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www.roceng.org

August 2020

Rooftops, Landfills, and Farm Fields – Solar Power Momentum Builds in New York State, August 2020 Albany’s Carbon-Neutral Goals and New Siting Policy Leaves Municipalities and Solar Developers with Opportunities and Challenges

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Also in this issue: Save the Date: 2021 Engineering Symposium in Rochester which has been re-scheduled to Thursday, April 29th | 9 Location still at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center; Registration will re-open around February 1st.


Rooftops, Landfills, and Farm Fields – Solar Power Momentum Builds in New York State, August 2020 (cover) 10

The Rochester Engineer Published since 1922 by

ROCHESTER ENGINEERING SOCIETY, INC.

Founded March 18, 1897

Volume 99, Number 2, AUGUST 2020 (Electronic Copy Only)

2,500+ Monthly electronically) ISSN 0035-7405

Circulation

(11

issues

RES Mission Statement: The RES will become the lead organization for improving the image and influence of the engineering community in the greater Rochester area by: Demonstrating a comprehensive knowledge of the region’s engineering and technical capabilities; Providing the best clerical support and public relations assistance to our affiliates; Continually communicating the engineering and technical accomplishments to both the engineering and technical community and the public; Providing regular forums and networking opportunities for the exchange of ideas and discussion of issues; and, Providing programs that identify career opportunities to the region’s youth and develop the skills of the practicing engineer. News items and articles are invited. Materials should be submitted to the administrative director at the society’s office, 657 East Avenue, Rochester, New York 14607; Phone number (585) 254-2350, e-mail: admin@roceng.org

contents 4 • RES History - April - May 1972 5 • RES Technical Corner by Brett Eliasz, RES Director & Tami Coghlan 6 • How Do You Arm a STEM Teacher with real-world application examples? Put an Engineer in the classroom!

7 • We continue to thank those who stayed commited to being a sponsor of the 118th RES Annual Gala which was cancelled because of COVID19 9 • 2021 Engineering Symposium in Rochester - New Date: April 29

10 • Rooftops, Landfills, and Farm Fields - Solar Power Momentum Builds in New York State, August 2020 (cover)

Published every month but July. Yearly subscription is $20.00, (4 hard copies, 11 digital). You can sign up on the website for the subscription for digital copies only (free) and receive an email notice when posted.

24-25 • Position Openings

OFFICERS: President GREG GDOWSKI, PhD University of Rochsester / Greg_Gdowski@urmc.rochester.edu First Vice President MICHELLE SOMMERMAN, PE Bergmann Associates / msommerman@bergmannpc.com Second Vice President DENNIS ROOTE, PE CDE Engineering & Environment, PLLC / dennis.roote@cde-pllc.com Treasurer ANDREW C. HIRSCH Retired / andrewcharleshirsch@gmail.com Past President JOSEPH DOMBROWSKI, PE Retired from M/E Engineering / jdombrowski3@rochester.rr.com EIGHT DIRECTORS: CORNELIUS (NEAL) ILLENBERG PE Rail Safety Consulting / nillenberg@aol.com RICHARD E. RICE Erdman Anthony / rriceaquash@gmail.com BRETT ELIASZ, PE Bergmann Associates / beliasz@bergmannpc.com KENTON G. HINES Merrill Lynch / kenton.hines@ml.com MIKE KURDZIEL, PhD Harris Corporation / mike.kurdziel@L3harris.com STEVEN W. DAY, PhD Rochester Institute of Technology / swdeme@rit.edu NANCY CRAWFORD Optimation Technology, Inc. / nancy.crawford@optimation.us DANIEL WEAVER Optimation Technology, Inc. / daniel.weaver@optimation.us Administrative Director LYNNE M. IRWIN Rochester Engineering Society / e-mail: admin@roceng.org

O b o b i D c w a M E t r b R

8 • Good News at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy...

The web site for the Engineers’ Center is at: www.roceng.org. The deadline is the 10th day of the month prior to the issue. Unless otherwise stated, opinions expressed in this publication are those of contributors, not of the Rochester Engineering Society, Inc. Advertising information may be obtained by contacting the office of the Rochester Engineering Society or going to the website at www.roceng.org.

Go to www.roceng.org to join the Rochester Engineering Society. Click on the individual membership and you can submit your application on-line. Board of Directors:

D

14 • Get IT Done - Riding the Bull, Feeling the Flow. Working IT 15-19 • Professional Firms - Employee News 15, 20-23, 25, 28 • News from Professional Firms 26 • Continuing Education Opportunities (PDHs) 26-27 • Engineers’ Calendar 39-40 • Directory of Professional Services

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40 • Directory of Business Services 41 • Affiliated Societies and Corporate Members of the RES Membership Application and Advertising Rates are also on the website: www.roceng.org.

news of the...

• ABCD Association for Bridge Construction and Design.....................33 • ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers............................................32 • ASHRAE American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers....................................................38 • IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.................34-35 • IES Illuminating Engineering Society....................................................31

2 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

• INCOSE International Council on Systems Engineering..........................36 • MPES Monroe Professional Engineers Society......................................30 • RES Rochester Engineering Society.................................................... 2-8 • SWE Society of Women Engineers........................................................29 • TERRA TERRA Science & Engineering Fair...............................................37

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Incoming President’s Message

Greg Gdowski, PhD University of Rochester Incoming RES President June 1, 2020 - May 31, 2022 Dear Fellow Engineers, One of the small pleasures that I have had since being given the keys to the office has been the unique opportunity to look through the RES archives that date back to 1897. The RES has survived many crises including the economic recession of WW1, the Great Depression, WW2, Vietnam, and 911. The Covid-19 crisis of 2020 has significantly impacted the RES in ways that we thought were unimaginable just a year ago. This year we have had to cancel the RES Gala. More recently, it was announced that the Rochester Engineering Symposium will also be changing due to the Covid-19 crisis. These changes have caused us to refocus on the magazine and website which function to bring the latest information to all engineers within the Rochester area. The Rochester Engineer In the future, we will be only delivering the magazine electronically. We will no longer be providing a service for receiving a printed copy of the magazine. That said, there is good news! The magazine will be delivered using ISSUU.com. This service allows us to archive many issues of the magazine. You can now find links to nearly the last 5yrs of issues on our webpages. ISSUU also provides a printing service. You may acquire a printed copy of any issue using their services. We will also highlight articles and member notices directly to our Facebook and LinkedIn sites in the near future! This means that your submissions will reach even farther within our community than ever before! A picture containing text, book Description automatically One of the more fascinating things I have encountered in the RES archives has been some remarkable artwork res news - incoming president’s message

for monthly luncheons dating back to the 1920s. I will be placing a different piece of artwork in each of the upcoming magazine issues. The first person to locate the artwork in the magazine and email Lynne the page number will receive a small gift from the RES! We have placed a copy of the artwork dated May 10, 1921, deep in the August issue! Within this issue you will also find an exciting article that details a number of large solar projects happening in our area (pg 10)! News about Bergmann Associates launching a new Science, Technology, and Industry Practice, and news about LaBella Associates acquiring Harmony Architectural Associates. I would also like to personally congratulate Wendy Smith for being promoted as the new Chief Operating Officer at Optimation Technology! Wendy served as the 2009 RES President and has a long history of helping with the RES Scholarship Committee. Finally, we also welcome Casmic Reid and Dwight Cooke as new RES members. Other RES news! At our last Board meeting, we decided to keep the membership dues levels the same for the upcoming year. We felt this was in the best interests of the members. Your contributions to the RES allows us to maintain the infrastructure needed to create the magazine, support community scholarships, and deliver STEM programs that reach numerous students in the Rochester area. Please remember that your membership is highly valued and your support is what keeps our mission alive. All my best, Greg Gdowski AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 3


Rochester History Continuing with the historical sampling of the earlier writings on behalf of the Rochester Engineering Society, the years following "The Great War", into and through the “Great Depression”, continued to be a time of reaching out for the maturing Society, both locally and nationally. The meeting minutes describe a series of technical discussions and presentations intended to broaden the technical horizons of the membership (especially the CE's, ME's and EE's). The RES affiliated itself with a number of National technical societies, adopted local Affiliated Societies, frequently held joint meetings with them and continued taking action on a growing list of public matters. Certain issues of standardization, some crucial to public safety, became the responsibility of the RES and its affiliates. In the pervasive economic downturn of the “Great Depression”, the magazine offered classified advertising for unemployed engineers, technicians and draftsmen and took other steps to try to deal with the crisis. Still, it continued its effort to shape the function, purpose and infrastructure of the City of Rochester, and beyond. World War, again affected the Society, taking away many of its leaders while providing opportunities for others to step forward to fill these vacancies. In an effort to provide even greater perspective on the happenings and concerns of the day, a synopsis, featuring selected items from "The Rochester Engineer" has become an integral part of this series. The Second World War and the Korean Conflict are now history, and the Vietnam War has recently become a focal point. These experiences have changed the face and, no doubt, the future of the community. The Rochester municipal leadership and the industrial community have become immersed in the cold-war, growth economy.

April 5, 1972 (Board Meeting, Bausch & Lomb) The Board approved applications for eight new Regular Members, one Associate Member, two Junior Members and two Student Members. The Board also approved petitions from the Rochester Conference of Standards Laboratories and the Association for Computing Machinery as the newest RES Affiliates. It was reported that George S. Beinetti, President of Rochester Telephone Corporation, had accepted an invitation to speak at the RES Annual Meeting on June 7th, at RIT.

