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www.roceng.org

February 2019

RES Tutoring Team – 2018/19 School Year Update | 10 Dr. Walter Cooper - Advisor, Mentor, Role Model

Also in this issue: 117th RES Annual Gala - Saturday, April 13 Sponsorships Now Available | 8


RES Tutoring Team 2018/19 School Year Update

The Rochester Engineer Published since 1922 by

ROCHESTER ENGINEERING SOCIETY, INC.

Founded March 18, 1897

Volume 97, Number 8, FEBRUARY 2019 (Electronic Copy Only) 2,500+ Monthly Circulation (Quarterly Hard Copies, 11 issues electronically) ISSN 0035-7405

RES Mission Statement: The RES will become the lead organization for improving the image and influence of the engineering community in the greater Rochester area by: Demonstrating a comprehensive knowledge of the region’s engineering and technical capabilities; Providing the best clerical support and public relations assistance to our affiliates; Continually communicating the engineering and technical accomplishments to both the engineering and technical community and the public; Providing regular forums and networking opportunities for the exchange of ideas and discussion of issues; and, Providing programs that identify career opportunities to the region’s youth and develop the skills of the practicing engineer. News items and articles are invited. Materials should be submitted to the administrative director at the society’s office, 657 East Avenue, Rochester, New York 14607; Phone number (585) 254-2350, e-mail: admin@roceng.org

The web site for the Engineers’ Center is at: www.roceng.org. The deadline is the 10th day of the month prior to the issue. Unless otherwise stated, opinions expressed in this publication are those of contributors, not of the Rochester Engineering Society, Inc. Advertising information may be obtained by contacting the office of the Rochester Engineering Society or going to the website at www.roceng.org. Published every month but July. Yearly subscription is $20.00, (4 hard copies, 11 digital). You can sign up on the website for the subscription for digital copies only (free) and receive an email notice when posted. Go to www.roceng.org to join the Rochester Engineering Society. Click on the individual membership and you can submit your application on-line. Board of Directors: OFFICERS: President JOSEPH DOMBROWSKI, PE M/E Engineering / jdombrowski@meengineering.com First Vice President GREG GDOWSKI, PhD University of Rochsester / Greg_Gdowski@urmc.rochester.edu Treasurer ANDREW C. HIRSCH Retired / andrewcharleshirsch@gmail.com Second Vice President MICHELLE SOMMERMAN, PE Bergmann Associates / msommerman@bergmannpc.com Past President MICHAEL V. TRIASSI Javlyn, Inc. / mike.triassi@gmail.com EIGHT DIRECTORS: CORNELIUS (NEAL) ILLENBERG PE Retired / nillenberg@aol.com LEE LOOMIS Retired / leeloomis46@gmail.com RICHARD E. RICE MJ Engineering / rriceaquash@gmail.com ADAM CUMMINGS, PE Town of Ontario / adamcummings22@gmail.com DANIELLE WALTERS MKS Instruments / dwalters710@gmail.com DOREEN EDWARDS Rochester Institute of Technology /ddeeen@rit.edu BRETT ELIASZ, PE Bergmann Associates / beliasz@bergmannpc.com DENNIS ROOTE, PE CDE Engineering & Environment, PLLC / dennis.roote@cde-pllc.com Administrative Director LYNNE M. IRWIN Rochester Engineering Society / e-mail: admin@roceng.org

(cover) Pages 10-12 Dr. Walter Cooper - Advisor, Mentor, Role Model

contents

5 • NEW: RES Technical Corner by Brett Eliasz, RES Director 6 • What's it Like to be an RES Tutor?... 7 • How Do You Arm a STEM Teacher with real-world application examples? Put an Engineer in the classroom! 8 • RES Gala - Sponsorships Now Available! 10-12 • RES Tutoring Team - 2018/19 School Year Update (cover) 13, 46 • Seeking Volunteer Mentors for 2019 Spring Science Fair 14 • Get to the Point! - More Writing Questions or Misconceptions 15 • Get IT Done - Walla Walla Washington 16 • Position Openings 17 • Continuing Education Opportunities (PDHs) 18-19 • Engineers’ Calendar 20-24 • Professional Firms - Employee News 25 • News from Professional Firms 43-44 • Directory of Professional Services 44 • Directory of Business Services 45 • Affiliated Societies and Corporate Members of the RES Membership Application and Advertising Rates are also on the website: www.roceng.org.

news of the...

• ABCD Association for Bridge Construction and Design...............30-32 • AFE Association for Facilities Engineering...........................................34 • ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers............................................36 • ASHRAE American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers....................................................41 • ASPE American Society of Plumbing Engineers....................................33 • EA Electrical Association.......................................................................35 • GVLSA Genesee Valley Land Surveyors Association.............................27

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• IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.................38-39 • IES Illuminating Engineering Society....................................................37 • INCOSE International Council on Systems Engineering..........................40 • IS&T Society for Imaging Science and Technology.............................26 • MPES Monroe Professional Engineers Society......................................28 • RES Rochester Engineering Society..................................................2-13 • SWE Society of Women Engineers........................................................42 • TERRA TERRA Science & Engineering Fair...............................................29

index


President’s Message

Joseph Dombrowski, PE M/E Engineering RES President 2018 - 2019 As I write this right after the start of the New Year, the weather has definitely changed and in my opinion not for the better; definitely colder now. Hopefully everyone had a good holiday season. Planning has begun for the RES Gala (April 13) and the Engineering Symposium (April 23); further information is on the RES website at: http://www.roceng.org. As always if you have any input, please contact us via the RES. I'd also like to remind everyone that the Rochester Engineering Symposium (impolitely called by me the PDH fest) will be held at the Joseph A. Floreano Rochester Riverside Convention Center on Tuesday, April 23, 2019. Further information is available at either http://www. engineeringsymposiumrochester.com/ or http://www.roceng.org. I was pleased to see that my request for teachers in a previous issue did not go unheeded; thank you Jeff Gardiner. That's all for now. Stay warm! And see you at our events. Joe Dombrowski RES President

res news - president’s message

FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 3


Rochester History Continuing with the historical sampling of the earlier writings on behalf of the Rochester Engineering Society, the years following "The Great War," into and through the “Great Depression,” continued to be a time of reaching out for the maturing Society, both locally and nationally. The meeting minutes describe a series of technical discussions and presentations intended to broaden the technical horizons of the membership (especially the CE's, ME's and EE's). The RES affiliated itself with a number of National technical societies, adopted local Affiliated Societies, frequently held joint meetings with them and continued taking action on a growing list of public matters. Certain issues of standardization, some crucial to public safety, became the responsibility of the RES and its affiliates. In the pervasive economic downturn of the “Great Depression,” the magazine offered classified advertising for unemployed engineers, technicians and draftsmen and took other steps to try to deal with the crisis. Still, it continued its effort to shape the function, purpose and infrastructure of the City of Rochester, and beyond. Soon, war would again affect the Society, taking away many of its leaders while providing opportunities for others to step forward to fill these vacancies. In an effort to provide even greater perspective on the happenings and concerns of the day, a synopsis, featuring selected items from "The Rochester Engineer" has become an integral part of this series. The Second World War and the Korean Conflict are now history. These experiences have changed the face and, no doubt, the future of the community. The Rochester municipal leadership and the industrial community have become immersed in the cold-war, growth economy.

May 7, 1969 (Board of Directors Meeting, RIT Engineering Building) The Board approved four new Regular Members, one Non-

Resident Member and one Junior Member. With the addition of 90 new members in fiscal year 1968-69, the total RES membership stood at 716. Applications from the Rochester Chapter of the Consulting Engineers Council and the Society of Logistics Engineers were also approved as new Affiliate Societies of the RES. Education Committee Chair, James Richardson, reported that the two recent evening seminars and the day-long seminar, co-sponsored with the Cornell University Industrial & Labor Relations School, had netted $2,700 for the RES. Alexander Beebee Jr., Chair of the Evening Programs Committee, reported that the RES Annual Meeting would be held at the Rochester Yacht Club. President Kirkpatrick reported that he had scheduled a meeting for the RES Board to discuss issues, with the President of the Detroit Engineering Society. Ernest Mohr reported on the work of the 14 Task Forces focused on the development of an Engineers’ Center. Mr. Mohr urged that the RES develop a closer rapport with local industry, toward acquiring their support for the concept of an Engineers Center, but that this would require that the RES demonstrate that it can actually provide unified services for the engineering profession.

“The Rochester Engineer” (May 1969)

This issue featured the first of several Task Force Reports from the “RES Engineers’ Center” project. Entitled, “The RES in Civic Affairs – A Task Force Report,” it made several recommendations. Among them were: the RES Civic Affairs Committee should maintain an active interest in, and surveillance of all activities of governmental units or private interests which affect the general public welfare; it should inform the RES membership on key issues, via “The Rochester Engineer,” and, it should recommend subjects and speakers and special meetings on these issues, form sub-committees to study and report on these issues, and stimulate the activity and participation of RES members on these sub-committees. It further stipulated that, “Under no circumstances should any RES Committee take a position on any 4 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

A Sampling from the Archives of the Rochester Engineering Society...1897 - 1969 by Lee M. Loomis

issue, except as may be resolved by the RES Board.” It was announced that the NYS Professional Engineering examination would be extended from 12 hours to 16 hours, to allow for expanded testing in individual engineering disciplines.

June 4, 1969 (RES Annual Meeting, Rochester Yacht Club)

Attendance – 33. Following a report on the current deficit situation with the Society’s finances, the RES membership approved a motion to eliminate the discount for on-time dues payment, and to institute a penalty for late payment of membership dues, after September 1st. The Nominating Committee presented a slate of RES officers, including: President – Alexander M. Beebee, Jr. (GM Rochester Products), 1st Vice President – Gordon S. Rugg (Eastman Kodak Company), 2nd Vice President – G. Robert Leavitt (Taylor Instrument Companies), Secretary – James Clark (Bausch & Lomb), Treasurer – Edwin L. Anthony (Erdman Anthony Associates), Directors – Orlando J. Feorene (Eastman Kodak Company), John D. Cooper (Rochester Telephone Company), Paul F. Pagery (Taylor Instrument Companies), Melvin J. Corson (RG&E). The membership voted unanimously for this slate.

