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Digitized by the Internet Archive in

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2010 with funding from

Members and Sloan Foundation

http://www.archive.org/details/virginian1946stat


FRANCES LILLIAN ELLIOTT Editor

SUE HUNDLEY Managing Editor

SHIRLEY

NEWTON

CRUSER Business

Manager


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mm PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENT BODY

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

B

DABNEY UNCASTER UBRARY L0i4GW00D COLLEGE FARMVILLE. VIRGINIA 23901


Oa

greater hond of

friendship thr ough

education

universal made

to receive

that people face.

the

and comprehend the

Those students of yesterday are

men and women

world peace.

difficulties

of today that are making our

Spring, 1945, brought our final

blow

and victory against the Axis powers. Later in the same summer Japan was defeated.

Steps were

taken immediately for the building of a lasting peace. Reahzing that

of people,

T7*RESHMEN,

entering S. T. C. and seeing the

number of

stairways, have only one thought:

we saw

necessary.

we have to Hve with all types

that to do this, cooperation

Understanding must come

is

To

first.

understand each other there must be a thorough

how

shall I ever

cUmb up

all

those steps?

But knowledge of each country,

later

its

people and customs.

they reahze the important part that steps play

This knowledge was probably gained from a in their Hves.

Steps lead

upward

room. The steps leading into a classroom higher learning which

class'

to places of

may

lead

provide a better under' to universal peace also.

standing of the problems of one's fellow man. This leads to world'wide cooperation friendship.

great

Think

for a

men and women

to classrooms, athletic

and bonds of true

moment

of the millions of

that have trod steps leading fields, offices,

and club rooms, where the mind

is

lecture

rooms

broadened and

As

well as being useful and a most important

fixture in

our

lives,

steps are very ornamental,

Therefore, because of these things tribute

we

feel that this

showing our appreciation for steps should

be written.


"Thoughtfulness makes friendships, and thoughtjulness keeps them.'

1

DABNEV LANCASTER

L

1000205006


DR. JOSEPH President State

iJiicatilai^

L.

JARMAN

'Xeax^ie.ts

College

Farmville, Virginia


The lege

ideals

and

principles

upon which our coV

was founded have heen preserved, strengthened, and

en'

couraged largely through the living example of one person.

By no such

artificial

means

as words, gifts, or tributes can

we

express sufficient gratitude for the fundamental truths with

which he has endowed

indescribable spirit, created

with

this will live in

In each one of us there

us.

b^/ his

love

and

interest.

his lapel

Along

and with a choice

whose philosophy may be characterized by the

"Keep

an

our minds forever a picture of a stately

gentleman with a rose in

favorite song,

is

On Hoping."

cigar,

title

Mindful of these thoughts

the staff dedicates the 1946 Virginian to an educator friend. Dr. Joseph L. Jarman.

of a

and


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CONTENI^S BOOK ONE Teaching and People

BOOK

TWO

Study Rest

Recreation

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imm

Qvto Faculty and Administration, Students,

Who's Who, Student Gov^

emment. Student Standards, Alpha

Kappa

Gamma


'HEN

Rotunda and glancing

entering the

w:

upward, one

sees

a dust'covered dome.

Careful scrutiny reveals four murals portraying different phases of

the divisions,

is

life.

Teaching, one of

represented by a

Roman matron

surrounded by children apparently eager to learn.

This one

is

to keep in

probably of primary concern, helping

mind

at all times Farmville's first

and

foremost purpose: to supply the schools of the state

with the best possible teachers.

Many, many people indirectly,

this

influence,

process

both directly and

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; people

Hop," who cheers us up with

like.

"Charlie

his smile

and "Hi,

everybody;" Mrs. Tabb, whose dehcious meals shall

not forget; Miss Wheeler, whose plays are

unrivaled; Nannie,

who

"Mr. Mac," who

delights us

jokes.

we

We could go on

trying to say

is

invented

Longwood

with

his

for hours, but

buns;

puns and

what we're

that these and not just lectures,

practice'teaching, tests, parallel

and

labs are

what

help to produce teachers. Teachers are people.


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OUR PRESIDENT When

Dr. Jarman

in

retires

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tiny of his college.

1946 from the

For

Mount

and Glass of Sweet Briar

of existence. This

institutions of higher education for

a remarkable record consider'

of service

J.

L.

M.

ville,

of their positions.

But what President Jarman did with

as

one of the builders of

Joseph Leonard Jarman was

ing the fact that most college presidents do not last

difficulties

Holyoke,

Smith of Randolph'Macon, Johnson of Wintrop,

years, or for almost three fourths of its sixty years

long because of the

he must rank

this reason

with Willard of Troy, Lyon of

he will have directed the school for fortyfour

is

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degree than most college heads he moulded the des'

presidency of the State Teachers College at Farm' ville

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bom

at Charlottes'

Virginia, in 1867, the son of Catherine

loe (Lindsay)

his long years

women.

Good'

and William Dabney Jarman. After

Ruffner,

attendance at the public schools of his native town,

Curry, and others captured the normal

he entered the Miller Training School in 1881.

is

more

significant.

WiUiam H.

school idea for Virginia and gave

it

From

expression in

there in 1886 he

was

sent to the University

the Farmville Foundation. Jarman gave their con'

of Virginia as winner of the Miller Scholarship.

ception amphfied reality. This reality had quanti'

He

tative expression in

ments. But

it

also

growing buildings and

1889, majoring in natural science.

enroll'

had quahtative expression

Professor of Natural Science at

in a

Mary

commonwealth with

of

young women.

wives and mothers for Virginia homes, and for

community

ginia

will be

was

Henry

schools,

He

citiziens

largely to his influence.

been,

To

is,

in

Professor Jarman left

Emory and

1902 to become President of Farmville.

received an honorary LL.D. from

Sydney College in 1906.

service considered fitting for Vir'

women. What Farmville has

Emory and Henry

Helen, the daughter of the Reverend Dr.

ginia College.

President

Jarman trained teachers for the Virginia

served as

E. E. Wiley, the President of the Southwest Vir'

the inculcation of the genteel tradition of Virginia

among a multitude

He

College from 1890 until 1902. In 1891 he married

combination of effective zeal for the cultural uplift of an educationally backward

remained at the University of Virginia until

He was

a

Hampden'

member

of the

Virginia State Board of Education from 1910 until

and

1918 and was president of the Cooperative Educa'

a greater 12


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tion Association of Virginia

from 1928 until 1932.

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series of buildings in the best

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Virginia taste. With'

In 1930 he refused to accept the position of State

out sacrificing the democratic purpose of prepar'

Superintendent of Public Instruction, which was

ing

tended him by the Governor of Virginia.

ginia schools, he has fostered

young women

gentility

Mrs. Jarman died ville for

in

twenty seven

1929

after living in

A

years.

at a small cost to serve the Vir'

an atmosphere of

and good breeding among the students

Farm' usually associated with the aristocratic tradition of

woman

of

much an old commonwealth.

personal charm and generosity, she

made

He

has kept Farmville de'

the Presi'

voted to the task of training teachers while other dent's

House a

center of hospitality, entertaining schools founded for the

distinguished guests of the College as well

same object have been

as

diverted to other purposes. faculty, students,

and community groups. She was

He a garderner of such zeal and taste that she

has been untiring in his support of the com'

made munity

the yard of her

home

as

beauty, and she

activities of

the

town

of Farmville, serving

a spot of great distinction and

was a

citi2;en

first

president of the Southside

Community

of such tireless energy Hospital, as one of the organi2;ers of the stock com'

and such a broad

social consciousness that she pro'

pany that moted many community

enterprises,

built the

Weyanoke

Hotel, as a leader

among them of patriotic organizations during the First

the founding of the Farmville

Woman's

War, and President Jarman during his long years of service

at Farmville has

had so much to do with the

velopment of the college that

it is

and personality personality.

He

is

de'

possible to say

that in an intimate and direct sense

its

character

a reflection of his character and

fostered

its

growth from a modest

structure housing three hundred students into a

large college of nine

hundred students

World

Club.

living in a

ville

as the principal organi2;er of the

Lions Club.

For more than thirty years he

served as chairman of the Farmville Methodist choir. Dr.

citizien

Jarman

official

Church and

since

as

schools

settled.

board of the

member

of

its

1902 has been the leading

of his town, a model for the

graduates

Farm'

who have assumed

and the communities

many Farmville

leading roles in the

in

which they have


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DEPARTMENT

This year, 1946, marks Dr. Martha Smith Smith's second anniversary at S. T. G. During the short time which Dean Smith has been with us, she has truly become one of our outstanding ladies. Patiently she has listened to our requests, large and small, and whenever possible, has granted us per' mission. Our parties would not have been complete without the appearance of Dean Smith. We've often wondered how she could keep all her ap' pointments and yet find time to attend our social gatherings. She has been called upon continuously to give lectures out of town as well as here. This is evidence that she is not only our dean, but a well'rounded educational leader. received her doctorate in Educa'

and Measurements at the Uni' Nebraska in 1935. Her name appears in Who's Who in American Education, Who's

tional Psychology

versity of

Who among Women,

Oi)

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE

DEAN SMITH

Dean Smith

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Woman's Who's Who.

Classes in the social sciences bring to us a clearer picture of current problems and make us reahze

the part which

we

play. This department,

by Dr. Walmsley, includes

headed

classes in history, social

science, economics, government,

and

sociology.

A

student who is interested in history finds a variety of courses in this field. Miss Peck and Dr. Moss teach History of Western Civih2;ation, which is a freshman course. Classes in southern history are offered by Dr. Walmsley and Dr. Simkins, and especially interesting to all students is the course Civil War and Reconstruction. Other history courses offered are Current History, British His' tory, the Far East, Canadian History, Russian His' tory, and American History. To students show' ing interest in the field of history and evidence of ability to do research work, a seminar course is

taught by Dr. Walmsley. It is essential

that

we know

about our

local,

and national governments. Classes taught by Dr. Walmsley and Dr. Moss help us to gain this knowledge. Courses in economics are offered by Dr. Moss and Dr. Simkins. Forever pressing upon us are problems which are state,

THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION In a teacher's college education courses are nat' urally of prime consideration. This year, with our

most capable Dr. John P. Wynne as head of this field, the Department of Education has been par' ticularly outstanding.

At

the present time

eagerly awaiting the pubUcation of Dr.

we

are

Wynne's

sociology under the direction of Miss Stubbs.

A

latest textbook.

The

of everyday concern to us. Interesting studies of the negro, child welfare, rural and urban society, marriage, and the family are made in courses in

courses included in this department are edu'

general course in the meaning of the social

sciences

taught by Dr. Walmsley.

is

and student teach' few exceptions, psychology courses the sophomore year, courses in elc

cation, psychology, philosophy, ing.

With

a

are offered in

mentary and secondary education in the junior year, and courses in philosophy and student teach' ing in the senior year.

The two

courses that are attracting special at'

tention at this time are the one in child develop'

ment and the one

One

in audio'visual education.

of the outstanding events of the year

was

sponsored jointly by the Department of Education and the State Department of Education. The purpose of this statewide meeting was to better professional

the Professional Institute held in the

fall,

relations.

The

climax of four years is attained when a upon her student teaching at the Training School or the Farmville High School. senior embarks

MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE Under

the direction of Miss Carrie B. Taha'

ferro, courses in algebra, trigonometry, calculus,

and soUd geometry are of was offered this Methods classes, which are of great help to

and plane, fered.

year.

A

analytical,

course in the slide rule


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required for

matics

is

dents

majoring

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student teachers, are taught. all

The

majors and minors. StU' take

education

elementary

in

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history of mathe'

courses in elementary mathematics under Miss

London. Commercial arithmetic

is

also taught

by

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is

scious of the scientific

we

made more con' realm by Mr. McCorkle and

In the chemistry lab

are

Mr. French in organic and physiological chemistry and in two courses in physics. Miss Burger teaches

In addition to American and English Ut'

may

study one particular author,

such as Shakespeare, Browning, and Tennyson.

Also courses in the novel, and

Biblical hterature, the short story,

modern poetry are

especially interested.

available to those

Preparation for teaching

is

given in courses in methods of teaching Enghsh.

general science classes.

Dr. Robert Brumfield, a biology department, and

new

professor in the

Mr. Davisson

Miss Leola Wheeler heads the Speech Depart-

started the

ment, which offers courses in pubHc speaking,

from a and Mr. Davisson was granted

voice and diction, oral interpretation, and the his'

year. After Christmas Dr. Jeffers returned

leave of absence,

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composition adapted to practical needs in busi'

ness.

erature a student

Miss London.

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and granmiar there are advanced courses which in' elude Joumahsm, a study of the development of the English language, and Business English, which

a leave to continue study until spring.

course in biology

is

offered,

including

A

fuU

general

tory of drama.

Courses planned to prepare

dents for duties of the teacher schools are taught

—Librarian

stU'

in small

by Dr. Leroy C. Merritt.

biology, botany, zoology, bacteriology, anatomy,

MUSIC AND ART

and physiology.

GEOGRAPHY The geography department draws more and has more meaning

in the

during this post'war period, of

many

Interest in music interest

minds of the students

when boundary

countries must be fixed

lines

and other import'

ant questions have to be settled.

Headed by Miss Grace Moran, with Miss Frances Waters as assistant professor, the depart'

ment

offers

courses including studies of South

America, Europe, Asia, the Pacific Islands, China,

and the Soviet Union. There are numerous survey courses of almost

emphasis

is

all

areas of the earth.

placed on the

life

to their environment and

is

stimulated

Department. In carrying out offered

As

which include

all

its

by the Music

aims, courses are

phases in this

field.

a background for a general appreciation of

music, a course in the history of music

is

offered

by

Miss Patterson. She also teaches courses designed to help with music problems found in the lower

and upper elementary grades.

Mr.

Strick,

who

heads the department, teaches equivalent courses pertaining to junior and senior high schools.

StU'

dents enjoy the courses in music appreciation of'

Major

of people in relation

upon the geography of

current problems.

ENGLISH, SPEECH.

AND LIBRARY

SCIENCE The Department of English, under the direction Mr. James M. Grainger, seeks to coordinate its work with that of other departments in the college of

and to secure the active cooperation of all instruct' ors in maintaining the use of good English in all

fered

classes.

of the College Choir and the Choral Club, which

Besides the fundamental courses in composition

by both

professors.

Mr.

are also offered as courses.

Strick

is

the director


C>K9 The

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exhibit displayed each year in the

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Art De'

French nation. native Spanish student and a native French student assist instructors in each class once a week. student interested in Latin may take Virgil, Ovid, Horace, Cicero, and more advanced courses. For those students interested in teaching languages, methods courses are offered.

partment reveals the actual work done by students taking courses in this field. The department is under the direction of Miss Bedford, assisted by Mrs. Lemen. Pupils are able to take classes in mc chanical drawing, drawing and composition crafts, art education, color and design, lettering and poster

and art appreciation. Miss Bedford, Miss Camper, and Miss Hall teach Practical Arts Education.

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A

A

design,

PHYSICAL EDUCATION The purpose ment

is

of the Physical Education Depart'

to provide an opportunity for

to engage in developmental

BUSINESS EDUCATION

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all

students

and recreational activ

ities.

The

Business Education Department

1930493 1.

was organ'

has rapidly grown into one of the largest departments of the college, with Mr. Merle L. Landrum at the head of the teaching staff, assisted by Mrs. J. P. Wynne, Miss Craddock, Mrs. Hanford, Miss Parmenter, and Mr. Snead. i2;ed

in the school year

It

The ness,

courses offered cover every aspect of busi' such as advertising, merchandising, payroll

and social security, accounting, insurance, and methods of teaching, in addition to the funda' mental shorthand, typing, and accounting subjects. Girls receiving a degree in business education will be prepared not only for high school commercial teaching positions, but also for higher positions in

business administration.

LANGUAGES The Language Department

composed of is and Latin. The modem languages are taught by Miss Helen Draper and classes in French, Spanish,

Ability in dance and experience in various sports who expects to become a teacher of physical education or a worker in the are essential to one

of recreation. Classes in health education, cor' and the teaching of physical edu'

field

rective exercises,

cation are taught by Miss Mary Barlow, who heads the department. In charge of all seasonal sports is Miss Olive T. Her, associate professor. Classes in dance are taught by Miss Emiley Kaudaurich. These classes include tap dance, modem dance, and social dance. Swimming classes are under the direc' tion of Miss Mary Dabney. For recreational pur'

poses the

swimming pool is open to students

at cer'

tain hours.

HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT Our college has been selected by the State Board of Education as one of the institutions for the edu' cation of home economic teachers for the junior and senior high schools of the State. The courses offered meet the standards set by the State Board and the Federal Authorities. The aim of the department is not only to qualify the students for teaching home economics in the pubhc schools, but also to make them capable of scientifically managing a home.

Miss Katherine Tupper heads the department, and the staff includes Miss Bessie Jetter, Miss Ruth Gleaves, and Miss Margaret Hall. The courses offered are, fundamentally, Foods and Cookery and Clothing Design and Constmc

House Planning, Home Furnishing, Home Management, and Lunch Room Management are tion.

Miss Emily Barksdale; Latin, by Miss Minnie V. Rice.

In addition to composition and grammar, stu' dents may take courses in French and Spanish lit' erature and courses in the development of the

also

important features included in the curricvilum.

Other than doing the practice teaching

in the

senior year, the students live in the practice house,

located on the campus, for one quarter. There they have the actual experience of managing a home.


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Our annual Mardi Gras Dance was

SENIOR CLASS

February, and our class

For four happy years, we have lived together, and now that the end is near, memories lay heavy on our minds and we find ourselves starting every conversation with, "Do you remember the day?" Each year was different, and each became more

held in

was well represented by

five lovely girls.

Then May Day

at

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;^Ann Garter was

Longwood

truly a lovely queen supported

our

by

six

members of

class.

The

rest of the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ghi

Ghain and,

Sing, the Daisy

And now,

many

year was crowded with

moments

unforgettable

Senior

unveiling,

at last,

graduation.

to the Freshman, Sophomores, Juniors,

the Administration and Faculty, the college itself, the town and all the cherished memories, we, the class of '46 bid a fond farewell. And to Dr. Jar'

man,

we give our

heartfelt thanks

and appreciation

for four wonderful years under his guidance.

WHO'S Those

girls selected

WHO

from the Senior Glass to

resent Farmville State Teachers Gollege in

Who Among dear to us as

we

reali2;ed that this

was our

Senior Glass; Garolyn Bobbitt, viccpresident of the Student

Grumpier, president of the Young

It took us a few weeks really to feel our im' portance but the night that we knelt before Dr. Jarman and he placed those black hats on our heads, we fully realizied our positions and pledged

this

Kappa Gamma; Jacqueline Parden, president of the Student Government Association; Agnes Stokes, president of Kappa Delta Pi; and Virginia Treakle,

circus,

Editor of the Rotunda.

of "our

in itself

dresses, the red rose bouquets,

Ghris'

Virginian; Frances Lee, president of the Athletic Association; Ann Martin, president of Alpha

our fuUest and best year.

men" were back for Senior Dance, was enough to make it a huge success. Mary Walker Watts returned to lead the figure with our beloved Bessy. The white dreamy

Most

Woman's

of the Virginian; Lillian EUiott, Editor of the

We

and that

Bral'

tian Association; Shirley Gruser, Business Manager

and we at last came out on have never thanked Poddy enough for all top. her hard work. Minnie Lee Grumpier reigned as queen and Jane Philhower as ring'master. It was a glorious night for the Seniors, and our hearts were almost bursting with pride when we left the gym.

Then came

Government Association; Lucy

head of Student Standards; Fredrika Ann Butt, president of the House Gouncil; Minnie Lee

ley,

mothers.

make

Students in American Golleges and

Universities" were Eleanor Bisese, president of the

last.

Never again would we be as carefree and frivolous. We saw ourselves as hard'ruled school teachers, stenographers and, the more hopeful, as wives and

ourselves to

rep'

"Who's

and the red and

white decorations formed a picture that won't be easily forgotten by any of us. And we'll never forget Miss Burger, our class sponsor, rolling that crepe paper up at 2 o'clock in the morning. What would we have done without her! 17


C^4^ C^vD C^^ THE JUNIOR CLASS

C^f^J)

"Where

are

screamed, as

this

marveled at the suites with pastel walls. After we unpacked enough to welcome our new sister class, we introduced them to some of our old favorite songs at the Green 'n White get'together we gave in September. Of course, they loved Cab Overby's

much

boogie almost as

Time passed then

we do.

as

we

settled

down

way, dragging, to being Juniors

With

well as socially.

longer

assignments, to say nothing of extra'Curricular de' mands at every turn, everyone righteously con'

vinced herself that "your Junior year of all."

An

increase of tuxedos

solid evidence that the

C^<9 twcday

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period

was

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shortened. In that one

rang with song and had we received such praise. The Freshmen really knew that we were the su' perior race. On the solemn last night Eloise Haynes presided over Rat Court, with an imposing man' ner and voice. day,

however, the

halls

laughter; never before

We made our bid for financial success by operat' We were ably helped by

ing the coke machine.

in that mystifying

flying, until

scholastically

as

C^<9 ditional

year?" we all swarmed into the "Building" and living

ya'

we

(>K9

is

the hardest

on the dance

war was

floor

actucilly

Miss Dabney, our classman, and by our

officers:

"Peepsie" Brooks, president; Julia Booher, vice president; Mary Lou Bagley, secretary; Dorris Ballance, treasurer.

The

were hardly placed on the proper quick step brought Color Rush and the hockey games. Cheering madly for heads,

rat caps

when time with its

gave over.

However, a war raged all year between Lucile Upshur and the Coke machine. Patting, puttering, cajoling, and occasionally kicking its rickety parts, Lucile managed to abate our thirst at least half the time. Our bouquets go her way.

When circus time rolled around, we chalked up another second for the Juniors with our forecast of the world in 2000 A. D. which included every thing from robots to atom pills. And great was the day that Green and White won Color Rush, and the Juniors took first in the song contest! On February 13 the Juniors invited everyone aboard the "Junior Jubilee" to see the first produc' This tion ever to be presented on a Showboat. brain child was nurtured by Grace Loyd, and "Swannee" will ring through our memories for'

Red and White, we watched our team Juniors and defeat the Freshmen.

worn

ever.

The

days jumbled on, leading us on to our ulti' Seniority. To history we remain just another class, but we'll cherish the memory always of "our Junior year at S. T. C."

mate goal of

.

.

.

until

Mardi Gras this

tie

the

Rat caps were

year.

Circus time brought excitement to all the Sophc mores. Changing our stunt at the eleventh hour brought midnight rehearsals, hasty costuming, and loads of fun, not only for the performers, but also for the entire class.

THE SOPHOMORE CLASS Sophomores

we

fincilly

at last!

made

it.

We waited a long time, but

On

annex and gym

Christmas and that extended vacation inspired ideas when February and production rolled around. worked out the holiday scheme with a committee, headed by Beatrice Geyer. Her assist'

many

we were

We

How long had we wanted

ants were Joyce Hill, Mary Rattray, Virginia Tyndall, and Virginia Yonce.

Back from vacation, we constantly and triumph' antly thought of Rat Week. This year the tra'

With spring came lighter spirits and open win' dows. While talking over our gay second year, we looked forward to a still better third.

the haughty race.

down town

at

Our favorite

any time.

privilege

was going

that!


C«K9

(>K!)

C^^

C^^^

C^sD

C^4^

ii

I

^ i

OK9

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next year, we paid our last visits. Gfoodbyes were said, but we knew it wouldn't be long before we would all be together again as "high and mighty" sophomores. ing on

Annex

i;

STUDENT GOVERNMENT This year we on the Student Council decided to bend our efforts especially toward making the stU' dent government on our campus as effective an or' ganiziation as it should be. Our desire was to have the entire student body reali2e the responsible part which every member plays in the making and en' en' forcing of rules by a student government. hsted help by electing Dr. Moss at a student body meeting to be a faculty member on the council. His sincere interest in our work and his ever wise ad'

We

FRESHMAN CLASS

duced to our "rec."

Not

sister class at

long afterward

a coke party in the whirled down to

we

made us

A

series thankful for his presence. Rotunda one written by a member of the faculty, one by a member of the council and one by a student at large was a part of our project to bring before the eyes of all the students the need for their active cooperation and

vice

Oh! what a wet, blue Monday it was when we first saw S. T. C. The rain was forgotten, though, in the excitement of meeting new people and seeing new things. During the first week we were intro'

all

of editorials in the

interest at all times.

the Big'Little Sister Reception to meet the faculty. Already we loved this place. It didn't take us long to discover the favorite haunts of S. T. C.

and most of our spare time was spent

girls,

in Butcher's

or Shannon's.

When few

it

dawned upon us

we

officers,

dent; Dolly

that

we might need

a

elected "Tootsie" Hamilton, presi'

Ann Freeman, vice'president;

Marjorie

We

and Lee Staples, treasurer. were thrilled when we found we could have Mr. French for our classman. Miller, secretary;

Then came ting."

that Httle institution called "rat'

We suffered,

laughed, had fun, and pxiUed

through with

many new

held the

of "Best Rat."

title

friends.

Nancy Dickenson

For our circus stunt we chose a Mother Goose theme, with Jane Taylor directing the frolics. Hav ing always been people who bubble over with spirit, we entered enthusiastically into the Color Rush and hockey, basketball, and volleyball games.

Hard work and loads of fun remind us of produc when we turned the pages of "The Freshman

tion,

In the spring we were bustin' buttons around here when Margaret Wall and DoUy Ann Ga2;ette."

