Page 1

1000205004

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inian


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1839


Digitized by the Internet Archive in

2010 with funding from

Lyrasis IVIembers

and Sloan Foundation

http://www.archive.org/details/virginian1945stat


.-•

-i


Virginian

DABNEY LANCASTER LIBRARY LONGWOOD COLLEGE iABMVflLE,VMGlNIA 239Q1


C05aLfei.i.

*4S


EDITION FORTY-THREE

IS 1-5


TO THE

LLC

JPl^L. of yourselyes,Ho

admiration. is

The

O you who have given this college a part

you who

are truly "Farmville," goes great

with your laughter, and there

halls are filled

not a plape on the campus that does not echo and re-echo your

class songs.

Here for a

brief

moment you can

forget, live as a

child again, only to he suddenly snatched hac}{ to reality

words of a the seas.

professor, the

They

you have met

said

it,

morning

you would prepare for

tly,

life

from across

in college, hut

blending the freshness of childhood with the

responsibilities of maturity. girl

headlines, a letter

by the

It has

not been easy to remain a

while the rest of the world grows old with war. Confident

you have, with a grace

qualities so desirable in

that

shows promise of those

American womanhood.

But you are more than Farmville; you are tomorrow, with you and

girls li\e

you

rest the

your small domain you have \ept

for

hopes of the future. In

alive that type of life to

which

war'weary young men some day wish to return. J^o time could be more appropriate than the present for paying tribute to you, the Farmville

girl.

1000205004

GIRL


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OLLEGE

days are recalled best

through the memory of friends.

To

each of us

these friends are different, hut to all of us there

one

whom we

have in common.

Somehow

this

is

one

has caught the spirit of Farmville and exemplified it

in his every action.

T^ever too husy

when we need

him, always

there greeting us with that same cheery smile, he will he

rememhered long for

thoughtfulness.

we

consider

his generosity

and

Because of these qualities which

first

in a friend, the staff wishes to

dedicate the 1945 Virginian to our

own

"Charlie

Hop," Mr. Raymond Holliday French.


The

Library Clock

Rotunda Entrance


C'OtR.iE:|*i»

^

Student Building

LONGWOOD


Senior Building Entrance


College Life

CONTENTS Book

I

Book

II

The People

—A

Week

at Farmville


Book

I

THE PEOPLE: To whom

"W.ITHOUT less series of buildings.

The

spirit" arises.

It is

all

'^the

things are possible

people

with them that a purpose

'

Farmville would he a meaning-

rests; it is

from them that

people are not only the students, but also the faculty, the administra-

ed by goals achieved.

Through them Hanging

ditions pass, the Christmas

Greens,

rush,

color

class

tra-

of the

productions,

At

Farmville the people belong to one

and

believe in themselves

that behef

.

They

No

and moral power to

can be complete without these fundament-

do much to influence the personaHty of the

worthiness of experience

school.

The

basis of each

is

strength or lack of strength determines the quality of the person. is

Education's greatest

the building of character

rise to a

which

gives

Farmville's people, 1945, have character,

the mental stamina to face the problems of that world of

which they

are a part.

by quantity but

The memory long as

its

is

not measured

quality.

of the year 1945 will live as

people

live, for

ing; only within them

they give

is it

They

it

mean-

preserved.

will never again exist as the

well-rounded individual.

The

sought by people of every time.

als

Its

no individual

school,

another, and their individual personaHties

character.

find courage in

place emphasis on endur-

ance, physical vitality,

determine right.

Founders Day.

aim

efforts appreciat'

Their contributions are measured in the success of the school; their

tion.

'^the

We

same group,

but wherever two of us shall chance to meet,

this

memories.

year will be relived through


OUR PRESIDENT

prrjblems, she has endeavored to schfjol life

c

,OMPLETING

forty

his

second year as president of our college, Dr.

Jarman

L.

J.

of "his

hf)lds the respect

No celebration

girls.''

without the familiar song, matter with Jarman? He's

were always pleased by

and love

Active in

who

all

published and used by the University of

our school traditions,

it

was

capping and

the conclusion of the

Alpha

service gave

college

and

life

—

the degree.

in daily activities

as important.

were equally

Chapel exercises would never

have been complete without

ing

numerous

certificates in

French, she

is

Nebraska. Before crjming to Farmville she

presented to each graduate that last link

His part

at

We

right."

them a rcassuring sense of pride. In cap and gown, Dr. Jarman directed graduation exercises and between

and Measurements

smile of ap-

all

his

placed the tasseled cap on each senior's

girls at

cational Psychology

Edu'

drxrtf^rate in

the author of a Beginners French course

presided at senior

Kappa Gamma

Eng'

also Assfjciate Professrjr of

is

having received her

the University of Nebraska in 1935. Hold'

head. His friendly handclasp for the newly

tapped

make our Dean

as well as profitable.

was complete "What's the

proval and gentlemanly nod.

he

Smith lish,

happy

his assistance.

was

a

member

of Psi Chi, a national honrjr-

ary Psychological fraternity, and several

National

Women

Associations

for

University

and Professors; she has recently

become a member of Kappa Delta Pi, a Na' honor society in Education. Her

tional

name appears in Who's Who in American Education, Who's Who Among Women, Woman's Who's Who. Her first interest is the well'being of the Farmville girl. Dean Smith's record thus far includes many improvements for each student.

Certain passages from the Bible that he often read will inspire us long after left this college.

and

"Thus abideth

we have

faith,

hope,

charity, these three, but the greatest of

these

charity" and "Be not overcome of

is

but overcome

evil,

evil

with good," two

favorite verses, adequately

summarize

his

philosophy, one of purposeful giving. Pleasant memories of his beautiful gar' den, love of red roses and choice cigars help

Throughout the

to present his personahty. years. Dr.

Jarman has always required and,

almost without exception, obtained the best that

in this student

is

body

to give.

EDUCATION AND PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT

^i

TTH Dr. John P. W>Tine

as the director of the Philosophy

and Edu'

cation Department, ample opportunit>'

THE DEAN OF

WOMEN

oA.-LTHOUGH at

our

college,

of

year.

Always

she

is

aspects of this

new

Dr. Martha Smith Smith,

Women,

Dean

provided to become well versed in

has served an excellent

willing to help us with our

field.

all

Assisting him are

is

the

^.liss

PauHne Camper, Miss Alice Carter, Mr. Boyd Coyner, Miss Sybil Henr>', Mr. Samuel Holton, Dr. Edgar Johnson, and Dr. Floyd Swertfeger. The courses of the Department of Education and Philosophy are


grouped under Philosophy,

four

Education,

heads:

Psychology,

the understanding of the obligations that go

Teaching.

with the privileges of democracy. ReaHzing

The Education of the

historical

principles

courses involve a study

the importance of history in

background of current

James E. Walmsley, head,

and practices

in the schools,

including

profession,

and observation schools.

professional

the

in

A special course

education,

learn to

in

college

is

ethics;

Peck, and Miss Florence Stubbs, of'

fered

numerous courses of timely

course in American history

philosophy are concerned

America

subjects,

rent History,

To

Dr. Walmsley.

thought, the history of philosophy from

ested in Southern history

emphasis on

Special courses

modern

A

of

theories of education.

outlook

psychological

with courses

in principles

ployed in this

ogy

evolution

field,

ish is

promoted

well as the professions, and

general Southern history.

on Latin America, the

Brit'

Empire, and the Far East were given as

ability to

A

do research work was offered one

quarter by the head of the department.

as

modern psycho-

Economics and government come under

logical theories.

in

were offered Civil

seminar class for those showing evidence of

application of psychol'

and industry

direction of

electives, especially to history majors.

and methods em'

to problems in business

required.

and Cur'

and Advanced Virginia

history,

historical

was

War

those especially inter'

War and Reconstruction,

and

the philosophy of education with special the

at

came under the

primarily with the types of philosophic

times,

civi'

for the sophomores, the survey

li2;ation;

Two

modern

interest.

preparation in the History of Western

offered in audio'

which the students

the age of the Greeks to

by Dr.

For the freshmen was required a survey

manipulate moving picture in

time. Dr.

Mary

training

machines. Classes

war

assisted

Gordon Moss, Dr. Frances Simkins, Miss

both

elementary and secondary; teaching as a

visual

Constant emphasis was placed on

world.

and Directed

the

title

of Social Science.

American gov

Teaching under competent supervision

ernment, state government, and compara'

one of the training schools provides valu'

tive

able experience for the future student

mem-

governments were especially empha-

Also included were courses

sized.

ology under Miss Stubbs.

bers of the teaching profession.

in soci'

Problems

asso'

ciated with the Negro, child welfare,

marriage were studied and discussed

To

and

fully.

supplement the war program, a new

course in the social problems in

war and

post'war planning was added.

SCIENCE

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE

i>.HE

science

classes

all

history

conscious

given to the fact that

Department of Science

includes courses in chemistry, physics,

ii

'N

AND MATHEMATICS

we

and

ence,

social

by Mr. T. A. McCorkle with Mr. Raymond H. French as assistant pro'

attention was

not only are

sci'

and biology. Chemistry and physics

are headed

fight'

a global war, but are hving in a global

fessor. 16

Two

courses in general chemistry


are offered

—one,

a course tor beginners in'

eluding the history, preparation, and pnjp-

more impcjrtant elements and compounds; another, a course for ad'

erties of the

their

Organic and physiologi'

vanced students. cal chemistry

and quantitative and

tative analysis also

Two

head of chemistry. taught

are

other

—one,

courses in physics

beginners and

for

more advanced

for

quali'

come under the general the

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

A

students.

course in household physics based on the

needs of students of

home economics

of the Physical

Education Department, Miss

offered.

Miss Elizabeth Burger all

Wh,-EAD

also

is

is

an assistant of

courses in general science. science

general

course,

a

Beside the

course

the

in

teaching of high school science, which

is

a

study of the aims and methods of teaching

teaches

and those direction

Mary Barlow

classes for corrective exercises

all

in health education.

Under her

the class in elementary physical

is

education required in the training of

ele-

mentary teachers.

Miss Olive T. Her, associate professor,

secondary school science, and a course in is

in charge of all seasonal sports

science for the elementary teacher includ'

—hockey,

basketball, volley ball, badminton, tennis,

ing the interrelationships of the sciences, are offered.

Miss Edith Stevens

is

acting professor of

Mr. George W. Jeffers is on absence. Mr. Paul Davisson is

an assistant professor

There are courses

which

biology,

in

the high school are required to take the

biology while a leave of

and archery. Those preparing to teach

is

in this

department.

Education

class in the teaching of Physical

in the

Secondary Schools. Under the super-

vision of

Miss Emily Kauzlaurich are

all

classes in

rhythm and dance. Students

are

for beginners in general

offered tap dancing, fundamentals of

a course in the general

ern dance, and composition. Social dance

modis

principles of biology, a survey of the animal

also included in the schedule.

kingdom, the human body, and the plant

obtained from the Hampden-Sydney V-12

kingdom, and one for advanced students in

unit.

The subjects,

general biology.

ogy,

human

botany,

z,ool'

physiology and genetics, are

also offered.

A

full

which

course

includes

is

offered in mathematics,

algebra,

body mechanics. is

charge of

all

and

newcomer

swimming

classes in

in this de-

who

is

in

classes.

cal'

BUSINESS EDUCATION

Miss Carrie B. Taliaferro. In

ORGANIZED

cooperation with the commercial depart-

ment Miss

A

Miss Mary Dabney,

partment

These subjects are taught under the

direction of

In addition. Miss Kauzlaurich teaches

freshman physical education and

trigonometry,

plane, analytical, solid geometry, cuius.

Escorts are

Lila

London

commercial arithmetic

in the school

teaches a course in

year 1939-40, the Business Education De-

as well as a course

partment has grown rapidly. Indication of

in elementary mathematics for the students

its

majoring in elementary education.

ing

growth staff,

is

evident in the size of the teach-

headed by Mr.

I^lerle

L. Lan-


drum. Other instructors

ment

Mrs.

are

J.

in the

new

depart'

Wynn, Miss

P.

Ottie

position for the director of the orchestra.

This

is

of forty voices

Parmenter, and Mr. Christy Snead.

do advanced work

The

is

selected

singing,

which

is

this club to

a course in

a general

music education through

A

from

in choral singing.

Mrs. Bradshaw teaches

two'fold purpose of the Business

A choir

also true of the choral club.

Craddock, Miss Zeta Bellamy, Miss Olive

vital experience.

course in elements of music

also a course designed to help

problems

in

group

background for

offered;

is

with music

lower grades, upper elementary

and junior and senior high school.

grades,

She gives two courses

mony,

in

which

elementary har-

in

a study of scales,

keys,

chords, and harmoni7;ation of original

Education Department

given melodies teachers

for

positions

and

to train business

is

in

is

made. Applied Music

in-

the state high cludes courses in elementary

schools and to prepare four'year girls not

and advanced

piano, elementary and advanced voice, class

interested in teaching for higher positions voice,

in business administration.

There

ditional two'year course in

which students

and introductory viohn.

an ad-

is

Under

the direction of Miss Virginia

Bedford, assisted by Mrs. Janice Lemen,

may

receive a certificate that will qualify

them

for a general clerical or stenographic

is

the Department of Fine and Applied Arts.

an elementary sur-

This department

offers

vey course

which includes weaving,

position. in art

city planning,

MUSIC AND ART

book binding.

% Mrs.

is

and

Alfred H. Strick, with

Mary Bradshaw

An

as assistant.

advanced students

taught by Mr. Strick.

There

appreciation course, which

is

is

tinuation of this course

is

is

music

a

the study of

instruments and early folk music.

ter

of lettering

A

con-

the study of early

drawing

may take an

in

drawings, handi-

chalk,

or architecture

and sculpture. For advanced students a course

tary grades

vanced

is

is

an ad-

and color and

design.

offered; also there

class in crafts

Miss Bedford teaches

a course in

opera, oratoria, and suite.

tary and secondary schools.

ducting elect

is

offered,

and students desiring to

orchestra must play a simple com-

in art

with reference to kindergarten and elemen-

of teaching

course in choral and orchestral con-

entire quar-

and poster design, clay

church music and the beginning of the

A

and

major or anyone par-

modelling and pottery, crafts,

elective course in the general appre-

ciation of music for

art

ticularly interested

HE director of music

I

the college choir

architecture, painting,

An

and supervising

methods

art in elemen-

There

course in art appreciation, which

is

is

a

a survey

course of painting, sculpture, and architecture of different countries.


An

elementary

course

in

drawing and draitsmanship Miss Bedford. ford,

mechanical taught by

is

Cooperatively, Miss Bed-

Miss Camper, and Miss Hall teach

Practical Arts Educaticjn,

which

is

a study

of industrial, economic, and aesthetic fea' tures of

community

The

wrjrk of the Latin

the high schofjls of the State.

study

is

inf;

classes are taught f jn such

as Virgil's

Roman

Besides the

syntax and ajmposition, interest'

fjf

Aendd,

Essays, Ovid's

life.

Dqjartment

primarily to prepare teachers of Latin for

famous works

Cicero's Orations and

Metamor phases, and

History.

Still

Livy's

another course takes

up a study of Latin Lyrics and

their influ-

ence upon modern writers. In the

French

classes

opportunity

is

given

to learn a great deal about French history, civiliziation,

and culture, and to read some

of the best of contemporary and 19th cen-

tury French Literature. After the students

have mastered their grammar

GEOGRAPHY

they

%)rITH time,

a dual purpose in

war

the Geography Department strives

may

phonetics in which they practice with rec-

ords and are then allowed to

own

records.

not only to offer the student courses involv' interest

ing man's relationship to his environment,

but to make the student conscious of geographical influences on the

war

timely

make

war course

their

of vital

and importance has recently been

added.

The

beginners in

Spanish learn about

Puerto Rico and Mexico as well as have

Under the direction of Miss Grace and more

A

in its vari-

ous theatres of operation.

Moran and Miss

sufficiently,

take a course in oral French and

Frances Waters, survey

drills in

As can

specific courses include all areas

of the world. Special emphasis, however,

vocabulary, idioms and grammar.

they advance, a study of Latin Amerilife

and culture and of contemporary'

is

put upon the geography of current problems.

LANGUAGES

T

JLHE

Language Department

consists of courses in Latin, French,

Spanish writers

is

offered.

Composition,

and

conversation, and oral and written reports

Spanish. These departments are under the

in Spanish are also included in these courses.

Miss Minnie V. Rice, Miss

For our Latin- American students on cam-

direction of

Helen Draper, and Miss Emily Barksdale

pus, Spanish

respectively.

ture courses are taught.

and Spanish-American Htera-

The study

of cur-


rent commercial usages of this language and

make

the dictation of business letters

uable

course

knowledge and

who

those

for

a val'

desire

this

include a study of

taught by Miss

Browning and

Mary Clay

study of Tennyson and his works, taught

by Miss Lucille Jennings.

training.

works,

his

Hiner, and a

Mary

Miss

Nichols also has an interesting class on the

study of Democratic Ideals in English and

American

HOME ECONOMICS

An

literature.

opportunity

is

given to read and study some of the most

To .O vocational

prepare students to teach

home economics

in the public

and experience

schools, to give training

in

famous novels of

times in the Novel

all

Course under the direction of Miss Nancy

For information on American

Foster.

a class under

the scientific administration of the home,

writers of the North, there

and to qualify students to become

the direction of Miss Wilhelmina London.

dietitians

Home

are the three purposes of the

Eco'

nomics Department. Headed by Miss Kath' erine

Tupper, the department's

Miss

includes

Bessie

Jeter,

staff also

Miss

Ruth

General courses are offered in cooking,

agement,

teaches

An

open to students with a major It consists

a

class

Honors Course

in is

in English.

of individual study, research or

by the

student.

The

home man-

speech department, under the direc-

tion of Miss Leola Wheeler, gives students

placed on senior tailor-

a chance to learn the techniques of speech

is

ing and senior nutrition.

two courses

The

latter

is

of-

for those girls especial-

arts as well as the principles of teaching

and speech

reading

in

public

schools.

Classes are taught in voice and diction, pub-

ly interested in dietetics.

Senior

literature.

and lunch room management.

Special emphasis

fered in

American

creative writing in a field chosen

Cleaves, and Miss Margaret Hall.

dress designing, house planning,

Dean Martha Smith

is

home economics majors spend one

quarter in the practice house. There they are given actual experiences in

lic

speaking, oral interpretation, plays and

festivals,

home man-

and the history of drama.

Several courses in Library Science are offered in order to prepare students for the

agement.

duties schools.

ENGLISH, SPEECH

AND LIBRARY

SCIENCE

studies

the

of

A as

teacher-librarian

student school

classification

may

library

in

schedule

small

such

administration,

and cataloging, or book

selec-

tion.

Wb..EADED Grainger, the

varied courses in

and

literature,

arts in

Some

by Mr. James M.

English Department offers

SENIOR CLASS

composition, grammar,

and the teaching of language

elementary and secondary schools.

of the interesting literature courses

'N

a rainy day in Septem-

ber, the Seniors returned to school, weight-

ed

down with

luggage and a sense of im-


We

portance.

den as

we

quickly lost the latter bur-

settled dcjwn to the business at

hand

— mainly,

edge

in

cramming enough knowl-

our heads to enable us to be grad-

The

last

few days held much to remem-

We

managed

day, and at last the .scrap of paper

quite a thrill at our

first

newly-capped heads together over our

WHO'S

It

Senior dance will long be all

of us.

Clad

in the tra-

we danced with borrowed dates and wished for those who were far away. To the tune of "Stardust," we ditional white,

walked class

in the figure led

member, Shirley

by our honorary class

president; Mari-

lyn Johnson, vice-president;

Watts,

and our

Pierce,

Wade,

Eleanor

officers:

Mary Walker

and Sally Robertson,

secretary;

i

'N

cir-

cus stunt and as a result produced another

winner.

treasurer.

faculty selects

WHO

the

Among

Students

Universities."

meetings, even as

we

American Colleges and

in

outstanding in extra-curricular activity as

A

well as scholarship, were chosen.

biography was published Selected

Marilyn

Mary

brief

this spring.

from the Class of '45 were

Bell,

editor

of

Elizabeth Fuqua,

the

U.

Virginlan: S.

O.

chair-

man; Martha Higgins, president of the

fairly

we went

Who

"Who's

This year eighteen seniors,

cheered our teams on to

victory in color cup clashes, as

each year the

of the Senior class

to represent the school in

president of the Y.