June 18, 1969 (Board of Directors Meeting, Chamber of Commerce) The Board approved eight new Regular Membership

applications. They then welcomed guest Robert Crory, Executive Director of the Engineering Society of Detroit. The meeting was then devoted to a presentation on the features of the Engineering Society building in Detroit, and aspects of the Detroit operations which would relate to those contemplated in Rochester. RES officers expressed gratitude to Mr. Crory for coming to Rochester and said that this discussion had been very helpful in planning the future course of the RES. The Board then approved an approximate $30,000 budget, including a $1,000 payment against an approximate $15,000 of continued indebtedness to Lincoln Rochester Trust Company.

“The Rochester Engineer” (June 1969)

The Rochester Section of the American Society of Lubrication Engineers announced the presentation of its first annual “Mr. Lubrication” Award to Edward W. Fisher of Garlock Corporation. Stating that rapid advances in every technology have “out-run” textbooks, a Special Task Force of the RES was appointed to develop and conduct two separate surveys; of engineers and of their employers, toward identifying the educational needs of engineers. The final results of these surveys, once completed, would be made available to professional societies and educational institutions in the community. The 1969 Annual meeting of the RES heard a presentation, “Nature, Art and Arithmetic” by Dr. Eugene W. Boehne, ITE Imperial Corporation. Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II, as well as a hoped-for period of post-war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry. We welcome your questions and comments on this series. res news - history


Technical Corner

This month’s article will continue with reliable fire pump circuits and will focus on wire sizing and voltage drop requirements. If you can recall, from the previous articles, the Fire Pump motor is 200HP and the Jockey Pump motor is 3HP. These motors are on the same circuit on a 480V system. The combined Locked Rotor Current (LRC) is 1618.5A. When do you use (LRC) or motor Full Load Currents (FLC) to determine necessary wire sizing which accounts for voltage drop? Wire Sizing Calc: LRC is not taken into account for wire sizing calcs for motors. The FLC’s listed in NEC Table 430.250 are used with a 125% safety factor (Otherwise called Minimum Circuit Ampacity (MCA)). Note: nameplate currents are only used to size motor overloads, see NEC 430.6(A)(1 and 2). Using values from NEC Table 430.250 Full Load Currents (FLC) of both the 200HP fire pump and 3HP Jockey Pump can be obtained at the 460V Utilization Voltage (UV) column. 1.25(240+4.8) = 306 Amps @460V. This should be the minimum rating that the specified wire can handle which equates to the minimum wire size. Using table 310.15(B)(16) and the 75 degree column we can see that #500 kcmil wire is adequate. Technically #350 kcmil wiring would suffice, however, I suspect we will need to use #500kcmil to help with any potential voltage drop issues and the rating of 310 amps is quite close to the MCA. Therefore the #500kcmil cabling is adequate and recommended to use as a starting point for calculations. But what about the Voltage Drop..? Voltage Drop Calc: NEC 695.7(A) indicates that a 15% voltage drop is permitted under fire pump motor starting conditions. LRC current needs to be utilized here to reflect manually starting across the line even if any soft starters are being utilized to start the motor. This ensures circuit operation in the case of a starter malfunction. res - technical corner

I will demonstrate below. R= resistance of conductor in (ohms/1000ft) Look up in NEC Chapter 9 Table 9 using power factor of .85 (Effective Z in PVC conduit) ***With a unity power factor you should be using Table 9 still but use the Alternating Current Resistance column*** L=Conductor length 1-way (ft) I=Current (Amps) R= .043 (ohms/1000ft) L= 325ft I=1618.5A (LRC value calculated in previous article) VD=[(2*R*L*I)/1000] * .866 =39.11 Voltage Drop (Theoretical) Conclusion: If we take this divided by the voltage of 480V we end up with an 8.2% voltage drop, which is in comfortable range below the 15%. There are also different variations of the Voltage Drop formula above which yield similar results, however this formula allows calculating with a more realistic power factor of .85. Hopefully this article/sample calculation finds you well and can be used as a reference for your project needs. If anyone would like to contribute to the RES magazine and add an article or would like to request information on a specific topic (not limited to Electrical) just email me at beliasz@bergmannpc.com. As always, any comments are appreciated…! Thank you for reading.

Brett Eliasz, P.E., LEED AP BD+C RES Director

FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 5


RES News - Tutoring Team What’s it Like to be an RES Tutor?…

2nd Grade Teacher, Jennifer Mosier

Tutoring Instructions

A Cooper Scholar, Reading to Mr. Koon

Mr. James Koon is a veteran tutor, having worked in a large suburban school district, for many years. He’s currently in his third year as an RES Tutor. He says his experiences with our Scholars, at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy, “Just keep getting better”. This year he’s been working with Ms. Jennifer Mosier and her Second Graders. Ms. Mosier’s classroom management style is unique and very effective. As you enter her classroom you’re impressed by the environment; there’s soft, low-volume background music, the students are quiet, focused and totally engaged. Upon his arrival, each Tuesday morning, Mr. Koon receives a set of written basic instructions from the teacher (see photo), describing the work that his students are to be doing that day. Jim typically works, individually, with six students in Mrs. Mosier’s class, spending about 20 minutes with each of them during his two-hour tutoring session. These students have been identified by Ms. Mosier as needing some extra help with reading and math to bring them up to Grade level so they can rejoin the other students. We are still building our Tutoring Team, for the 2018-19 school year… We have been giving “Lunch & Learn” presentations in several Rochester area firms and professional groups, to inform and inspire prospective new tutors. We have “hit the ground, running”, and we need your support...Can we schedule a presentation with your firm, work group, church or family, sometime this Winter? Even just two hours a week of your time can make a big difference in the life of a Dr. Walter Cooper Academy Scholar… Questions??? Reach out to RES Past President Lee Loomis and the RES Tutoring Team at… Rochester Engineering Society, (585) 254-2350 via website: www.roceng.org or via email: leeloomis46@gmail.com, (585) 738-3079 (mobile & text) 6 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

res news - tutoring

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RES News How do you arm a STEM Teacher with real-world application examples? Put an Engineer in the classroom!

In the 1990’s, Eastman Kodak Company jumped the gun, starting a family of STEM initiatives, years before the Government coined the STEM acronym. The name of these programs was the 21st Century Learning Challenge (TCLC), and at our peek, we were 1500 engineers and technicians, visiting Rochester City School Classrooms, twice a week for two-hour visits, during the entire School Year. This effort continued for nearly ten years, and not only pre-dates our recent STEM excitement level, but delivered support on a scale we have yet to match. Many of the volunteers in these programs were, and still are, members of the Rochester Engineering Society (RES). In the intervening twenty-five years, many have retired, or are about to retire. That makes them even more available as STEM Coaches, than they were as Kodak employees. The RES is working to put technical people in K-12 Classrooms, throughout the Greater Rochester area, as STEM Coaches. Their presence will: • • •

Help the Teacher stay current with our ever-changing technology. Provide real-World Application Examples, making whatever is being taught, real enough to be worth remembering. Support the teachers with not only the delivery of STEM concepts, but perhaps more importantly, the design and delivery of STEM related hardware.

Last year we had six STEM Coach, doing Classroom Visitation at School #3. That was so successful that RCSD is interested in expanding this program to involve nine STEM Coaches this year.

The RES is specifically seeking Retired, Technical people, (Engineers, Technicians, Machinists, Entrepreneurs or anyone whose work would allow them to visit during School hours), as STEM Coaches. We currently have more than 30 Coaches, and are connecting them with 13 Rochester-area Schools. “This is a life-changing experience!” For more information contact: Jon Kriegel  jkriegel@rochester.rr.com  585-281-5216 RES Volunteer Coordinator, Volunteer STEM Coach Please visit: stem-bridges.org res news - stem bridges

FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 7


8 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

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res gala

FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 9


RES Tutoring Team – 2018/19 School Year Update by Lee M. Loomis Background… We’ve been reading about the crisis in our Nation’s public schools for years, and we know all too well that it’s no better, and maybe even worse, here in Rochester. There are more than enough opinions available on what to do about it; decrease class sizes, pay teachers more, keep kids in school longer, hire better teachers, get parents to pay more attention to their children’s educational needs…it goes on and on. Regardless of what the best answer is, one basic tenant is pretty much indisputable; the more time and attention a student gets, the more likely it is that he/she will succeed. With this in mind, in 2013, I decided to get better acquainted with a successful local effort to assist the existing process of educating elementary school students in the Rochester City School District (RCSD). The name of this group was Friends of Educational Excellence (FREE) Partnerships, and it had been in operation since 2008. It was working, in a very structured way, with a group of ten RCSD schools, bringing teams of tutors into direct contact with students in Grades 1 - 6, specifically identified by their teachers, who are struggling to reach acceptable levels of academic performance. I began working as a volunteer FREE Partnerships tutor in the Spring of 2013, to get some first-hand experience, and see if I was up to the challenge. Sure, I used to help my children with their homework after supper, but actually spending 3 - 5 hours a day in an elementary school, once or twice a week, that could be a little scary. (Let’s quickly dispense with the mystery, if I hadn’t survived the experience, I wouldn’t be writing this article.) During the Spring of 2013 I worked one-on-one with First Grade students who needed a little extra help with their reading skills, at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy, School #10, in the City’s 19th Ward. I didn’t read to them, they read to me. The books they read are graduated by reading level, revealing the characters and stories to the students, as they read along, providing them with an immediate sense of understanding and success. It’s NOT just the old, “See Spot Run…” stuff that many of us might remember, these are relevant stories about real characters (animals & people). In just a few short weeks, I was able to see measurable improvement in the reading level of several of the students with whom I’d been working. From this experience, it was clear to me that there’s a tremendous need for, and value to be gained from, providing one-on-one tutoring for these little people. As a result of this experience, the RES Board authorized the establishment of a tutoring team to assist the existing process of educating elementary school students in the Rochester City School District (RCSD). The RES Tutoring Team has been in operation for the past six years. It works in a very structured way, to support the work of the teachers at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy (RCSD School #10), 353 Congress Avenue, Rochester, NY 14619. We provide teams of tutors, placing them in direct contact with students in Grades 1 – 6. These are students who have been specifically identified by their teachers as ones who are struggling to reach acceptable levels of academic performance.