“The Rochester Engineer” (April 1972) George S. Beinetti, was named “1971 Rochester Engineer of the Year,” and presented with the traditional, engraved, hand-wrought silver bowl, at the April 26th, 1972 Engineers Joint Dinner, at the Downtown Holiday Inn. The featured speaker at this event was Robert W. Decker, Vice President – Manufacturing, General Motors Corporation. His address was entitled, “Advancing Technology.” It was something of a “Homecoming” for Mr. Decker who, earlier his career (1957 – 63), had served as General Manager of the Rochester Products Division of GM. Dr. H. Searl Dunn, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the U of R spoke on a proposed system for low-emission automobile using hydraulic accumulators at the April 12th RES luncheon. Working with Dr. Paul Wojciechowki, Research Engineer at Alliance Tool & Die, Dr. Searl’s system uses a relatively small engine, only a fraction of the size of a conventional automobile engine, with an “energy accumulator” to provide surges of power, when needed. Editor’s note: This resembles, in principle, the Ford Escape “Hybrid” SUV’s of the 2000’s, with its four-cylinder gasoline engine-generator, feeding a battery pack (“energy accumulator”), which then drove an electric motor, connected directly to the front wheels. As a special observance of its 75th Anniversary, the RES co-sponsored (with the League of Women Voters) a “Transportation Meeting” in which the luncheon speaker, Ann Uccello, former Mayor of Hartford, CT and now US Director of Consumer Affairs, conducted a public hearing in which participants were invited to express their viewpoints. As yet another part of its 75th 4 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

A Sampling from the Archives of the Rochester Engineering Society...1897 - 1972 by Lee M. Loomis

Anniversary celebration, the RES co-sponsored, with the Rochester Patent Law Association (Who says Engineers and Lawyers can’t get along?), a luncheon presentation, “The Patent Law Office in a Changing World” by Robert Gottschalk, recently-appointed US Commissioner of Patents. This issue also presented a slate of RES officers for 1972-73 including: President - Edwin L. Anthony, PE, Erdman and Anthony, 1st Vice President – Mark H. Sluis, PE, General Railway Signal Corporation, 2nd Vice President, John F. Schickler, Rochester Products Division of General Motors Corporation, Secretary - John D. Cooper, PE, Rochester Telephone Corporation, Treasurer – Howard R. Jaquith, Taylor Instrument Companies, Directors – James A. Richardson, Eastman Kodak Company, Roger W. Kober, RG&E, Dr. Myron Tribus, Xerox Corporation. Continuing as Directors - Dr. Richard A. Kenyon, George G. Landberg and John M. Walsh.

May 3, 1972 (Board Meeting, Bausch & Lomb) Concerned that the cost of publication of the Operation RESOURCE final report (three volumes) would be burdensome on the Society’s finances, the Board approved a motion to charge $25 per copy to the general public. RES Member, Victor Vinkey had agreed to represent the Society on the City of Rochester’s Commission to revise the current Municipal Zoning Ordinance. Reporting for the Membership Committee, G. Robert Leavitt presented applications for eight new Regular Members, one Associate Member, two Junior Members and one Student Member. In addition, a petition for the Rochester Chapter of the Optical Society of America to become the latest RES Affiliate was presented and approved. RES President, James A. Clark announced that the RG&E Men’s Chorus would be performing at the RES Annual Meeting, at RIT.

May 24, 1972 (Board Meeting, via US Mail) RES Executive Secretary, Norm Howden reported that he had recently received seven applications for RES Membership from the Admissions Committee, and rather than wait for the next regular Board meeting, he was conducting a “first time, ever” RES Postal Board Meeting. The Board subsequently approved, by mail, three Regular Members (including Lee M. Loomis), one Junior Member and three Student Members.

May 25, 1972 (Special Board Meeting, RES Offices) The Board approved a 5% salary increase for RES Executive Secretary, Norman Howden, to $14,385 per year, effective June 1, 1972. Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II and the Korean Conflict, as well as a hoped-for period of postwar growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry, and the ensuing prosperity of the second-half of the 20th Century. We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

res news - history


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Technical Corner For this issue, I’d like to introduce and thank Tami Coghlan for contributing to the Technical Corner! With this article we will review how to use NEC Chapter 9, Table 8 to resize an equipment grounding conductor after increasing the phase conductors to accommodate for voltage drop. Consider the following example: You are sizing conductors for a copper feeder circuit to a panel, which requires 100 Amps, 3 phase, 208V. You originally size the conductors at (3) #1 AWG, (1) #1 AWG neutral with a minimum equipment ground size of #8 AWG. These are sized prior to applying any voltage drop calculations. The feeder length is roughly 400 feet. As a result, voltage drop calculations are performed. It is found that the phase and neutral conductors will need to be increased to accommodate the length of the feeder, due to voltage drop requirements. Taking into consideration voltage drop requirements for feeders, you increase the (3) #1 AWG and (1) #1 AWG neutral conductors to (3) #1/0 AWG and (1) #1/0 AWG for each ungrounded phase conductor and neutral conductor. How do you size the Equipment Ground following phase and neutral conductor increases for voltage drop? First, find the total circular mil value in NEC Table 8, Chapter 9 for your original conductor size: #1 AWG = 83690 circ mils Next, find the total circular mil value of your new (adjusted) conductor, using the same method: #1/0 AWG = 105600 circ mils Divide the adjusted size by the originally required size to determine the proportionate value of circular mil area adjustment. The result will then be your multiplier you use to size the equipment ground. 105600 ÷ 83690 = 1.26 The minimum size equipment grounding conductor for a 100A feeder is #8 AWG, according to NEC Table 250.122. The circular mil value of a #8 AWG conductor is 16510 as provided in NEC Table 8, Chapter 9. Multiply the value 16510 circular mils by 1.26 (the multiplier you found in the previous step), to come up with 20802 circular mils. With this value, once again use NEC Table 8, Chapter 9 and round up to the next higher value in the table. This will tell you the minimum ground size. In this example, the next higher value rounded up from 20802 circ mils is 26240 circ mils, which results in a #6 AWG adjusted equipment ground size. Hopefully this article finds you well and can be used as a reference for your project needs. If anyone would like to contribute to the Rochester Engineer magazine and add an article or would like to request information on a specific topic (not limited to Electrical) just email me at beliasz@ bergmannpc.com. As always, any comments are appreciated…! Thank you for reading.

Brett Eliasz, P.E., LEED AP BD+C , RES Director res - technical corner

Tami Coghlan

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 5


RES News How do you arm a STEM Teacher with real-world application examples? Put an Engineer in the classroom!

In the 1990’s, Eastman Kodak Company jumped the gun, starting a family of STEM initiatives, years before the Government coined the STEM acronym. The name of these programs was the 21st Century Learning Challenge (TCLC), and at our peek, we were 1500 engineers and technicians, visiting Rochester City School Classrooms, twice a week for two-hour visits, during the entire School Year. This effort continued for nearly ten years, and not only pre-dates our recent STEM excitement level, but delivered support on a scale we have yet to match. Many of the volunteers in these programs were, and still are, members of the Rochester Engineering Society (RES). In the intervening twenty-five years, many have retired, or are about to retire. That makes them even more available as STEM Coaches, than they were as Kodak employees. The RES is working to put technical people in K-12 Classrooms, throughout the Greater Rochester area, as STEM Coaches. Their presence will: • • •

Help the Teacher stay current with our ever-changing technology. Provide real-World Application Examples, making whatever is being taught, real enough to be worth remembering. Support the teachers with not only the delivery of STEM concepts, but perhaps more importantly, the design and delivery of STEM related hardware.

Last year we had six STEM Coach, doing Classroom Visitation at School #3. That was so successful that RCSD is interested in expanding this program to involve nine STEM Coaches this year.

The RES is specifically seeking Retired, Technical people, (Engineers, Technicians, Machinists, Entrepreneurs or anyone whose work would allow them to visit during School hours), as STEM Coaches. We currently have more than 30 Coaches, and are connecting them with 13 Rochester-area Schools. “This is a life-changing experience!” For more information contact: Jon Kriegel  jkriegel@rochester.rr.com  585-281-5216 RES Volunteer Coordinator, Volunteer STEM Coach Please visit: roceng.org/stem-bridges 6 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

res news - stem bridges


We continue to thank those who stayed committed to being a sponsor of the 118th RES Annual Gala which was cancelled because of COVID19! DIAMOND

PLATINUM

GOLD

SILVER

BRONZE

PROGRAM ADVERTISERS

res - thank you gala sponsors

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 7


RES News - Tutoring Team Good News at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy… There is much progress to report on the renovation of #10 School, at 353 Congress Avenue. A recent “Zoom” meeting provided a virtual tour of the facilities, where approximately two-thirds of the original structure has been replaced with a new main entrance, gymnasium/auditorium with a stage, and expanded building space, including more than 20 additional classrooms. The remaining one-third of the original structure, with its “Legacy Design Features” has undergone extensive renovation to preserve the hardwood floors, cabinets and decorative wood carvings of the tribes of the Iroquois Nation. Despite pandemic-related delays, the project has remained on schedule, and the “Summer 2020, Move-In” is underway. Recent discussions with School Administrators reveal that, in light of the current COVID-19 pandemic, “It is doubtful that visitors will be allowed into the School”, this Fall. Nevertheless, When it finally does happen, we will once again need the dedicated service of our current RES Tutors and, no doubt, additional tutors, working with the teachers and students, in support of our Cooper Scholars. Does this sound interesting to you, or maybe to some of your friends? Could you see yourself supporting the presentation of science curriculum to students, ages five to eleven? Who was it that showed you how science could “make a difference” in your life? Could you help introduce someone to science, yourself? Do you think you can make room in your life for this important challenge? We will continue to build our RES Tutoring Team, now for the 2020-21 school year… We have been giving “Lunch & Learn” presentations in several Rochester area firms and professional groups, to inform and inspire prospective new tutors. We have “hit the ground, running," and we need your support...Can we schedule a presentation with your firm, your work group, your church or family, sometime this Fall? Even just two hours a week of your time can make a big difference in the life of a Dr. Walter Cooper Academy Scholar… Questions??? Reach out to RES Past President Lee Loomis and the RES Tutoring Team at…Rochester Engineering Society (585) 254-2350,via website: www.roceng.org, or via email: leeloomis46@gmail.com, (585) 738-3079 (mobile & text)

RES TUTORING TEAM, FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (and tentative answers)... • When will the RES Tutors begin working? We hope that we can resume tutoring in early 2021 • What is the schedule for the teaching of science (at each Grade level)? Mornings… Mid-Day

Afternoons…

3 Grade (9:50AM – 10:30AM)

Kindergtn (12:50PM – 1:30PM)

2nd Grade (2:30PM – 3:10PM)

6th Grade (10:30AM – 11:10AM)

1st Grade (11:45AM – 12:15PM)

4th Grade (1:30PM – 2:10PM)

5 Grade (12:50PM – 1:30PM)

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th

• Will Tutors be working (exclusively) inside the class rooms? Yes, they will be supporting the teachers & assisting the students, during and following the science lessons. They will be working in the classrooms, with small groups of students (3 – 5), and (occasionally) with individual students • Will there be week by week DWCA “Science Lesson” schedules for the school year? Yes, the teachers, at each Grade level, will provide this information for the tutors • What if I cannot begin tutoring until after the October 28th “start date”? You may become an RES Tutor, and begin whenever your schedule allows; we can "fit you in" to our tutoring schedule.