Freeman were But

elected to the

May

Court.

good things end sometime, so did our freshman year. With the happy thought of room' as all

On Tuesday nights we had our regular meetings, and under the capable guidance of our president, Jacqueline Parden, we did our best to decide upon fair punishments for girls who had broken rules. We also took part in many college activities which are an integral part of our hves as students here at Farmville. On lyceum nights we dressed in our usual black evening skirts and white blouses (Dr. Moss was excused because he had no black skirt) to fulfill our duties as ushers. And I'm sure none of use will ever forget the "eight hundred and some" favors we cut out for the Christmas Ban' quet! Jacky's room was litereilly overflowing with us, paper, and scissors for a full week. On Nov' ember 19, we celebrated Dr. Jarman's birthday at a banquet in the Tea Room with our own beloved president of the college as our guest of honor. Carolyn Bobbitt was our viccpresident this year.

She put a great deal of work into the editing


C^KS of our

C"^^

C>K9

C^^O

C*^^

mean so much who must famiharizie themselves Farmville ways. As secretary, Margaret

little

blue handbooks, which

to the freshmen

with our

was to keep records of all student body meetings as well as those of the council's weekly ones and to issue our famous "caUing cards" to Lohr's job

who must

C^sS

C^KD

(>K9

CT^^O

C^^S

further the spirit of the State Teachers College. Always, we keep before us the spirit of Joan of Arc, "That spirit which in one regard has had no peer nor shall have none."

At Circle

the beginning of the

was composed

quarter the Joan

fall

of Eleanor Bisese, treasurer;

then stray no Betty

Minnie Lee Grumpier, Shirley Cruser, viccpresi'

farther than the confines of the campus.

dents; LiUian EUiott; Frances Lee;

Minetree kept our funds straight and paid our bills. Chairman of the campus League this year was Jean

tions, the

and During fall tapping we recogni2;ed seniors, Carolyn Bobbitt, Freddie Ann Butt, Margaret Hewlett, and Dorothy Overcash; and juniors, Martha Russell East, Margaret Ellett, and Margaret Lohr. At the winter tapping service we added to our circle two additional seniors, Betty Adams and Connie Ozlin. Working with us throughout the year were our two faithful advisers, Miss Ehzabeth Burger and Miss Ruth

We

Gleaves.

those erring students

Bentley.

STUDENT STANDARDS The Student Standards Committee is actually Body committee. It is made up of rep-

the Student

from each class, heads of all organiziamajor officers, and six faculty members. work for what the students want and need

resentatives

all

here at S. T. C.

Most

president; Jacqueline Parden;

and many of the

Martin,

Stokes;

Virginia Treakle, secretary.

The annual

of the minor complaints

Ann

Agnes

circus,

under the successful leader-

was held on November 10 gymnasium. First priK for class stunts went

ship of Frances Lee,

in

major ones come to Student Standards for ironing out. Such things as putting bulletin boards where needed, putting ash trays at the head of the steps, furnishing the recreational equipment for the Rec,

the

to

and getting permission to date in Student Lounge have come through this committee. Certainly the one thing that Student Standards does and that

of S. T. C. in the atomic age, the juniors placed

is

to sponsor the trips to Rich'

concerts at the

Mosque. This accommoda-

everyone recogni2;es

mond tion

is

for the pleasure of the student body; the

committee makes no money.

You see. Student Standards is just what it says: an organi23,tion to keep the standards of S. T. C. and its student body high. Our committee is the "middleman" between the student body, faculty, and administration. It is the S. T. C. mediation board and requires the cooperation of all its members. To the student body: this committee is yours.

Use

it!

the seniors,

who

portrayed a street scene in a small quite happy except the

town where everyone was

With

sophisticated college graduate.

The Circus

second.

carried out a

Lee Grumpier, a senior, as Attending her in the court were Nellie Smith, a junior, as "Little Bo-Peep"; Peggy Moore, a sophomore, as "Little Miss MufFet"; and Violet Ritchie, nie

a freshman, as

"Mary, Mary, quite contrary."

Jane Philhower, as ringmaster, thriUed and delighted her audience with her unusual grace and poise.

Another big event on the Alpha Kappa Gamma was the annual national convention, which was held on our campus April 12 and 13. Because of wartime restrictions on travel during the past few years, this was the first convention calendar

from the four ficers,

found among you." It with these words that the Joan Circle of Alpha

"Such

is

leaders have been

Kappa Gamma,

national

leadership

fraternity,

seeks to recognize those girls in our student

whose years have been

full

have given the best of their

of devotion and abilities

and

body

who

talents to

Mother Goose

Top" was Min"Queen of Hearts."

theme, and reigning over the "Big

since the beginning of the war.

ALPHA KAPPA GAMMA

their version

circles, as

attended the convention.

vention was held at

Mix

as

Representatives

well as the national of-

Our banquet

con-

Longwood with Miss Grace

our guest speaker.

In the spirit of our patron saint, did strive to

"Leadership in

we

of the Joan

which was ours and catch the meaning of our motto,

Circle did realize the challenge

womanly

service."


DR.

MARTHA SMITH SMITH Dean

DR.

J.

L.

JARMAN

President

DR.

J.

L.

JARMAN

At Wor\

of

Women


S.

L.

GRAHAM

Business

Manager

MABEL JONES McCOY Night Matron

ALPHA LEE GARNETT Assistant to the

S.

M.

HOLTON

B.A.,

F.

SHELTON

Dietitian

HALLIE LAING Home Department

Assistant in

BUGG

WINNIE

RAY

A.

B.A.,

MOORE

J.

P.

WYNNE

B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Director of Teacher Training and Professor of Education

HINER

SOPHIE PACKER

M.D.

School Physician

V.

Treasurer

Registrar

M.A.

Director of Personnel

ANNIE

VIRGILIA L

Dean

R.N. School Nurse

FLOYD

F.

SWERTFEGER

B.S., M.S.,

Ph.D.

Associate Professor of

Education


M.

EDGAR JOHNSON ..S.,

M.A., Ed.D., Ph. D.

BOYD COYNER B.A.,

M.A.

Professor of Education

MARY

B.

B.S.,

HAYNES M.A.

Primary-Grade Supervisor

JAMES M. GRAINGER B.A.,

,

M.A.

Professor of English

Associate Professor of

Education

^^y^^l MARY CLAY HINER B.S.,

M.A.

Professor of English

SIBYL

HENRY

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Principal of Elementary School

NANCY FOSTER M.A.

B.A.,

Assistant Professor of English

MARY NICHOLS B

s

_

M.S.

^B^S WILHELMINA B.S.,

P.

LONDON

M.A.

Associate Professor of English

JAMES ELLIOTT

WALMSLEY

LUCILLE B.S.,

JENNINGS M.S.

Associate Professor of English

LEOLA WHEELER B.A.,

M.A.

M.A., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English

Professor of History and Social Sciences

Professor of Speech


FRANCIS BUTLER SIMKINS

C. G,

GORDON MOSS

B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences

Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences

GRACE

B.

B.S.,

MORAN M.A.

Associate Professor of Geography

T. A.

McCORKLE

B.A., M.S.

Professor of Chemistry and Physics

FRANCES WATERS B.S.,

M.S.

Assistant Professor of

RAYMOND B.S.,

MARY B.S.,

E.

PECK

M.S.

H. FRENCH M.S.

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics

H.

STRICK

Professor of Music

Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences

PAUL DAVISSON A.B., B.S., M.S.

Geography

ALFRED

Assistant Professor of Biology

ELIZABETH BURGER B.S.,

M.A.

Assistant Professor of Science

GEORGE W. JEFFERS B.S.,

M.A., Ph.D.

Professor of Biology

HELEN DRAPER B.S.,

Professor of

M.A.

Modern Languages


MINNIE

V.

RICE

VIRGINIA BEDFORD B.S.,

M.A.

JANICE LEMEN B.A.,

M.A.

Professor of Latin

ZITA BELLAMY A.B.,

Associate

HANFORD

M.A.

Professor of

Associate Professor of Fine and

Associate Professor of Fine and

Applied Arts

Applied Arts

ALICE

C.

WYNNE

B.A., B.S.,

Business

Education

M.A.

OLIVE PARMENTER B.S.,

M.A.

Associate Professor of Business

Assistant Professor of Business

Education

Education

MERLE LANDRUM B.S.,

M.A,

Professor of Business Education

CHRISTY SNEAD Assistant Professor of Business

Education

MARY BARLOW OTTIE CRADDOCK B.S.,

M.A.

Assistant Professor of Fine and Applied Arts and Business

Education

B.S.,

M.A.

Professor of Health Education

OLIVE B.S.,

T.

ILER

M.A.

LMILY KAUZLARICH B.S.,

M.A.

Associate Professor of Physical

Education

Assistant Professor of Physical

Education


LILA

CARRIE

LONDON

B.S.,

B.

TALIAFERRO

B.S.,.M.A.

M.A.

Professor of Mathematics

B.S.,

Professor of Mathematics

EMILY BARKSDALE ALICE

E.

B.S.,

CARTER M.A.

of

Home

Economics

B.S.

CARMEN CLARK

Instructor in

Home

Economics

MARION COR WIN TERRY A.B., M.S. Assistant Librarian

Modern

Languages

B.S.,

Home

Professor of

MARGARET SPRUNT HALL

M.A.

Assistant Librarian

RUTH CLEAVES

BESSIE JETER B.S., M.A. Economics

M.A.

Associate Professor of

Associate Professor of Education

Associate Professor

A.B.,

KATHERINE TUPPER

M.A.

Associate Professor of

Economics

JESSIE A.

PATTERSON

A.B.,

Home

M.A.

Associate Professor of Music

FLORENCE B.S.,

H.

STUBBS

M.A.

Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences


SENIOR CLASS

SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS Left to right:

ELIZABETH VIANNAH

ADAMS

A. Summers, V. Shackelford, E.

NELLIE KATHERINE ALLEN

Richmond B.S.

Elementary

Bisese,

Enonville

B.A.

English

Miss Burger, L. ElHott


SENIOR CLASS 1946

CAROLYN TEAFORD ALPHIN

MILDRED HUNT ALTICE Rocky Mount

Amherst Elementary

B.S.

JANE GUTHRIE ANDERSON

B.A.

JEAN ELIZABETH ANDERSON

Farmville

B.A.

Mathematics

English

Pedro B.S.

History


MILDRED ELLEN BAILEY

PAULINE ELIZABETH BARNES Richmond

Brookneal

Elementary

B.S.

B.A.

ANN GRAY

GARY FRANCES BEARD

SENIOR CLASS

Home

BELL

Chatham

Roanoke B.S.

Latin

Economics

B.A.

English


SENIOR CLASS 1946

FRANCES LASHLEY BELL

LUCILLE ALLEN BELL

Petersburg

B.A.

Kenbridge Spanish

ROSA LEE BELL

B.S.

ELEANOR ANN

Kenbridge B.S.

Mathematics

Business Education

BISESE

Norfolk B.S.

History


FLORA LOUISE BLANE

ANNA

Alton B.S.

Business Education

CAROLYN ALEXANDER BOBBITT

B.S.

SENIOR CLASS 1946

Elementary Education

BLANTON

Business Education

CAROLYN

South Hill B.S.

LEE

Cumberland

E.

BOOTHE

Wakefield B.S.

Elementary Education


SENIOR CLASS 1946

LUCY BOWLING

LUCY HARDWICKE BRALLEY Richmond

Andersonville

B.A.

Mathematics

B.A.

Social Science

RUTH DOWNS BROOKS

BETTY LEE BROTHERS

Farmville

Suffolk

B.S.

Business Education

B.S. 33

Elementary Education


BARBARA WESTBROOK BROWN

EDITH CARR BRYANT Branchville

Hilton Village B.S.

Business Education

ALICE ELIZA BUCK Baltimore, B.S.

SENIOR CLASS 1946

B.S.

Economics

KATHERINE BURFORD

Md.

Elementary Education

Home

Amherst B.S.

Elementary Education


SENIOR CLASS 1946

FREDRIKA

ANN BUTT

ESTHER CARBONELL Miami, Florida

Portsmouth B.A.

English

MAE CARDWELL

EMILY CARPER

Concord Depot B.S.

Biology

B.S.

Rocky Mount History

B.A. 35

History


ANN WILMERYON CARTER

PHYLLIS PAGE

B.S.

Social Science

ANNA BARBARA COSEY

SENIOR CLASS 1946

History

B.S.

MINNIE LEE CRUMPLER Suffolk

Lakeland, Florida B.S.

COOK

La Crosse

Cumberland

Art

B.S.

Business Education


SENIOR CLASS 1946

SHIRLEY

NEWTON CRUSER

DOROTHY LUCILLE CUMMINGS

Norfolk B.A.

Charlottesville

English

B.S.

Elementary Education

MARY ANNE DOVE

KITTY EAST

Roanoke

AltaVista

B.A.

History

B.S.

History


VIVIAN EARLE EDMUNDS

FRANCES LILLIAN ELLIOTT Farmville

Norfolk B.S.

Chemistry

MARGARET ELIZABETH

ELLIS

B.S.

MARGARET FLEMING Chase City

Coral Gables, Florida B.S.

SENIOR CLASS 1946

History

Mathematics

B.S.

Home

Economics


SENIOR CLASS 1946

DOROTHY HENRIETTA GELSTON Hudson B.S.

Heights,

N.

FLORENCE INEZ GODWIN Smithfield

J.

Business Education

EVELYN MATTHEWS GRIZZARD

B.S.

LUVERTA GUMKOWSKI

Drewryville B.S.

Elementary Education

Elementary Education

Smithfield B.S. 39

Business Education


MARGARET HARVIE

MINNIE ROSE

Richmond B.A.

English

B.S.

MARGIE HEWLETT

SENIOR CLASS 1946

Business Education

ROSA HILL

Richmond B.S.

HAWTHORNE

Kenbridge

Sedley

Music

B.S.

Elementary Education


SENIOR CLASS 1946

MARY ELLEN HOGE Bluefield,

B.S.

W.

MARTHA HOLMAN

Va.

Elementary Education

Farmville

History

B.S.

MARY LILLINGTON HUNTER

NANCY ANNE INGLE

La Crosse

Lebanon

B.S.

Business Education

B.S.

Mathematics


MARIA IRIZARRY

LUCILLE JONES

Puerto Rica

Staunton Biology

B.S.

1946

Physical Education

MARTHA ELLEN JONES

JEAN MOORE KENT

Buckingham

Wirtz

B.A.

SENIOR CLASS

B.S.

Music

B.S.

Business Education


SENIOR CLASS 1946

EARLINE

H.

KIMMERLING

FRANCES HERNDON LEE

Roanoke B.S.

Richmond Chemistry

MARTHA ROSALYN

LEE

B.S.

MARY ANNE LOVING

Craig B.S.

Business Education

Business Education

La Crosse B.A. 43

Endish


MARY KATHERINE LYNCH

NANCY CONN McCAULEY

Lebanon

Danville English

B.S.

MARGARET AMELIA McINTYRE Marion, B.A.

SENIOR CLASS 1946

S.

B.A.

English

LUCIE ELLEN McKENRY Arlington

C.

History

B.A.

History


SENIOR CLASS 1946

KATHERINE ANDERSON MADDOX

ISABELITA

Lynchburg B.S.

Elementary Education

ELIZABETH PAGE

MANSON

Elementary Education

Endish

B.A.

ANN BEAMAN MARTIN

DeWitt B.S.

MALDONADO

Puerto Rica

Suffolk

B.A.

English


BETTY MAE MARTIN

JULIA MESSICK

Lynchburg B.S.

Elementary Education

CAROLINE

MOON

Front Royal B.S.

ELIZABETH MOUNTCASTLE

Shipman B.S.

SENIOR CLASS 1946

Business Education

Elementary Education

Mountcastle B.S.

Chemistry


SENIOR CLASS 1946

CARLOTTA BUFF NORFLEET

MARY REBECCA NORFLEET Holland

Virginia Beach

Chemistry

B.S.

MARGARET

LOUISE

ORANGE

B.S.

DOROTHY MARGARET OVERCASH Hampden Sydney

Richmond B.S.

Physical Education

Mathematics

B.S.

47

History


DOROTHY ELIZABETH OVERSTREET

VIRGINIA CONSTANCE OZLIN

Bedford

Chase City

B.A.

History

JANE HELEN PAGE

VIVIAN JACQUELIN PARDEN

Amherst B.S.

SENIOR CLASS 1946

Music

B.A.

Portsmouth English

B.S.

Business Education


SENIOR CLASS 1946

tas&^'i'',''. ' .^i'vjs;-';'

BETTY JEAN PARRY

GLENN ANN PATTERSON

Farmville

B.A.

Kenbridge English

JANE PAULETTE

B.S.

BEVERLY ELIZABETH PEEBLES

South Hill B.S.

Business Education

Elementary Education

Hampton B.S.

49

Elementary Education


MARY

ELLEN PETTY Wren English

B.S.

EVELYN MARIE PIERCE

JANE CLAYTON PHILHOWER Williamsburg B.S.

NAOMI RUTH PIERCY

Greensboro, N. C. B.S.

SENIOR CLASS 1946

Home

Economics

Elementary Education

Jefferson

B.A.

English


SENIOR CLASS 1946

NANCY BOYDEN

PITTS

BESSIE IRENE

B.S.

Elementary Education

REGINA

M.

PORTINARO

Physical Education

Chemistry

B.S.

KATHARINE

Newport News B.S.

POMEROY

Quinton

Norfolk

B.

PREBBLE

Lynchburg B.S. 51

Biology


VIRGINIA LEE PRICE

ALMA JEAN RIDDICK

Farmville B.S.

1946

Hickory Economics

B.S.

Elementary Education

JACQUELINE LEE RITCHIE

MARGARET THAYER ROSS

Richmond

Onley

B.S.

SENIOR CLASS

Home

Biology

B.S.

Chemistry


SENIOR CLASS 1946

RUTH PLEASANTS ROWE

NELLIE

Rural Retreat

Chemistry

B.S.

ANN

FINLEY SEARSON

Stuart

B.A.

Business Education

English

ALICE VIRGINIA SHACKELFORD

Upper Marlboro, Md. •B-S.

MELBA SCOTT

Gloucester Point

B.A. 53

English


FRANCES

MARWOOD SHACKELFORD

LOIS

History

B.S.

ESTHER RAY SHEVICK

B.S.

SENIOR CLASS

Home

Economics

MILDRED LOUISE SHIFLETT Palmyra

Richmond B.S.

LLOYD SHEPPARD Stuart

Petersburg

Music

B.S.

Elementary Education


SENIOR CLASS 1946

MARY CAROLYN SMITH

MARY NANNIE SOURS

Farmville

Chatham

B.S.

History

B.A.

History

MARY CORNELIA SPRADLIN

AGNES BAGLEY STOKES

Roanoke

Kenbridge

B.S.

Elementary Education

Elementary Education

B.S.

55


MARGARET ANNE SUMMERS

MILDRED LORENE THOMAS

Hampden Sydney

Lawrence ville

B.S.

1946

B.S.

Elementary Education

KATHERYNE LEIGH TINDALL

VIRGINIA EUBANK TREAKLE

Hatton

Farmville

B.S.

SENIOR CLASS

Business Education

Business Education

B.S.

English


SENIOR CLASS 1946

MARGARET VIRGINIA VERELL

MARY

Newport News B.S.

Suffolk

Elementary Education

MARTHA

ELISE

WATKINS

B.S.

Business Education

PHYLLIS JANE

Blackstone

B.A.

VIRGINIA WALKER

WATTS

Lynchburg English

B.S.

Physical Education


JANICE

GORDON WELLS

MARTHA

Hampton B.A.

History

RUTH BARROW WHITTEN

B.A.

SENIOR CLASS 1946

WHITE History

DOROTHY EVELYN WINSLOW

Farmville

B.A.

LEE

Richmond

Norfolk English

B.S.

Business Education


SENIOR CLASS 1946

ANNIE GAY

WOOD

BETTY

Gladstone B.S.

Barhamsville English

KATHERINE LEE WRIGHT Bowling Green B.S.

WYATT WOODWARD

Business Education

B.S.

Business Education


Who's

ELEANOR

Who Among

BISESE

MINNIE LEE CRUMPLER

ANN MARTIN

American College Students

in '46

ANN BUTT

CAROLYN BOBBITT

LUCY BRALLEY

SHIRLEY CRUSER

LILLIAN ELLIOTT

FRANCES LEE

AGNES STOKES

VIRGINIA TREAKLE

JACKIE

PARDEN

FREDDIE

.


JUNIOR CLASS

CLASS OFFICERS Left to right;

M.

Ellett,

Bibb, Headlee,

Loyd, Miss Her

GWEN ADKISS Newport News

NANCY

V.

ADAMS

Redoak

MARIE ADDLEMAN

MARY EMMA ALLEN

ALENE ALPHIN

Cumberland

Ford

Zuni

LO^aCE

E.

ALTIZER

Farnirille


GRACE ANDERSON

VIRGINIA W.

EDITH APPERSON

Clarkton

ANDERSON

Culpeper

RUTH MARION ATKINSON Hilton Village

Midlothian

FELICIDAD M.

ANN BAER

LOU BAKER

MAE BALLARD

AVELLANET

Hampton

Roanoke

Bedford

ELIZABETH BENNETT

HILDA BENNETT

Keeling

Richmond

Puerto Rico

SARA MARGARET BALLARD Bedford

DOROTHY

LILLIAN

BENNETT Roanoke

BETTY MAURICE BIBB DORIS BIEDENBENDER Lynchburg

JUNIOR CLASS

Chase City

LOUISE

BLACKMAN

Courtland

NANCY BLAIR Gloucester Point


JUNIOR CLASS BOONE

BETTY BOWLES

VIRGINIA SUTTON

BEVERLY BOONE

BLAND

Norfolk

Carrsville

Richmond

KITTY SUE

RACHAEL BRUGH

ANNE BUCK

MARY STEWART

BRIDGEFORTH

Roanoke

Farmville

LOIS

West Point

BUFORD Lawrenceville

Kenbridge

HARRIET GALE

ELIZABETH LEE CARTER

Appomattox

Concord Depot

PATRICIA CARTER Bluefield, W, Va.

MARY ARMISTEAD

ROSA MAE CHANDLER

ANNE CHARLTON

CONSTANCE CHRISTIAN

CATLETT

Clover

Dillwyn

Phoebus

MARGARET JEANNE BUTTON Roanoke

Wicomico G3


EVELYN LORENE CLAIBORNE

BETTY DEUEL COCK Hampton

Skipwith

PATSY DALE Homeville

MABEL PERKINS DUDLEY

LOUISE

DALTON

Pulaski

MARGARET ALMA CRAWLEY

EVELYN LaVAUNNE

Prospect

Portsmouth

ALICE BURKS DAVIS Phenix

CURTIS

THELMA

E.

DIGGS

Norfolk

MARTHA RUSSELL EAST MARGARET BINFORD ANNIE MARJORIE South Boston

ELLETT

ELLIS

Gasburg

Jennings Ordinary

Farmville

LORENA EVANS

PEGGY FINK

MARY MORTON

VIRGINIA FORD

Brookneal

Washington, D. C.

FONTAINE

Hopewell

Martinsville

JUNIOR CLASS


JUNIOR CLASS

JULIA AGNES FOSTER

TERRY FULLER

BETTY GILLESPIE

MARY GOODE

Farmville

Concord, N. C.

Grundy

Ferrum

EVELYN MAE

BARBARA GRAHAM

CLAUDINE GUTHRIE

EVELYN HAIR

GOODMAN

Pulaski

Sunny Side

Danville

JANICE ADAIR

LOUISE HARRELL

GENE DARE HARRISON

MARY ELIZABETH

HALSTEAD

Suffolk

Richmond

Roanoke

HARRISON Thomasville, N. C.

Norfolk

ANN BUTTERWORTH

ANNA STUART

SARAH HODGES

FREDRIKA HUBARD

HAUSER

HEADLEE

Nathalie

Farmville

DeWitt

Norfolk


AUDREY JANE HUDSON KATHERINE HUNDLEY Virgilina

Lynchburg

SUE HUNDLEY

HILDA IRIZARRY

Suffolk

Puerto Rico

ANN HARRIS JOHNSON

JANE M. JOHNSON

RUTH JONES

GERALDINE JOYNER

Kenbridge

Stuart

Chatham

Zuni

ELIZABETH KEISER

BARBARA KELLAM

RACHEL KELSEY

MARY JANE KING

Abilene

Norfolk

Farmvillc

Radford

HELEN LACY

IRMA LASSITER

BETTY HOOD LEE

BETTY LEWIS

Richmond

Driver

Richmond

Hickory

JUNIOR CLASS


JUNIOR CLASS

FRANCES LIVESAY

MARGARET LOHR

MARIAN LOTTS

CARMEN LOW

Emporia

Brightwood

Natural Bridge

Hopewell

GRACE LOYD

SUE McCORKLE

SHIRLEY MANKIN

Lynchburg

Lexington

Richmond

Prospect

MARY AGNES MILLNER

BETTY HARRIS MINETREE

ELIZABETH MAXEY Ransons

DORIS

MAY

Roanoke

Danville

FRANCES

F.

MARSHALL

Petersburg

BARBARA

GLENNIS DARE MOORE

IMOGEN MOORE

BARBARA LEE MYERS

MONTGOMERY

Richmond

Chatham

Danville

Alberta

67


EMILY NEAL Chatham

GERALDINE

NEWMAN ANN POMERY

Chuckatuck

NICHOLS MARY CABELL OVERBEY

Farmville

Chatham

DOROTHY OWEN

EARLYE LEE PALMER

KATHERINE PARHAM

MABEL PARK

Sedley

Norfolk

Petersburg

Boydton

BETTY PARRISH

NANCY PARRISH

JULIA PEREZ

ANNE PULLEN

Manassas

Manassas

Puerto Rico

Danville

LUZA QUINONES Puerto Rico

JUNIOR CLASS

IRADA

G.

RAMIREZ

Puerto Rico

DORIS ROSE RAMSEY SHIRLEY Petersburg

ANN REAVES

South Boston


JUNIOR CLASS

JUDY RIECK

BETTY LOUISE RIVES

West Point

McKenney

HELENA PATTERSON SAUNDERS

Upper Marlboro, Md.