The Need… The Rochester City School District provides an education for more than 32,000 students in pre-K through grade 12. The academic results of Rochester public schools are poor. Most RCSD elementary schools do not achieve acceptable results. In 2018, only 1 out of the 38 elementary schools had more than 50% of students pass the NYS English Language Arts (ELA) exam. In 2018, the Rochester City High Schools reported an improved graduation rate to 52%. In order to increase future graduation rates, the 7,200 elementary school students that did not pass the 2018 State ELA exam must improve their literacy skills. At Dr. Walter Cooper Academy, for 2017-18, there have been measured improvements in academic performance (both ELA and Math). 10 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

Where “We Never, Never, Never Give Up…” cover article

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They are now ahead of the RCSD averages, but these levels of performance are still well-below acceptable standards. Educated citizens get better paying jobs, and they become supporters of the quality of life in their local communities. Rochester’s high school dropouts will struggle financially, are more likely to live in poverty, may participate in illegal activities and end up in jail, unavailable to support their families. Improving students’ success in school is fundamental to improving Rochester family life and enhancing our local community.

A Possible Solution… Rochester has an urban school system that has a critical need for community support to improve educational system outcomes, and also is a city with a rich history of community involvement in those public schools. The learning process for our children is complex. A young person has three primary “schools” in their lives: 1) home, 2) community, and 3) the public school system. In Rochester, poverty, low adult literacy, and family and community norms and expectations place a greater challenge on the public school system to get the desired outcomes that we want to achieve. So the public schools must be even stronger, to get good results.

RES Tutor - Maureen (Miss Mo) Duggan

Most schools already provide paid specialists to help children with learning disabilities. However, most children that are “just a little behind” usually don’t get one-on-one support to help them get up to grade level. The RES Tutoring Team supports the #10 School teachers by providing volunteer resources to help their students succeed in school. When a teacher embraces these additional “human resources,” the RES Tutors become an important part of the learning environment for that teacher’s students. With tightening school budgets, the strategy of using community resources will become an essential component of a teacher’s toolkit to help their students succeed in school.

How can the Rochester Engineering Society Help? Volunteer academic support from the Community can be effective in assisting students to perform better. A number of groups are currently supporting our young Cooper Scholars, including “Volunteer Grandparents” and others. The RES can help and extend this already successful effort by supporting its own RES Tutoring Team at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy, RCSD School #10. Engineering students, practicing engineers and other technical professionals, and retired engineers are uniquely qualified to support and encourage students in the process of learning to communicate, to question, to reason and to make decisions.

Why the Dr. Walter Cooper Academy? Named for Dr. Walter Cooper, the University of Rochester’s first African American PhD Chemist, retired Eastman Kodak Research Chemist, NYS Regent (emeritus) and RES Engineer of the Year for 1996, the Academy, started as a K-2 school in 2009, and grew into a K-6 school by 2016. The Academy has now graduated three classes of sixth graders into the secondary schools of RCSD. As part of their preparation, these students wrote essays about themselves to accompany their applications to several local junior-senior high schools. These often resulted in multiple “acceptances”, giving many of our Cooper Scholars an actual choice of where they might attend next. The school’s faculty engages its diverse student body in joyful, rigorous, and Bergmann Team Leader – Michelle fascinating learning experiences. Dr. Walter Cooper Academy follows the “Expeditionary Learning” model for planning hands-on educational experiences for its Sommerman students. They instill in their students both perseverance and a sense of responsibility, as reinforced in their motto, “We never give up, never give up, never give up!” (a famous quote from Winston Churchill).

Our Progress, to Date… Since the Fall of 2013, the RES Tutoring Team has attracted over 50 volunteer tutors. These have included undergraduate cover article

FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 11


and graduate College Students (U of R and RIT), mid-career Engineers, Technical Professionals, Business Managers, retired Engineers, School Teachers and Executives. It’s not just retired people who have availed themselves of this opportunity; business owners, as well as independent consultants, have made time for this, as well. In addition, a number of full-time-employed professional people have gotten permission from their respective managements to “flex-time” and spend two hours a week, supporting our Cooper Scholars. Even more impressive are the Rochester Engineering-Architectural firms, Bergmann Associates and LaBella Associates, who have not just allowed, but encouraged interested employees to form four-person teams (each team member tutoring one, two-hour session, per month), each four-person team being the equivalent of one, full time tutor. Since 2013, the RES Tutoring Team has provided over 3,500 hours of much needed support to children who are “learning to read,” on their way to “reading to learn.” Also, since 2014, the Rochester Engineering Community has generously supported the RES Tutoring Team by sponsoring a table for RES Tutors at the Annual RES GALA. This has allowed us to recognize and celebrate the RES Tutoring Team’s continuous support for our mission at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy.

What can you do? Consider this an invitation, from Dr. Cooper and me, to become a member of the RES Tutoring Team, at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy. We want to tell you more about how you can help with the unique new Expeditionary Learning Program at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy, as a tutor and/ or as an advisor. We are still building our Tutoring Team, for the 2018-19 school year… We have been giving “Lunch & Learn” presentations in several Rochester area firms and professional groups, to inform and inspire prospective new tutors. We have “hit the ground running,” and we need your support...Can we schedule a presentation with your firm, work group, church or family, sometime this Winter?

LaBella Team Tutor – Jamie Douthit

Even just two hours a week of your time can make a big difference in the life of a Dr. Walter Cooper Academy Scholar…

If you cannot commit right now, please plan to attend a (no obligation) Informational Meeting, in the early Fall of 2019. Come and hear, how the program works, your responsibilities as a tutor, and the support you will receive as you help these students. We will be hosting these meetings, periodically, to generate interest among the RES membership, their families, friends and neighbors, toward sustaining and growing the RES Tutoring Team at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy. We are also currently seeking “Volunteer Mentors” to support a “First Annual Science Fair” at Dr. Walter Cooper Academy, this May-June (Do you remember your last science fair?). Please see the article describing details of this opportunity (Page 13).

Why should you consider doing this? We should all be very concerned about what it will mean for America’s future, if only half of its newer citizens have successfully completed high school. Those of us who have enjoyed a successful engineering/business career can afford to “pay it forward” and make a difference, even if it’s just helping one child at a time. Thank you for your attention… …Lee Loomis, Past President (1980-81 and 2012-13) . 12 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

Celebrating the Tutoring Team, with Dr. Cooper, at the RES GALA cover article


Seeking Volunteer Mentors for 2019 Spring Science Fair At Dr. Walter Cooper Academy The RES has been invited to help establish the first annual, Dr. Walter Cooper Academy Science Fair. The SchoolBased Planning Team, including parents, teachers and administrators, has requested the support of the Rochester Engineering Society in developing a Spring 2019 science fair at #10 School. The scope of this request includes… • Teachers at Grade Levels 3 - 6 will introduce the requirements of the science fair to their classes, later this Winter. • Students will be invited to volunteer to participate in this assignment, and they will agree to complete the required work. • RES Volunteer Mentors will meet with small groups of students, twice a week, at the school, during their daily, 40 minute science instruction block. • The RES Volunteer Mentors will help the Students select a “scientific phenomenon” they would like to investigate, guide them in planning their investigation, and help them design their presentation and findings for the Fair. Homework for the Students, in support of this effort, will be a distinct possibility. • The Dr. Walter Cooper Academy 2019 Science Fair will be scheduled, at the School, for early June 2019. • RES Volunteer Mentors will begin helping the Students get prepared for the Fair during the week of May 6th, and then meeting twice each week with their Students, for the next six weeks. This will allow Students and Mentors 12 – 14 days to work on their investigation/presentation. The RES is seeking Volunteer Mentors to support this Science Technology Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) activity. Unlike our RES Tutoring Team, this involves only a short-term commitment of approximately six weeks. Volunteer Mentors will be working with Students who have expressed a desire to learn more about science, technology, engineering and math. These Students are motivated! Do you think you might consider making room in your busy lives to support our “Cooper Scholars” as they develop habits that will help them achieve new levels of learning, focused on a brighter future? Then volunteer to become an RES Mentor. Please contact RES Director, Lee Loomis (leeloomis46@ gmail.com) or (585) 738-3079 (mobile & text) for more information, and to volunteer for this important, potentially life-changing opportunity.

res tutoring | advertisement

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Get to the Point!

More Writing Questions or Misconceptions Previously in this article, I listed the top 10 questions or misconceptions people have had about writing. Over the last 26 years I've noticed that I tend to hear the same questions, comments, or arguments in almost every class I teach. Here's some more for you to consider.

After a period, do you use one or two spaces? Years ago, we were taught that you insert 2 spaces after the final punctuation mark of a sentence. This was true when we used a typewriter, but things have changed with computers and wordprocessing. As I write this, I am reminded that some readers may never have used a typewriter so I decided to add an image.

ending with a preposition, relax. That too, is evolving and most grammarians now agree it is OK to do so). Is that or which better to use? It's not a choice of "better," but rather a choice of what you are trying to communicate. If you are adding some information to clarify a point, but is not essential, use which and set it apart with commas. If the information is required to understand the point, use that without any commas. CORRECT: The field staff require multimeters that are waterproof for the project. INCORRECT: The field staff require multimeters, which are waterpfoof, for the project.