8 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

res news - tutoring


Save the NEW Date for the:

2021 Engineering Symposium in Rochester www.engineeringsymposiumrochester.com

Earn up to 7 PDHs Sponsored by Rochester's Technical and Engineering Societies and RIT

Thursday, April 29, 2021 Courses available in: Civil, Electrical, Lighting, Mechanical, HVAC, and Plumbing.

SAME LOCATION AS THE LAST SYMPOSIUM (2019): Joseph A. Floreano Rochester Riverside Convention Center 123 East Main Street, Rochester, NY Time: 7:30 am to 6:30 pm $140 Advance Registration (Plan to go back online ~February 1st) $20 Student Registration $170 AFTER April 1, 2020 and at the Door Registration will re-open online at www.roceng.org about ~February 1st

The Monroe Chapter of NYSSPE, in accordance with ADA compliance, will make every attempt to provide reasonable accommodations for those requiring additional services to participate in our educational programs. If you should require such services, please contact Lynne Irwin at the Rochester Engineering Society (res@frontiernet.net or 585-254-2350) to request support by April 1, 2021.

2021 symposium

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 9


Rooftops, Landfills, and Farm Fields – Solar Power Momentum Builds in New York State, August 2020 Albany’s Carbon-Neutral Goals and New Siting Policy Leaves Municipalities and Solar Developers with Opportunities and Challenges John Shields, PE and Daniel Yanosh, PE (August 1, 2020, Rochester NY).

Cuomo Administration’s Regulatory Impetus Has Solar Developers and Engineers Revisiting Complex Site and Financing Challenges August Update: While narrow margins between solar power prices and upstate New York electric prices continue to make solar project “go/no-go” decisions difficult, the solar development community is energized following Albany’s introduction of Article 23 in the 2020 NYS Budget. An alternative-energy, catch-all piece of legislation, the Accelerated Renewable Energy Growth and Community Benefit Act (Act) was created to “accelerate approval and construction” processes and effectively removes the behemoth Public Service Commission (PSC) to replace it with a new and nimble Office of Renewable Siting (ORS, please see sidebar).

What got us here? Creative efforts at municipalities like Clifton Springs, Walworth, and City of Canandaigua set the stage Alternative Energy Complex at Clifton Springs Remains Model of Creativity The addition of a solar array to the Village of Clifton Springs’ Department of Public Works site in 2016 cemented the Village’s claim to having created a premier, regional Alternative Energy Complex. With a yield of approximately 355 KWs from the combined North and South Arrays, the creation of the solar fields added to the Village’s preexisting wastewater treatment plant, wood chip storage capacity, and co-composting facility.

Clifton Springs Alternative Energy Complex

For its part, HUNT Engineers and Architects entered the solar market in 2015/2016 in response to NYSERDA incentives that encouraged municipalities and school districts to develop arrays that were generally 2.5 MWs and smaller. They recorded several high-profile successes, building on their preexisting municipal and K-12 relationships and by quickly finishing site design, navigating municipal approval processes, and then rapidly completing buildouts. “The size of our early projects was based on site constraints, not a specific electric output target”, says HUNT’s John Shields, PE. “The Clifton Springs array with about 350 KW output is a perfect complement to the Village facility. The objective was to save energy costs, create carbon free power, and create a facility that is a working model for sustainable practices. It’s not uncommon for students from area schools to tour the site and see sustainability firsthand”. 10 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

cover article

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e

Introduction to the Accelerated Renewable Energy

Growth & Community Benefit Act

With the creation of the Act, the Cuomo Administration released a “solar pulse” of its own in the January 2020 budget. Pressed by a goal of carbon neutrality, Albany is seeking with the Act to both increase the size of solar array projects, and, with its creation of a new fast-track-oriented state agency, dramatically alter the array siting-decision-making process. For projects reviewed under the Act, array siting oversight moves from the Public Service Commission (PSC) and local municipal control to a new multi-agency Office of Renewable Siting (ORS). In doing so, Albany hopes to reproduce the success of its Regional Economic Development Council model and simultaneously empower New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Although the new process prompted an outcry from both local jurisdictions and solar developers who worry about having to “compete” with NYSERDA (through the Act, the Authority is afforded the ability to locate, secure and permit sites to then sell as ‘build ready’ to developers), Albany has remained steadfast in asserting that employing the PSC for the alternative energy initiative was too cumbersome for a body created to oversee electric, gas, steam, telecommunications and water service regulatory issues.

Key elements: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

The Act is created to accelerate approval and construction of all types of alternative energy projects. It creates ORS removing siting authority from the PSC. The Act will be a permitting option for solar projects 20 MWs to 25 MWs. The Act is available to both private and public sponsored projects. Projects less than 20 MW will be reviewed under local jurisdiction. In addition to private sector solar developments, a new public sector operating structure will be based on regions. Wherein locals can identify and nominate sites for alternative energy projects, this will be similar to NYS’s Regional Economic Development Councils. These regional organizations are now expected to be operational in Q4 2020 at the earliest and perhaps not until Q2 2021. NYSERDA will review the nominated sites and have the authority to acquire and permit these sites. When permitted they will be auctioned to developers. PILOTs and Host Community Agreements will be negotiated with NYSERDA. The Act has a “mandatory approval” trigger. If approvals are not received after 12 months from the submission of a complete application the project is considered approved. The Act supports NYS’s target of 6 GWs of distributed solar. As a result, a “distribution study” is expected to be conducted from Q4 2020 to Q1 2021. This study will be repeated every four years after 2024 to ensure reliability and flexibility. The distribution study will identify required upgrades to the electrical grid. These upgrades are targeted for 2023.

cover article

Town of Walworth Construction

Traditional Example: Town of Walworth

Walworth’s power generating facility is widely seen as a traditional array. The Town had an underutilized site which allowed for a larger array with a common configuration. Working with solar project developers, the Town of Walworth implemented a Community Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) that allowed the Town to capture an electrical power credit for the next 25 years – at no up-front costs to itself. At the urging of New York State, Walworth has aggressively sought to reduce its carbon footprint – an effort aided by utilizing federal tax credit incentives and NYSERDA cash grants -- through this PPA agreement.

Ballast System at Canandaigua AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 11


Landfill Examples: City of Canandaigua takes advantage of an attractive site with complicated geotech and ground-mounting considerations

The City of Canandaigua’s Ontario County Road 46 site was the location of a landfill that had been abandoned with no formal documentation of closure. Working closely with NYSDEC officials, the City and its engineering and financing partners verified the landfill was a suitable site for a new purpose. After field tests were conducted, it was decided that the site could optimally be used for solar energy production. Photovoltaic panels were fastened to a ballasted racking system to minimize disturbance to the surface and avoid penetration of the protective landfill cap. The Ontario County Road 10 site was cited on private land through a lease agreement with the solar developer. This additional site allowed the City to integrate an even larger renewable energy project than could have been installed on the landfill site alone. The two arrays include over 13,000 solar modules, approximately 90 solar inverters, and combined will produce 5.5 MWs. The County Road 46 site is the larger of the two arrays. With an estimated 25-year savings of approximately $3.5M to be realized, City of Canandaigua officials worked patiently with the more than six parties brought together to make the project work, including: HUNT, NEE, RER Energy Group, RG&E, NYSERDA, and AEP Onsite Partners.

Solar Array Types: Overview – megawatts & land size, approval process, project cycle 1.

Structure Arrays – generation capacity varies based on application. These would be roof-top installations and parking lot canopies. Municipal review required, glare study likely, electricity captured by owner. Project cycle: < 12 months.

2.

Small Array (2MW/10 acres) – easiest for municipal approval, SEQRA, interconnect easier, none are major steps toward NYS’s target for solar energy (6 GWs by 2025). Project cycle: 3 years +/-.

3.

Medium Array (up to 25MW/150 acres) – perhaps more resistance from communities, SEQRA, interconnects tricky, but sub-transmission lines work, no substation investment, good progress toward NYS’s target for solar energy. Project cycle: 3 years +/-.

4.

Large Array (›25MW/125+ acres) – strongest resistance from communities, traditionally require Article 10 review, interconnects limited, substation investment likely, major advance toward NYS’s target. Project cycle: 7+ years often much longer.

Reflecting on the Canandaigua project in July 2020, HUNT’s Shields asserted that, “Sites like this allow creativity to come into play when developing land to its highest and best use. More recently, we completed a landfill site for Brockport. Again, solar development breathes new life onto a property whose development options are severely limited. The Brockport landfill has a formal closure plan so geotechnical and structural considerations related to the installation of the panels and racking were needed to protect the integrity of the landfill and the plan required specific ground mounting to protect the landfill cap.”

