, the bridge is likely to be in damage to all or part of the considered for preservation. A score under historic bridge.” “We explored various options for 50 means the bridge will probably need to After performing an exhausbe replaced. preservation, including building tive evaluation, only two feasible alternatives remained if the a new bridge above the existing bridge was to be preserved: structure and keeping the historic replace the existing deck of the arches in place. However, all of structure to meet GDOT width and load requirements, or con- the options would have resulted struct a replacement bridge in damage to all or part of the to the north and evaluate the impacts to the existing bridge. historic bridge.”


Barn swallow nests were identified under the existing bridge. Since the historic overpass would remain in place after the new bridge was constructed, no special provisions to protect the swallows were required.

The aquatic protected species survey revealed the presence of the endangered Altamaha Shiner. This discovery prompted DNR to restrict work within the stream during the shiner's spawning season.

IT’S ALL IN THE PLANNING

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After assessing all alternatives, GS&P recommended the construction of a new westbound bridge parallel to the existing structure. Mitigation measures to preserve the historic arch bridge were proposed to the Federal Highway Administration and the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). GS&P worked closely with both GDOT and SHPO to identify the historical boundary of the property, along with permissible construction activities on the bridge itself and within close proximity to the structure. “An essential part of the planning process was completing the proper research, studies and agency coordination to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA] and Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act,” explains senior civil engineer Sandy Layne-Sclafani. “The GS&P team was able to draw on years of experience completing NEPA documents in multiple states, as well as effective coordination with natural and cultural resource agencies, to deliver an FHWA-approved NEPA document for GDOT. It allowed the undertaking to be completed without late-stage delays or objections from local, state or federal agencies so we could adhere to GDOT's schedule for construction.” GS&P also assisted the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ (DNR) Wildlife Resources Division with a comprehensive assessment of the aquatic environment around the historic bridge site. “We conducted an aquatic protected species survey to determine the presence or absence of threatened or endangered aquatic species within the project area,” says Layne-Sclafani. “The survey revealed the presence of 18 different species of fish within the project area. One particular species—the Altamaha Shiner—is on the state’s list of endangered species. This discovery prompted DNR to issue a special provision restricting work within the stream from May 1 to July 1 due to the shiner’s spawning season.”

THE TEAM’S BRIDGE HYDRAULIC REPORT DEMONSTRATED THAT THE NEW PARALLEL BRIDGE WOULD NOT ADVERSELY IMPACT THE FLOOD PLAIN OR THE FLOODWAY, NOR THE APALACHEE RIVER’S FLOW CHARACTERISTICS.

“The GS&P team was able to draw on years of experience completing NEPA documents in multiple states, as well as effective coordination with natural and cultural resource agencies, to deliver an FHWAapproved NEPA document for GDOT.” SANDY LAYNE-SCLAFANI, SENIOR CIVIL ENGINEER


The new support structure was placed at a parallel angle to the creek to better convey storm flow. The substructure columns were aligned to deflect debris toward the center of the span to prevent refuse from becoming entangled in the downstream bridge support.

CONFIGURING THE NEW BRIDGE

“ ”

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Improving the hydraulic efficiency of the overall project site GS&P’s report because the positioning of the proposed was a key goal in the design of the replacement structure. structure was designed to keep the flow of water the same. The new westbound bridge was placed at a parallel angle So there were no changes to the overall streambed.” to the Apalachee River to better convey storm flow, while Jointly, the completed bridge evaluations, NEPA docuits substructure columns were aligned to deflect debris mentation, wildlife surveys and hydraulic analysis allowed in the channel toward the center of GS&P to leave the historic arch bridge the span to prevent any refuse from intact and commence construction on becoming entangled in the downstream the new bridge in 2013. ... the GS&P team successfully bridge support. “GDOT has fixed dollars to deliver “We designed a wider opening for projects, so any extra cost overruns estimated the construction the new bridge so the stream could flow the end result in a loss of funding for costs, which prevented GDOT freely beneath the road without being other programs,” notes Shelton. “For hampered,” says Braswell. “The design this effort, the GS&P team successfrom having to reallocate prevents a damming effect where the fully estimated the construction costs, monies from other projects. water would have otherwise backed which prevented GDOT from having to up, spilled over the embankment, and reallocate monies from other projects. “From the start date through to flooded adjacent property.” Additionally, the team’s Bridge Hydraulic Report, which completion, GS&P developed, updated and monitored the required approval from Walton and Oconee counties, project costs. When the engineer's final cost estimate was demonstrated that the new parallel bridge would not compared to the contractor's, it was in a very close range. adversely impact the flood plain or the floodway, nor the This allowed the Department to go to construction per Apalachee River’s flow characteristics. schedule without having to wait on additional funding.” “During the hydraulic analysis, we studied the potential effects of the proposed construction—as well as the possible impact of an old mill and weir wall located upstream—to make sure there would be no upstream or downstream flooding when the new bridge was put in place,” says Shelton. “Both Walton and Oconee counties approved


MEETING THE NEEDS OF THE FUTURE

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Opened to traffic in May 2014, the new westbound crossing of the Apalachee River consists of a 410-foot-long by 40-foot-wide bridge, with the adjoining roadway comprising a typical section of two 12-foot travel lanes in the westbound direction and a 10-foot rural shoulder. The preserved historic arch bridge was permanently closed to traffic, with the new two-lane overpass serving all vehicular circulation traveling westbound. It was an honor to “This project is unique in that it was part of preserve that past design the first GDOT bridge contract that GS&P won in while at the same time Georgia and ultimately allowed us to expand our structural services in the Atlanta office, enabling us executing a design of our to secure future GDOT bridge work,” says Shelton. own to meet the needs “It was also special because it gave us a whole new perspective on preserving a piece of history since of the future. it was a quality design performed in the past by our civil engineering peers. Every time we went into the field we stood in awe of the historic arch bridge. It was an honor to preserve that past design while at the same time executing a design of our own to meet the needs of the future.” “The GS&P design team did an excellent job delivering a quality bridge replacement design on time for the Department and successfully worked with the GDOT Historic Preservation Division to preserve the adjacent historic arch structure during construction of the new bridge,” concludes Derrick M. Brown, District 1 Program Manager for GDOT. “I look forward to working with the GS&P design team in the future, as I know they will be responsive, proactive and timely with deliverables.”

“ ”


The GS&P design team did an excellent job delivering a quality bridge replacement design on time for the Department and successfully worked with the GDOT Historic Preservation Division to preserve the adjacent historic arch structure during construction of the new bridge.

DERRICK M. BROWN, GDOT DISTRICT 1 PROGRAM MANAGER

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TE A M

PIC Kent Black, p.e. PM Scott Shelton, p.e. PP Ted A. Kniazewycz, p.e. PP Sandy Layne-Sclafani, p.e., cpesc

Jody Braswell, p.e. Michael Bywaletz, p.e., cpesc, env sp Laura Muddiman Rodney C. Palmer Tom Tran, p.e. Sarah Worachek, p.e. Gary Young


SETTING THE TONE

Innovative Cancer Institute – Center for Innovative Medicine

FOR

LOCATION

FUTURE

DESIGN IN

SOUTH MIAMI

South Miami, Florida C L IENT

Innovative Cancer Institute Dr. Beatriz E. Amendola

SERVIC ES

Architecture Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding Interior Design


L

ocated in South Miami, Innovative Cancer Institute (ICI) provides cutting-edge treatment in radiation oncology to patients from the South Florida region and across the globe. In need of a larger facility to accommodate growing demand and incorporate the latest technologies, ICI commissioned GS&P to design a new cancer treatment facility that would create a unique identity in the community. The resulting 61,500-squarefoot, four-story Center for Innovative Medicine offers patients a positive, healing environment, along with state-of-the-art cancer care. Principal-in-charge Luis Cano describes some of the key project challenges:

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The design team’s strategy was to maximize the site and incorporate the parking into the building.

“The site itself was one of our biggest hurdles,” explains Cano. “The property was selected and purchased before GS&P became involved and was way too tight a space for what the client needed. We not only had to design to the setback and height limits, but the City of South Miami required a set number of parking spaces per square foot. Given these site limitations, there was no room whatsoever on the ground level to provide the 80 parking spaces that codes required.


“THE SITE ITSELF WAS ONE OF OUR BIGGEST HURDLES... THERE WAS NO ROOM WHATSOEVER ON THE GROUND LEVEL TO PROVIDE THE 80 PARKING SPACES THAT CODES REQUIRED.” LUIS CANO, SENIOR HEALTHCARE PRINCIPAL

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“Our design solution was to incorporate an access ramp garage—it just appears as a sleek-looking metal skin. on the first floor where it will not be a prominent feature But when you’re inside, that skin almost disappears of the building, and then place parking on the second, and doesn’t impede your view. Additionally, the panels third and fourth floors. This presented provide natural ventilation, allowing us with the challenge of making the air to flow from one end of the THE PERFORATED building look like a 21st-century, highbuilding to the other. At night, you ALUMINUM SCREEN can tell those aren’t walls, and that tech radiation facility that reflects the quality of care that patients will receive, something unusual is happening SYSTEM CREATES AN OPEN as opposed to a parking garage.” on the inside because you can see To accomplish this, the design team pinpoints of light emanating from SPACE IN WHAT LOOKS selected a sleek, perforated alumithe garage.” LIKE A SOLID BUILDING, Distinguished by its smooth-texnum skin to cover the parking garage, ture white stucco finish, along with enhancing the aesthetic quality of the AND THE PANELS PROVIDE building’s facade. aluminum cladding, translucent NATURAL VENTILATION. “Using the perforated aluminum glazing and brushed-metal signage, screen system to wrap the building GS&P’s exterior design gives promdid a couple of key things,” says Cano. “Firstly, it inence to the occupied spaces and architecture of the created an open space in what looks like a solid building, while placing the garage portion of the structure building. During the day, you can’t tell it’s a parking in the background.


THE SITE WAS FAIRLY SMALL AT

21,810 square feet

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15-foot REQUIRED SETBACKS

MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE

HEIGHT OF

50 feet


THE CLIENT’S INTENT WAS TO move their existing practice to the new site, and have more usable square footage to function in while also accommodating tenant spaces that could generate revenue.

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SAVING SPACE TO ACCOMMODATE TECHNOLOGY VeriShield modules, the 2-foot walls would have been around 4 feet Another way in which the design in width, and the 4-foot walls would have measured approximately 6 team was able to maximize space to 7 feet in thickness. That would have taken up a lot more footprint was by working with Veritas Medical and meant a lot less usable area in the space considering how tight Solutions to plan for the design is based on the radiation-shielded treatsmall site. Incorporating ment vaults constructed the VeriShield blocks into THERE ARE TWO MAIN WAYS with VeriShield™ modular the design allowed the vault blocks—a system of dryto fit within a single floor OF DESIGNING A RADIATION stacked, ultra-high-density because of the density of shielding modules, and a those blocks.” CANCER TREATMENT CENTER OR space-saving alternative Housed within the A LINEAR ACCELERATOR VAULT. to solid concrete shieldfacility’s radiation-shielded ing materials. YOU EITHER USE SOLID CONCRETE treatment vaults are some of “There are two main the world’s most advanced OR A PRODUCT LIKE VERISHIELD, ways of designing a radiaradiotherapy and radiosurtion cancer treatment center gery technologies, including WHICH DRAMATICALLY REDUCES or a linear accelerator vault,” the Varian EDGE™ system says Cano. “You either use that targets tumors with WALL AND CEILING THICKNESSES solid concrete or a prodpinpoint accuracy, precision COMPARED TO CONCRETE. uct like VeriShield, which and speed while protecting dramatically reduces wall surrounding, healthy tissue. and ceiling thicknesses “Innovative Cancer compared to concrete. Institute is leading the way “Most of the walls in the facility’s as one of the first freestanding cancer treatment centers in the U.S. to offer this first-of-its-kind technology,” notes Cano. treatment vaults are 2 feet wide, and then the primary walls are Other front-line technologies include brachytherapy, conformal approximately 4 feet wide. If we had therapy, IMRT, IGRT, a brand-new 64-slice Siemens CT scanner, incorporated the same technology and a Varian Trilogy® linear accelerator that provides patients with using solid concrete instead of the a wide range of cancer treatments.


View of the Varian EDGE™ system and vault; Varian EDGE is a first-of-its-kind technology that targets tumors with pinpoint accuracy, precision and speed.

VeriShield™ is a system of dry-stacked, ultrahigh density shielding modules. It dramatically reduces wall and ceiling thicknesses when compared to concrete, which allowed the vault to fit within a single floor.


CREATING A COHESIVE DESIGN

“WE WERE ABLE TO USE SOME OF THE SAME MATERIALS ON THE INSIDE AS WE DID ON THE OUTSIDE. FOR EXAMPLE, THE SOLID METAL PANELS THAT WERE USED ON THE 92

EXTERIOR WERE ALSO USED ON A

IN NOVATIVE CANCE R I N STITU TE – C ENTE R FO R I N NOVATIVE ME D I C I N E

CURVED WALL ON THE INTERIOR.” SHAUNA CARPENTER, SENIOR INTERIOR DESIGNER

EXTERIOR TO INTERIOR In addition to complementing the growing South Miami locale through a variety of progressive exterior features, the design team sought to bring the architectural tone of the facade into the facility’s interiors. “We desired a cohesive building, with the interior following the exterior, which is high-tech and streamlined,” explains senior interior designer Shauna Carpenter. “We were able to use some of the same materials on the inside as we did on the outside. For example, the solid metal panels that were used on the exterior were also used on a curved wall on the interior. So, when you’re on the inside, it feels like you’re in the same building you saw on the outside. Everything is white, glass, clean and contemporary, as opposed to looking very institutional and plain.”


Along with a unified connection to the exterior, creating the best possible patient experience was a key driver in the interior design. Interior features such as art collections and views to lush gardens generate interest and help ease anxiety for patients. Neutral, contemporary offices and clinical areas also contribute to a calming aesthetic. “We wanted to create an environment where the patient feels at ease across the board,” says Carpenter. “That’s why we incorporated the landscaping the way we did, and laid out the interior with almost all patient care, such as waiting and sub-waiting areas, with views to daylight.” “We also designed the exam rooms so equipment like stethoscopes, blood pressure cuffs and other machines are concealed inside a panel behind a beautiful wooden headwall. So the patient never has to see that equipment, which can be very overwhelming. They only see a clutter-free space, which helps to alleviate stress,” adds Cano.

WE WANTED TO CREATE AN ENVIRONMENT WHERE THE PATIENT FEELS AT EASE ACROSS THE BOARD.


IN NOVATIVE CANCE R I N STITU TE – C ENTE R FO R I N NOVATIVE ME D I C I N E

From top to bottom: Executive office and balcony; break room

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AN INSPIRED, MODERN FACILITY

Successfully accommodating all of the client’s needs along with the requisite parking on the small site, GS&P’s eye-catching design sets the tone for future design in South Miami by enhancing the architectural character of this emerging Miami-Dade County neighborhood. Radiation oncologist and ICI founder Dr. Beatriz E. Amendola speaks to the project’s success: “The Innovative Cancer Institute is the work of a collaborative team with an unwavering focus on providing patients with a positive, healing environment and the very latest in cancer treatment. GS&P has created an inspired, modern facility that helps us embrace the most advanced, sophisticated technology. We are proud to serve the South Florida community, as well as national and international patients. Our team is dedicated to changing lives one at a time with exceptional, personalized care.” “We got lucky,” concludes Cano. “We had a client who gave us the opportunity to really make a difference. That is very unique, and we were very fortunate.”

“THE INNOVATIVE CANCER INSTITUTE

95

IS THE WORK OF A COLLABORATIVE PROVIDING PATIENTS WITH A POSITIVE, HEALING ENVIRONMENT AND THE VERY

SHOWCASE 9

TEAM WITH AN UNWAVERING FOCUS ON

LATEST IN CANCER TREATMENT.” DR. BEATRIZ E. AMENDOLA

TE A M

PIC Luis J. Cano, aia, leed ap, edac, ncarb PM Kristin S. Herman-Druck, aia, ncarb ID Shauna L. Carpenter, ncidq, rid, leed ap, iida

PC Rebekah Fried

James R. Kolb, aia, leed ap Eddie Perez Mike Summers


A

OF A

JUNCTION


Interstate 40/ State Route 66 Diverging Diamond Interchange LOCATION

Sevierville, Tennessee C L IENT

Tennessee Department of Transportation SERVIC ES

Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Roadway Design Roadway Lighting Traffic Modeling Traffic Signals Utility Coordination


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n recent years, the interchange between Interstate 40 and state Route 66 at Exit 407 in Sevier County has more than exceeded its capacity to keep traffic moving smoothly due to the increasing volume of tourists passing through the region. The interchange is the gateway to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park—the most visited national park in the country with approximately 10 million visitors a year. Needing to increase capacity and safety at the heavily traveled exchange, Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) called upon longtime trusted advisor GS&P. “The existing interchange had been performing poorly for many years, and traffic flow through Pigeon Forge, Gatlinburg and the Smoky Mountains was only getting worse,” explains senior civil engineer Jonathan Haycraft. “TDOT’s overarching goal was to address the high volumes of traffic and crash rates, as well as the projected ramp queues within the vicinity of the exchange, while keeping disruptions to tourist traffic at a minimum.”

“Another motivating factor in redesigning this interchange was the ongoing construction TDOT was undertaking to widen SR 66 and add more lanes to alleviate traffic,” adds senior transportation engineer Jason Brady. “Improving the existing interchange would ultimately complement the other roadwork and better manage the volume of motorists traveling to and from vacation.” Due to the urgent need for improvements, TDOT requested the project be completed on an extremely fasttrack schedule. “GS&P was given six months to complete the effort,” says Haycraft. “In comparison, a project of this magnitude would typically take a standard roadway design team of two to six people anywhere from 18 to 24 months to complete. To meet the accelerated timetable, we assembled a massive design team consisting of 20 staff members from three different GS&P office locations.”

“The existing interchange had been performing poorly for many years, and traffic flow through Pigeon Forge, Gatlinburg and the Smoky Mountains was only getting worse.” JONATHAN HAYCRAFT, SENIOR CIVIL ENGINEER

As the interchange is the gateway to the nation’s most-visited national park, reducing traffic congestion and improving safety at the junction was a top priority for TDOT.


The two existing bridges were repurposed and remained open during construction. This saved on costs and helped reduce the project's impact on the environment and local community.