What's the difference between a dash, parentheses, and commas? All three of these marks are used to set-off

information that adds, explains, or offers a side comment, however, they are not interchangeable. Each has its own relationship to the content. Commas indicate a moderate level of All you need today is one space. Your grammar checker is emphasis, parentheses offer a greater level of emphasis and may probably flagging the extra space and you've wondered why. Sophisticated software can determine (with some acuracy) if the include a full sentence, and a dash interrupts the contect with an mark is an end of a sentence and auto adjusts the space to about abrupt departure. I recommend avoiding dashes because they seem to lose the connection. 1.5 spaces. If you have two spaces, it creates an uncomfortable large gap. Are you wrong with two spaces? No...but don't When do I use an S' to indicate a possessive? This is argue this one at the lunch table; there's too much out there another common cause for grammatical confusion and only occurs promoting one space. when you are working with plural words. If the plural does not What words should be capitalized in a heading? In a end is S, then add 's to show possession as is done with women's major heading, the generally accepted format is to use caps on rights or media's responsibility. However, if the plural ends in S, all "major" words. That means that "minor" words, such as "of, then you only add an ' as is done with attorneys' papers or the at, on, if, and" should be lower case. In second level, or third engineers' report. This means the report belonged tomore than level headings, the general guideline is to use sentence format, one engineer. which means a cap only on the first word. If this is the case, I How do I refer to plural numbers? This is related to the suggest a color or a period after the lower level heading. above issue but is a bit of a contradiction. According to the Should I use "who" or "whom"? If this confuses you MLA and APA style guides, you should not use an apostrophe to there is a good reason. Like it or not, over time, our language is indicate a plural of a number or an acronym. The following are evolving. In our spoken language, who is often replacing whom, correct: even when it is grammatically correct. For example, when you answer the phone, do you say "To whom do you wish to speak?" 1990s JPEGs PCs or "Who do you want to speak with?" The first way is correct, but it sounds stuffy because we don't hear it that often. (I'm just telling you the way it is; I'm not advocating for either way here!) In writing however, the distinction is still observed and there is Š 2019, RGI Learning one simple rule: Use who to refer to the subject of the sentence Lisa Moretto is the President of and whom to refer to an object of the sentence. (I'll cover RGI Learning, Inc. For 24 years she has subjects and objects in a future article, if necessary.) SUBJECT: Who provided you with the RFP? OBJECT: To whom did you present the proposal? or Whom did you present the proposal to? (For those of you howling about 14 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

helped engineers improve their oral and written communication skills. Visit www.rgilearning.com or call (866) 744-3032 to learn about RGI’s courses.

get to the point


t

Get IT Done

Walla Walla Washington — by Andrè Godfrey There was an absorbing article in the Scientific –American many years ago that spoke of The Tyranny of Choice. While oftentimes we describe freedom as the ability to have true choice, it is accurate to suggest that too many choices create anxiety and stress. In my small world, one of my minor talents I provide is to make decisions quickly and decisively. Of course, I warrant no responsibility for the outcome of those decisions, only the speed with which they are made.

Every day there are over 24,000 malicious mobile apps that are blocked.

I bring this up because of the plethora of self-improvement programs and people that are inundating my life. With apologies to my self-improvement friends (and there are a lot of them), I am awash with self-appointed gurus who want me to use more transitive verbs when expressing myself or reinvent my life by embracing the philosophy of a recently rediscovered 4th century monk who ate scorpions in the desert. I can’t fit any more exercise machines in my house, I can’t apply any more curative oils on my neck, and they don’t make a vitamin for improving cybersecurity. Which is the actual subject of the article today.

IoT attacks were up 600 percent in 2017. (I wrote an article a few years back about Stuxnet and how the Israelis set back Iranian nuclear ambitions by a decade using manufacturing IoT malware and it was a factor in the Iranians coming to the negotiating table).

41 percent of companies have over 1,000 sensitive files including credit card numbers and health records left unprotected. (Btw - the financial industry is by far the industry most targeted).

I was pondering The Wall (you know the one I mean) and as I’m writing this we are still in the midst of the longest government shutdown ever. I hope it is resolved by the time you read this. Regardless of whether it is resolved or not it is an infinitesimal security issue compared to cybersecurity. Seriously. While our government, aka Walla Walla Washington, is preoccupied with the anachronistic barrier let me tell you share with you information that is relevant to your business, whatever your business is.

70 percent of organizations say that they believe their security risk increased significantly in 2017. (I see phishing exploits and ransomware every day).

I copied/pasted many of the following stats from a website run by an IT security company called Varonis. By the way, much of what is below is verified by the February 2018 report to the nation by the Council of Economic Advisors, an office of the Executive Branch. Parentheses are my smart- aleck comments. Damage caused by cybersecurity attacks is estimated to be 6 trillion dollars by 2021 (that is equal to 40% of the total GNP of the United States). Over 20 percent of cyber-attacks in 2017 come from China, 11 percent from the US and 6 percent from the Russian Federation. (Iran and North Korea are on that list as well).

Ransomware costs will rise to $11.5 billion in 2019 and a business will fall victim to a ransomware attack every 14 seconds at that time. (Worse news. Ransomware is growing at 350% annually).

get IT done

21% of all files are not protected in any way. The industry with the highest number of attacks by ransomware is the healthcare industry. Attacks will quadruple by 2020.

The app categories with the most cybersecurity issues are lifestyle apps, which account for 27 percent of malicious apps. Which ties right back to my original premise. Self-improvement is a security issue. Think About IT

Andrè Godfrey is President, Entrè Computer Services, www.entrecs.com

FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 15


Position Openings

16 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

position openings


Go to the RES Web Site for Updated Details On All Meetings - www.roceng.org

Continuing Monday, February 11

Education Opportunities

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) p 41 Refrigeration: Presentation at City Grill with a Tour of Meier Supply immediately following – 1 PDH Pending

Presented by: Mike Nohle Place: City Grill, 384 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Meier Supply, 430 Atlantic Avenue, Rochester, NY 14609. Cost: $25 per person Time: 12:00 noon – lunch buffet. Presentation at City Grill with tour at Meier Supply immediately following. Reservations: Reservations at Rochester.ashraechapters.org.

Wednesday, February 13

Association for Facilities Engineering (AFE) p 34 Tour Nu Flow Services of Upstate NY 1 PDH Approval Pending

This tour will include a demonstration of a pipe lining installation. Place: Nu Flow Services of Upstate NY, 140 Mushroom Blvd., Henrietta, NY. Dinner will be at Delmonico’s Steakhouse, 125 White Spruce Blvd., Henrietta, NY (corner of Crittenden and East Henrietta Road) Time: 5:30 pm Cost: Members - $25; Non-members - $30. Reservations: Make your reservation by Friday, February 8th to Ken Carr, Ken.carr@rochesterymca.org. Payment can also be made on the website at http://afe21.org/tours/next-tour.

Wednesday, February 20

American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE) Lead Lowdown (Public Water) 1 PDH Credit Approved

p 33

Speaker: Kevin Wier, Davenport Associates Place: Valicia’s Ristorante, 2155 Long Pond Road, Rochester, NY 14606 (just north of Route 31, Gates) Time: 12:00 noon to 1:30 pm (please arrive by 11:50 am). Cost: $20 (member or guest), check or cash at door. Reservations: To Dave Jereckos (585-341-3168), or djereckos@ibceng.com by February 13th.

Support Your Affiliate Attend A Meeting

Thursday, March 14

Association for Bridge Construction and Design (ABCD)

p 31

TSC Joint Dinner Meeting – explore&more Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Children’s Museum – 1 PDH Credit

Speakers: Michelle Urbanczyk, CEO explore&more, and Gwen Howard, VP Foit Albert Association Place: Salvatore’s Italian Gardens, 6461 Transit Road, Depew, NY Time: Cash bar at 5:30; Dinner at 6:30 pm; program to follow dinner (Entrees: Chicken Parmigiana, Roasted Chef ’s Blend Vegetables & Roasted Vegetables with Mediterranean Orzo, Poached Salmon, or Prime Rib 10 oz.) Cost: $30 for members, $35 for non-members. Reservation: Contact Diane Dumansky by Thursday, March 7 with your dinner choice: dianedumansky@verizon.net.

Friday, March 15

Association for Bridge Construction and Design (ABCD) Spring Seminar – Up to 6 PDH Credits

p 32

Place: Batavia Downs Gaming Center, 8315 Park Road, Batavia, NY Time: 7:30 am Check-in. All day program begins at 8:00 am Costs: Members-$100 ($125 after March 1); Nonmembers-$125 ($150 after March 1); Full Time Students-$35 ($60 after March 1). Registration: Advance registration is required! Opens February 12th. Register by Friday, March 8th by using SignUpGenius. More information to follow. Questions? Contact David Jenkinson, PE, Djenkinson@popligroup.com or Jason Messenger, PE, Jmessenger@luengineers.com.

Save the Date Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Engineering Symposium in Rochester

To post continuing education opportunities on this page please contact the Rochester Engineering Society, 585-254-2350, or email: admin@roceng.org continuing education calendar

FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 17


Engineers’ Calendar

The engineering societies are encouraged to submit their meeting notices for publication in this section. The deadline for submitting copy is the 10th of the month prior to the month of publication. Please email to: admin@roceng.org. The meetings offering PDHs are highlighted in blue. Details about the meeting and affiliate (if in this issue) are on the corresponding page listed next to the affiliate name.