State-of-the-Art: Solar in mid-2020

“Project delivery has changed in the last five years”, says HUNT’s Dan Yanosh, PE. “Projects are getting bigger and the players have more experience, so coordination has improved, which is important. Also, developers and contractors have worked with us to streamline the process.” Market research suggests that the 20MW projects offer fantastic short- and long-term opportunities. In December 2019, HUNT made an internal commitment to court larger 20 MW projects in addition to continuing to cater to those closer to the 5 MW scale. The path for solar arrays has some key mile-markers. Feasibility is the starting point, with criteria such as land use regulations, generating potential, and grid interconnect potential. Once the project kicks-off, a tight scope of work schedule is created and customized around developer needs and site requirements. Engineering efforts begin with survey, civil, permitting, electrical, and structural services. 12 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

cover article

c


Canandaigua Before and After: Landfill at left and traditional array at right.

Once topographic and boundary survey is complete, preliminary design and permitting is coordinated with the local municipality. Regulatory processes such a NYS’s State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) can be handled by a firm like HUNT who often calls on subconsultants for archeological, geotechnical, and endangered species reports. At the 85%-complete-drawings-mark, the team will review all aspects before issuing Construction Drawings. Once construction commences the project requires administration of civil and electrical construction services, SWPPP inspections, and electrical commissioning. HUNT’s Yanosh says his firm uses specific software that allows a comprehensive project delivery. “HelioScope® is a tool that allows a developer to discover the power generation potential for a given layout over a particular property. Forge Solar® software helps determine whether a project will generate unwanted glare which is most critical for projects near airports, highways, and structures. With ground mount, roof-top and canopy systems it’s useful information for surrounding property owners”.

Mid-Size and Article 10 Projects Continue to Draw Attention

Solar Engineers believe the mid-size array market -- 10-20 MW projects -- will be sustained to at least 2025 if NYS solar developers add 600 MWs per year until NYS’s Green New Deal target is reached though many in the market feel it will be longer. At the close of 2019, completed and pipeline projects totaled 2.8 GWs. Meanwhile, pipeline projects 25 MWs and above are still governed by A10 regulations (major power generation siting rules). These are large, often complex projects. Current A10 threshold is ≥25 MWs of name-plate capacity for new or repowering projects. These tend to be large solar, wind, and in some cases hydroelectric projects. Most of these projects are 80 MWs and up, a major undertaking that requires enormous staff capacity and expertise to permit. Furthermore, observers worry that the A10 market is limited because of the few number of sites that can meet all the requirements of these large projects. For example, a proposed, Wayne County Towns of Galen and Rose (called Rosalen Solar) project is 350 MWs and encompasses 2,000 leased acres. q By John Shields, PE, Daniel Yanosh, PE, and Marty Muggleton, Regional Business Services Courtesy of HUNT Engineers, Architects, Land Surveyors, and Landscape Architect, DPC cover article

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 13


get IT done

Riding the Bull, Feeling the Flow. Working IT — by André Godfrey

For both of my fans I want to reference the article I wrote March 12th of this year about the work environment changing due to COVID. I rarely get a chance to relive my mistakes, but this gave me an excellent opportunity to compare those relatively recent predictions to actual happenings. Let’s take a look. On March 12th I spoke about a predicted significant increase in using Zoom and Microsoft Teams. Home Run. I spoke about working from your residence and setting up VPNs to augment your productivity. Home run. I spoke about the increased utilization use of eScreenz™ to communicate to those users who previously we communicated to solely via email or hallway conversations. Home run. I’m exhausted running the bases while simultaneously patting myself on the back. There are a great many aphorisms that speak to change. In fact, I am told there are some 6,022 memorable quotes that deal with change. Those are just the memorable ones. Boy oh boy, did COVID change our world. I’m proud of the way my colleagues in the technology business have responded to the challenge. I think it’s the way we respond to challenges that makes life interesting and while I don’t for a moment wish to live in a world with a single case of COVID, the opportunities this issue presented for creative problem solving has been life affirming. I’ll sight one instance for you in which I had some modest involvement. A local health organization had been planning a live conference for many months, only to have it impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Disappointed, they wanted to find a way to still hold their conference while adhering to the new and now necessary social-distancing guidelines. They believed the bringing together of health experts in their field of specialty was too important to allow this recent scourge to interfere. How to do it? The health organization came to me and asked if they could repurpose a mobile app to host a virtual conference. Could the client pull off a fully online event? If so, the mobile app needed to allow conference 14 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

attendees to see the daily agenda and speakers, give them the opportunity to see videos and chat amongst themselves in discreet groups, take quizzes for prizes and enjoy the experience as if they were there in person (almost). Here’s the kicker. The delay of whether to host the conference or not had put them in a time crunch. Could they produce the content and navigation to work for hundreds of attendees flawlessly and in less than two weeks? Anyone involved in writing mobile applications can tell you that it can’t be done. Plus to have it available to all Android and iPhone users? Not a chance. If I told you how we did it, I would have to pay for advertising space. Let’s leave it like this. You know the end to this story. The virtual conference was a success! People registered, they mingled on the chat sites, they attended the daily keynotes virtually, they took the quizzes and watched the videos. Though a virtual conference was not their initial intention, the results were outstanding. Both the attendees and the conference hosts avoided the cost of travel and rooms. Yet, without the need for travel or lodgings, attendance was at the same level or higher than expectations for the live conference. Given the lower cost, this organization will now host more virtual events and conferences throughout the year. Attendees are provided more flexibility, creating the opportunity to attend from even across the globe. Plus the information provided is persistent and can be referenced throughout the year. Think About IT

André Godfrey is President of Entre Computer Services www.entrecs.com

get IT done


o

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Professional Firms Employee News William Doughty, P.E. named Western New York Director of Bridge Condition Inspection William Doughty, P.E. has been named Director of Bridge Condition Inspection for GPI’s Western New York Operations. Bill’s 27-year career has included inspection, design and management roles; providing a depth of expertise that encompasses the above- and below-water condition inspection of bridges, culverts, canal structures, ancillary highway structures and waterfront structures for local, state, and federal clients. He is tireless in his pursuit of best practices and cost-effective solutions for his projects. Bill also currently instructs and has been involved in the development of several nationwide FHWA/NHI courses related to structural inspection and maintenance. He was awarded the FHWA Instructor of Excellence award for each of the last three evaluation periods. A native of New Jersey, he is a graduate of Rutgers University. Bill and his family now make their home in Penfield, New York where they have been active in several local sports clubs and as Science Olympiad coaches. Please join us in congratulating Bill on this well-deserved promotion! < < Our Competitive Advantage is our People > > Greenman-Pedersen, Inc.

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Engineering

News From

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Design

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Construction Management

Professional Firms

Barton & Loguidice News

Barton & Loguidice Awarded "Best Firm To Work For" - Third Year in a Row Barton & Loguidice (B&L), an engineering, planning, environmental and landscape architecture firm with over 300 employees throughout the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, for the third year in a row has been named one of the “Best Firms To Work For” nationally in both the Multidiscipline and 200+ Employee categories according to the Zweig Group – a leading industry research and benchmarking firm. The award honors the best architecture, engineering, planning, environmental and construction firms (AEC) to work for in North America. Firms were comprehensively evaluated by both management and staff on their firm culture, workplace practices, employee benefits, employee retention rates, professional development and more. “Reports from the Zweig Group indicated that it was a very competitive year for submissions, and the fact that we moved up in the rankings (#17) signifies a strong workforce culture that allows our employees to feel valued and rewarded for their hard work and dedication,” said President and CEO of Barton & Loguidice John F. Brusa, Jr. “In light of the additional challenges arising from the COVID-19 pandemic, receiving this recognition is a true testament Continued on page 25 professional firms employee news

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 15


Professional Firms Employee News Optimation Technology News

OTI has a new Chief Operating Officer, Wendy Smith

the challenge.

Optimation, a global design, engineering and fabrication company for industry, announced a new Chief Operating Officer. Wendy Smith, with over thirty years’ experience in plant operations and design and engineering services management, is excited to take on

“This new role is a wonderful blend of both of my engineering and manufacturing roots. I am excited to bring those two worlds together and work with the entire team as we engineer and fabricate solutions to delight our customers. I am energized by the day to day bustle in our shops and being able to witness the wide variety of projects becoming reality before our eyes,” said Smith. Smith has a bachelor of science in ceramic engineering with a business management minor from Alfred University, including a study abroad semester at the University of Sheffield in England. She started at Corning Incorporated as a Melting Engineer and went on to hold key manufacturing and operations leadership positions over the next 15 years including Department Head, Product Line Coordinator, Supply Chain Manager, Operations Manager and Plant Manager. In 2003 she joined Optimation Technology Inc. as the Mechanical and Process Engineering/Design Supervisor as well as the COO of Klug Systems (a company that Optimation had recently acquired). Over the next fifteen years, Smith took on additional management and leadership roles at Optimation where she is currently the COO, a member of the Sales Team and the Executive team, and sits on the Board of Directors. Smith has broad experience in a variety of 16 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

manufacturing environments including continuous flow, batch processes, hot glass, refractory, finishing and assembly. She also has broad general management experience with responsibilities for sales, gross margin, operations, manufacturing efficiencies, EH&S, facilities, information technology, supply chain, procurement, logistics, materials, and quality. She has extensive experience with business strategic planning as well as organizational and personnel development. Smith is an active member of the Board of Directors for Compeer Rochester. She is former President of the Rochester Engineering Society and continues to serve on the scholarship committee for that organization. She has also served on the President’s Advisory Board at Roberts Wesleyan College. Smith is married and has four children. In 2019 Smith was recognized as an Influential Woman in Manufacturing by Putnam Media. Influential Women in Manufacturing honors women who are effecting change in the manufacturing and industrial production space. Women are vastly underrepresented in U.S. manufacturing, which continues to struggle with a skills gap. • • •

According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, women account for only 13% of the engineering workforce in the United States. Only 26% of those working in computer science in the United States are women. Women account for about one-third of the manufacturing workforce overall.