The existing exchange at Exit 407 was a standard diamond interchange—a common type of junction where one highway crosses over another. Two separate bridges—one for each direction of travel—conveyed SR 66’s northbound and southbound lanes over I-40. The highest volume of turning traffic was movement from northbound SR 66 to westbound I-40. To reduce construction time, GS&P determined it would be highly beneficial to keep the existing bridges in place. After exploring multiple design possibilities, it quickly became evident that a Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI) was the clear solution for the location due to its increased capacity to handle traffic, cost effectiveness, reduced

construction time, and minimized disruption to tourism. “TDOT’s planning study revealed that a DDI would provide the most efficient traffic pattern for people leaving the tourist areas and heading back in the direction of Knoxville or Nashville,” explains Haycraft. “With a standard diamond interchange, you have two or three lanes in each direction and two signals with multilane left turns. By using a DDI, we were able to keep the signals timed to just stop-and-go cycles with no turn movements, which moves a lot more vehicles in a shorter amount of time.” Improved safety was also a key factor in selecting the Diverging Diamond Interchange. Brady explains: “The easiest way to describe a DDI is that when you drive it, it feels more

like two one-way streets that intersect rather than an interchange. When properly designed with the right geometrics, if you just follow the stop-and-go signals, you’re going to be pointed in the direction you’re meant to travel in. And you have the ability to make a free-flow left onto the interstate—you’re never turning across traffic, which was the case with the previous exchange. Eliminating the turn arrows not only helps efficiency, but also greatly increases safety by reducing the possibility of T-bone collisions, which is the most dangerous type of car crash.”

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THE DIVERGING DIAMOND SOLUTION

“GS&P was given six months to complete the effort... a project of this magnitude would typically take a standard roadway design team of two to six people anywhere from 18 to 24 months to complete.”


I-40

SR 66


To further increase capacity, GS&P redesigned the markings on the existing two-lane bridges to reduce the width of lanes and shoulders, and to add a third lane to each bridge. Repurposing the current bridges not only saved on costs, but also helped reduce the project’s impact on the environment and local community. “Utilizing the existing bridges reduced the amount of construction materials hauled on and off the project site as well as the resulting truck emissions,” says Haycraft. “The improved

“Eliminating the turn arrows not only helps efficiency, but also greatly increases safety by reducing the possibility of T-bone collisions.” SENIOR TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER

HOW A DDI PERFORMS DDI intersections are shaped like a steep “X” and drivers are pointed into the opposite lanes. When a motorist pulls up to this intersection, the signal is either green for southbound traffic to move, or green for northbound movement. By only having two signaling phases at each intersection, more traffic can flow through the intersection during each cycle. By eliminating left turns, dangerous T-bone crashes don’t occur, creating a much safer intersection.

interchange further reduces emissions by leaving fewer vehicles idling at stop lights, and the increased traffic flow means more visitors to the national park as well as to local businesses.” “A DDI adds a level of efficiency to traffic movement,” notes Brady. “The only thing comparable was looking at a three-level diamond interchange, but the price tag would have been much higher for a similar result and level of service.” Though GS&P’s design decisions saved money and helped expedite construction, the team didn’t cut any corners on quality. “Despite the abbreviated schedule, we took extra time even in the crunch to analyze traffic and lane flow to see how we could improve upon the concept,” says transportation engineer Cody Crews. “We could have just executed the basic job we were asked to perform, but it’s a part of our culture to go above and beyond and deliver a better product—even when our entire team is under the gun.”

SHOWCASE 9

JASON BRADY,

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When construction began, there was only one DDI in the state of Tennessee, which was also designed by GS&P. Across the country, there are less than two dozen DDIs in service. None of these are located at such a nationally significant location, nor do they cater for the same volume of traffic.

I -40/ SR 66 DIVE RG I NG D IA MO N D I NTE RC HA NG E

1 02

“... the best way to understand a DDI is simply to drive one. Once people have a chance to experience it for themselves, they realize just how well it works.”

PUBLIC OUTREACH AND INFORMATION GS&P developed a comprehensive public information program to demonstrate to local motorists and tourists alike how the new interchange would work, primarily by displaying video simulations in person at local events and on television newscasts. “Videos and images are effective in conveying how the interchange operates, but the best way to understand a DDI is simply to drive one,” says Haycraft. “Once people have a chance to experience it for themselves, they realize just how well it works. “In our industry, lack of feedback is the best kind of feedback. And we’ve gone through an entire tourist season without a single complaint about the new interchange.” “The improvements to this exchange are most notable during tourist season,” adds Brady. “Where drivers used to wait 30 minutes for 10 to 20 signal cycles, they can now make it through the interchange in just one cycle.”


ONE TEAM, ONE UNIT “TDOT is always looking for innovative and costeffective ways to improve our transportation system. The DDI design by GS&P provided an efficient solution to the congestion issues at the Exit 407 interchange.” FREDERICK MILLER, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, TDOT ROADWAY DESIGN DIVISION

Opened to traffic in June 2015, the Diverging Diamond Interchange between Interstate 40 and state Route 66 at Exit 407 provides a safer and more efficient interchange for travelers to and from Sevier County. GS&P completed the design and construction plan in just under six months. Construction for the project was completed two weeks ahead of schedule. “Because of the time constraints, we started parts of the process at the beginning of the project that we typically wouldn’t have begun until the design was 60 to 90 percent complete,” says Crews. “Our team in Knoxville was working on traffic control at the same time we were still working on what we were going to build. The biggest challenge—and ultimately the biggest victory—was making sure everyone stayed on the same page. Everybody worked together on simultaneous parts of the project as one team and one unit. We truly lived the firm’s core values of commitment and teamwork to make the project a success.” “It’s not very often a client like TDOT comes to you and says, ‘We need you to design a very complex and unique project in a third of the time it

would typically take, and develop the plans so the contractor can build it in half the normal time. And, by the way, it’s the interchange that feeds tourists to the most heavily visited national park in the U.S.,’” says Haycraft. “That request shows that our client trusts in our management skills and our capabilities to be on the leading edge of innovation. We not only delivered for our client—we beat their expectations.” “TDOT is always looking for innovative and cost-effective ways to improve our transportation system,” notes Frederick Miller, assistant director of TDOT’s Roadway Design Division. “The DDI design by GS&P provided an efficient solution to the congestion issues at the Exit 407 interchange.”

TE A M

PIC Michael A. Flatt, P.E. PM/PP Jonathan D. Haycraft, P.E., CPESC, ENV SP PP Jason Brady, P.E. PD Cody G. Crews, P.E., ENV SP

T.J. Carr Ben Coles, EIT David L. Fergus Patrick Fiveash, P.E., CPESC, ENV SP Cindy Frear Katherine Ham Tait K. Karlson, P.E.. PTOE Larry Ridlen, P.E. Buddy Sherrill, Jr., CPESC Wes Stanton Richard A. Yeager, Jr.


Rutherford County Judicial Center LOCATION

Murfreesboro, Tennessee

AU T H E N T I C A L LY MURFREESBORO

C L IENT

Rutherford County Public Building Authority SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing Engineering Structural Engineering Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding


RU TH ERFO RD C O U NT Y J U D I C IA L C E NTE R

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utherford County is among the fastest-growing regions in Middle Tennessee. The rapid rise in population compelled the county to consider options for expanding its existing 35-year-old judicial center in downtown Murfreesboro. After determining that new construction would offer the best opportunity for future flexibility, Rutherford County Public Building Authority solicited GS&P to design the new Rutherford County Judicial Center (RCJC). “The main issue with the existing judicial building is sheer volume,” explains project coordinator Adam Nicholson. “On any given weekday, you’ll see a steady stream of people lining up to get into the old courthouse. There’s only one door in and one door out, one magnetometer in security, and one elevator. So major congestion is an issue before you even enter the building.”

“The existing facility is also extremely compromised in terms of the way its design approaches safety, security and the separation of certain populations,” adds senior architect and principal Jeff Kuhnhenn. “This new judicial center will provide a far greater level of security not only for the general public, but for the people who are working within the building as well as the defendants.” To be situated just three blocks north of Murfreesboro’s historic downtown Square, the new Rutherford County Judicial Center will consist of a 215,000-square-foot, sixstory building programmed to house up to 16 courtrooms. The facility will also include an off-site, four-level “The main issue with the parking garage with 366 existing judicial building is spaces on two adjacent sheer volume. On any given sites on Maple Street, a prominent city artery.

weekday, you'll see a steady

stream of people lining up to get into the old courthouse.” ADAM NICHOLSON, PROJECT COORDINATOR


The fenestration and materiality of the building embrace themes present in significant local projects. Rhythmic patterns, vertical emphasis, traditional proportions and a clear articulation of base, middle and top are created through contrasting materials of brick and precast architectural concrete. Repetitive pillars and arched details at street-level establish a direct link to the architectural fabric present in the downtown Square.


An initial visioning session established priorities for the project that were used to inform and evaluate processes as well as guide decision-making throughout the design.

RU TH ERFO RD C O U NT Y J U D I C IA L C E NTE R

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A COLLABORATIVE DESIGN PROCESS From the outset of the planning phase, GS&P engaged the county’s Design Review Committee composed of various stakeholders, including the Clerk and Master, judges and the program manager, as well as representatives from the Chancery Court, the County Clerk’s Office, the Office of Information Technology, and Rutherford County Sheriff’s Office. “The Design Review Committee was an essential part of the overall development and design,” says Kuhnhenn. “We engaged early on with all the key stakeholders in a process for benchmarking other facilities and developing a vision for “We engaged early on with the new building. That process created a all the key stakeholders in a common language for everyone involved, process for benchmarking so as we moved into the actual design, we all understood one another.” other facilities and developing Priorities established during the a vision for the new building.” initial visioning session were then summarized in a series of guiding principles. JEFF KUHNHENN, At the top of the list was the provision SENIOR ARCHITECT, PRINCIPAL of a safe facility for both visitors and employees. Also key was a functional and efficient building design. To accommodate the facility’s necessary functions, the design team evaluated a number of options for pairing courtrooms and stacking floors. After assessing two-court, four-court and six-court pairing schemes, a four-court configuration that stacked the building six-floors high was ultimately agreed upon.


The interior vaulted ceiling extends the central form of the exterior and embraces a traditional color present in the domed ceiling of the nearby City Hall.

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“ ”

SHOWCASE 9

“Given our previous experience designing the Justice A.A. Birch Building in Nashville, which is a courthouse of similar size, we had an understanding of how the three main populations needed to move separately throughout the building,” says Nicholson. “You have the public, the defendants, and the judges and jurors. These lines of circulation must not meet until all parties reach the courtroom. Our design made sure these groups entered and moved separately through the building.” ...we had an understanding Visitors enter the building of how the three main through a single point of security from the entrance plaza. Judges populations needed access separate, restricted eleto move separately vators in the basement level. Jurors are also escorted to this throughout the building. restricted area for access to the deliberation rooms. Defendants are separated from the other populations by entering the facility one level below grade, and are directed into a secured-vehicle sally port. From there, they are escorted to a central The two-story volume and vaulted ceilings holding facility until called for their within the lobby are a continuation of the arched details of the exterior. court appearance.


AN EMPHASIS ON THE COMMUNITY Along with creating a functional and efficient facility, GS&P focused on the building’s role as a civic landmark, creating a design that balanced operative necessities with details such as public outdoor spaces that will contribute BUILDING’S ROLE AS A CIVIC to Murfreesboro’s distinctive urban fabric. LANDMARK, CREATING A “This building is extremely sensitive to its particular location in a way that’s very special to Murfreesboro,” says DESIGN THAT BALANCED Kuhnhenn. “We championed the idea that the new facility OPERATIVE NECESSITIES must embrace its surroundings and add to what is unique about downtown Murfreesboro from a civic point of view.” “We engaged the public in each step of the design PUBLIC OUTDOOR SPACES process and let them tell us how THAT WILL CONTRIBUTE TO the building needed to fit into the community,” adds Nicholson. “We asked, we listened, and then translated that feedback into a building that is DISTINCTIVE URBAN FABRIC. authentically Murfreesboro.” Creating a new civic presence, the judicial center’s highest point is an iconic cupola that pays homage to the historic pre-Civil War courthouse near “This building became a careful downtown Murfreesboro’s Civic Plaza. exercise in finding the right The fenestration and choice of exterior materials, including red brick and mixture of timeless design and precast concrete, were also inspired forward-looking design.” by themes in local architecture.

GS&P FOCUSED ON THE

WITH DETAILS SUCH AS

MURFREESBORO’S

STEVE JOHNSON, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, CORPORATE + URBAN DESIGN


“This building became a careful exercise in finding Moving from the public plaza inside to the security the right mixture of timeless design and forward-looking area, a vaulted ceiling extends the central form of the design,” says Steve Johnson, executive exterior and embraces a traditional vice president of GS&P's Corporate color found in the domed ceiling + Urban Design market. “I believe of the nearby City Hall. Clerestory our design solution does a good job We engaged the public in each step windows provide ample daylight in walking that fine line between of the design process and let them and accentuate the transition from the two, and creating a balance of security into a double-height central tell us how the building needed to architecture that will fit in and be lobby accented by vaulted ceilings fit into the community. We asked, respectful of the past.” and red-brick masonry piers that also Softening the pedestrian trancomplement the building’s exterior we listened, and then translated sition into the new building, an aesthetic. Reducing the load on public entrance pavilion embedded with that feedback into a building that is elevators, a monumental stair links the lobby to the high-volume courta terraced public plaza will serve authentically Murfreesboro. as a counterpoint to the Civic Plaza rooms and clerks’ offices on the first at the southern end of Maple Street. two floors. The landscaped area will link the “We incorporated high ceilings, entrances of the Rutherford County Drug Court and the an elevated finish palette, and a center judge’s bench to new judicial center. convey a sense of dignity in the courtrooms, which is the “We envision a wide range of events for the new only space within the building where officials, defendants plaza, including public gatherings, ceremonies, and even and the public will meet,” says senior architect Tim DeBuse. daily lunches served by food trucks,” notes architect “Although the details within the space are simplified to Emil J. Mastandrea. align with the exterior architecture, the more traditional “The streetscaping around the building offers spaces woodwork and symmetry honor the original courthouse.” Murfreesboro doesn’t currently have in its downtown core,” adds Nicholson. “Tensions in court can run high, so we’ve provided places of comfort and relief—a well-landscaped park setting for lunch or breaks. As the area grows, others will also convene in this space.”

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SHOWCASE 9


Increased glazing on the south elevation permits an abundance of natural light into the space at all times of day. Placing the public corridors along this facade facilitates a connection to the downtown area and offers a stunning vista of the surrounding landscape. Framed views of the cupola atop the historic courthouse reinforce the connection between the new judicial center and its predecessor.

THE DESIGN TEAM PLACED A

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Each sequence leading to the judicial center is defined by a layering of landscaping, building assemblies and spaces. The trellis surrounding the entrance pavilion provides shelter for visitors during peak hours. Arched details, present at various scales throughout the project, extend a tradition that has come to define the character of Murfreesboro.

PARTICULAR EMPHASIS ON INCORPORATING FISCAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTIONS THAT WILL RESULT IN LONG-TERM VALUE TO

BOTH THE CLIENT AND THE COMMUNITY.


BUILT FOR LONGEVITY

Along with benefiting the public “A big part of the sustainability component involved the engineering through the building’s safety, aesthetic of the building,” adds Nicholson. “We looked at what was going to and cultural components, the design matter 50 years from now, and operational costs were an important team placed a particular emphasis piece of the puzzle. To better understand the performance of the on incorporating fiscal and environbuilding envelope, we developed an energy model early in the mental solutions that will result in process. It helped us determine the types of budgetary decisions we long-term value to both the client could make, such as how to properly size our mechanical equipment. and the community. This assessment translated into a low operational cost and high “This is the public’s money and efficiency for the owner.” it’s also a building that’s intended In terms of long-term viability, the facility will open with 10 to have a very long active courtrooms, which will eventually expand to 16 courtrooms with a fourth-floor buildout. life span. So we had to take a lot “That’s the difference between a building that ...we recognized the need of different things might be obsolete in 20 years versus one that can to design a building that into consideration,” last another 50 years,” says Nicholson. explains Kuhnhenn. has strong, flexible and “What might be functional bones that support inexpensive in the short term could the kind of things that need actually turn out to to change over time... be costly in the long run. For instance, AV technology used in the courtrooms changes rapidly. So we recognized the need to design GS&P designed a full-scale mock-up of the a building that has strong, flexible proposed courtroom. This allowed the team to and functional bones that support receive invaluable feedback from the client the kind of things that need to and various end users, including judges and change over time.” attorneys who used the existing courthouse.

“ ”


RUTHERFORD COUNTY JUDICIAL CENTER

DOWNTOWN SQUARE

Slated for occupancy by June 2018, the new Rutherford “We are going to be extremely proud of this building,” County Judicial Center serves as a catalyst for growth and notes Rutherford County Mayor Ernest G. Burgess. “I am development within the city’s urban core, while setting a very pleased with GS&P’s professional, competent and precedent for projects of a larger scale experienced approach to the project. in the historic downtown area. Their contribution to the success of our The new courthouse is “Public safety, the administration of new judicial center is immeasurable.” justice, and the building as a symbol of positioned to not only support good government are all vital aspects the historic Square, but also of this project. I’m proud of how our team approached each of these and extend and enhance the responded with appropriate solutions,” center of economic activity in concludes Johnson. “The new courthouse is positioned to not only support downtown Murfreesboro. the historic Square, but also extend and enhance the center of economic activity in downtown Murfreesboro.”

“ ”


The RCJC serves as a bookend and counterpoint to Civic Plaza formed by the public library and City Hall at the termination of Maple Street. Its presence reinforces the central position and importance of the historic courthouse centered within the downtown Square.

TE A M

PIC Steven P. Johnson, aia, ncarb PD Jeffrey W. Kuhnhenn, aia, leed ap PM Timothy J. DeBuse, aia, ncarb, leed ga PP Emil J. Mastandrea III, aia, leed ap PP Kelly M. Cathey, aia PC Adam Nicholson ID Afton Mooney, iida, leed ap id+c

LINEBAUGH PUBLIC LIBRARY Jim Alderman, segd Brett Anderson Tisha Bandish Lauren Boehms Bill Butler

Deron McIntosh, p.e.

Chandra Clonan

E. Michele McMinn, iida, leed ap id+c, edac

Tracey Curray Jim Daniel Joyce Ferguson Randall E. Gibson, p.e. Brandon M. Harvey, associate aia, cdt

competent and experienced approach to the project. Their contribution to the success of our new judicial center is immeasurable.