As we

fall fjf

members

House Council; Mary

After Christmas time seemed to whiz; by.

work.

frjur years'

felt

senior chapel.

was not long before we were putting our

pri2;e

class

which

to get through installation

with only a few minor mishaps and

remembered by

Mr. French,

the sadness at leaving

symbolized the end of

uated.

Lantern parade,

ber, the frantic packing, the

Ann

W. C.

Jarratt,

vice

A.; Fay Johnson,

head of Student Standards; Marilyn Johnto son,

president

played bridge and had

of

Cotillion

Club;

Jane

Knapton, editor of the Colonnade; Sara Moling, Y.

W.

C. A. Cabinet member;

Harriette Moore, president of the Student

Body; Sally Robertson, president of the

Dramatic Club; Jane Rulfin, editor of the

Rotunda; Barbara the

Scott, vice-president of

A. A.; Mary Preston

of the Spanish Club;

president of

our bull finality.

sessions,

That

even closer as

we

near.

pres'

a feeling of

time" sensation came

vice-president of the Student Body; Sara

was

sang our

class

senior chapel and realised that

ment was

A. K. G.; Eleanor Wade,

ident of the Senior Class; Ophelia Whittle,

there

"last

Sheffey, president

Lucy Manson Sharpe,

songs at

commence-

Bird Williams, president of the Y.

W.

C.

A.; and Helen Wilson, president of the

A. A.


haywire. For weeks

was

it

a familiar sight

to see the junior kitchen filled

with the

overflow of exploded cokes.

We had made a success of our May Day dance

we

last year, so

elected

Anne Sum-

mers chairman of the dance which added to the success of another tion.

THE JUNIOR CLASS

LPMING

September held more

May Day

celebra-

Through our worries and our

our smallest and

and our

largest tasks,

joys,

our successes

our friend and classman,

failures,

back to school in

Miss Burger helped us with her sound

in store for us

than counsel.

merely seeing

of our old friends again.

all

There were the new freshmen, our

The

circle.

own

little

sister

welcome

into our

realisation that they

were our

class, to greet and to

"Red and Whites" pleased us

and made us more than happy to give

all

them a "Glad You're Here" party "Rec."

we

all

When

our stunt as

much

as

Gym. With

giving the

Jane Philhower's excellent

we

guidance and impromptu suggestions,

depicted a rally for a presidential election in a negro night club,

Night If

in

"A

what was

Cunningham. "Nothing

in store for else

girls

group of volunteer

ex-

fire

with pitchers of water added con-

Our hopes were

in

sooner had the machine been

re-

fusion to the scene. vain.

No

If

Sophomore

we

look the

whole world over, none to you compare."

AU

through the

halls of

this familiar refrain

of a

new

Gym

and Annex,

rang out the beginning

year for the "Superior race," the

men. The typical two-day "examination"

tinguished by Bessy, our coke-keeper and

A

fair.

us

after the

motor had been successfully

class president.

to thee our

Our trunks were hardly unpacked, when we settled down to work on the Fresh-

could pos-

happen" was our only hope

fire in the

AIL

and so

we

trouble with the

in the other building,

just didn't realize

I

sisters, stately

lordly Sophomores.

we thought we'd had

sibly

called

Harlem."

Coke Machine

in

which we

W.

and prac-

actual performance under the "big top" of

the

SOPHOMORE CLASS

joined merrily into the spirit of the

big event and enjoyed preparing ticing

in the

Circus time rolled around,

paired than the refrigerating system went

—

period

was

just

around the corner with

"Professor" Grace

Loyd

presiding over the

last big night.

Circus time found us with heads in a

With we pantomimed

huddle debating ideas for our stunt. Pat

McLear

as

head,

through song and dance a typical forest scene with

all

the color and romance the

gypsy band possessed. Excitement buzzed


among

the Sophs

when we

placed second

own Grace Loyd

and saw our

as

rinfj-

occurred every day.

naturally

ju.st

Rumors soon spread

that our "rat caps"

4,

which

were

afterno<')n

some meant Valentine's Day but

to the

found kneeling proudly before the sophcy

master.

Time to

studying, eating, and playing were things that

swiftly flew

tcj

February

Sophs, class production.

1

Nancy Whitehead

turned the Rec into a GayNineties saloon

with flora'dora

bicycle built for two,

girls,

and the unforgettable Cile Sarver

own

interpretation of

This year

"By

we went

her

in

the Sea."

into business and

undertook the management of the coke machine, a main source of revenue. Those

who

took care of our responsibilities were

our

officers,

Margaret

president;

Ellett,

Grace Loyd, vice-president; Betty Bibb,

and

secretary; Betty Minetree, treasurer;

was not long before spring

through our windows, and

we

air bree2,ed

year

bell

rang out the

last

we

Anxious

who

out

upper classmen to

as the

(jur officers

would

be,

we

find

elected

"Peepsie" Brocjks, pre.sident; Virginia Tindall,

vice-president;

tary;

Mary Lou

Anna

Kucera, secre-

Bagley, treasurer, and Miss

Dabney, classman.

Many narrow"

freshmen "walked the straight and

when

the

reigned over us the

'Twas

all in

sophomores

lordly

two days

of "Ratting."

fun, though, with Jean Givens

More

proclaimed as "Best Rat."

fun and

we

presented our class stunt at the annual

Each

days of a

with joys shared and rang

filled

realization that

m(jres to be capped.

journeyed to

the roof for those lovely sun tans.

tone of the

we were

hard work were around the corner when

our ever loyal classman, Miss Her. It

and one

here,

in the

too would soon become

a part of "the Building."

THE FRESHMAN CLASS

yQ/HERE

is

"Where do we go now?" questions ble

day

we were

in

Room

22?"

These were

asking that unforgetta'

September.

It

though, before our

spirits

the spirit of S. T. C.

The

wasn't too long,

became part of

circus.

We

torious

runners in Color

were proud,

freshman hockey players

our

vic-

Rush and

the

too, of

who

sophomores Thanksgiving.

mas our

talents

were revealed

We visited on Annex and Gym frequentknowing that each

visit

brought a won-

helped us to learn more about the college

ly,

which was now our Alma Mater.

derful year closer to an end.

sisters"

were always there to help

us,

and

the reception they gave started our social life

at Farmville.

Soon, going to

classes.

our pro-

in

duction.

orientation classes

"Big

defeated the

After Christ-

It

gave us a

preview of our coming sophomore year

when we would more

actually live there and be

a part of S. T. C.


3n ilemoriam

Miss

Mary White Cox


DR.

J.

L.

JARMAN

President

DR.

MARTHA SMITH SMITH Dedii 0/

Women


S, L.

GRAHAM

Business

MAUDE

K.

Manager

TALIAFERRO

Postmistress

VIRGILIA L BUGG

ALPHA LEE GARNETT Assistant to the

Dean

WINNIE

MABEL JONES McCOY

S.

M.

HINER

HOLTON

CARMEN CLARK

M.A.

Assistant Librarian

B.A.,

Night Matron

V.

Treasurer

Registrar

Director of Personnel

ANNIE

F.

SHELTON

Dietitian

HALLIE LAING Home Department

J.

P.

WYNNE

B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Assistant in

Director of Teacher Training and Professor of Education

26

FLOYD

F.

SWERTFEGER

B.S., M.S.,

Ph.D.

Associate Professor of

Education


EDGAR JOHNSON B.S.,

M.A., Ed D.

Associate Professor of

M.

MARY

BOYD COYNER B.A.,

HAYNES

B.

B.S„ M.A.

M.A.

B.A.,

Primary-Grade Supervisor

Professor of Education

JAMES M, GRAINGER M.A.

Professor of Engluh

Education

v"^* (

MARY CLAY HINER B.S.,

M.A.

Professor of English

SIBYL

HENRY

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Principal of Elementary Schools

NANCY FOSTER B.A.,

^Md

WILHELMINA

M.A.

B.S.,

B.S.,

LONDON

Associate Professor of English

Assistant Professor of English

MARY NICHOLS

P.

M.A.

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY M.A., Ph.D.

M.S.

Professor of History and Social Sciences

Assistant Professor of English

27

LUCILLE JENNINGS B.S.,

M.S.

Associate Professor of English

LEOLA WHEELER B.A.,

M.A.

Professor of Speech


FRANCIS BUTLER SIMKINS B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences

GRACE

B.

B.S.,

MORAN

M.A.

C. G.

GORDON MOSS

B.A.,

M.Aâ&#x20AC;&#x17E;

Ph.D.

EDITH STEVENS

B.S.,

M.S.

Geography

Professor of Chemistry and Physics

PECK

M.S.

FRANCES WATERS Assistant Professor of

McCORKLE

E.

Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences

Geography

B.A., M.S.

B.S.,

Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences

Associate Professor of

T. A.

MARY

RAYMOND B.S.,

H.

FRENCH

M.S.

Assistant Professor of

Chemistry and Physics

B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology

ELIZABETH BURGER B.S.,

M.A.

Assistant Professor of Science

FLORENCE B.S.,

H.

STUBBS

M.A.

Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences

PAUL DAVISSON A.B., B.S., M.S. Assistant Professor of Biology

HELEN DRAPER M.A. Modern Languages

B.S.,

Professor of


MINNIE

V.

RICE

Professor of Latin

JANICE LEMEN

VIRGINIA BEDFORD B.S.,

M.A.

B.A.,

Associate Professor of Fine and Applied Arts

ZITA BELLAMY A.B.,

M.A,

Associate Professor of Business

Education

OTTIE CRADDOCK B.A.,

M.A.

Assistant Professor of Fine and Applied Arts and Business

ALICE C

WYNNE

B.A., B.S.,

M.A.

M.A.

MERLE LANDRUM B.S.,

M.A.

Associate Professor of Fine

Professor of Business

and Applied Arts

Education

OLIVE PARMENTER

CHRISTY SNE.\D

B.S.,

M.A.

B.A.,

M.A.

Associate Professor of Business

Assistant Professor of Business

Assistant Professor of Busines:

Education

Education

Education

MARY BARLOW B.S.,

OLIVE

M.A.

B.S..

Professor of Health Education

Education

29

T.

ILER

M.A.

EMILY KAUZL\RICH B.S..

M.A.

Associate Professor of Physical

Assistant Professor of Physical

Education

Education


.

LILA

LONDON

B.S.,

CARRIE

M.A.

B.

Professor of Mathematics

KATHERINE TUPPER

TALIAFERRO

B.S.,

M.A.

B.S.,

Professor of Mathematics

Professor of

M.A.

Home

Economics

BESSIE JETER B.S., M.A. Associate Professor of

Home

Economics

^

1

W-^ ^ -â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

^

^ |ir 1

w

RUTH CLEAVES B.S.,

MARGARET SPRUNT HALL

M.A.

Associate Professor of

ALICE

Home

Instructor in

Home

H.

STRICK

Professor of Music

CARTER M.A.

Associate Professor of

Economics

GEORGIE NORRIS B.S., M.A. Grammar Grade Supervisor

Education

Economics

ALFRED

E.

B.S.,

B.S.

RAY

A.

B.A.,

MOORE M.D.

School Physician

30

SOPHIE PACKER R.N. School Nurse


SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS Wade, M. Watts, M.

Left to right; Mr. French,

Robertson,

Johnson

VIRGINIA LEE

ABERNATHY Cochran B.A.

English

LOREEX

KATHRYN AGEE B.S.

Music


SENIOR CLASS 1945

JEAN GREY AKERS

MARGARET ANN ALVIS Lynchburg

Gladstone B.S.

Elementary Education

MARGARET EDMUNDS BARKSDALE

B.S.

Mathematics

Economics

MARGARET ELIZABETH BEAR Churchville

Java

B.A.

Home

B.S.

32

Business Education


JOSEPHINE BEATTY Iviinhoc, B.S.

MARILYN BELL

N. G.

Richmf;nd

History

B.S

ANN

BETTY MARIE BLACKWELL RoanokeB.S.

Biology

History

BLAIR

Portsmouth B.S.

Elementary Education

SENIOR CLASS


SENIOR CLASS 1945

MARY ALINE

BOSS

OLIVE

B.S.

Elementary Education

ELIZABETH BACON CALDWELL

B.S.

B.S.

Chemistry

MARY WILLIAM CALVERT Lynchburg

Sweet Briar History

BRADSHAW Rice

Hadlock

B.S.

34

Business Education


NORMA CHANDLER B.A.

Richmond

History

VIRGINIA RAE CHICK Home

Economics

English

B.S.

LENA

M

CLAIBORNE

Skipwith

Prospect B.S.

CHEATWOOD

JOYCE

Tallahassee, Fla.

B.S.

Elementary Education

SENIOR CLASS 1945


SENIOR CLASS 1945

HELEN COBBS

GENEVA COLEMAN Wellville

Roanoke B.S.

Business Education

FRANCES COPENHAVER Farmville

B.A.

English

Elementary

B.S.

ELEANOR CORELL Portsmouth B.A.

Art


DOROTHY COX

ALICE LEE DAVIS

Richmond B,S.

Home

Whaleyville

Economics

ROBERTA UAVLS

Economics

JEAN MARIL DEAN Farmville

Mohj.ick

B.A.

Home

B..S.

EnfiUsh

B..S.

37

Biology


SENIOR CLASS 1945

NANCY JANE DICKERSON

ANNA CAROL

B.S.

Elementary Education

BETSY BROOKS DILLARD

Mathematics

B.S.

MARY

LOUISE

DONDLEY

Covington

Draper, N. C. B.S.

DIGGS

Farmville

Spout Spring

B.A.

Business Education 38

Art


SUSAN DURRETT

SARAH LEE EAST

Richmond B,.S,

MaLhemaiics

SHIRLEY EASTERLY

S'juth fVrttori

B.S.

Elementary Education

BETTY TJI^ON EDWARDS

Lebanon B.S.

Social Science

Hillsville

B.S.

History

SENIOR CLASS


SENIOR CLASS 1945

FRANCES ELIZABETH EDWARDS

ALICE RUTH FEITIG Richmond

Gloucester B.S.

Educatwn

Business

B.S.

History

NELL RAY FLEMING

MARY ELIZABETH FUQUA

Chula

Cape Charles

B.S.

Home

Economics

B.S.

Business Education


ALICE GREEN

ELEANOR HALL Nomjni Grove

Farmvillc

B.A.

ROSALIE

rrench

ANNE HAMLIN

Home Economics

B.S.

NANCY RANDOLPH HARRELL Emporia

Surry B.S.

History

B.S.

Hiuory

SENIOR CLASS


SENIOR CLASS 1945

MARY ELIZABETH HARVEY

NELL CAROLYN HAYSLETT Clifton Forge

Roseland

B.A.

MARTHA

B.S.

Chemistry

HIGGINS

MARTHA

Elementary Education

HITE

Blackstone

Portsmouth B.S.

History

B.S.

42

Home Economics


LELIA

HOLLOWAY

B.A.

ELISE Blucfield,

B.S.

En'^iish

HUME W.

CAROLINE HUDDLE Richmond

Purely

Va,

Biology

B.S.

S1'(3TSW{ X )D

History

HUNNICUTT

Stony Creek B.A.

History

SENIOR CLASS 1945


SENIOR CLASS 1945

ANN HERSEY HUTT

LULIE THERESA

B.S.

Bttsiness

Education

MARY ANNE JARRATT

B.S.

Business Education

FAY JOHNSON Vinton

Jarratt

B.S.

HUTT

Neenah

Neenah

Elementary Education

B.S.

English


MARILYN JOHNSON

BEATRICE JONES

Roanoke B.S.

Business

Educalum

EDITH J(^NES

Salem

Bmmess Education

B.S.

ELIZABETH

Holland B.S.

History

ANN

JONES

Bcrryviile

BS.

Elementary

SENIOR CLASS


SENIOR CLASS 1945

RACHEL JOYNER

DORA WALKER JONES

Zuni

Radford B.S.

B.S.

Home

Economics

Elementary Education

B.S.

ISABEL KEY

JANE KNAPTON

Bedford

Covington

Business Education

B.S.

46

Biology


LUCY LINGO

GEORGIA KNIGHT Appalachia B.A.

Funt^oteague

BS.

English

Elementary Education

HELEN McGUIRE

EDITH LOVINS

Grundy

Cumherland .S.

Physical

Educatwn

B.A.

EnglUh

SENIOR CLASS 194^ 47


SENIOR CLASS 194?

ELIZABETH McLEAN

PATRICIA

South Hill B.S.

Business Education

ANNE MAPP Bridgetown '.S.

Business Education

MADDOX

Roanoke Cherwistry

B.S.

MARGARET ANN MASLOFF Danville

B.A.

English


MARGARET

POGIJE MASSEY

Hampdcii-SydiK-y B.A.

Social Science

LUCY MESSICK Front Roy.il B.S.

Business Education

ELIZABETH MAST Lynrihaven B..S.

Engltsh

SARA MOLING Winchester B.A.

£ngli.5h

SENIOR CLASS 1945


SENIOR CLASS 1945

MARY FRANCES MOON

GERTRUDE MOORE

Shipman B.S.

Home

Economics

HARRIETTE MOORE Gastonia, N. C. B.S.

Business Education

Danville

Mathematics

B.A.

HELEN MUNDY Chatham B.A.

Latin


VIK(;iNIA (];i]),i\

B..S.

NAYLOR

ALICE NICHOLS

Zone History

MARION ORANGE

Lynchburg B.S.

MARCARET PARK

Providence Forj^e i.S.

Elementary Education

Mathematics

B<jydton B.S.

Home

Economics

SENIOR CLASS 1941-


SENIOR CLASS 194?

VIRGINIA PARSON

ANNA WARD

B.S.

Elementary Education

HELEN PHILLIPS

B.S.

B.S.

Social Science

LILLIAN ALLYNE PHILLIPS

Melfa Ele-mentary Education

PEERY

Tazewell

Stony Creek

Baskerville

Elementary Education

B.S. 52


VIRGINIA PRINCE

JEAN PROSISE

Capron B.S.

Elementary Educaium

VIRGINIA rULLEN

Wils/,n

«.S

VIRGINIA

Danville B.S.

History

Engliih

RADOGNA

Purdy

B.A

English

SENIOR CLASS 194^


SENIOR CLASS 1945

LORRAINE RAIFORD

SALLY ROBERTSON Lynchburg

Ivor B.S.

Home

Economics

B.S.

Bwlogy

JANE RUFFIN

MARY WALTON RUCKER

Holdcroft

Lynchburg

B.A.

English

B.S.

Busmess Education


EDITH SANFORI)

HELEN SAVAGE

Richmond U.S.

Chemi.stry

BARBARA ANN SCOTT Franklin B.S.

Social Science

Onley B.A.

English

AYERS SHAFFNER

JCJSEI'HINE

Hampton B.A.

History

SENIOR CLASS 194^


SENIOR CLASS 1945

LUCY MANSON SHARPE

ANN OGBURN SHAW South Hill

Virginia Beach B.S.

Home

Economics

MARY PRESTON

SHEFFEY

Elementary Education

B.S.

GLORIA FRANCES SHEPPARD Walkerton

Marion B.S.

Physical Science

Elementary Education

B.S.

56


JEAN CARTER SMITH Williamscn, W. V;i. English

B.S.

MARY STERRETT

MARf;UERITE STEF'HENSON Wakefield B.S.

MARGARET STEWART

Raphine B.A.

English

Elementary Education

Clinchpfjrt B.S.

Business Education

SENIOR CLASS


SENIOR

CLASS 1945

EVELYN STOVALL Baskerville B.S.

ELISE

Home

Economics

THOMPSON

VIRGINIA TERRELL Front Royal

B.A.

CATHERINE TROWER

Boydton >.S.

Home

Economics

Art

Eastvillc

B.S.

English


MARTHA ANN UPSHUR

VIRGINIA VIA

fallen t( 111

Business Education

B.S.

ELEANC^R

WADE

Critz B.S.

MARY

Charlottesville

B.A.

Mathematics-

Home

Economics

ELLA WATKINS Empfjria

B.S.

Business Education

SENIOR CLASS 1945


SENIOR CLASS 1945

MARTHA WATSON

MARY WALKER WATTS

Richmond B.S.

History

NANNIE WEBB

Amherst Physical Science

B.S.

FAITH WEEKS Purdy

Ordinary B.S.

Home

Economics

B.A.

English


FRANCES WENTZEL

OPHELIA WHITTLE

Richmond B.S.

Business Education

NANCY WILKINSON

Petersburg B.S.

SARA BIRD WILLIAMS WixxJst'xk

Kcnbri(J),'c

B.S.

Elementary Education

Btxmness Education

B.S.