It’s not news that manufacturing needs more women in skilled and professional positions such as the skilled trades, designing and drafting, engineering and development. But if we’re going to close the gender gap in manufacturing, we also need to see more women in leadership positions. Optimation Technology is honored to grow these numbers by a very important one. “Change comes from encouraging young women and girls to consider careers in STEM, but also by encouraging and nurturing women working in manufacturing to lead. To become operations and plant managers and subject matter experts, engineering managers, vice presidents and presidents,” President and CEO Bill Pollock. q

professional firms employee news

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W a i


SWBR News

SWBR Welcomes New Team Members SWBR welcomes Construction Administrator Tom Thompson, Senior Project Manager Rich Linder AIA and Project Designer Pete LaDolce. Thompson’s significant field experience makes him a welcome addition to the construction administration team. Tom Thompson He believes meaningful design serves a purpose, provides a function and creates a pleasing aesthetic. Thompson received a bachelor of arts and science in education from Syracuse University and a master of science in project management from Boston University.

community values and wants to preserve because they contribute to the quality of life. He has an associate degree in architectural technology from Alfred State College.

Rich Linder AIA

As part of the firm’s housing studio, Linder manages projects from design through completion. He sees meaningful design as the creation of buildings the

LaDolce brings significant experience with multi-family and mixed-use housing projects to the firm’s housing studio. He credits his appreciation of hand drafting in high school for drawing him to the field of architecture. He has an associate of applied science from Alfred State College. q Pete LaDolce

BME Associates News

Bob Cantwell To Retire After 32 Years with BME Robert J. Cantwell, R.L.A., an original member of BME Associates, will retire in September after 32 years of service with the firm. In 1988, Bruce Boncke, Jim Mueller and Doug Eldred left Sear-Brown Associates of Rochester and formed BME. Joining them from Sear-Brown were Cantwell and current BME president Peter Vars.

Land Planning Design Services. “Among the things I enjoyed most about my years at BME was the pleasure of working with clients of high integrity who were excellent business people,” Cantwell said. “They gave me the opportunity to approach projects in innovative ways to meet their needs.”

Cantwell has been a key contributor to “For three decades, Bob Cantwell has many of BME’s most visible and successful played a key role in creating projects that projects, including Cobblestone Creek are more than simply places to live or work, Robert J. Cantwell, RLA Golf Course Community, Spall Properties/ but places where people can interact with Pittsford, The Highlands at Pittsford, their surroundings,” Vars said. “He brought a passion to Riedman Development Communities, Arbor Ridge, every design he prepared, and the results are now part Omnitech Business Park, Corporate Crossings Office of the very fabric of our communities.” Park, and many more. In addition to Cobblestone, he was involved with local golf courses Ravenwood and Greystone, as well as Hickory Stick in Lewiston, NY. A native of Whitesboro, NY, Cantwell graduated from Syracuse University in 1976 and spent the next ten In retirement, Cantwell plans to continue his long years at various engineering and surveying firms service to the Fairport community, which includes in northern Virginia before joining Sear-Brown and serving on the Fairport Municipal Commission and on subsequently moving to BME. the advisory board for the Fairport-Perinton Partnership for a Better Community. q With more than 35 years of experience in land planning and land development design, Cantwell’s responsibilities included oversite of BME’s Landscape Architecture and professional firms employee news

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 17


Professional Firms Employee News Passero Associates News

Passero Associates Announces Leadership Transition Passero Associates proudly announces a leadership transition that will positively impact service delivery to clients, stimulate growth and new opportunities, and enhance the firm's overall performance.

Director of Civil Engineering. Mr. Sudol has over 20 years of experience in the industry, and over 18 years of service with the firm. Mr. Sudol is based in the firm’s Rochester, New York office.

Leadership Transition

“I am grateful and blessed for the opportunity to continue Passero’s long standing commitment to our community, begun by Gary Passero, and continued by past presidents. I am also passionate about this opportunity to support our employees and their professional growth as our firm expands. Our people are the reason for our success and together, we have a very bright and exciting future.” – Jess Sudol, PE

Fiscally sound, with a strong workforce, and continuing its growth trajectory, Passero Associates has appointed new leadership to continue the growth of the firm and its services to our valued clients. Each member of our leadership team is an industry expert with the vision and determination required to lead Passero into the future.

Executive Committee Members

Andrew M. Holesko, MBA, CM has been appointed CEO. As CEO, Mr. Holesko will focus on the growth and expansion of the firm, and on maintaining the firm’s culture of exceptional service. He will also continue in his role of National Director of Aviation Services. Mr. Holesko has over 30 years of experience in the industry, and over 25 Andrew M. Holesko, CM years of service with the firm. Mr. Holesko is based in the firm’s St. Augustine, Florida office. “I am both humbled and very proud to guide the future of Passero Associates and to lead the Executive Team as the newly-appointed CEO. Building on Passero's 40+ year history of exceptional client service, and on the dedication and success of my two distinguished predecessors, Gary Passero and Wayne Wegman, I hope to continue our legacy, support our Core Values and remain dedicated to our corporate focus on Service — Solutions — Results.” - Andrew Holesko, CM

Jess Sudol, PE, President

Jess Sudol, PE has been appointed President, succeeding retired President John F. Caruso, PE. As President, Mr. Sudol will ensure that all aspects of the firm’s operations and staff engagement contribute towards its success. He will also continue in his role as

18 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

David K. Passero will continue in his role as CFO. Mr. Passero has over 35 years of experience in the industry, and over 34 years of service with the firm. Mr. Passero is based in the firm’s Rochester, New York office.

David K. Passero, CFO

“I am extremely proud to be entering my 34th year with Passero Associates. Guided by our Core Value of servant leadership, and by all that I have learned from our founder, Gary Passero, I look forward to our bright future, which is in very capable hands with my colleagues Andrew Holesko and Jess Sudol.” – David Passero

Mr. Holesko, Mr. Sudol, and Mr. Passero comprise the firm’s Executive Committee and are also all members of the firm’s Board of Directors.

Additional Members of the Board of Directors

Peter R. Wehner, AIA

Peter R. Wehner, AIA, LEED AP BD+C has been appointed Vice President and joins the firm’s Board of Directors. He continues in his role as Director of Architecture Services. Mr. Wehner has over 30 years of experience in the industry, and over 13 years of service to the firm. Mr. Wehner is based in the firm’s Rochester, New York office.

"My 13 years of client service and management at Passero professional firms employee news


Associates have prepared me well for this new role. I am honored and excited to be an integral part of firm leadership as an Architect.” – Peter Wehner, AIA

Jeffrey W. Bonecutter, PE

Jeffrey W. Bonecutter, PE has been appointed Vice President and joins the firm’s Board of Directors. He continues in his role as Director of Midwest Aviation Services. Mr. Bonecutter has over 25 years of experience in the industry, and over six years of service to the firm. Mr. Bonecutter is based in the firm’s Dayton, Ohio office.

”It is an honor and a privilege to be appointed Vice President and a new member of the firm’s Board of Directors. Passero Associates is fortunate to have extremely talented people within all levels of the organization, and I look forward to helping the leadership team as we continue to grow, serve our clients, and bring value to the communities in which we work.” - Jeff Bonecutter, PE

Bradley J. Wente, PE

Bradley J. Wente, PE has been appointed Vice President and joins the firm’s Board of Directors. He continues in his role as Director of Southeast Aviation Services. Mr. Wente has over 23 years of experience in the industry, and over three years of service to the firm. Mr. Wente is based in the firm’s St. Augustine, Florida office.

“I am so grateful to be affiliated with Passero Associates. We are blessed with great people, exceptional clients, and meaningful projects. I look forward to a bright future with PA: expanding our existing services and developing new

capabilities while maintaining our strong customer focus.” – Bradley Wente, PE

Daniel J. Savage continues in his role as Vice President and Director of Municipal and Survey Services and Director of Marketing until the end of 2020, when he will be retiring from the firm. He also serves on the Firm’s Board of Directors. Mr. Savage has Daniel J. Savage over 40 years of experience in the industry, and over 37 years of service to the firm. Mr. Savage is based in the firm’s Rochester, New York office. “As I step away from Passero Associates after 37 years, I do so knowing that the firm is in excellent hands under the new leadership team. They have guided the firm through this unprecedented time during the pandemic and have positioned the firm for expansive growth in the post-COVID era. The new leadership team’s emphasis on equipping our staff with the latest technology to provide innovative solutions has given the firm a strategic advantage and has added tremendous value to our clients.” – Dan Savage

Additional Associates

Steven Trobe, AIA, has been promoted to Associate. He continues in his role as Project Manager and Senior Project Architect. Mr. Trobe has over 30 years of experience in the industry and six years of service to the firm. Mr. Trobe is based in the firm’s Rochester, New York office. David Cox, PE, MBA has been promoted to Associate. He continues in his role as Project Manager and Senior Project Engineer. Mr. Cox has over 20 years of experience in the industry and over ten years of service to the firm. Mr. Cox is based in the firm’s Rochester, New York office. Mr. Trobe and Mr. Cox join the firm’s current Associates: Mira Mejibovsky, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Project Manager and Senior Project Architect; Sue Cocca, HR & Accounting; Kim Kulik, HR & Recruiting. Ms. Mejibovsky, Ms. Cocca, and Ms. Kulik are all based in the firm’s Rochester, New York office.q

Beardsley Architects + Engineers News Ostiguy Joins Beardsley

Beardsley Architects + Engineers announced that Kristin M. Ostiguy has joined the firm as an Electrical Designer. Kristin graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 2020 with a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering with an environmental sciences immersion.