FRANCES SEWARD

CHRISTINE SHIFLET

Petersburg

Churchville

Lynchburg

L.

ROBERTSON

CILE

SCOTT SARVER Abingdon

Chase City

JEANNE ELIZABETH FELICIA ANN SAVEDGE PHYLLIS SCHERBERGER Norfolk Littleton SAUERWEIN

Waynesboro

IGARET ANN SKELTON

MARY

ANN SHUFFLEBARGER

GRACE SHRIVER West Englewood, N.

J.

Bluefield

SHIRLEY PENN

CORNELIA SMITH

LOUISE SMITH

SLAUGHTER

Norfolk

Danville

Lynchburg


MARTHA AMELIA

ELOISE STANCELL

MARGARET KENT

SOURS

Emporia

STEVENS

ANN

F.

TAYLOR

Hague

Radford

Chatham

MARGARET THOMPSON CHARLOTTE CREWS THORP Amherst

VIRGINIA TRAVIS

DOROTHY TURLEY

Lynchburg

Wytheville

Oxford, N. C.

LUCILE UPSHUR

MARJORIE LOUISE

VIOLA CATHERINE

CLARE SCOTT WAILES

Cheriton

VAUGHAN

VARNER

Amherst

Lynchburg

Farmville

MARTHA WEBB

MARTHA WELLS

CHARLOTTE WEST

NANCY WHITEHEAD

Erwin, Tcnn.

Petersburg

Surry

Kecoughtan

JUNIOR CLASS


JUNIOR CLASS

MARGARET WALTON ANNE GORDON WILKINSON

WILLIS

Culpeper

MARGARET

E.

WILSON

Washington, D. C.

Martinsville

HELEN HOPE

WORSHAM

Danville

MARY ELIZABETH WYATT

CONSTANCE ELIZABETH

South Boston

Covington

YOUNG

HELEN WORRELL Courtland


SOPHOMORE CLASS

SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS Left to right:

J.

Booher, L. Brooks,

Balance, Kucera, Miss

mm^^^'.-M^iS.

ELEANOR ABBOTT New

Castle

ALICE

ANN ABERNATHY

Stony Creek

HILDA MAE

ABERNATHY Cochran

MEADE ADDLEMAN

LUCIE

Cumberland

DOT ANDERSON Chatham

ESTELINE HOPE

ANDERSON Andersonville

MARTHA ANDERSON Andersonville

VIRGINIA ELAINE

ATKINSON Glen Allen

Dabney


JEAN BABB Ivor

VIRGINIA BAILEY Lawrenceville

CORINNE HINES BAKER Richmond

MARY FULMER BAKER Abilene

DORIS BALLANCE Norfolk

VIRGINIA BEAVER Crewe

JEANE BENTLEY Roanoke

CATHARINE BICKLE Staunton

DOROTHY BLAIR Chatham

MARY JANE BOND Alexandria

BETTY BONDURANT Farmville

JULIA

BOOHER

Abingdon

LELA EVELYN BOULDIN Remo

DOROTHY BRADLEY Vernon

Hill

NEVA BRANKLEY Skipwith

LOUISE

OVERTON

BROOKS Farmville

BETTY BURCHETT Suffolk

JANE BURCHETT Suffolk

MARJORIE

ANN BURNS

Danville

VIRGINIA CURTIS

BUTLER Bluefield,

W.

Va.

SOPHOMORE CLASS


SOPHOMORE CLASS

MARGARET

LEE CABINESS

Farmville

KATHLEEN CAGE Nathalie

MARY SUSAN CASTLE Willis

DOROTHY LEIGH CHAMBERS

Red House

NANCY CHAMBERS W.

Maben,

Va.

CLAIRE CLARKE Richmond

NELL COLEMAN Richmond

SHIRLEY CONNELLY Gladys

JUNE CREGAR Tazewell

MURIEL GENE CROSTIC Richmond

BARBARA CROWTHER Avalon IRIS DAVIS Dillwyn

JUANITA DAVIS Buckingham

MILDRED DAVIS Paces

SUE DUVAL DAVIS Lynchburg

THELMA DAVIS Branceville

BETTY DeBORA Cedar Bluff

SHIRLEY DIDLAKE Richmond

SARAH LEE DODSON Mattox

GERTRUDE ELIZABETH DRIVER Skippers


EDITH DUFFY Norfolk

NANCY DUNCAN Portsmouth

JANET ADAIR DUNLAP Staunton

MARY FAMES Providence Forge

BETTY LOU EAVER Churchland

JEAN EDGERTON Goldsboro, N. C.

LOUISE ELDER Charlotte C. H.

VIRGINIA ELLIOT Falls

Church

VIVIAN ELMORE Carson

BETTY EPPERSON Lawrenceville

BETTIE EWELL Bloxom

ROSA LEE EWING Newport News

MARY New

LEE FARRIER

Castle

VIRGINIA New Castle

C.

FARRIER

FRANCES FEARS Richmond

HELEN

FIFIELD

Remington

NANCYE FOSCUE Lawrenceville

EVELYN HOPE FRANK Roanoke

ANN FULGHAM Carrollton

FRANCES ELLEN

GARNETT

Curdsville

SOPHOMORE CLASS 75


SOPHOMORE CLASS

MAE GEORGE

ESTER

Washington, D. C.

GEYER

"BE BE" Chatham

BETTY GILL Orange

JOSEPHONE M.

GOODWYN

Stony Creek

FRANCES BLANTON GORDON Ballsville

MARY LOU GRAHAM Beckley,

W.

Va.

ANNETTE BURDEN GRAINGER Farmville

CAROLYN GRIMES Portsmouth

CHARLOTTE THOMAS GRIZ2ARD Drewryville

MARIAN GUNN Blackstone

MARIAN

HAHN

V.

Richmond

LOTTIE GREY

HAMMOCK

Blackstone

D.

J.

HANCOCK

Lynchburg

HAZEL

IRIS Winterpock

JACKIE

HANCOCK

HANCOCK

Courtland

KITTY HANKINS Richmond

JANIE

HANKS

Hampton

ALICE MARIE

HANNAH

SufFolk

AUGUSTA HARGAN Roanoke

ELIZABETH

CONNALLY HARRELL Emporia


ETHEL HARRISON Emporia

ANNE JEANETTE HASKINS McKenney

MARY HELMER Newport News

JOYCE HILL Pulaski

MARJORIE HOLLAND Bedford

ANNE RANDOLPH HOMES Boydton

NORMA HOWARD Roanoke

DOROTHY HUBBARD Melfa

NANCY W. HUGHES Mullens,

W.

Va.

AZELE HUTT Neenah

CHARLOTTE HUTTER Lynchburg

MARY FRANCES JENNINGS Appomattox

CAROL BELLE JENKINS Burkeville

MARGARET

L.

JONES

Wilkesboro, N. C.

EDITH KIRKLAND La Crosse

ANNA KUCERA Roanoke

GLADYS VIRGINIA LANKFORD Franklin

KATIE LAWRENCE Windsor

NANCYE JANE Bluefield,

W.

LITZ

Va.

GEORGE ANNE LEWIS Petersburg

SOPHOMORE CLASS


SOPHOMORE CLASS

HELEN BOYES LEWIS Richmond Mabel Lewis Hopewell

JUDY LIGHT Winchester

VIRGINIA LOVE Chase City

JACQUELIN McCLAUGHERTY Roanoke

GLADYS McCONNELL Tazewell

ELLEN McMULLAN Rapidan

MILDRED PAIGE McWILLIAMS Norfolk

JANE MANTIPLY Fishersville

VIRGINIA MARSHALL Richmond

MARY HATTON MASON Portsmouth

BETTY JANE

MINTON

Roanoke

EVELYN MOORE Prospect

PEGGY MOORE Norfolk

MARY ANNE MORRIS Richmond

MARTHA FRANCES MORRISON CoUierstown

ELIZABETH CLAIBORNE

MOTLEY Lynchburg

MYRA ANNE MOTLEY Danville

CAROLYN MURPHY Eastville

EVELYN MUSTAIN Gretna 78


DOROTHY OVERTON Farmville

CAROLINE PAINTER Marion

AUGUSTA ANNE PARRISH Chatham

ELEANOR

I.

PARSONS

Richmond

CONSTANCE PEMBERTON Warsaw

EDITH TEMPLE

PEMBERTON Gloucester

ALFREDA PETERSON Waynesboro

FANELLE PICKERAL Manassas

VIRGINIA

THOMAS PICKRAL

Gretna

DAPHNE PITTMAN Portsmouth

ARSTELLE PRESLEY Council

BILLIE E. PRUETT Shawner Mill

HARRIET PURCELL Drakes Branch

KATHERINE RAINEY Andersonville

MARY HUNTTING RATTRAY East

Hampton, Long

Island

MARGUERITE REID Farmville

BETTY LEE RENN Bassett

BERKELEY RICHARDSON Richmond

MARY RICHMOND Norton

EVELYN ROGERS Nathalie

SOPHOMORE CLASS


SOPHOMORE CLASS

MAUD SAVAGE Onley

BETSY HOWISON SCOTT Pulaski

CELIA SCOTT Lynchburg

ELIZABETH

].

SCOTT

Onancock

BETTY SCROGGINS Richmond

JACQUELINE SEYMORE Brodnax

MILDRED SHEPHERD Richmond

JANE SHORT Portsmouth

ALICE SMITH Lawrenceville

ELLA STONE SMITH Gretna

GLADYS SMITH Denniston

LORRAINE SMITH Nathalie

SARA SMITHSON Saxe

JEAN LOUISE SNEAD Farmville

NANCY JUNE SNEAD Martinsville

HARRIETTE SUTHERLIN Sutherlin

NORMA SOYARS Rice

YVANNE SOYERS Roanoke

NANCY SQUIRE Emporia

MARTHA W. STRINGFIELD Elbenon


SUZANNE STEELE East

Hampton, N. Y.

ELIZABETH McNEIL

STONER Fincastle

BETTIE JANE SUTHERS Roanoke

HILDRIAN ANNE SUTTLE Danville

JEAN FRANCES TAYLOR Oriskany

NANCY GRAHAM TAYLOR Pungoteague

NANCY MINA TAYLOR Clarkton

ZILPHA G. Mappsville

TAYLOR

MARY ELLEN TEMPLE Dinwiddle

MARY

LEE

THOMAS

Farnham

MARJORIE TICE Tazewell

VIRGINIA TINDALL Hatton

JEANNE TOLLEY Natural Bridge Station

FRANCES TREAKLE Farmville

MARY JEAN TURNER Jamesville

MARTHA JANE UNDERHILL Machipongo

MARY FRANCES VAUGHAN Amherst

PAGE VAUGHAN Dolphin

MARY WADDELL Drakes Branch

ANN WATKINS Farmville

SOPHOMORE CLASS


SOPHOMORE CLASS

ELIZABETH WATTS Austinville

DORIS WHITE Cedar Bluff

DOROTHY GAY WHITE Staunton

KATHERINE

WHITMORE McKenney

BARBARA JEAN WILEY Nelson

HELEN WILLIAMS Sunny Side

JOYCE ANNE WILLIAMS Richmond

REBECCA ROBINSON WILLIAMS Woodstock

TUCKER

R.

WINN

Wilson

FA YE WOLFE Big Stone

Gap

MARY YATES Richmond

"GEE GEE" YONCE Inglewood


FRESHMAN CLASS

FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS Left

to

Staples,

MARY ANN ADAMS CLARA ANN ASHBY

WILMA ALLEN

PHYLLIS

J.

ALLEY MARGARET

A.

AMES

ANN

L.

AMORY

right:

Hamilton,

Freeman,

Mr. French, Miller

REBECCA ANDERSON

MARTHA ASHBY KATHRYN BALDWIN PHYLLIS BAGLEY ANNE BARKSDALE MARY

0.

BARNES

LUCY ANTHONY LUCILE BEASLEY


First

Row

Second

JEAN BELL PATSY BLAIR JACQUELINE BOBBITT

Third

JEANNE BOYD BARBARA BOYLE

BETTY JANE BROCKWAY JANE BROWDER BETSY BROWN ERLA CARTER BROWN

JEAN BRATTON

Fourth

Row

SARAH BROWN

Fifth

Row

RUTH FRANCES BURROW

PAGE CALLIS GEORGIE CARDWELL SUE CARPER PAULINE CARTER

JEAN CAKE

BARBARA JANE CHURN

VENIE BUCHANAN JACQUELINE BURKHOLDER

FRESHMAN

Row

RUTH BRITE

BARBARA BRANDEN

ANNE BOSS RUTH BOWEN

CLASS

Row

DOROTHY BOWRNE


FRESHMAN CLASS

First

Third

Second Rot

Row

GWENDOLYN

CRESS ELIZABETH ESTRIDGE CRICHTON CROKETTT ELIZABETH JEAN CROOM

ADELAIDE M. COBLE

COLEMAN ANNE ELIZABETH COLLINS LAURA JEAN COMERFORD IRIS

Fourth

Fifth

Row

CORNELIA WALLACE DAVIDSON S. MERCEDES DAVIDSON MARY DAVIS FRANCES DeBERRY

BARBARA DeHARDT 85

Row

JENNIE LEE CROSS

CATHERINE ROSE COSLEY

IMEZ CLEATON

RUTH CRUSH EDITH CULBERT JEAN MILDRED DAILEY FRIEDA DANSBERGER

Row

EVELYN ESTELLE DeJARNETTE NANCY DICKINSON KATHRYN DOBYNS ELIZABETH SEWARD DREWER JOAN ELIZABETH DRIVER


first

Row

Second

Third

KATY

FRANCES CELESTINE FARLEY

ELEANOR MAY FARMER MARION FARY MARY LOU FEAMSTER

ELLIS

BETTYE EUDAILEY

Row

Row

MARY FRANCES EVANS

DORIS ANNE ELLIOTT DORIS LEE ELLIS

Fourth

Fifth

Row

JOYCE FLEET

CHARLOTTE FRANK

ANNE FORD

JOYCE FRAZIER

LEDDIE FOSTER AUDREY ONEIL FOX JANE ELLEN FOX

DOROTHY ANNE FREEMAN

FRESHMAN CL7\SS

Row

CONNIE ELLINGTON

DELORES DUCK MARY JANE DUNLAP ANNE EAST HELEN ELDER JEANNE ANN ELLETT

PHYLLIS FULCHER

DORIS OLIVIA FUNCK


FRESHMAN CLASS

first

Row

Second

Row

MARY NEALE GARRETT ANDREA GARRISON

MARTHA ELIZABETH

MAXINE GAYLE EVELYN GIANINNI JUNE GIANNINY

ALICE

Third

GILLIUM

CHRISTINE GRIZZARD JANICE GUTHRIE

ESTHER W. GOFFIGON

MAE GORDON HELEN GORDON SARAH GREENE

Fourth

Row

Row

MARGARET GREGG JUNE GUTHRIE JOAN HAHN

Fifth

Row

COROLEASE HALL CORNELIA HAMILTON

MARTHA HATCHER

VIRGINIA HANKS FRANKIE HARDY VIVIAN ELIZABETH HARRISON

SHIRLEY ANN HAWKS JANE HAWPE SARAH LEIGH HEDGEBETH

MILDRED HAWKINS


First

Row

Second

Row

Third

Fourth

CAROL HUPP MARIE H. HUTCHINSON HATTIE HYATT

MARGARET HYLTON

Fifth

SHIRLEY IRVING

VIRGINIA

HELEN JACKSON MARION JACKSON BETTY JAMES BETTY JEFFERSON

NANCY

FRESHMAN CLASS

Row

Row

MARY FRANCES HUNDLEY

MARGARET JACKSON HENDRICK VIRGINIA HOLLIFIELD JEAN HOLLMEYER MARTHA LUCILLE HICKS NANCY HOLTON BETSEY HIGGINBOTHAN DOROTHY T. HOPPER CATHERINE HOGGE JEAN HOWELL ELAINE HOLDER

Row

MAE JENKINS

JESSEE

PEGGY JONES ALICE JORDAN


FRESHMAN CLASS

First

Row

Second

BETTY PELL JORDAN MARY LOU JORDAN ANN JOYNER HILDA KAUFFMAN

GWENDOLYN

E.

KELL

Fourth

Row

rhird

Row

GENE KELLEY

LAURA

MARY KENNEDY JOANNA KIMBALL

DORIS MAE LANIER MARY LAWLESS

LUCIA KING BARBARA KREBBS

NADINE LAURA LEWERS ALFREDA MAY LEWIS

Row

HAZEL LEWIS

MARTHA P. LILLY MARY HELEN LONDEREE MARJORIE LOVE CONSTANCE LOVING

Fifth

LIBBY LANE

Row

ANITA MURIEL McBRIDE HELEN McBRIDE GRACE MALLORY ESTHER REBEKAH MARSH LANIE

MATTHEWS


First

Second

Row

SARA MANGUM LOU ANNE MEERS RUTHELLEN MEERS MARY EVELYN MILES MARGORIE LYNE MILLER

Fourth

BOBBY MITCHELL ALICE

MOORE

JEAN MOSS

GLORIA LANE MOORE

Row

BETTY MOTT-SMITH JEANNETTE MURFEE PEGGY MURRAY CATHAN NEAL

CLASS

Third

Row

MARY ELLEN MOORE JEAN MORAN MARTHA BRITT MOREHEAD MARY VIRGINIA MORRIS

LOUISE MILLS

CATHRYNE MOSTELLER

FRESHMAN

Row

LOLA MILLINER

Fifth

Row

AUDREY M. NEWMAN CONSTANCE NEWMAN LINNIE NOBLIN

ANNE ORGAIN LAURA ORNDORFF


FRESHMAN CL7\SS

First

Row

Second Row BETTY MARIE PAIRET EVELYN PATTERSON MARY ALENE PATTESON MARY ELIZABETH PARHAM MARIAN CATHERINE PEAKE

JENNY OSBORNE

ANN OWEN ELAINE ROBINS

OWENS

HELEN OWINS PATTI PAGE

Fourth

Row

Third

Row

MARGARET PEARSON DOROTHY PENNINGTON JEAN PHILLIPS ELAINE PIERCE

DOROTHY POARCH

Fifth

Row

JOAN RAINES

REBECCA JACQUELINE REYNOLDS

DOROTHY RAMAGE ARLENE RANEY

MARY

SARA RAWLES

LUCY LEE RIVES SHIRLEY ROBERTS

JANE PAGE READE

LEE RILEY

VIOLET PATRICIA RITCHIE


First

Row

DORIS M. ROBERTSON MARY FRANCES ROBINS

ANNE

ROBINSON JEAN ROCK C.

RUTH RADOGNA

Second

Third

MARTHA SHOWALTER

Fifth

VIRGINIA

Row

NEWTON

SLEDD

ANNE MARIE SMITH GWENDOLYN ROSE SMITH

JANE SIMMONS

PEGGY ANN SMITH

DULCE ROSETTA SIMPSON

THELMA SOUTHALL

FRESHMAN

Row

BARBARA SAUNDERS MARGARET SAUNDERS KATHLEEN SHANER BETTY LEWIS SHANK DELTA ELIZABETH SHEETS

MILDRED ROUNDTREE LIZZIE RUSH BETTY RUSSELL MILDRED RUTH SADLER

Fourth Row ETHEL SHOCKLEY DOROTHY RAINE SHOTWELL

CLASS

Row

ELLEN FRANCES RORER


FRESHMAN CLASS

First

Row

Second

Row

Third

Row

MILLIE SPAIN

HARRIET STEELE

LOUISE SYDNOR

JEAN H. SPARROW ELIZABETH SPINDLER REBA SPRINKLE MARY FRANCES SQUIRE

LOIS STEPPE ELEANOR LEE STAPLES

JANE TAYLOR

PEGGY STEPHENSON JOANNE STERLING

RUBINETTE THOMAS JANE THORP

Fourth

Row

AILEEN TILGHMAN RUTH TILLETT BETTY TILSON BETTY HODGES TIPTON JUNE MARILYN TOLLEY

RACHEL THOMAS

Fifth

JOYCE

Row

TOWNSEND

PEGGY TURNER SUE MAPP UNDERHILL BETTY JO VAIL ANNIE FLOYD VERSER


First

Row

Second

MARY WALDROP AUDREY WALKER VIRGINIA GERTRUDE JEAN WALL

WALKER

Row

Third

ANN WALTON MARY VIRGINIA WALSH SUE ANN WARD

VIRGINIA

WATSON

BONITA WATTERSON JEAN GRAHAM WATTS

MARGUERITA ELIZABETH WASH EDNA EARLE WATERS MARGARET

MARGARET WALL

Fourth

Row

Fifth

WEBB THELMA A. WEEKS MARTHA ANNE WHITE MARGARET WHITTLE

Row

JACQUELYNN WATSON

B.

WATTS

Row

AUDREY WILLIAMS

JENNIE SUE

FRANCES ANN WILLIAMS MARGARET ESTELLE WILSON DOROTHY EILLEN WINTON MARIAN WITTKAMP MARY YOUNG

ALICE WILKINS

FRESHMAN CLASS 94


1

••I

",

PRESIDENT JACKIE PARDEN

J.

Bentley, C. Bobbitt, Minetree,

Lohr

Seated, left to right:

Cruser, Lee, Grumpier, Butt, Parden, Bobbitt, Brothers, Mr.

Standing, left to right:

Moss

Abernathy, Bentley, East, Lohr, Minetree, Parham, Tindall


Front row,

left to right:

Second row, Third row,

Seated, left to right:

Standing,

Whitehead, Adams,

left to right:

left to right:

Bisese,

Mr. Holton, Parden,

Miss Garnett, Bibb, Dean Smith, Miss Burger

Lee, Cruser, Martin, Bisese, Treakle

left to right:

Ellett,

Bralley, Hill

Bentley, Lee, Treakle, Cabiness, Richardson, Butt, Elliott

Hewlett, East, Bobbitt, Stokes, Grumpier,

Elliott,

Lohr, Butt â&#x20AC;˘JG

Overcast, Parden,


'man

Q

art

ltÂť/o

Publications, Clubs, Sororities,

Honor

Societies,

Sports,

Senior Personalities. Snapshots, Index

May

Views Day,


<i>TucL Romans.

ancient

and

Stately

lofty

cis

learning

should be, study was enshrined to our bewildered

dome

eyes as an intricate and essential part of the of our Rotunda.

Study, in the

gray matter.

and plaid

T. C. manner,

S.

process requiring

Donning the

shirt,

is

a complicated

more than the usual amount of traditional blue jeans

without which one can not study,

the industrious student settles

down

to a peaceful

evening with her favorite textbook.

This

is

not the bridge shark barging

If it is

ments

SEEMINGLY study, as of

effort

a

and

trivial

we

consider

word,

involves four years

and of the pleasure of attainment.

One of the first and most which we encountered

typical phases of S.

as

portals of higher learning didn't

it,

reaiizfi. it,

we was

we

but as

T. C.

entered these broad

Perhaps

study.

ga2;ed

we

with saucer'like

eyes and open mouths at the surroundings which

would be our home

for

study as portrayed in

many

its

who

and chat insignificant

we

a day,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

highest form

perceived

that of the

If it

the telephone.

not the recollection of a meeting momeu'

tarily forgotten, it

STUDY

in, its

the

is

signal for a series of successive interruptions.

is

the friend without assign'

picks that unfortunate evening to call

for hours.

Through

the experience of such nights of agony,

with work weeks behind, most of us have eventu' ally

wended our way

these quiet walls

to the library.

we have found

quired to accomplish our ends.

has taken

Our

its

place as the abode

aspirations have in

Here amidst

the soHtude

Thus the

re

library

symbohc of study.

most cases exceeded our

grasp, but before us part of our heritage

is

the

beautiful ideal of study as presented to us in our

Rotunda.


.

C>K5 C^^ C>f^i) THE VIRGINIAN

(^^ As we

sit

down

C^^i)

some peculiarly

What?

Mr. "Mac"

well,

pulled a 'bone head';

I

guess we'll have to

"You

phrases, such as

many

This and

straighten the crasjy thing out."

swim—^now

chose to

you're swimming," are typical phrases that could

when

be heard during the year

"Mac"

when

LiUian ran to

Mr.

Since that great day in the

for his advice.

spring of '45

si2;ed pictures,

but understanding

to write this article, a picture

reared back in that chair in the lab saying, "Gal,

more

C^^si)

C>fs<>

the situation, he corrected these.

appeared before us.

youVe

C>K5

C>K5

C^fs5

Christmas

holidays

extended

being

week

a

wasn't a great help, but Margaret got on the job

and

started assigning articles.

"Fm

pulling

Nancy

Her

favorite expres'

and lengthening

sion after checking

words

articles

Foster checked our articles. During

was,

Miss

right out of the air."

all

the

confusion Miss Bedford had her capable art staff

working

at full speed.

and Shirley got

Lillian, Sue,

make plans for the '46 Virginian, Mr. "Mac" was near to lend a helping hand.

together to

We even

Our first plans were really "knocked."

thought of organi2;ing an army post and presenting it

but

in pictorial form,

divide the

finally settled

GOOD BOOK

down

to

into four sections, tak'

dome

ing the sections from the paintings in the

Study and Meditation, Teach'

of the Rotunda:

Many

ing. Rest, Recreation.

people

who

passed

through the Rotunda when Mr. Bundy had moved Joan and was lying flat on his back taking a picture, can better understand the situation now.

Summer came, and

Lillian

and Sue

left

on the

night train for Chicago, the purpose of the trip

being to finish plans for the annual. This

complished and also

many more

things,

we ac

which can

be summed up in one of our favorite expressions, "A'l knocked out trip." We'll never forget our

School opened with usual rainy day.

was one

of the

this year's

annual

Reali2,ing that this year, 1945'46,

greatest in history,

we knew that

must be a book of peace. Suitcases had hardly been unpacked before individual pictures were being taken. Dotties's running around getting the group snapshots taken pictures

was a

picture in

itself.