ERNEST G. BURGESS, RUTHERFORD COUNTY MAYOR

Elaine McDowall Ann McGee, aia, ncarb, leed ap

Amanda Coulter

I am very pleased with GS&P’s professional,

William C. Mays

John D. Brew, p.e.

Fran Coradini

CITY HALL

Blaine Matthews,

p.e., leed ap

David V. McMullin, p.e., leed ap Louis Medcalf, fcsi, ccs Mary Mohsin Jong Park Jimmy Perrin Kristen Prevost

Brian Hubbard, aia

Mary Raccuglia, ncidq

Amanda Hunter

Tim A. Rucker, segd

Meredith Jacobs

Andrew M. Stoebner, p.e.

Douglas E. Karaszewski,

Bryan A. Tharpe, p.e.

leed ap

Grace Vorobieff

Abigail Kursave

Jordan Watson

Melissa Long, eit

Richard Wheeler

Diane Marable

Jared Younger

Don Dwore, Courthouse Architect Consultant


A

FOCAL POINT FOR THE CITY


UP Health System — Marquette LOCATION

Marquette, Michigan C L IENT

Duke LifePoint SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design Structural Engineering


Part of the hospital’s site design concept was to locate and orient the patient tower on axis with the city's iconic Lower Harbor Ore Dock, a source of pride for the community, and a vestige of the city's history as a mining town.

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ocated in Marquette, Michigan, Marquette General Hospital has served Michigan’s Upper Peninsula since 1973 from a building originally constructed in 1915. After purchasing the aging facility in 2014, Duke LifePoint Healthcare performed an occupancy evaluation and determined the best way to continue providing quality, efficient care to the community would be to build a replacement hospital. Following the evaluation, Duke LifePoint solicited GS&P to provide professional services for the new UP Health System–Marquette, a 229-bed hospital featuring a clinical services building and a three-story parking garage.

“The city of Marquette has a rich railroad and mining history,” explains principal-in-charge Greg Gore. “The site selected for the new facility sits squarely in the center of downtown Marquette and is a former railroad maintenance yard—a brownfield site immediately adjacent to an area of the city that’s already undergoing tremendous revitalization. The new hospital will extend that revitalization to the west and become a focal point for the city.” Downtown Marquette

HOSPITAL SCALED TO KEY CITY STRUCTURES


The hospital campus exterior employs a restrained material palette that reflects the natural qualities of the region.

RESPONDING TO THE COMMUNITY

CHRIS HOAL, PROJECT COORDINATOR

SHOWCASE 9

“Through conversations with the public, we discovered that the residents of Marquette wanted something more regionally inspired.”

With a population of just over 21,000, the city of Marquette is the largest city in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. The new 600,000-square-foot campus will be embedded in the town’s commercial district, which is largely comprised of historic one- and two-story brick buildings home to small restaurants and businesses. “We were charged with designing a behemoth of a facility that will serve the entire Upper Peninsula,” says project coordinator Chris Hoal. “When completed, it will be the largest building in the region by an order of magnitude. Because it would be completely out of scale with what currently exists in the community, it posed a myriad of challenges, including the question of how to sensitively integrate such a large building into the natural and historical landscape of Marquette. “Duke LifePoint desired a technologically sophisticated facility that projected the level of care they provided. Through conversations with the public, we discovered that the residents of Marquette wanted something more regionally inspired. Our exterior design solution ultimately balances both predilections through the use of white, modern precast panels in a way that’s organic and heavily influenced by the birch forests that are prevalent in the area.”

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BUILDING FORM DESIGN STRATEGIES

“We rotated the new facility to match the city grid. This aligned the patient tower to better address the prevailing winter winds, which will prevent the accumulation of snow drifts in high-traffic areas such as the main entrance and public walkways.”

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RESPONDING TO THE CLIMATE With an average snowfall of approximately 150 inches per year, Marquette is known for being one of the snowiest cities in the continental U.S. The design team not only had to account for the possibility of monumental snowdrifts but also the extreme cold and winter winds that came with the territory. “We were dealing with one of the harshest climates in the country and that was a big challenge for us,” says Hoal. “For this reason, we spent a great deal of time siting the building to maximize solar gain because the facility will lose heat throughout the year due to the climate. To offset the hospital’s heating load, we positioned it to take advantage of ample southern exposure. To obtain the highest degree of energy efficiency, we located the major programmatic elements along an east-west orientation, which also protects most of the patient rooms from the glare of the setting sun.”

Breaking and shifting the patient tower geometry creates breathtaking views of Lake Superior, downtown Marquette and the historic Lower Harbor Ore Dock.

Orienting the building in a way that wouldn’t cause hazardous snow-drifting was also critical. Project architect Brent Hughes explains: “The current hospital’s maintenance crew spends months at a time pushing snow around the site. In talking with them, we learned about the challenges they face in regard to how the snow, wind and existing facility interact. Keeping this in mind, we rotated the new facility to match the city grid. This aligned the patient tower to better address the prevailing winter winds, which will prevent the accumulation of snow drifts in high-traffic areas such as the main entrance and public walkways.” The bitterly cold climate also drove the need for two separate building entrances—a ceremonial front door and a very necessary covered parking garage entrance that will protect occupants entering the building from the elements during the long winters. “One of our challenges was, if there are two entrances to the hospital, where do you put Patient Admitting?” says Gore. “We knew that if we placed it toward one particular entrance that it was naturally going to give that entrance precedence over the other. We didn’t want to create that experience for visitors. To compromise, we located Admitting in the center of the public concourse that connects the two entrances.”


The twostory public concourse links the ceremonial front door and the parking garage entrance.

A MORE EFFICIENT DESIGN Originally a St. Luke’s Hospital, the existing hospital building had undergone multiple expansions during its century-long history. “Due to the many additions, not all of the floors connect, which makes it extremely inefficient for both staff and the public,” says project coordinator Lindsay Hamilton. “Also, key circulation zones are mixed together. In listening to the hospital’s physicians and medical staff, we identified critical vertical and horizontal adjacencies for the new hospital that would better serve their needs.” GS&P’s design arranges major clinical functions along the public concourse and separates staff and public circulation paths. The circulation pattern in the patient tower allows daylight to permeate the building from numerous locations and provides unimpeded views of

GS&P’s design arranges major clinical functions along the public concourse and separates staff and public circulation paths. The circulation pattern in the patient tower is set up for natural daylight to permeate the building from numerous locations, with unimpeded views into the surrounding landscape.

the natural landscape, creating a soothing environment for patients and their families. “Although the square footage of the new hospital is actually smaller than the existing facility, we’ve given the client a much more efficient design,” notes senior interior designer Julia Boren. “For example, nursing staff will save steps by not having to walk as far to retrieve medical supplies, and intuitive wayfinding will create a less stressful environment for visitors—especially first-time patients.”

Views to Downtown

“Although the square footage of the new hospital is actually smaller than the existing facility, we’ve given the client a much more efficient design.”

JULIA BOREN, SENIOR INTERIOR DESIGNER

Woodland Views

Views to Ore Dock


SETTING A BENCHMARK

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Slated to open in 2018, the new UP Health System – Marquette hospital will provide Michigan’s Upper Peninsula with a state-of-the art facility that responds to the city’s regional and natural characteristics. “This was our first endeavor with Duke LifePoint,” notes Gore. “It serves as a great example of how listening to our client’s goals, understanding their needs, and interpreting them into a holistic design solution elevated GS&P’s position to that of a trusted advisor.” “I’m always pleased at the end of a project when I feel like we’ve left the community in a much better place than when we first arrived,” concludes Hughes. “I believe we’ve done that for the city of Marquette and its surrounding regions. And that’s directly attributable to the team’s effort, the input we received from the client, and the strong relationship that we built with them. It’s extremely gratifying to know that by helping physicians and clinicians provide better care to their patients, you’ve set a benchmark for healthcare in a community for decades to come.”

“[The project] serves as a great example of how listening to our client’s goals, understanding their needs, and interpreting them into a holistic design solution elevated GS&P’s position to that of a trusted advisor.”

GREG GORE, PRINCIPAL-IN-CHARGE


“It’s extremely gratifying to know that by helping physicians and clinicians provide better care to their patients, you’ve set a benchmark for healthcare in a community for decades to come.”

TE A M

PIC Gregory A. Gore, aia, ncarb PM Mack McCoy, aia, leed ap MP James R. Kolb, aia, leed ap PA Brent Hughes, aia, ncarb, edac, leed ap PC Lindsay B. Hamilton, leed ap PC Christoper D. Hoal, leed ap ID Stephanie D. Irwin, leed id+c

BRENT HUGHES, PROJECT ARCHITECT

ID Julia A. Boren, iida, leed ap

Brandi Amos Samuel Ball Eric Bearden, aia Morgan Black Lauren Boehms Buddy Burks, p.e. Reid Cimala Fran Coradini Jerry L. Culp Martha T. Fox, iida, ncidq, leed ap Jason B. Fukuda, p.e., s.e. Patrick Gerhart James Z. Gore, II, aia, ncarb James D. Graham Cindy Lucente, leed ap Emll J. Mastandrea, aia, leed ap Elaine McDowall Marc A. Sauvé, lean R.J. Tazelaar, p.e. Bryan A. Tharpe, p.e. Grace Vorobieff Richard Wheeler Elisa A. Worden, iida, edac, leed ap


K.R. Harrington Electrical Building and Switchgear Replacement LOCATION

Nashville, Tennessee C L IENT

Nashville Metro Water Services SERVIC ES

Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing Engineering Structural Engineering Water and Wastewater


I K .R. HARRI NGTO N E LECTRI CAL BU IL DING A N D SWITC H G E A R RE PL AC E ME NT

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Located at the confluence of the Cumberland River and Stones River, the 35-year-old water treatment facility was completely engulfed by the floodwaters in 2010.

n May 2010, Nashville experienced a flood of epic proportions that inundated the city with nearly 14 inches of rain in just 36 hours. The event resulted in significant damage and destruction of private and public facilities, including the K.R. Harrington Water Treatment Plant— one of two 90-MGD water treatment plants that provides potable drinking water to the Nashville metropolitan “GS&P has worked at K.R. Harrington since 1988 when area and its surrounding communities. the firm was hired to design a plant expansion, so we had Located at the confluence of the an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the system’s Cumberland River and Stones River, operations from our past experience. Just prior to the the 35-year-old water treatment facil- flood, we had been selected to design the replacement ity was completely engulfed by the of the plant’s existing switchgear, which had outlived floodwaters, shutting the plant down its anticipated life cycle. Before we could get started on and exposing weaknesses in the project, the flood event the overall water treatment dramatically changed the A planned electrical project’s original purpose and water distribution system. system upgrade for the GS&P engineers worked with and scope. Metro Water Services’ (MWS) “Getting the plant back facility turned into a engineering and operational in operation and online as comprehensive floodstaff to assess the condition quickly as possible was an of the facility and helped enormous effort unto itself. mitigation effort to expedite the recovery of its During that process, we protect the plant from operations within 30 days of determined there were several future flood events. the superflood. Joe Whitson, things we had to do to make executive vice president of sure the facility would not GS&P’s Water Resources market, fail under another flood, and were tasked by Metro Water explains how a planned electrical Services with fully protecting the entire plant’s electrical system upgrade for the facility turned supply and distribution system from a 500-year flood into a comprehensive flood-mitigation event in addition to replacing the original switchgear. effort to protect the plant from future Previously, the majority of the facility was only protected flood events: to the 100-year flood elevation.”


To replace the plant’s existing switchgear and keep the facility operational required the installation of a new electrical building on the site. The new facility is a two-story building designed to stand 2 feet above the 500-year flood elevation.

CUMBERLAND RIVER

NEW ELECTRICAL BUILDING

EXISTING ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION

SHOWCASE 9

A PHASED APPROACH To replace the plant’s existing 4,160-volt switchgear and at the same time keep the facility operational required the installation of a new electrical building on the site. This presented the design team with one of the project’s biggest challenges. “Site space was limited due to several factors, including an existing electrical generator building and substation as well as raw water lines,” says Dale Mosley, senior vice president of GS&P’s Water Resources market. “The flood plain along the Stones River also presented limitations. Because we lacked the area needed for the building footprint, we had to make the structure two stories.” Designed to stand 2 feet above the 500-year flood elevation, the first floor of the new building would house four 2,500 kW diesel generators relocated from the existing electrical building and allow space for two future generators. The upgraded switchgear and variable frequency drives (VFDs) would be situated on the second floor.

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“The plant’s four existing generators had been partially submerged in the flood. A big part of the project was relocating those generators to the new electrical building,” says Mosley. “Each generator weighed several tons, so extensive coordination was required to move them to the first floor where they’d be safe above the flood level. To keep the plant operating with emergency backup, we kept two of the existing generators running while we moved the other two generators to the new building. Once the relocated generators were operational, we then transferred the remaining generators. This phased approach was absolutely critical because it allowed the plant to remain online throughout the extensive construction, and supplementing Nashville’s drinking water, which was being produced at the Omohundro Water Treatment Plant.”


SECOND FLOOR – SWITCHGEAR AND VFDS

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FIRST FLOOR – GENERATORS

“It was a remarkable achievement to have a project of this scope and size and be able to replace the plant’s entire electrical system—the cables, the switchgear, and the instrumentation and controls—without shutting it down,” adds Whitson. “We essentially replaced the facility’s brain and nervous system while it kept on working.” In addition to being flood-resistant, to meet stringent International Building Code requirements, the new electrical building was also designed to be earthquake-resilient. “The building and the equipment inside were specifically designed to withstand natural disasters such as an earthquake and still remain in service,” says Mosley. “The structural steel superstructure and metal insulated panels allow movement during a seismic event. So, if there’s a major earthquake in Middle Tennessee, the facility will remain intact and be fully operational. “From an aesthetics standpoint, GS&P selected a metal building type that complements the color of the plant’s mostly brick structures. From a distance, you can’t tell it’s a metal building on the far end of the facility. It simply blends in with the rest of the plant.”

“It was a remarkable achievement to have a project of this scope and size and be able to replace the plant’s entire electrical system—the cables, the switchgear, and the instrumentation and controls— without shutting it down. We essentially replaced the facility’s brain and nervous system while it kept on working.”

JOE WHITSON, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, WATER RESOURCES


FLEXIBLE, EFFICIENT AND RESILIENT Early in the design, GS&P and MWS established four key goals for success: reliability, energy efficiency, maintainability and operational efficiency. Mosley discusses a few of the ways these drivers were incorporated into the new facility:

Above: Load-bearing structural beams known as H-Piles support the entire water treatment plant as well as the new electrical building and the duct bank system. To reduce project costs, GS&P’s design routes the new duct bank system over the existing system where possible to eliminate the need for additional H-Piles and grade beams.

“To increase reliability, we designed redundancy—or backups—into the various electrical systems so if there’s an issue with one piece of equipment it doesn’t shut half the plant down. For example, the upgraded diesel generators transferred from the existing building can produce enough electrical power to operate the entire water treatment plant at the rated 90-MGD capacity. This provides a standby electrical power source for the plant. We increased energy efficiency by installing 4160-volt VFDs on the high service pumps to vary treatment system flow rates to match the water distribution system demands. This allows the plant to alter flows and fill the system during lower-pressure periods, which requires less energy. “The use of VFDs on the high service pumps for flow control add to operational flexibility because of their ability to function by just turning on a switch at the control station. In terms of maintainability, we looked closely at the serviceability and reparability of equipment. We spoke with maintenance personnel about what equipment they liked, what had worked well for them in the past, and what equipment hadn’t worked for them. Using that input and our own electrical system experience and knowledge of plant operations both pre- and post-flood, we helped MWS select equipment that could not only be easily maintained but also quickly restored to service in the event of a failure.”

“To increase reliability, we designed redundancy—or backups—into the various electrical systems so if there’s an issue with one piece of equipment it doesn’t shut half the plant down.” DALE MOSLEY, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, WATER RESOURCES


K .R. HARRI NGTO N E LECTRI CAL BU IL DING A N D SWITC H G E A R RE PL AC E ME NT

1 30 A metal building type was selected to complement the color of the plant's existing brick structures.


EXISTING TREATMENT PLANT

READY FOR THE FUTURE Changing course from a standard switchgear upgrade to a major flood-protection effort, GS&P’s design solution provided Metro Water Services and K.R. Harrington staff with a flood-protected, earthquake-fortified, energy-efficient facility that provides the city of Nashville and Davidson County with a reliable source of water. “The key to the way this project is designed is that in the event of a flood, when the water hits a certain level, plant personnel can turn off the entire electrical system and leave the facility. When the water level goes

down, staff can return to the plant, flip a switch, and restart the facility without worrying about a system failure because all of its processes are above water and protected,” says Mosley. “This project defines what we do for our clients,” adds Whitson. “As trusted advisors, we form a bond with our clients and function as part of their staff as they become part of our team. I’m proud of our successful delivery of a complicated project, and that Nashville and Davidson County now has a 90-MGD water treatment facility that is essentially weatherproof.”

NEW ELECTRICAL BUILDING

TE A M

PIC William J. Whitson, p.e. PM J. Dale Mosley PP Wendell Strickland, p.e. PP James R. Wilson, p.e., leed ap

Tisha Bandish Andrew Bratcher Chandra Clonan Anthony N. Coles Randy M. Curtis, p.g. Seth Dobyns, eit Nathan G. Guessetto Amanda Haider Nathan D. Hudgens, p.e. David A. Johnson, p.e. Douglas E. Karaszewski, leed ap Scott Kibby, ei Jeremy Kubac, p.e.

GS&P’s design solution provided Metro Water Services and K.R. Harrington staff with a flood-protected, earthquake-fortified, energy-efficient facility that provides the city of Nashville and Davidson County with a reliable source of water.