Kristin M. Ostiguy

During her time at RIT, Kristin served as Program Assistant for the Women in Engineering office, which is dedicated to increasing representation of women in engineering and preparing women for leadership roles within the profession. At Beardsley, Kristin will be working on projects for governmental and commercial clients. q AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 19


News From

Professional Firms

Bergmann Associates News

Bergmann's Resilient Design Team Takes Comprehensive, People-Centered Approach To Designing Safe, Adaptive Business Environments Bergmann has formed a multi-disciplinary resilient design team to assist organizations with creating safe and flexible spaces. The group helps clients reconfigure business spaces both in response to regulations put in place due to the COVID-19 crisis and the need to prepare facilities to withstand disruptive events in the future. “We think about adapting and redesigning spaces from two perspectives. The first is with people in mind, seeking to ensure that employees and customers feel comfortable and confident about the day-to-day health and safety of the workplace,” says Andrew Raus, Senior Vice President Bergmann. “Secondly, we think of workspaces and the building itself as an ecosystem constantly needing to evolve in response to a range of factors and variables, which calls for a focus on resilience in the design process.” The team is comprised of experts in areas such as interior design, architecture, mechanical engineering, and environmental health and safety, and clean room protocols. Together, they look holistically at business spaces to adapt and create environments that support the needs of employees while delivering on business goals.

Their work typically begins by conducting a comprehensive audit that reviews factors such as existing floor plans, HVAC systems, workspace and office configurations, as well as the company’s business operations, culture and human use of the space. Comprehensive recommendations are then provided on a range of aspects from redirecting the movement of people to facilitate social distancing to strategies for mitigating air quality risks through enhancements to the HVAC system. “By applying universal design principles and engineering practices, our goal is to create environments that are inclusive of all people and uses, and that are designed to react and adapt to unplanned circumstances that a company might face down the road,” says Raus. “Through good design and planning, we can help our clients efficiently respond to unknown risks, maintain their operations and keep employees safe.” Bergmann offers specialized and tailored planning services to meet the unique needs of clients across multiple vertical markets including corporate and office, education, hospitality, and retail. q

LaBella Associates News

LaBella Associates Acquires Harmony Architectural Associates, PC Rochester Design Firm Expands Footprint and Services in the Central New York Region LaBella Associates, an award-winning, multidiscipline design firm, announced it has completed the acquisition of Harmony Architectural Associates, PC, an architectural firm based in Syracuse, NY. Through the deal, LaBella Associates expands its existing presence and capabilities in the Central New York (CNY) region. Harmony boasts more than 45 years of experience and a wide range of architectural projects, both residential and commercial. During the firm’s history, it also functioned as a design-build firm, resulting in a team of architects well-grounded in construction expertise. “We’re excited that Harmony’s talented team has joined LaBella,” said Jeff Roloson, President, LaBella Associates. “In addition to enabling us to expand our capabilities in the CNY region, the deal extends new 20 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

resources to the Harmony team to do what they do best – deliver exceptional design services to their clients.” “In collaborating with LaBella, we found alignment in our approach to both projects and company culture,” said Bill Ferraldo, Principal, Harmony Architectural Associates. “LaBella’s core values—including an emphasis on creating partnership with employees, clients, and our community—has resulted in a highly respected brand that we are thrilled to join.” Harmony’s six employees will begin operating under the LaBella name and brand immediately. They will join LaBella’s Syracuse-based staff of nine at its Armory Square office later this summer. LaBella has had a Syracuse-based office dedicated to serving the CNY region since 2014. q news from professional firms


Bergmann Associates News

Bergmann Launches New Science, Technology & Industry Practice

National architecture, engineering and planning firm Bergmann recently announced its new Science, Technology & Industry (STI) practice, providing an in-demand offering to companies in highly specialized industries. The STI practice combines Bergmann’s decades of experience in engineering design services for manufacturing and research clients with recently added planning and architectural capabilities for pharmaceutical and biotech operations. This unique team of experts brings years of industry knowledge and understanding of business priorities and workflows which are integral to the success of these specialized projects. Since its founding, Bergmann’s Research and Manufacturing practice has provided highly specialized engineering services to industrial and manufacturing companies. The practice has expanded since then to include scientific research organizations, with the firm building an extensive resume in the design of clean rooms, laboratories, GMP facilities and most recently cannabis and hemp facilities. “Each facility our STI team works on is unique, complex, technical and regulated, as well as expensive and timeconsuming to design and build, so a deep understanding of the industry is critical,” said Pete Giovenco, President and CEO, Bergmann. “The marriage of our engineering and architecture capabilities into this new practice, paired with our exceptional level of service, provides our clients with incredible value in addressing each facet of these intricate projects.” Bergmann’s acquisition of Johnsrud Architects in 2019 balanced its existing engineering services with specialized architecture capabilities. Over 24 years, Johnsrud Architects became a leader in the planning and design of laboratories, as well as animal and production facilities, with a primary focus in the pharmaceutical and biotech categories. The team’s unique experience has made it a trusted advisor to many Fortune 100 companies as well as numerous emerging life science companies. With the integration of teams, Bergmann’s STI practice now includes planners, architects and engineers who provide clients with a unique blend of specialized expertise and dedicated service tailored to a number of markets including biotechnology, cannabis and hemp, materials manufacturing, life science industries and pharmaceuticals. The STI practice’s core service offerings include programming and planning, laboratory planning, architecture, engineering, and client management services. “The STI practice brings to life the visions that both Bergmann and Johnsrud had when we embarked on this collaboration,” said Charles Johnsrud, Principal, Bergmann. “We are excited to bring greater value to existing clients and explore how we can engage with new organizations that will benefit from our combined expertise in planning and designing their facilities.” More information on Bergmann’s STI practice can be found here: https://www.bergmannpc.com/markets/ science-technology-industry. q news from professional firms

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 21


News From

Professional Firms

Beardsley Architects + Engineers News

Beardsley Project Receives Prestigious AIA New York State Excelsior Award Beardsley Architects + Engineers announced that the Environmental Education Center at Green Lakes State Park in Fayetteville, NY, has been selected by AIA New York State to receive a 2020 Excelsior Award, Award of Merit, in the Historic Preservation category. The awards program recognizes public architecture projects throughout New York State. “We are very proud of our many accomplishments working in close partnership with the team at the Central New York State Parks Region in service to Park visitors and our community,” says Barry Halperin, AIA, NCARB, architect for the project. “Their passion for making Park visits great for everyone makes the work we do with them very special.” Originally constructed in 1942, the historic boathouse at Green Lakes State Park is an iconic structure to anyone who has visited the beach at the north end of Green Lake. The building had been in use since its construction but lacked an adequate foundation due to poor soils. The NYS Office of Parks Recreation and Historic Preservation (NYSOPRPH) selected Beardsley to design the restoration and conversion of the building into a new environmental education center. As a registered historic structure, renovations also required coordination with the State Historic Preservation Office. To create the new environmental education center and alleviate structural issues, the existing structure was meticulously dismantled and re-built on an entirely new foundation system. Special care was given to preserving as much of the building as possible. Following relocation, the building was restored and renovated to provide fourseason usage. The central exhibit space, anchored by preserved stone columns, includes educational kiosks and displays about the Park’s unique meromictic lakes, wildlife and habitats, and history. The building also includes restrooms, a small kitchenette, offices for Park educators, and generous storage space on the main floor and in the full basement. An outdoor education space was created for use by Park educators for school groups or other interpretive presentations. A small boat rental building was also relocated and renovated for continued use. Visitors can now enjoy the lakefront boardwalk or launch their kayak or canoe from new docks that connect to the boardwalk. An interpretive center like this one did not previously exist in the Park and has allowed Park educators to vastly expand and enhance their programming. The interior and exterior spaces provide an array of learning opportunities to students and the public through the use of interactive displays within the exhibit space as well as outdoor signage along the boardwalk. In addition, opportunities for school groups to visit the Park have expanded, particularly through the Connect-Kids-to-Parks Field Trip Grant Program, which provides the financial assistance necessary to connect kids throughout New York with history and nature. q 22 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

news from professional firms


SWBR Architects News

DePaul Upper Falls Square Recognized with 2020 Excelsior Awards Honor Award SWBR announced

funders, to be

that DePaul Upper

recognized as a

Falls Square

recipient of a 2020

Apartments has

Excelsior Awards

been recognized

Honor Award.”

with the 2020 Excelsior Awards

The Excelsior

Honor Award from

Awards, an AIA

the New York State

New York State

American Institute

partnership with

of Architects. This

New York State

prestigious award

contracting

recognizes the

agencies, provides

project’s overall performance, how it impacts the

a model of excellence for state-funded building

user, the community, and design excellence, all

design, professional practice, and advocacy. The

within the context of a publicly funded project.

projects reflect the collaborative efficacy of the design and construction team.