Soon the

came back, and every other person

in

school wanted hers retaken, but realiziing that the

tions.

The

articles

wouldn't have to mail the books in July.

where we dedicated the Virginian to Dr. Jarman. Pages began to be turned, pages which meant work and fun to

us, the staff of the

Now that we have

spent

many

over'time

hours in the

lab.

The

a chance to pause a

before the day of graduation,

we

can

sit

moment

back and

even laugh at the moments that seemed chaotic. Nancy Whitehead, editor, and Cay Lynch, business manager,

December fifteenth dead line arrived, and with it came Tom, the one for whom Lillian had waited three years. Mr. Brightman must have gotten

GOOD BOOK.

COLONNADE

what's a wrinkle

staff

Then

Everyone went to the auditorium,

Pasting began; pictures were

and the

ques'

written and typed, the pictures

gone, and dummy drawn and mailed to Mr. Brown meant that the '45''46 Virginian was completed. Then we sat around each day eagerly awaiting its We prayed that we arrival from the printers.

photographer wasn't to be blamed, quieted down. si2;ed;

the scene in Febru'

—and answer our many

they came!

running from Dr. Cyclops. Fall came.

Mr. Brightman appeared on ary to give us a push

The

first

may have an extra wrinkle, when so much fun was had?

issue

was

but

eagerly dedicated to our

and little green mice Congratulations were

favorite freshman class of '49,

ran throughout the pages.

extended to

Anne

Willis,

who wrote "A

Kiss In


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The Dark," and Margaret Wilson, who wrote "Erase The Puppy" both winners of the short'

story contest. Honorable mention was well de' served by Betty Cock and Irene Pomeroy, whose

were

stories

And had

.

.

ing, all the

office

delayed the appearance of the

members

for their efforts

were rewarded

of the staff

when

was

the finished edition

850

tributed at each of the

dis'

seats in the dining

creative student writing,

we may

pro'

THE ROTUNDA

Latin American theme predominated the

The

issue.

spotUght was centered on our

poetry contest, which was another of our main

The

events of the year.

pri2;es

of

five, three,

and

first, second, and third were given to the winners. After staying

dollars respectively, for

awake for nights, the judges declared it a tie be' tween Betty Cock's "Greeting" and Anne Willis's translation of "Quien Sabe" for first place. Anne Motley placed second, and Virginia Treakle third. Several other Spanish translations lended savor to

the printed pages.

It

was a privilege to read Dean Smith, our guest

Senora de Soto's words.

some

writer, gave

these and a host

Scoops, headhnes, cuts, galleys

words have a familiar ring in the ears of the Rotunda staff members. From Wednesday to Wednesday, there was a complete cycle of activ ities in order to pubhsh weekly FarmviUe's record of events. Beginning with assignments on Wednes' of other

day nights and ending with the finished product

room.

places

C>*si)

harder with

still

duce a maga2;ine enjoyed by everyone.

This extension plus the strike

January issue of the Colonrtade. However, after two different proofreading jobs and a lot of hop'

two

C^fsD

work

the earnest hope that by printing the best of art

work and

remember that extended holiday we

Herald

The March

C^4^

C'^sS

also printed. .

at Christmas?

at the

C^^

centive to urge each of us to

inspiring thoughts in her article,

"Thoughtful Satisfaction."

staff members worked Each day brought some duty for mem'

one week from that date, the together.

bers of the business or editorial staff; however,

Mondays, Tuesdays, and

the busiest days were

Wednesdays

as

we

typed copy and traced and re

traced our steps to the Herald

office.

The

state

ment, "Never a dull moment," might well apply to those girls working on the paper for new and in' teresting things continuously occurred.

always remember the time

when

not get back from the engravers, the time wrong'si2;ed pictures

We

shall

the pictures did

when the

came back, and the times

when last'minute events caused us to change the makeup of the paper. These are just a cross'sec' tion of the things that make the editing of a college weekly an interesting and challenging

job.

"College Polish," cleverly concocted by Jane

Philhower, was always

first

on the

list

to be read.

Carmen Low and Glenn Anne Patterson

deserve a

"big hand" for lending their skillful stroke with the

pen in dressing 'Up each

drawings and

illustrations.

in each issue, latest books.

the Herald

issue

with their

Book reviews appeared

which gave us an

insight into the

Last minute proofreading, trips to

office,

and distribution of the

finished

products accompanied putting out the Colonnade.

The May,

the final issue for the year,

cated to our beloved president, Dr.

J.

was

dedi'

L. Jarman,

whose resignation was effective June, 1946. Again this year we were very proud of the Cer' tificate sent us by the National Scholastic Press Association, rating our maga2;ine during 1944'45 as First Class

Excellent. This in itself

was an

in'

On March issue,

which

6, we printed our Founders Day we dedicated on behalf of the alumnae,

faculty, administration,

and present student body

to our beloved president for over fortyfour years.

Dr. Joseph L. Jarman.

As

editor'in'chief,

Virginia Treakle kept in

touch with the business and editorial departments

by Shirley Slaughter, man' down the news was Mary Helmer; Betty Deuel Cock nosed around for feature topics and gave us the latest news from the stables. Louise Blane kept us posted on the com' petition between the red and whites and the green and whites. News of social events and latest fash' ions was kept up to date by Evelyn Gri2;2;ard. Car'

of the paper, assisted

aging editor.

men Low

Chasing

continued her work in the linoleum


C^sD

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C^sD

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THE

W.

Y.

During four years of

college

many things change

for better or for worse, but always

day when the freshmen can count on the

"Y"

on that rainy

we

come

to Farmville,

to be

on hand, dressed

first

girls

C^KS

G. A.

in white, to act as guides, information bureaus.

Red Caps, or "what have you." We had heard of the "Y" before we came to Farmville, for during summer most

the

of us had received letters from

who was

an upperdassman

When

to be our Big Sister.

came back, they were eager to find their little sisters and to show them off and around. On Friday night there was the formal reception given for the Big and Little Sisters with entertainment, food, and everything! The first few blocks, portraying each

Our

activity.

watched our

was

week some phase of college manager, Ruth Brooks,

business

financial status;

Mary

Stewart Buford

in charge of distributing the finished

members and Dorothy Turley

product

on Wednesday

to faculty

students,

nights.

started out the session as

advertising manager; however, she resigned during

and the position was filled by Ruth Rowe, who weekly visited the business places of Farmville. Whenever there were any snaps to be taken around campus, Mary Ann Loving was ready with the camera. To see that all of the copy her term of

Sundays

after

school opened, the

operative Committee, headed by

the

girls in

the

Rotunda

Church Co'

Mary Wyatt, met

to take

them to Sunday

School and church.

Soon the freshmen were

installed into the

"Y",

but they don't fully appreciate this service until they are sophomores and can be onlookers.

It

was

office,

ready to be taken to the Herald

was typed and office was Dorothy Gelston s job. No writcup of the Rotunda would be complete without some mention of our faithful adviser, Mr. S. M. Holton,

who was

the upperclassmen

ever willing to assist us and to advise us

a beautiful sight to see the freshmen, dressed in white, carrying their candles

down

the long, dark

Colonnade and singing "Follow The Gleam." Prayers each night after supper has become a favorite time for

many

of us, Charlotte

and Virginia Tindall combined these inspirational

Christmas

C. A.

is

moments

really a

Gri^ard

their eflForts to plan

of meditation.

busy time for the Y.

W.

The Freshman Commission, with Judy

could

Rieck as counselor, decorated the Rotunda and

not have printed a weekly record of activities and events at S. T. C. without the cooperation of the

planned for the annual "Hanging of the greens."

in our manifold problems.

Herald their

office personnel,

Then,

who

too,

we

were wiUing during

busy days to give us advice.

members included a December and a formal banquet

Social activities for the staff

Christmas party in in

May. Working

Miss Rice told us the story of "The Other Wise Man" one night at prayers, and we had the Christ'

mas Pageant and White Christmas another night. Each organi2;ation brought a contribution to be used for local needs.

In addition to this contri'

bution, the Service Committee, headed together,

we

brought to the students

magaynes

for patients at a near'by hos'

and faculty of our college a record of college activ from the most serious news stories and ed'

collected

and more humorous features on down to our "Heard After Bedcheck" column of the activities of cupid on campus.

the fund for sending food overseas.

ities,

itorials,

to the gayer

by Patsy

Dale, collected clothes for the welfare department,

pital, sent

The ghetti

baskets to the needy,

and contributed to

cabinet and advisers had their annual spa-

supper, which Ellen

McMullen and

the


social

OKD

04<D

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committee prepared.

lounge, and

To make

it

was indeed

C>K9 We had in it

C^^ "Y"

the

more enjoyable, Hilda Bennett and her Sing Committee planned bit

They sponsored

Sing programs.

a contest for the

most original sing program among the

classes.

In February Marjorie Hewlett and the Public

Committee sponsored the Peace Welfare Drive. This was a combined drive for the Red Cross and the World Student Service Fund. To promote the interest in these two organi2;ations, we had special speakers in chapel that week. Follow ing this came Rehgious Emphasis Week-, which was Affairs

planned by our viccpresident,

Ann

We

Martin.

had Rev. Charles Jones from Chapel Hill with us for that week. These few days devoted to the emphasis of religion in our

lives

were indeed a

chal'

edited the

Rotunda, through which dent body posted on the Ozilin's

"Y" column

in the

we tried to keep the stu' "Y" activities. Connie

Library Committee arranged attractive

dis'

plays emphasizing the monthly theme of the "Y".

The town

girls

had a representative on the Cabi'

net,

Dot Overton, who kept them

"Y"

going'ons.

Much

abreast of the

credit for the success of the Y.

due to the

W.

C. A.

officers:

FRESHMAN COMMISSION "Hey, where's Freshman Commission this week?" "I think it's down on Main. Wonder if there's anything

any time

in the

cra2;y?

good?"

night owls

girls elected

by

is

composed of

their classmates.

This year

Evelyn Patterson acted as our president, Violet Ritchie as secretary, and Jane Taylor as treasurer.

Judy Rick gave her

services as

our adviser.

other than that of

see

their favorite brand There were always the

who came around

''45''46.

during

down

whether

in store.

about

dc

11:45

manding peanuts, nabs, and candy. The commission worked on numerous

projects

Just after supper every night there

was that "Hush'hush" outside the auditorium. Members were stationed there weekly to prevent noise while prayers were being held in the audi' torium. The commission made prayers as successful as possible by leading impressive services when called upon.

And

then the Sunday afternoons during Janu'

and March were so dreary. The this problem by opening

commission helped solve

the browsing room from two to five, and students were invited to listen to the classics on records.

Hikes to various

historical places within

walking

were started for the spring quarter. Those Sunday afternoons were cheerful again. distance

The T.

B. drive for the class

successful drive,

was sponsored by

Every freshman made

and the box was

this a

fiUed to the

brim

with nickels and dimes for the cause. It

was

impossible to forget the new freshmen who

There them combined with our Big'Little party. The Freshman Commission did their

entered Farmville for the winter quarter.

was a party Sister

for

best to support the

"Y"

as a

branch of that

or'

ganiziation.

Let's say farewell to the commission of '45

'46 and wish

all

and

kinds of success to the new'comers

next year.

We surely hope Hershey bars and Milky

Ways

more

are

plentiful.

INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

These expressions were

The Freshman Commission

No

C*K9 the com'

day to see whether the potato chips

were fresh and to of cigarettes were

heard throughout the building the entire year. twelve

went

girls

all

food in their rooms. Girls wandered

selling

the commission also.

Minnie Lee Crumpler, presi' dent; Ann Martin, vice'president; Martha East, secretary; Agnes Stokes, treasurer; and our ex'of' ficio members, Jackie Pardon and Jane Anderson. We are especially grateful to Minnie Lee for her untiring devotion to the work of the Y. W. C. A. on our campus. She not only performed her duties well, but also was an inspiration to all of us. is

the job about which

ary, February,

lenge to each of us.

Anna Headlee

What was mission

a treat!

Saturday nights a

Of^ OK9 CSO

C^4-J>

In college, the Inter 'Varsity chapter on the

col'

campus provides something which is desparately needed a friendly circle in which a student finds an atmosphere of faith and loyalty to the Lord Jesus. Through Bible studies, prayer meetings, dis' lege

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;


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cussion groups, and the almost universal "bull ses' sion," Inter' Varsity encourages

Word

upon God and His pose for their

This

Our

its

rely

and to seek God's pur'

of our members.

we

sent

two

chapter in Farmville

is

only

new organization. two years old, but

tx)

Conference held in Urbana,

we

C^KS)

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During the Christmas hohdays

delegates

state conference held in

lives.

the purpose of our

is

members to

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the National Student Illinois.

sent fourteen delegates

At

glowing enthusiasm.

To the annual

Natural Bridge, Virginia,

who

returned with

the conference

Anne

A good number

Buck, a Wesley Foundation worker, was elected

of students attended meetings each Tuesday night

one of the vice'presidents of the State organization.

it

has been making rapid progress.

A

in the student lounge.

song service and Bible

This year

we thought we had realized our dream Miss Frances Currin was The plan had to be

study were the essential features of each nights'

of a student secretary.

activities.

our part'time student worker.

The chmax and star feature of the year's pre gram was the conference held on the campus in the spring for Virginia and North Carolina. Among the colleges represented were Randolph'Macon, William and Mary, University of N. C, Duke University, University of Virginia, and Princeton

discontinued until next year because of the resig'

Inter'Varsity chapters are compar'

University.

new

atively

in

all

of these colleges, and the con'

much to strengthen the Dr. Graham Gilmer, pastor of

ferences here have done

new

organizations.

the Rivermont Presbyterian

was the

Church

in

Lynchburg,

leading speaker for the conference.

Other

activities of the

in the fall for freshmen social at

Longwood

group were a special night

and

in the spring a picnic

for the senior members.

were fun and a good

release

These

from the routine of

nation of Miss Currin in December.

Our weekly hour

assistants: vicc'president,

secretary,

Mary Agnes

this

Our

poetry and nature, and with music by students of

Hampden'Sydney.

On

April sixteenth the campus was once again

the scene of a concert given by the Glee Club of

Randolph'Macon Men's College, sponsored again by the Wesley Foundation. The Glee Club gave a program of sacred songs, folk songs, a spiritual group, and a mixed group. Ever promoting our Christian work have been our

officers:

this

year

Virginia Lee Price, presi'

dent; Evelyn Grizzard, vice'president, Lovice Al' tizer,

second viccpresident; Carolyn Bobbitt, sec

fol'

retary;

lowing

was held

programs were very interesting with talks on

school hfe.

Jane Anderson served as president with the

of fellowship

year every Sunday night at six'fortyfive p. m.

and Lorraine Thomas,

treasurer.

Geraldine Joyner;

Millner; treasurer, Nadine

Lewers; His representative, Gertrude Driver; chor' ister,

Bonnie Curtis;

missions secretary,

pianist,

Naomi

Ellen Bailey;

and

Piercy.

THE WESLEY FOUNDATION At any this

of light important student conferences

year could be found members of the Wesley

The high point of the year was in the The Regional Student Conference was held on the campus here at State Teachers College. The

Foundation. fall.

attendance totalled seventyfive, leaders

from

all

and Methodist

over the region were present. After

meetings and lectures

we

enjoyed the highly suc'

cessful dance.

Various other conferences claimed the attention

THE BAPTIST STUDENT UNION Bright

fall

leaves

announced to us that our new

Student Secretary was "at home" in our remodeled Student Center for

all

Baptist

girls.

Miss Olivia

Stephenson, well'loved already by most of us, was


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

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C>f^ who had

taking the place of "Copey,"

C^^s^ been pro'

moted to the rank of pastor's wife during the summer. However, she and Mr. De Foe were the first to greet us

and help us formulate our plans

coming year

at

of these plans, our

with forty tion in

As

our pre-school retreat.

girls

for the

a result

quarter was most successful

fall

attending the annual

Richmond, an

fall

conven-

inspirational Thanksgiving

C^^

C^KD

In October our council journeyed to

an overnight

Many

the church here their "church

little

time to do

it"

Hall Preston to speak to us. Ohvia's brother, Dick Stephenson,

left his studies at

the Seminary for a

week

to conduct an unforgettable Student Evange-

listic

Week

in February.

Nor

could

we

Valentine Banquet sponsored by the Y.

at

which Dr. Baker James Cauthern was the guest speaker, and Mr. Scott was welcomed back from

make away from home."

quite helpful to

it

Then when November roUed around, a real treat in store for our council when they attended Statewide Westminster Fellowship Confer-

the

ence at V. P.

Here we received much help and

I.

from similar groups

inspiration

in the colleges of

Virginia.

December and

a Christmas party, January

and

the organi2;ation of our student choir, that has

helped the regular choir a great deal, February and several well-known ers,

A.

of the girls found

was

forget the

W.

Longwood

rally

Sunrise Service and a Christmas play given at the

"So much to be done and so

C^4-S>

and made many plans for the year ahead. The last of October we sponsored a plan by which the students might become affiHated members of the Farmville Presbyterian church. for

church, climaxing our activities.

was our theme song after Christmas hoHdays. However, we weren't too busy to bid the Rev. and Mrs. De Foe a sad farewell. Mr. Winders, our State Student Secretary, visited us often. Once he stayed a week to teach a study course on "What We Beheve," and again he brought Mr. WiUiam

c^4^

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day and for several succeeding Sundays we old girls were kept busy showing the new students how to get to "the white church two blocks down."

March and

and the spring annual (and

and

interesting visiting speak-

the election of

retreat at

much

new

officers,

Longwood,

May

April

and the

looked-forward-to) hayride

thus our year was complete.

the chaplaincy to be our pastor and "King of our

Hearts."

Spring rushed by too quickly as usual

with the annual Statewide Retreat held at Danville

and our

own local

plans for

and

Retreat at Longwood.

summer work

We made

at camps, at Bible Schools,

of the B. S.

Nell Scott, president, La

U.

Vonne

Ellen Petty, Lois Lloyd Sheppard,

this year

were

Curtis,

Mary

Naomi

Piercy,

Evelyn Hair, Ellen Bailey, Catherine Cage, Virginia

Treakle, Patsy Dale,

Rachel Brugh, Lee

Carter, Betty Bennett, Geraldine Joyner, Virginia

Tobey, Frances Treakle, and Maria Addleman.

year,

The Westminster

when we gave

a

we arrived we honored

Saturday night after

at school in September.

At

this

time

new Presbyterian girls here at school, as new Hampden-Sydney students. The

as the

feel that

we

are looking forward to

more big

CANTERBURY CLUB Yes,

we consumed several gross of mixed cookies

out of the long-suffering cookie-box in the May's

we

pantry, and the

Pooh"

listened for hours to the

records.

we had

"Winnie

We never got home before the

eleven on

Sunday

nights.

Along with

a busy year filled with various activ-

ities.

Fellowship of Presbyterian

students got off to a good start

the

and

last stroke of

THE WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP

first

we

our Westminster Fellowship has truly had a good

that,

reception the

the help of an excellent council and a

things in September.

at Ridgecrest.

The members

With

most cooperative advisory committee,

well

next

Among sions

some of the topics

Racial Relations in the U. riage,

for

program

discus-

have been The Post-War World, Russia,

Heaven and

Hell,

S.,

Personahties, Mjir-

Church Customs and

Symbols, and The Various Denominations. Among some of our guest speeikers were Dr. Walmsley,


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Miss Kauzlarich, Mr. Renely, and Miss Cutler. Also this year

we were extremely fortunate

in acquiring the interest

Gordon Moss

as

Maude

and

services of

Dr. C. G.

our faculty adviser.

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ognizied as apprentices.

of is

B

Upon

two consecutive

plus for

is

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

young

highest rank in the society.

which we have

peoples' organi2;ation of the other churches,

on National

participation in a special youth service

attaining an average quarters, a

member

wear the pin studded emblem of growth. This is the

and she

with emeralds

of the special programs in

C"^si)

recognizied as having achieved the master's dc'

participated include several union services with the

Some

C^^O

cepted on the basis of their college record are rec

gree,

One

entitled to

the

of our most important jobs began the

first

Youth Sunday, and a corporate communion service at 7:30 a. m. followed by breakfast at the Rectory. Among our parish services we found some of our members helping with the nursery hour; some teaching Sunday schools; some assisting the Altar Guild; some singing in the choir during the weekly Lenten services; and some addressing envelopes for

when we sold second-hand books to freshmen. Our business meetings were held the second Tuesday of each month. Not forgetting, however, that "all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy," we had two social gatherings. The first was in December, when we had a Christmas party. Each of us caught the spirit of the season when we

parish material to be mailed.

gathered around the piano and raised our voices in

Then

we

of course,

nics, wafHe'Suppers,

part of our social

of school

can't forget our usual pic'

and

life.

week

sing'fests

And

picnic at Willis Mountain,

there

which have been was the bang'up

which terminated our

year this spring. Yes, the Canterbury Club has had a busy and

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ever spurred on by the inspira' and nourishment provided by the never 'empty

interesting year

tion

cookie tin in the Mays' pantry!

ALPHA

PHI SIGMA

"Let us press forward to higher attainments, and in

our endeavor

With

this

hearts,

let

us never forget to be kind."

our motto ever present in our minds and

we Alpha

Phi Sigmas have come smiling

through another year of hard work.

Our

organi2,a'

tion has the distinction of being the only national

honorary scholastic fraternity on campus for which freshmen are light service, class

eligible.

we

By an

initiated

impressive candle'

twentyeight from

and twentyone sophomores

at

our

first

this

meet'

bids

new

girls

who have

the United States Office of Education.

secretary;

who

have maintained an average of

two con'

tary;

from high schools

Miss

for

are

all

fraternity

in the novice group.

The

who

are

ac

activities

were our most Mildred

president;

vice'president;

Grainger,

girls

our

Tindall,

Tucker Winn, recording Lucy Addleman, corresponding secreAudrey Lee Davis, treasurer; Annette

Davis,

B

all

Virginia

capable:

salutatorians,

secutive terms here in this college.

social gathering

Division of International Education Relations of

and

and freshmen and sophomores

The second

in

graduated from their high schools as valedictorians

Those entering the

carols.

March, when we had the honor of entertaining Mrs. Marita Osuna de Soto of Caracas, Vene2;uela, who came to our college under the

came

Leading us in

ing early in October.

Alpha Phi Sigma

our favorite

reporter;

Mary

and Faye Wolfe, chaplain.

Peck, our beloved adviser, guided us

to the completion of a successful year.


C^KD

C>K<)

C^si)

RED CROSS AND Persuading

C^^

C^>i> U.

S.

O.

made memorable on the committee, the Red Cross Unit. On many Sundays we took programs to Camp Pickett. Girls went through the various wards singing and dancing for the boys. Jane Philhower was a perfect mistress of ceremonies; "Gee Gee," "Birdie," and the madrigals really made a big impression. Special thanks are due Miss Wheeler for her splendid help. Besides this work done by the Recreation Committee, we were in charge of the making of surgical dressings in the ing late on Saturday afternoons

By doing

Chapter

and

fill

pri2;es

its

we

this

quota.

helped the Prince

wards and were responsible

to Farmville to meet

We

McCarthy

in the mysteries of the

held discussions on

instructed us further

we

Mass, and

discussed dif'

ferent sections of the Mass.

In February we were invited to spend the after' noon and to have dinner with Father McCarthy and Father Eilerman at their home in Crewe, and

we went

wonderful being able to get together

To

formal way.

we were

Edward

we

back again in March. In the Spring

held a picnic in the cabin at Longwood.

It

was

such an

in

in'

aid with the finances of the club

hostesses to the visitors at

Sunday afternoon during

Longwood one

We

this quarter.

con'

eluded the club year with a special dinner at Hotel

in the convalescent

for five

Father

religion.

We also sent checkerboards

and bingo to be used

C^fvD

C>fv5

various questions that had arisen in regard to our

to Beverly and others

fall.

McCarthy came

Father

with us twice a month.

be in programs and practic'

girls to

C>K5

C^si)

C'^si)

Weyanoke.

Thanksgiving

who were unable to go to Agnes Stokes served as general chair' man of the Red Cross Unit; Margie Hewlett, vice' .president and Betty Adams, secretary 'treasurer. The USO Committee continued its work this year. Every week girls signed up to go to the various service clubs at Camp Pickett and to the USO in Blackstone on Saturday nights. Often the girls went to special dances during the week. Beverly Peebles as chairman of the committee did a wond' baskets sent to soldiers

LE CERCLE FRANCAIS

the mess hall.

erful job of organizing these trips.

Cross Unit and the

USO

Le Cercle Francais, a club consisting of all the French students in school, has as its purpose the speaking and understanding of the French language

and the study of the customs and culture of France. Its

Both the Red

its

motto,

"Noblesse

year have been diversified

this

cassin et Nicolette" to

Committee would not

fall

its

members read "Au'

weird medieval music.

Poems of Ronsard, du BeUay, and Verlaine were read, together with original papers on the lives of

members of the Student body.

NEWMAN

the nuguet;

The programs

these poets. In February Dr. Merritt talked to the

We wish to extend our thanks to them. THE

is

and entertaining. In the

have carried out the programs for the year without the cooperation of

flower

Oblige."

circle

on

and

Paris,

in

March

there

was

a gay

Valentine party with Valentines in French for

CLUB

every member.

Of

course, the big

program of the

Mc

year was the traditional Christmas party given

Carthy extended an invitation to all Catholic girls become members of the Newman Club. The Club celebrated its second anniversary at S. T. C.

with the Spanish Club. This year the party took

At

the beginning of the

fall

quarter Father

the form of a Christmas

to

in September.

not return; dent,

Our

president,

Frances Livesay,

became president.

Helene

languages. carols

Griffin, did

As

Barbara de Hardit, secretary; and PhyUis Scher'

was

re'elected

with barkers in these

and Christmas

sung in French were enjoyed by

all.