Tuesday, February 5

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) Rochester Section Excom Meeting

Monday, February 11

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, p 39 and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)

p 41

Refrigeration: Presentation at City Grill with a Tour of Place: New China Buffet, 3333 West Henrietta Road, Rochester, Meier Supply immediately following – 1 PDH Pending NY 14623 Time: 11:50 – 1:00 pm Cost: A full Buffet lunch, $5 for all attendees (members and students), includes soft drinks. IEEE event website: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/187276

Friday, February 8

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) p 41 62nd Annual ASHRAE Valentine’s Dinner Dance

Place: Strathallan Rooftop. Comments: ASHRAE members check your email for the invitation or go the website for more information and to purchase tickets and be a corporate sponsor (Rochester. ashraechapters.org)

Tour of the Rochester Airport

American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) ASCE Ski Day

Place: Bristol Mountain Ski Hill Time: 8:30 am Website: More details when available at www.sections.asce.org/ Rochester

Electrical Association (EA) Electrical Week Luncheon

p 35

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Eric Bieber, President & CEO of Rochester Regional Health. Place: Midvale Golf & Country Club Time: Noon to 1:30 pm Cost: $25 Members or $30 for Non-members. Tables of 8 are $185/member or $230/non-member. Comments: Presentation of four scholarships to area students will be given. Reservations: For reservations and more information call 585-382-9545 or check the website at www.eawny.com. The RES website (www.roceng.org) has a calendar of events for this month's meetings and meetings that are received or updated after print deadline. Please refer to the website for updated information. If you wish to be listed in the calendar please send details to res@frontiernet.net 18 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

Wednesday, February 13

Illuminating Engineering Society (IES)

Saturday, February 9

Monday, February 11

Presented by: Mike Nohle Place: City Grill, 384 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Meier Supply, 430 Atlantic Avenue, Rochester, NY 14609. Cost: $25 per person Time: 12:00 noon – lunch buffet. Presentation at City Grill with tour at Meier Supply immediately following. Reservations: Reservations at Rochester.ashraechapters.org.

p 37

The tour will focus on the new Airport Improvements and the exterior illuminated canopy. Place: Rochester International Airport, 1200 Brooks Avenue, Rochester Time: 5:30 pm till approximately 7:00 pm (conclusion of the tour). Cost: $30 per person (includes dinner). We will begin with a light dinner (provided by Gusto) at 5:30 pm in the International Arrivals Hall, follow by a tour of the new features at the airport. Reservations: Register for this event ASAP on our ‘Education’ page at www.iesrochester.org or contact Diane Montrois at 585-254-8010 or diane@illuminFx.com.

Wednesday, February 13

Association for Facilities Engineering (AFE) Tour Nu Flow Services of Upstate NY 1 PDH Approval Pending

p 34

This tour will include a Demonstration of a pipe lining installation. Place: Nu Flow Services of Upstate NY, 140 Mushroom Blvd., Henrietta, NY. Dinner will be at Delmonico’s Steakhouse, 125 White Spruce Blvd., Henrietta, NY (corner of Crittenden and East Henrietta Road) Time: 5:30 pm Cost: Members - $25; Non-members - $30. Reservations: Make your reservation by Friday, February 8th to Ken Carr, Ken.carr@rochesterymca.org. Payment can also be made on the website at http://afe21.org/tours/next-tour. engineers' calendar


Wednesday, February 13 Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T)

Tour of the New MAGIC Center at RIT

Monday-Wednesday, February 25-27

Institute of Electrical p 26 and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) IEEE Stratus 2019 Workshop

p 38

Place: Rochester Institute of Technology Place: Rochester Institute of Technology, 300 Lomb Memorial Registration and information: http://ewh.ieee.org/r1/rochester/ Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 grss/STRATUS2019 Time: 6:00 pm No meeting reservations are required. See page 26 for directions.

Thursday, March 14

Wednesday, February 20

Society of Women Engineers (SWE)

University of Rochester SWE Section Hosting a Networking Event

Association for Bridge Construction and Design (ABCD)

p 31 p 42 TSC Joint Dinner Meeting – explore&more Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Children’s Museum – 1 PDH Credit

Place: University of Rochester. Time: 6:30 pm Check the website for room location, directions and additional details. www.swerochester.org.

Wednesday, February 20

American Society of Plumbing Engineers (ASPE) Lead Lowdown (Public Water) 1 PDH Credit Approved

p 33

Friday, March 15

Speaker: Kevin Wier, Davenport Associates Place: Valicia’s Ristorante, 2155 Long Pond Road, Rochester, NY 14606 (just north of Route 31, Gates) Time: 12:00 noon to 1:30 pm (please arrive by 11:50 am). Cost: $20 (member or guest), check or cash at door. Reservations: To Dave Jereckos (585-341-3168), or djereckos@ibceng.com by February 13th.

Thursday, February 21

International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE)

Systems Theory as the Foundation for Understanding Systems

p 40

Speaker: Kevin Adams, Patrick Hester Place: 4 host sites. Details are on page 28 or contact Kevin Devaney at kdevaney@srcinc.com. Time: Meetings begin at 6:00 pm and run to approximately 7:30 pm Reservations: Contact the host person at the host site list on page 40.

Thursday, February 21

Genesee Valley Land Surveyors Association (GVLSA)

p 27

Board of Directors and General Membership Meeting Place: 40 & 8 Club, 933 University Avenue, Rochester Time: 6:00 pm GVLSA website: www.gvlsa.com engineers' calendar

Speakers: Michelle Urbanczyk, CEO explore&more, and Gwen Howard, VP Foit Albert Association Place: Salvatore’s Italian Gardens, 6461 Transit Road, Depew, NY Time: Cash bar at 5:30; Dinner at 6:30 pm; program to follow dinner (Entrees: Chicken Parmigiana, Roasted Chef ’s Blend Vegetables & Roasted Vegetables with Mediterranean Orzo, Poached Salmon, or Prime Rib 10 oz.) Cost: $30 for members, $35 for non-members. Reservation: Contact Diane Dumansky by Thursday, March 7 with your dinner choice: dianedumansky@verizon.net.

Association for Bridge Construction and Design (ABCD) Spring Seminar – Up to 6 PDH Credits

p 32

Place: Batavia Downs Gaming Center, 8315 Park Road, Batavia Time: 7:30 am Check-in. All day program begins at 8:00 am Costs: Members-$100 ($125 after March 1); Non-members-$125 ($150 after March 1); Full Time Students-$35 ($60 after March 1). Registration: Advance registration is required! Opens February 12th. Register by Friday, March 8th by using SignUpGenius. More information to follow. Questions? Contact David Jenkinson, PE, Djenkinson@popligroup.com or Jason Messenger, PE, Jmessenger@luengineers.com.

Saturday, March 16

Terra Rochester Finger Lakes Science and Engineering Fair

p 29

Place: Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607 -Do you know middle or high school kids? Make sure they register by Feb. 24 -Want to volunteer on Fair Day? Pick your time and task NOW by signing up online! -Want to talk to fair students about their projects? Become a judge! Details all at terrafairs.org/Rochester or call 315-422-2909.

FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 19


Professional Firms Employee News Bergmann Promotes Buss to Lead Systems Optimization Efforts National architecture, engineering and planning firm Bergmann has promoted Kate Buss, GISP, to the position of corporate business systems manager. Buss will lead efforts to enhance current systems and implement new applications as part of a full-scale effort to optimize technology and improve business processes at Bergmann. Buss has 15 years of experience with geographic information systems (GIS) and currently serves on the New York State Geospatial Advisory Council. She has been with Bergmann for more than 13 years, most recently leading the GIS team in the Northeast Buildings division. Buss brings extensive project management and technology expertise to the position, having managed enterprise software implementations, custom software development, and system integration projects at the firm for the past seven years. She has a master of urban planning degree from the University at Buffalo and a bachelor of arts from Binghamton University in environmental studies. /

“We realized that the perfect fit was right in front of us,” said Scott Lockwood, chief financial officer chief administrative officer, who will oversee Buss. “Kate combines her knowledge of Bergmann with superior technical skills and a professional understanding of our industry. She will be able to lead us into the future.”

Kate Buss, GISP,

Buss will transition from her role managing GIS projects for the firm's clients into her corporate position leading business systems during January. She will work closely with the information technology, accounting, human resources and corporate marketing teams on systems upgrades and new software implementations throughout 2019. Her role will include project management, vendor relations, systems integration design and the development of employee training. q

Barton & Loguidice Announces Senior Level Promotions for 2019 Barton & Loguidice, (B&L), a northeast and mid-atlantic regional engineering, planning, environmental, and landscape architecture firm with twelve offices across New York, Pennsylvania and Maryland announces that two members of the firm’s Rochester office have received senior level promotions in 2019. David R. Hanny, CPESC, CPSWQ, LEED AP has been promoted to an Associate. He received his BS degree from

SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. David is a member of the firm’s environmental practice area. Brian J. McGrath has been promoted to a senior environmental scientist. He received his BS degree from the Rochester Institute of Technology. Brian is a member of the firm’s environmental practice area. q

Optimation Announces the Following New Hires

Austin Wheeler has been hired as a drafter.

Anthony Attoma has been hired as a senior electrical and instrumentation designer.

20 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

Edwin Carrasquillo has been hired as a senior technician. professional firms employee news


s

Erdman Anthony News Rachel Stuckey, PE, Named in Engineered Systems Magazine’s 20 to Watch: Women in HVAC Engineered Systems Magazine has named Rachel Stuckey, PE, LEED AP®, BEMP, CEA, EBCP, to its 2019 list of 20 to Watch: Women in HVAC. Stuckey, senior associate and building performance engineering department manager in the facilities core business at Erdman Anthony’s Rochester office, was selected from 150 nominees to be on the elite list of 20. Beginning with undergraduate research experience at the University of Notre Dame’s superconductor lab in 1998, Stuckey has focused the past 18 years on expanding her engineering career to bring about change within the industry. In her 10 years with the firm, she has obtained numerous licenses and certifications and authored articles for local and national publications while providing HVAC design, energy analysis, and commissioning services for industrial, educational, commercial, and health care client facilities. She is also a founding member of SustainabiliTEAM™, Erdman Anthony’s approach to Rachel Stuckey, PE sustainable design and building operation, which combines the efforts of the firm’s engineers, energy analysts, and commissioning professionals. Stuckey was elected to Erdman Anthony’s board of directors in 2018. She is an active member of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers and helps educate children about the importance of STEM careers. Engineered Systems Magazine is a print and digital publication that promotes energy-efficient solutions for high-performance buildings by offering insights and news for mechanical consulting and facility engineers. The January issue featuring Stuckey is being distributed January 14-16 at the 2019 AHR Expo in Atlanta.