Diane Marable Tim A. Rucker, segd John Scannell Kristi M. Schnell, p.e. Jordan Watson


Tennessee Tower Food Court LOCATION

Nashville, Tennessee C L IENT

Tennessee Business Enterprises Doug Rhodes SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding Structural Engineering


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“We helped them see the bigger picture in that this dormant area could be of greater service not only to the Tennessee Tower but also to the surrounding buildings.” JACK WEBER, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, NASHVILLE DESIGN STUDIO


L

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ocated in downtown Nashville and owned by the State of Tennessee, the William A. Snodgrass Tower houses more than 3,000 state employees. Originally built in 1970, the 31-story high-rise, best known as the Tennessee Tower, functioned for many years with only a small 700-square-foot café that was no longer capable of keeping up with the demand of the growing population of employees and visitors to the building. Recognizing the need to provide a much larger and more convenient amenity, Tennessee Business Enterprises (TBE) solicited GS&P to expand their food services into an abandoned 30-year-old cafeteria space situated on the Tower’s third floor. “This was a great project to come on the heels of the T3 consolidation that we executed with the State of Tennessee,” says Jack Weber, senior vice president of GS&P’s Nashville Design Studio. “GS&P had already completed extensive renovations to the building, including the public areas, and knew the state wanted to do something with the almost 8,000 square feet of vacant space that was formerly a Morrison’s Cafeteria. I think we helped them see the bigger picture in that this dormant area could be of greater service not only to the Tennessee Tower but also to the surrounding buildings.” “This effort was essentially guided by Gov. Bill Haslam’s statewide ‘Healthier Tennessee’ initiative,” adds senior interior designer Julie Roquemore. “So, along with creating a larger food service area, both the client and the state sought to improve the quality of food offered to employees by providing healthier choices.”


UNEXPECTED CHALLENGES

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Soon after the initial concept for the project had been developed, GS&P discovered that incorporating the abandoned cafeteria as part of the design solution came with numerous implementation challenges. Roquemore explains: “As with any structure that’s 30 years old and hasn’t been used for decades, the demolition uncovered multiple unforeseen challenges. For example, we discovered that a main wall slated for demolition was supporting existing ductwork. And above what was to become the new seating area, there was no possibility to support the new ceiling from the deck above due to the extensive mechanical units and ductwork that couldn’t be moved.” To mitigate these unexpected challenges, GS&P’s structural team developed a system of new steel columns and beams to support the loads of existing ductwork and corridor ceilings as well as the newly designed ceilings and walls. “We designed the space and then had to rework it once we actually got into construction,” says Roquemore. “One of the best things we did was engage with the stakeholders—the client, the state and the contractor—on a weekly basis. We brought the contractor on board early in the process, which meant that we got to execute the demolition as early as possible, which was key. During this phase, everybody knew there were going to be some unknowns. So, when an issue presented itself, we worked together as a team to figure out how to navigate what was being dealt to us and problem-solved in real time. That team effort ultimately played an important role in the project’s success.”

One of the best things we did was engage with the stakeholders—the client, the state and the contractor—on a weekly basis.

JULIE ROQUEMORE, SENIOR INTERIOR DESIGNER

Demolition uncovered that a main wall slated for removal was supporting existing ductwork. GS&P's structural team developed a solution involving a system of new steel columns and beams tying back to the existing concrete columns and beams to support the loads.


TN ROOM OVERFLOW SEATING & MEETING ROOMS

TOWER FOOD COURT

PUBLIC CORRIDOR

TOWER COFFEE SHOP

137 CIRCULATION IN

CIRCULATION OUT

activities, and the food court/coffee To fulfill the client’s goal of creating a centralized, convenient, and shop. The new amenity gives people inviting food court area for employees and visitors alike, GS&P designed an open, bright and inviting space with bold signage that the opportunity to have lunch or grab complements the state’s rebranding efforts. Extra-large openings a cup of coffee outside of their own enable easy circulation, and floorplate and socialize distinct points of entry for food with other employees. This project continues the synerstations improve navigation “When the state gies between the various agencies and customer flow. The design first started moving creates a cohesive connection workers back into within the building, which was a with public areas previously the building as part huge driver in the T3 effort. renovated by GS&P, and incorof the T3 consolidation, porates convenient access from there was only a small the kitchen to the adjacent Tennessee Room (a new space used for walk-up grill and no place for people overflow seating) and to the freight elevator for easy service and to gather and chat or run into one catering. The 7,800-square-foot floor plan also features the addition another. This project continues the of a coffee shop—a new amenity for employees. synergies between the various agencies “Because the Tennessee Tower is such a tall office building accom- within the building, which was a huge modating as many as 3,000 employees, you can only do so much to driver in the T3 effort. It also facilitates connect people from floor to floor,” says Weber. “And there’s only a connection with state employees two places where people outside of their own floorplate can connect from nearby buildings who patronize with one another—a conference center, which supports scheduled the new food court.”

SHOWCASE 9

CREATING SYNERGIES


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The clean and modern midcentury look featured in GS&P's design honors the building's original architecture.

Along with creating opportunities for connection, GS&P’s design honors the iconic building’s original architecture. “We kept the clean and modern mid-century look, especially with the signage at the front of the food court, which matched the metal finishes that are used in other areas of the building,” explains interior designer Amy Klinefelter. “Although this was a small project in terms of size, it was extremely complicated. I’m proud that we were able to deal with all the challenges and still come out with the look the client wanted for this space.”


Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam officiated the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new food court in September 2015.

“ Transforming the abandoned remnants of a 30-yearold cafeteria into an inviting and convenient amenity, GS&P’s design provides state employees with an alternate place to work, socialize and relax at all times of the day. Opened in September 2015 at a ribbon-cutting ceremony officiated by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, the new food court offers healthier choices to employees, including a rotating menu of fresh grill specials as well as a salad bar and a frozen yogurt station. “As we were working on the design, we helped the state recognize the massive impact that a food service area could have in bringing people together,” says Weber. “We’ve received nothing but positive feedback from the client, the state, and employees who are really enjoying the new amenity.” “This project is a big step in the right direction in regard to the governor’s initiative to promote a healthier workplace,” adds Roquemore. “We worked hard to give the client everything they wanted and specifically designed the space to emphasize a range of healthy menu options. The expansion not only vastly improves state employees’ dining options, but also provides three times more food service than the previous facility.”

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This project is a big step in the right direction in regard to the governor’s initiative to promote a healthier workplace.

JULIE ROQUEMORE

TE A M

PIC Jack E. Weber, IIDA, MCR, LEED AP PM Kelly Knight Hodges, NCIDQ, LEED AP PP Julie Roquemore, IIDA, LEED AP PD Amy Klinefelter, IIDA, LEED AP AOR Eric Bearden, AIA

Patrick Gilbert, AIA, LEED AP James Graham Andrew Stoebner, P.E. Mike Summers Bryan A. Tharpe, P.E.


TRANSFORMING

LOUISVILLE NEIGHBORHOODS

T H R O U G H

COMMUNIT Y CONNECTION

REC O N NA IS SA NC E


Rsquared 40212 LOCATION

Louisville, Kentucky C L IENT

Louisville Forward Vacant & Public Property Administration SERVIC ES

Landscape Architecture Urban Design and Planning

ANALYSI S

ENG AG EME NT

C OL L ABO R ATE

REF IN E

C O N N ECT

DES IG N

IM PL E M E NT


VACANT PARCELS VACANT AREA

ACE HARDWARE

S. 28TH STREET

S. 29TH STREET

MAP KEY

PIRTLE STREET

VA

W. JEFFERSON STREET

STATS

W. MARKET STREET

AMERICA’S BAPTIST FINEST FILTERS TABERNACLE

CHURCH

GREEN ALLEY

CONGRESS STREET CEDAR STREET

W. JEFFERSON STREET EDDY STREET

S. 26TH STREET

S. 28TH STREET

VACANT PROPERTY

GREEN ALLEY

1 in 3

W. MUHAMMAD ALI BLVD.

EDDY STREET ELLIOT SQUARE PARK 2 BLOCKS AWAY

parcels is vacant

55%

total land area is vacant

W. MUHAMMAD ALI BLVD.

STONE ALLEY

W. MADISON STREET ELLIOT SQUARE PARK 2 BLOCKS AWAY

s with many urban centers across the country, Louisville is a city faced with the growing crisis of abandoned lots and blighted neighborhoods that often pose a risk to public health, safety and well-being. With the goal of reusing and revitalizing target areas in Louisville’s post-industrial Portland, Shawnee and Russell neighborhoods, Louisville Metro’s Vacant & Public Property Administration developed the Rsquared 40212 program. This comprehensive umbrella initiative aims to employ sustainable methods to reduce

blight and vacancy in the heart of West End Louisville. GS&P’s team of landscape architects and urban planners was solicited by the client to develop an integrated community-input process. In four key planning stages: education, engagement, empowerment and implementation, the GS&P team launched what became a yearlong effort to identify vacant lots for reuse, bring community leaders and residents together to develop creative ideas and solutions, and work with local nonprofits and partner organizations to implement a tangible plan of action.

S. 26 STREET

S. 28 STREET

W. MADISON STREET

TH

S. 29TH STREET

CEDAR STREET 28TH STREET STONE ALLEY BAPTIST CHURCH

TH

AMERICA’S FINEST FILTERS

S. 29TH STREET

28TH STREET BAPTIST CHURCH

FUTURE FOOD PORT SITE

A

VACANT PARC VACANT AREA

ACE HARDWARE

S. 27TH STREET

S. 30TH STREET

FUTURE FOOD PORT SITE

CONGRESS STREET

S. 27TH STREET

S. 30TH STREET

W. MAIN STREET

S. 30TH STREET

NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILWAY

NORFOLK SOUTHERN RAILWAY

BAPTIST TABERNACLE WESTONIA PARK 1 BLOCK AWAYCHURCH


190 PARCELS 75.3 AC

190 PARCELS 75.3 AC

EDUCATION & ENGAGEMENT

K & I BRIDGE

Abandoned lots were photographed and classified during an on-foot survey.

US

OH

IO

RI

VE

PORTLAND PORTLAND (728)

R

STUDY STUDY AREA AREA SHAWNEE PARK

SHAWNEE SHAWNEE (502)

MUHAMMAD ALI

RUSSELL RUSSELL (600)

VACANT LOTS BY NEIGHBORHOOD

CBD

CALIFORNIA

CHICKASAW PARKLAND

LIMERICK

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GS&P’s landscape architecture team began the education phase of the project with an on-foot survey of 614 vacant lots—approximately 136 acres—as well as an exhaustive analysis of corridors and gateways into the 40212 ZIP code study area. “A great deal of the education element was simply learning about the neighborhoods,” explains landscape architect Louis Johnson. “It essentially involved our landscape architecture team and the City learning about the community’s needs.” After completing the survey and analysis, the GS&P team developed a series of metrics for the vacant properties. From there, they established a baseline from which to evaluate potential reuse and redevelopment strategies. The starting point comprised five key reuse metrics that were mapped by the team and then taken to the community to develop.

RA DI

CELS A

ILE

ACANT PROPERTY

Left: The Rsquared 40212 study area is in the heart of Louisville's West End neighborhood. It includes 614 parcels.

ON EM

Y


RSQ UA RE D 40212

1 44

The focus of our first public visioning session was five broad themes—connect, grow, live, play and shop,” says Johnson. “Based on those criteria, we asked members of the community what they would like to see accomplished on the vacant lots. During that first meeting, each group was tasked with creating a collage based on hundreds of images that we provided, and each collection reflected one of the five reuse themes. At the end of the brainstorming session, there were more than 20 incredible collages that represented individual concepts for the underutilized “IT WAS TRULY INSPIRING TO SEE THE properties. That BROAD SCALE OF DIFFERENT SOLUTIONS input laid the foundation for THE COMMUNITY WAS ABLE TO GENERATE.” the vacant-lot JON HENNEY, reuse strategies.” In addition to the visioning session, the SENIOR LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT in-depth community engagement included door-to-door informational walks, a fieldtrip to vacant lots to discuss design opportunities on-site, and two large-scale chalkboards installed IDEATION PROCESS on vacant properties designed to collect aroundthe-clock input from the community while the team prepared to develop the concepts for vacant-lot reuse. connect “I was expecting a more limited set of responses like ‘Clean it up,’ or ‘Remove that eyesore,’” says senior landscape architect Jon Henney. “So I was overwhelmed at the wealth of ideas that came pouring out. There was an grow amazing number of creative solutions for how we could utilize these properties. It was truly inspiring to see the broad scale of different solutions the community was able to generate.”

renewal

learning

live

health + wellness

play

community

shop

art


At the public visioning sessions, members of the community were asked to create a collage as part of the public input process for vacantlot reuse strategies.

In addition to visioning sessions, two chalkboards were installed on vacant lots to collect input 24 hours a day.

wi-fi park bike hospital community commons exercise park game garden sport space obstacle course open-air market pop-up market food port library pocket park plaza pollinator park tool share produce park re-lot

EMPOWERMENT & IMPLEMENTATION

Throughout the empowerment process, the GS&P team worked in tandem with the City to engender community involvement in the implementation of ideas that were born out of the planning process. A number of citizen-based groups submitted proposals to the City for executing one or more of the reuse concepts. This community participation led to a “How To” workshop for these groups that outlined what it takes to be successful when it comes to the often complex art of implementation. “Possessing good leadership qualities, understanding budgets and construction methods, using a volunteer labor workforce versus experts to help execute implementation, and taking on liability insurance were all key elements covered in the workshop,” notes Henney. “Another benefit of the ‘How-To’ session was that it allowed us to take each group through a quick design development exercise to further vet projects and their scope so we could provide sufficient information to the City when it came to committing the vacant lot, as well as funding for implementation.” Following the workshop, the City and GS&P team continued to work with a handful of groups, vetting concepts and strategies for their feasibility given the budget and time lines associated with grant dollars. West Louisville-based nonprofit Louisville Grows was ultimately selected to implement a project across three vacant lots. The concept, Produce Park, was a direct result of collaborative sessions between the GS&P team and students from the University of Kentucky, who had been involved in developing concepts for earlier vacant properties. Johnson explains: “We worked closely with the University of Kentucky and let the students run with the design. Part of that was because they had the

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Below: This flow chart illustrates the ideation process from the original five reuse themes, to the hundreds of communityprovided ideas. It also demonstrates how public input directly influenced and formed eventual concepts (far right).


Produce Park

University of Kentucky students collaborated with GS&P by submitting design ideas that ultimately led to the final concept of Produce Park.

RSQ UA RE D 40212

1 46

Re-Use

time, and part of it was because we are really passionate about landscape architecture and the education of landscape architects. The students sent us sketches and ideas, and we’d give them feedback and guidance. The final concept was developed by the students and their professor. It includes two main components—an edible forest garden, and a gathering place that can house community-based events, markets, exhibits and more.” Before breaking ground in early 2016, Rsquared launched Produce Park’s footprint by installing temporary cedar posts to indicate where the edible forest garden would be planted. Additionally, a billboard was erected to announce the project and depict a visual of its ultimate outcome. And while Louisville Grows was engaged to implement the design concept and maintain the park, members of the community were highly encouraged to stay involved.

“WE WORKED CLOSELY WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY AND LET THE STUDENTS RUN WITH THE DESIGN.” LOUIS JOHNSON, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT “Louisville Grows runs the operations,” explains Johnson, “but community volunteers were involved when they planted all the trees on the site. They really want to get people in the community tied to the project, so they’re going to be running educational workshops on-site.”

A temporary installation represented the future edible forest garden, including a huge banner that depicts the Produce Park concept.

Learning

Health + Wellness

Community

Art

This spa food cyc food. Th from gar cooking/ access t


PLANNING WITH ACTION

“This is one of those projects where you get excited,” says Henney. “The outcome exceeded whatever expectations the client had in terms of what the end product might look like. I think in many ways we’ve helped them get even more excited about what the future holds, and how these types of projects can really effect change within the communities. That contributes enormously to further advancing their mission as an organization.” With Produce Park scheduled to open in the summer of 2016, the GS&P team believes the excitement within the community will RSQUARED 40212 help create future REPRESENTS A MAJOR “ambassadors,” not only for this project, PARADIGM SHIFT but for future efforts. “A lot of people in FROM THE SILOS OF this neighborhood PLANNING AND DESIGN, are going to tell their fellow neighbors that AND EPITOMIZES THE this is something that can really make a difSYNCHRONIZATION OF ference,” says Henney. PLANNING WITH ACTION. “It’s not just lip service. There are real opportunities to have impactful change on these areas where sites are being implemented.” Johnson agrees: “We went from creating an entire planning document, running a detailed public design input process, and implementing a project in under a year. That success aligns with the generosity of the people working with us. For the community to be able to see something they had direct input into come to fruition and be such a high-quality product—that is truly invaluable.”

Recipient of the 2016 Honor Award in Planning and Analysis from the Kentucky chapter of ASLA, as well as a special merit award for “Outstanding Project/Program/ Tool” from the Kentucky Chapter of the American Planning Association (APA-KY), Rsquared 40212 represents a major paradigm shift from the silos of planning and design, and epitomizes the synchronization of planning with action.

PIC Jonathan D. Henney, pla, aicp PM Louis R. Johnson, asla, pla

Jared Kaelin, asla, mla The ribbon-cutting for Produce Park was celebrated on July 15, 2016.

David Amin Omidy, asla, pla

SHOWCASE 9

TE A M

147


A MEMBER-FOCUSED D E S I G N


Kaiser Permanente Southwood Comprehensive Medical Center LOCATION

Jonesboro, Georgia C L IENT

Kaiser Permanente SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design Civil Engineering Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing Engineering Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding Landscape Architecture


H

K AISE R PERMANE NTE SOU THWO O D C O MPRE H E NSIVE ME D I CA L C E NTE R

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eadquartered in Oakland, California, Kaiser Permanente is one of the nation’s largest not-for-profit health plans, serving more than 10.6 million members across the United States. As part of a strategic growth initiative for the Atlanta market, Kaiser Permanente sought to expand and renovate its Southwood Comprehensive Medical Center facility in Jonesboro, Georgia, to improve its medical efficiency, technology, and ability to meet the needs of a growing community. In 2011, the healthcare leader selected GS&P to provide comprehensive building design, site layout and phasing plans for the project. The three-phase expansion and renovation of the outpatient medical center included a 5,500-square-foot addition to the existing 40-year-old structure (Building 1), a new 65,000-square-foot multispecialty building (Building 2), and a 58,000-square-foot renovation to revitalize and transform the original areas of Building 1.

“We were tasked with developing a design that was guided by Kaiser Foundation Health Plan’s design guidelines, which are nationally instituted,” says architect Adam Smith. “Although we’d previously been involved in some design competition work with Kaiser Permanente that put us on their radar screen, this was our first official project with the organization. We went through goal-setting and visioning exercises at the beginning of the effort to gain a better understanding of what they wanted to achieve with this project and how we could incorporate our own design solution with their established standards. A big part of setting those goals was simply listening to the client and talking through their needs.” As a result of those early visioning sessions, the team identified three major project goals: promote efficiency, provide a “Total Health Environment,” and respond to the organization’s responsibility to society.