Pere

sack of oranges.

succeeded

her as vice'president; Iraida Ramirez, was treasurer; berger, social chairman.

fair,

colorful minuet

Noel, as usual, was the hit of the evening with his

former vice'presi'

Ann Wilhams

The

a

moneymaking

orful post'cards in the

Miss Emily Kau2;larich

venture, the circle sold col'

modem

language booth at

the circus and original French cards at Christmas.

our adviser.

Imogen Moore contributed some lovely 107

ones.


o^^

c>^i)

Two

prizies

c^4^

c-^^

were awarded

cr^^vf)

in the spring:

one to

the student with the best pronunciation and one

improvement in her

to the student showing most

This encouraged use of the album of

accent.

Miss Draper, faculty

French records.

made recordings

adviser,

of each student's pronunciation at

The growing importance lationships has

C**^

C^K!) re

of Pan'American

made us proud

that our Spanish

club has taken such an active part in fostering good feeling.

we

This year, together with Beorc Eh Thorn,

brought to the campus

Muna

Lee

De Munoz

Marin, wife of the president of the senate in Cuba.

Under

the beginning and at the end of the year.

C^s^

(>fsÂŁ)

C^^v<)

the leadership of ever capable officers

Gay Wood,

Evelyn Goodman, president; Annie vice'president;

Teddy

Diggs,

secretary;

Eloise

StanceU, treasurer; and Miss Barksdale and Miss

Draper, advisers,

we

feel that this,

our third year,

has been one of the best.

BEORC EH THORN The purposes

of Beorc

Eh Thorn

are to present

our program as an aspect of modern Hterature, to link

with the

it

classical,

and to

ofi^er

inspiration

and stimulus for literary achievement. Feeling the necessity of knowing our fellowman to the south

THE SPANISH CLUB Founded only three years ago, the Spanish Club on being one of the progressive groups

prides itself

on campus. Following our motto "Las Lazias Mai which means "Closer

estrichos entre las Americas,"

Ties Between the Americas,"

we

strive to

clearer insight into the character of Latin

Our all

club

have a

America.

composed of Spanish students from

is

the classes.

As

club meetings are a part of the

Freshman Spanish course, a great number of our ninetyfive members are freshmen. Upperclassmen, too,

are found in enthusiastic numbers,

the club

we

for in

more informal

learn Spanish in a

atmosphere.

A

glance at a typical meeting

would

business meeting, conducted in Spanish,

by a program

in

which we

find us

we

are

all partici'

pate: skits, short talks, piano selections,

We have

and the

songs which

we

to eleven the

number of songs which we know.

The Fiesta

love to sing.

increased

were the Christmas Longwood. At the fiesta

highlights of the year

and the picnic

we learned

we

make

a study of the literature of Latin America.

of Beorc

Eh Thorn

elected this year to

One

of the highlights of the program for the year was a most interesting reading of the Ufe and works of the noted Chihan poetess, Gabriela Mistral, given by Miss Emily Barksdale, an instructor in the Language Department. The theme was further carried out when we were entertained with talks by the Puerto Rican students, and readings, book reviews, and songs presented by various members of the society. The library staff ably assisted us by making displays of Latin America. On November 29, we sponsored a lecture by Dr.

Burgess Johnson, a noted professor of Enghsh.

A

number attended and enjoyed Dr. Johnson's talk, which consisted of character sketches of writ' ers he had known and characteristics of good large

grouped in the audio'visual room. After the formal entertained

of us,

at

something of the Spanish observance of

Christmas, and at the picnic

sang together.

we

played, ate,

and

writings.

Our programs were American

climaxed by the Latin'

institute the first

week

Gamma

in April.

We

and the Spanish had Club in presenting a program of interest. as guest speaker Muna Lee, the charming wife of Munoz; Marin, President of the Puerto Rican then cooperated with

Psi

We

Senate.

We,

as

members of a Hterary

society, sought to

attain higher degrees in the society

and were urged


(>M)

C^K5

C^si)

to contribute original writings to the Colonnade.

ship of

As

vicc'president; Katherine Prebble, secretary;

the

is

C^si)

C^KÂŁ>

0^-S>

annud custom, one meeting was devoted works written by our mem'

CSsi)

C^f>^

Lucy Bowling,

C^K5

C^^J)

president; Betty

Adams,

Anna

to the presentation of

Headlee, treasurer; and Martha Ellen Jones,

bers.

rarian.

Many

of us purchased the beautiful "flying

made

horse" pin of the society, which was able for the

Ann

first

avail'

time this year.

Martin, our president, capably presided

over the meetings which were held this year one

Thursday afternoon every month. Our viccpresi' dent, Margaret Ellett, also served as chairman of a most interesting series of programs. The other officers were Catherine Lynch, recording secretary; Constance Odin, corresponding secretary; Lee Carter, treasurer; and Margaret Wilson, historian. The year was made successful by the guidance of these and the members of the Enghsh Department

who

that the

was

In order to allow a few underclassmen to become members of the organization we held special elec' tions, selecting one girl each from the freshmen and the sophomore class and a girl, a junior, from each of the

J.

L.

organi2;ed.

to give those fession

It

was

Jarman Chapter here

The purpose

who

first,

second, third, sixth, and seventh cur'

riculums.

The Rotary Club

shown

interest

its

six years

ago

at Farmville

of the organi2,ation

ASSOCIATION OF CHILDHOOD

EDUCATION as the elementary majors

is

plan to enter the teaching pro'

an opportunity to become acquainted with

The

Shiflett, vice'president of

zest to the meetings.

view of an

Especially notable

which was made by

At

October 25, 1945.

G. Tyler Miller, Dr. U. Rowlett,

Dr.

Dabney

J.

S.

that meeting J.

we had

L. Blair Buck,

Gifford,

Mr.

The much

Dr. Paul

Hounchell, Miss Celeste Jones, Dr. John L. Mana' han. Professor George

J.

Dur'

several

fire,

At

the

first

The Chapter this year has been under the leader'

Stories, told as

we

sat

and the group singing of Christ'

meeting in the

fall,

fifteen third

year

the Association.

Miss Grace Moran appeared grams

in the spring

School." Miss

entertained us with a tea in the Student Lounge.

fall,

elementary majors were initiated as members of

the

ways of improving Dean Martha S. Smith

in the

childhood days.

the difficulties involved in developing and main'

professional standards.

members

anticipated meeting at Miss Hayne's

ing the institute the discussions centered around

taining desirable relations and

re

mas carols gave us the true spirit for the approach' hoHday season. Eating nuts, raisins, and pepper' mint sticks and oranges really took us back to our

Oliver, and other Vir'

ginians interested in the teaching profession.

a

ing

Mrs. Eleanor

Lancaster,

was

emphasizing the child as an individual.

before an open

high point of our year was the second In' on Professional Relations held here at Farm'

by

the club, added

of the Childhood Education,

issue

of vital concern to teachers.

with us Dr. McDonald, Dr.

are

varied and interesting programs, arranged

Mildred

apartment came Christmas.

ville,

who

under the direction of Jean Riddick, the president.

as well as to provide a time for discussing problems

The

girls

selected.

the state and national organizations for teachers

stitute

here in Farmville has

by paying the dues of those

tion are called, have been capably led this year

especially

ready to work again on the job of being

future teachers of America.

the adviser for the

members of the Association of Childhood Educa'

FUTURE TEACHERS OF AMERICA this year,

Wynne,

Chapter here.

The "Aces,"

Back we came to school

lib-

have enjoyed, too, the interest and

help of Dr. John P.

served as our advisers.

seniors,

We

"Place

of

in one of our pro' and gave an excellent talk on

Geography

Moran gave

in

the

Elementary

helpful suggestions as

where we could secure appropriate supple' mentary materials to use in teaching a unit on to

geography. During the meeting she showed which one of her classes had made.

slides


C^^ OhS

C^KS

C^^si)

C^^<9

The Ways and Means Committee added funds to the treasury

by helping to serve refreshments

Longwood on Sunday

at

Mildred

Shiflett

were Mary Spradlin, secretary; Dorothy Cum' mings, treasurer; and Jane Philhower, chairman of the Ways and Means Committee. We are grateful to

OKi)

C-i^

tion

and had excelled

field

of educa'

in scholarship.

efficient officers for

Agnes

following:

C^K*)

C^^si)

displayed outstanding interest in the

Our most

afternoons.

Assisting Jean Riddick and

C>K5

the year were the

Stokes, president; Betty

Adams,

vice'president; Katherine Prebble, secretary;

Dorothy Cummings,

treasurer.

and

Miss Camper,

as

always, remained a most loyal adviser.

Miss Mary Haynes, our adviser, for her guid' and understanding in helping us to

ance, interest

accomplish our goals.

KAPPA DELTA

PI

Getting together once again in the

fall,

we were

Dabney S. Lan' an honorary member of Kappa Delta

particularly thrilled to have Dr. caster,

who

is

with

Pi, present

open meeting, Virginia," discussion in

which

us.

As

guest speaker before an

his topic, "Educational

Trends

was of especial interest to us. on various phases of his speech

all

in

A lively followed,

was the annual Christ' mas banquet in the Tea Room. This gay affair reached a cHmax when Dr. Wynne and Betty Adams on the affirmative side opposed Barbara Kellam and Mr. Johnson on the negative side in a debate on the question, "Is There a Santa Claus?" With witty retorts flying back and forth mid gales

The

highlight of the year

we were

of laughter,

side having gained

forced to leave with neither

an advantage.

As the theme of our programs for the we paid tribute to the Seniors by choosing prime interest to a

winter

one â&#x20AC;&#x201D; them "The College Graduate

of in

we cant

forget

and Agnes counted the days

how Miss Camper till

March

9,

when

they departed for the National Convention in Mil'

waukee, Wisconsin, where they represented Beta Epsilon Chapter.

With

The Commercial Club was

the arrival of spring

we made

lavish prep'

business world.

It

was not

to take

its

porter.

At

Alice C.

the beginning of the school year, Mrs.

Wynne was

sound advice the In January

and Seniors who had

elected as the adviser of the

Without her guiding hand and club would have been at a loss.

we

initiated seventysix

freshman

month to be remembered in that the Commercial Club had its annual banquet. It was held at the high school be' cause the enrollment of the club was so large that the tea room could not accommodate all the mem' into the club.

February was

in having as

initiated Juniors

on was our

Minnie Rose Hawthorne. Mary Virginia Walker was viccpresident; Barbara Brown, secre' tary; AUce Davis, treasurer; and Jean Kent, re'

who

We

activities

president,

and members of the

Additional members were gained during the

the

place as one of the outstanding clubs

our campus. Leading us in our

bers.

year.

fields of

until the present year,

however, that the Commercial Club really began

ception honoring the Freshmen and Sophomores classes.

organized in

other better while studying the various

arations for our final big event, the formal re'

ranked in the upper quarter of their

first

1939 for business students to get to know each

club for the year.

Postwar World." Naturally

COMMERCIAL CLUB

eagerly participated.

The honorary

also a

guests included Dr. Jarman faculty.

We

were fortunate

our guest speaker, Mr. Arthur L.

Walker, Supervisor of Office Education in the State of Virginia.


C^KS

We

C^^^

C^si)

C^^i)

C^fs5

C>Kf)

O^^ C^O

C>K9

C^vD

Versus

our adviser, gave her interpretation and opinion.

Secretary" that was presented at one of our meet'

For variety and entertainment there was usually a

This play portrayed the good and bad habits

Our own "Bertie" played the role bad secretary who chewed gum while work'

game or puzzle in Latin; very often there were a few anecdotes. Much of our time this year was spent in making plans for sending delegates to the

ing and handed in a letter to the boss with holes

national convention in Bowling Green, Ohio. This

ings.

will never forget the play, "Boss

of secretaries. of the

in

Everyone

felt

one and that

convention had not met for several years because

from numerous erasures.

resulting

it

it

and hard work

war time

that the year was a very successful was only a beginning of more fun

of

in years to come.

our national magazine, "The Tribunal," which was

We

restrictions.

were

also excited over the

pubhcation of

printed in the spring under the direction of Kath'

LATIN CLUB That Latin plays such day hves

arine Allen, for the

a great part in

a starthng fact to most people.

is

At the

our every

bers those juniors

It is

first

time since the war.

beginning of the year

and

and

we

took in as

mem'

seniors having a high average

They were

thought of as a language to be forgotten long ago.

in Latin

However, the mere fact that Latin

Lovice Altizer, Lee Carter, and Audrey Davis.

as a language of

is

not spoken

any people today does not

mean it is dead. The Latin Club is open

Although our membership was small, we left school in June feeling that we had had a most successful

neces'

sarily

better understanding

and

Roman

it tries

year.

all

The programs

history,

our vicc'president,

rolling

co'Operated with

contributing as

much

all

Elliott

love of the classics.

GAMMA

as possible to each.

To

Miss Rice, with her wide knowledge of Latin,

was ever an

inspiration to us.

ready and willing to aid us in any grateful to her untiring efforts so

She was always

way and we

Alti2;er,

Our main

this year

PI

all

Gamma Psi

work is

the

through the school year has

especially

halls,

on the

bulletin

first floor.

Together with Beorc Eh Thorn and the Spanish

we

sponsored a program "The Institute on

Latin American Culture." There were lectures on

RHO

Latin American Countries. Pictures dealing with masterpieces and outstanding art features of these

mind our purpose, fostering the love of the classics, the program of the monthly meeting

Rho

through the

Club,

in

of Sigma Pi

activity

board in Library Hall,

our vice'president; Nell Scott,

SIGMA

outstanding

membership in

took place on our campus. These posters were seen

presi'

our secretary; and Beverly Boone, our treasurer.

Having

who have done

honor offered on our campus.

are

Assisting her with the duties of the club

were Lovice

PSI

been the making of posters for every big event that

under the direction of Katharine Allen, our dent.

students

in the field of art,

which have helped

much to make our club what it is. The Latin Club had much success

planned the meetings.

was ever present. Dr. James Walmsley, an honorary member, shared our

on the campus by

drives

who

We could not forget to mention Miss Rice, whose

bers should participate in this important activity.

We

efficiently

helpful guidance

when bandage we stressed that our mem'

the beginning of the year

was being done,

who

Katharine Allen served as secretary and treasurer.

is

presented in Latin.

At

our president,

presided over our meetings, and Jane Anderson,

usually

and often a play

This was realized under the direction of

Mary Ann Dove,

to arouse a

feeling for the language

used by the ancient Romans. center around

membership to

for

those interested in Latin, and

in general scholarship.

countries were enjoyed.

almost always consisted of read'

Spring brought out the talents of the art

ing over classics. After these readings Miss Rice,

dents in an exhibition of the year's work. 111

stu'

We took


C^^

an active part in

C^4^

C^si)

C^-S> this

and were quite

C^-S>

gratified

with

Each quarter the

initiation

brought into our art

Miss

of

new

circle

proved to us their abiUty and

To

OK5

C^^O

new members girls

president;

Norma Howard,

C^^^

er,

Civili2;ation."

Gamma Mu

In the Winter Pi

with the Choir

who had

gave "Folk Songs of the Allied Nations." Annota'

Carmen

tions on English, Welsh, and Scottish folk songs were given by members of Pi Gamma Mu. We had

talents.

Bedford, our loyal adviser;

C^K5

to our campus; he spoke in the school audi'

torium on "Lessons of

the results.

Low,

C^4S

vice'president;

as our guests for this program Dr. and Dr. Luther Richmond.

J.

Blair

Buck

Mardi Gras, under the leadership of Kitty Maddox, general chairman, was a traditionally beautiful occasion with Jane Philhower as queen.

Gowned

Margaret

Peebles,

War

in dresses of the Civil

Ellett,

Krebbs, Margaret Wall,

Period, the

Peggy T. Ross, Beverly

lovely ladies of her court,

Booher, Barbara

Julia

Ann

Carter, and

Mar

garet Orange, were perfect "belles of the ball."

Ours was

a traditional

Mardi Gras with colored

masks and gay costumes

Glenn

Ann

Patterson, secretarytreasurer; Sutton

Bland, poster chairman; and

chairman,

we owe many

Mary

Rattray, social

thanks for guidance and

help through our year's activities.

PI In 1927 Pi

studied

"The Smaller Countries in the Through

Situation" as a topic for the year.

a series of well prepared papers and group dis' cussions, as

open forums,

we

prepared ourselves to

think more intelligently about the worlds situation

GAMMA MU

Gamma Mu,

We World

galore.

and about the place these smaller countries

a national honor society

have in our future world. In Pi

Gamma

will

Mu

we

by promoting interest in these timely sub' we were taking a vital step in preparing the

felt that,

was founded on our campus. Girls who have shown outstanding in' terest in the field of social science have shown the

youth of today to participate in solving the prob'

abiHty to do an original piece of work, and have a

lems in this our Post' War World.

high standard of general scholarship are ehgible for

the year culminated in our project in the spring.

in the field of social science,

Gamma

jects,

Our work

for

chapter this

Because of his outstanding interest and guidance.

year Dorothy Overcash served as president; Emily

Dr. Walmesley has proved an immeasurable asset

Carper, viccpresident; Eleanor Bisese, secretary;

to our organi2;ation. His untiring efforts and con'

Betty Adams, treasurer; Dr. James Elliot Walmes-

stant cordiality have proved an inspiration to us

membership. In our Virginia

ley,

sponsor;

two

faculty members, Miss

Mary

all.

We

have found in Dr. Walmesley a friend

Nichols and Dr. C. G. Gordon Mass, were active

who

in the society.

any request. High ideals and scholarship, two of the things for which we strive, have been con'

Our

interesting visit to the

render grounds in the

fall

Appomattox Suf

included a sight'seeing

Appomattox Court House, the Nat' ional Historical Monument, and a park which com' memorates the termination of the War Between

tour of the

the States.

We also enjoyed the talks

licious picnic

we

luncheon on

this trip.

and the

In

de'

November

brought Will Durant, noted author and lectur'

can offer sound advice at

stantly

expanded under

truly say that

all

times and

We

his leadership.

can

we consider Dr. Walmesley not only

an integral part of Pi

Gamma

Mu but

also a con'

stant incentive for our accomphshments.

with

upon

his unerring leadership

operation, that

we

brought Pi

successful year's end.

was

It

and each person's

Gamma

Mu

co'

to a


/<.


Left to right:

Front row,

L.

ELLIOTT

left to right:

Patterson,

Second row,

left to right;

Owen,

Maddox, McCorkle, Hundley,

Elliott,

Cruser, McCorkle, S.

Hundley

Cruser, Overcash, Balance

Bennett, Shufflebarger, Wolfe, Clarke, Rattray, N. Parrish, Abernathy, Loyd, McCorkle, Ewell, Morris,

Cosey, EUett

114


Seated

:

Loving,

Second row,

Owen

left to

right:

Seated, left to right:

Second row,

Mclntyre, Lynch, Carpe:

Willis,

left to right:

Whitehead, Lynch, Carper, N.

Piercy, Rattray,

Low,

Bralley,

Scott,

Cock

Owen, Mclntyre, 115

Patterson, Hair, West, Sutherline, Wilson, Odin, Tindall


First row, left to right: Morrison, C. Griszard, Altice, Wilkerson Second row, left to right: Lewis, Hundley, Abernathy, Wilson Third row, left to right: George, Young, F. Treakle, Epperson Fourth row, left to right: Headlee, Low, Tindall, V. Bailey

Seated, left to right:

Second row,

Helmer, Cock, Mr. Holton, V. Treakle, Slaughter, Brooks, Turley Shepherd, E. Griward, Gelston, Buford

left to right:


CRUMPLER

Front: C. Grizzard, Rieck, Stokes Left:

Grumpier, Hewlett, Bennett, Parden, Brough,

Right: Martin, Tindall, Dale,

Left to right:

McMuUen, Headlee

Stokes, Rieck, Martin,

M.

East

M.

East


Front row,

left

to right:

Freeman, Miller,

Bobbitt, Hamilton, Verser,

Walton, Mallory,

Gillum

Back row,

left to

Patterson,

Front row, J.

left to right:

J.

right:

East,

V. Ritchie, E.

Taylor, Ford

Hudson,

Thorpe, Jordon, Hair,

Marsh Second row, Millner,

left to right:

J.

Lewers,

Anderson, Joyner,

Carter, Bennett

Back row,

left to

right:

Wood,

Jennings, Bailey, Booth, Driver,

Thomas

Front row,

left to right:

Currin,

Kent, Harrell, Cummings, Price,

Grumpier, E. Grizzard,

C. Grizzard

Second row, left to right: Rainey, Alphin, Thomas, Robbins, C. Bobbitt


M. Rowe

Seated, left to right: Ozlin, Mantiply,

Second row, Peterson,

left

East, Stokes,

to right:

Bickle,

Rattray, Overby,

Mr. Roberts, M. Graham, Bowling,

Sarver

First row, left to right: Spindler,

Cock, Butler, Catlett

Second row,

left

to right:

Ballard, Willis, Freeman,

Taylor,

First row, left to

right:

Carter,

Dale, Hair, Brough

Second row, Bailey,

left to right:

Bennett,

Scott,

Booth,

Shepherd, Mr. Defoe

Third row, left to right: Toby, Petty, Addleman, Cage, Curtis, V. Treakle Fourth row, F.

left to right:

Treakle

Piercy,

Croom, Mr.

May


Left to right:

Front row,

left to right:

Irrizary,

Summers, Hewlett, B. Adams

Maldonado, Costa, Avellanet, Quinones,

Ramirez;, Carbonell

Back row, left to right: Cosby, Scherberger, Whittaker, Garrison, Couche, Moran, Bisese, Bentley

Left to right:

Tindall,

Addleman, M. Davis, A. Grainger, A. Davis, Winn, Wolfe 120


Left to right:

Harvie, White, Grainger, Mantiply,

Mason

Seated, left to right:

Goodman, Maldonado,

Bibb, Diggs,

Miss Barksdale Standing,

Front row,

M.

left

to

right:

Wilson, Altizcr, Shackclfmd,

M.

Davis,

Butt,

N.

Scott,

left to right:

Stancell,

Martin, E. Smith, Rives, Altice, Piercy, Harvie,

Motley, Tindall, Carter, L. Addleman

Back row,

left to right:

B. Boone, S, Hundley, Cruser,

M.

Ellett, Willis, Ozlin,

121

Wood

V, Treakle, Whitten, Lynch


Seated, left to right: Bowling,

Dr.

Wynne

Standing,

M.

left

to right:

Adams,

Jones, B.

Headlee, Prebble

Left to right:

Riddick,

Cummings, Spradlin,

Shiflett

Front row,

to

left

right:

Overcash, Prebble, E. Grijzard, B.

Adams, Hair,

Rives, Ingle,

Woodward

Second row,

left

to right:

Gumkowski, Cummings, Davis, K. Allen, N. Parrish, L. Carter, J. Millner,

Anderson,

Altizer,

Stokes,

K. Maddox, C. Bobbitt, Hewlett, Lynch

Back row, left to right: F. Godwin, West, Bennett, Treakle, Odin, Young, Ellett


Front row,

left to

right:

N.

V. Hollifield, B. Boone, Waters Scott,

Back row, Rice,

left to

Light,

right:

Dove,

Miss

Altizer,

K. Allen

|p^jE!9

^^St=^^ II^^^^^^^F^^ T^^^^^^^^^^^^H

^^l Left to right: A. Davis, Mrs.

Wynne, Hawthorne, M. Walker, Kent, B. Brown

'

Wm ^[^JKM

Left to right:

J.

Anderson, A.

Davis, Dove, L. Carter, Dr.

Walmsley, Miss Rice, K. Allen

Altizer,


Left to right:

Front row,

left to right:

Second row, Third row,

Rattray,

E. Grizzard, B.

left to right:

left to right:

Low, Whitehead, Patterson

Adams, C.

M. Wilkerson,

Bobbitt, G. Patterson, Overcash, Overstreet, Butt, A. Martin, Rives, Carper

C. Young, R. Hill, K. Allen,

Piercy, Altice, B.

Woodward,

E.

J.

Anderson, A. Stokes, Holman

Kimmerling, K. Maddox, Bisese 124


made our physical bodies

that has

more. There are those rest

girls

able to withstand

who have

discovered

can be obtained through participation in the

different organiwtions

on campus. This kind of

rest has helped to prepare us as better leaders of

tomorrow. Then there are

girls

who

actually find

a rest in the pure joy and pleasure of accomplish'

ing their work.

proved in the

itself

invaluable to us.

humble "thank you"

We have found of S. T.

A NOTHER

division of the

It is this rest

C,

it

us this does not

signify merely the rest derived

from a recUning

rest.

for a task well done.

in hearing the cheerful "hello" of a

We have found

the fact that as college students

position of the body.

It is

one of the best ways to

true that lying

rest,

but

we

down

at S.

adults,

some of us never having had

fore.

We

have found

little

It is this

have found

this feeling

be

it

in the attitude of the

and administration.

Through

girls

these

realized that rest

time for physical exercise

on campus.

are treated as

rest be'

rest in participating in the various

sports offered

in

T. C.

most universally accepted one. The

who have found

we

it

is

faculty

have learned that there are other ways of sides this

atmosphere

mural in the Ro'

To

*"tunda portrays

We have found rest

just in the friendly

fellow classmate passing by.

â&#x20AC;˘*

which has already

this

we

126

we have

By

so doing

may be

obtained.

have broadened our views and thus en'

riched our

kind of rest

and many other ways

lives.


C'^s^

C>K5

C^^i)

CNsi)

C>fs<)

C^^^

CS^

C^si)

C^vi)

C^^i)

emment. The House Council unburdened this

now done

What

an untidy room.

for three warnings for is

itself

year of the responsibility of giving punishment

about these warnings does not go

through the Council.

The

year's

been without

and a very

work its

for the

House Council has not

A committee was appointed,

play.

delightful Christmas party

was held

in

the Student Lounge. However, the entertainment

was not the exchange

No one need worry!

of stories about problem

girls.