Home

Economics

SENIOR CLASS 1945


SENIOR CLASS 1945

HELEN WILSON

LUCILLE

B.S.

Mathematics

MATTIE WINSTON Rustburg 5.S.

Business Education

WINSTON

Richmond

Petersburg B.S.

Home

Economics

BETTE JANE

WOOD

Hopewell B.S.

Art


SARA CLARKE

WOOD

MARY FRANKLIN WOODWARD Barhamsville

Wingina B.A.

B.S.

English

WHO'S

WHO

IN

English

AMERICAN COLLEGES

Moling, Wade, Sharpe, F. Johnson, Fuqua, Sheffey. Williams, Whittle, M. Bell Second row: Jarrett, H. Moore, B. Scott, M. Johnson, Robertson, S. Third row: Higgins, Knapton, H. Wilson. Ruffin

Front row,

left

to right:

63


JUNIOR CLASS

JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS Front row,

left to

right:

Cruser,

L. Elliott

Second row: Miss Burger, Hewlett,

Bisese

ELIZABETH ADAMS Richmond

CAROLYN ALPHIN Amherst

MILDRED ALTICE Rocky Mount

JANE ANDERSON Farmville

JEAN ANDERSON Pedro

BETTY TOM ANDREWS Roanoke


JUNIOR CLASS

MILDRED BAILEY

PAULINE BARNES

GARY BEARD

Brookneal

Richmond

Roanoke

FRANCES BELL

ROSA LEE BELL

Petersburg

Kenbridge

LOUISE BLANE Alton

ANNA

LEE

ELEANOR

BLANTON

BISESE

ANN

BELL

Chatham

NANCY

BL.\IR

Norfolk

Gloucester Point

CAROLYN BOBITT

LUCY BOWLING

South Hill

AndersonviUe

Cumberland

LUCY BRALLEY

RUTH BROOKS

BETTY BROTHERS

Richmond

Farmville

Suffolk


BARBARA BROWN

EDITH BRYANT

Hilton Village

Branchville

FREDDIE

ANN BUTT

Portsmouth

BETTY COCK Hampton

ALICE BUCK Baltimore,

ESTHER CARBONELL Miami,

Fla.

Md.

Fla.

EMILY CARPER

Concord Depot

Rocky Mount

Norfolk

EULA DOGGETT

DOROTHY CUMMINGS

VIRGINIA DALE

Surry

Charlottesville

Homeville

66

SHIRLEY CRUSER

Suffolk

NANCY CRYMES

JUNIOR CLASS

Amherst

MAE CARDWELL

BARBARA ANN COSEY MINNIE LEE CRUMPLER Lakeland,

KATHERINE BUFORD

Isle

of

Wight


JUNIOR CLASS

MARY ANN DOVE

KATHREN EAST

VIVIAN EDMUNDS

LILLIAN ELLIOTT

Roanoke

Altavista

Norfolk

Farmville

DOROTHY GELSTOX

BETTY ELLIS

LAURA FARMER

RUTH FLEMING

Coral Gables, Fla.

Farmville

Chase Citv

FLORENCE GODWIN

MARY GOODE

VIRGINIA GREEN

ENELYX GRIIZARD

Smithfield

Fcrrum

Crewe

Dre\vr\-\Tlle

MARGIE HEWLETT

ROSA HILL

Richmond

Windsor

MARGARET HARVIE MINNIE Richmond

R.

HAWTHORNE

Kenbridge

Hudson

Hts..

X. Y.


MARTHA HOLMAN

MARY HUNTER

NANCY INGLE

Farmville

La Crosse

Covington

LUCILLE JONES

MARTHA ELLEN JONES

JEAN KENT

EARLENE KIMMERLING

Staunton

Buckingham

Wirtz

Roanoke

CATHERINE LYNCH

NANCY McCAULEY

Lebanon

Danville

MARY ELLEN HOGE Bluefield,

W.

Va.

FRANCES LEE

MARTHA

MARGARET McINTYRE Marion,

S.

JUNIOR CLASS

C.

LEE

Craig

Richmond

LUCIE

McKENRY

Arlington

KITTY

MADDOX

Lynchburg

ISABELITA

MALDONADO

Mayguez, Puerto Rico


JUNIOR CLASS

BETTY PAGE MANSON

ANN MARTIN

BETTY MARTIN

JULIA MESSICK

DeWitt

SutFolk

Lynchburg

Front Royal

ELIZABETH MOUNTCASTLE

BETTY NIXON

CARLOTTA NORFLEET

Shipman

Mountcastle

Winchester

Virginia Beach

REBECCA NORFLEET

MARGARET ORANGE

Holland

Richmond

Hampden-Sydney

Bedford

CONSTANCE OZLIN

JANE PAGE

JACQUELIN PARDEN

JEAN PARRY

Chase City

Amherst

Portsmouth

Farm\-ille

CAROLINE

MOON

DOROTHY OVERCASH DOROTHY OVERSTREET


BEVERLY PEEBLES

MARY ELLEN PETTY

South Hill

Hampton

Wren

JANE PHILHOWER

EVELYN PIERCE

RUTH PIERCY

Williamsburg

Greensboro, N. C.

Jefferson

Norfolk

IRENE POMEROY

REGINA PORTINARO

KATHARINE PREBBLE

VIRGINIA PRICE

Quinton

Newport News

Lynchburg

Farmville

MARY JANE RICHARDS

JEAN RIDDICK

JACKIE RITCHIE

Toano

Hickory

Richmond

GLENN ANN PATTERSON JANE PAULETTE Kenbridge

ISABELLE

RANSONE

Buchanon

JUNIOR CLASS

NANCY

PITTS


JUNIOR CLASS

MARGARET ROSS

JEANNE SAUERVEIN

NELL SCOTT

\TRGINIA SHACKLEFORD

Onley

Upper Marlboro, Md.

Stuart

Gloucester Point

ESTHER SHEVICK

MILDRED SHIFLETT

Stuart

Richmond

Palmvra

WINIFRED SLAIGHT

CAROLYN SMITH

JANET SOLLENBERGER

NANNIE SOURS

Yorktown

Farmville

Woodstock

Chatham

DOROTHY SOUTHALL

MARY SPRADLIN

AGNES STOKES

ANNE SUMMERS

Pamplin

Roanoke

Kenbridge

Hampdcn-Sydney

FRANCES SHACKLEFORD Petersburg

LOIS

SHEPPARD


BARBARA SURFACE

LORENE THOMAS

KATHERYN TYNDALL

VIRGINIA TREAKLE

Roanoke

Lawrenceville

Hatton

Farmville

MARJORIE VAUGHAN Roanoke

PHYLLIS

WATTS

Lynchburg

LOIS

WILKERSON Farmville

MARGARET VERELL MARY VIRGINIA WALKER MARTHA WATKINS Newport News

JANICE WELLS

MARTHA

WOOD

LEE

WHITE

Richmond

Hampton

ANNIE GAY

Blackstone

Suffolk

BETTY

WOODWARD

Barhamsville

Gladstone

JUNIOR CLASS

72

RUTH WHITTEN Farmville

KITTY WRIGHT Bowling Green


SOPHOMORE CLASS

SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS Front row,

left

to

right;

Ellett,

Minetree, Loyd

Back row: Miss Her, Bibb

GWENTH

ACKISS

Newport News

NANCY ADAMS Redoak

MARIA ADDLEMAN Cumberland

MARGARET AEBERSOLD Richmond

COLLEEN AGEE Farmville

MARY EMMA ALLEN Ford

NANCY ALMAND Kenbridge

ALENE ALPHIN Zuni


LOVICE ALTI2ER Farmville

GRACE ANDERSON Clarkton

EDITH APPERSON Culpeper

HELEN APPERSON Newport News

MARION ATKINSON Hilton Village

BETTY JANE AUSTIN Roanoke

MADELYN AYERS Roanoke

JO BAILEY Brookneal

LOU BAKER Roanoke

SARA MARGARET BALLARD Bedford

LUCILLE BELL Kenbridge

DOROTHY BENNETT Roanoke

HILDA BENNETT Richmond

ELIZABETH BENNETT Keeling

BETTY BIBB Lynchburg

MARY

LOUISE

BLACKWELL

Courtland

SUTTON BLAND West

Point

CORINNE BOLAND Falls

Church

BEVERLY BOONE Norfolk

LOIS

BOONE

Carrsville

SOPHOMORE CLASS 74


SOPHOMORE CLASS

BETTY lEANNE BOWLES Richmond

MARGARET BRACE W.

Charleston,

Va.

MARIE JULIA BRAGA Brazil

KITTY SUE

BRIDGFORTH Kenbridge

NOLA BRISENTINE Prospect

JEANNE

D.

BROWN

Hilton Village

ANN BRUCE Columbia

BEATRICE BRUCH Roanoke

RACHAEL BRUGH Roanoke '

ANNE BRUSHWOOD Norfolk

MARGARET BUCK Farmville

MARY STEWART BUFORD Lawrenceville

MARY CAMERON BUTT Portsmouth

MARGERY JEANNE BUTTON Roanoke

JEAN CAMPER Orange

MAE CARDWELL Concord Depot

ANN CARTER Cumberland

ELIZABETH LEE CARTER Concord Depot

PATRICIA E. CARTER Bluei^eld, W. Va.

MARY ARMISTEAD CATLETT Wicomico


ROSA MAE CHANDLER Clover

ANN CHARLTON Dillwyn

CONSTANCE CHRISTIAN Phoebus

LORENE CLAIBORNE Skipwith

MARY ANN CLARK Dinwiddle

MARY CLEMENTS Prospect

HARRIET LONG CALE Appomattox

JUDITH SCOTT

CONNELLY

Lebanon

PAGE COOKE LaCrosse

REBA CONNER Cluster Springs

WILLIE AGNES COOKE Burkeville

ELIZABETH

P.

CORR

Richmond

MARGARET ALMA CRAWLEY Prospect

CATHRYN CREGAR Tazewell

ALICE CROSS Lawrenceville

MARION ELIZABETH CROUCH Marion

MARCHETA CUNNINGHAM Blacksburg

EVELYN LaVAUNNE CURTIS Portsmouth

PATSY DALE Homeville

JEAN DANIEL Roanoke

SOPHOMORE CLASS 76


SOPHOMORE CLASS

ALICE DAVIS Phenix

JOAN DAVIS Lynchburg

MAE

JUSTIN DERIEUX

Remlik

ANN DICKINSON Richmond

MARY

LEE DICKERSON

Pamplin

THELMA ELIZABETH DIGGS Norfolk

ELIZABETH DRISCOLL Roanoke

MARTHA DROSTE Ronceverte,

W.

Va.

MABEL DUDLEY Farmville

BETSY JANE

DUNN

Radford

MARTHA EAST South Boston

MARGARET ELLETT Jennings Ordinary

JEAN ELMORE Carson

PEGGY FINK Washington, D. C.

EVA MAE FLEMING Chula

MARY

M.

FONTAINE

Martinsville

VIRGINIA FORD Hopewell

MALINDA FOX Eastville

HELEN FULLER Concord, N. C.

RUTH GARRISON Clifton Forge


SHIRLEY GIBSON Falls

Church

BETTY GILLESPIE

-

Grundy

JANE MARIE GLENN Prospect

EVELYN GOODMAN Roanoke

BARBARA GRAHAM Pulaski

ANNE GRAZIANI Farmville

ANN GREGORY Roanoke

DOROTHY HAILE Richmond

EVELYN HAIR Danville

JANICE HALSTEAD Norfolk

DORIS HARPER Falls

Church

LOUISE HARRELL Suffolk

GENE DARE HARRISON Richmond

MARY

E.

HARRISON

Thomasville, N. C.

BETTY

J.

HARVILLE

Petersburg

BETTY LEWIS

HAYWARD

Hampton

ANNA

S.

HEADLEE

Norfolk

ELLEN HIGGINBOTHAM Mt. Sidney

SARAH HODGES Nathalie

ANN HAUSER DeWitt

SOPHOMORE CLASS 78


SOPHOMORE CLASS

HOWARD

ELIZABETH Norfolk

FREDRICKA HUBARD Cumberland

CONNIE HUBBARD Farmville

AUDREY JANE HUDSON Virgilina

DOROTHY HUMBERT Troutville

SUE HUNDLEY Suffolk

JEWEL HUNT Eastville

RUTH HUNT Nathalie

ROSA JENKINS -

Crewe

ANN JOHNSON Kenbridge

BETTY JOHNSON Richmond

VIRGINIA RUTH

JOHNSON Keysvillc

RUTH JONES Chatham

GERALDINE JOYNER Zuni

LUVERTA JOYNER Smithfield

LOIS

SPANGLER

KAVANAUGH

Roanoke

KATHERINE KEARSLEY Oak

Ridge, Tenn.

ELIZABETH REISER Abilene

BARBARA KELLAM Norfolk

79


RACHEL HOPE KELSEY Farmville

KENNAN

JOY

Raphine

MARY JANE KING Radford

HARRIETTE ANNE

KINGDON

Bluefield,

HEIDI

W.

Va.

LACY

Richmond

IRMA

H.

LASSITER

Driver

RUTH LAWRENCE Hopewell

ROBIN LEAR Chapel

Hill,

N. C.

BETTY HOOD LEE Richmond

SARAH MARGARET LEECH Richmond

BETTY LEWIS Hickory

FRANCES EULALEE LIVESAY Emporia

MARGARET LOHR Brightwood

MARIAN CLAIRE LOTTS Natural Bridge

MARY ANN LOVING LaCrosse

GRACE LOYD Lynchburg

CARMEN LOW Hopewell

SUE McCORKLE Lexington

PATRICIA McLEAR Richmond

SHIRLEY MANKIN Richmond

SOPHOMORE CLASS 80


SOPHOMORE CLASS

MARY GARDEN MARTIN Toano

ELIZABETH MAXEY Ransoms

DORIS

G.

MAY

Roanoke

OLIVIA JANE

MEADE

Martinsville

BETTY MINETREE Petersburg

ANNE McLEAN MINGEA Abingdon

BETTY MITCHELL Clifton Forge

PAT

MONAHAN

Blackstone

BARBARA MONTGOMERY Alberta

ELLEN ROBERTS MOORE Culpeper

GLENNIS MOORE Richmond

VIRGINIA IMOGEN

MOORE Chatham

DORIS LEE

MURRAY

Roanoke

BARBARA LEE MYERS Danville

EVELYN MARGARET NEVINS Victoria

GERALDINE

NEWMAN

Chuckatuck

DORIS LEONE

NEWTON

Chase City

ANN POMEROY NICHOLS Farmville

BERNICE NELL NICHOLS Clover

MARY CABELL OVERBEY Chatham


DORIS LEWIS

OWEN

Sedley

VIRGINIA

MAE PACKETT

Warsaw

BETTY ANN PALMER Crystal Hill

EARLYE LEE PALMER Norfolk

KATHERINE ANN PARHAM Petersburg

MABEL CRUTE PARK Boydton

BETTIE LUCILE PARRISH Manassas

NANCY ELLEN PARRISH Manassas

JERALDINE PAYNE Onancock

LUCY ELLEN PERRY Fort Spring,

W.

Va.

JEAN PRITCHETT Petersburg

DORIS ROSE RAMSEY Petersburg

SHIRLEY

ANN REAVES

South Boston

CORA

LEE

REDD

Chatham

JUDITH RIECK West Point

BETTY LOUISE RIVES McKenney

MARY ROBERTSON Chase City

ALMERA ROSSER Evington

JANE WILLIS

ROWE

Richmond

RUTH PLEASANTS

ROWE

Rural Retreat

SOPHOMORE CLASS


SOPHOMORE CLASS

CILE

SARVER

Ahin(;don

HELENA PATTERSON SAUNDERS Waynesboro

KATHERINE LOUISE SAUNDERS Christiansburg

ANN

FELICIA

SAVEDGE Littleton

ANN_ FINLEY SEARSON Steele's

Tavern

FRANCES SEWARD Petersburg

CHRISTINE SHIFLET Churchville

GRACE SHRIVER West Englewood, N.

J.

ANN SHUFFLEBARGER Bluefield

SHIRLEY PENN

SLAUGHTER Lynchburg

DORIS HARDY SMITH Victoria

CORNELIA COCKE SMITH Norfolk

MARTHA AMELIA SOURS Chatham

MARTHA LYNN SPRYE Lynchburg

GERTRUDE RUTH STABLES Wilson

GRACIE LILLIAN STABLES Wilson

ELOISE STANCELL Emporia

MARGARET KENT STEVENS Radford

CATHARINE AMMEN STONER Fincastle

BETTY

J.

STUBBS

Bonne. N, C.


HESTER MAE SYDNOR Hague

KATHRYN TATTERSON Shadow

ANN

F.

TAYLOR

Hague

VIRGINIA FRY TERRELL Richmond

ELIZABETH VIRGINIA

TERRY Pamplin

VIRGINIA THOMPSON Crewe

FRANCES TIMMINS Richmond

REBECCA TOMLINSON Black Creek, N. C.

VIRGINIA COX TRAVIS Lynchburg

HELEN TRUMP Crewe

ANNE TUCKER Norlina, N. C.

GENE TUCKER McKenney

DOROTHY TURLEY Wytheville

LUCILLE UPSHUR Cheriton

CATHERINE VARNER Farmville

SOPHOMORE CLASS


SOPHOMORE CLASS

MABEL WADDELL Drakes Branch

CLAIR SCOTT WAILES Amherst

MARGARET WALTON Martinsville

MABEL WEAVER Rice

MARTHA WEBB Erwin, Tenn.

MARTHA WELLS Petersburg

CHARLOTTE VIRGINIA WEST Surry

NANCY EVELYN WHITEHEAD Kecoughtan

MARY WALKER WILLIAMS Holcomb Rock

VIRGINIA

WOODWARD

Chuckatuck

HELEN ROSE WORRELL Courtland

HELEN HOPE WORSHAM Danville

RUBY LOUISE WRIGHT Moneta

MARY WYATT South Boston

CONSTANCE

ELIZABETH YOUNG

Covington

85


FRESHMAN CLASS

â&#x20AC;˘

FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS Left to right: L. Brooks, Bagley,

Miss

Dabney,

Kucera,

V.