Erdman Anthony Hires Regina Startzel as Senior Administrative Assistant Erdman Anthony has hired Regina Startzel as a senior administrative assistant in the Rochester office. The Greece resident has 17 years of experience providing support in fast-paced, team-oriented professional settings. q Regina Startzel

CPL Welcomes New Hire in Rochester CPL, a full-service design firm that has served public- and private-sector clients for more than 40 yearss welcomes Cindy Ford who joins the administrative team in its Rochester office. In her new role, Ford will provide administrative support to the firm’s civil engineering and transportation engineering teams in the form of office management, critical clerical work and scheduling meetings or events. She has more than 25 years of administrative experience as well as a bachelor’s degree in business administration and finance from SUNY Oswego. Outside the office, Ford is a member of the International Association of Administrative Professionals and volunteers at the Humane Society of Rochester. q Cindy Ford

professional firms employee news

FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 21


Professional Firms Employee News Horn to Return Focus to Finger Lakes Area MRB Group, a Rochester-based Engineering and Architecture firm, recently announced that Mathew D. Horn, former city manager for Geneva, will soon be leading their Municipal Services Division. Horn announced that he was leaving the City of Geneva in 2016 to accept a position with a Washington DC-based consulting firm, providing his municipal budgeting and management expertise to a national audience. “We have been in discussions with Matt for the past two months,” said Ryan Colvin, president of MRB Group. “We thought it was time to bring him back home to the Finger Lakes region, where his talents are needed most,” Colvin stated. While the firms’s staff of more than 75 professionals, technicians and planners have been recognized for highly publicized water, wastewater and civil engineering projects for communities across New York State, they are also heavily involved in other local government operations, providing behind-the-scenes support for community planning, grant writing, planning board reviews, shared services studies, capital improvement plans, and strategic plans for infrastructure maintenance. “Since 1927, community leaders have leaned on our staff to help them transition into their positions and effectively support government operations,” Colvin continued. “Because of our strong familiarity with the communities we serve, we are sometimes the primary source of institutional knowledge that helps new staff and leadership understand what needs to be done to keep local government operating efficiently,” Colvin stated. According to Colvin, the firm’s long-term relationships with communities have, in some cases, spanned decades, with staff becoming trusted advisors to municipal leaders. “Our role goes well beyond the expected. We become part of the municipal team that community leaders rely upon, every day,” he said. 22 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

In 2011, that role was recognized as a new division at MRB Group, and Horn has been selected to define and develop the continuing path for the Municipal Services team. “We understand municipal challenges including limited budgets and limited staff. We assist our communities in most aspects of government operations – with expertise that’s available only as needed, to minimize the financial impact on taxpayers. Matt will help us enhance those services, and expand the ways we can support our communities,” Colvin stated. “I am really excited to have my career path return to the Finger Lakes area,” said Horn. “This is where I want to raise my family, and teach my kids by example that caring about their community means being involved in making things work – and work well.” Horn has been directly involved in making things work well for local governments since his early career in economic development. He went on to serve the City of Beaufort, SC, as assistant manager, and was the director of City operations for CH2M serving the City of Sandy Springs, Georgia, and a host of nationwide municipal clients before becoming manager of the City of Geneva. “My role working for local governments has always been one that supports community planning and strategic growth,” Horn said. He believes this new position will allow him to focus on that role and expand it, helping the firm continue to serve clients with even more services. “I am really pleased to be joining a firm that puts me where I want to be, doing what I feel I was meant to do. It’s a great opportunity to work with people with just as much dedication to supporting local government and helping communities thrive,” Horn stated. q

professional firms employee news

p


Two Architects at SWBR Earn Code Enforcement Certifications SWBR announced that architects Michael Brown, AIA, and David Phelps, AIA, are now certified code enforcement officers. As code enforcement officers, Brown and Phelps will be able to serve their clients and the firm by having the ability to do third-party plan reviews, fire-safety and propertymaintenance inspections, building code interpretations/recommendations, execution of variance requests, and appeals to jurisdiction review boards. The certification required passing six courses and more than 140 hours of total training. Michael Brown, AIA

As a project manager, Brown is responsible for project design and management with a primary focus on municipal, corporate and retail projects. He earned a master’s in architecture, master’s in business administration and bachelor’s in architecture from the University of Buffalo.

Davud Phelps, AIA

As a project architect in SWBR’s Education Studio, Phelps has completed several large, complex projects for K-12 school districts in New York State. He earned his bachelors of science in architectural engineering and his A.A.S. in architectural engineering technology from Alfred State College. q

DiMarco Group Names Chief Financial Officer DiMarco Group, a leading full-service development company, announced the appointment of Jeff Fasoldt as chief financial officer. He brings to the position nearly 30 years of professional experience. Fasoldt joins DiMarco from Annese, a technology solutions integrator with operations throughout New York State, where he served as CFO since 2015. Previously, Fasoldt was an executive vice president and regional CFO for Toshiba Business Solutions, a global technology leader.

Jeff Fasoldt, CFO

Fasoldt brings extensive financial, operational and strategic experience to his new role. He began his career as a CPA in public accounting followed by positions at Ziff-Davis and the Sutherland Group. He holds a bachelor of science in accounting from SUNY Geneseo and a master of business administration from Rochester Institute of Technology. Fasoldt was the recipient of the Rochester Financial Executive of the Year award in 2011. Additionally, he is a certified public accountant, certified management accountant and chartered global management accountant.

As chief financial officer, Fasoldt will lead the financial operations of DiMarco Group. He will be responsible for corporate finance, financial planning and analysis, treasury management, and compliance. In addition, he will oversee human resources, IT and marketing. “We’re confident Jeff’s track record of strong leadership and experience is a great match for this key role at our organization,” said John DiMarco II, president and chief operating officer. “With his long history in leadership at prosperous organizations, Jeff will be a huge asset to the continued success of the DiMarco family of companies.” Outside of the office, Fasoldt is an active member of the community, serving on the board of Campus Auxiliary Services at SUNY Geneseo, the Saunders College Dean's Advisory Council at Rochester Institute of Technology, the Flower City Habitat for Humanity Gala Committee, and is past chair of Catholic Charities of Livingston County and a past president of the Rochester chapter of Financial Executives International. In addition, he is an adjunct instructor of accounting at SUNY Geneseo. Fasoldt resides in Avon with his wife, Doreen. They have two sons, Jeffrey Jr., a second-year law student at Syracuse University; and Nicholas, a cadet in his third year at the U.S. Air Force Academy. q professional firms employee news

FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 23


Professional Firms Employee News Roderic A. Sechrist, P.E. Joins GPI as Transportation Operations and Asset Management Specialist GPI, an engineering, design, planning and construction management firm, announced that Roderic A. Sechrist, P.E. has joined the firm as transportation operations and asset management specialist for its New York State offices which include Buffalo, Rochester, Albany, Manhattan and Long Island. Mr. Sechrist has joined GPI after a 32year career with New York State Dept. of Transportation (NYSDOT), from which he retired in 2016. His tenure with NYSDOT culminated with his serving as assistant commissioner of regional affairs, and prior to that assistant commissioner of operations and asset management. These positions involved his oversight and supervision of the NYSDOT’s eleven regional offices, as well as the offices of transportation maintenance, traffic safety and mobility, modal safety and security and fleet administration in Albany. He is extremely knowledgeable of state-of-the-art engineering technology that helps maintain and improve New York’s state and local highway system. This includes highway safety improvement programs, system operations including emergency transportation operations/incident command systems; traffic incident management and intelligent transportation systems, maintenance operations, snow and ice control, pavement and appurtenance maintenance, drainage maintenance, fleet operations and management, and capital program development and execution.

technology. Such projects include Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (PSAP) for NYSDOT Regions 8 and 10; traffic signal timing and arterial optimization projects in Upstate West, NYSDOT Regions 4, 5 and 6 and Long Island Region 10; NYSDOT INFORM Long Island ITS system services; and electronic E-ZPass toll system replacement at all Port Authority of NY/ NJ facilities, among others. According to Michael J. Salatti, P.E., PTOE, senior vice president and director of transportation engineering services in the firm’s Long Island and Manhattan, NY offices, “Rod has incredible knowledge of transportation-related asset management, maintenance and operations from the agency-side that will be extremely beneficial to our public agency clients.” Mr. Sechrist earned a BS in civil engineering from the State University of New York in Buffalo and is a licensed Professional Engineer in New York. He is a life member of New York State Association of Transportation Engineers (NYSATE), having served as president and board member of NYSATE Sections 5 and 6. In addition, Mr. Sechrist course developer and instructor for a multitude of topics including incident command system, ICS 200, leadership development for maintenance managers; and principles and techniques of job management. q