Everyone seemed to enjoy the

it was just one of those make the House Council a pleasant organi2;ation. Some members of the Council seemed

party very much, and

HOUSE COUNCIL "Quick, shut'up and turn the

Ann

comes Freddie spoke the

-

things that

Here

lights out.

on her nightly

vigil!"

Thus

gathered for a "Bull session" after

girls

were supposed to be out at and Freddie Ann often found

hours. Although lights

Mrs.

eleven, it

McCoy

necessary to break

up

those noisy crowds,

who

to have had fun one night selling sandwiches

the

the cause."

halls, "all for

Longwood

place of serving at

One

This was done

on in

this year.

of the art classes took the interest of the

House Council to heart and painted some

attractive

Not only were

always excused themselves by feigning such things

posters concerning study hour.

as seeing bats or rats, or hearing mysterious scream'

these posters pretty, but they seemed to catch

Honestly, the stories some

ing on the halls.

girls

can think up to try to keep out of getting a "call

down!"

The House Council feels it has accomplished much this year. The old system of campusing girls was replaced by confining them

for punishment

the library during study hour.

work much ment

better

for noise

and seems a more

made

to

This seemed to logical punish'

during study hour. Instead of

having "lights out" at 10:30 with only three "late light" permissions a week, everyone

extra half hour. half

hour for

From 10:00

the day's last minute visiting and

business; then the extra half

11 :00

was given an was a

until 10:30

was given

in order to

of

downs," a

receiving

the fifth "call

and

"call

down"

her

activities

the faithful house mothers.

Mrs. McCoy, Mrs.

Beazley, Mrs. Laing, and Miss ful in their usual places:

other

name

to the

with the freshmen fall

list

Hamner were

help-

Miss Camper added an-

of house mothers by hving

in the Practice

House during the

quarter.

The House Council

has had a most successful

Ann Butt as its president. Assist'

punishment for three

the same punishment girl received

"call

was

her sixth

name was handed to Student

Parham

as secretary,

and Nancy Parrish

as

treasurer. in'

received four "call

down"

House Council's

ing her were Margie Hewlett as vice-president,

lenient this year,

However, when a

of the

have time to get ready

confinement to the library during study hour. For given.

The account

year with Freddie

downs" before she was punished. The punishment was a week's girl

a girl

for the year could not close without mention of

Kitty

The Council became

As

would be ambling down the hall speaking in a rather loud voice, she would see a poster and im' mediately become conscious that it was study hour.

hour from 10: 30 until

for bed.

stead

everyone's eye at just the right time.

Gk)V'

EASTERN SHORE CLUB Onley, Eastville, Onancock, Cheriton

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

these

names can make one think of only one thing, the Eastern Shore. These places are foremost in the minds of the girls here from the other side of Chesa' peake Bay. It was with sadness that we packed our


c>M>

C^^sJ)

O^^

C>Ki)

C^sS>

We

we found

Mater.

that

it

wasn't too

We

selves to Farmville.

and

the

all

difficult to

adjust our'

came to love the

college

girls.

the past few years,

girls

from

like to

form a

club. Last year the club

was continued, and Peggy T. Ross was chosen

Maude

viccpresident;

to

Carolyn

preside over our meetings as president.

Savage was

Miss Craddock gladly con'

secretarytreasurer.

sented to be our faculty adviser.

At

our meetings

talked about events that were taking place on

the shore, and after everyone had put in her

worth, there wasn't anything that

know about our home

we

The main purpose of the club is T. C. among the girls

interest in S.

to

all

we

sent the

the schools.

col'

to create an in the high

Rotunda and the Colonnade

At

the end of the year

we

all

packed our trunks for another long journey. Sev eral of

and

A^le

viccpresident;

treasurer;

Our one and faithful

Mary Lee

Taylor led us as president.

Hutt, secretary

and Connie Pemberton, only "Charlie

and helping

reporter.

Hop" was our

ever'

adviser.

two

In order to carry out this

shore.

Ann

Thomas was

GRANDDAUGHTERS

towns. These meetings also

keep in closer contact with each other in the

purpose,

Alma

had together.

didn't

brought us together as a group and enabled us to

on the

back home, en'

went for those hamburgers with mustard and But this was just one of the good times we

onions!

schools

girls

The event of the year that everyone from North' Neck looked forward to was the annual ham' Everyone burger feast in Mr. Graham's yard. really

lege.

C^vi)

C^fsi)

the

couraging them to choose S. T. C. as their

they would

cents'

C^sS)

letters to

ern

Some time during

we

wrote

also

the Eastern Shore got together and decided that

Murphy was

C^-S>

C<K!)

trunks to embark from the good sandy beaches, but as everyone does when she comes to S. T. C,

Did your mother go to Farmville? Your great' If the answer was in the affirmative, the student automatically became a member of the Granddaughters Club. Under the leadership of Rosa Lee Bell, president; Betty Woodward, vice president; Hilda Abernathy, secretary; and Char' lotte West, treasurer, we participated in an active program this year. grandmother?

We were off to a grand

us wouldn't be returning to stay any length

start this fall

when we

of time. Marriage and business and teaching have

invited twenty attractive girls to join our club.

called them.

Another booth.

NORTHERN NECK CLUB

We

live

in

that

little

strip

all

of country be'

tween the yellow Rappahannock and the broad

Potomac blue, commonly known to each of us as the Northern Neck. We're back again this year with more new girls. Our first aim was to get all of our new and old girls together and to make each one

feel

her part in our club.

new

We also tried to help

first few hard weeks would soon reali2B the real Farmville spirit and become an actual part of the school.

our

girls

through those

so they

Another of our aims was to get together for and to reminisce of our good times back home, but we usually ended by planning local social activities

what we would do during our summer

vacation.

who

activity this fall

was our annual

circus

"Ringing the bottle" proved attractive to stopped to try their luck.

February 14

marked the date of our Valentine's Day banquet. We had a most delightful one in the tea room with the Valentine theme carried out in the decorations and menu. Although this was the first banquet we


C>KS

CÂŤ^si> have had,

it

was

C^f^

many more, making

it

C>KÂŁ)

C^^sX)

so successful that

To

we were

impressed

with the need of the American Red Cross. During

Red Cross Campaign

in Farmville

we

helped

not only by giving, but also by decorating windows in

some of the down town

distributed posters

As March

Besides this

stores.

we looked forward

came,

since

it

was Dr. Jarman's

last.

were kept busy meeting the

to Founders

We granddaughters helping with

visitors,

said

As new

GIRLS'

CLUB

and smoking; the other

for last'minute preparations for classes.

ginning of the

fall

gram and took

quarter

in the

we had

new town

is

At

is

used

our formal pro'

Our colors, new girl when

To

We soon added fifty help us become better

new members by

Circus would be complete without a pop'

giving one

of her lovely teas.

Had

it

not been for the guidance of our faithful

the year would never have been so success'

Cock was

Betty

vice'president;

Judith

Pierce, treasurer;

we

president; Luz; Quinones,

Reick,

secretary;

Evelyn

and Martha Sours, reporter.

could beUeve

it,

Christmas was ap'

and the highlight was our "tasting

We joyfully tasted goodies

prepared by the third'year Spring brought us

girls.

many interesting

through pictures and through speakers.

ideas

Perhaps

one of the most interesting was the demonstration of flower arranging

by Mr. Charles Burg, a

local

florist.

It

as

was time

we

closed,

to bid farewell for another year, and

we

tried to keep all

fresh in our minds to apply in our

taken into the club.

No

to our group.

party" held in the lab.

the be'

the high'

year began, our thoughts naturally

new members.

tertained the old and

girls.

orange and black, are pinned on a she

girls

proaching,

Have you ever wondered for what the rooms A and B on Main are used? They are for us girls who live in town. One room is used for informal chats, bridge games,

new

the

Before

TOWN

is

Home Economics

acquainted, Miss Tupper, our capable adviser, en'

highly successful year.

THE

of the

goal.

ful.

came with exams and graduation, we good'bye to the seniors. We had enjoyed a spring

member

all our meetings, programs, and were carefully planned to help us reach our

parties

officers,

rooms.

C^fvi)

Club. Therefore,

the registration, and taking the alumnae to their

As

every

turned to our

Day, which we resolved to make the best ever,

C^^vi)

be the best homemaker possible

est desire of

we

over town.

all

C^O

C^^^

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB

an annual event.

This year as much as before the

C^4^

we hope to have

our new ideas

homes during

the summer.

corn booth; therefore, following the usual custom,

THE PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL

the club sold popcorn at the circus to secure funds to help carry

the

fall

we

on the work of the

club. Later during

sponsored a chapel program.

By means

of these programs, the day students and dormitory students got to

know

each other better and were

brought closer together.

Miss Winnie Hiner led us, assisted by the fol' officers: Martha Holman, president; Nola

lowing

Brisentine, secretary; Betty Bondurant, treasurer;

Catherine Mustello, reporter.

We

also recorded

our progress and interest by keeping a scrap book.

Those who made outstanding records at S. T. C. were written up in the book. Clippings and pict' ures were put in among our treasures.

want you to meet Miss Cleaves." These words are magic to the new girl suffering from a "I

quarter of carefully guarded conversation.

We


C^vf)

C^^

C^^vD

C^-S>

C^^^

and rejoiced when were over. The Pan'Hellenic Council, which makes the rules, is a governing board of the eight sororities on fretted about the rules

and the accompanying

These together

or an alternate to the meetings. sororities

make up

the Pan'

Hellenic Council. This organi2;ation strives to prO'

mote better relations between the sororities and to

make them

a unified force rather than rival groups.

There are three rushing seasons a year: one in

The

each of the quarters. distributes the Uttle visiting times,

and

Pan'Hellenic Council

white cards to rushees, assigns carries the cards

back to the

sororities

with the decisive "accept" or "regret"

inscribed

on them.

No

sorority girl will ever for

get the night she signed the bid presented to her

by

Miss Cleaves.

At

the Fall

scholastic average for the year 1944' 1945.

The dreaded

February, sent us aU hurrying to the chapter room

we were

plained, yes, but

many

To

glad that

of the rules previously

the monthly meetings

We

com'

we had learned

unknown.

we

C>KS>

Happy

indeed were

we

all

when once

again

we

months spent other.

in eagerly awaiting letters

Of course, many

ories of

from each

of us cherished fond

our house party at Virginia Beach.

tongues going like mad, ences of the

we

mem'

With

reviewed our experi'

summer amid the

turbulent uproar of

everyone's claiming her various belongings stored

room.

in the chapter

When

we were extremely proud of our room, which had undergone quite a fall

rushing arrived,

The

metamorphosis.

pleasing sight of walls freshly

At we were more than thrilled

painted a heavenly shade of rose greeted us. the close of to

fall

rushing

welcome Kitty Hankins

we

fall

as

one of our own.

considered ourselves quite

fortunate to have Mrs.

Eddy Schmidt, our Nat'

ional Historian with us as she gathered material for the forthcoming publication of our history.

Perhaps one of the most memorable occasions of

was our Christmas party, where laughter and fun abounded. Then turning to the more seri'

the year

Pan'Hellenic examination, given in

to study the constitution and bylaws.

C^v5

C^*s5

convened in the chapter room after long summer

During the

the head of the calendar for the school year

Tea given in the Student Lounge. At that time Dean Smith talked to us, and Mu Omega Sorority was awarded the plaque for the highest

was

C^^^D

SIGMA SICMA SICMA

silence

our campus. Each sorority sends a representative

with the heads of the

C^^^

rushing

took any problems

which came up, knowing that the best solution would be found. This year our officers were Eve' lyn Gri2;2;ard, president; Margaret Orange, vice' president; Betty Brothers, secretary; Dorothy

Woodward, rush Ruth Cleaves was our capable and

ous

we

side,

Christmas as

reali2;ed

we

the deeper significance of

sang together Christmas carols

with the inspiring background of a fragrant tree

and the dim glow of flickering candlelight. Before anyone had time to recover from the thrill of a postwar Christmas, we were honored with a visit from one of our alumnae, Eleanor Folk. This was a source of

much enjoyment to us as we entertained

her with our traditional after'dinner coffee.

Overstreet, treasurer; and Betty

chairman. Miss faithful adviser.

On May 18 we danced to the Music of the Vagabonds under the streamers of the various col' All too soon

representatives.

go to our

May was upon us,

and

installation of

Our

officers

and

new

it

was time

officers

and

thanks for a successful year

and

delegates:

Margaret

Mc

Dorothy Overstreet, Betty Brothers, Betty Adams, Betty Woodward, Margaret Orange, Eve lyn Cri2;2,ard, and Barbara Kellum. Intyre,

again

we

plunged into rushing, and

Ann

we

Ashby, PhylHs

Bagley, Julia Booher, Barbara Brandon, Frances

De Berry,

Doris EUiott, Dolly

Ann Freeman, Kath'

erine Hundley, Grace Mallory, Evelyn Patterson,

ors of the sororities.

for election

Once

were happy to welcome Clara

Margaret Skelton,

Ann

Verser, Margaret Wall,

Margaret Watts, and Martha In April's balmy weather

Ann

White.

we donned gay eve

ning dresses to attend the long'awaited spring banquet.

Impressive as

ered the banquet a

man was

cUmax

it

was,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;our

affair

we

consid'

to our year as Dr. Jar-

the guest of honor.

Underneath the


C^^

C^^

ing the year's activities

C^si) CSsi) C^KD C^fsi) Our big moment came after Christmas when seven new "Baby Gammies" came into our chapter. They were Adelaide Coble, Jean Edgerton, Mary Lawless, Sara Mangum, Lee Staples, "Jackie"

held at

Watson, and

C^4^

C>K9

gayety, a feeling of nostalgia

were

too aware that this

all

he would attend in his

C^-S>

was ever present; we was our last banquet

official

capacity. Culminat'

was our last get'together Longwood, where the Seniors especially make the most of every precious minute.

tried to

C-K9

Many

are the memories that wiU linger of this Through the leadership of Kitty Maddox, president; Peggy T. Ross, vice'president; Minnie Rose Hawthorne, treasurer; Louise Rives, record'

year.

ing secretary; and Heidi Lacey, corresponding sec retary,

we

as ever,

It

was, "Welcome,

We were very proud of our celebrities this year. Sue Hundley was selected

as editor of the forth'

coming 1947 Virginian, and Dorris Balance managing

May

Our beauty

editor.

as its

representative for

Court was Minnie Lee Grumpier.

Miss

enjoyed a most successful year.

Camper, our adviser, remained, faithful and loyal supporter.

Watts.

Eli2;abeth

Gammies!"

None

our most

work

of us could have accomplished our year's

if it

hadn't been for the able leadership of

Miss Stubbs as our adviser; Margaret Hewlett, All too soon

it

became time to say good'by, but

with visions of a beach party before that

was not

all

us,

we

felt

Ann Martin,

head;

Nancy

vicchead; Jane Page, secretary;

Pitts, treasurer;

and Minnie Lee Grumpier,

finished.

chaplain.

Founder's Day, on

GAMMA THETA Every college year

is

happy one

a

for

all

Gamma

duced to some of our

happy than usual. As we turn back the calendar and look into our chapter room, we see the girls

Founder's

returned in September going over

Margaret Harvie when she came in sporting a

dia'

mond.

We

and best wishes!

some of our

noticed, too, the absence of it

girls,

and

took a long time getting used to not having them

among

had

at

it

Being intro'

fun.

looked'forward'to event of

Longwood, and every

the house and cabin

long for old and

May

was taken up.

quainted, and everyone pitched in

make

it

all

was the

We

11th.

available spot in It didn't

new Gamma Thetas

tion of the meals to

This year's

a long time that

take

ac

to get

on the prepara'

a regular family

affair.

us. first

adviser.

big get'together

Miss Stubbs.

It

was given by our loyal was a Gamma Theta

specialty, a spaghetti dinner,

wood

was

Day was the first in back so many alumnae.

The most

It

Our

sisters

35th reunion of our chapter on

can imagine the excitement caused by Congratulations

brought

the

all

events of the past summer.

You

9th, brought back to

a get'together in the chapter room.

Thetas, and this past year has been even more

who

March

us quite a few of the old "Gammies." There was

buns. Served

really a big success

topped

off

with Long' it

was

and one that won't soon be

for'

on Miss Stubb's

terrace,

Fall quarter rushing brought us Pat Carter

West

Virginia.

To

our

way

from

of thinking,

was a great way to start the season. Another addition came to our chapter when Mrs. Janice Lemen consented to be our patron. The happy oc'

this

casion called for a buffet supper given in Mrs. Lemen's honor and celebrated in the chapter room.

really

one big family that

sat

around the

cabin that night, singing the old familiar songs, talking about old college days general,

To year

gotten.

Bluefield,

was

cover is

and chums, and,

in

remembering events and people. all

of the

many happenings

of a college

almost an impossibility, but always some

things will remain in our memories for years to

come.

And

as

we

tear

from the calendar our

last

month of college together, we are hoping for those who come back a happy and useful year and to those who are leaving our chapter, we want to say, "The best of luck to all. Remember always our ties

of friendship."


C^4^ C^i-S C^O ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA

C^s^

C^sJ)

And we

had something to celebrate right away, "Did you hear? We got Miss Wall!" Of course, we had to have a party to welcome her, and

.too.

it

was!

Day banquet in November was With Dr. Jarman, Dean Smith, and Miss Moran as guests, we ate tearoom rolls in im' Our

Founder's

a big success.

possible numbers.

Sig

Did anybody ever

who wasn't hungry? And we're

an Alpha

see

still

sorry that

there

was the Christmas

party, complete

with the ever'present food, with the ni2;ing

off 'key

harmc

while Kitty shuddered, and with the pres'

which were

C'KS

C"^^^

in the middle.

C^KD

side of the room and a tiny patch Anyway, we knew it was there.

We'll never forget the intermission parties with everybody so dressed'Up and sophisticated. It was quite a contrast to the usual blue jeans. But what we still want to know is what became of the party raided everybody else's for Mardi Gras dance? punch bowls, but where was ours? And Miss Wall's peanuts! just ate and ate. Lillian, as editor'in'chief of the Virginian, had a difficult task to perform; we even got tired from just watching her. Boots was elected the Alpha

We

We

girl

of the year on the basis of her leadership in the

chapter and in the college.

We're

donated to the Christmas

so

proud of

them! Let's not forget the annual trek to

Dr. Walmsley couldn't come.

Then

C^K5

showing on each

There always seems to be something happening in the chapter room. From the very iirst day in September, when we wandered over to claim our belongings, there was never a single dull moment.

quite a party

C>K5

the week'end.

The

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Longwood

cabin, hard beds,

for

good food,

and fresh air there was nothing like it! Every body in the chapter was a victim of the epidemic of spring fever.

con'

The time for putting on the white dust covers and dismantling the chapter room came with tears, but there's another September coming. This has been a full and successful year, under

centrating so seriously on books just didn't look

the leadership of Jackie, president; Boots, secrc'

ents

later

baskets.

During exams

it

was hard

chapter room. All of those

natural.

However, that

to recognize the

silent,

solemn

girls

didn't last long,

and the

tary; Jean, treasurer;

much'anticipated holidays were finally here.

No

PI

record of the year could be complete with'

out some mention of the

new "pink" rug

talked about for so long.

and many

trips to

The Rug,

as Jackie called

After

Richmond,

it,

the beautiful, that

much

it finally

we had

discussion

arrived,

was

and Dot,

vice'president.

KAPPA SIGMA

It seems we Pi Kaps have covered a good deal of ground this year. There are many, many things we can look back on with pleasure, but we deem it necessary to record at least a few of the most im'

portant happenings.

put lovingly down, and looks just wonderful!

And,

of course, we'll never forget Ruth's

first

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;our

first

entrance into the room as Mrs. Soyars bride of the season.

After winter rushing pledges: Alice

Ann

we welcomed eighteen new

Abernathy, Dorothy Bourne,

Mary Jane Dunlap, Mary Teed

May

Davidson, Eleanor

Farmer, Martha EHzabeth Gillum, Cornelia

Hamilton, Helen Jackson, Betty Jefferson, Alice

Moore, Sara Lee Rawles, Violet Ritchie, Lucy Lee Rives, Betty Lewis Shank, Jane Taylor,

Nancy

Mary Lou

Bagley.

Taylor, Marie Hutchinson, and

was wonderful to see them all at the pledge nobody could see The Rug when every body sat down. There was just a small edge left It

party, but

After unpacking all our "junk" from the chapter getting our old "stamping ground" clear and shiny, we got off to a big start in the school year with a wonderful pledge party honoring three new Pi Kaps, who had been 1945 spring rushees. These girls were Betty Gillespie, Marjorie Tice,

room and

and Ethel Harrison.

How proud we were,

too!

Shortly before Christmas we were all shocked and

saddened at the news that one of our most beloved Pi Kaps, Frances Garnett, had been stricken with polio. It is needless to mention how much we have missed her in every way, nor the continual hope we have that she will take her place among us next year. It

we got down to some when those dreaded exams had rolled

seems that hardly had

real studying,


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None

Christmas party.

of us could ever forget the

beautiful Christmas tree, the running cedar, the holly, or the mistletoe, to say nothing of the de'

hghtful presents

for

all.

"White

Listening to

Christmas," which made us even more anxious to

was not the

get home,

least of this party's

many

assets.

now

about the most

important event of the post'Christmas season.

Right you are

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

^winter rushing.

After the usual

hub'bub, browbeating, and whispered prophecies,

we

proudly claimed

Ann

Townsend,

East, Joyce

Ruth

Harriet Steele, Marjorie Miller,

Ellett,

Ellen Mears, Margaret Watts,

Virginia Sledd, and Joan

To

for 1946.

September found us in the familiar mad scramble to clear our chapter

Then once its

room of its customary clutter. room was transformed into

again our

We

homelike appearance.

to

Hahn

Bobby as Pi

Mitchell,

Kap novices we celc'

top off this special event,

remember and cherish of

unparalleled vigor thoroughly enjoyed

The sudden

by us

on'rush of spring brought

teresting events,

all.

many

one of these being our

in'

trip to

both formal and

day afternoon

social,

and our lovely

in the chapter

something to look forward will ever be

remembered

with which

tree,

us

we had

to.

complete

if

in'

we failed to mention our glorious week' we had at Longwood in

end house party which

goes without saying that each one of us

It

had a perfect time, and those

song'fests

left for

the hohdays

May

year

we

was

With

quite suddenly reah2ied that the school

virtually at

and

paid tribute to our

two capable

and Miss Dabney, and to our

advisers,.

Miss Her

officers of

the year:

Virginia Shackleford, president; president;

we

Kay Lynch,

Connie OzUn, treasurer; and

vice'

Mary

Dr. Moss

gifts for all.

Each of

filled

Wheeler

with the

told.

We

spirit of Christ'

parties,

where we entertained our traditional

punch

cookies.

Winter rushing came with

its

din of suspense

and excitement and the ever'tO'beTemembered strains of

"Nancy With

Of

the Laughing Face."

were continuous happy chatter and

exclamations as

we welcomed

eight

new

pledges,

whom we are proud: Mary Ann Adams, Jean Cake, Gwen Cress, Betty Jane Brockway, Frances of

Farley,

an end.

our gratitude and unending thanks,

all

huge

especially for the

such a time.

and other guests with our

around the

and the renewing of old friendships with the Pi Kap alumnae who re' in

on Sun'

mas. Along the social lines also should be included

be forgotten.

With our banquet

teas

that gave us

Our Christmas party

the beautiful story which Miss

course, there fireplace will never

room

Of

meetings,

the thought which accompanied

felt intensely

dates

Kap would be

gay

its

bobbed for

a perfect Santa Claus and brought out from

who

think any report on Pi

We

week we had our Tuesday

course each

our intermission

attended.

exciting.

apples and played the usual Hallowe'en pranks.

Washington to see a new Pi Kap chapter installed. This was truly a thrilling experience for all of us

turned,

new and

festivity typical of the occasion.

made

with

plates of delicious food were,

O's have

this past year as

was our Hallowe'en party with

First of all

under the tree most amazing

The

girls.

Mu

The

being one of our best.

its

much

new

April.

then began on our

plans for our twenty 'first year with high hopes of

brated with a most successful party honoring these

We

C^^ C^O

C^si)

MU OMEGA

each week brought something

We'll give you three guesses

Jean

C>K9

C^KS)

around again. However, we all took time oflF from cramming and the scurry of packing to have a

Virginia

Hollifield,

Rebecca Williams.

They immediately became staunch

Mu

O's and

joined with us in a spirit that can never be equalled.

February found

Shuffle, Hilda,

a shopping spree to

the chapter room.

and Grace

Lynchburg to buy

off

on

fixings for

This turned out to be a very

Anne Loving, secretary. Amid spring quarter exams, packing our trunks, and tearful partings, we once again bade good'by to S. T. C, Pi Kap, and a host of "Golden Mem'

eventful experience with the purchase of a pretty

ories."

the theme of our twentyfirst birthday.

new

chair as a lasting result.

brought

all

April came, and

sorts of big things for us: spring rush-

ing and our spring banquet which centered around

We

wel'


C^^

C^fsi)

cr^vi)

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C^si)

corned back our dearly loved alumnae and enjoyed

our

toasts, decorations, and, of course,

quet food," which

our "ban'

we consumed between

laughter

can not

Omega

fail

to mention our pride in

Mu

awarded the scholarship plaque With beaming

for being

for the highest average of the year. faces

and high

inspiration,

Longwood was where we ties

CNKD

C>Kf)

December brought

senior dance

C>K9

and the

inter-

mission party in the chapter room. It brought also

our Christmas party with

all its

trimmings

—our

beautiful Christmas tree, presents with clever

and song.

We

C^*^

C>K5

we hung

With

of friendships.

memory.

it.

the setting for our spring picnic,

frolicked, ate, sang,

little

Miss Nichols' Christmas story, and, of course, the wonderful food all of which will ever loom high in our verses for the recipients attached.

and strengthened our

such a combination there

After lovely Christmases at home and thoughts of winter rushing right on us,

once again.