PHASE I PHASE II PHASE III

Provide for an immediate need of Imaging technology

5,500-square-foot addition (BUILDING 1) Expand a variety of medical clinics

65,000-square-foot addition (BUILDING 2) Revitalize and transform the existing facility

58,000-square-foot renovation (BUILDING 1)

ADAM SMITH, ARCHITECT

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“We went through goal-setting and visioning exercises at the beginning of the effort to gain a better understanding of what [Kaiser Permanente] wanted to achieve with this project and how we could incorporate our own design solution with their established standards. A big part of setting those goals was simply listening to the client and talking through their needs.�


Existing nurse work areas in hallways

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PROMOTING EFFICIENCY

New nurse station. Orange accents highlight all staff work locations so that visitors intuitively know where assistance can be reached.

Intuitive wayfinding, a seamless continuity between the new and Acknowledging that the needs of existing facilities, and flexible clinic modules came together to the healthcare market can rapidly produce a more efficient design for the client. change, clinics were designed with “Medical centers can be extremely difficult to navigate,” notes standardized exam room modules, interior designer Ashley Wood. “To create a more patient-friendly giving staff the flexibility to expand or experience, we incorporated bold colors and clear and concise focal reduce a clinic’s exam room quantities points that enhance wayfinding. For example, we used orange accents based on need. to highlight all staff work locations so that visitors will intuitively “The incorporation of flexible know where assistance can be found in any department. clinic modules will allow the building The consistent use of finishes throughout the facility “To create a more also provides clear direction.” to adapt to changing patient-friendly “Graphics and signage were another key considclinical needs without having to incur major eration in the design,” adds architect Clint Harris. experience, we “Wayfinding cues, such as the use of supergraphics in renovations,” explains incorporated public areas, ultimately led to an additional level of Smith. “Standardizing distinction between public and staff zones.” the exam rooms means bold colors and To support operational efficiency, the layout of the that whether you’re in clear and concise medical center was developed to create a seamless oncology, urology, pedifocal points connection between the new and existing buildings atrics or primary care, while also providing a secondary entrance. Direct all of the rooms are set that enhance public and staff connections were made between up exactly the same wayfinding.” the two buildings, further promoting efficiency as so staff can flex back well as continuity. and forth between the “To connect the new building to the original medical various specialties. The center, we designed a two-story glass lobby that was hospital’s existing clinic inspired by Kaiser Permanente’s ‘Thrive’ campaign, modules simply didn’t allow that flexibility.” which focuses on the total health and wellness of its staff and members,” says Harris. “The new connecting lobby ASHLEY WOOD, promotes physical movement and features a monumental staircase for easy access from one clinic floor to the next.” INTERIOR DESIGNER


BUILDING 1 (1970)

BUILDING 2

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Waiting area for clinics on second floor of Building 2

Existing chemotherapy infusion

Renovated chemotherapy infusion


PROVIDING A TOTAL HEALTH ENVIRONMENT

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Incorporating Kaiser Permanente’s signature brand elements throughout the facility was key to creating a Total Health Environment—a member-focused initiative for the organization. Senior architect Brent Hughes explains: “Kaiser Permanente is unique in being a nonprofit integrated health plan that provides healthcare to its patients—or members, as Kaiser Permanente refers to them. They treat patients more like consumers who have a choice in their healthcare. Kaiser Permanente’s mission is to take care of the customer and make sure they have nothing but a positive experience in their encounters. The organization also wants people to have a consistent experience at every location—whether it’s a clinic in Georgia or a hospital in California. Kaiser Permanente’s philosophy is that great brands evoke emotional experiences, and they wanted their customers to experience the ‘Total Health’ promise that’s featured in their advertising campaigns. This idea extended to the rebranding effort for the hospital’s exterior as well as the design of the new entry for the facility.” To highlight the Kaiser Permanente brand, the design team oriented the entrance for Building 2 toward the site’s primary traffic artery. The increased visibility allows its sleek metal-panel facade featuring the organization’s distinctive logo to act as a billboard and key piece of wayfinding. The new entrance combines several clinic registrations, significantly reducing congestion at the medical center’s main entrance. Design features throughout the new and renovated interiors also support Kaiser Permanente’s Total Health Environment by inspiring visitors to lead a more active lifestyle. “As you enter Building 2, there’s signage that points out areas of active-occupant design,” notes Smith. “For example, visitors are encouraged to take the stairs instead of using the elevator. Kaiser Permanente is devoted to keeping patients healthy, and our design solutions support their various initiatives for preventive care.”

“...they wanted their customers to experience the ‘Total Health’ promise that’s featured in their advertising campaigns.” BRENT HUGHES, SENIOR ARCHITECT


Existing lobby

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New lobby, Building 2


Energy-efficient rooftop mechanical system with energy recovery

100 percent of roof drainage is captured in cisterns for site irrigation

Energy-efficient LED light fixtures

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The facility maintains performance by incorporating a well-designed thermal envelope, energy-recovery units, occupancy sensors, and full energy monitoring reported to Kaiser Permanente's regional headquarters.

Stormwater runoff from the buildings' rooftops is collected in a 65,000-gallon underground water cistern. This provides 100 percent of the site's irrigation needs. More than 50 percent of wood-based materials and products used in construction are certified in accordance with the Forest Stewardship Council's principles on forest management.

To maximize efficiency in all aspects of the project, the multidisciplinary effort was coordinated throughout design and construction via the use of Building Information Modeling (BIM). The end result is a functional and flexible model that Kaiser Permanente can use facility-wide.

Materials that contain lower levels of VOCs were selected to reduce the quantity of air contaminants.

Thirty percent of all building materials contain recycled content, which reduced the demand for virgin materials. Twenty-five percent of the materials used were sourced from within 500 miles of Jonesboro.

Alternative transportation strategies include bicycle racks and showers, and preferred parking spaces for lowemission vehicles.


RESPONSIBILITY TO THE ENVIRONMENT AND COMMUNITY

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Known for their environmental stewardship, both GS&P Sustainable design features and Kaiser Permanente agreed that creating a sustainable such as dual-flush toilets, waterless and energy-responsible facility would increase the medical urinals, and low-flow faucets and center’s long-term viability and make it a better steward of showerheads were incorporated the surrounding community and its vital resources, such into the interiors, reducing water as water and energy. consumption by 20 percent. “Sustainability and maximizing Below ground, a 65,000 -gallon ® “ENERGY STAR energy efficiency were key guiding water cistern collects rainwater principles for the project from sets a target of 100 runoff from the buildings’ roofthe very beginning,” says engitops and provides 100 percent EUIs—or energy neering project manager John of the site’s irrigation needs. use intensity—for a Diminishing the demand for virgin Horst. “We conducted a life-cycle cost analysis that evaluated not facility of this type materials, 30 percent of all building only the initial cost of purchasmaterials contain recycled content. and size. Since ing and installing the building’s Twenty-five percent of materials mechanical systems but also the renovation and used were sourced from within the operating cost over the 500 miles of Jonesboro. expansion effort, lifetime of the facility. Working Also contributing to the facility’s closely with Kaiser Permanente, Southwood now has LEED Silver status are features that we ultimately selected an extremely promote the overall health of an EUI of 78, 22 occupants, such as low -VOC efficient mechanical system that materials to improve indoor helped us meet our goal of achiev- percent lower than air quality, recycled content in ing LEED Silver certification.” our benchmark.” indoor finishes, and providing Other energy-reduction measures include a well-designed for alternative transportation means. thermal envelope, energy-recovery units, occupancy sensors, and full energy monitoring reported to Kaiser Permanente’s regional headquarters. JOHN HORST, “In terms of overall perfor® ENGINEERING mance, ENERGY STAR sets a target of 100 EUIs—or energy PROJECT MANAGER use intensity—for a facility of this type and size. Since the renovation and expansion effort, Southwood now has an EUI of 78, 22 percent lower than our benchmark,” adds Horst. “I truly believe the active dialogue and coordination between GS&P and Kaiser Permanente played a pivotal role in this accomplishment.”


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AN ELEGANT DESIGN SOLUTION Providing additional medical services and patient capacity by nearly doubling its size, the revamped Southwood Comprehensive Medical Center meets the needs and goals outlined in Kaiser Permanente’s strategic market expansion plan. Through careful coordination with the owner, the team successfully implemented the desired member-focused design and completed the expansion and renovation effort several million dollars under budget. “As a full-service project, Southwood is a great example of what makes GS&P successful: a multidisciplinary effort to understand and realize the client’s goals,” says Hughes. “Working as a unified team, we provided an elegant solution that meets Kaiser Permanente’s high standards for design and quality. Due to the success of the Southwood project, GS&P is now a member of Kaiser Permanente's Preferred Provider program, which has selected us to provide professional services for numerous projects going forward.” “We have worked with GS&P on numerous projects over the last five years,” says Stephen Cox, Manager of Facilities Design and Construction at Kaiser Permanente. “Their collaborative spirit and design leadership have exceeded Kaiser Permanente’s expectations and helped transform our vision into reality. By focusing on our goals and the membership experience, GS&P has consistently delivered projects that are safe, efficient, sustainable and an integral part of the communities we work in.”


TE A M

PIC Steven P. Johnson, aia, ncarb PD Brent Hughes, aia, ncarb, edac, leed ap PM John R. Horst, p.e., leed ap, cpd PP Adam Smith, aia, ncarb, leed ap PC Clint H. Harris, aia ID Ashley S. Wood, rid, ncidq, iida

Tisha Bandish Bill Butler Brennon Clayton Chandra Clonan Joyce Ferguson James R. Harding, segd Justin Hethcote, p.e., leed ap bd+c, cxa Christopher D. Hoal

“By focusing on our goals and the membership experience, GS&P has consistently delivered projects that are safe, efficient, sustainable and an integral part of the communities we work in.”

Michael D. Hunkler, p.e., leed ap, env sp Deanna Kamal Melissa Long, eit Mack McCoy, aia, ncarb, leed ap E. Michele McMinn, iida, leed ap id+c, edac David V. McMullin, p.e., leed ap Jeffery E. Morris, aia, leed ap, lean, edac, ncarb Terence S. Mulvaney, rla, clarb Parhem Penn O'Briant Tim A. Rucker, segd Trey Rudolph, rla Jane S. Skelton, ncidq, iida, edac, leed ap William Curtis Smith, p.e., leed ap bd+c

STEPHEN COX,

Kristen Vaughn, leed ap

MANAGER OF

Bogue M. Waller, p.e.

FACILITIES DESIGN

Jack E. Weber, iida, mcr, leed ap

AND CONSTRUCTION,

Johnathan C. Woodside, p.e., leed ap o+m, c.e.m., gbe

KAISER PERMANENTE


Port of Portland Integrated Stormwater Master Plan LOCATION

Portland, Oregon C L IENT

Port of Portland SERVIC ES

Stormwater Master Planning Stormwater Asset Management Stormwater Design Standards Development Hydraulic Modeling Water Quality Modeling


To keep this multifaceted project on track and efficient, GS&P's team used a matrix structure with a common set of tasks applied to each of the nine Port of Portland facilities within the city limits.

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F

ounded in 1891, the Port of Portland is the port district responsible for the management of Portland International Airport (PDX) as well as marine activities in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. GS&P has served as a trusted advisor to the organization for more than a decade and has worked on multiple projects for the client, including the implementation of an enhanced deicer management system at PDX. From 2012 to 2015, GS&P led the creation of the Port’s 20-year master plan for management of stormwater, which was driven by regulatory, operational and future development considerations. “The Port of Portland has nine diverse facilities—PDX, four marine terminals and four industrial facilities,” explains senior environmental engineer and principal-in-charge Tim Arendt. “This project grew out of the client’s need to address some

existing ponding issues at PDX, as well as their desire to create a uniform means of implementing stormwater management features in the future. “The Port’s overarching goal for the project was to integrate seemingly disparate elements of stormwater management into each of the facilities, which presented a huge coordination and technical challenge. GS&P was selected by the client because we have a history of successfully executing extremely complex projects for them that were in a similar technical area. They also liked the fact that we brought a strategic, long-term vision to the table.”

“The Port’s overarching goal for the project was to integrate seemingly disparate elements of stormwater management into each of the facilities, which presented a huge coordination and technical challenge.” TIM ARENDT, PRINCIPAL-IN-CHARGE


DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED MASTER PLAN “Gathering data was one of our very first tasks,” says Dietrich. “This involved digging deep into the Port’s information database. We explored numerous areas, including their existing regulatory requirements and future compliance issues. We also reviewed a large amount of GIS data as well as past construction plans. This supporting work ultimately resulted in five main work products that came together to form the Integrated Stormwater Master Plan.” Establishing the foundation for the Port’s future efforts, the five principal work products comprised: stormwater master plans; a stormwater design standards manual; stormwater asset management plans; stormwater models; and a regulatory compliance strategy and plans. “It’s easy to develop plans that just sit on a shelf and never get used,” says Arendt. “Our goal was to deliver useful work products to the client that could be implemented in their everyday operations at the different facilities. The products we developed address the Port’s regulatory needs, but they also allow the client to fully integrate stormwater management into their short- and long-term planning and operations as opposed to taking a project-by-project approach.”

GOAL S

1

DEFINE A PATHWAY TO MEET MULTIPLE REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS

2

CREATE A STANDARD PROCESS FOR IMPLEMENTING STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES

3

DEVELOP STORMWATER MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS TAILORED TO UNIQUE FACILITY FEATURES

163

SHOWCASE 9

One of the most ambitious stormwater master planning efforts ever attempted by an owner of airport and marine port facilities, the comprehensive project would cover more than 6,000 acres of Port of Portland property. It required extensive coordination between GS&P and the Port’s operations, maintenance, safety, environmental, development, engineering, finance, legal, and asset management departments to define their stormwater management issues and needs. The Port established individual project goals at the outset, which GS&P helped refine by shaping various stormwater management drivers into a focused plan for implementation that supported the client’s current operations as well as future development. “Having a strong relationship and open lines of communication with the client was key to the project’s success,” explains environmental engineer Tom Dietrich. “It not only helped us acquire critical information but also allowed us to vet the various processes and outputs so they were actually relevant and useful.” “Given the project’s scope and complexity, it was also critical to have the right team in place,” adds Arendt. “This was a massive undertaking that involved multiple needs and tasks. As lead, we recognized the value of utilizing the most qualified subconsultants on this type of project. So we brought a number of strategic partners on board, including Geosyntec Consultants and HDR, to help cover all of the major pieces.” To keep the multifaceted project on track, GS&P’s team utilized a matrix structure with a common set of tasks applied to each of the nine Port facilities. These included a thorough review of stormwater infrastructure data, stormwater characteristics and regulatory standards, the development of stormwater flow and quality models, and the preparation of asset management plans, stormwater design standards and stormwater master plans.


PRI N CI PAL WO RK PRO D U C T S

1 | STORMWATER MASTER PLANS

2 | STORMWATER DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL

3 | STORMWATER ASSET MANAGEMENT PLANS

4 | STORMWATER MODELS 5 | REGULATORY COMPLIANCE STRATEGY AND PLANS


“Having a strong relationship and open lines of communication with the client was key to the project’s success.” TOM DIETRICH, ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEER

COLLABORATIVE ACTION

not only needed between the GS&P team and the client but also among and between the various Port departments, facilities, tenants and outside entities, including multiple government agencies and local environmental interest groups.

165

SHOWCASE 9

Extensive collaboration was

Collaboration was a vital element in the project’s execution and in the Port’s improved process for managing stormwater in the future. Arendt explains: “Extensive collaboration was not only needed between the GS&P team and the client but also among and between the various Port departments, facilities, tenants and outside entities, including multiple government agencies and local environmental interest groups.” Monthly multidepartment meetings held throughout the three-year period supported this cooperative effort. “Those recurring meetings were critical during the execution phase,” says Arendt. “We came together with the various stakeholders to discuss the stormwater management needs of each department, decided on criteria for defining the extent to which those needs would be solved, and evaluated potential solutions. We also established procedures in the Stormwater Design Standards Manual to facilitate interaction between those selecting and designing stormwater management measures and Port of Portland staff responsible for overall stormwater management.” Collaborative actions for ongoing stormwater management included regular coordination between the Port of Portland, the City of Portland and the Multnomah Country Drainage District, which share certain stormwater management responsibilities. GS&P also worked with the client on a regular basis to support decision-making on stormwater regulations, stormwater model use, and implementation of stormwater management measures. “One of the things that raised the bar on this project was how closely we worked with the client," says Arendt. "We made regular visits to their offices for a week at a time and spent that full week meeting with the various departments to review the project’s direction and discuss their needs. Operating airport and marine terminals is an extremely complex enterprise. Having that open forum not only gave us a great perspective but also provided an opportunity for the Port’s different facilities to understand each other’s needs.”


JUST THE FACTS Sustainability and green infrastructure were also taken into consideration as part of the master planning effort, with GS&P evaluating a wide range of water quality and quantity best management practices (BMPs) with green components for possible use in future stormwater development. “We created BMP fact sheets that identified if a BMP included elements of green infrastructure, low-impact development or Within the next 20 general sustainability,” explains Arendt. years, when they need to “We coordinated the work with the Port’s general sustainability plan to make sure address a specific issue, sustainable elements of stormwater management were consistent between both. I the client can simply pull believe the project as a whole has given the out this three- or fourclient a broader sense of what they need to page document and see do from a compliance standpoint regarding environmental regulations.” a concise description To promote the efficient implementation of the issue and its of stormwater management measures root cause, along with without having to sift through detailed technical information, GS&P also developed a description of the cross-referenced fact sheets for more than solution, risk mitigation 30 stormwater management needs and solutions to be used during future project strategies, schedule planning and design. recommendations and “Another key success factor was taking cost estimates. an extremely complicated analysis and presenting it to the client in a way that was accessible and implementable,” says Arendt. “We took what we referred to as a ‘rip and run’ approach to the master plan. We gave the Port fact sheets that identified and described stormwater STORMWATER MANAGEMENT issues they were experiencing and presented corresponding NEED FACT SHEETS short-term and long-term solutions to those issues. Within the next 20 years, when they need to address a specific ∘ Text and graphical characterization of the need issue, the client can simply pull out this three- or four-page ∘ Discussion of root cause document and see a concise description of the issue and ∘ Listing of regulatory drivers its root cause, along with a description of the solution, ∘ Consequences of not addressing the need risk mitigation strategies, schedule recommendations and cost estimates.”

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STORMWATER MANAGEMENT SOLUTION FACT SHEETS ∘ Text and graphical description of the solution ∘ Implementation considerations ∘ Risk mitigation strategies ∘ Schedule recommendations ∘ Cost estimates


I believe this project has ‘moved the dial’ at the Port. It has raised awareness levels and dialogue about storm system issues within the organization, and will enable us to begin asset management planning for the storm system. It has also been very influential within the Port in demonstrating the importance, benefits and value of planning for utility systems.