Tindall

Margaret Abbot, Alice Abernathy, Hilda Abcrnathy, Lucie Addleman, Dot Anderson, Estaline Anderson

Martha Anderson, Annette Anthony, Jean Babb, Mary Lou Bagley, Jane Baines, Virginia S6

Bailey,

Corinne Baker


First

Ruw

Second

Row

Third

Row

JEAN BENTLEY KATHRYN BENTLEY

DOROTHY BLAIR

VIRGINIA BEAVER

MARION BENNETTE CATHARINE BICKLE

RUTH BENNETT

TINNIE BIGGER

MARY JANE BOND MARGERY ANN BOAZ BETTY BONDURANT

MARY BAKER DORRIS BALLANCE

MARGARET BALLARD

Fourth

JULIA

Row

BOOHER

KATHLEEN BLANKENSHIP

Fifth

Row

LOUISE BROOKS

LELA BOULDIN

BARBARA LEE BROWN

DOROTHY BOUSERMAN DOROTHY BRADLEY

MARGARET BROWN GLADYS BUNCH

JOYCE BRIDGES

BETTY BURCHETT

FRESHMAN CLASS


FRESHMAN CLASS

first

Row

Second

Row

Third

JANE BURCHETT VIRGINIA BUTLER MARGARET CABANISS

DOROTHY CHAMBERS NANCY CHAMBERS MARION CHASE

MARGARET CARTER MARY CASTLE

ANNE CLARK

NELL COLEMAN EDITH COLGIN

CAROLYN COLLIE MARGARET COLLINS

BETTY CHRISTIAN

Fourth

Row

Fifth

Row

SHIRLEY CONNELLY ALICE COON

ETHEL CRALLE JUNE CREGAR

ENEIDA COSTA

LAURETTA CROCKETT MURIEL CROSTIC

MARY COWHERD ANN COX

Row

CLAIRE CLARKE

MARY CROWDER


/•ir.sl

Row

Se-

nd

Row

Third

Row

BARBARA c;R0WTHER

MILDRED DAVIS

EDITH DUFFY

DOROTHY DANIEL

SUE DAVIS BETTYE DE IKJRD SUSAN DICKINSON

JACKIE

SARAH DODSON

LOUISE ELDER

LUCILLE DAVIDSON

ALMA DAVIS JUANITA DAVIS

Fourth

Row

Fifth

Row

VIRGINIA ELLIOTT VIVIAN ELMORE

BETTIE EWELL

BETTY EPPERSON

MARY FARRIER

MARIAM

HELEN FIFIELD FRANCES FLYNN

ESTES

LORENA EVANS

FRESHMAN CLASS

NANCY DUNCAN DUNTON MARY EAMES

SUSAN FANSLER


FRESHMAN CLASS

first

Row

Second

Row

MARGARET FOLTZ

LOIS FULLER

LUCY FRANCIS EVELYN FRANK JEAN FREEMAN

DOROTHY FULTZ JEANE GANZERT FRANCES GARNETT ESTHER GEORGE

ANN FULGHAM

Fourth

Row

Third

Row

BETTY GILL JEAN GIVERS BETTY GODDIN JOSEPHINE

GOODWYN

FRANCES GORDON

Fifth

Row

ANNETTE GRAINGER CAROLYN GRIMES CHARLOTTE GRIZZARD

LOTTIE HAMMOCK DORIS HANCOCK

CLAUDINE GUTHRIE

HAZEL HANCOCK

MARION HAHN

ANNE HOMES

DAWN HOLCOMBE


First

R„w

.Second

eloise

hanes

c;atherine hankins janie hanks alice hannah

Fourlh

Row

NORMA HOWARD DOROTHY HUBBARD

CLASS

Third

Row

ANNE HASKINS CLARICE HASKINS MARY HASKINS

BLANCHE HAYNES

ELIZABETH HARRELL ETHEL HARRISCJN

JOYCE HILL MARJORIE HOLLAND VIRGINIA HOUSE

FRESHMAN

Row

CAROLYN HARDY AUGUSTA HARCAN SHIRLEY HARPER

MURIEL HANf^OCK

MARY HELMER

Fifth

Row

NANCY HUGHES AZEELE HUTT CHARLOTTE HUTTER PEGGY JACOB JOSCELYN JAMES


FRESHMAN

51

CLASS

First

Row

Second

Row

CAROL JENKINS

ANNA KUCERA

MARY JENNINGS

DOROTHY LADUE

JOYCE JOHNSON MARGARET JONES EDITH KIRKLAND

GLADYS LANKFORD

Third

HELEN BROOKS LEWIS GEORGE ANN LEWIS HELEN LEWIS

KATIE LAWRENCE LOUISE LAYMAN

Fourth

Row

MABEL LEWIS JUDY LIGHT BETTY LEMON BETTY LIVELY WILMPJE LONG

Row

VIVIAN LESLIE DORIS LEWIS

Fifth

Row

VIRGINIA LOVE JACQUELINE McCLAUGHERTY

GLADYS McCONNELL

MARGARET McMILLAN ELLEN McMULLEN


first

Second

Row

MILDRED McWILLIAMS

BETTY MINTON HELEN MONEYHUM PEGGY MOORE

NANCY MAGNER JANE MANTIPLY VIRGINIA MARSHALL

ANN MOORE

MARY MASON found Row

MARY NYE ELEANOR OVERBEY

DOROTHY OVERTON MARY JANE OYLER VIRGINIA PARRIS

FRESHMAN CLASS

Third

Row

EVELYN MASTAIN

Row

MARY ANN MORRIS MARTHA F. MORRISON ELIZAIJETH

C.

MOTLEY

MYRA MOTLEY CAROLYN MURPHY

fifth Roil.

CAROLINE PAINTER

AUGUSTA PARRISH ELEANOR PARSONS FRANCES PARTIN LOUISE PEGRAM


FRESHMAN CLASS

First

Row

Second

CONSTANCE PEMBERTON LENORA PERKINS ALFREDA PETERSON VIRGINIA PICKARD

DAPHNE PITTMAN

Fourth

Row

Third

Row

MARGUERITE REID

NANNY

fifth

Row

BETSY SCOTT

GLORIA RIDOUT EVELYN ROGERS

CELIA SCOTT

PHYLLIS SCHERBERGER

REID

CHOLINA RICHARDS BERKELEY RICHARDSON

MARY RICHMOND MAUDE SAVAGE

Row

MARY RATTRAY

BETTY PLUNKETT THERESA POWELL BILLIE PRUETT IRIS LEA QUIELLIN KATHERINE RAINEY

ELIZABETH SCOTT BETTY SCROGGINS EDITH SEYMOUR


Fir.sl

Second

Row

Row

Third

BETTY SHEPHERD MILDRED SHEPHERD JANE SHORT

NANCY SIMMERMAN

ELIZABETH SMITH ELLA LORRAINE SMITH

alic:e

smith

Fourth

Row

SUZANNE STELLE ELIZABETH STONER

MARTHA STRINGFIELD KATHERINE STUBBLEFIELD HARRIETTE SUTHERLIN

FRESHMAN CLASS

NANCY SNEAD NORMA SOVARS NANCY SQUIRE

EDNA smith

AGNES SIZEMORE

Row

ELLA SMITH JEAN SNEAD

dorothy smedley

Fifth

Row

BETTY J. SUTHERS HILDRIAN SUTTLE OTTIE MAE TALBERT JEAN TAYLOR

NANCY TAYLOR


FRESHMAN CLASS

First

Row

Second

Row

NANCY TAYLOR

MARJORIE TICE

ZILPHA TAYLOR

VIRGINIA TINDALL

MARY ELLEN TEMPLE MARY LEE THOMAS MARGARETTE THOMPSON

EUGENIA TOLLEY ALPHA TORRENCE FRANCES TREAKLE

Fourth

Row

MARY FRANCES VAUGHAN ELM A G. WALKER MARY WALLACE 96

Third

MARY

Row

TUCKER JEAN TURNER SHIRLEY TURNER JANE UNDERBILL HELEN PAGE VAUGHAN JO


First Roti

ELLEN

WARD

MARTHA WEBB MYRTLE A. WEST BETTY WETHERALL DORIS WHITE

Second

Row

Third

MARY WHITE MARIAM WHITE KATHERINE WHITMORE BARBARA J, WILEY NELLIE WILKINSON

Fourth

Row

VIRGINIA YONCE

AUDREY YOUNG MARION YUNN

FRESHMAN CLASS 97

Row

HELEN WILLIAMS V. WILLIAMS REBECCA T. WINN LOIS FAYE WOLFE MARY YATES

MARY


Book A

Week At

II

FarmviUe

Monday: another wee\

LUE the

first

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

day of the wee\

is

the

cult

one to tread. Monday, as ever,

way

largely the success of the conclusion.

week faced

week'end

we

The

schedule of the

us; the dining

room announce'

met each Monday.

ments served to remind us that there were group

responsibilities to be met.

Another period of a

Farmville's tradition ly in song,

always a

Yet. every

diffi-

human

The

laundry Hsts were carefully noted, and the

crammed

full

of a week's washing.

we sang "Rum and Coca Cola" while the vie down the hall played "Making Beheve." Mondays meant "Cherr>' Roll Day" in the Tea Room and down town privileges ^\nd

for the

hemmed-in freshmen. Chapel cuts

times painful.

That

Through many Mondays our troops

their song chapel, for

fought in the Philippines, and the morning

is

expressed adequate-

and the knowledge

headlines told of the victories and the trag-

o[ these ori-

ented the newcomers into the feeling of

edies.

This day began the week, and each

repetition of

belonging.

But Mondays are

is

and "bed check" were familiar and some-

classes began, giving

renewed opportunity for learning.

day the freshmen had

wee\-end and the

wor\

period.

to describe fully

classes or meetings of organizations.

bags

sleepy eyes and various recoUec'

tions of the activities of the

irregidarity of the

falls lot to this transition

which one enters the week determines

With

which seems

bridge which connects play with

event must have a beginning and the in

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a term

hn\ between the

The

routine of the next five days.

Monday''

begins

recalled

by more than

it

brovight us closer to the

of another year.

end


"THE VIRGINIAN"

where he was requested

senior dormitory

to take even a mirror-image shot.

Before the M4 had been

released, the

annual

new Virginian

1945 was an accumulation of ideas heads of

editors

its

when

took form

and

staff.

in the

The

ideas

was

the page sequence plan

sent to the engraving

company

of

early in the

summer. September found Pat and Marilyn on the that

way to Chicago

made

for a six'day trip

a hfe-time impression.

Early in

November Mr. Brightman gave

us a reassuring

visit,

commented on the

group pictures, and cautioned us about

minute work. With Miss Bedford's

last-

assist-

ance, the art staff did a unique job, un-

Word

usually complete.

counts added work

and offered many headaches to the

staff

members who did write-ups.

Amazed Pasting individual pictures, giving hair-

in the produc'

by the complexity involved

cuts while

si2,ing

them,

we

many

spent

tion of an annual, they received first'hand

Monday

The

nights in the lab.

tragedy of

and

information on engraving, printing,

putting a freshman in the junior section binding.

~

Other memories, which included nearly caused us to pool credits and raise

"The College

Inn," the lakcshore drive,

her standards rather than change the entire

Northwestern University, and the perfect host,

Mr. Brightman, were

out the year after

much

We

when

make-up. Some

girls

and others cut

off

were pasted

in twice

recalled through'

by the

at the throat

the staff needed "a lift"

strenuous work.

found that Virginian chores

in-

eluded not only mental strain but also stress

on the biceps

as

we

hiked around the camp-

The

us with the photographer.

were

elements

not always in tune, and schedules for

pictures

weather.

were upset by a

spell of

stormy

Blouses purchased and pressed

each night for the individual's picture ceived

much wear. Never

the student shirts.

let it

body can not be

re-

be said that

fitted into

four

A moment of amusement broke the

monotony when

the photographer asked

one girl to look into the camera, and she literally

put her head into

it.

His job was

a difficult one, for the editor's ideas of feat-

ure pictures took him from

down town

to

eager picture-cutters.

Our

mistakes were

nevertheless remedied and never too cult for

Mr. Mac

In February the old heads Bell, editor;

and Mary

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marilyn

Pat Maddox, managing editor;

Eli2,abeth

ager â&#x20AC;&#x201D; appointed

book of

diffi-

to straighten.

Harvey, business man-

the

new heads

'46. Lilhan Elliott

with Shirley Cruser

for the

was made

as business

and Sue Hundley, managing

editor,

manager

editor.

The


new appointments

didn't

bririf^

our old job

to an end, and sprinj^ iound us readinj^

May

and indexing.

prcjof

brought the

released

and proudly placed beside

the girls quietly.

"Time

feel-

ing of a job completed, with the '4? annual its

pre-

summon

eliminate the usual yelling and to

for

bedcheck" was another

miliar refrain oi the hall presidents.

fa'

Bridge

games, parties, the nightly gatherings were ended; and pa jama clad visitors scurried

decessors.

back to their rooms to be checked

Although bed check was done for

night.

the

in for the

time this year,

first

for the

girls

trj

it

didn't take long

get accustomed to

The

it.

added another responsibility to the

rule

faithful presidents.

Every morning found Mrs. Laing, Mrs.

U

And

'Little

Higgins' and Mrs.

that's the

the proverbial

way

it

was

Here

McCoy!"

quite often with

march of the house council

almost every night.

welcomed by the

easily

Three warnings put a

Although one might a certain Tues'

it if

girl

behind them.

tor an untidy

room would

on campus. Cleanliness hung by

a hair's breadth over freedom. It

became necessary to have student

wardens, and this job

lovers of light.

have concluded

ly they left their calling cards

That knock was not

Giving call'downs was not the purpose of the house council.

their inspec

tion tours of the "dorms." Quite frequent'

/NDER the beds!

come

Warren on

Beazley, and Mrs.

HOUSE COUNCIL

of

was the

To

to the

fire'

members

see that

everyone

buildings for the

fire drills

House Council.

was out of the

fell

responsibility of the wardens.

It

would be many

day were considered. That was the night

doesn't seem that there

House Council went on

tasks left to do after the performing of these

a

rampage and

With

gave a sophomore three call'downs.

numerous

duties,

but

War Day

presented

the house mothers and hall presidents work'

another responsibility to the hall presidents,

was

that of assigning the students to the various

ing

more

quietness

closely together,

maintained on the halls during study hour.

The

attractive signs placed

around were an

incentive for the girls to be

One

of the biggest problems

"Don Ameche." cruit

phone.

volunteers

Such

Plans were to

more

was

made

answer the

a system

quiet.

that of the

discussion groups.

The

year wasn't

members

of

all

work though

House Council. The

mas Committee devoted

for the Christ-

their time to

a

to re-

party in the student lounge. i\l though they

outside

had to work, the members enjoyed going to

was supposed

to

Longwood one Sunday afternoon

to

sell


cokes and sandwiches to the

The

whose voices were

strollers.

year was a successful one with

Martha Higgins

as president; Sally Robert'

son, vice-president; Freddie

Margie Hewlett,

retary;

Ann

Butt, sec

Call

treasurer.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; they

downs, campus, "Little Higgins"

were House Council. They were alsoS.T.C.

man

The

of vigor.

Fresh-

Class took top honors in the contest.

With girls

full

the tolling of the

clad in red

in each hall

bell,

and green gym

breathlessly to their banners.

screams could be heard

suits

dashed

Many

joyous

when

the red and

whites displayed their colors on the majoriety of the buildings.

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

The

round-robin

tournaments

started

we

enjoyed

soon afterwards, during which

NWARD onward

FarmviUe,

the cheers, the songs, the whistle, the gun,

Farmville, plunge right into the

the groans, the laughs, and the yells that

frayf The Athletic Association

stirred us

once again in our school song that will echo

and re-echo

in the

chambers of our memory.

The main purpose be

easily

summed up

meaning to every ical Fitness."

day,

of the Council could

it is

in

two words

girl at S.

T. C.

full of

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;"Phys-

spirit:

In

all

the games,

we

felt

the strain-

ing eagerness, the heartbreak of defeat, and the glory of triumph.

Red and white

again

strove to keep their colors on the cup while

green and white battled to change them.

In our war-torn world of to-

as possible, not only for her

fit

good,

but for her country,

as

she,

own the

youth,

will

become the measure of the

future.

The

playing of basketball, hockey,

and other sports

every able

two

the outward symbols of our school

the duty of each girl to keep her-

self as

volleyball

are

girl is

is

voluntary, but

required to take at least

Every

years of physical education.

Anyone

Longwood on

passing through

a

day vigorous exercises are taken, followed

pleasant spring week-end might see groups

by body-building games enjoyed by every-

of girls clad in plaid shirts and blue jeans

and participating

one.

Color Rush

this

year again boosted our

Farmville spirit to an class

was

busily

song to spur

its

time high. its

own

Each

original

team to victory. The audi-

torium on Song girls

all

working on

Day was crowded with

whose hearts were

full

of hope and

in

all

types of games.

This colorful array could be almost any ganir;ation in school.

Now

once again on one of their ties,

famous for

it's

many

the

or-

A. A.

cabin par-

their food, games,

and

all-

around fun. The Council has taken much teasing about these parties.

Although

all


!

other ()rgani2,ations walk out to Lfjngwotjd,

Some

the Athletes ride. tired

say that they are

from a busy season

Bobbie

president;

officers:

Scott,

Mary Walker Watts, Our

Lee, treasurer.

spirits

and en-

Helen Wilson, vice

-

president;

secretary; Frances

sports managers

were

Phe Whittle, hockey; Mar-

the following:

garet Orange, basketball; Heidi Lacy, volsoftball;

Robin Lear,

swimming; Margaret Lohr,

badminton;

leyball;

Mike

Sue Hundley,

Shiflett,

archery; Phyllis Watts, ten-

nis; Lucille Jones,

The

cabin at Lfjngwrjod

ping-pong. Miss Her

was

was

us for the use of the cabin

An

ends.

fjur resprjns-

Various fjrganizations signed with

ibility.

Helping to keep up our thusiasm were our

to try their luck for the excellent prizes.

We were

school rfjutine.

at LfjngwfKjd in

we had

less to say,

Ellie

the week'

Wade

the guests of the

November. Need'

an "athletic good time."

served as our president with

Peepsie Scott as vice-president.

and

was

and a relaxation from

a notable (jccasion

A. A.

fjn

overnight trip to Lfjngwtxjd

worries

financial

went

to

Records Ophelia

Miss Her was our

Whittle, treasurer.

ad-

viser.

our loyal adviser.

THE

TOWN

GIRLS"

CLUB

MONOGRAM CLUB

T>HE

'Ms.AVE Monogram Club

has a two-fold purpose; to stimulate interest in sports

and to

recogni2,e athletic ability,

scholarship and sportsmanship. ing of

day

new members was

after the initiation of

The

choos-

a big event.

The

new members, we

dered about the town

you ever won-

girls?

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Where

do

they go to hold their informal chats, to play

May-

bridge, to prepare last minute lessons?

be you have wondered, too, for what the rooms,

A

They

and B, on Main are used.

are for the girls

who

live in

town. Laughter

wore blue and white monograms on our

could be heard, and smoke rings could be

sweaters.

seen coming from the doors during

In the

fall,

a

few days before color rush

and traditional hockey game between the four classes,

we were busy making and

ing paper hockey sticks.

of the day.

and

We girls

decorated

sell-

brightly

one

covered

hours

all

became very energetic the

of

chairs,

rooms with

two day

beds,

-

In this way, green

bright curtains, lamps, and other accessories

and white, and red and white supporters

were

identified.

cokes, even

During the game we

though November was a

chilly for iced

drinks.

game had

to

wade through

the

made

the

room

cheerful and complete.

The other room was reserved

for those

who

little

"Bingo" was the

source of fun at our circus booth. of the

that sold

wished to do a

Lovers

classes.

crowd

room,

little

studying between

Besides the usual social chats in the

we

enjoyed thoroughly the party


"Y" Cabinet

given by the club and the ing the

fall

These famihar

yells

the booth of the

down through

music which has come

Pop Corn!"

cents!

could be heard from

Town

Club

Girls'

The Club was proud

and work and proud of

of

at the

its

keep that interest alive as well as to

develop a true appreciation for the

choir.

Rae

spent

Singing for the joy of singing,

many hours

With Mr.

our music.

president; Loreen Agee, secretary; Virginia Farrier, treasurer.

Miss Mary

there to help us

as did the

to

life,

"dorms," when the town

stepped" in during

them

They came

Strick at the piano,

we

sang

parts of the "Messiah" and our beloved

"Requiem."

girls.

The two rooms on Main were used great advantage.

we

room 21 working

in

diligently to perfect ourselves in

Clay Hiner

classics,

has been for years the aim of the college

room

officers,

its

To

Chick, president; Virginia Lee Price, vice'

was always

the

ages.

'Top Corn! Five

Circus.

dur'

quarter.

to a just girls

September and turned

At

we

Christmas, just before our holiday,

presented our annual Christmas con'

cert.

Our

soloists,

Miss Jean Love, soprano,

and Mr. James Montgomery, tenor, drew high praise for their beautiful interpreta'

into an active part of S. T. C.

The

tions of sacred music.

gram.

various choral

much

groups also contributed

to the pro'

Perhaps the most inspiring part of

came

the whole concert

end when

at the

the choir and soloists sang the "Hallelujah

Chorus" from the Messiah.

As tion

Under

cert.

COLLEGE CHOIR

president;

OR

centuries

singing

we

soon as

returned from our vaca'

we began work on

our Spring Con'

the leadership of

Pat

Maddox,

vice

Ann '

Blair,

president;

Jean Prosise, secretary, and Julia Messick, treasurer,

we

spent

many happy hours

has been one of man's outlets wherein he learning

new

music.

might express his joys and sorrows. Today

On we

still

find

our song, although

April 12

we were proud

to present

expression for ourselves in

we may

not choose the same

Dr. T. Tertius Noble,

final concert.

famed organist and composer, again re

forms as our ancient forebearers. Although

turned to our campus to conduct us in the

we, as modern college

singing of

liking for the veaMzfi.

girls,

have a natural

"hep" music of our

the true worth of

age,

we

the beautiful

some of

his

own

compositions.

In addition to this he gave a teresting lectures.

series of in'

Brought back by popular


demand, Mr. M()ntf;;omcry and Mr. Rnbert Nicholson, baritone,

were presented.

Bernard Zegar, and Dr. Roscfjc White, led us in discussifjns which pertained to our

theme: Christ and

Our Day. Topics

THE CHORAL CLUB

lationships" and "Japanese

'EAUTIFUL composing

voices inspiration,

group of Choral

eager

songsters,

Club.

"Right on the beam" quoted our

the

capable director, Alfred H. Strick.

We

were active throughout the

Not

only did

we

year.

present programs at the various

churches in town, but aided in

campus

came

activities.