At

we

down we wel-

settled

the close of rush season

was no other outcome but the best of fun for us all. It was indeed a successful year, resulting from

comed with open arms

the earnest efforts of Miss Wheeler, our adviser

Bradley, Edith Duffy, Leddie Foster, Janie Fox,

and

Our

friend.

officers

were Grace Loyd, head;

Anderson,

Anne

Janie Hanks,

fifteen pledges:

Virginia

Barksdale, Jackie Bobbitt,

Nancy

Jessee,

Dot

Cathryn Mosteller,

Anil Shufflebarger, vice'head; Earlene Kimmerling,

Margaret Nevins, Margaret Pearson, Dorothy

secretary; Eleanor Bisese, treasurer; Jackie Parden,

Ramage, Virginia Tindall, and Jean Watts. Soon after their initiation our new members

They in their capable way held us tO' and made our year a better one. After we

chaplain.

gether

had

our exams, had covered the furniture

finished

and had stored many of our

entertained us with a lovely party in the chapter

The new

room.

We

girls

performed for the old

girls.

but with gay hopes as

had a dehghtful time. May came with its usual rush of May Day, PanHel dance, and our spring picnic at Longwood, and

house party at Virginia Beach in the middle of

finally

in the chapter room,

belongings,

we left in June with tears and farewells, we looked forward to our

ALPHA SIGMA TAU

Longwood

the wonderful times suit-

but with a cheery "hello" for everyone, the

S. T.'s arrived at Farmville in

picnic at

in honor of the seniors

brought reminiscences of the year behind us and

Drenched with rain and loaded down with

A.

exams.

Our

June.

cases,

all

September, happy

parties;

we had had

intermission

parties;

—coke

'n 'nab

Cab

meeting

&

Johnny; engagement rings for Carolyn, Lucy, and

Mary

Ellen; boxes of

candy from the proud pos-

wedding

Dot

indeed to see everybody and to get back into the

sessors of the "sparklers";

old famihar routine again. Despite the wonderful

White; the return of Pritch & Ebbie; our song at Pan-Hel; sun baths and bridge games; pajama par-

summer settled

vacations of fun, food, and

down

to

what proved

frolic,

we

soon

to be a most success-

We

were glad to welcome Nancy

Lit?,

an A.

T. sophomore transfer from Concord, West Vir-

ginia, into

our midst.

we had our annual Founder's Day With transportation facilities vastly imwe were happy that many alumnae who

In November,

banquet. proved,

and rushing.

We

thought of the interesting

programs with outstanding speakers, round-table

ful year.

S.

ties;

bells for

had not been able to come be with us again.

The

in previous years could

beautiful

candle light

and the presence of so members made this banquet one

and talks by our own Zeta Taus which saw a good had proved so enjoyable to us all. year behind us with Carolyn as president; Anna discussions,

We

Lee as vice-president; Lucie

Anna urer;

and Miss Bedford

With

as

as treas-

sad hearts and tear-brimmed eyes, the

seniors bid farewell to their sisters at the close of

They had many happy memories

service, the dehcious food,

school.

with them, however, for A.

never to be forgotten.

Dot

our faithful adviser.

many

aliminae and

as recording secretary;

as corresponding secretary;

in their hearts that

S.

T. had

to carry

filled

would never be empty.

a place


C^KD

C^>J>

OK9

C^^sD

C>K9

THETA SIGMA UPSILON With

the opening of school in September gay

their belongings stored

clear

through the summer

now

happy Even though we were happy, embracing those who did return, we felt there was somehow a vacantness, for some of our girls had married or had found good business positions or hand transferred to another school. Dot Haile and and to

talk over their

vacations,

only

pleasant memories.

Frances Partin chose matrimony; Virginia

Mae

Reba Conner liked the business world. Doris Young, Miriam Estes, and Mabel Waddell Packett and

had decided to try Madison, Radford, and Mary Washington respectively. Mary Clements also did not return! She waited until spring to say "I do." Fall rushing,

however,

filled

the gaps.

Then we

pledged Jane Anderson, Pauline Barnes, Cathleen

Cage, Craig Farrier, Libby Mountecastle,

Mary

and Irene Pomeroy. Christmas came none too soon. lovely tree adorned the chapter room. buffet supper really Ellen Petty,

A

A

You would have laughed with us you could have read those nonsensical verses at' tached to "priceless" gifts which we exchanged. When we dimmed the lights, however, and sang carols, our minds turned to more serious thoughts. Then came winter rushing, and we gained Gfene Harrison, Dorothy Hopper, Martha Ellen Jones, Ann Owen, Reba Sprinkle, Ann Walton, and Ann Ward. We were proud of our new pledges and also of our own Martha Frances Webb, who was among the cast of the spring Dramatic Club play. The high light of the year was our Founder's Day banquet in the tearoom in March. We were happy to have as our guests Dr. Jarman, Dean Smith, Miss Carter, and Mrs. McCoy. We changed the wording of the old song, and instead of saying, "Everything went wrong," we "hit the spot."

C^KD

C^4^

Woodward

Theta Sigs rushed to the chapter room to

away

C^^

C"f^

Our

did a fine job.

C^^

loyal adviser.

Miss

sue come

Jennings, diligently served us through another

In the limelight, too, should

cessful year.

Peggy Fink, from whose labors came those luscious Christmas, pledge, and intermission parties. This year we decided always to send Rotunda plates to our married sisters as a

them to think of us

still

way

of helping

here and to remember their

days among us.

We Taus, with the other Theta

Sigma Upsilon

Chapters, collected and sent books to a Spanish'

speaking community in southern Colorado which was badly in need of reading material. Also we started

working to

establish chapters of

Theta Sig

in other colleges near us.

May saw many of among the famihar faces in the chapter room at intermission. The spring picnic at Long' wood was more fun than we had dared to dream of The

our old

Pan'Hellenic dance in girls

and provided a superb ending for a superb year in of Theta Sigma Upsilon. But even with the closing of school, we were eagerly looking forward to big times for our adviser and some of us girls, when in August Theta Sig would hold its annual convention in Canada.

Tau Chapter

if

new phrase under the faithful guidance of our president, Lucy Bowling. Margaret Verell, as coined a

vice'president,

Martha

really

worked hard

and

long;

Webb

"respectfully

guarded our funds; Rosalie Bell submitted" the minutes; Marion

2ETA SIGMA

PHI

To Phi Zeta Sigma Our memories will

And

cling

years after college days,

Its praises we'll sing.

We

never forget our bull sessions in the chapter room, our coke and nab parties after rush' shall

and all the other occasions when Phi Zeta Sigmas got together for work or play. While thinking about pleasant memories, we shall not forget the lovely tea which Miss London ing,

gave for us at her home. of Phi Zetas as

we

afternoon in early

was waiting

We were a happy group

strolled

fall,

up

to her

home one

realizing the big feast that

for us.

Phi Zeta Sigma ushered in the Christmas season with a buffet supper in the chapter room the week prior to exams. Santa Claus visited the party leav'

ing under the tree, to each

girl,

a stocking full of

goodies.

During the

fall

quarter,

we

did not rush;

how

As Rush

ever, during the winter quarter eight attractive

Chairman of the Pan'Hellenic Council, Betty

freshmen pledged their allegiance to Phi Zeta

Lotts, our editor, kept us in the headlines.


C*K9

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They were: Laura Jean Comerford, Cor' Mary Davis, Elaine Holder, Mar'

Sigma. nelia

C^^

Davidson,

New

garet Hylton, Jean Kollmeyer, Constance

man, and Ethel Shockley. It was a long, hard, and strenuous week, but finally on Thursday night after the bids were signed, we hailed them as our very own. On February 16, eight of our alumnae returned had our to help us celebrate our birthday. formal banquet, with all the trimmings, on Satur' day night in the Tea Room. On Sunday afternoon, we had a tea in the chapter room, where we really

We

got to visit the returned members.

Next on our calendar Founder's Day.

of events

was

our college

In honor of our old

girls

who

came back we had a coke and nab chapter room after the play on Saturday night. Rachel Brugh faithfully led the chapter during spring quarter of last year and during part of the fall quarter. However, much to our regret, she had party in the

to resign from

all

college duties because of sickness.

Katherine Tindall was then elected president.

The

duties of the presidency she diligently per'

formed. Serving as vice'president was Virginia Treakle;

Ann Gray

Bell was recording secretary; Nell Scott was corresponding secretary. Keeping up with the money was Jane Mantiply. Mary Sue Spradlin and

C^si)

ence

Godwin kept our

Evelyn

Gri2;2;ard

scrapbook.

Our own

its

beginning in 1900 Chi has remained a

but

secret organization,

its

has remained unchanged.

purpose,

It

made

public,

has been our aim to

cooperate with the governing bodies of the school.

We have tried

to improve the student body's un'

derstanding of the high standards of conduct for

which Farmville is known. It has been our desire to maintain and promote the spirit and traditions have warned some, both pecuhar to Farmville. as groups and individuals, in hopes that they would heed these warnings and take interest in the wel'

We

fare of their college.

We know that many wondered who we were; where we met; when we met; how we painted warnings, sent notes, and hung our banners with' out being seen. It was because of this great secrecy and our meeting in improbable places that we were able to work quietly and effectively. We

realize that

our objective

is

we

receive criticism, but since

the welfare of the school as a whole,

necessary for us to

work through the individual

students; therefore, with the understanding of the

student body our purpose could be more fully real' i2;ed.

To

us

ganiziation;

It was with much regret that we learned of Miss WiUie London's resignation as a faculty member and adviser of our chapter. Miss London has been

C^KÂŁ)

CHI Since

served as president of the Pan'

Hellenic Association.

C^-S>

at the fireplace in true picnic style. Guests of honor for the week'end were the senior members. With exams just around the bend, we gave the chapter room a final cleaning, stored our junk, and locked the door on another happy year in the his' tory of Phi Zeta Sigma.

it is

Virginia Lee Price planned our parties, and Flor'

C^f^

C^fsi)

its

it is

members, Chi a

is

more than an

old as the school

spirit, as

based on close and lasting friendship. identity

was

revealed,

we

realizied that

or'

itself,

As

our

among the

with so many attractive dates back for the Pan'Hell

memories of Farmville and its many traditions and outstanding events, memories of Chi, with its secrets, bonfires, and lasting friendships would re' main with us. have been aided in our efforts by the co' operation of two members of the faculty, who have given generously of their time and efforts. These members have helped us function wisely and more efficiently. wish to express deep and sincere appreciation to Miss Olive T. Her and Mr. Ray

dance.

mond H.

to us a constant friend and companion.

She has

shared with us our hours of joy and hours of anxiety.

Sigmas' first

Miss London, first

lady, was,

who is,

in the hearts of all Phi

is

truly Phi Zeta

and ever

shall

remain

Zeta Sigmas.

We joined the other seven sororities on the campus in dancing to the music of the Vagabonds on May 18. We knew the war was really over Our

final

event in the spring was our never 'tO'

Longwood. We went out on Saturday afternoon of May 25 and had supper

be'forgotten week'end at

We

We

this

French. Those of us

year are the following:

who

will graduate

Eleanor Bisese, Betty

Brothers, Shirley Cruser, Frances Lee, Margaret

Orange, Dorothy Overcash, and Peggy T. Ross.


>'


Freddie

Left to right:

Front row,

Third row,

Butt

Parham, N. Parrish, M. Hewlett

left to right:

Second row,

Ann

left to right:

left to right:

Parham, N. Parrish, Duncan, Butt, Hewlett, Harrell, Edmunds, P.

J.

Watt, Butler, Parish,

Cook, A. East, Hanks, McMullen, Hannah, B. Scott, C. Young, D.

M. Gillum,

Fuller, R. Hill, B.

Woodward, Gumkowski, Bowling, 138

S.

Blair,

Dodson

Fifield,

Allen,

Wrenn, Harrison

Vaughan


Seated, left to right:

Standing,

left to right:

West, R.

Bell,

Miss Wall

Woodward, H. Abernathy,

S.

Davis

Front row,

left to right:

Second row,

Third row, left Pemberton

Front row, B.

left to right:

E. Scott, P.

Ames, A.

Boss, Drewer, C.

Ashby,

E.

left to right:

J.

to

right:

Marsh, A. Taylor, R. Thomas

L.

Anthony, Mr. French,

L.

B. Crowther,

M. Thomas

Sydnor, K. Dobyns, A. Hutt, L. Bouldin, C.

Taylor, D. Hubbard,

J.

Underbill, Ross, B. Ewell, H. Lewis,

Churn, C. Murphy

Second row,

left to right:

M.

Savage, N. Dickerson, Miles,

J.

Turner, GofEgon, Sterling, Tilghman, Hutchinson, R. Meats, L. Mears,

N. Taylor, Lewers 139


Front row,

left to right:

Second row, Third

Lynn, Overton, Mostellar, Price, Brisentine, Holman, I. Coleman E. Ayers, L. Foster, V. Watson, E. Mcore, R. Kelsey, M. Johnson, Altizer

left to right: left to

right:

Pairet,

W. Webb, W.

Allen

^Xii&

Front row, left to right: Quinones, Rieck, Cock, Pierce, Southall Second row, left to right: Steele, Cress, Lenier, Peake, Mathews, Simons Third row, left to right: Anderson, Brockway, Farley, Miller, Townsend, Mostellar, Comerfort Fourth row, left to right: Kolmeyer, Sheppard, V. Price, Goode, G. Moore, Maxey Fifth row, left to right: Nichols, Brown, Suthers, Hall, Dodson, Owen, Sours, B. Lee Sixth row, left to right; May, Sherberger, Moore, Langerie, Morgan, Percell, William, Rogers Seventh row, left to right: Brisentine, Goffigan, Christian, V. Watson, Newman, Rainey, Wolfe, Walton, Thorpe, Romirez, Whitmore, Smith, Hauser, Shufflebarger, C. Grizzard

140

F.

Treakle,

J.

Davis,


Overstreet, Orange,

Left to right:

Front row,

left to

Second row, Third row,

left

left

right:

to

E. Grizzard, B.

C. Norflect, G. Patterson, A. Stokes, Carper

right:

to right:

Woodward, Mclntyre, Kellum,

Overcash, Butt,

Orange,

Shiflett,

Bell,

Hawthorne, Maddox, Ross,

Summers 141

F.

Lee

Adams


Front row,

Richardson, L. Baker, Yonce, Ellett, Jenkins, G. Lewis, L. Rives

left to right:

Second row,

left to right;

S^S -

: ",-

\^-i-^'^-'-fly

Jfr^

i^ii

/f

"^r

-^^^tx 1

1

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Stevens, Slaughter, C. Smith,

left to right:

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i ivri II 1

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iirtPf'iwF

left to right:

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Front row,

^Ts

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f:

Young, Haskins, Squire, Overby

T'[ IpL''^I1

d^^T ML .J I. -^"^-^-mm i^P"! -^>- -

Scott, B. Lee, C.

^__-*1E^yi^. jfPW^i

¥ 1BP!R

Parham, C. Baker, Morris, B.

Jl M.

King, H.

Worsham

Minetree, Whitehead, Rieck, Montgomery, Lacy,

142

M.

Wells, Hauser, Bridgeforth


Front row,

left to right:

Second row,

left to right:

Page,

S.

Davis, Dudley, Clarke, Harvey, B. Burchett

Burchett,

M. Walker, M. White, Chambers,

Left to right:

Wailes, Brothers, A. Martin,

143

Fuller

S.

Hundley, Balance, Grumpier, Hewlett,

Pitts


Front row,

left to right:

Second row,

Front row,

left to right;

left to right:

Brooks, N. Parrish, A.

Hannah

Myers, Riddick, Bralley, K. East, Overstreet,

L.

Elliott

Holmes, McMuUen, Howard, Lawrence, Epperson, Soyars, Buford,

J.

Wilson, Ritchie

Second row,

left to right:

Upshur,

P. Brooks, Dale, Turley, Suttle,

N. Snead, Cabiness, J44

Owen

Bentley, Bowles, McCorkle,


Front row,

Miss Dabney, Hutt, Savage, Hahn, Duncan,

left to right:

Second row,

left to right:

Front row,

left to right:

Second row, Third row,

Lohr, Seward,

left to right: left to right:

J.

Hill,

D.

M.

East

May

Scroggins, Johnson

V. Shackelford, Miss Her, Mclntyre

Travis, Lynch, Peebles,

145

P.

Cook, Loving, Temple


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Ji

.

f..4 Left to right:

Wolfe, Peterson,

Ingle, Shufflebarger, F. Shackelford,

Prebble,

Hancock, Kimmerling, H.

Bennett,

Kucera,

Parish, Bland

Left to right:

Cruser, B,

Adams, Halstead, Harrison, 146

L.

Boone, Ames, R.

Hill,

Nixon, Ewell, Bisese, Parden, Loyd


Left to right:

Front row,

left to right:

Second row,

left to right:

D, Bennett, Rainey, D. White, Bibb, N.

Headlee, L. Jones, Ramsey, Kellum, Hoge, Nichols, Gelston, Wright, Paulette,

Litz, Bailey, P.

Moore, Hutter, Overton, M. Davis

Rowe

Ellis,

147

A. Carter, Edmunds, C. Bobbitt, McKenry


Front row,

Third row,

Hammock, Gunn,

left to right:

Second row,

left to rigfit;

Purcell,

left to right:

Front row,

Snead

N. Adams, Tolley

left to right:

Second row,

J.

West, A, Savage, Vaugfian, Claiborne, Pemberton, Crowder

left

to

J.

right:

Anderson,

Lotts,

H. Abernathy, Verelle, M. Watkins, Bowling, R.

Woodward, Webb,

Fink,

Wood,

148

B.

Boone

Bell, L.

Bell


Front row,

left to right:

Second row,

Front row,

left to right:

Second row,

left to

right:

left to right:

M. J.

Lewis, Pruitt, Brough,

Newman, Mankin,

V. Treakle, K. Tindall, Miss London, N.

A.

Bell,

Godwin, Blane, Spradlin,

McRea,

Bickle, L.

J.

Mantiply,

Shepard,

Scott, E. Grizzard

E. Pierce,

149

V. Price

F.

Treakle, L. Harrell, N, Hughes, C. Grizzard

M. Wyatt, DeBord


Chi

Left to right:

Bisese, Cruser, Brothers, Overcash,

Orange, Ross, F. Lee


xOecTeaUon us hours of real enjoyment and fun out of which has developed the spirit that

within the various sororities ideals

we

and standards which

is

Farmville's.

we have

we

Even

cultivated

uphold

daily,

and

have successfully practiced the art of working

and playing together.

These are an

we

exist

essentisJ part of college.

Saturday night movies and pop'

Catching a few hands of bridge between

corn? classes?

TE HAVE

found much to break the mo'

notony of the

and no play."

Many

dull routine of "all

activities afford

pleasure, teaching us at the

things not available in books.

work

us unlimited

same time the

httle

Through the never

ceasing battle between the red 'n whites and green 'n whites, along

tition,

our

with an undying love of compe'

class spirit

has grown.

ductions, sings, circuses,

and

Our

class

pre

May Days have given

can

without Sunday breakfasts in junior and

senior kitchens?

TX

How

Bull sessions at any time?

Selling sand'

wiches and drinking cokes?

Goat week and

rat

week? Chi with

Recreation

an

in'

tegral phase of

what hold

S.

life.

secrets?

Tradition and the

is

spirit are

T. C. together, enhanced by com'

radeship of the to have fun.

its

many

activities.

We

know how

We have found the true meaning of

a principle of education, the worthy use of leisure time.

tice.

We

have put that meaning into daily prac


C>K9

C^^v5

C^KD

C>*^i>

(>K!)

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION The

Athletic Association started the year with

A few

minutes of each sport and also some

modern dances were demonstrated

to the

new

and afterwards cokes and nabs were served to the initiation.

fall

and spring

cabin at Longwood.

fall

Ufe there became

especially rugged

it

A. A. banquet was held

physical education.

to go out.

shoes were it

possible this

summer

was

new

This gave them

ideas

and helped them in leading the A. A.

we were

once again ball squad.

The

as a whole,

but each

put

its

colors

by the

fact that

able to have a varsity basket'

spirit

did not stop with S. T. C.

class

was

in there fighting to

on the Color Cup. The round'robin

tournament of the

different sports really

brought

the girls out to cheer their colors on to victory. It

was here

that the girls

showed so much

and

spirit,

no matter whether there was the heartbreak of

were our ever

agers

and

Heidi

fastest

and

assistant,

Smith and

Margaret

assistant,

Alice

Ann

Abernathy; tennis

green and whites could hardly be held

Jane King; swimming, Virginia Yonce;

Ann

Summers; volley

ball,

the

first

Jeanne Bentley; archery. Dot White.

MONOGRAM CLUB With

the purpose of stimulating interest in

and recogniyng

since

started for

time in several years. This same day was

Song Day, when each

class

song to boost their colors. filled

down

with

girls

submitted an original

The auditorium was

seeming to burst their lungs with

golf,

Margaret Lohr and

PhyUis Fulcher; softbaU, Betty Minton

assistant,

The

hung on the majority of buildings

assistant tennis,

Mary

athletic abihty,

manship, and scholarship, the their banners

Peggy T. Ross

Ellett; basketball, Nellie

and ping pong, PhyUis Watts and

athletics

the bell rang to signal their start.

the following sports man'

their assistants: hockey,

The

runners in each class were ready for their

when

Miss Her,

Lacy and Sue Hundley, the

was composed of

Color Rush has always been a day for high

races

faithful adviser,

Frances Lee, president; Margaret

officers:

chairman, council

always predominated.

year they seemed even higher.

to bring out the Farmville

Kitty Sue Bridgeforth, treasurer. Besides the social

assistant,

this

of the

Orange, vice'president; Bettie Parrish, secretary;

and

but

and winter

among the "non'obtainables"

Always helping us Spirit

defeat or the glories of triumph, the Farmville spirit

spirits,

fall

the students through the association.

and our

Farmville spirit has really been wonderful especially boosted

closed both

swimming was done. Tennis

war, but this year they were made obtainable to

two weeks, where they took

a course in athletics.

was

honor

for

Frances Lee, Margaret Orange, and PhyUis Watts

The

in

It also

Since the pool

this year. It

and

fire.

quarters, very httle

to go to Georgia for

ofi^,

of our beloved Dr. Jarman.

two years of

The A. A. made

went

necessary to cook on an open

gave them an idea as to the sports for which they

wanted

the electricity

in the

they

required

is

This

when

the council found

In April the

to take because every able girl

to take

has almost become a tradition with the council

It

to spend a week'end every

girls,

This was especially helpful to the

C^f^i)

ning the contest.

finish

freshmen in deciding what physical eds.

wanted

C^si)

came out on top by win-

song, but the Junior class

a bang by introducing the freshmen to the associa' tion.

C^O

C^si)

C^^si)

its

work

early in the faU.

Margaret Orange, president; Louise president;

sportS'

Monogram Club The officers were Blaine, vice'

and PhyUis Watts, secretary 'treasurer.

We looked to Miss Her for advice and assistance. We were glad to have Kitty Sue Bridgeforth, Lu' ciUe Jones,

and "Pete" EUett

as

new members.


C^^

C^KS)

C^K5

C^fsf)

C^^s^

"Step right up and try your luck at the game of Bingo." Dressed in blue skirts and white sweaters,

we

stood in our circus booth and called out num'

and gave

bers

needed

Our

prizies

financial status

rush and the

final

We

to the winners.

those nickels

all

we

really

got that night, too.

was again

raised during color

hockey games.

Small red and

green hockey sticks were the result of hours spent

C^K9

C^f^

(>f^

Cr>K9

C^^si)

get our rackets restrung and ready for the spring

When March rolled around, we were happy to see faithful Isaiah out there busying around the courts. White lines began to appear, and finally white shorts and tee shirts. We went season.

to classes, played in the afternoons, and practiced

who would come

wondering

for doubles,

out on

top this time.

drawing and cutting. These were sold to the sup' porters of the

two

colors,

and they

ered their lapels. During the

game we

literally

cov

to the almost voiceless spectators. Being in charge

of the cabin at

Longwood was another

we

Many

undertook.

which

job

of the organizations found

place for week'end entertainment.

The A. A.

in'

and

we

vited us to be their guests one week-end surely did go for that outdoor

of the most popular sports in the

Every afternoon the courts were

of us tennis lovers,

some of

ing to compete in singles.

Mary

Jane,

Mary

whom

it

fall

was

the Color

with

were practic

When the girls and equipment and the arrows started

tions, it

got out on

flying in all direc

seemed almost a miracle that no one was

At

first

Beanie,

Beanie might defeat Lee, but five points

we

beginners looked with amaziement at

the advanced students, only hoping that some day

toward

Cup for red and white.

There were, of course, classes taught for those of us who wanted to learn more about this sport. Miss Her and Phyllis Watts taught the beginner's classes, and Phyllis taught the more advanced classes.

arrows. the

field

carry

hit. filled

Phyllis, Lee,

Lee was the victor marking up

in the vi'

A. A. house girls were bows, arm guards, and

carefully selecting their

Harrison, the Burchetts, and

if

interested in

manager.

we

We found the back stroke to be quite dif'

home almost

the arrows, which were extremely scarce.

Later

we

felt real

We

thrilled at hitting the inner circle.

excitement

when we

hit the bull's eye.