SUSAN AHA, WATER QUALITY MANAGER,

167

PORT OF PORTLAND SHOWCASE 9

Setting the standard for a variety of projects over the next 20 years, GS&P’s Integrated Stormwater Master Plan provided the Port of Portland with effective, targeted plans for long-term stormwater management that are now an integral part of the their planning, operational, maintenance and project implementation processes. The facility-wide plan’s principal work products will reduce the client’s future safety and operational risks, provide specific information for the long-term capital planning process, and provide confidence that innumerable applicable regulations will be met in the foreseeable future. “When most entities address stormwater management issues, the issues are often assessed one at time, in a limited area, and sometimes only after a problem has arisen. This often results in incomplete work, significant assumptions, unintended consequences and additional costs,” notes Arendt. “With this effort, GS&P and the Port of Portland formed a true partnership to create an integrated approach to stormwater management that standardizes their protocols and provides flexibility to meet the current and future needs of the nine different facilities.” “I believe this project has ‘moved the dial’ at the Port,” says Susan Aha, Water Quality Manager at the Port of Portland. “It has raised awareness levels and dialogue about storm system issues within the organization, and will enable us to begin asset management planning for the storm system. It has also been very influential within the Port in demonstrating the importance, benefits and value of planning for utility systems.”

TE A M

PIC / PD Timothy P. Arendt, p.e. PM Thomas L. Dietrich, p.e., leed ap bd+c PP Melanie C. Knecht, p.e., env sp

Mark R. Ervin, p.e. Liz A. Miller, ei


A NEW MISSION CONTROL


Montgomery Regional Traffic Management Center LOCATION

Montgomery, Alabama C L IENT

Alabama Department of Transportation SERVIC ES

TMC Staffing and Operations ITS System Integration Traffic Incident Management Advanced Traveler Information Systems Development Video Distribution Management System Development


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he Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT) has deployed Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) throughout the state for a number of years, with systems operational in Mobile, Montgomery and Birmingham, and others being planned for the Tuscaloosa and Huntsville areas. Although its central office in Montgomery had a growing network of traffic surveillance, vehicle detection and traveler information dissemination equipment, it lacked a control and monitoring facility. Moreover, it didn’t possess the operations staff specifically dedicated to utilizing the system to improve safety and mobility. In 2014, ALDOT made the decision to use consultant staff to operate its Regional Traffic Management Centers (RTMCs), beginning with the new RTMC being implemented in Montgomery. Having worked with the client on a number of projects, including the development of standard operating procedures for its statewide RTMCs, GS&P was selected by ALDOT to provide staffing operations for its new Montgomery RTMC. “The primary functions of a traffic management center [TMC] are managing traffic on a routine basis as well as during emergencies and special events,” explains senior transportation engineer Carla Holmes. “Additional responsibilities include disseminating information to travelers

and coordinating with ALDOT and other transportation and public safety agencies. We were charged with hiring operations staff who would be responsible for gathering, processing and sharing all relevant data and information from a number of resources for the RTMC, so hiring the right people for those types of duties was critical.”

“We were charged with hiring operations staff who would be responsible for gathering, processing and sharing all relevant data and information from a number of resources for the RTMC, so hiring the right people for those types of duties was critical.” CARLA HOLMES, SENIOR TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER


ASSEMBLING THE TEAM GS&P worked closely with ALDOT to find the proper utilized for the new RTMC wasn’t staffing for the new RTMC. Holmes comments on the completely outfitted, so our team had selection process: to train while equipment was being “To help get the RTMC up and running, we hired a installed and the software was still gentleman who had a background in law enforcement. being implemented.” Having led the Traffic Division of the Montgomery Police Despite the challenges, on Monday, Department, he had been coordinating with ALDOT for October 20, 2014, just three business years on traffic accidents, lane closures and special events. days after GS&P was given notice to From an operations perspective that was key. Someone with proceed, the Montgomery RTMC that type of experience understands traffic patterns in the became operational. In addition area and is used to coordinating to providing focused traffic with first responders. He was monitoring, incident man“When staffing a new also able to train those who agement, and information TMC, you typically were new to the field.” sharing and dissemination provide three months In hiring operators withservices, GS&P's new operout previous TMC experience, ations staff provided other of training and then GS&P sought people who not tangible benefits to ALDOT. have new personnel only knew the area but also had “Hardware and software a good sense of Montgomery’s sit with an experienced were installed and impletransportation infrastructure. mented much faster because operator before they’re our staff was there putting “We were looking for people who were familiar with the local it through the paces,” says allowed to take the interstates and other major Holmes. “They were able wheel... Through an arterials, as well as some of to address issues with the expedited on-the-job the accident hot spots,” says equipment and operating Holmes. “We also wanted staff systems as they were using training process, we who could communicate well them, and were able to work had our staff operating with the software developer with emergency responders and grasp the concept of clearing to iron out the bugs. We were within three days.” incidents safely and quickly.” extremely fortunate to have An industry veteran and former state traffic operations a team of people who truly cared engineer for Georgia Department of Transportation about what they were doing and (GDOT), Holmes brought her own skill sets and know- understood the importance of the how to the team. new RTMC as a model for other “As project manager, Carla not only shared her expertise, ALDOT traffic management centers she also brought credibility to the project,” notes Ranzy throughout the state.” Whiticker, a senior vice president of Transportation at GS&P. “She drew from her past experience working with GDOT to help train staff in software use and operating procedures, which played a pivotal role in the project’s success.” “I temporarily relocated to Montgomery until we were fully manned and operational,” says Holmes. “It’s important to note that when staffing a new TMC, you typically provide three months of training and then have new personnel sit with an experienced operator before they’re allowed to take the wheel, so to speak. Through an expedited on-the-job training process, we had our staff operating within three days. Not only that, the retrofitted space being

“As project manager, Carla not only shared her expertise, she also brought credibility to the project. [Her past experience] played a pivotal role in the project's success.” RANZY WHITICKER, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, TRANSPORTATION


ON-THE-JOB TRAINING

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During the three-day onboarding period, GS&P staff had to quickly familiarize themselves with iNet, the center’s Advanced Transportation Management System (ATMS) software, to manage incidents, monitor traffic conditions, and provide information to the public, emergency responders and ALDOT staff. On the very first day of training, the new hires were put to the test. “In an RTMC, you’re looking for anything that disrupts the flow of traffic—whether it be debris in the road, an accident or heavy congestion,” says Holmes. “On day one, GS&P staff experienced a combination of intensive on-the-job training and a condensed course in TMC operations and traffic incident management when they were faced with an overturned tractor-trailer that shut down traffic at the extremely busy interchange of I-85 and I-65 in the heart of Montgomery. It was quite the initiation, but it gave us the opportunity to start testing out the new software and begin putting notifications of the incident on the dynamic message signs. I’m proud of how the team was able to think on their feet and quickly began managing the incident and coordinating with ALDOT and emergency responders.”

THE PROJECT ALLOWED GS&P TO INCORPORATE NUMEROUS OTHER SERVICE AREAS AND EXPERTISE IN ITS, INCLUDING STATEWIDE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES, TRAVELER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (TIS), MOBILE APP DEVELOPMENT TO SUPPORT TIS, AND AN ALL-IMPORTANT VIDEO DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM.


SHARING VITAL INFORMATION

173

SHOWCASE 9

In addition to staffing the new RTMC, the project allowed “In concert with this startup project, GS&P to incorporate numerous other service areas and GS&P redesigned all those systems expertise in ITS, including statewide standard operating so that any authorized entity with procedures, traveler information systems (TIS), mobile an internet connection can be given app development to support access to the RTMC’s virtual TIS, and an all-important video video wall. We created a First “We created a First distribution management system. Responders Page that gives Responders Page “Most traffic management emergency response agencies that gives emergency special access to all of ALDOT’s centers use video. The problem is it’s very hard to integrate surveillance cameras and allows response agencies those video feeds with a TMC’s them to utilize features not special access ATMS software, which is the available to the public. They can overall operating system,” notes see exactly what’s taking place to all of ALDOT’s Whiticker. “GS&P’s ITS specialat an incident and what types of surveillance cameras responder resources are needed ists set up a video distribution and allows them to management system that takes at the scene. It also helps them determine what routes to take. the video footage coming in utilize features from the TMC’s cameras and We also developed an app for not available to integrates it with the central ALDOT's ITS/traveler informaATMS software. This allows tion program, which is called the public.” external users to have access to ALGO Traffic. The public can the video being used by the TMC. One group of users—or download the ALGO Traffic app to their partners—are first responders. It’s imperative to be able mobile devices. It lets them access the to share video information with agencies who share streaming videos used by the RTMCs responsibility for traffic safety and the management of traffic and obtain real-time information incidents. However, that has been a costly endeavor in the on road conditions in Montgomery, past because it required a lot of equipment on both sides. Mobile and Birmingham.” “It’s an app you can use in the mornings before you hit the road, or in the evenings before you head home so you can be aware of any incidents or delays,” adds Holmes. “In a nutshell, it’s all about getting the traveling public to and from their destinations safely and efficiently.”

The ALGO Traffic app provides streaming traffic videos and real-time information on road conditions in Montgomery, Mobile and Birmingham.


Montgomery RTMC Team. From left to right: Kristofer Kiefer, ALDOT Region Traffic Engineer; Michael Taylor, ALDOT Central Office Computer Services; Richard Adams, ALDOT ATS Maintenance Supervisor; Chris Hilyer, ALDOT Statewide ITS Program Manager; Joy Smith, GS&P RTMC Operator; Scott Harris, GS&P RTMC Manager; Catherine Shonk, GS&P RTMC Senior Operator; Rodney Hall, ALDOT Central Office Computer Services

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“We didn’t just take a cookie-cutter approach to hiring operations staff... putting an exceptional team together—augmented by our own experience and a strong understanding of the client’s needs and business operations— played a pivotal role in getting the RTMC operational in such a short span of time.”

Allowing ALDOT to maximize the benefits of its Intelligent Transportation Systems, GS&P’s staffing and operations efforts at the Montgomery RTMC have resulted in a safer and more efficient transportation system in the area. As a direct outcome of the project, GS&P was selected to provide statewide staffing services for ALDOT’s various regional traffic management centers. “We didn’t just take a cookie-cutter approach to hiring operations staff,” says Whiticker. “We were extremely thoughtful in our selections and made sure we brought on people who were fully capable of coordinating with ALDOT partners. I believe that putting an exceptional team together—augmented by our own experience and a strong understanding of the client’s needs and business operations—played a pivotal role in getting the RTMC operational in such a short span of time.” “I am most proud of the way our team was able to take the past experiences and expertise of our individual staff members and win a project in an area that GS&P had never served before,” concludes Holmes. “Since the Montgomery RTMC’s first day of operation, our staff has worked hard to help ALDOT achieve its goals to improve safety, system reliability and efficiency, reduce traffic congestion, and enhance the overall level of customer service.”


GOALS: IMPROVE SAFETY, SYSTEM RELIABILITY AND EFFICIENCY, REDUCE TRAFFIC CONGESTION, AND ENHANCE THE OVERALL LEVEL OF CUSTOMER SERVICE.

TE A M

PIC Ranzy L. Whiticker, p.e. PM Carla Holmes, p.e., ptoe

Lori Adams Scott Harris Laura E. Hartley, p.e. Kendra McCoy Blair C. Perry, p.e. Catherine Shonk Joy Smith


Tampa International Airport Consolidated Rental Car Center and Automated People Mover LOCATION

Tampa, Florida C L IENT

Hillsborough County Aviation Authority (Tampa International Airport) SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design Structural Engineering Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding Design Team Project Management


ConRAC QUICK-TURNAROUND (QTA) BUILDING

APM MAINTENANCE & STORAGE FACILITY

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TA MPA INTERNATI ONA L A I RP O RT C O N R AC A N D A PM

ECONOMY GARAGE

APM GUIDEWAY

N

TIO STA

PM Y A AL M O MIN ON EC N TER O T AI &M

Tampa International Airport’s need for rental car services has outgrown the capacity available at the main terminal. GS&P was tasked with relocating all rental car activity 1.4 miles south of the main terminal to relieve congestion. This will help preserve capacity of the roadways and curbside at the main terminal for passenger activities.


RENTAL CAR SERVICE CENTERS

ConRAC READY/ RETURN BUILDING

COMMERCIAL CURBSIDE

ConRAC CUSTOMER SERVICE BUILDING

APM STATION

2.44 MILLIONSQUARE-FOOT

CONSOLIDATED RENTAL CAR CENTER

1.4-MILE

AUTOMATED PEOPLE MOVER

K

nown for exceeding passenger expectations, Tampa International Airport consistently ranks among the top airports in the world for customer service and satisfaction. With an increase in both domestic and international passengers over recent years, TPA’s existing rental car facilities were at capacity for current operations, and the airport’s roadways and curbsides had become increasingly congested. To alleviate bottlenecks and provide additional capacity for future growth, TPA selected GS&P to manage the design of a 2.44 million-squarefoot consolidated rental car center (ConRAC) and design 1.4 miles of automated people mover (APM) infrastructure, which will connect the airport’s main terminal with the ConRAC and the existing economy

parking structures. In addition to architecture and project management services, GS&P is providing interior design services, structural engineering for the elevated APM guideway and maintanence and storage facility, and environmental graphic design services for this first phase of TPA’s master plan. “The current rental car facilities at TPA’s main terminal cannot accommodate the rental car inventory required during the airport’s peak hours of operation,” explains Grant Clifford, senior vice president of GS&P’s Aviation market. “This has resulted in the constant shuttling of cars between off-site lots and the terminal, generating a significant volume of additional traffic. This in turn has contributed to congestion on the terminal curbsides, which isn’t consistent with an airport

known for its high level of customer service. The ConRAC will alleviate these issues by relocating all rental car activity 1.4 miles south of the airport’s main terminal and well away from the current points of congestion, preserving the roadways and curbside for passenger activity.” The ConRAC design also includes a remote curbside to further remove traffic from the main terminal complex. Additionally, the APM station at the ConRAC has been designed to connect to a future commercial development to the west, and a larger remote curbside is also planned for this location. “The ultimate goal is to optimize the use of the APM, to reduce traffic, and to preserve the longevity of the main terminal complex as traffic volumes increase at TPA,” notes Clifford.


AN ACCELERATED DESIGN-BUILD EFFORT

“From the onset, our design-build team of GS&P and Austin Constructors engaged stakeholders from all parties—such as airport leaders and the rental car industry—at every stage of the project,” says senior architect and principal Altan Cekin. “This relationship has helped us to design facilities that will maximize convenience for passengers and provide the airport and One of the largest aviation projects in GS&P’s almost 50-year history—and one of the largest the rental car industry with a platform for strong financial performance. in the history of the Tampa Our ‘One Team’ approach has Bay Region—the multidisciplinary effort comprised played a vital role in helping Our ‘One Team’ more than four dozen GS&P us make the right decisions at team members from several the right time to stay on track approach has played a divisions working together for this compressed three-year vital role in helping us across five different GS&P construction schedule.” office locations. The massive “The use of building make the right decisions size and complexity of the information modeling [BIM] at the right time to design-build project also technology has also been vital required intense collaboration in allowing the project to be stay on track for this between TPA, general contracdesigned and built in such compressed three-year tor Austin Constructors, LLC a short time frame,” adds construction schedule. and GS&P. Clifford. “I don’t believe we’d “GS&P’s long working be able to construct something relationship with TPA, from this monumental without it. a ticket-level modernization BIM has facilitated coordiin the late 1990s to the more nation between the design recent main terminal modteam and subcontractors, ernization in 2012, altogether and allowed us to detect and represents around $250 mileliminate potential conflicts lion of construction work at before construction takes ALTAN CEKIN, the airport,” says Clifford. place in the field.” SENIOR ARCHITECT, PRINCIPAL “The ConRAC/APM program Another factor contributalone has a $730 million coning to speed-to-market is the project’s design-build delivery method. struction budget. It is a massive program, and we have remained on track for an aggressive “Many airports still consider design-build an completion date in the fall of 2017 since the alternative project delivery method compared project began the concept design phase in to design-bid-build,” says Clifford. “Over the March 2014.” years, GS&P has completed multiple design-build One of the keys to the successful delivery programs at TPA, and this approach has the of the fast-track project is GS&P’s “One Team” benefit of allowing the contractor to become a part of the team from day one to help deliver approach, which involves an interactive design the project on time and on budget.” process that builds consensus among stakeholders, allowing them to make decisions in a timely manner.

TA MPA INTERNATI ONA L A I RP O RT C O N R AC A N D A PM

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ConRAC + APM Storage and Maintenance Facility

181

The multidisciplinary effort comprised

MORE THAN FOUR DOZEN TEAM MEMBERS from several divisions working together

ACROSS FIVE GS&P OFFICE LOCATIONS

Construction of APM Station at Main Terminal

SHOWCASE 9

Plate Girder for APM Station at Main Terminal

Completion is scheduled for the fall of 2017. By the end of the project, an estimated 9,000-plus design and construction personnel will have worked on the program.

APM Guideway


BY THE NUMBERS COST

$730 MILLION TOTAL PROGRAM

$129.3 MILLION APM DESIGN, BUILD, OPERATE, MAINTAIN $283 MILLION APM INFRASTRUCTURE $323.5 MILLION ConRAC

SCOPE

DURING PEAK HOURS, THE ConRAC IS EXPECTED TO PROCESS

MORE THAN 3,200 CARS AN HOUR 1,541 RENTALS AN HOUR

1,650 RETURNS AN HOUR

APM FLEET CONSISTS OF

12 CARS

PICKING UP EVERY 2.0 TO 2.6 MINUTES CARRYING

2,700 PASSENGERS AN HOUR AT PEAK TIMES COMPLETING

4.2-MINUTE TRIPS FROM MAIN TERMINAL TO ConRAC

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Currently, economy parking customers are transported to the main terminal by shuttle bus. The APM will eliminate the need for this, improving customer service, eliminating operating costs associated with the 24/7 shuttle bus service, and reducing carbon emissions.