One

annual

the

at

when we sponsored

a

many

well'known baritone, delight'

success of the year's in the

work

Spring Concert

great renown.

Mr.

Wfjrk

Methodist Conference,

our group Lucie McKenry,

and spoke

Sunday night

in chapel.

church, the monthly

after

pubhcation of our paper. The V^^eslyon,

and suppers to which

we

invited the V-12's

We enjoyed a year of Christian companionship under the direction of our leaders:

Virginia

Lee

Cummings,

Dorothy

president:

Price,

vice-president; Betty BlackweU,

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION

crHE

way

A

in times of trial."

was

at

ahead of time,

planning for the big event of our

year, the Methodist State Convention.

In

arrived at Natural Bridge eag-

erly anticipating a

week-end of Christian

fellowship combined with the additional thrill

of viewing the Bridge

The

speakers.

in the

It

15

summer.

Baptist students attended

the Southwide Student Retreat at Ridgecrest,

EEKS

B. S. U., as

work even

Twelve Farmville

WESLEY FOUNDATION

we

our campus,

under the auspices of the Wesley Foundation

called,

January,

Virginia

the

:

"Beautiful music sung the beautiful

we began

of

visited

and

Strick

and Lucy Lingo, viccpresident.

means much

Miss Virginia Henry, director of People's

secretary; Elizabeth Mast, treasurer.

appreciation goes to

president,

Later,

Young

orientation of a social fellowship hour each

April under the direction of Dr. T.

his assistants in

wealth of

spiritual knfiwledge frrjm them.

of these occasions

Christmas concert,

Tertius Noble, organist and composer of

Our

a scjurce of

a

from Hampden-Sydney.

was our performance in

and we derived

Other highlights of the year were the

all his listeners.

Crowning the

American Re-

on-

Robert Montgomery, whose songs ed

-

The meetings were

kication."

raised in song" describes best this

for

our mfornial groups were "Inter-Racial Re'

by moonHght.

Dr. Hill Bollinger, Rabbi

North Carolina. This was one of our

big conferences of the year, and the girls

came back with many new other

girls

taught

in

ideas.

Bible Schools in the mountains.

not only performing

Twelve

Mission Vacation

They were

a useful service,

but

also getting excellent experience.

Twenty-four

girls

attended

the

State

Baptist Student Convention in Roanoke.


One

own

of our

Virginia Treakle,

girls,

presided as president of the Virginia B.S.U.

We

girls really

enjoy going to the StU'

The Center

dent Center.

is

located in a

building across from the college. tractively

come

and to

fixed,

"A home away

us,

it

is at'

It

has

end of planning. The cold briskness of the weather, a roaring

fire in

the cabin, abund'

ant food, and strolling under the stars it

made

"en toto" an Experience. Results of

this

concourse were the plate-supper meetings

be'

from home."

Sunday evenings we enjoyed fellowship Tuesday evenings we had

hours, and on

missionary programs. Thanksgiving

and

a special sunrise service,

we had

a students' night

The week

local church.

a big one in our year.

that for

vÂŤ/e

signed

summer

We

up

for

in

we had

December

program

at the

of April 8-1?

It

was

in this

was

week

Volunteer Enlistment

service.

owe much

trude Moore.

to our president, Ger'

we had

part due to

such a successful

year.

Sunday

first

each month and

in

the weekly Vesper Services in

which the

liampden'Sydney Presbyterians took

To

It is in a large

her efforts that

served the

the

state

Conference held at several delegates

two fuU days

part.

Westminster Fellowship

Mary Baldwin

were

sent.

They

College

reported

and

of inspiration, activity,

fun.

The Westminster

WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP

Fellowship secured as

chapel and special program speakers Rev.

Albert Edwards, of Orange, and Rev. Lynn

AUNCHING

a

new

Jones, of Norfolk.

Other highlights were

weenie

followed by a brief but

a fall

year last

May,

the Westminster Fellowship

enjoyed a bang'up hay ride and picnic in the country. Recently elected officers were

bers had a

notable were a movie borrowed Pickett entitled

June several of the Council mem-

challenging talk

a lovely,

memorable week

living

"up on

course,

when

And also from Camp

"Chaplains at War," a

made by

a

Seminary

Fel-

lowship Student, and a Christmas vesper

hour of carol singing.

the hill" at Massanetta.

Of

impressive worship period, and a game'ses' siou'spaghetti-supper in February.

outdoor candlelight

installed in service. In

roast,

Unusually able advisers were Mr. Phil school began again in

Roberts, Mrs. Farrar Shelton, and Mrs.

September, there was the annual informal reception for Presbyterian students at the

church.

trekked to

Shortly

thereafter

Longwood

the

council

for a vigorous week'

W.

McClintic.

dent,

Agnes Stokes was

with Sara Dailey Moling

as

president, Sarah Lee East as secretary,

Martha Droste

as treasurer.

W.

presi'

vice'

and


Virginian

Heads left to right: M. P. Maddox, Harvey

Bell,

Mr. McCorkle

Left to right:

Shuffleharger, E.

Thompson, McLcar,

Hundley

Left to right: Whittle, P.

Maddox,

L. Elliott, C. Diggs, Crusei,

M

Bell.

0\eicash. K.

Maddo

Corcll,

McCorkle, Han.-ey, Moling,


House Council

iH:

Officers, left to right:

Front row,

Hewlett, Robertson, Higgins, F. Butt

left to right: Myers, Duncan, Stokes, Higgins, Garrison, Robertson Second row: L. Curtis, C. Alphin, A. Nichols, L. Joyner, R. Hill, N. Parrish, R. Wright, Calvert, Barksdale Third row: Kearsiey, Harvey, Lynch, Hewlett, K. Allen, E. Jones, F. Butt, Lacy, Wyatt


Athletic

Association Officers

Left to right:

Miss Her,

Wilson, B. Scott

Athletic

Association

Council

First row, left to right:

Second row: Third row:

P. Watts, Lohr Orange, Dudley, Lacy

Shiflett,

Whittle, Hundley

M. Watts,

F.

Lee,

H.


Monogram Club

Town Girls

Front row,

left

V.

ziani,

to

right:

Gra-

Farrier, Price, L.

Agee, Chick, Bonn,

Jett

Second row: M. Reid, Altizer, C. Hubbard, Miss Hiner, Covington Third

row:

Kelsey,

L.

Levins,

Holman,

Wilkerson,

Ker-

nodle, Bondurant, L. Elhott

Fourth row

Brisentine. E. Moore, Lynn, V. Treakle, Overton,

Soyars

:


Choir

W

>i»i

i\r^i\rls\ "a "a a;'

'P^

y:jar r-ir

J—

* '^rir—^-y

Front row, left to right: Levins, Shevick, Parden, Grumpier, Shaffner, Fuqua, Prosise, A. Blair, L. Messick, Blackwell, Cummiiigs, Button, Murray, K. East

Second row: McLean, Elmore, N. Haskins, McKenry, Price, E.

Blair, Correll, Verrel, Portinaro,

J.

Mcssick, Freeman,

McCauley, Tomlinson, M. Stewart, M. Jones, A.

Goodman, D. Bennett, Kennan

N. Scott, Kimmerling, L, Harrell, J. Halstead, Carter, N. Taylor, Magner, Yonce, Haynes, Calvert, Odin, K. Cregar, B. Jones Fourth row: C. Young, Hewlett, M. Watkins, Doggett, V. Shackleford, Carper Third row:

Bobbitt,

Choral Club

left to right: Haskins, N. Duncan, Yonce, Portinaro, Hargan, J. Cregar, McCauley, Lingo. McKenry, N. Taylor, Gosey, B:illard, Butler, Overstreet, Carper Second row: Haynes, M. Savage, Dickerson, M. Morris, M. White. Grimes. G. .\ndorson. M. Jones. Love, Moneyhun, E. Overbey. N. Howard Third row: M. Reid, Goddin, J. Babb, J. Bailey, Crawley, M. Morrisson, Crockett. G. Knight, G. Moore, M. Ballard, V. Tindall, Garnett, Tomlinson, Clark, Simmerman. P. Moore, V. Dale, Helmer, Peterson, J. Freeman, Magner, E. Stoner, Pomeroy, Mountcastle, Davis, Crowther, Davis

Front row,


Wesley Foundation

Hamlin, Mast, Raiford, Price, B. Adams, \'. Farrier left to right; Second row: A. Buck, C. Alphin, L. Thomas, Godwin, Blackwell, L. Brooks Third row: D. Cummings, E. Grizzard, L. Harrell, Miss Hiner, Mr. Blackwell Front row,

Baptist Student

Front row,

left to

Back row:

E. Bailey,

right; ].

L. Sheppard, Knight, G.

Bailey,

N.

Scott,

Union

Moore, M. Addleman, A. Davis, A. Buck, Mr. DeFoe

Fuqua, Petty, V. Treakle, Copenhaver, Putney, Corell


Front row,

left

Back row:

C. Shiflet, L. Bowling, Ozlin, Droste,

to right;

J.

Davis, ShefFey, Stokes, Beatty,

M.

East,

Westminster Fellowship

Moling McCorkle,

S.

Williams


Tuesday The

Meet

Classes

'T Tuesday we had

The

down

settled

order of the day included class meetings and offered opportunity for the development

of that friendly atmosphere so typical of our campus.

The bonds

and the strengthening of these constitutes the purpose of tions, circus stunts, sings

a display of talent and

were

a proving

with hammers

minute

showmanship; they ability to

were born

friendships

in hand,

ideas,

"wee hours/'

were more than

ground for our

Many

cooperate.

last

to a weed's activity.

with a poohng of

with rehearsals into the

We

worked

to produce

and

Mrs.

Bea2,ley

when

all

spmt

are strona

class activity.

Produc-

of class

down

the hall seemed futile

she looked under the bed or in the

closet.

"Warning

note!"

Local politicing was a source of bull

which carried us

sion

sulting

in

the

ses-

far into the night, re-

"bobby-pin struggle" and

"cold water."

the result gave us a feehng of oneness, of

Those Tuesdays

in

belonging together.

A typical Tuesday

the

German push and

Dream

of

You" on

the radio. Things

You Kidding?"

we oificial

we

doubt'

We

griped

hked were "knee slappings" and ed with "Are

about no mail and sweet potatoes in the dining room.

the anxiety for loved-

found us listening to ones in the struggle.

''I

December brought

One minute

clean-ups with

With May came

announcement that the war

in

the

Eu-

rope was ended. That particular Tuesday

we gave thanks

for victory

and re-dedicated

ourselves to peace through prayer.


they seated themselves around the table in

AU were

their appointed places.

and prepared to do

composed

their best in judging

offenses of fellow students

whether there

be a slight infraction of rules or an offense

more

of a

serious nature.

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

even the most trying problems to have

%

the very basis of student government.

This privilege comes naturally with the democratic

way

of

Our campus

life.

is

a

Each March major

elections are held.

major

officers

and the heads of the three

publications meet to

draw up

at least three suggestive

dent government, a valuable experience tO'

fice,

learns

the slate

is

girl

for further nominations.

and employs those practices of

free

final elections are held.

speech, free press, free religion.

ing of her individual opinion

although not always agreed

The voic

is

to.

they see

the "Y," a communitive worship

is

empha'

nomination.

on our campus.

ization

through the

eiforts of

It

was

Dr. Lear,

girl

may have

bility of

vice-president

who had

served on government for

donned

their caps

at

who was

mass student body meetings, and issuing

has existed as a

bitt,

ten the seniors

and gowns amid

and whispers of the passers-by on annex.

two

previous years. Keeping the minutes of the

life.

Tuesday night

was Ophelia Whittle

realized

as secretary.

On

The

assume the responsi-

counting the votes and announcing

campus

student

officers

the results.

For over two decades vital part of

where each

the privilege of one vote.

outgoing major

then the head of the history department. it

one

Ballot boxes are placed at five pre-

Our

have not always had student organ-

is

of the most important days in the school

cincts throughout the school

sized as well as that of each separate de-

We

following day

year.

Working through

it.

The

Through life

With

for each of-

Election day

respected

three publications the girls write about at school as

a slate.

names

opened to the student body

Here each

building citizenship.

A

committee composed of the previous year's

proving ground for future living; our stU'

ward

ac-

ceptable solutions.

HE right of free choice

is

Led by our cap-

Moore, we found

able president, Harriet

of the council in the government

and Campus League chairman, Martha

Not

floor

nature.

first

room,

Treasurer was Carolyn Bob-

Droste.

stares

Joined by the other nine members

cards, Virginia Shackleford served

room

all

of our meetings were of a serious

We

often

for a chat,

stopped by Hackie's

and the seniors were guests-

of-honor at a farewell party before turning


new

over their duties to the

officers

in

March. Being a part of the student council is

experiences of r;rientation were

not only a privilege but a grave respons-

We served on

ibility.

a council that

lieved an integral part of school

we

life,

for

beits

fa.st

bea^m-

ing an integral part of our college. It

wasn't long before

into the Y.

W.

(I.

we

installed

A. None of us

forget the beauty of the scene

stream

steady

a

of

them

will ever

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

early twi-

success kept the status of student rights re-

light,

spected and safe.

white, and carrying lighted candles, walk-

Colonnade

ing through the

Soon

chairman.

astic

intfj

in

Joan Ojurt.

Freshman Commis-

after this the

way with Corinne Baker

sion got under its

clad

girls

The new

girls

as

were enthusi-

and eager to take over the duties of

the retiring

Sophomore Commission.

During the hustle of the weeks preceding

W.

Y.

the Christmas holidays, the

C. A.

"Y"

did

much

to remind us of the true spirit of this religi-

S^lOME moments

home

freshmen arriving on

as

us for the

first

to us as

this year's

Farmville.

of our anxious this

camp-

time were vividly brought

we

did our best to help

freshmen

We

feel

wore

they belonged to

white so that they

They wore

couldn't miss us.

make

expressions

completely revealed their bewilder-

that

ment; thus

we had no

trouble discovering

the time the

Big-Sister, Little- Sister

Reception rolled around at the end of that first

ditional

again

We had

our beautiful and

White Christmas

made

the

pageant,

Rotunda

alive

Christmas-like atmosphere in our of the Greens," and

we

we

tra-

once

with a

"Hanging

joyfully caroled

throughout the town of Farmville, hoping that

would catch our Christmas

others

spirit.

On

our return to school

in January',

we

found many new tasks to occupy our

them.

By

ous season.

week, the freshmen's apparently inex-

haustable store of questions had dwindled; their homesickness

had almost disappeared,

and they seemed more than glad to and enjoy the company of

their

everybody

The

a-bu2;z

after a

else's

with the

Big

Sister.

own and

Gym

lively chatter of girls

few days of the

tiring,

relax

was

who,

but helpful

The

thoughts and our time. mittees seemed

all

their special duties.

afternoons meeting,

we

the

to be

various com-

busy working

When

at

on Wednesday

held our weekly Cabinet

Committee Chairmen com-

pared notes, so that we'd

all

know what the

others were doing.

Religious

Emphasis

Week

chance to take a breathing

gave us

spell

a

from the

busy and confused everyday world and to


stop for sincere consideration of the more

Dr. Churchill

serious subject of religion.

from Richmond to

Gibson came down

spend a few days with us and to help lead our thoughts in the right direction.

we

February

Campus

War

Drive.

all

the

World

same calm,

capable

efficient

willingness to help at

all

love and admire her.

times,

made us

With

such a guide, the its fine

memorial plaque for the piano belonging to the

Modern Languages Department.

all

"Y" was

traditions

able to

and complete a

and minuet carried out the French

As

theme.

FRENCH CIRCLE

Noel"

dis'

in French.

At

a

fall

meeting of

le

cercle,

a brief

study of Canada introduced Miss Draper's

announcement of the impending

arrival at

Farmville of Lise d'Onjou, a French student

became

L'

Cercle Francais,

a

club for studying and speaking French, be^

gan the year with a

picnic.

Every month

held, each especially planned interest in

French customs,

ideas,

France

and music.

a stimulating part of

the French department, assisting with class' es in conversation

E

new

"Pere

climax

a

tributed oranges, and everyone sang carols

quarters, Lise

to create

cleverly presented

from Quebec. With the opening of winter

successful year.

meetings were

A

the Spanish Club. ballet

"Birdie's" ability to cope with

situations in the

carry on

sale.

goal the purchase of a

Of course the most pretentious event was

Red Cross and

manner and her

its

the Christmas party, jointly sponsored with

Bird Williams was our

president.

as

Chest

Student Service Fund. Sara

French greeting cards were offered for

The Club had

This was our big yearly

sponsored the

drive for the

In

Christmas time when lovely hand'painted

itself,

in

Games

circle meetings.

and being present

An

at the

unusually interesting

program was the one welcoming her to

"Oh Canada,"

T. C.

Lise's native land

S.

the national song of

was sung by the group.

After that Lise vividly described

life at

the

French university from which she trans' f erred.

played entirely in French were always pop' In addition to Miss Draper's guiding ular, including favorite

and "Je vais

At

card games. Bingo,

hand,

a Paris."

the circus simple messages written in

French to be sent to boys overseas were sold in a gaily

decorated booth. Again

money making venture was undertaken

le

cercle

had

as officers the following:

Alice Green, president; Margaret Harvie,

a at

vicc'president;

Spott

Hunnicutt,

second

vice-president; Sara Dailey Moling, secre' tary;

Anne Mingea,

Lear, reporter.

treasurer,

and Robin


Parrish, viccpresident; Betty Bibb, secretary;

and Evelyn Ofjodman, treasurer.

GAMMA MU

PI

M.

.(JRE than ever the

ture of the world

THE SPANISH CLUB

youth of this,

^ The

T'S Tuesday afternoon.

four o'clock bell rings, calling

all

eager

lies in

Pi

t(jday.

Gamma Mu,

continued her interest

War World," our project.

and we took

We

fu-

the hands of the

in

feeling

our "Post

a phase of

it

for

acted out the San Fran-

Spanish students to their monthly meeting cisco conference as in the audiovisual

room.

As

might hear such unintelligible phrases

"Muchas Gracias"

With

or

"Hace Mucho

as

Cal-

the guiding spirits of the club

sponsor. Miss Barksdale, the Puerto Rican

and Bra2,iHan easily

girls,

the entire meeting

we had

leading figures and countries in the world.

Our social event of the was

passing by the table in the hall

a great success

Helen McGuire. as queen.

attractive assortment of colorful cards

the club,

latter part of

when food

December

for

similar to that of the

earlier

part

of

the

year,

Carlos Manning, a native of Bolivia, spoke all

Spanish students contrasting the cus-

toms of the United States with those of

Mary

Mardi Gras,

under the direction of

Virginia Terrell reigned

ladies of the court, dressed

costumes of colonial South America,

were Ehse Hume, Jane Philhower, Mary Watkins,

Mary Walker Watts,

Ross, Virginia Travis,

It

Pegg>' T.

Lynn Sprye and Luz

was our pleasure

club officers this year were these:

Preston Sheffey, president;

Nancy

to have several pro-

grams with the college choir giving "Songs of the Allied Nations."

Joan Ruth here

With

Bolivia.

The

The

year,

Quinones.

Spanish was served.

During the

our

by the

club members. The typical Fiesta came to

T. C. in the

for

dc in

signed with a Latin- American touch

background

a better

project.

few weeks before Christmas witnessed an

to

would

speeches, papers and discussions on

Thus we had

is

conducted in Spanish.

Anyone

S.

it

In our meetings throughout the year

be.

a

imagined

the room, the ignorant bystander

ward

or."

we

they rush to-

program.

the help of our officers, Betsy Fox,

Nancy Harrell, Feitig,

in a

We also sponsored

Caroline Huddle, and Alice

and our sponsors. Miss Nichols, Dr.


HOME ECONOMICS CLUB

Walmsley, and Mr. Coyner, we had a very successful year.

s.lERVICE was KAPPA DELTA

PI

.AVING

some time the need the story of

Pi,

our group de-

study this year the

its

Kappa Delta

history of

knowing more of

for

Kappa Delta

cided to select for

and to use the

Pi,

Educational

our

excellent

material

Forums

round out our programs.

to

In the Fall tor

for

realized

in

we made

our

new

dean.

the year.

Doc

She was speaker

our annual banquet held

on December in the

8.

Beta Epsilon Chapter of

at

Tea Room

in the

Initiated into

who had

could. During the

W.