In his new position, Mr. Sechrist will assist GPI branch offices with their transportation-related projects involving asset management, maintenance, and state-of-the-art 24 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

professional firms employee news


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News From

Professional Firms

Erdman Anthony-Designed Project Wins Award from American Public Works Association’s Genesee Valley Branch The Erdman Anthony-designed Allen Padgham Road Bridge over Ganargua Creek in Farmington has won an award for the project owner, the Ontario County Public Works Department. The Genesee Valley Branch of the American Public Works Association has named the project a 2018 recipient of the Project of the Year Award for structure projects in the less than $5 million category. The project replaced an existing two-span 120-foot bridge with a single-span 150-foot steel multigirder bridge with integral abutments. The new bridge opened at the end of September. Representatives from Ontario County and Erdman Anthony will attend the awards ceremony at the RIT Inn & Conference Center on January 31. For 65 years, Erdman Anthony has provided infrastructure engineering and support services to private industry and government clients. The multidisciplinary firm employs over 250 people, including 70 professional engineers and professional land surveyors, throughout its offices in Albany, Buffalo, and Rochester, New York; Harrisburg and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; West Palm Beach, Florida; and Portland, Maine. The firm’s integrated engineering expertise spans the bridge, commercial/site development, education, energy, health care, highway, industrial, oil and gas, parks and recreation, private utility, rail, retail, and water/sewer markets. Erdman Anthony’s quality management system is certified to the ISO 9001:2015 standard. q

SWBR Celebrates Opening of Durand Senior Apartments Senior Living Community Now Open for Community

Providence Housing’s Durand Senior Apartments, a new affordable housing development for seniors age 55 and older located in Irondequoit, NY, is now open. Located at the sites of the former St. Salome Church and Durand United Church of Christ, the development consists of 65 one-bedroom and five two-bedroom apartments, along with seven fully wheelchair accessible units and three units for the hearing/visually impaired. Apartments come with a fully equipped kitchen, including Energy Star appliances, a spacious living/dining area, central air news from professional firms

conditioning, individually controlled heat and electric, off-street parking, emergency call system, Intercom entry and elevator access. St. Ann’s Adult Day Service at Durand, which will provide medical and social adult daycare services, is also located on the property and is set to open in mid-January. SWBR provided architectural and structural engineering design services for the project. q

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Rochester Chapter

Society for Imaging Science and Technology Website: http://rochesterengineeringsociety.wildapricot.org/ISandT

Our meeting locations have changed starting this fiscal year. They are being held at the Irondequoit Public Library, 1290 Titus Avenue, Irondequoit, NY. The November through January meetings are in Room #216 (Newport). No meeting reservations are required. February's meeting is a tour at RIT (see below).

Meeting Schedule:

February 13, 2019 - Tour of the new MAGIC Center (https://magic.rit.edu/). March 20, 2019 - TBD April 10, 2019 - RIT Student Presentations May 8, 2019 - Replay of paper from Technology for Digital Photo Fulfillment, by Joe LaBarca Venue ideas requested - we are soliciting input regarding other possible venues for our meetings.

Wednesday, February 13, 2019 - 6:00 pm Tour of the new MAGIC Center at RIT Location:

MAGIC Center, Rochester Institute of Technology 300 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester NY 14623 Directions: Please enter the campus utilizing the main entrance on Jefferson Road at the traffic light and turn right before the flags/roundabout. Our building is noted as "MSS" in the yellow block on the map in front of the Gannett building. Visitor parking is available in Lot E, just in front of the building (turn left into the lot). You can’t miss the building it looks like nothing else on this campus! http://maps.rit.edu We will plan to meet in the atrium of the building and begin with an overview in our theater, which is just off the Atrium. We will be seated for 20-30 minutes (depending on the number of questions) for an overview and then will do a walking tour of the building. The building is ADA compliant with a ramp in the front and elevators/ramps in the building. 26 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

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Genesee Valley Land Surveyors Association Website: www.gvlsa.com

Year 2018 Officers President Jared R. Ransom, LS Vice President Justin M. Roloson, LS Secretary Robert J. Avery, LS Treasurer Michael A. Venturo, LS Roy B. Garfinkel, LS, Ex-officio

Upcoming Events 2018:

February 21, 2019 Board of Directors and General Membership Meeting: 6:00 pm 40 & 8 Club 933 University Avenue Rochester, NY 14607

Board of Directors

February 2019

2016-2018 Douglas W. Magde, LS Douglas Churchill, LS 2017-2019 David L. Standinger, LS Daniel T. Hickok, LS 2018-2020 Timothy T. Odell, LS Matthew R. Palmer Jonathan Navagh - Associates Representative

Board of Directors and General Membership Meeting February 21, 2019 6:00 PM 40 & 8 Club

Professional Affiliations •

New York State Association of Professional Land Surveyors, Inc.

National Society of Professional Surveyors

Rochester Engineering Society

gvlsa news

933 University Avenue Rochester, NY 14607

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Monroe Professional Engineers Society A Chapter of the New York State Society of Professional Engineers 657 East Avenue, Rochestter, New York 14607 Dedicated to Professionalism in Engineering in the Interest of Public Safety and Welfare 2018-19 Officers: President Chris Kambar, PE, President-elect Arthur Reardon, PE, Vice-President Scott Wolcott, PE, Secretary Martin Gordon, PE, Treasurer Michael Ritchie, PE, Membership Chair Arthur Reardon, PE Past Presidents: David Roberts, PE, Chris Devries, PE Directors: Barry Dumbauld, PE, Robert Winans, PE, Joseph Dombrowski, PE, Jim Drago, PE, Neal Illenberg, PE, Douglas R. Strang Jr., PE

NSPE Plays Key Role in NTSB Look at Licensure Exemptions NSPE’s major effort to improve public safety in the aftermath of a deadly pipeline explosion in Massachusetts has resulted in a new state law. On December 31, Governor Charlie Baker signed emergency legislation that requires a licensed professional engineer to approve plans for engineering work associated with natural gas infrastructure in the commonwealth. Following the Merrimack Valley gas line explosions in September, the National Transportation Safety Board investigated the incident and consulted with NSPE. The Society and NTSB staff spent several weeks discussing the engineering licensing process, its standards, and NSPE’s opposition to licensing law exemptions. NSPE shared several documents, including its industrial exemptions position statement and fact sheet, and public testimony from professional engineers. Read the full article at: NSPE Plays Key Role in NTSB Look at Licensure Exemptions

Succeeding as a woman in biomedical engineering Being a woman in engineering is not straightforward. To shine some light on some of the hurdles women face whilst building a career in bioengineering, we recently interviewed BMC Biomedical Engineering Editorial Advisor, Prof Chae-OK Yun about her experience as a female biomedical engineer in Korea, China and the US. Prof Yun shares insights into her daily working life, the difficulties she had to overcome during her early steps and provides advice for your young women aspiring to become engineers. Full report available here: https:// blogs.biomedcentral.com/bmcseriesblog/2019/01/09/succeedingwoman-biomedical-engineering/. Source: BMC Series Blog | Article written by Alexanderos Houssein | Wednesday, January 9, 2019 | http://blogs.biomedcentral.com/bmcseriesblog As always, we encourage active membership in the Monroe Professional Engineers Society. We are constantly striving to improve your membership but we always need more help. If you are interested in becoming an active member or have any questions, please email me at CKambar@apd.com or contact MPES through our website at www.monroepes.org/contactus/.

Christopher V. Kambar, President, MPES 28 | The ROCHESTER ENGINEER FEBRUARY 2019

mpes news


terra news

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President/Education Chair: JENNIFER WENGENDER, P.E., CPD CPL 205 St Paul Blvd Rochester, NY 14604 585-454-7600 Vice President Technical: DAVE JERECKOS IBC Engineering, PC 3445 Winton Place, Suite 219 Rochester, NY 14623 585-292-1590 Vice President Legislative: DAVID MYERS LaBella Associates, PC 300 State Street, Suite 201 Rochester, NY 14614 585-454-6110 Vice President Membership: DOUG MEIER Twin”D” Associates 1577 Ridge Road West, Suite 116B Rochester, NY 14615 585-581-2170 Treasurer: ALAN SMITH, P.E. IBC Engineering, PC 3445 Winton Place, Suite 219 Rochester, NY 14623 585-292-1590 Administrative Secretary: ADAM KRAMER IBC Engineering, PC 3445 Winton Place, Suite 219 Rochester, NY 14623 585-292-1590 Affiliate Liaison: TRAVIS JESSICK Altherm, Inc. 255 Humphrey St. Englewood, NJ 07631 551-486-9556 Newsletter Editor: CHRIS WOLAK Victaulic Fairport, NY 14450 484-350-1954

President's Message The Holidays are already over?! The next Engineering Symposium in Rochester will be April 23, 2019. I hope to see you there. The Rochester ASPE chapter will be hosting the ASPE Region 2 Presidents meeting this coming June. Delegates from each of the ASPE chapters in the Region will be coming to meet and talk about activities from the last year. This sharing and personal interaction provides ideas to help strengthen each of our chapters. The Rochester Chapter is growing strong. At 57 members, we are the largest we have ever been. I would like to thank all of the local engineering firms who support our chapter by encouraging participation and attendance at our monthly meetings. Jennifer Wengender, P.E., CPD Rochester Chapter President

Meeting Notice – Save the Date Topic: Lead Lowdown (Public water) Kevin Wier, Davenport Associates Date:

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Time:

12:00 noon – 1:30 p.m. (please arrive by 11:50 am)

Place:

Valicia’s Ristorante, 2155 Long Pond Rd., Rochester 14606 (just north of Route 31, Gates)

Credits: 1 PDH Approval Cost:

$20.00 (member or guest), check or cash at door.

RSVP: To Dave Jereckos (341-3168), or djereckos@ibceng.com by February 13th. (Chapters are not authorized to speak for the Society)

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Please RSVP by February 8, 2019 to: Ken Carr Maplewood YMCA 585-277-1655 ken.carr@rochesterymca.org

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Rochester Chapter

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers Rochester ASHRAE website: rochester.ashraechapters.org

President’s Message Thank you to Chris Wolak from Victaulic for presenting ‘Design Considerations for Thermal Expansion in Pipes’ at our January meeting at City Grill. It was a great presentation, with PDH credits available to those that signed up. Thanks again Chris!