Customer Service Building


CONSTRUCTION

MATERIALS INCLUDE

200,000+ CUBIC YARDS OF CONCRETE (25,000 TRUCK LOADS)

9,000 TONS OF REBAR 5,000 TONS OF STEEL

ConRAC

MINIMIZING IMPACT TO CUSTOMERS AND OPERATIONS Given TPA’s well-known reputation for putting the customer first, the multimillion-dollar construction project has been designed from the beginning to minimize the impact on the traveling public. “This is an extremely complex undertaking that’s being constructed around active areas of the airport,” says Clifford. “The construction site is 1.4 miles long, including the APM system, and it interfaces with the public pretty much every inch of the way. Reducing the impact of construction to customers began during design where we defined site limits and determined how those sites coalesce with roadways. We also identified road closures as well as rerouting options. “We meet with the aviation authority weekly to share how construction is impacting traffic and what they can anticipate going forward. This

enables them to send out updates to their operations staff and the police department so they can help prevent any potential delays, minimizing inconvenience to customers.” Maintaining airport operations and building systems that are adjacent to construction activities is also critical. Architect Tim Beecken explains: “When we were designing the project, we identified vital airport operations that could not be disturbed, such as active roadways, economy parking and the baggage system. For example, an underground tunnel below the baggage claim level known as ‘Tug Row’ that delivers baggage to the airside at the terminals was a ‘no-go’ zone, resulting in 120-foot spans of steel.”


Main Terminal APM Station Platform

GOOD FOR THE COMMUNITY, GREAT FOR THE ENVIRONMENT Main Terminal APM Station

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“This airport is such a beloved piece of the community and they’re incredibly invested in it,” says senior interior designer Jessica Smith. “From an architectural and interior design standpoint, coming up with a design that blends with the existing structures as well as other ongoing projects at the airport is a priority. Our goal is to make sure that everything ties together to create one campus, one facility, one mindset, and one image for the community.” While allowing for future growth, the massive construction project has already demonstrated its socioeconomic value. “Coming out of the Great Recession, this program has generated significant economic benefits to the community, including job creation for both the design and construction industries,” says Clifford. “At present, approximately 2,000 workers are on-site daily, and it’s estimated that more than 9,000 design and construction personnel will have worked on this program by the time it’s complete.” The airport expects 2.7 million fewer vehicle miles traveled on airport roadways once the project opens, which will reduce annual carbon emissions by approximately 1,600 tons. GS&P also designed the ConRAC and APM facilities with sustainability in mind. “Tampa Electric recently installed a 2-megawatt solar array on the south economy garage roof, which generates enough energy to power 250 homes annually, or roughly the equivalent of the energy needed to power the APM at peak demand,” notes architect Matthew Wilson.


Economy Garage APM Station

“Our goal is to make sure that everything ties together to create one campus, one facility, one mindset, and one image for the community.” JESSICA SMITH, INTERIOR DESIGNER

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SHOWCASE 9

THE AIRPORT EXPECTS

2.7 MILLION FEWER VEHICLE MILES APPROXIMATELY

1,600 TONS FEWER ANNUAL CARBON EMISSIONS


A WIN-WIN FROM EVERY ANGLE

TA MPA INTERNATI ONA L A I RP O RT C O N R AC A N D A PM

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Addressing the future needs of Tampa International Airport, the new ConRAC and APM will make a substantial and positive impact on traffic circulation, the environment and the overall passenger experience, while extending the life of the main terminal facilities. “The new ConRAC will provide numerous benefits such as allowing for more on-site rental car companies, which will offer more choices and varied price points for passengers,” notes Clifford. “It will also mean less pollution as far fewer

Elevators to APM Station Platform at Main Terminal

cars will be shuttled between the main terminal and remote service center sites. The APM will minimize the amount of time needed to travel between the ConRAC and the main terminal, making the 4.2-minute journey virtually hassle-free. It will also greatly reduce travel time from economy parking and replace the current shuttle bus operation. “I’m extremely proud of our team’s efforts, and that our enhancements will not only support the airport’s long-term growth but also their customer-service objectives.”

Customers in baggage claim will take the 65foot escalator directly to the fourth-story APM platform. From there, in under two minutes, they will board the APM to economy parking and the ConRAC.


Main Terminal APM Station Platform

“I’m extremely proud of our team’s efforts, and that our enhancements will not only support the airport’s long-term growth but also their customer-service objectives.” GRANT CLIFFORD, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, AVIATION TE AM PIC Grant J. Clifford, RIBA, LEED AP

PC Matthew DeLoatche

Matthew B. Amos, AIA, LEED AP

PM Altan Cekin, AIA, NCARB

PC Jonathan Massaro

Emaline Brady

PD Wilson P. Rayfield Jr., AIA, NCARB, LEED AP PP Brian D. McKeehan, P.E., F.ASCE PP Matthew H. Wilson, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP PP Todd P. Martin, AIA PP Jessica Smith, NCIDQ PP Abhijit Joshi, AIA, NCARB PP Kevin W. Hopkins, AIA, NCARB, CDT, LEED AP BD+C PP Eric Bearden, AIA PP/PC Tim Beecken, AIA, NCARB

PC Benjamin Raposa, LEED AP

Betty J. Crawford, SEGD

PC Kristen Weldon

Timothy Dow

EGD Jim Alderman, SEGD

Angie Guarnieri

EGD James R. Harding, SEGD

Kevin Kim, AIA

EGD Tim A. Rucker, SEGD

Emil J. Mastandrea, AIA, LEED AP

EGD Deanna Kamal

Louis Medcalf, FCSI, CCS

PE Tom Tran, P.E.

Mili Mehta

PE Thomas E. Bradbury

Jennifer M. Shupe, P.E.

PE John David Chesak, P.E.

Mike Summers

CA Kenneth H. Beeler, P.G. CA Gina Voccola AA Cheryl Sharp


A COMMUNITY ASSET


St. Joseph's Hospital–South LOCATION

Riverview, Florida C L IENT

BayCare Health System SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design Structural Engineering Environmental Graphics and Wayfinding


“The project had been a vision of the client’s since they first purchased the property in the 1980s. To develop a successful design, we worked closely with hospital administrators, building on GS&P’s previous master planning analyses as well as lessons learned from St. Joseph’s Hospital-North.” CHRISTINA WILSON, SENIOR ARCHITECT

S

eeking to improve healthcare services to residents of growing Hillsborough County, BayCare Health System tasked GS&P with providing facility master planning for a full-service acute care hospital to be situated on a 72-acre site just south of Tampa in Riverview, Florida. Following the successful master planning efforts, BayCare hired GS&P to lead a multidisciplinary team to design the 335,000-square-foot, 90-bed hospital—St. Joseph’s Hospital-South—as well as an adjoining 85,000-square-foot medical office building. BayCare desired to create a spa-like environment different from the traditional medical facility that provided a variety of amenities supporting hospitality, comfort and a healing environment.

“The project had been a vision of the client’s since they first purchased the property in the 1980s,” explains senior architect and project manager Christina Wilson. “To develop a successful design, we worked closely with hospital administrators, building on GS&P’s previous master planning analyses as well as lessons learned from St. Joseph’s Hospital-North, which had recently been completed when we started our initial design work.”


BIG BEND

CAREFULLY PLANNED FUTURE PARKING

FUTURE MOB

FUTURE PARKING STRUCTURE

SIMMONS LOOP

FUTURE MOB

MOB

FUTURE CEP

HOSPITAL CEP

191

The building was carefully positioned to protect dozens of acres of native wetlands to the south and the north of the facility. The preserved natural areas provide a habitat for various species of wildlife and vegetation, and offer a stunning surrounding environment for the campus as well as the community.

“With the community’s population on the rise, our design had to anticipate the type of growth that might occur and do so in a way that wouldn’t be disruptive to hospital services.” JIM KOLB, PROJECT DESIGNER

SHOWCASE 9

During the planning process, the client established several key goals for the project, from creating a patient- and family-focused facility to accommodating future growth—a major design driver. Project designer Jim Kolb explains: “With the community’s population on the rise, our design had to anticipate the type of growth that might occur and do so in a way that wouldn’t be disruptive to hospital services. We achieved this by developing an openended design that allows for horizontal growth of virtually every component of the hospital, including emergency, diagnostic and interventional services. We also designed the bed tower so that multiple wings can be added, giving the client the flexibility to go from a 90-bed hospital to a 350-bed facility.” “The attached medical office building was also an important element of the client’s growth strategy,” adds principal-in-charge Matt Harrell. “We specifically designed it to be hospital-grade, so in the future they can move into that building as a hospital and then construct an additional MOB to the north.” Another vital part of the planning process was siting the hospital on the expansive greenfield site. “We carefully positioned the building to protect dozens of acres of native wetlands to the south and the north of the facility,” says Wilson. “The preserved natural areas provide a habitat for various species of wildlife and vegetation, and offer a stunning surrounding environment for the campus as well as the community.”


ST. J O SE PH ' S H O SPITA L –SO U TH

1 92

PUTTING THE HOSPITALITY IN HOSPITAL St. Joseph’s hospitals have been delivering high-quality healthcare to the community since 1934 and are known for making patients and families as comfortable as possible during their hospital experience. GS&P’s design continues this tradition of excellence by creating a soothing, spa-like environment featuring interior finishes accented by sleek, crisp lines and a calming color palette. “The patient and family experience is the first and foremost priority with every aspect of the design,” says Wilson. “From the spa-like interiors to the lushly landscaped gardens to the hospital’s strategic positioning that maximizes views of the site, we strived to represent the client’s goals of quality, comfort and serenity.” “When you enter the building, it doesn’t feel like you’re walking into a hospital. It feels more like a five-star hotel—warm, welcoming and relaxing,” notes interior designer Carrie Kovacs. “We paid special attention to the amenities within the hospital. The waiting areas are open and

“When you enter the building, it doesn’t feel like you’re walking into a hospital. It feels more like a five-star hotel— warm, welcoming and relaxing.” CARRIE KOVACS, INTERIOR DESIGNER

comfortable and feature views of nature through large windows and artwork, which creates a soothing environment to help ease anxiety for family members during a typically stressful time. The design also includes an inviting courtyard area between the hospital and MOB, and a café where patients and visitors are offered a wide variety of food choices, including healthy options.” To further support hospitality, comfort and convenience, each private patient room includes a sofa bed and recliner as well as a relaxation area and outlets for computers and phones. Exterior views to the surrounding landscape provide a calming environment for patients and families during their stay. A unique headwall design conceals medical gas utilities behind decorative artwork, creating a less clinical atmosphere.


193

DESIGNED WITH EVERYONE IN MIND Along with creating a patient- and family-cenDesign features supporting quality of envitered environment, providing an atmosphere ronment include antimicrobial carpet in the that staff and physicians can enjoy was also a corridors as well as wall-wash lighting fixtures key client goal. that reduce light-glare on patients as they’re “Frequently, the accommodabeing transferred by staff. The tions we make for families and use of technology to minimize “Frequently, the patients in our designs also serve overhead paging creates an acousstaff and physicians equally well accommodations we tically ideal environment for both relative to creating a restorative patients and staff. The focus on make for families environment,” says Kolb. “For staff satisfaction extended equally and patients in our to areas patients never see. example, there is a general pattern designs also serve in the form of the hospital build“Facilities staff had input on ing that allows it to maximize staff and physicians the selection and layout of the daylight and views of nature in the hospital’s central energy plant,” equally well interior spaces. The overarching notes Wilson. “This resulted goal of this concept is to improve relative to creating in a plant that is both efficient the quality of the environment not and provides an enjoyable work a restorative only for patients and families but atmosphere for this dedicated for all populations.” arm of the team.” environment.”

SHOWCASE 9

Clockwise from top left: Antimicrobial carpet and wall-wash lighting fixtures reduce lightglare; a unique headwall design conceals medical gas utilities behind decorative artwork; waiting areas feature large windows and artwork to create a soothing environment.


PUBLIC CIRCULATION NON-PUBLIC CIRCULATION STAFF CIRCULATION

PUBLIC PARKING

MOB ENTRY

STAFF PARKING

A CIRCULATORY SYSTEM AT THE HEART

MAIN ENTRY EMERGENCY ENTRY AMBULANCE

LOADING DOCK

The goal of separate circulation paths for staff and patients began at the site-plan level.

PUBLIC CIRCULATION STAFF CIRCULATION

MOB ENTRANCE

MAIN ENTRANCE

PUBLIC ELEVATORS LAB

IMAGING STAFF ELEVATORS

EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT EMERGENCY WALK-IN ENTRANCE

AMBULANCE ENTRANCE

FIRST FLOOR

EVS MATERIALS MGMT

LOADING DOCK

The goal of separate circulation continued into the overall floor plan development.

Providing separate circulation paths for patients and staff was also pivotal to the quality of the end-user experience. Kolb explains the planning process: “The hospital was planned so the front-ofhouse main concourse connects the MOB, main entrance and ED, while back-of-house circulation connects the back of the ED and imaging with differentiated staff and patient elevators and back-of-house departments, such as the lab and materials management. “On the upper floors, the circulation paths maintain separation of public and staff. Public elevators open at the family waiting areas at each level. Staff elevators open up to circulation that connects to surgery and labor and delivery on the second level, as well as to staff work areas on each floor. They also provide direct access to patient rooms on the third and fourth levels for patient transport.” In the hospital’s emergency department, staff use a dedicated interior loop, which feeds into exam rooms from one direction. Patients and guests use an exterior loop, which feeds into exam rooms from another direction while providing separation from back-of-house operations. “Separating public and staff circulation is critical for many reasons,” says Wilson. “As a patient or visitor, you can get directly to the patient rooms through the public corridor without seeing back-of-house traffic, such as patients being wheeled to surgery. That makes a huge difference when it comes to your experience of walking through that space. It saves patients and visitors from being unnecessarily exposed to a lot of upsetting traffic.”


SETTING THE STANDARD

“From small things like adopting our sheet-number system for all their projects to their implementation of our signage and wayfinding design throughout the system, we brought value to the client well beyond our successful delivery of the project.” MATT HARRELL, PRINCIPAL-IN-CHARGE

Bringing much-needed inpatient and outpatient services to the southern region of Hillsborough County, the new St. Joseph’s Hospital-South was opened to the public in 2015 to enormous support from the surrounding community. During its opening year, the facility exceeded its goals for patient volumes in all departments. In January 2016, the hospital’s capacity was at a rate of 88 percent, prompting BayCare Health System to return to GS&P to begin the development of design for expanded capacity. “The response from the community during the hospital’s first year of operation is a direct outcome of the client’s commitment to provide not just a hospital building but an asset for the community that creates an environment for healing and family support,” says Wilson. “It’s an honor to be associated with a project you can be incredibly proud of and that the community has truly embraced.” “The way we delivered this project set several systemwide standards for BayCare,” adds Harrell. “From small things like adopting our sheet-number system for all their projects to their implementation of our signage and wayfinding design throughout the system, we brought value to the client well beyond our successful delivery of the project.”

TE A M PIC Matthew G. Harrell, aia, acha, leed ap PM Christina Wilson, aia, ncarb, edac, leed ap PC Jonathan Massaro PD James R. Kolb, aia, leed ap ID Carrie May Kovacs, iida, leed ap

Robert A. Berry, aia, ncarb, edac

Brian D. McKeehan, p.e., f.asce

Adrienne Ciuba, aia, ncarb

Katrina Pasteur, aia, ncarb

Betty J. Crawford, segd

Bruce M. Pitre, aia, leed ap

Ramon A. Cruz Moreno

Ryan R. Rohe, aia, ncarb, leed ap

Christopher L. Davis, leed ap bd+c, cdt, ccca, associate aia

Marc A. Sauvé, lean

Glenn T. Davis Jason B. Fukuda, p.e., s.e.

Frank Swaans, aia, acha, fhfi, leed ap, edac

James D. Graham

Bryan A. Tharpe, p.e.

Michael Hall

Gina Voccola

James R. Harding, segd

Ray A. Wong, aia, edac, fhfi, leed ga, ncarb

Ellen Lina Orlando Lopez-Isa, aia, leed ap

Jennifer M. Shupe, p.e.


AS EASY AS


TDOT Fast Fix 8 Accelerated Bridge Construction Project LOCATION

Nashville, Tennessee C L IENT

Tennessee Department of Transportation, Structures Division, Bridge Inspection and Repair Office SERVIC ES

Bridge Design Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Lighting Design Roadway Design


C

Four pairs of mainline bridges spanning downtown streets and active railroad tracks were rehabilitated utilizing 10 of the 13 weekend closure dates.

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SHOWCASE 9

onstructed in the late 1960s, the twin eastbound “The Department wanted to complete the project bridges that intersect Herman Street, Clinton within a compressed schedule to minimize the social and Street, Jo Johnston Avenue and Charlotte economic impacts to Nashville’s central business and Avenue in downtown Nashville were showing entertainment districts, which are continually generating advanced signs of deterioration. Though all of the struc- huge traffic demands on I-40. By using ABC versus a more tures exhibited some degree of deck traditional delivery method, it was estimated the failure, the Charlotte Avenue bridge project could be completed within a total of 13 experienced three major deck failure weekend full-closure periods instead of up to issues during the summer of 2013. This three years of reduced traffic lanes.” required the closure of multiple traffic Along with ABC, Construction Manager/ lanes and an emergency weekend closure General Contractor (CM/GC) project delivery was to replace two bays of the existing deck. selected for the effort. This involved GS&P, TDOT Recognizing these four pairs of bridges and general contractor Kiewit Infrastructure along I-40 required immediate attention, South Co. working together to find the most Tennessee Department of Transportation reasonable cost for the project as well as the optimum methods for (TDOT) selected GS&P as lead design “By using ABC versus a more completing the reconstruction of engineering firm for the $62 million traditional delivery method, it the various bridge elements. bridge rehabilitation project. The scope was estimated the project could of work included comprehensive site “We identified four to six potenbe completed within a total of investigation, structural analysis and tial solutions for rehabilitating design, preparation of detailed roadway each of the four pairs of bridges 13 weekend full-closure periods and bridge construction plans, technical assessing criteria such as costs, instead of up to three years of assistance and research, and detailed materials, constructability, life-cytraffic management plans. cle analysis, risk factors and traffic/ reduced traffic lanes.” “It’s not uncommon for bridges that railroad impacts,” explains senior were built half a century ago to expe- TED KNIAZEWYCZ, transportation engineer Larry rience functional failures,” says senior Ridlen. “This evaluation process SENIOR STRUCTURAL ENGINEER structural engineer Ted Kniazewycz. was an incredibly valuable tool in “In the case of the existing I-40 bridges on this project, ranking the various site-specific options and identifying all the decks were showing consistent issues with their which should move forward for further consideration. At performance. This prompted TDOT to realize that an the end of the day, material procurement played a pivotal Accelerated Bridge Construction [ABC] project had to be role in the selection of final options for each of the bridges executed to address these issues. in respect to the accelerated schedule.”