It

was not long before we had gained much from Miss Her's instruction. Techniques were learned, as well as the rules

As

and

finer points of the

game.

in other sports, the impetus of competition

We

helped our enjoyment.

each other, but with our

The way in which

all

began.

had sore arms and sore appeared

we had

many hours

with

tried not only

own previous

points rolled

grew was amazing.

ficult,

the winter season, but this afforded time for us to

beginner's

immediately. Those that

missed the target were thankful that they could find

score

and our form just wasn't good when we first But practice makes perfect, and we were very eager to improve our game of tennis. Phyllis Watts was also the manager of tennis this year, and Mary Jane King assisted her. Of course, the tennis courts were bare during

Some had

too could hit the target.

luck and hit

It really

looked as

we became

ing out the targets. In the

was a hard fight between the reds and whites and greens and whites. For a minute

sports

archery. Classes

of the

NeUie were among the most frequently seen keep' ing the balls flying over the nets. The time came for finals.

first

were given for be ginners, as well as for advanced students, under the direction of Miss Her. Dot White served as

was

cinity of the athletic field could see the girls

TENNIS

all

of the

in the

time talking about plans for the summer.

One

One

this year

Almost any afternoon one who was

life.

More new girls were added to the club spring. At our final meeting we spent most

tennis.

ARCHERY

sold "cokes"

attainments.

up and the

total

When we first began, we

fingers.

But when these

the feeHng of veterans.

of practice and

much

fvm,

we

dis'

After forgot

the class part and thoroughly enjoyed the sport.

Each of us to year.

herself

was a Robin Hood

of the


C^^

C>KD

C>K9

C^K9

C>fvi)

GOLF As

we

beginners

ment

somewhat awkward with

felt

golf clubs in our hands.

A. A.

field for

we supplemented the Longwood, and with

the course at

to stand, to drive, etc.

how to hold our clubs, After we had completed the

we

could hardly wait to get to

Miss Her's guidance learned beginner's course,

Longwood. Mr. Graham took

the golf course at

over and started us off on the

Summers

as

manager of

difficult

golf assisted him.

tinued with the fundamentals, and learn the

rounds.

we

more advanced techniques of

dreamed of making a hole

found that they were rather

was not any easy

one or a

in

Anne

He

con'

Since

golf.

We but

difficult to attain.

job getting those balls

ing in

up the

It

fall

program

its

quarter

we

C-^sD

cJso.

have been practicing, hav'

mind the tournament sponsored by the

Athletic Association.

Learning to dodge around

and to improve serves added much to our enjoyment. When the touma' edges,

to

ment was

place

balls,

held, Lucille Jones, having

games, was proclaimed "champ."

won

the most

This gave an

additional five points toward the color cup for red

and white.

But competition

began to

birdie,

CNK!)

C^^si)

lay idle. This year's corrective class included

ping pong in

Eager to learn the funda'

mentals of this popular sport,

OK9

C>M)

a

not the prime motive. Here

is

game which can be

filled with minutes of in' and excitement, a game which can afford relaxation, and a game which can help while away is

tensity

idle

hiUs,

moments.

and we watched Mr. Graham with envy, hoping that

some day we would be

wondered

at times

if

able to equal him.

we would

VOLLEYBALL

We

be able to msike

it

The winter

season started off with a bang as the

around the course, but those cold cokes which were

red 'n whites and green 'n whites poured into the

awaiting us in the club house were enough to make

gym

was a good thing, too, that from Longwood back to school be' us probably could never have made

us want to get back.

we had

a ride

cause some of the grade.

It

Bad weather was

which we

we anxiously waited for when we could again make that and

golfers hated to see,

the sun to shine

a thing

journey to Longwood.

to begin practices.

Miss Her, our instructor,

was ready to show us how kept an account of

As

the season

to serve

and

to keep the

Margaret Lohr, the manager,

volleyball in the air.

our practices.

all

drew to a

against the greens. Plans

played

close, the reds

were made for the round'

robin tournament, and captains were elected.

Serv

ing as captain for the seniors, juniors, sophs, and

freshmen respectively were the following: Lucille

PING PONG

Jones,

Dot Owen, Betty Minton, and PhyUis The time for the stiff competition was the air was tense. Practices were ever more

Fulcher.

"Get

a ball,

and

play ping pong," were

let's

near;

words to nearly every college student Farmville, whether by ability she be classified familiar

expert or beginner. veniently located

The

all

at

meaningful as a player on a team had to have at as

ping pong tables, so con'

over the campus, could be

This year, because of the rising in the

main

rec,

ure to us and our dates.

on week days the

where

On

class.

interest, a table

it

afforded pleas'

week'ends as well as

familiar clicking

sound could be

heard.

tied the

The second battle saw the

the freshmen and the juniors

The men

last struggle

ing the juniors.

triumphant, but for

was

tie

seniors defeat

the sophomores.

a tense one with the fresh'

tying the sophomores and the seniors defeat'

This being a year 'round sport, a sport that could

few hours that the ping pong equip'

also.

seniors

sophomores and the juniors defeated the

freshmen.

be thoroughly enjoyed despite climate or weather, there were

could play for her

There was the "C" average to consider

The first battle proved successful in that the

found almost always in use.

was placed

least eight practices before she

all.

As it

a

resxilt,

red'and'white was

was a grand and

glorious season


C^^O

C>K9

C^fvJ)

C>KÂŁ>

C^f^

H2O CLUB The purpose of the H2O Club is to promote more interest in swimming. This year the pool was not open as much as it has been in the past, but it was always filled whenever we had a chance to go swimming. We especially loved to splash around in the pools on those lonesome Saturday nights when there was nothing else to do. With the strains of sweet music from the port' able radio

and with cokes lying around, one could

almost imagine S.

was the beach

it

C^^

Whenever we went in swimming, there was al' ways an H2O Club member there to take care of us. The pool was open several nights a week for recreational swimming, which afforded us the op' portunity to break the monotony of studying by taking a quick dip into the cool water.

who had

passed the senior

life

Students

saving course

assist'

ed Miss Dabney on these nights.

Our

pool

is

considered one of the best and most

up'tO'date pools in the state,

and swimming

is

one

of our foremost popular recreational activities.

instead of the

T. C. swimming pool. The H2O Club was headed by PhyUis Watts

by Milhe Shepherd, the secre' Dabney was our adviser and

this year, assisted

C^^ C4^ C^S

C^KD

BASKETBALL The

basketball season this year

once

was

we had

high'lighted

a varsity team.

tarytreasurer. Miss

by the

was always there to help us. We were particularly proud of the fact that this year Farmville was hostess for the inter'collegiate swimming meet. Many other colleges from our section of the country were competing in this meet.

Several days in late

Those who passed through the gym on any afternoon from 5'6 would see us hard at work in practice. With the leadership of Miss Dabney, our coach, the team was gradually molded

We

into shape.

and

also sold bathing caps

suits.

These

suits

aren't exactly the most glamorous bathing suits in

the world, but they serve the purpose. During the year,

ming

we

fact that

agciin

fall

were given over to try outs

for the varsity.

Our first game was the first of February with left in the Lynchburg College on their court.

We

gave demonstrations of different swim'

strokes

and

These demonstrations

dives.

proved that swimming

is

one of the outstanding

sports in the athletic program.

The new members were and

we

shall

initiated in the spring,

never forget the fun

we had

at the

party afterward.

SWIMMING Swimming has always been an important activity

on our campus,

are required to pass a

can graduate. This

athletic

especially since all students

swimming

test

is

test before

they

generally given during

middle of the morning in taxi cabs and came back victorious that night.

The

next game was in the

Those who can not swim soon

middle of February with William and Mary. This

forget their fear of the water after a class under

was the only game played on our home court, and once again Farmville won. After the game, the A. A. entertained the visiting team with a tea, and

the freshman year.

Miss Dabney. Jumping and dog paddles soon

be'

came actual diving and crawls. The beginners swimming classes were not the only classes taught this year. There were many classes taught for

advanced swimming students,

eluding classes in junior and senior

life

saving.

in'

The first of March found us journeying to Bridgewater, and the next night we played Madison there. This was they spent the night in the college.

really a

game worth

seeing as the teaims seemed


C^O C^^

C>fsi)

evenly matched, but the

C^sÂŁ)

C>*s5

found

final whistle

C^^si)

T.

S.

round'robin tournament.

The seniors were

C^KD

C^si)

C^4>S>

game from beginning

The

score O'O.

to

end with the

and white were triumphant over the teams of green and white, marking up ten points for the color cup.

A great deal of spirit was shown at the basket' ball

exciting

fast,

C. one point behind.

C>*si)

the

fighting teams of red

only undefeated team, but the green and whites

won

The

the points for the Color Cup.

ORCHESIS

captains

of the teams were as follows: senior, LiUian Elliott; Christine

junior,

sophomore,

Shiflet;

To

Josephine

those of us in the Club, Orchesis has played

a large part in college

Goodwyn; freshman, Helen Loundree.

as

life.

have gone through the

HOCKEY

With Miss

Kauzlarich

our sponsor and Betty EUis as president, activities of the

we

year in a

very successful way.

Christmas time found us planning our Sing,

As the Indian summer days faded away and the crisp Autumn days rolled around, we made a dash for the hockey sticks. Dressed in our own class colors of^green and red we ran anxiously to the field. One could plainly see enthusiasm and excite'

we came

ment written on every

to interpret

"Ground

down

dribbling, goal,

Sticks"

the field

which was very timely and rather

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;The game

and driving the

ball

line,

After

many hours

girls

toward the opposite

Our

room

dale.

They guided us through

Ann

exciting

fol'

its

meaning and the way

to the Club,

girls as their leaders.

formal banquet was held in the tea

in February. It as

a round'robin.

this year, as it

The most

was

Barks'

Some

and hard'

exciting

last year,

was

a gala occasion with Dr.

our guest of honor.

we

The banquet was

decided

it

should be an

of the outstanding numbers done in Sing

were repeated in our winter

was

Recital.

The

These games were scheduled for lucky and

had a hoHday, we played them a week later. Fresh' men, sophs, juniors, and seniors all came out to

girls.

We

May

Day, which included an Indian

Ceremonial and two epochs of pioneering:

freshmen,

the forest and

a fighting game, but smilingly donned their

The

Our

once again.

seniors

won

play,

over both the freshmen and

sophomores, but found

through the defensive

it

more

difficult to

line of the juniors. It

year

last,

trip to

Randolph'Macon to

performed on the campus, s activities.

first,

of

of the plain.

When

this

was

see the

Greek

wound up our over, so

was a

wonderful year for Orchesis, one that will long be

break

was

DaU

as

completed our year of dancing by par'

ticipating in

own team on to final victory. The who were defeated by the sophomores,

serious

cheer their

rat caps

other

"Worship" and "Want." Recital was a big night for all of us, and the fact that it was dedicated to Dr. Jarman made it even more important. We felt a httle empty when we reahzed that it was all over. Again in spring queirter Orchesis took in new

games of the

we were

more

study, to the

and the one between the freshmen and the

Thanksgiving Day; but since

new

and they eagerly

annual event.

season were the ones between seniors and the

lost

gave to

it

dances ranged from the hghter type as the

The tourney

sophomores.

and

in dance.

such a success that

fought games.

juniors

first

Jarman

lows: senior, Lucille Jones; junior, NeUie Smith;

sophomore, Jerry Colgin; freshman,

it

were issued bids

Our

line.

captains were as

to understand

began work with the old

of practice the captains for

each team were elected.

Choral

serious.

time,

After Christmas vacation was over, twelve

passing,

sometimes scoring, but more often being

blocked by the strong defensive

first

strength of feehng. In thus working out the theme,

Dashing

began.

for the

one of our dances, "Worship," more power and

face.

went the forward

was used

reading

remembered by

a 157

its

members and the student body.


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PEGASUS "All's well that ends well"

that this year without

fail.

It

.

.

.

Pegasus proved

looked like a horse'

less year back there in September when we had no horses, no stables, no instructor. But with Jeanne

Sauerwein forever after the prospective buyers,

and the Jeanne,

who wanted

girls

we

to ride forever after

came through with a

finally

stable full

we term as horses, and plugs we loved 'em! With Mr. Cralle and Mr. Wells in charge,

of those beloved plugs

or no,

many improvements were made and though

in the tackroom,

quarter to get

and

at the stables it

took

spring

till

done, the gals themselves finally

it

appliqued those red horsie'heads on the

white

little

and hung them in the windows of the newly painted clubhouse. Trail rides and ring' work went on as usual with Jeanne as instructor, curtains,

to a peak in time for the annual horse

May. Among ened

this

the

many

popularities

show

which

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were all integral parts of our Everyone shed a tear or two Cinderella's

plight,

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delightful at

play.

hard'working

but only seconds later

all

were rocking with laughter at the jests of the courtiers. Every aspect of the play was excellently done.

Throughout the year the acting group, with Betty Minetree as

its efficient

head, presented one'

enjoyment of Dramatic Club

act plays for the

members. However, the night Miss Wheeler read

"The White

Cliffs" will

always be remembered as

the outstanding program. It

was moonlight upon the swelling ocean, and "Outward Bound" the audience

at the spring play

found themselves aboard a

ship.

The

play

tells

the

who

story of the group of very queer passengers

in

height'

year came the numberless before'break'

which though popular indeed with the were no favorites with the horses or the professors of those 8:05 classes to which the breathless riders rushed, still breeched and booted! Also with the spring weather and the long trail fast rides

girls

themselves,

rides over roads scented

with the perfume of

soming apple and peach Booters and

new

trees,

officers for

blos'

came new Dusty

New,

the Riding Club.

were the ribbon'winners in the horscshow and new the thrills which were a part of every ride for the S. T. C. jocks. But 'twas the same old story of "Hit the Trail," and the same old cry of "Tally too,

ho!", and the

same old tune of "Sing your

Home," which made "all's

Way

it

a perfect year after

all.

If

well that ends well" here's to another bad

beginning such as resulted in such a wonderful end as the spring of '46!

apparently have no idea where they are going. Shortly afterward the even more amazing fact that

they are

Under

the skillful direction of Miss Wheeler,

Cinderella."

The

Cinderella's

dream

"A

came

Kiss for

antics of the refugee children, ball

with the prince of fairy

fame ever present, and the miniature

made known

is

to them.

With

This was certainly a red

year, for the spring play

was the

first

letter

joint

pre

duction presented by the Dramatic Club and the

Hampdeu'Sydney Jongleurs

since 1942,

one had been eagerly awaiting

and every

this collaboration

some time. Although members of the Dramatic Club do

for

definite purposes to accomplish during the

year with regard to the phases of play production,

plus the aid of a well chosen cast, Cinderella to life once again in the fall play

dead

pletely enthralled.

have

THE DRAMATIC CLUB

all

such a mystifying theme the audience seemed com'

tale

glass slipper

we

enjoy the social side as well.

approaching

we

With Christmas

gathered in the Student Lounge

It was then Miss Wheeler held us spellbound with her beautiful in'

for our long'awaited party.

"How Come

Christmas."

close another of

our biggest

terpretation of the story

Spring saw at

its


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we resumed sponsoring Tournament. At this time six

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the Southside Play

high schools in this area of Virginia presented plays

which were judged by outstanding authorities on silver loving cup was presented to dramatics.

A

the

two winners.

we The

graduation looming around the comer,

With

entertained the

new members

Dramatic Club

is

at a final tea.

a well organizied unit.

vided into six departments:

the

It is di'

group,

acting

headed by Betty Minetree; staging, headed by Beanie Dudley and Betty Bibb; Ughting, headed by

Nancy

Doris Rose Ramesay; makeup, headed" by property, headed

Pitts;

by Louise Harrell; and

Ann

costuming, headed by

With

Shufflebarger.

the Dramatic Club resting in the hands of Carlotta Norfleet, our

most

efficient president,

no one ex' Other

pected other than a most successful year. officers

were Dotty Overcash,

first

vice'president;

Betty Bibb, second vice'president; Virginia Shackel' ford, secretary; Kitty

Anne Summers,

Maddox,

social

business manager;

chairman; Hilda Bennett,

CHOIR college choir of '45''46 enlarged

The

thanks to Miss Wheeler, our adviser, ried us over

many

owe our

who

has car'

was a

concert here

On

Every

Monday and Thursday

Room

success.

presented

nights

as

one

21, voices of the choral club

brought a smile on the President's face and tears

from the

We

visitors.

to Charlottesville to give a concert

went

at the University of Virginia

many

concerts each year in the

we were very

Camp Pickett as soloist at the Presbyterian Church. For our Christmas concert we had as our soloist we

and came back with

glowing reports of good times.

And May Day was

greatly enriched

and choral club

large chorus of choir

girls

re'

presented a sing school in the old days out West.

Under the

direction of

Ozlin, president,

we had

Mr.

Strick

and Connie

a most successful and en'

joyable year.

JUNIOR The melodious

A CAPPELLA

voices of the fifteen members,

under the direction of Margie Hewlett, make me' Cappella. Our debut was morable our Junior in

Richmond during the

and

inspiring

hymn

fall

Nell

quarter.

we

sang the beautiful

"Alleluia."

This was one of

the most noteworthy occasions of the year, and

Troxill.

Before leaving for the holi-

gave a concert at

Camp

Pickett.

was

so important to us.

Another

represented hours of practice and fun

we

activity that

was the pre

which we sang, "Schu' berts Serenade," "Dancing In The Dark," and "Embraceable You."

gram given

We,

in

Chapel

at

with the other musical organizations of the

school, helped

by contributing our musical

This year a new group was formed, called the

at the

Christmas concert and Founders

"Melody Makers," made up of twelve outstanding girls from the Choral Club. Under the direction of Mr. Strick, who was assisted by Mary Ellen

gram.

The

Hoge, president of the club, the choral club has accomplished much and has brought pleasure to

many.

by the

who

can never forget that week'end in Richmond which

fortunate to have Corporal Richard Murdock from

days,

sang in tribute to the " On Hopin'

alumnae and to Dr. Jarman. "Keep

Scott accompanied us while

churches, here in town, but this year

Miss Barbara

we

Founder's Day,

made

could be heard.

We

WRVAâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the high'

The annual Christmas

hght of the choir year.

A

a crisis.

CHORAL CLUB walked by

of

all

a thirtyminute broadcast over

chairman; Betty Cocke, publicity chairman; and

We

group

its

them taking part in the concerts at churches in town and in chapel programs. In December, we went down to Rich' mond for two concerts in large churches there and

to seventy members, with

scrapbook chairman; Earlene Kimmerling, music Caroline Painter, poster chairman.

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activities of the year, for

appreciation of the alumjiae

talent

Day

pro-

made us

even more proud to be a part of the College Choir.

The trips, new experiences, and enjoyment which we gained this year from the organization will re' main in our hearts and

among our

will long

college memories.

be cherished


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SENIOR The

Senior

is composed and represents the highest qual'

of the best

In past years the contribution of

of music.

ities

A Cappella to the town, to the college, and we hope that Twice a week we

to the state has been noteworthy, and

we

have a splendid record.

humming when ville

in

Giles Presbyterian

Strick's

The

the melodious strains of the songs.

were not completely

filled

best literature in music

The

was

high'light of the year

studied.

was our

shaky at

little

selves to the

first,

we

"mike" and sang

Besides singing with the choir at St.

Al'

we

as

vard Methodist Church. In the spring

Dressed in the robes of fifteenth century

Richmond

friars,

in the

fall.

We

not only sang in two of the churches, but also sang

We

entertained the soldiers at

by singing

in the

appearing in a special program.

wards

We

as well as

to lighter tunes with the ever'popular favorite,

Under

The

Day Program, and

student body especially enjoyed "Sym'

phony," which

we

sang on several occasions.

This year the Madrigals have been most

efi^ect'

by Esther Shevick, the director. The members were Martha E. Jones, Elaine Holder, Jean Watts, Norma Howard, Mary Frances Hundley, Julia Messick, Nancy Blair, Carolyn ively led

Bobbitt,

Lucy McKenry, Dot Cummings, and Vir'

ginia Yonce.

Connie Ozjin served

to

our most outstanding years.

MAY DAY COMMITTEE spring quarter began, the plans

elected for

what we hoped would be one

most successful

May

as accompanist.

We

Days.

of our

began working

and soon had over one'third of the students par' ticipating in

"The Westward Movement."

Roses go to Miss Emily Kaudarich,

who

directed

our committee. Frances Lee and Betty EUis cap' ably served as co'chairmen of the committee. Shar' ing the responsibilities were ness manager, Doris

sang on different occasions in the churches of Farm' viUe.

Cummings we make this one of

the leadership of Dorothy

worked and played together

helped with

the Orchesis Christmas Sing and Orchesis Recital, participated in the Founder's

sang in

were almost complete and the committee was

we gathered around the table to begin practicing for the numerous things in which we would partici' pate during the year. The high'light of this year's

Pickett

we

Our audience seemed to love our singing "Ave Maria" and "The Rosary." Then we turned

Long before

MADRIGAL GROUP

Camp

we

chapel in one of a series of programs sponsored by

spring quarter.

over the radio.

WRVA,

"Stardust."

have never

Other outstanding features of the year for us were our contributions to the spring concert and the trips to Charlottesville and Richmond during

trip to

Church and over

completed the week'end by singing at the Boulc'

soon adjusted our'

sung before.

work was our

Farm'

the choir. trip to Rich'

WRVA.

mond, where we broadcast over though a

rehearsals

with singing, for the

at the

performance

first

we received that needed encouragement for further work. The first of December saw us dashing to Richmond, where we spent one of our gayest week' ends ever.

Mr.

November we sang

Baptist Church. After this

home. All of our worries about the concerts were momentarily dissolved in in

C>K!>

INTERMEDIATE A We in Intermediate A Cappella started the year

stepped across the lawn to practice in an informal

way

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CAPPELLA

A CAPPELLA

A Cappella

Senior

voices of the Choir

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May

Lucy

and

as co'chairmen of costuming,

Bralley as busi'

Ann

Shufflebarger

Pat Carter as staging

chairman, Connie Ozilin in charge of the music,

and Kitty Parham

We

in charge of transportation.

began our work with

tion of the queen

ant thing to do was to obtain

ous dances.

assisting in the elec

and her court. The next import' girls for

There were Indians,

the numer'

scouts,

home

steaders, surveyors, dandies, chorus girls, a bride,

and numerous other people.

Then

the

work

really began!

practices every day.

There were dance

Girls busily

sewed costumes.


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Music was composed and practiced. Everything from a covered wagon to a mule was sought. Though we were stumped at times, when May finally came, we were more than rewarded for all most

efforts as Barmville presented another

our

spectacular

May

Day.

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MAY DAY This year's caught the

men

May Day

had a Western theme. the

spirit of the attraction of

West

It

for

of adventurous natures as well as the spirit

of loneliness which prevailed

Along with

among

the

women.

these sensations, however, onlookers

could detect a note of optimism, also characteristic

COTILLION CLUB

of these

Western

settlers.

Hopes were high and prospects numerous for CotiUion members. The large number of return' ing boys made the thoughts of dances something like a dream, after the last few years when dates were so noticeably lacking. We got started quick' ly on our plans for a successful year in which we hoped to make Cotillion an integral part of the social life at Farmville.

Fall quarter brought us nineteen upper'classmen

new members. Under the direction of Glenn Patterson and Carmen Low, the new girls transformed the gym into a scene of football festiv' The ity on the night of October twenty 'seventh. as

Ann

music

committee,

headed by Peggy T.

brought us the music of Jimmy

St. Clair,

The whole May Day was

divided into four sec

Ross,

tions, depicting four different phases of hfe in this

and we

open, monotonous country of earth, sky, grass, and

The

was

considered the evening a gala opening of the sea'

wind.

son's dances.

The

was done by the members of Orchesis, who brought in a red

indi'

medicine pole strung with traditional symbols of

In January

we

took in eighty freshmen.

proud show of ribbons during the next week cated that they were as pleased as we.

Nu

held

its

annual ceremony present'

ing identification bracelets to

Two

its

Senior members.

days later the school was subjected to a

thorough spring cleaning by the goats,

who

really

outdid themselves to please the mighty court head'

ed by Jane Philhower. After the

we

all

sighed in relief and

the hard'working

girls as

last

goat court,

welcomed into the club

Our ofiicers this year were Ann Summers, presi' Nancy Pitts, figure leader; Katherine Prebble,

dent;

ager.

Mr. Coyner was our

adviser.

entitled "Trail Break'

pow'wow

drums. After this a general and colorful took place between

Indian scouts,

trail breakers,

and trappers.

A group ond

called homesteaders

section.

spirit

of lonehness

when

Orchesis had shown us in

The

we

seventeen

vision of the dance entitled

year.

composed the sec

Here, especially, did

catch that

girls

did a

its recital earlier

staking of claims

re

"Lean Years," which in the

was

also

an interesting

the

title

given to the

part of this section.

"Westward Trek" was third division of

our eyes when

May

we saw

Day.

A startling sight met

in the distance a long cara'

van, composed of a covered wagon, wheel barrows,

true members.

secretarytreasurer; Peggy T. Ross, business

section

first

fascinating tribal Indian dance

Indian lore, and danced to the accompaniment of

The date for Spring CotiUion having been set for March thirtieth, Jane Philhower directed the goats into making the gym a suitable background for our spring spirits. The green and yellow crepe paper was perfect for our flowers and new dresses. Nancy Pitts led the traditional figure in her charm' ing manner.

A

ers."

man'

horseback riders, and the various groups of West' emers, wind

its

way from

the cabin over across the

and up to the road behind us. Our hearts thrilled to the sound of one hundred beautiful

hill


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voices of

members of the choir blended

From

moved slowly on

way, and the surveyors in the

its

days,

and waved

—Gracious

was

to the pioneers.

We

Because of her amiable

friendliness.

seemingly never

spirits

ingly complied with her gentle requests for quiet.

The

and the "shady lady."

spirits,

disturbance, everyone will'

by the shghtest

ruffled

loved the bartender, card players,

dandies, chorus girls,

manner, cheerful in

in

that trait so characteristic of S. T. C.

called in those

A "Boom Town"

scene next pictured to us the gaudy side of Hfe in

the west.

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with a gay retort to meet the demands of every occasion, Freddie Ann is the ideal embodiment of

Pike," while the caravan

site," as it

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Butt

in the sing'

ing of "Sweet Betsy

grove "platted the

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under her superb leadership the House