Committee of the Y.

work

ing the volunteer dressings for the

fall

of service

quarter,

we

Red

was given

the club

of

making

surgical

Cross.

in the early

time, the freshmen

meet

C. A. in promot-

of Miss Tupper's delightful teas for

all

At

fall.

this

had an opportunity to

Home

of the instructors in the

Economics Department and to get to know each other.

At some

and

field

emphasized cooperation with the Service

Kappa Delta

displayed outstanding in'

terest in the field of education,

that

we

membership

Pi were girls from the Junior and Senior classes

attempted to help in any

One

Martha Smith Smith, our honorary

member -for

we

the theme

Economics Club

In view of war-time conditions,

this year.

Ms

Home

carried out in the

of our meetings,

we

discussed

become

the post-war world, and tried to familiar with

some of the products,

especi-

who had be put on the future

ally textiles, that will

a record of sound scholarship. During the

market for world consumption. In cooperaSpring the society honored the members of the Freshman and

made up

Sophomore

who

classes

the upper quartile of the classes

with a reception held

in the

Student Build'

Officers for the current year

Wade,

president; retary,

Elea-

president; Alice Nichols, vice-

Mary

and

were

Franklin

Mary Ann

Woodward,

sec-

Jarratt, treasurer.

Miss Pauhne Camper was our sponsor.

We

the

Granddaughters Club

we

again presented the history of the college

through costume.

We

ing Lounge.

nor

tion with

With

were well guided by our Elsie

Thompson

officers.

as president of the

club; Lorraine Raeford as vice-president;

Ann

Shufflebarger

Webb porter,

secretary;

Nannie

and Joan Davis

as re-

concluded another year.

Miss

as treasurer;

we

as

Home

Economics De-

kept in constant touch through correspond-

Tupper, head of the

ence with the National Kappa Delta Pi at

partment, continued to be the advisor for

Tiffin,

Ohio.

the club.


New

DiJstyB' inters (organization of ad'

vanced riders

Pegasus) were Jody Davis,

cjf

Shirley Gibson, and Jean Sauerwen.

DRAMATIC CLUB 'OOM,

u

Down

and over the

the

fields for a

went members of Pegasus

for

another year of fun and instruction. Back

Longwood we went,

to

for long hours in

the ring under supervision of Joyce Cheat'

wood, student

we found

trails

We

enjoyed

trails,

thanks

both

Oh, the new

instructor.

many

eventful rides

new and

we offered

Dean Smith

to

down

Many were

old.

for letting

us ride on Sunday afternoons, and

were the envious glances which as

we headed

the

we

for the stables, slick

many

received

and

shin-

Again

The

this spring

we

presented the an'

excitement and success as in the years past, this year, too,

thrills of

we had

the added minor

gay jaunts to Hampden' Sydney

during exams and

chummy

on early Sunday mornings. blue'jeans

and plaid

tells

the story of

shirts

American nurses in a

dug'

out, adjacent to Bataan, early in 1942.

The

women.

Its

cast

is

composed

presentation

left

entirely of

an enthusiastic and

in-

spired audience.

The

acting group, under the direction

of Grace

Loyd and Dodie

Jones, presented

comedies and tragedies for our entertain-

ment during the

The

year.

various depart'

ments helped to present these plays.

At

all

our meetings the programs were excellent.

The

high tide of the year came the night thrilled us all

with her

view of "The Barretts of Wimpole

With

nual Horse Show, with the same amount of

and

play

on Bataan. The story takes place

Miss Wheeler

ing from top to toe.

"Cry Havoc."

standing play of the year,

and around Farmville!

in

fa'

miliar sounds during practice for the out'

/P and away!

jolly canter

ack'ack" and

thunderous crashes were many of the

PEGASUS

trail at a brisk trot

zip,

fairies

a

a

and

climax

jump from Japs and khaki veils,

in

re-

Street."

to

the spring season reached

"A Midsummer

Dream." The scenes

Night's

in the forest, the cos'

the mix-

breakfast'rides

tumes of the light-footed

We advocated

ups of the mortals, the antics of the com'

second to stand'

edies, the

fairies,

never'ending pranks of Puck, the

praised the Colonel

immortal speech of Shakespeare, the lovely

and dodged the Colt, and held our breaths

music of Mendelsohn, were there for the

ard riding togs, and

till

we

Joyce had placed us

of the

moment.

all

upon our mounts

enjoyment of

all

who

The Dramatic Club

heard.

has

its less

strenuous


side, too,

with numerous

which served

INTERMEDIATE A CAPPELLA

social functions

among

to create friendship

the members. Having seen each other only occasionally since spring,

when

greetings

with

a'

for the

we

gave hilarious

the old girls met this

fall

and we discussed plans

jovial party

coming year. As Christmas was ap-

proaching, the members

another party.

Gay

the need for

felt

/AN'T Help

is

A

Cappella group. To the freshmen and sophomores with nice voices but little experience our song group offered an opporate

We

tunity for practicing and perfecting.

were

also

members

was, with appropri-

it

Singing"

an apt phrase that describes the Intermedi-

of the choir or choral

club.

ate festive decorations,

the members.

Our

and

among

jesting

social event of the year

With

the intermediate singers

to lighter music.

were popular

For the

first

we

sang in chapel, open-

ing the program with the is

hymn,

we

Beguine" gave that added

new

the

sang "Begin the bit of

ment we needed. Porgy and

of the

"Now

Over." The eager response that our

group received when

was our entertainment

turned

selections of tested quality.

Early in the year

Day

we

time our songs

encourage-

Bess's

"Sum-

girls at a

tea in Student Lounge.

The Dramatic Club functional departments

is

:

divided into six

the make-up group,

headed by Catherine Lynch; the costume group, by Helen McGuire; lighting, by lian EUiott; staging, ties,

by

Ann

Lil-

Blair; proper-

by Carolyn Hayslett; and acting by

Grace Loyd. Sally

Robertson

Carol Diggs as

iirst

served

as

president;

vice-president; Virginia

Shackleford as second vice-president; Lucy

Manson

Sharpe, secretary; Fay Johnson,

treasurer; Earlene

Kimmerhng, music

chair-

man; Doris Harper, scrap book chairman; Betty Cock, chairman of pubHcity; Dorothy

Overcash and Kitty Mattox,

man; and Virginia

director of the plays. ficers,

and

social chair-

as adviser

It is to her,

their dependable

the credit should be given.

and

the of-

workers that

You Are"

The group had contemplated singing "Dark Eyes" but gave the idea up to put more tedious work on the spring concert. It was a great honor to be asked to sing Dr. T. Tertius Noble's original composition "I

Wandered by

the Brookside."

we

personal direction

presented

Under it

as

his

our

contribution in the concert.

Many

evenings

we

could be found work-

ing diligently in the choral club

Terrell, parliamentarian.

Miss Leola Wheeler served

mertime" and "All the Things completed our program.

room over

the numbers in our performances, but some-

times

we

sang just for the joy of singing,

applying our

own

arrangements.

With

Ester Shevick as our leader and Margie

Hewlett

as pianist,

we

most successful year.

considered 1945 our


Student

Government

Officers, left to right:

V. Shackle

ford, Droste, Bobbitt, Whittle

H. Moore

left to right; Higgms, Parden, V. Shackleford, Whittle, Bobbitt, Lohr. Droste, H. Wilson, Brothers, B. Scott, Helmer, Massey, M. East

Council, seated,

Standing:

S.

WilHams


Y.

W.

Rieck, Jarrett, A. Martin, Ozlin, S. Williams, Grumpier first row, left to right: Second row: Stokes, Cruser, Wyatt, J. Anderson, Brugh, Hewlett, Moling Back row: Massey, H. Moore, K. Maddox, V. Treakle, Price

Cabinet,

C.

A


French Circle

Officers, left to right:

M.

Harvie, Moling, Green, Mingea

Spanish

Club

Officers, seated, left to right:

Garcia, Bihh

Standing: N. Parrish, Shetfey

Goodman.


'

Pi

Gamma

Mu --i

Radogna, Huddle, N. Harrell, McGuire, Ruffin, M.

Seated, left to right:

Standing:

^''^?5:----:?3

ilf-^-^?

^"^-3

Bell

G. Sheppard, V. Abernathy, B. Scott, Overcash, Fuqua, Shaffner,

Bisese,

E. Jones, R. Davis,

Holloway

Kappa Delta Pi

First

Wade, Whittle, Doggett, Jarrett, Prosise, Nickels M. Stewart, B. Abernathy, M. Woodward, B. Woodward,

row, left to right: Radogna, Ingle, Blanton, Robertson,

Second row:

Hewlett, Bobbitt, MaslofF, Barksdale, Durrett,

Prebble

Standing:

N.

Shaffner,

Harrell, H. Moore, K. Ozlin, Bowling, Boss,

Sheffey, Stokes, V, Treakle, Sanford, Weeks, B. Adams, Anderson, Ruffin, E. Grizzard, Lynch, Calvert, Holloway

Maddox, Overcash, J.


Home

First

Economics Club

Webb, J. Davis, V. Burton, Sours, J. Davis, Shufflebarger, left to nj;lit; Thompson, Hauser, F. Moon, B. Nichols, Sollenbcrger, Nixon C. Christian, Stovall, Chick, Via, May, C. Shepard, Hall

row, E.

Second row: Third row: Back row:

Brisintine,

C. Grizzard, N.

Schriver, Hite, Raiford, B. Lee,

Fleming, Seward, A. Davis

Rieck, F. Treakle, S. Williams, Short,

Jk

M. Atkinson,

Left to right

:

E.

Anderson, Pierce. Price

Lohr, Sterrett

Pegasus

Left to right,

left

picture:

Cheatwood.

Left to right, right picture: B.

Gibson, L. Jones

Ellis, J.

J.

Smith

Rowe.

J.

Davis. S.


Dramatic Club FROM PLAY "CRY HAVOC'

Left to right:

Whitehead, Loyd, M.

Executive Board, front row,

Back row:

left to right:

Bell,

Pegram, James, Twiford,

J.

Davis, T. Powell

Harper, McGuire, K. Maddox, Lynch,

Loyd, Miss Wheeler, Kimmerling, C. Diggs,

S.

Robertson, Overcash

L.

Elliott,

V. Shackleford, Hayslett


Front row,

right: Munlian, S. Dickenson, A, Clark, Hewlett, Shevick, Sarver, M. SavaKe, N. Hov/ard, Mint'pa N. Taylor, M. West, I. Davis, Page, Helnier, Bahb, E. Overby

left to

Second row:

T Intermediate

A

Cappella


Wednesday Students lead Chapel exercises

^TUDET^lT Day Chapel girls to

offers

contribute through special programs to various school exercises.

unique presentations as well as devotional services originate

It is

the choir selections

The

men's Creek."

were but examples of the chapel programs

teachers'

presented each Wednesday.

8:05

"The student body chapel." These

remain after

will

words meant added

attrac-

A skit to publici2,e the annual circus

or an appeal to purchase a play ticket might

The

be the order of the day.

ended the

familiar chord

rose to

march out

to

striking of a

exercise,

the

and we

"Bells of

St.

Mary." might find us

students themselves.

War Day

We

creativity in

exercise, the

hstened to the student

woes and complained about our

classes.

We hummed "There, I've Said A famihar question "Got a date

it

Again.""

for senior

dance?" was followed by our theme song

Walk

"I

a thrill

Alone." Telephone

and those scarce

calls

gave us

articles called

were our main topic of conversation.

my

men

"Oh

aching back" survived as a favorite say-

The book

of the year

Many Wednesday

selling

egg salad sandwiches or collecting coke bot-

Amber";

The

ing-

Any Wednesday

tles.

ivith the

they ivho are the leaders, the speakers, the performers.

Red Cross Campaign,

tions.

an opportunity for the

was "Forever

the movie of the year, "French-

of

the

Tokyo.

naval

No

touching us a

and

headlines told stories air

bombardment of

day passed without the war little

deeper.


thing,

empty coke bottles, confusion and

all.

Treakle lived in town, but on Tuesday

always found an empty bed

she

nights

somewhere calls to

Ruffin on other nights soon came to

Mary Walton

be accepted as the sight of

typing on the famihar

Betty

of the school opened last

before the doors fall,

members of

and Evelyn

Cock managed

Gri2;2;ard

their noses to the

side, Sterrett

grindstone, seeking to

make an accurate

ley collected the ads,

week by week record

of Hfe at S. T. C.

It's

Rotunda

staff

been hard work from beginning to end,

but with printer's ink in our blood, we've loved every minute of

an

si2;ed job,

new

it.

It's

been a

all'time, all'Staff job,

full'

with each

edition beginning before the ink on the

old one has dried.

There have been some very

all

we

room itors

we

into an office.

sports columns

There the

Monday

captioned

associate ed-

nights; there the

we

were

pulled our grey late; there,

and strong, we

the paper to be on

Our

Rufiin's

were composed; there the

hair over articles that

nights.

office after

converted

copy was typed; there

coffee, black

this

ran into bedcheck, and

virtually

convened on

distinctive

Rotunda

because that kept us out of the eleven,

over

put together

Monday and Tuesday

favorite cartoon

"Any

in the

ol'

was the one

Monday

night"

by

Betty Deuel, which pictured the whole

On

who

the business

Dot Tur-

and Ruth Brooks took

way

We

started some'

of cartoons, and Car-

men Low turned up with

a

new

linoleum

cut every week.

The

ever

'

continuous

cycle

persisted.

Assignments were given out on Wednes'

On Thursdays we took pictures

day nights.

things about putting out the year. First of

new

angle;

the features,

balanced the books.

charge of circulation. thing

paper. for us;

kept us posted on

went where and when.

had

the

news

the

watched out for the sports

Ellis

Betty Deuel

qAi.LMOST

yeUow copy

down

Betty Lewis ran

THE ROTUNDA

Her midnight

in "the building."

for the next edition

and sent the

film off

with fingers crossed that the prints would be back by

Sunday and would be good.

Monday

first

the

of the copy

was taken

the Herald ofiice to be set up. There

to

was

a

continual stream of copy flowing to the

Herald

office

on Tuesdays, and

got the gallies. fore supper

fun,

the

at five

we

dummy

be'

on Tuesday was always great

we burned

and

Tuesday

Making up

nights.

the midnight

oil

on

On Wednesdays we raced

to the Herald office at chapel time for a final

check before the presses started

ing.

We

ness";

we

shifted articles filled

up

roll'

to avoid "grey

loose spaces with leads;


we

we

rewrote heads;

the pressroom in

And

faces.

joined the others in

inking our fingers and

finally the

paper went to press.

In the afternoon the circulation staff folded

and distributed the

copies,

the vicious circle began

and that night

all (jver

verted into sion

ffjr

War

Bfjnds, served as admis-

the evening's entertainment.

put on a quiz program for the

benefit ot the

American Red Cross. There

were

five cfjntestants

from the V-12"s

Hampden-Sydney and

again.

In

we

the spring

five

at

selected

girls

frcjm the student body.

ALPHA KAPPA

A

GAMMA

jeweled pin, which will be

anly Service."

Joan

JADERSHIP LWith this as

held

Circle

in

tapping

impressive

its

Wom-

our purpose,

service once each quarter in Student

We recognized as leaders in the

chapel.

and winter:

Ann Martin, Nancy

Treakle,

ginia

Day

Frances Lee, Vir-

Our

er Jones.

officers

and

spirit of

as a goal for

Mary

which

ideals.

ALPHA

SIGMA

PHI

Dora Walk'

were: Lucy

T.HIS

Manson

scholastic fraternity

president; Jane Ruffin, secretary, and Har-

that

Moore,

Miss

to strive.

our advisers, helped us to uphold these high

Sharp, president; Sara Bird WiUiams, vice-

riette

Joan of Arc was

Gleaves and Miss Elizabeth Burger,

Maddox, Martha

Higgins, Sally Robertson, and

The

kept before us always as a light to guide us

Eleanor

Harrell,

Bisese, Shirley Cruser, Pat

fall

the circle.

worn by

was purchased by

the president each year

it

is

is

national honorary

unique

in the fact

the only organization of

its

kind

on campus which bids freshmen. Member-

treasurer.

We presented the annual circus, a merry-

ship includes

new

girls

who were

and salutatorians of

the vale-

go-round of fun under the direction of

dictorians

Helen Wilson. Grace Loyd served

school graduating classes, as well as fresh-

master.

as ring

Reigning over the "big-top" were

men and sophomores with an two consecutive

Helen McGuire, queen; Jackie Parden, rep-

B-plus for

resenting the Juniors; Margaret Lohr, the

who

Sophomores, and "Peepsie"

Master's degree.

Each

Freshmen.

went

class

gave a

who

Brooks, skit.

the First

their high

average of

quarters.

Those

maintained this standard achieved the

We

enjoyed a successful year under the

cleverly dis-

direction of our leaders: Patsy Dale, our

played the history of the circus from the

most capable president: Mar)" Stewart Bu-

place

days of the

and

to the Seniors,

Romans

Bciiley.

gypsy mores.

life

The

won

War

to the days of

Barnum

colorful presentation of

second place for the Sopho-

stamps, which later were con-

ford, vice-president:

secretary; retary;

Ann

Carter, recording

Rachel Brugh, corresponding

sec-

Page Cook, treasurer. Dot Turley,

reporter,

and

Anna

Headlee,

chaplain.


Miss Mary Peck, in all

our

our adviser, assisted us

as

The outstanding

was

project for the year

the organi2;ation of a second'hand book store

with the purpose of

the freshmen.

were treated the

activities.

selling

books to

In addition to this

Alpha

This was one of

graciously.

happy moments

remembered

to be

connection with the U.

S.

in

O.

Jackie Parden, as chairman of the com-

made evenings

mittee,

at the

U.

S.

O.

so

tempting that few could refuse to attend.

Phi Sigma sponsors a loan fund to enable

Mary EHzabeth Fuqua,

students financially handicapped to con'

Ophelia Whittle, secretary-treasurer, and

tinue their education.

Miss Wheeler,

Our programs of

many

during the year consisted

interesting discussions, but the

max was

a talk

on "Character,

-

chairman;

most able adviser,

assisted in solving all problems.

Shirley Gibson

and Lucy McHenry,

as

cli-

Citizienship,

and Culture" delivered by our own Dean Smith. High ideals as well as high standards of scholarship are fostered

a

as

vice

on the campus

through the influence of Alpha Phi Sigma.

heads of the Farmville recreation center, took us to the center and back on such oc-

There we entertained or more

casions.

of-

ten were entertained by the soldiers from

Camp

Pickett and the V-12's from

Time

den-Sydney. passed

all

activity,

Hamp-

spent at the U. S. O.

too quickly with a variety of

including

bridge,

dancing,

and

ping pong.

Sandwiches, doughnuts, and

coffee served

by the hostesses come only

in

time to revive us after a particularly vigor-

ous game of ping pong or a

fast jitter-bug

number. Because there were few men

U.

S.

O.

tioned at Pickett, the center

COMMITTEE

was

sta-

closed in

January, thus ending an active part of our

s

ÂťATURDAY

U.

S.

O. night" was

trips

is

However,

were confined

this

year

war program.

trip to Pickett in the

fall.

This was a com-

bination dance-party given in honor of the

Camp

WAR

COUNCIL

chiefly to the local

recreation center with the exception of one

convalescents at

college

a familiar phrase often

heard on the campus.

our

night

Pickett Hospital.

SHsOT

often in the eyes of

the public, but always striving to bring the

student body into a fuller reali2;ation of the

war, the 1945

War

Council has been an

we were

the

active organisation.

Through the various

honored guests rather than they, for

we

committees such as

Red

After arriving

we

felt

that

Cross, Physical


Fitness, or Surgical Dressings, the council

many hours and much

has spent

approaching the goal for which

To

ated.

it

emergency

establish an

him

was

ising

(organiza-

which our school might have a

tion in

part in the

war

effort

was our purpose.

Thursday nights the Art Lab was with

girls

with heads wrapped

ere'

vital

On filled

in scarves.

Eagerly working they tried to establish a

new

record in the

number

of

Two eye operations

household.

effort in

He

slight visicjn.

ha.s

manual dexterity, and

srjared since he has

long-drawn

have

his spirits

weathered a recent

He

tack of malaria.

have given

developed prom-

at-

enjoys imitating the

cries of the street vendors.

All third year elementary majors and

minors were invited to become members of

our group. They have

fulfilled their duties

dressings in helping us carry

through our programs

rolled.

and

The

climax of the year came on

Day." Major Noel Adams, chaplain from

Camp

Pickett, spoke forcefully

ditions of the

on the con-

the student's contri'

His speech highlighted a day of

bution. activity

sions

war and

which included round'table

discus-

on the major countries of the world.