Structural steel superstructure units were used on four of the eight bridges. These units were fabricated off-site at the "Bridge Farm" in the median of I-40, then transported and installed during the weekend closure.

TDOT FA ST F IX 8 AC C EL ER ATED B RI D G E C O N STRU CTI O N PROJ ECT

2 00

NO TWO BRIDGES ALIKE With the evaluation factors considered for the four crossing sites, the selected construction method turned out to be unique for each location, with no two bridges requiring identical restoration solutions. “For the Herman Street/NWR overpass, we decided to replace the existing superstructure with steel-beam superstructure units,” says Kniazewycz. “For the Clinton Street/CSX crossing, we chose a superstructure replacement of two spans with prestressed concrete bridge elements and the elimination of four spans. For the Jo Johnston bridge, we selected a superstructure replacement of one span with prestressed concrete bridge elements and the elimina...the single-biggest tion of two spans. For the Charlotte Avenue overpass, we decided to project challenge was replace the entire bridge with a that each bridge had to be single-span steel structure. “I think the single-biggest projlooked at individually in ect challenge was that each bridge regard to how it was going had to be looked at individually in regard to how it was going to to be accomplished. be accomplished. For example, the two 600-ton capacity cranes used for the Charlotte Avenue bridge had to be brought in from Canada. The contractor had to determine when those cranes were available, and our team worked backward from that date to make sure everything came together from a schedule standpoint. On the whole, the contractor had to look at the project through a holistic lens regarding what it would take to make things happen in the field.”

“ ”

Precast concrete bridge elements were used on six of the eight bridges as a means of accelerating the overall bridge construction timeline. These included prestressed box beams, full-depth deck panels, precast concrete end walls and precast approach slabs. All components were fabricated off-site and shipped to the location just prior to weekend installation.


Sixteen superstructure units, each weighing in excess of 200,000 pounds, were installed on the Herman Street bridge.

“Not only were the plans welldeveloped, but there was a lot of discussion prior to execution regarding what would happen during the weekend closures — especially that first weekend.” LARRY RIDLEN, SENIOR TRANSPORTATION ENGINEER

WORKING FOR THE WEEKEND To deliver the project in the anticipated 13-weekend period, GS&P employed numerous innovative engineering techniques on the four sets of bridges. Kniazewycz explains: “We utilized structural steel superstructure units on the Herman Street overpass that were longer, wider and heavier than any comparable project that had been completed to date. These units were designed to be fabricated off-site, transported, and then installed during a single weekend closure period. In designing the superstructure units, we paid particular attention to standardizing the construction details to reduce the risk of fabrication and fit-up issues, which can be both costly and time consuming. “Another method to accelerate the replacement of a bridge is to reduce the amount of bridge there is to replace. To achieve this, the team utilized span elimination on six of the eight bridges, which not only reduces the amount of bridge construction during a weekend, but also lessens the amount of maintenance required in the future.” Precast concrete bridge elements were also used on six of the eight bridges as a means of accelerating the overall bridge construction timeline. These included prestressed box beams, full-depth deck panels, precast concrete end walls and precast approach slabs. All components were fabricated off-site and shipped to the location just prior to weekend installation. “Careful planning before the weekend closures played an important role in the project’s success,” notes Ridlen. “Not only were the plans well-developed, but there was a lot of discussion prior to execution regarding what would happen during the weekend closures—especially that first weekend.”

“Deciding exactly when those closures would take place was also key,” adds Kniazewycz. “Major weekend events that would be negatively impacted by an interstate closure—such as the CMA Music Festival—were factored into the weekend closure decisions to minimize impacts to local residents. When a weekend was identified for construction, alerts were issued to the public as soon as, and as often as, possible regarding interstate closures and detours. We also analyzed traffic patterns and selected I-440 and state Route 840 as alternative routes around downtown Nashville so we could divert as much traffic away from the project site as possible.” Weekend planning and scheduling also included the coordination of multiple subcontractors, suppliers, labor and equipment. Detailed hourly schedules and hour-by-hour snapshots of the ongoing work were tools used to accomplish the weekend work within a 58-hour closure window. “Each weekend closure started out with bridge demolition, which was scheduled to be completed within a 12-hour period so reconstruction activities could begin,” says Kniazewycz. “At times, both cranes and excavators were used on a single overpass in order to have enough resources to remove the bridge in time. As the project moved through the various weekends of construction toward completion, the crews were able to meet, and in most instances, beat the project requirements to have the interstate open in time for Monday-morning rush hour.”


LOOKING OUT FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

The mix design was approved for use on the project

as TDOT Class X concrete, and will be available to be utilized on future ABC projects throughout the state. This special concrete composite can be batched from a plant and delivered by truck, which ultimately saved more than 36,000 concrete bags from the waste stream.

TDOT FA ST F IX 8 AC C EL ER ATED B RI D G E C O N STRU CTI O N PROJ ECT

2 02

Along with leading-edge engineering techniques, GS&P incorporated numerous environmentally conscious elements into the effort. “The project promoted the reuse of the steel beams and rebar from the existing bridges,” says Ridlen. “Additionally, the demolished concrete from slabs was used as supplemental fill materials, and the new bridge designs utilized weathering steel, which doesn’t require painting and is much better for the environment.” Most notably, GS&P—in partnership with TDOT, Kiewit, Irving Materials, Inc., and Middle Tennessee State University’s Concrete Industry Management Program—developed a high-strength, ready-mix-type concrete that reaches 4,000 pounds per square inch in just four hours. After that time, a bridge can be opened to traffic. “The mix design was approved for use on the project as TDOT Class X concrete, and will be available to be utilized on future ABC projects throughout the state,” says Ridlen. “This special concrete composite can be batched from a plant and delivered by truck, which ultimately saved more than 36,000 concrete bags from the waste stream.”


A FAST-PACED THREEDIMENSIONAL PUZZLE Completed seven months ahead of schedule and utilizing only 10 weekend closures as opposed to the allotted 13, the Fast Fix 8 Accelerated Bridge Construction project restored four sets of mainline I-40 bridges in downtown Nashville with minimal impact to the environment, local businesses and residents, and the traveling public. “In the end, four different pairs of bridges with four different rehabilitation solutions, along with an ABC approach, equaled a challenging, fastpaced three-dimensional puzzle,” says Kniazewycz. “Our success was supported by the hard work and seamless communication of all parties involved. I am most proud of our team’s ability to meet the aggressive schedule. We had 57 days to generate final design plans for the eight bridges in total. Not only was this completed in 57 days, but those days fell over the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays.” “GS&P was totally committed to the success of the project and worked long hours designing and redesigning the bridge elements to meet the capabilities of the contractor as well as doing what was best for the project and owner,” says Wayne J. Seger, P.E., TDOT Structures Division Director. “The team’s professionalism and design expertise, along with their flexibility and cooperation, made the Fast Fix 8 project a huge success for TDOT and the people of Tennessee.”

TE A M

PIC Mark Holloran, p.e. PM / PP Ted A. Kniazewycz, p.e. PD Larry Ridlen, p.e.

Thomas J. Carr Ben Coles, eit

The team’s professionalism and design expertise, along with their flexibility and cooperation, made the Fast Fix 8 project a huge success for TDOT and the people of Tennessee.

WAYNE J. SEGER, P.E. TDOT STRUCTURES DIVISION DIRECTOR

Cody G. Crews, p.e., env sp Cynthia Frear Katherine Ham Mickey Hamilton III Jonathan D. Haycraft, p.e., cpesc, env sp Rodney C. Palmer Buddy Sherrill, Jr., cpesc Wes Stanton Mark H. Washing, p.e. Gary Young


CREATIVELY

EC

CONN

TING

A CA M P U S


Jackson Home Office Expansion – New Office Building, Conference Center and Dining Addition LOCATION

Lansing, Michigan C L IENT

Jackson National Life Insurance Company SERVIC ES

Architecture Interior Design


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long-standing client, Jackson National Life Insurance Company (Jackson®) has solicited GS&P’s professional services for numerous high-profile projects across the country, including several major renovations and the design of its 150,000-square-foot regional headquarters in Franklin, Tennessee. In 2013, Jackson selected GS&P to provide architecture and interior design services for a two-phase expansion project at the firm’s headquarters in Lansing, Michigan. Phase I included a 40,000-square-foot multilevel conference center and dining facility expansion. Phase II comprised a new 230,000-square-foot office building and a 500-foot enclosed bridge connecting the new construction through existing woodlands to the current building.

“Jackson was quickly outgrowing its existing headquarters, which was at maximum capacity,” explains Steve Johnson, executive vice president of GS&P's Corporate + Urban Design market. “They ultimately decided that expanding their current headquarters to consolidate off-campus staff presented the optimum solution in terms of anticipated growth over the coming decade.


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The conference center, dining facility and new office building are situated on a wooded campus with an existing 300,000-square-foot, crescent-shaped office building.

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“Since the campus is spread out, Jackson wanted to create spaces that would allow their associates to interact and connect in various ways. They were also in desperate need of flexible conference space because employees were using conference rooms for office space in the existing building due to the rapid growth. So, along with the workplace expansion, they desired a large conference center that attached to the current building,

NEW CONFERNCE RENCE CENTER

as well as an expanded dining facility that could accommodate twice as many employees.” Jackson’s overarching goals for the project included the incorporation of sustainable design principles, a seamless connection between the existing lobby and the new conference center, unhindered sight lines, and minimal impact to the surrounding environment.

“Since the campus is spread out, Jackson wanted to create spaces that would allow their associates to interact and connect in various ways.” STEVE JOHNSON, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, CORPORATE + URBAN DESIGN


The pre-function space in the conference center features a heavy timber roof and panoramic views of the woodlands.

CONNECTING A CONFERENCE CENTER

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Creating a true sense of corporate community, the new Class-A conference center has the capacity to seat up to 400 people. It includes a versatile pre-function hall as well as three multipurpose rooms that can easily be opened up into one conference room. “The pre-function space is an important part of the building because it also serves as a gathering space,” says Kelly Hodges, vice president of Lacking the space to accommodate its firmwide GS&P's Corporate + Urban Design market. “It’s and community events, one of Jackson’s top priessentially a staging area for conference events, orities was developing an on-campus conference but when employees aren’t using the meeting venue that was both functional and comfortable. rooms, it also acts as a free, collaborative space Senior architect and principal Jeff Kuhnhenn where associates can meet or perhaps grab a explains the challenges involved in connecting cup of coffee.” the new conference center to the existing “This conference center is a whole new office building: concept for Jackson,” adds Jack Weber, senior “The conference center needed to be immedivice president of GS&P’s Nashville Design ately accessible to the existing building’s main Studio. “They didn’t have anything like it before. lobby for ease of access by guests and employees. Since the conference center/ However, a main feature of pre-function spaces opened, the lobby is a floor-to-ceiling “This conference glass wall that opens the space employees have increasingly up to the woods to the west. center is a whole new utilized the collaborative spaces This is such an iconic view that concept for Jackson.” as individuals, as small teams, and for large meetings.” we had to avoid interrupting it with the conference center. Also providing additional To preserve the outlook, we space for interaction is the moved the conference center campus’ expanded dining entry to the south so it aligned facility, which connects to with an existing elevator core the conference center and is and stayed out of the framed located on the ground level of JACK WEBER, viewpoint from the lobby. the existing building. SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, “The client also expressed a “Jackson already had a dining CORPORATE + URBAN DESIGN desire for the existing lobby and facility on campus, but it wasn’t new conference center connecnearly as dynamic as what this expansion offers,” says Weber. “A dining area tion to appear seamless. To create continuity between the new and existing buildings, we needs to serve as a positive distraction—a place used a similar material pallet for a more unified that’s inspiring and offers respite from the aesthetic. So the path was more open and inviting, workspace. This dining expansion offers exactly we took the curve from the existing corridor and that type of respite while adding an extra 5,180 rotated it out to form a wider corridor that spins square feet to the existing dining facility that’s off the lobby space. This corridor culminates at a more playful and much livelier. Jackson reports that food sales have increased by 30 percent monumental stair, connecting to the conference since the new dining center has been open.” center and linking the dining expansion.”


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The conference center can hold up to 400 people. It blends seamlessly with the existing office by using similar natural materials.


The design team took the footprint of topography to create the roof.

A ridge line for central rain collection was then added.

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Finally, the roof was segmented for added constructability.

Beyond its obvious aesthetic advantages, the green roof reduces thermal heat gain, provides UV-ray protection, and aids in stormwater retention and filtration critical to the Lansing site.


RAISING THE ROOF

RYAN ROHE, ARCHITECT

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“We hand-picked what trees to keep and what trees to demo, and reused some of the trees we took down for components in the interior design.”

Maintaining existing views as well as creating additional vistas was the main driver for the siting and form of the conference center. With this in mind, the design team aimed to preserve as much of the natural topography as feasible. “This natural forest area is such a prized and treasured amenity for the people working within the existing building, and the client didn’t want anything to spoil that view,” says Kuhnhenn. “So we came up with a solution that took its cues from the surrounding topography. “We thought about what it would mean to insert this building into the landscape, which involved manipulating the natural environment by removing trees and excavating the ground. But our goal was to mitigate the impact to the surrounding site. So we considered the possibility of slicing out the ground—the footprint beneath the conference center—and then raising up the lush groundscape and tucking the program underneath. That design concept ultimately became the genesis for how we approached the conference center’s rippling green roof.” By using the footprint of topography to create the green roof, the design team preserved the view of the woodlands beyond, and created a scenic foreground vista for the existing building. “There was very little site disturbance considering the monumental effort that took place,” says architect Ryan Rohe. “We hand-picked what trees to keep and what trees to demo, and reused some of the trees we took down for components in the interior design.”


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The walk between buildings is broken down into a series of refuges designed to reduce the sense of distance, allowing portions of the facility to become more than just a corridor.

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A NEXTGENERATION OFFICE BUILDING During the programming phase of the project, the design team determined that locating the new office building too close to the existing headquarters posed a number of drawbacks, and that placing the new facility on the other side of the woodlands presented the best solution for Jackson’s needs. To connect the new facility to the existing headquarters, GS&P designed a 500-foot elevated walkway that traverses the delicate wetlands and allows wildlife to pass beneath. “We designed the connector to be more than just a long corridor,” notes interior designer Amy Klinefelter. “It provides an opportunity for casual interaction as well as moments of transition as employees move through the campus.”

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“We designed the connector to be more than just a long corridor. It provides an opportunity for casual interaction as well as moments of transition as employees move through the campus.”

AMY KLINEFELTER, INTERIOR DESIGNER


All shared amenities are grouped around a central atrium.

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The ground floor cafe is located at the base of the "treehouse."

Two monumental stairs on either side of the atrium encourage employee health.


Situated in the corner of the large agricultural site, Jackson’s new 230,000-square-foot office building provides capacity for more than 1,200 state-of-the-art workspaces and offers employees stunning vistas of the surrounding woodlands. The building is composed of two wings of office space connected by a large atrium. Each wing of office space is narrower than the typical office building to increase access to daylight. The angled relationship between the north and south wings is narrower toward the main entry and wider toward the woodlands. Monumental stairs rise from just past the entry lobby to provide access

“A centralized meeting and break room in what we call the ‘treehouse’ provides a variety of meeting, social and wellness areas that deliberately nudge people together.” ADRIENNE CIUBA, ARCHITECT

to all floors. Elevators are tucked back into the core space to encourage use of the stairs. In the center of the building, collaborative spaces were designed to encourage employee interaction as well as a sense of camaraderie. “Large meeting and break areas are collected around the atrium space, which concentrates activity in the core of the building and provides an improved sense of community,” explains architect Adrienne Ciuba. “For example, a centralized meeting and break room in what we call the ‘treehouse’ provides a variety of meeting, social and wellness areas that deliberately nudge people together.”

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The two wings of office space are narrower than the typical office building to increase access to daylight.

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The main conference and break areas make up the center "treehouse." Smaller break rooms are located on the perimeter.

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“In many respects, it’s a next-generation building compared to your typical office building.”

JEFF KUHNHENN, SENIOR ARCHITECT, PRINCIPAL

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Along with collaborative spaces, sustainable design elements including energy-efficient LED lighting and an underfloor air distribution system were incorporated into the building. “The new facility runs 40 percent more efficiently than the original office building,” says Kuhnhenn. “One of the major energy-saving strategies was the underfloor HVAC system, which delivers air directly to where people need it as opposed to blowing air down from the ceiling through space that isn’t occupied. It gives users flexibility because everyone has their own adjustable vent in their workstation. The building also has high-performance glass so it’s well-insulated. In many respects, it’s a next-generation building compared to your typical office building.”

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Borrowing from the existing office building material palette, the new building is clad in glass and metal panel. High-performance glazing, building orientation and an underfloor air distribution system all contribute to achieving a high ENERGY STAR® rating target.


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Evolving a pre-existing headquarters into a vibrant and sophisticated string of workspaces, collaboration rooms, dining and entertainment zones, GS&P’s design supports Jackson’s continued growth and flexibility while minimizing the impact of the built environment on the cherished site. “From an interiors perspective, our key focus was creating spaces where people could connect,” says Weber. “The original building simply wasn’t designed as a place for the type of interaction that Jackson is looking for today. So each key component—from the conference center to the new office building, and even to the connector that ties everything together—was an aspect of trying to find places for people to interrelate.”

“I think the most impressive thing about this project is how the overall campus came together,” concludes Kuhnhenn. “There is a seamless connection between the two different office buildings that are on the one hand separated by the woodlands, but at the same time feel connected in a very intimate way.”


“There is a seamless connection between the two different office buildings that are on the one hand separated by the woodlands, but at the same time feel connected in a very intimate way.” JEFF KUHNHENN

TE A M

PIC Steven P. Johnson, AIA, NCARB PM Kelly Knight Hodges, NCIDQ, LEED AP PP Eric Bearden, AIA PD Jeffrey W. Kuhnhenn, AIA, LEED AP PD Jack E. Weber, IIDA, MCR, LEED AP PD Brian Hubbard, AIA PC Ryan R. Rohe, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP PC Adrienne Ciuba, AIA, NCARB PCID Amy Klinefelter, IIDA, LEED AP

Anna L. Barnes, LEED AP Adam Bates Lauren Boehms Helga Bolyard Joseph M. Bucher, AIA, NCARB Pamela Bybee Clint H. Harris, AIA Cindy Lucente, LEED AP Elaine McDowall Louis Medcalf, FCSI, CCS


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CASE

Showcase 9 - Gresham, Smith and Partners - 2016  
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