FEBRUARY NEWSLETTER

ASHRAE February Meeting - 1 PDH Credit Pending Date: Monday, February 11, 2019 Time: 12:00 Noon. Lunch Buffet. Presentation to start approx. 12:30 PM Location: City Grill, 384 East Avenue in Rochester, Ny 14607 Cost: $25 Reservations: Reservations at rochester.ashraechapters.org Topic: Refrigeration: Presentation at City Grill with a Tour of Meier Supply (430 Atlantic Avenue, Rochester, NY 14609) immediately following. Presented by Mike Nohle

Our February meeting will be Refrigeration night, with Mike Nohle from Meir Supply leading the presentation, taking us through a refrigeration piping sizing example. Immediately following the presentation there will be a tour of Meir Supply for those that wish to attend. Also, on February 8th, we are having the 62nd annual ASHRAE Valentine’s Dinner Dance, hosted by Jody and Matt McGarry, at the Strathallan Rooftop. This is always a class event with great food and memorable times. Please check your mail ashrae news

for the invitation or log on to our website for more information and to purchase tickets to join us! Corporate sponsorship opportunities can also be found online. Please continue to check out our website at www.rochester.ashraechapters.org for information on upcoming chapter meetings, current officer list and contact information, chapter newsletters, and more! Also take a minute and like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/ashraerochester.

Paul Kenna, PE 2018-2019 President, Rochester Chapter FEBRUARY 2019 The ROCHESTER ENGINEER | 41


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Directory of Professional Services

www.eco-rentalsolutions.com 855-ECO-RENT Newest Rental Fleet in the Industry Exceptional Customer and Technical Service Consistent Quality Rentals • Sales • Service

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Solving soils problems for over 40 years. 46A Sager Drive, Rochester, NY 14607 Tel: 585-458-0824 • Fax: 585-458-3323 www.foundationdesignpc.com

, Inc. esign14526 USA D t c of u Y N P. Haltaolt f Prod enfield, f.com H GarGry Haltokbridge Lane, P arry@ c

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Design Engineering Services - Concept thru Production Mechanical / Electromechanical - Consumer / Industrial All Plastic and Metal Technologies Tel: 585-388-9000 Fax: 585-388-3839

www.Haltof.com

Advertising Rates and Membership Application is Available at www.roceng.org

Directory of Business Services Philip J. Welch

First Vice President - Investments

Wells Fargo Advisors Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC

Member FINRA/SIPC

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200 Meridian Centre Blvd. Suite 260 Rochester, NY 14618 Direct: 585-241-7546 Fax: 585-241-3986 Toll Free: 877-237-6201 philip.welch@wellsfargoadvisors.com

directory of professional services | director of business services


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Affiliated Societies of the Rochester Engineering Society American Consulting Engineering Companies of New York President, David J. Meyer, 585-218-0730 Email: dmeyer@pathfinderengineers.com American Public Works Association Monroe County/Genesee Valley Branch Chairman, Peter Vars, PE Email: PVars@bmepc.com American Society of Civil Engineers, Rochester Section President, Drazen Gasic, CPSWQ, CPESC, LaBella Associates. 585-402-7005 Email: DGasic@LaBellaPC.com American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Rochester Chapter President, Bill Clark, PE, CEM Email: ashraerocnews.com

Email: RCentola@prudenteng.com Association For Facilities Engineering, Rochester Chapter President, Dennis Roote, PE Email: Dennis.Roote@cde-pllc.com Electrical Association Executive Director, Karen Lynch Email: karen@eawny.com President, Russ Corcoran, Landmark Electric, 585-359-0800. Email: russc@landmarkelectric.net. Genesee Valley Land Surveyors Association President, Jared R. Ransom, LS 585-737-6881 Email: jaredransomls@gmail.com Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Inc., Rochester Section President, Dan Rusnack Email: drusnack@bergmannpc.com

Monroe Professional Engineers Society President, Chris Kambar Email: CKambar@apd.com New York State Association of Transportation Engineers, Section 4 President, Howard R. Ressel, 585-371-9280. Email: Howard.Ressel@dot.ny.gov NYSATE has scholarships available for dependents of members who are or plan to enroll in a postsecondary university of accredited business or vocational school (undergraduate only). Some members may also be eligible. Information will be posed in the early spring at www.nysate.org

New York Water Environment Association Inc., Genesee Valley Chapter (www.gvcnywea.org) President, Bill Davis, 585-381-9250 Email: william.davis@mrbgroup.com

Imaging Science & Technology, Rochester Chapter President, Bruce Pillman, 585-748-6006 Email: bruce.pillman@gmail.com

Sheet Metal & Air-Conditioning Contractor’s National Association-Rochester, Inc. Executive Director, Aaron Hilger 585-586-8030. Email: mzin@smacnaroc.org

American Society of Plumbing Engineers, Rochester New York Chapter President, Jennifer Wengender, PE, CPD, Clark Patterson Lee, 205 St. Paul Blvd., Rochester, NY 14604. 585-454-7600. Email: jwengender@clarkpatterson.com

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Rochester Section Chairman, Sreeram Dhurjaty Email: SDhurjaty@dhurjaty.net

Society of Plastics Engineers, Rochester Section President, Brett Blaisdell Email: zippel@frontiernet.net

Alfred Steele Scholarship available to ASPE members and their immediate family. Applications due in January each year. Details at https://www. aspe.org/SteeleScholarship.

Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers, Rochester Chapter President, John Kaemmerlen, 585-475-2767 Email: jxkpdm@rit.edu

Society of Women Engineers President, Marca J. Lam, RIT Email: mjleme@rit.edu

Association for Bridge Construction and Design President, Ronald Centola Prudent Engineering

International Council on Systems Engineering, Finger Lakes Chapter President, Jack Riley Email: jackri2139@hotmail.com

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Rochester Section Chairman, Steven Ivancic, University of Rochester

Terra Rochester Finger Lakes Science & Engineering Fair Director, Mary Eileen Wood, 315-422-2902 Website: TerraFairs@terraed.org. Awards and scholarships available. Visit the website for details.

Corporate Members of the Rochester Engineering Society Bergmann (Enterprise) BME Associates CHA Consulting (Champion) Clark Patterson Lee Erdman Anthony Associates Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce (RBA) Champion) Greenman-Pedersen, Inc.

Hunt Engineers, Architects & Land Surveyors, Inc.

Rochester Institute of Technology, Kate Gleason College of Engineering

IBC Engineering, PC (Champion)

Stantec

Kistner Concrete Products Inc.

TY-LIN International (Champion)

M/E Engineering, PC (Enterprise)

VJ Stanley

MRB Group (Champion) Optimation Technology, Inc.

IS YOUR COMPANY LISTED HERE? Call 585-254-2350 for information.

Passero Associates

affiliated societies & corporate members of the rochester engineering society

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Non-Profit Org. US Postage PAID Permit No. 178 Rochester, NY PUBLISHED BY ROCHESTER ENGINEERING SOCIETY 657 EAST AVENUE ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 14607

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Save the Date Saturday, April 13, 2019 RES Annual Gala

IMPORTANT DATED MATERIAL Please do not delay

Seeking Volunteer Mentors for 2019 Spring Science Fair At Dr. Walter Cooper Academy The RES has been invited to help establish the first annual, Dr. Walter Cooper Academy Science Fair. The School-Based Planning Team, including parents, teachers and administrators, has requested the support of the Rochester Engineering Society in developing a Spring 2019 science fair at #10 School. The scope of this request includes…

When engineers,  technologists  and  technicians  are  promoted   from  within,  they  have  the  technical  knowledge  to  excel,  but   do  they  have  the  leadership  skills  they  need  to  be  successful?   Courses SpeciÞcally Designed for Engineers Managing Projects

Managing Conßict

Listening Skills

Oral Presentations

Managing Time

Ethics and Technology

Understanding Personality Types

Letter and Report Writing

Meeting Skills

Data Privacy and Security

Intercultural Communication

Discovering Your own Innovation

Elements of Critical Thinking

Leadership Models and Icons

42 years of experience putting the P in the P. E. CTEL offers open registration and in-house programs. Call for details 585-943-0921or see www.rgilearning.com a subsidiary  

• Teachers at Grade Levels 3 - 6 will introduce the requirements of the science fair to their classes, later this Winter. • Students will be invited to volunteer to participate in this assignment, and they will agree to complete the required work. • RES Volunteer Mentors will meet with small groups of students, twice a week, at the school, during their daily, 40 minute science instruction block. • The RES Volunteer Mentors will help the Students select a “scientific phenomenon” they would like to investigate, guide them in planning their investigation, and help them design their presentation and findings for the Fair. Homework for the Students, in support of this effort, will be a distinct possibility. • The Dr. Walter Cooper Academy 2019 Science Fair will be scheduled, at the School, for early June 2019. • RES Volunteer Mentors will begin helping the Students get prepared for the Fair during the week of May 6th, and then meeting twice each week with their Students, for the next six weeks. This will allow Students and Mentors 12 – 14 days to work on their investigation/presentation. The RES is seeking Volunteer Mentors to support this Science Technology Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) activity. Unlike our RES Tutoring Team, this involves only a short-term commitment of approximately six weeks. Volunteer Mentors will be working with Students who have expressed a desire to learn more about science, technology, engineering and math. These Students are motivated! Do you think you might consider making room in your busy lives to support our “Cooper Scholars” as they develop habits that will help them achieve new levels of learning, focused on a brighter future? Then volunteer to become an RES Mentor. Please contact RES Director, Lee Loomis (leeloomis46@gmail.com) or (585) 738-3079 (mobile & text) for more information, and to volunteer for this important, potentially life-changing opportunity.

Profile for Rochester Engineering Society

Rochester Engineering Society Magazine February 2019  

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