Such a program had

as

purpose, "war

its

projects.

"War

The

speakers.

Miss Mix, the

Christmas party with "Santa Claus," and the informal meetings before Miss Haynes' fireplace will

memories. sing

have a special place

We

our

in

heard a group of children

and were pleasantly impressed that

they did so well. In the musicale sponsored

by the A. C. E. and the P. T. A.

in

March,

consciousness." several parts of the

The

worthy.

ASSOCIATION OF CHILDHOOD

program were note-

kindergarten entertained us

with rhythms; the fourth grade

EDUCATION

in

costume

danced the Virginia Reel: and the sixth

5.N war

our fourth year of

the Association for Childhood Educa-

tion has attempted to

drives

and war

do

its

activities.

part in

Its

campus

main project

gave part of the opera "Hansel and Gretel.""

Leading us

president gave us ful

child, Benji.

As

Committee half-starved,

many

inspiring

as vice-

and

help-

AUeyne

Ann Jones was sec-

Phillips,

treasurer,

and

American Friends Service

Philadelphia,

ten-year-old

had existed by begging Gate.

was Aline

Rachel Joyner

programs. Elizabeth

Nancy in

activities

described to us in retary;

a letter from the

our

Boss, as president.

of the year has been to help support a

Chinese

in

Benji

was

Benji, cleaned, clothed

Ways

a

bHnd boy who

at the city's

Dickerson, chairman of the

North

and fed has

become a popular member of the Convoy

and Means Committee.

We are grateful to

Miss Mary Haynes, our guidance,

interest,

adviser, for her

and understanding

helping us to accomplish our work.

in


GRANDDAUGHTERS CLUB

marked the S.

NE coining to Farmville

My

tradition.

here."

of

my

that

is

mother and

reasons for is

it

my

sister

came

We soon found that countless others

had had mothers or grandmothers attended this school.

We

reaHzed that by lots

whose mothers attended

lots of girls

school here.

who had

we would meet

being Granddaughters,

and

a family

We

had always heard our

Alma Mater.

Farmville as our

This year sent boxes to

we

servicemen, and col'

lected costumes typical of past years. This

project

was continued from

last

year and

costumes become school property.

all

November

During the

well.

bers

at the circus

were taken

fall

in

we had

In

our wishing

first fall

meet'

secretary;

Griffin,

Frances Livesay, treasurer; Phyllis Scher'

Miss Emily Kauz,'

berger, social chairman.

was

larich

re'elected

McCarthy came

our adviser.

Father

to Farmville to meet with

us twice a month.

We held round'table dis'

on various questions that had

cussions

arisen in regard to our religion.

we were

Early in February

invited to

spend the afternoon and to have dinner

Crewe. After Christmas our club Lise D'Onjou,

at

his

home

we welcomed

who had come

in

into to S.

We conclud'

T. C. from Quebec, Canada.

ed the year with a special dinner at Hotel

Weyanoke and hoped

1946 would

that

bring us an equally enjoyable club year.

new mem-

thirtyfive

and

Helene

vice'president;

with Father McCarthy

Longwood,

have served at

wounded

elected at our

ing Bea Bruch, president; Libby DriscoU,

mothers talk so fondly about the professors

and traditions that we wanted to claim

We

T. C.

anniversary of the Club at

first

we had

our annual

COMMERCIAL CLUB

party.

Our

officers

were: Nannie

Webb,

presi'

dent; Virginia Lee Abernathy, viccpresi' dent; tary;

Mary Frankhn Woodward, Dorothy Bennett,

treasurer,

and Eve'

lyn Griz2,ard, reporter. Miss Virginia

was our

secre'

Wall

adviser.

(O much time," all

is

afternoon or night, first

if

floor Library,

Any

home

the

CLUB

JT the beginning

quarter an invitation to the

of the

Newman

Club was extended by Father Eilerman to Catholic

girls.

You would

probably wonder what went on with such earnest purpose.

qA^ new

of the

Commercial Department, you could hear a

NEWMAN

all

morning,

you were passing

steady tap, tap, tap, tap, tap.

fall

little

the familiar complaint of almost

the commercial students.

near

to do, so

This past September

If

you happened to open

one of the doors, you would have found us energetically

pursuing our

courses

even

after class time.

We try to study every aspect of business,


such as advertising, merchandising, Federal

come

a

is

sym-

Income Tax accounting, insurance,

bfjlic

of a friendliness that prevails.

To

in ad-

dition to the ever-present shorthand, typ-

Anyone who

and bookkeeping.

ing,

that a commercial course

is

says

member. This simple phrase

maintain this friendly relationship not only

amrjng individual orities

really has not

get information

and understanding of the

business world, and to present an oppor-

tunity for knowing each other better.

we

how

how

on

several helpful films

Rushing comes three times a year

to find your

right

life

They

many

sug-

which were helpful to everyone.

we

initiated the

who made

C

averages during the

quarter instead of

and minors

all

business maj-

as in the preceding years.

We felt that this would

then that the counhouse,

scheduling

times, keeping a recrjrd of the girls rushed,

with the

sororities

little

final

"regret" on them.

white cards to the

words "accept" or

Through

the Pan-Hel-

Council and the careful guidance of

Miss Cleaves the

rules are

made

made up

of a represent-

clear

and

are enforced.

The ative

girls

extending membership to

It is

clearing

a

council

is

from each chapter and the president

new

freshmen, taking in only fall

as

fall,

work, and

and wrong ways of ap-

After Christmas

ors

acts

cil

lenic

proaching the problem and gave gestions

winter, and spring.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

to apply

to accomplish other useful aims.

showed the

s^jr-

one of the chief aims of the Pan-

is

and distributing the

took advantage of the Au-

dio-Visual Department of the college and

for a job,

among

organi2;ed in

stimulate interest in the field of business, to

how

alsfj

Hellenic Council.

1939 for commercial students in order to

saw

but

been around us very often.

The Commercial Club was

This year

girls

"a bed of roses"

of each chapter,

who work

together as a

unit to solve the problems of the eight sororities

and to

familiarize each sorority girl

of the rush rules by giving the Pan-Hellenic

greatly strengthen

exam.

our Club. In the

we had

fall

Lounge which was ities

a tea in

Student

a highhght of the activ-

of the council. Jean Prosise, our presi-

dent, presented the scholastic plaque to Phi

Zeta Sigma. Decorated in the gay colors of the eight sororities, the

gym became

the

scene of festivity one Saturday evening in

PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL

qA-

JT Home" are two words

which give a sorority

to a girl the opportunity to visit

and

later, if

she chooses, to be-

March.

We

danced to the music of the

"Vagabonds."

AH

too soon the fun

over. In April installation sen,-ices realize that our

work had ended.

was

made us


WAR EMPHASIS DAY COMMITTEE JL

Day

HE

to be observed

Wednesday, February entire Student

War

third

on

this

Emphasis

Campus was

when

21, 1945,

Body was divided

the

into six

groups to discuss what the major nations of the world demand,

would

obtain,

and could

ORCHESIS

contribute to the peace conference.

The group

discussing England

C. G. Gordon Moss with

Other students

assisting

was

Blanton, Shirley Cruser, and Kitty dox. Miss Leola

led

by

Anne Summers. were Anna Lee Mad'

Wheeler and Betty Adams

led the group discussing

China and Frances

Copenhaver and Agnes Stokes

also took

Leading the group on the British pos'

was

S.

ginia Treakle.

Holton,

Jr.,

with Vir'

Others helping with

this

were Nancy Harrell, Caroline

discussion

Huddle,

M.

and

Dorothy

was easy

Thursday mornings

to pick out the

Orchesis as they trekked to

Overcash.

The

members of After

classes.

a grueling session of dancing the night be' fore, said

members were usually walking

though on

as

and moaning something

glass

which sounded suspiciously

part in leading the group.

sessions

N it

"Oh,

like

my

aching back."

However, sore muscles and aching

feet

by the fun we

were well compensated

for

had

was on those same

at

our meetings.

Wednesday

nights

It

we

that

created the

United States Discussion group was led by

dances which would later be presented in

Dr. James Elliott Walmsley, assisted by

Recital or Sing.

Mary Ann

our president, Betty

Jarratt,

chairman, and Evelyn

With Miss

Kau2,larich and

Ellis in

the lead

we

Grizzard, Minnie Grumpier, and Shirley

found ourselves doing dance steps which

Slaughter.

would have put grandma

Dr. F. B. Simpkins and Fay Byrd John'

Growing out

of the

to bed for a week.

fall

work was our

We

son led the group on Latin America with

annual Christmas sing.

Juha Braga, Olive Bradshaw, Carmen Flores

our old favorites in addition to several beau'

and Catherine Trower helping them. Those

tiful

new

the

newcomers was the "Annunciation"

assisting in the discussion

on Russia were

Jane

Waring

Ruffin, Mildred Altice, Elea'

nor

Bisese,

Lucy

Bralley,

and

Eleanor

Wade.

Moore

presided

among

and the sprightly "Carol." After

we had bid

we

sixteen

new

apprentices

got under

way

again, this

time rehearsing for our Recital and

v/as a general assembly in the large audi'

torium at noon. Harriette

some of

ones. Particularly effective

in January,

Following these open discussions, there

did

Day. Some of our parts in

May Day

girls

and nearly

and introduced the student leader of each group who gave reports from their respect'

ticipated.

ive groups.

fun and hard work.

Our

recital

May

had leading dance all

of us par'

climaxed a year of


Rotunda

Heads, left to right: Holton, Sterrett

Ruffin

row, left to right: Turley, B. Lcwh, R. Jone?, Blane, Gehton, Hundley Second row: Droste, A. Buck, Buford, T. Hutt, Holloway Third row: Nichols, R. Brooks, Overcash, Spry, M. Woodward, Cobbs, B. Woodward, F. Lee, M. Loving First

Seated, left to right:

Standing:

M.

E. Grizzard, Sterrett, Ruffin, Rucker, Pullcn, Trowcr, B. EUi;

Bear, F. Johnson, Moling, Walton,

Radogna


Alpha Kappa Gamma

Seated, left to right:

Standing:

H. Wilson,

M. S.

Bell, P.

Maddox, Robertson,

Jarrett, F. Lee, Cruser, Higgins, Whittle, Bisese,

Williams, Martin, V. Treakle,

Wade,

Ruffin, D. Jones,

H. Moore

Alpha Phi Sigma

Turley, Dale Second row: Headlee, A. Carter, P. Cook, Buford, Brugh

Officers, front row, left to right:

N. Harrcll


U.

O. Committee

S.

Front row,

left

Second row:

to

right:

Prebble, Gibson,

Ruffin, Fuqua,

McKenry, Miss Wheeler,

Peebles, Parden,

War

Left to

right:

S.

M.

Bell

Whittle, Shufflebarger, Lynch

Williams, Grumpier, Bisese,

Council

M. Watts, H. Moore, H. Wilson, McGuirc,

Ruffin, Droste


Association

Of Childhood

Officers, left to right:

Education

E. Jones, Joyner, A. Phillips, Boss

Granddaughters

Club

Officers, left to right:

V. Abernathy, D. Bennett, Grijsard,

M. Woodward

E.


Newman

Seated, left to right:

Club

Braga, Costa, Quinones, Livcsay, Bruch, DnscoU, GrifEn, Avellanet, A. Williams

Standing: J. Bentley, Carbonell, Scherberger, Maldonado

M, Watson, Miss

Kauzlarich, McCarty, deCarbona, Portinaro, Bisesc, Calvert,

Commercial

Club

left to right: H. Hutt, Fuqua, T. Hutt, Hawthorne

Officers,


Pan-Hellenic Council

Left to right:

War

Front row,

J.

Emphasis Day Committee

left

Second row:

Smith, A. Carter, F. Butt, Brothers, Prosise, E. Grizzard, Ritchie, Bisese

to

H. Moore, Ruffin, Jarrett, E. Jones V. Treakle, B. Adams, F. Johnson, Summers

right:

Bisese,


Front row,

left to right:

Lovins

Second row: F. Lee, J. Smith Third row: Whitehead, B. EHis, Suttle

Orchesis


Thursday We journeyed

down Town

S

)VERTDAT

men

was "down town day" jor

hut on three days each wee\ the freshmen swelled the

campus included Shannon's, Southsides, Patterson Thursday was a day when Main Street was chases might consist of scarce Kleenex or

even more scarce candy bars.

The

daily

filled ivith

In reality the Farmville

ran}{s.

Baldwin

s,

the upper class-

and the two theaters.

s.

student shoppers whose prize pur-

began our week-end

cuts.

in school for that all

Others remained

important play re

where

hearsal

"from whence there was no

re-

they indulged in a good old American milk

treat."

The

re-

shake and grilled cheese sandwich.

unions" between alumnae and us

lunches crowded the eating places

Still

halls

were scenes of "glad

was

girls.

The

with the

others sought school supplies or hesitated

cigarette shortage

over the displays of much'needed station'

scarcity of matches running a close second.

ery.

Various dance chairmen shopped for

crepe paper,

thumb

We

were

tacks, ''tempera'' paint

by

a

stiU acute,

plunged

often

fuse blown.

into

darkness

Those forbidden hot

and cardboard. plates!

Thursdays would

"Moon centuate

find

us listening to

River" or jitterbugging to the

Positive."

We

"Ac

exclaimed

"hon'ee" over chipper things and called our friendly enemies

"A.

F.'s."

Many

of us

Iwo Jima and

common words

the Rhine River became in

our vocabulary.

mourned the passing Roosevelt.

of Franklin

\\ e

Delano


THE COLONNADE

Wu

came thick and

.URRY

while reading them

up with those

No'

were the best

March and May. During

Betty Cock's

familiar with that age-old cry every

the last aziine

Ann

two or three weeks before the mag'

came

out, all the staff

kept busy even after

all

members were

material

to be done.

two

different

Then,

any

And

then the

two

The

Patriotic

One

between

Venture and Ahead.

Step

were so good we could

Both

easily see

they had a hard time deciding. Tears

Honor, Margaret Wilson's saga of the

of

spirit of the

proofreading jobs

after catching

before turning the

so they declared a tie

Masloff's

stories

why

was turned

in to the Herald office to be printed, for

there were

ate,

judges were stumped as to which of

Contributors to the Colomiade were very

vember, January,

all

best ones over to the judges.

Monday's the absolute deadline!"

articles;

Jane practically

fast.

and breathed with those manuscripts,

slept

Old South, came

in second,

and

mis'

takes that might have been missed before,

we

sat

back and heaved a big sigh of

and waited

for the night

node would come out

when

Colow

the

in the dining

relief

room.

Jane Knapton, editor, and Hersey Hutt,

were

business manager,

1944.45 editions of the

Fay Johnson took

in charge of the

Colo7i')W.de.

21,

As we

Betty

did not have a regular ofEce this year, our

the Library to Student Building before the

was

over.

existence,

with the

But

in spite of

we managed

least possible

features

attractive

Mary Lou Dondley

Cock came up with

first

place again

To

a

Yellow Kitten, while Margaret Harvie's

A

Fairy

our nomatic

to get out the issues

mix'ups and the most

we

third place with her July

In the spring poetry contest,

with her amusing verses dedicated

meetings were held in various rooms from

year

1943.

World was second with

Wells' I

Saw

able Sea

coming

the J^ight and

Janice G.

The

Invulner'

in for a dull decision for

third place.

could dream up.

most of

Besides our regular student contributions

those tricky covers adorned by that perky

of stories, poems, articles and other features

character

we

call

gets credit for

"a college gal," and two

faculty contributions

of our main events of the year were the short story

ners got

and poetry

pri2,es

of

contests.

five, three,

The

and two

lars respectively, for first, second,

Burger,

We were

win'

sent us

dol'

were supphed by Miss

Dean Martha all

Smith, and Dr. Moss.

very proud of the

Association, rating our maga2,ine in 1943'

and third

places in each contest.

The

short story con-

44

took place in the

fall,

and the

spur us on to even greater

test

certificate

by the National Scholastic Press

entries 148

as First Class'Excellent.

With

efforts,

this to

both the


and business

literary

staffs

worker together

to produce a magazine to be read and en'

joyed by everyone,

made

possible

best of creative student writing

by the and

art

a drive to return missing

books and maga'

This drive proved to

zines to the library.

We tried

be very successful.

all

year to

work. We've had plenty of work along the

ent or faculty and sought to improve

way, but we've enjoyed every minute of

in all

it!

we had

STUDENT STANDARDS ITH many us and

facing

many new

Student

All

good year's work.

^ENTERING our theme for the year

Standards started our work for the year.

the talk

at the

it.

BOERC EH THORN

Fay Byrd Johnson acted

head of the

Frances Lee was kept busy schedul-

table.

a very

old problems

ones

in-

any problem brought up by stud'

vestigate

around international

members

of Boerc

Eh Thorn enjoyed

a

by Mrs. Anne Chamberlayne on her and experiences

life

literature,

in

Germany

including

ing meetings and keeping them from over-

some of the customs of that country. Other

Catherine Trower kept the point

programs were devoted to French, Russian,

lapping.

system running smoothly so that not one

and Chinese

person carried more extra-curricula activ

sponsored Robert Frost, well-known poet

ities

than they were able

to.

and

We concentrated efforts on the improvement of smoking

in the halls, quieter study

lecturer.

hours, less noise in the dining room, and

In April close

order to keep the rec walls in the main building clean

we

appointed various sopho-

visit to

and we

our campus was

all

enjoyed the

ings

we

brought our programs to a

with a presentation of original writ-

from the members of the

Once each quarter we terested

down

English and creative writing.

there and see that they keep their feet

we

Our biggest

undertaking was the starting

of organi2,ing trips to

Richmond when

wish to attend programs and concerts

Mosque.

We

when

Jose' Iturbi's

The

and showing outstanding

ability in

In February'

voted unanimously to invite Dr. Francis

Butler

Simkins to become an honorary

member, and we were very pleased when

at the

he accepted.

arranged for

and chaperones. One carried out

girls

society.

initiated girls in-

mores to stay in the rec when dates are

off the walls.

in'

formal "fireside" chat after the reception.

better lighting conditions in the library.

In

His

quite a success

we

In January

literature.

trip

tickets, busses

was

successfully

a group of girls attended

performance

in February.

faculty and Student Standards held

The month.

society

Mary

met one Thursday night each Franklin

as president, assisted

by

president. Virginia Lee

W^oodward

led us

Ann Masloff,

vice'

Abemathy was our


treasurer;

Ann Martin,

recording secretary;

Jean Prosise, corresponding secretary, and

each phrase of music until

ODT

Although

The members

Katherine Lynch, historian.

we had

it

per-

fect.

prevented

restrictions

we were

of the English department gave us invalu-

our usual out-of-town concerts

able assistance.

privileged to take part in both choir concerts as well as in several chapel programs.

These programs

in addition to the

had planning them, have made to

with a table

STAGE

honor organization

single blue star,

and

dimly lighted

in the center a

around which are seated eleven

girls,

robed in the traditional garb of fifteenth century

friars!

They

are singing

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

their

voices blending into one harmonious lyric, a bit strange to our "jive"

which sounds

The

trained ears.

Madrigal this

singers,

ancient

are the S.

girls

whose

musical

T. C.

interpretations of

form are generally

ject.

The purpose

is

wor\, and

girls

once again? The answer

lots of

it.

Madrigal singing

is

initiated

tion to everyday

life

The

edited

war time

is

to

show

strive to pre-

we

this.

This year, however,

to the

working of

we were

For the same reason the

was not

The programs were most They ranged from

have

organ of

official

restrictions

usual national convention

held.

interesting.

discussions of the classics pu7,2,les

and the telhng of

We closed our meetings by

On Thursday nights we gathered round the

to the flag in Latin.

re-sang

and to

Trihiinal, the

the national society.

singing

Maddox, sang and

have

membership.

into

In the past here at Farmville

practice and an inborn feeUng for music.

rection of Pat

who

serve a love for the classics.

jokes in Latin.

di-

Each quarter

of our organi2;ation

an art which can only be acquired through

piano in the choir room and under the

an

the needs for the humanities and their rela-

unable to do

normal college

is

This year Jane Anderson and Georgia

Knight were

concert.

away and we become

Rho

the highest scholastic averages in that sub-

because of

the robes are laid

in Latin.

Pi

bid to membership those girls

considered to be the high spot of any school

But what goes on behind the scenes when

this a year

RHO

PI

s.IIGMA we

qA

we

remember.