At 143,000 square feet, Upper Falls Square brings quality affordable housing to Rochester’s

SWBR provided architectural, structural

Upper Falls neighborhood, while serving DePaul’s

engineering, landscape architecture, and interior

mission of improving people’s lives and their

design services for the project.

community ties by offering clean, safe homes, and an array of support services. It spans

“SWBR is proud to have partnered with DePaul

two city blocks and is one of the largest single

on this amazing and transformative project,”

developments ever undertaken by DePaul.

says SWBR Principal Joe Gibbons, AIA. “Upper Falls Square will truly provide a positive impact

“The DePaul Upper Falls Square Apartments

for many residents in the CONEA neighborhood

are an example of partnership and progress in

of Rochester for many years to come. This

action, providing the highest quality housing

project also demonstrates DePaul’s tremendous

and supportive services to people in need while

continued commitment to sustainability in

creating a sense of community and contributing

affordable housing as it was recently certified

toward the neighborhood revitalization of

by the US EPA as an Energy Star multifamily

Rochester's Hudson Avenue corridor,” said

project and exceeded the requirements of the

DePaul President Mark Fuller. “We are so very

NYS Housing Finance Agency’s Climate Bond

proud, along with our project partners and

Initiative.” q

news from professional firms

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 23


Position Openings...Pages 24-25

NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 1530 JEFFERSON ROAD ROCHESTER, NY 14623

CONTINUOUS RECRUITMENT The New York State Department of Transportation is continuously recruiting engineering candidates at all levels, entry level through Team Leader. To apply, visit the New York State Department of Civil Service website at https:// www.cs.ny.gov/jobseeker/public/licensing.cfm, select Engineering Positions, specifically Civil/Transportation Exam Series, which includes Engineer Trainee, Assistant Engineer, and Professional Engineer 1. For general inquiries, please email R04-Design@dot.ny.gov. 24 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

Save the Date Annual Engineering Symposium in Rochester Re-scheduled to Thursday, April 29, 2021 Rochester Riverside Convention Center Additional details will be posted on the RES website: www.roceng.org Registration will re-open around February 1st.

position openings


Barton & Loguidice Awarded...Continued to the strength of B&L’s core values of teamwork, trust and integrity. We are fortunate to continue to be recognized as an employer of choice.” The annual evaluation yields over 2.3 million benchmarking data points on everything from culture and values, career opportunities, and leadership in the AEC industry. Winners will be honored at the 2020 Elevate AEC Conference in September. The complete list of “Best Firms to Work For” winners can be accessed here: https://www.zweiggroup.com/2020best-firms-to-work-for/?_ke=#1593443673278f52047fa-131f q position openings | RES news

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 25


Go to the RES Web Site for Updated Details On All Meetings - www.roceng.org

Continuing

Education Opportunities

Thursday, April 29 (Re-scheduled)

2021 Engineering Symposium in Rochester

p9

Earn up to 7 PDHs Place: Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 East Main Street, Rochester Time: 7:30 am to 6:30 pm Cost: $140 Advance registration; $20 Student registration; $170 AFTER April 1, 2020 and at the door. Registration: Registration will re-open at www.roceng.org around the 1st of February.

BE SURE TO CHECK IF A MEETING IS STILL SCHEDULED BECAUSE OF COVID-19 To post continuing education opportunities on this page please contact the Rochester Engineering Society, 585-254-2350, or email: admin@roceng.org

Engineersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Calendar

The engineering societies are encouraged to submit their meeting notices for publication in this section. The deadline for submitting copy is the 10th of the month prior to the month of publication. Please email to: admin@roceng.org. The meetings offering PDHs are highlighted in blue. Details about the meeting and affiliate (if in this issue) are on the corresponding page listed next to the affiliate name.

Tuesday, August 4

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)

Saturday, September 12 p 35

International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE)

p 36

EXCOM Meeting

Annual Banquet Meeting

Place: On-line: via webex conferencing.

Speaker: TBA

Time: 11:50 am to 1:00 pm

Place: Cornellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Statler Hotel.

Registration links for our events are at:

Time: 12:30 pm

http://sites.ieee.org/rochester/. Vtools 234896

Comments: More information will be available as we get closer to the event. Note that this may change depending on meeting rules/regulations due to the

Tuesday, September 2

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) EXCOM Meeting Place: On-line: via webex conferencing. Time: 11:50 am to 1:00 pm Registration links for our events are at:

pandemic.

p 35

Support Your Affiliate Attend a Meeting

http://sites.ieee.org/rochester/.

26 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

continuing education calendar | engineers' calendar


Friday, September 11

American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)

Tuesday, October 27

Institute of Electrical p 32 and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)

Annual 18-Hole Scholarship Golf Tournament

Place: Webster Golf Course – East Course, 440 Salt Road, Webster, NY 14580 Time: Registration, lunch, and social hour from noon to 1:15 pm; Shotgun start at 1:30 pm. Dinner will be served following the tournament. Cost: Four-person Scramble Format. $95/person includes lunch, driving range, 18 holes, cart, dinner and drink tickets. Registration: To register or sponsor a hole, contact Josh Rodems, 585-232-5135 or jrodems@bergmannpc.com. Reservations and payment due by August 28, 2020. Website: https://sections.asce.org/rochester.

Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) p 31 Annual Buffalo and Rochester Joint IES Golf Outing

Place: Stafford Country Club, 8873 Morganville Road, Stafford, NY 14143 Time: Shotgun start at noon; Lunch served starting at 11:00 am. Online registration is not yet available. Upon confirmation that we are definitely proceeding we will send an email announcement. Please check the website at www.iesrochester.org for any updates.

Thursday, October 15

p 36

Systems Engineering and Product Management Speaker: Dr. Nancy Li, Director of Product-Edge Cloud Computing, Cox Communications Place: All meetings being held virtually until further notice. Time: Meetings begin at 6:00 pm and run to approximately 7:30 pm Reservations: We use Globalmeet2 for our monthly meetings (GlobalMeet Join Details – Join as a GUEST). Meeting details web address: https://incose.pgimeet.com/INCOSE_GMTwo. Access number – 1-719-457-6209. Guest passcode: 519 731 6920.

engineers' calendar

2020 IEEE Rochester Section Joint Chapters Meeting Place: Virtual Event (free for members). Time: 3:00 pm to 9:00 pm Additional details about this chapter meeting will be announced next month.

Thursday, April 29 (re-scheduled) 2021 Engineering Symposium in Rochester

p9

Earn up to 7 PDHs

Monday, September 14

International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE)

p 35

Place: Joseph A. Floreano Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 East Main Street, Rochester Time: 7:30 am to 6:30 pm Cost: $140 advance registration, Student registration $20; $170 after April 1st Registration at www.roceng.org.

The RES website (www.roceng.org) has a calendar of events for this month's meetings and meetings that are received or updated after print deadline. Please refer to the website for updated information. If you wish to be listed in the calendar please send details to res@frontiernet.net AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 27


News From

Professional Firms

CHA Consulting News

CHA Evolves to a More Client and Market Focused Organization Four Experienced Leaders Named Sector Presidents CHA Consulting, Inc. (CHA), a highly diversified, innovative full-service consulting engineering and construction management firm, announces its evolution to a more client and market focused organization to support its growth and goal to become the most client-centered and responsive engineering firm in the industry. The foundation of the new organizational structure is strong leadership and collaboration centered around sectors and markets. CHA’s sectors include Infrastructure, Buildings, Power, and Fire Protection Services with each of those sectors consisting of targeted business lines. CHA’s markets incorporate the firm’s major client groups: Government, Industry, Utility, Education, and Commercial Development. As part of the new structure, CHA has named four Sector Presidents: John Hensley, PE, Infrastructure; John Achenbach, PE, Buildings; Greg Corso, PE, Power; and Randy Treglown, Interim Fire Protection Services. “I am confident our enhanced structure led by our operating Sector Presidents and supported by the leaders for our business lines, corporate teams, and markets, will provide the most efficient pathway for CHA to meet our strategic goals, fuel our growth, maximize the value we bring to our clients and provide greater opportunities for employees,” said Jim Stephenson, CEO, CHA Holdings, Inc. and President, CHA Consulting, Inc. John Hensley, PE, Sector President, Infrastructure, will provide leadership for transportation, aviation and water resources. John joined the Executive Team in 2016 after twenty years of leadership at one of the world’s largest engineering firms. He is a civil engineer with 34 years of diverse experience in the transportation, environmental, water and infrastructure consulting and engineering fields and is based in the Atlanta, Georgia office.

28 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

John Achenbach, PE, Sector President, Buildings, will direct building design, land development, project management/construction management, and sports facility architecture. He draws on over 35 years of engineering experience from facilities to energy, to understand client needs and develop cost-effective, innovative solutions to improve the built environment. John joined CHA’s Executive Team in 2015 following a decade as Chief Operations Officer for a large international engineering firm, and also served in the U.S. Navy after graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy. John is based in the Colonie, New York office. Greg Corso, PE, Sector President, Power, has responsibility for utility infrastructure, advanced energy and manufacturing, and asset management. Greg has been with the firm for 20 years, most recently establishing and overseeing our Industry and Energy Market. His more than 25 years of consulting experience spans a wide range of markets and clients, focusing on strategic growth, client service and project delivery. His leadership propelled the strategic growth of the power delivery sector within CHA. Greg is based in the Colonie, New York office. Randy Treglown, Interim Sector President, Fire Protection Services, will lead the company’s global fire protection engineering, procurement and construction services. Randy was the Founder and President of American Fire, a leader in custom design, engineering, installation, and maintenance of fire protection systems domestically and around-the-world. He is based in the Birmingham, Alabama office. For more information on CHA’s sectors, markets and business lines, visit www.chacompanies.com. q

xxx news from professional firms


swe news

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 29


657 East Avenue, Rochestter, New York 14607 Dedicated to Professionalism in Engineering in the Interest of Public Safety and Welfare 2020-21 Officers: President Arthur Reardon, PE, President-elect Scott Wolcott, PE, Vice-President Michael O. Ritchie, PE, Secretary Martin Gordon, PE, Treasurer Chris Devries, PE, Membership Chair Michael O. Ritchie, PE Past Presidents: Chris Kambar, PE , David Roberts, PE, Directors: Barry J. Dumbauld, PE, Robert K. Winans, PE, Joseph Dombrowski, PE, Jim Drago, PE, Neal Illenberg, PE, Douglas R. Strang Jr., PE

COVID-19 STATE ACTIONS

NSPE is tracking and identifying executive orders and legislation related to Covid-19 and has created one-page printable reports for the majority of the states. Click here for NEW YORK (https://www.nspe.org/sites/default/files/sites/default/files/c19/NewYork-C19.pdf) These are all dynamic resources that NSPE continues to update on a daily basis, so please check back regularly for new/ additional information. Access the information for Licensure (https://www.quorum.us/spreadsheet/external/XzccVELfzzrFQYyqEmxn/) Access the information for Small Business Legislative (https://www.quorum.us/spreadsheet/external/GQuvKPGmWdIYzQPSUkaO/) Click here for more Resources (https://www.nspe.org/resources/coronavirus-covid-19-resources)

2020 ENGINEERING SYMPOSIUM

The 2020 Engineering Symposium has been re-scheduled for Tuesday, September 22, 2020. If you have already registered for the event, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to do anything - you will be advance registered and paid for the event in September. If you would like a refund, there will be no fees or penalties. Please email res@frontiernet.net and we will process a refund. Please allow up to one week for Lynne to credit your account. Our goal is to re-open registrations by August 1st and host a great event under better circumstances. Thank you for your understanding and stay safe.

WHY GET LICENSED?

https://www.nspe.org/resources/licensure/why-get-licensed

Message from Incoming MPES President

It will be my honor to serve as president of the Monroe PE Society for the next two years. During this time our profession will continue to grow and evolve as new legislation is passed that impacts our work and as we adapt to our ever changing environment. We will continue to utilize a virtual monthly meeting rather than meeting in person at RIT to minimize the possibility of Covid-19 transmissions to board members. Mathcounts, TEAMS, and the Symposium have all continued to evolve with many improvements along the way. Please join me in thanking our outgoing president Christopher V. Kambar, P.E for his diligent work over the past two years.

Dr. Arthur C. Reardon, P.E., President, MPES As always, we encourage active membership in the Monroe Professional Engineers Society. We are constantly striving to improve your membership but we always need more help. If you are interested in becoming an active member or have any questions, please email me at artreardon@gmail.com or contact MPES through our website at www.monroepes.org/contactus/.

Dr. Arthur C. Reardon, PE, President, MPES 30 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

mpes news


ies news

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 31


32 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

asce news


abcd news

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 33


34 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

ieee news


ieee news

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 35


36 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

incose news


terra news

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 37


Rochester Chapter

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers Rochester ASHRAE website: rochester.ashraechapters.org

AUGUST NEWSLETTER

President's Message Once again, I hope everyone’s family and friends are doing will during these difficult times. It looks like our community is doing its share to aid in the recovery of the conditions Covid-19 has created. Typically, our annual golf outing and picnic is held in May, but was cancelled due to Covid-19. This is our largest fundraiser and helps support our educational and community programs throughout the year. Additionally, Burgundy Basin Inn has permanently closed which has hosted our September clambake for almost 20 years. Our Board of Governors will be meeting in the near future to organize an event in lieu of the golf and picnic outings. If you have a suggestion please leave us a message on Facebook or use the “Contact us” link on our website (http://rochester.ashraechapters.org/ feedback.html). As a reminder, we will be donating 25% of our proceeds from this event to Foodlink NY (www.foodlinkny.com). Please continue to check out our website at www.rochester.ashraechapters.org for information on upcoming chapter meetings, current officer list and contact information, chapter newsletters, and more! Also take a minute and like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/ashraerochester. This is my last monthly newsletter and as I think about the past year, I realize it has been very challenging. We first lost our meeting venue when City Grille closed unexpectedly. We’ve also had to deal with the challenges from Covid-19. This is on top of the usual challenges of replacing board members through attrition and managing our budgets. For each instance, our Chapter’s members have risen to the occasion and found solutions. With that said, I’d like to take a moment to thank all of the volunteers who help keep our local ASHRAE Chapter going strong. Officially, we have 33 volunteers, but there are many more of whom donate their time and energy and do not get the recognition they deserve. The Rochester Chapter is lucky to have Mike Benedict, of Air Systems Test and Balance, as Chapter President. I am certain he will make the necessary adjustments to guide our Chapter through these unusual times. Again, thank you for this opportunity.

Tom Streber, P.E. 2019-2020 President, Rochester Chapter

38 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

ashrae news

d


s

Directory of Professional Services

www.eco-rentalsolutions.com 855-ECO-RENT Newest Rental Fleet in the Industry Exceptional Customer and Technical Service Consistent Quality Rentals • Sales • Service

directory of professional services

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 39


Directory of Professional Services

Solving soils problems for over 40 years. 46A Sager Drive, Rochester, NY 14607 Tel: 585-458-0824 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax: 585-458-3323 www.foundationdesignpc.com

Inc. esign,526 USA of duct D o P. Halt NY 14 r , d P el f fi GarGryarry@Haltof.com Haltobridge Lane, Pen 40 Rock

Design Engineering Services - Concept thru Production Mechanical / Electromechanical - Consumer / Industrial All Plastic and Metal Technologies Tel: 585-388-9000 Fax: 585-388-3839

www.Haltof.com

Advertising Rates and Membership Application is Available at www.roceng.org

Directory of Business Services Philip J. Welch

First Vice President - Investments

Wells Fargo Advisors Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC

Member FINRA/SIPC

40 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER AUGUST 2020

200 Meridian Centre Blvd. Suite 260 Rochester, NY 14618 Direct: 585-241-7546 Fax: 585-241-3986 Toll Free: 877-237-6201 philip.welch@wellsfargoadvisors.com

directory of professional services | director of business services


s

Affiliated Societies of the Rochester Engineering Society American Consulting Engineering Companies of New York President, David J. Meyer, 585-218-0730 Email: dmeyer@pathfinderengineers.com American Public Works Association Monroe County/Genesee Valley Branch Chairman, Peter Vars, PE Email: PVars@bmepc.com American Society of Civil Engineers, Rochester Section President, Joshua T. Rodems, PE, Bergmann, Rochester, NY. 585-498-7944. Email: jrodems@bergmannpc.com American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Rochester Chapter President, Thomas Streber, PE, tstreber@ jwswanson.com. Email: ashraerocnews.com

Association For Facilities Engineering, Rochester Chapter President, Matt Knights, Constellation Brands, Inc. Email: Matt.Knights@cbrands.com Electrical Association Executive Director, Karen Lynch Email: karen@eawny.com President, Russ Corcoran, Landmark Electric, 585-359-0800. Email: russc@landmarkelectric.net. Genesee Valley Land Surveyors Association President, Jared R. Ransom, LS 585-737-6881 Email: jaredransomls@gmail.com Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Inc., Rochester Section President, Rob Gleason Email: rgleason@cscos.com

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Rochester Section Chairman, Steven Ivancic, University of Rochester

Imaging Science & Technology, Rochester Chapter President, Bruce Pillman, 585-748-6006 Email: bruce.pillman@gmail.com

American Society of Plumbing Engineers, Rochester New York Chapter President, Jennifer Wengender, PE, CPD, Clark Patterson Lee, 205 St. Paul Blvd., Rochester, NY 14604. 585-454-7600. Email: jwengender@clarkpatterson.com

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Rochester Section Chairman, Eric Brown Email: eric.t.brown@ieee.org

Website: https://www.aspe.org

Association for Bridge Construction and Design President, Michael D. Davidson, PE JM Davidson Engineering, DPC Email: mdavidson@jmdavidsoneng.com

Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers, Rochester Chapter President, Poojith Kalluru, Alstom Email: poojith.kalluru@alstomgroup.com International Council on Systems Engineering, Finger Lakes Chapter President, Jack Riley Email: jackri2139@hotmail.com

Monroe Professional Engineers Society President, Arthur C. Reardon, PE Email: artreardon@gmail.com New York State Association of Transportation Engineers, Section 4 President, Paul J. Spitzer, PE, NYS DOT Region 4, Genesee Valley, 1530 Jefferson Road, Rochester, NY 14623. 585-272-4890. Email: paul.spitzer@dot.ny.gov Website: www.nysate.org

New York Water Environment Association Inc., Genesee Valley Chapter (www.gvcnywea.org) President, Bill Davis, 585-381-9250 Email: william.davis@mrbgroup.com Sheet Metal & Air-Conditioning Contractorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Association-Rochester, Inc. Executive Director, Aaron Hilger 585-586-8030. Email: mzin@smacnaroc.org Society of Plastics Engineers, Rochester Section President, Brett Blaisdell Email: zippel@frontiernet.net Society of Women Engineers President, Marca J. Lam, RIT Email: mjleme@rit.edu Terra Rochester Finger Lakes Science & Engineering Fair Director, Harold R. Clark, PhD Email: tasasef@terraed.org Website: TerraFairs@terraed.org.

Corporate Members of the Rochester Engineering Society Bergmann (Enterprise) BME Associates CHA Consulting (Champion) Clark Patterson Lee Erdman Anthony Associates Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce (RBA) Champion) Greenman-Pedersen, Inc.

Hunt Engineers, Architects & Land Surveyors, Inc.

Rochester Institute of Technology, Kate Gleason College of Engineering

IBC Engineering, PC (Champion)

Stantec

Kistner Concrete Products Inc.

TY-LIN International (Champion)

M/E Engineering, PC (Enterprise)

VJ Stanley

MRB Group (Champion) Optimation Technology, Inc.

IS YOUR COMPANY LISTED HERE? Call 585-254-2350 for information.

Passero Associates

affiliated societies & corporate members of the rochester engineering society

AUGUST 2020 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 41


PUBLISHED BY ROCHESTER ENGINEERING SOCIETY 657 EAST AVENUE ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 14607

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IMPORTANT DATED MATERIAL Please do not delay

BE SURE YOU CONTACT YOUR AFFILIATE BEFORE ATTENDING ANY EVENTS! WITH THE COVID-19 CRISIS MANY EVENTS ARE BEING CANCELLED OR RE-SCHEDULED. WE HOPE EVERYONE STAYS SAFE AND HEALTHY! ~ RES Board of Directors

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42 years of experience putting the P in the P. E. CTEL offers open registration and in-house programs. Call for details 585-943-0921or see www.rgilearning.com a subsidiary  

Profile for Rochester Engineering Society

Rochester Engineer August 2020  

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