SIGMA

MADRIGAL GROUP

fun

"America" and pledging

allegiance

This year Jane Waring Rutfin served as president;

Margaret Barksdale,

vice-presi-


dent;

Mary Ann Dove,

secretary and treas-

Assisting these girls

urer.

was Miss Rice

as adviser.

and wfjrds which we use

The

in fjur

language.

Latin Club has had a most .successful

year under the leadership of Helen

who

THE LATIN CLUB

EW of us realize the impor'

We

served as president.

any

with

operate

special

campus by contributing

as

Mundy,

ar

strive to

on the

drives

much

as possible.

tant part that Latin plays in our everyday

Too many

lives.

as a

it

how

dead language, without realizing

alive

The

it

really

is;

ORENSIC

Latin Club, under the influence of

students interested in the Latin language.

Miss Rice, with her wide knowledge of the subject

and untiring

inspiration to spirit,

help, has

proved an

She has been the moving

all.

we owe

and to her

our pleasure and success.

in a large part of

The

even more limited appeal to cut

Our

share a

guage.

It

is

applies the

down on

year by the

was

O.DT.

unnecessary travel.

forth that

among

We

ourselves.

this activity

had

felt,

however,

a lot to offer

and

should be kept alive in spite of the war.

chief pur'

to bind together

common

this

activity

debates consisted of arguing back and

Pi

pose of the club

who

KAPPA DELTA AND DEBATE CLUB

to us Latin hves.

Miss Rice, was organi^d for the benefit of all

PI

are inclined to discard

Kappa

Delta, national honorary de-

those

all

bate

had two members on our

society,

interest in the Ian'

knowledge gained life.

The

make

their

the classroom to a lighter side of

members have an opportunity

to

in

campus, Marilyn Bell and Alice Nichols.

Through

this society

tion for the year

we

obtained our ques-

and received valuable

in-

Latin useful and enjoyable, but they also

formation.

have a chance to develop further their

take over industries in which there were

knowledge of the

labor disputes,

The month.

subject.

club meets the

The

first

Thursday

Vice-president

in each

prepares the

program, with the help of Miss Rice.

The

"That the government should

all

other means failing"

was

the 1944-45 question.

We

were invited to the spring tourna-

ment sponsored by Winthrop College

in

N. C, but we were unable

to

programs often center around holidays.

Charlotte,

Discussions also centered around the effect

send representatives. Scheduling several de-

Roman

customs on American

Other

bates

programs centered around the customs and

year.

of

traditions of the

life.

Romans, and Latin phases

with

local

colleges

completed our

In previous years the Debate Club and


Kappa Delta have been two

Pi

active

on campus.

organi2,ations

members

at

of the most

one time were

trotters"

whose

them

away from

literally

Their "globe

endeavors took

forensic

the campus.

Trips

were taken annually to Hickory, N.

C, and

far

Winthrop. As

New York,

far north as

we

west as Minneapolis

as far

and

sent repre'

Debating its

is

an exemplification of free

To

height.

be able to voice

opinions pro and con on any subject the

American way. In

tivity It is

ical

is

is

truly

a sense forensic ac'

a preparation for sound citizenship.

conducive to clear thinking and reasoning.

debating

bulletin

closely

Although

log'

extra'curricula,

board on the

floor of

first

Library Hall was the background for of our displays.

At Christmas

time

many

we

dis'

played a series of tree decorations, expressing our individual ideas on the subject.

Later in the year the Training School pro-

vided us with some of us a

interests

same channels

With power

art

and

work.

gave

It

works of those ran along the

abilities

as ours.

the entrance of spring and her

to

awaken

may have

lain

we

new

gained

tion of

its

exhibit the

thrill to

whose

sentatives.

speech at

The

in us all

much

of

what

dormant during the winter, ziest

by means of the

new members,

of

had become convinced.

whose Still

initia-

talents

another

we evi-

current'cvent

paralleled

classes.

Dr. C. Gordon Moss became our adviser.

new

Other sponsors were Miss Nichols

and Dr. Swertfeger.

GAMMA N and varied requests

PSI

answer to the many

for posters

from the

dence of spring's influence was the party

which followed

this initiation.

For the success of our year's

Gamma

Psi

was

ever'ready with a finished product.

As

that

owe much

took

Miss Bedford, and to our

organi2;ations

on campus.

was our purpose and our

interest,

pleasure in doing our best to

fill

we

Lou Dondley,

such needs.

Library-goers and English students es' pecially,

to our loyal

could not miss catching sight of

some of the evidences of our year's work.

vice

-

and helpful

we

adviser.

officers:

Mary

president; Virginia Terrell,

president; Jane Knapton, secretary;

Lucille

Winston, treasurer, and Eleanor

Corell, poster chairman. 152

activities


H.O CLUB

Fun, as well as work, marked the year.

we members of

Occasionally

JrC EMEMBER the Saturday nights when you were at a

for

loss

something to do? Then someone came by

and

go swimming."

"Let's

yelled,

You

grabbed your cap and excitedly ran to the pool.

Remember how your whole Saturday

night

was changed

have

on food and fun.

What

new members

fun

it

was

tx) initi-

in the spring!

With

Jean Smith as president and Frances Lee as secretary, the

H-O

Club's purpose was suc-

cessfully carried out.

you discovered the

as

JUNIOR A CAPPELLA

fun in splashing around in the delightful

water?

An HoO

would

get-togethers and ajncentrate

social

ate the

the club

Club member was making

m:

ALLELUJAH!

all

haUe-

ujah!" echo the eighteen voices making the Junior

up

A Cappella, one of the outstand-

ing groups of the college choir that follow closely the footsteps of the Senior pella.

we

To Jean Prosise, much

give

to

The

promote more

entire club attempted interest

in

throughout the school for health entertainment.

tempt.

We

But wait.

the year

we

though

During

sponsored a water aquacade

we were it

was work

always on hand.

had to be done

graph, there remained peting with

many

all

to

at school

Even by

tele-

the spirit of com-

other colleges from our

section of the country.

our college

we mem-

only to present songs for the various college

at'

be done for the inter-coUegiate telegraphic meet,

were.

bers of the group were always willing not

There's more!

there

we

loyal

as well as

succeeded in the

When

definite asset to

making our

swimming

with spectacular performances of diving

and swimming.

A

Cap-

the student director,

credit in

group of songsters what this possible.

A

activities

but also to represent the college

through programs in the

churches.

local

Often these presentations were

in collabo-

ration with other groups of the choir,

often they performed individually. the

war prevented our

trips to other schools

special

Though

usual out-of-town

and churches, we sang

numbers for the cadets

Union when the

and

the entire choir

went

at

Fork

there in

fall.

Conscientiously

we

practiced

every


Wednesday

night.

The achievements were

miraculous. For a long hour

we worked on

new

party for the

girls

who

for the winter quarter.

entered school

we

In February

R. Thompson's 'Tueri Hebraeorum" for

asked Mr. Phillip Roberts to come to talk

our

to

contribution to the spring concert in

combination with the Senior

Mastering

it

it

Cappella

in the Latin translation

not an easy task, but our

proved that

A

we were

final

was

performance

capable to cope with

successfully.

Freshman

the

"What

Shall

meeting of

I

all

once a month.

torium every

We congratulated ourselves for our abil' ity to give fine

performances of the music

One

o'clock.

keeping the

book of

we

A joint

"Y" committees was

held

We were in charge of VespAudi-

in the Small

Sunday afternoon

five

at

our hardest jobs was

of

girls quiet

on the

is,

halls so that

could have our short but impressive

Leading prayers as often as pos-

services.

FRESHMAN COMMISSION

the

Life?"

"shushing" at prayers every night; that

that will be an unforgettable part of our college memories.

Do with My

which were held

ers,

His topic was

class.

sible

was probably the second

activity of

our members.

E

are the link

Our

the Freshman class and the "Y." selected

from our

class strengthen the

signed

Association.

up

to

"The Freshman Commission has Luckies girls

bond

The Young Womens

that connects us with

Christian

between

work on

Each Freshman

a specific

of the "Y," and our task

was

committee

to better

ac

quaint them with that committee in the

"Y" and

its

Our

services.

president this

and Hershey bars." These familiar words echoed through the

and ended

halls

in a

long line before the door of a commission

We

member.

sold food

all

year long, and

each of us took turns keeping to

sell.

To

the outsider

how we managed

it

it

in her

was

a

room

mystery

to keep cigarettes

and

year was Corinne Baker; vice-president,

candy almost

all

the time.

In fact, very

Juha Booher; secretary, Jean Freeman, and often people thought treasurer,

Berkeley

Richardson.

we were running

a

Agnes black market, but seriously

we

think that

Stokes acted as our adviser, giving us help

and advice

the

at all times.

Collecting magazines for the Piedmont

Sanitorium for Negroes was one of our first projects.

After Christmas

we

gave a

man

at the wholesale

partial to us.

was used

house was rather

The money which we made

for paying our debts

ing parties.

and

for giv-


Colonnade

Heads,

left to right:

H. Hutt, Knapton

Left to right:

Winston, H. Hutt, M. Bear, Bobbitt, Knapton, Dondley, Calvert,

Mapp, Low

left to right: Loving, Hair, A. Blair, Whitehead, M. Harvey, Lynch Second row: M. Upshur, Ruffin, Cock, Carper Third row: L. Upshur, Ozlin, Prebble, Grumpier, Moling

Front row,


Student Standards

Left to right;

RufEn, Brooks,

H. Wilson, M.

F.

Lee, B.

Parrish,

Droste, Mr. Holton,

Dean Smith, Trower, Wade,

Higgins,

Bell

Beorc

Front row, left to right: Moling, M. Harvey

Eh Thorn

K. Allen, L. Carter, F. Butt, V. Abernathy, A. Martin,

M. Woodward,

J.

Prosise,

Lynch,

Radogna, Holloway, Cruser, Hundley, N. Harrell, V. Shackelford, Knight, V. Treakle, Ozlin, Shaffner, Ruffin, A. Nichols, Weeks

Second row:


Madrigal Group

Left to right:

A.

Blair,

Blackwell, ShafFner,

Cummings,

L. Messick,

Murray,

P.

Maddox,

Shevick, Prosise

Sigma Pi

Left to right:

Rho

Dove, Barksdale, Miss Rice, Mr. Grainger, Knight,

J.

Anderson, RutEn

B. Jones,

J.

Mcssick,


Latin Club

Front tow,

left

to right:

Second row: Dove, Third row:

B.

Edwards, Mundy, Barksdale

L. Carter, Miss Rice, Knight, B.

Altizer,

J.

Anderson,

Pi

Front row.

left to right:

F.

Boone

Garnett, Varner,

J.

Foster

Kappa Delta

A. Nichols, Weeks, Ruffin, Cock, B.

Second row: V. Terrell, M.

Bell,

Bagley, B.

Brown

And

Adams

Debate Club


Gamma

Left to right:

Psi

Robertson, V. Terrell, Sanford, Corell, Dondley, B.

Wood

H,0 Club

Front row,

left to

Second row:

P.

right: Lear, Loyd, Hayward, F. Lee, P. Watts, J. Smith Maddox, Droste, Peery, Kearsley, Hume, H. Moore, Miss Dabney


left to right: N. Blair, M. Jones, Prosise, Bennett, H. Ahernathy, A. Haskins Second row: Verell, Portinaro, Shaffner, McKenry, V. Price, Cooke Third row: Bobbitt, Goodman, L. Baker

Front row,

Junior

A

Cappella


Front row, left to right: L. Brooks, M. Morris, B. Christian, Freeman Second row: Richardson, N. Taylor, Dickinson

Third row: C. F, Treakle

Baker,

Booher,

Freshman Commission


Friday Athletic Activity

Senior Chapel

JL.

HE quality

of

good sportsmanship can

best he exemplified

through Athletics. Competition, personal or with team mates, gives an outlet for the nat'

A famous coach

ural spirit of combat.

hung within

once said that he ivould rather have the diploma

the individual than on the wall.

body

build a sound

in

which the well

in-

tegrated personality might serve best the girl

and her community.

on the Athletic Field or

find us

but

Any

many

Fridays

games of every

we engaged

day might in the

in inter-class

their

traditional

gown

Seniors

privilege

and

Chapel each

marched

in

Friday.

All under-classmen remained in

cap and

to

their places, adding their voices to the fa-

always

many

week-ends. For sentation,

we

we

took time oif to play.

Fridays after

Over Tokyo."

We

pre-

the piano and

moved

complained about the plumbing.

muley" developed

as a

new

"Good

expression.

changed sheets and collected our

laundry. ular

its

talked about "Thirty Seconds

Walks

to

Longwood became

on spring Fridays, and

what happened

to

pop-

we wondered

those

"Longwood

passes."

And

Patton marched through Germany.

The Ledo road was

miliar song.

As

has alivays been the purpose of athletics to

We

sport.

To the strains of the Alma Mater observed

gym,

It

re-opened.

Some

of our

boys came home on furlough from across

Those envied schedule arrangers with no

the seas, bringing hope that some day

Saturday classes gloated over their long

would

return.

all


HOCKEY

however, the great day dawned bright and clear,

G/li.LMOST

any afternoon

during October's balmy weather, and later in the chill crispness of

was

letic Field

November

the Ath'

crowded with

usually

playing a favorite college sport

with the

skill

that eventually,

come more

stick

for play.

Supporters from hill

class

and

ball.

at the

sport,

be'

they

Cup. Under the

assistant.

Beanie Dudley, green be-

Those who came

to see a

not disappointed for shape.

fine

all

good game were

the teams were in

The Freshmen

defeated the

Sophs, and the air was white with discard-

ginners became finished players, and old

ed rat caps.

hands at the game got back into winning

tled mightily to a scoreless tie.

form.

grit

the season neared

its

end, playing be-

came more earnest and blue

jeans

were

and

The

will to

their first points

Juniors and Seniors bat-

So by sheer

win red and white gained toward the Color Cup.

ex'

BASKETBALL

changed for regulation green and red gym

Teams were chosen with Helen Wil-

HEN winter's cold winds

son as captain of the Seniors; Margaret

Orange heading the calling

signals

for

Juniors;

the

Anne Tucker

Sophomores, and

After a

series of

drove us in from the Athletic Field,

games, in which the

would go

played each other, the date off the edge.

set for the

ditional

friendly

tourney between the enemies.

tra-

Seniors versus

be-

we

spent

many

hours learning to place our shots so that the ball

sister classes

we

gan to practice basketball. Under the guidance of Margaret Orange

Jerry Colgin leading the Freshmen.

was

air.

They

teams and allowed to

try for the coveted Color

suits.

covered the

all classes

and cheers rang through the cold

the

all

expert direction of Phe Whittle, manager,

As

perfect

girls

when they had

proficient

would be put on

and her

was pronounced

each trying to out'do the other in

acquiring

knew

field

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;hockey.

There were representatives from classes,

and the

in the basket

and not bounce

We soon organi2,ed into class

teams, each one choosing a captain. Heading the Senior team

was Mary Walker

Juniors and Freshmen against Sophomores.

Watts; Lilhan EUiott led the Junior team;

This date had to be moved up a week be-

the Sophomores followed Margaret Lohr,

cause old

us a

man

muddy

Sol refused to shine, giving

field as

a result.

Eventually,

while the Freshmen were paced by

Ann

Abernathy.

These

captains

AHce soon


into expert cooperative

whipped our teams

we began

groups and

to play

our traditional

There was probably more

interest

these class games than ever before.

was evidenced

spirit

hung

in

Class

team supporters

as

on the balcony of the

their banners

gym and gave

lusty cheers for their class

When

the final scores were tallied,

mates.

after four well played games,

that the Sophs

was found

won

over the

This gave green and white

points toward the Color

Wade was

Eleanor

it

had defeated the Juniors and

Freshmen, while the Seniors

same teams.

Cup.

"That was

team was able to make only one

we

fine,"

beginning

Miss Dabney accompanied the

where they

Williamsburg

William and

we were

if

know something

to

The

courts were always in

and we didn't mind not

The end

being able to play in saddles. fall

quarter brought with

singles

Again

tournament.

of

it

the annual

it

was

a fight

between the colors for points toward the color cup.

We

beginners marvelled at the

form of the players and were bewildered to see their

were

all

much

We

powerful back-hand strokes. eager to

know who would Watts'

Phyllis

be

vic-

was too

fast ball

She was proclaimed

for her opponent.

champion, adding more points for Red and

White!

Mary

The

team.

girls

defeated

only

SOFTBALL

to

the

^<

ON'T

home

game was played with Bridgewater College

practice this afternoon!

and once again our

ever forgot, for

girls

came out

victori'

we were more

ous.

TENNIS

%. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ACQUETS,

white

lines

tennis!

One

thing

balls, nets,

we

was

that

we

couldn't spend parts of our

afternoons out on the courts.

In the

fall

and spring quarters we made up for

lost

Classes for beginners were held by

softball.

The

athletic field

two diamonds, and

into

at the

Some very hot days found

same

us playing

barefoot, in the cool green grass.

though, a

we were more

L^sually

interested in

home run than overcoming

making

the heat.

Besides just playing for pleasure and exercise,

some of us took scheduled

taught by Miss

We

Hundley.

skill in

of us

rolled around,

two games going

the manager, Phyllis Watts, and Miss Her.

sought perfection of form and

Not many

time.

lovers

of this sport didn't like about winter quart-

softball

than eager to rush out for a

was converted there were

forget

when Spring

few innings of

time.

as

Accordingly, one day Miss Her and

trip.

ers

would

Phyllis

felt

excellent condition,

abfjut tennis.

torious.

chosen captain of the

Varsity this year. Because cf O.D.T. regu' lations the

say,

actually

intramural games.

When

the various strokes.

The

Iler first

classes

and managed by Sue part

was

in

funda-


GOLF

mentals, and the last in playing the game.

the end of the season, class games were

At

T.HE

played and once more red and white and green and white fought for the color cup.

Whenever

we

gym and

bases in the

and

rained,

it

up imaginary

set

practiced throwing

wood saw much quarters.

Long-

and spring

fall

Loaded with equipment we rode

out with Mr.

Graham

For us beginners

hitting.

golf course at

action

to

make

the rounds.

was somewhat

it

difficult

to master the swing and follow-through.

Mr. Graham was

ARCHERY

and

patient

faithful,

teaching us the fundamentals of the art of

ITH

his trusty

arrow he could part your are the

But

bow and

hair."

These

from the

The

greens seemed far

away

and almost impossible to

tee-off

words about the 1945 Robin Hood. quite a

alas,

campus can be

number around our own

just as nimble

bows and arrows.

Just

the spring and

the

sionally

quarters,

fall

see for yourself.

with their

walk down to the

any afternoon during

athletic field almost

But take

"2,ing!

zing!

and you

Then comes

will

care, for occa2;ing!"

arrow might wander rather from the

the

of

target.

the endless search for the miss'

ing dart.

But

playing golf.

it

make under

we watched Mr. Graham's hoping that soon feats.

was

fun,

the beginners

all

of

it!

Miss Her guided

by teaching them the

tech-

niques and aided the advanced archers in

improving

theirs.

Not only were

classes

conducted for the purpose of teaching

down

late in the after-

after dinner for

mere entertain-

but anyone could go

noon or

it,

With much

par.

we

enthusiasm

long drives,

could accomphsh such

A trip around the golf course was no

child's play.

Many

in the afternoons,

of us returned to school

complaining about our

aching limbs. Yet the next lesson found us eager to get to

Longwood

at ''beating the

game."

for another try

SWIMMING

ment.

The

oA^^FTER we

season ended with an archery tour-

nament to

select best archers of the college.

This provided

thrills

and excitement for

always there to take care of

successful.

of us

A member of the HjO Club was

an hour.

The

was

many

found the pool an excellent place to spend

both the participants and the spectators. year

returned from

the movies on Saturday nights,

us.

All of the


Uir recreational purposes

swimming wasn't alone;

numerous

were held

classes

We

ginners and advanced students. glad that

we

instructor,

for be-

were

could have a special swimming

Miss Dabney. Jumping yielded

to actual diving;

dog paddles were convert-

We

ed into crawls.

would-be swimmers

were no longer frightened to

see the pool

or embarrassed to get in the water.

Robin Lear

manager,

as

the

With

inter-class

Neither

swimming meet got under way.

who

of us

played

— who wfjn —who

who

stopped only on the

stop

watch —

never

will

lost

the

final tick of

frjrget

the

spirit

dominating our volleyball season.

Red and White nor Green and White was Since

completely victorious.

the

classes

BADMINTON

each received the same number of

tied,

points toward the color cup. Supporters of

each team were there to encourage their class

swimmers on

3'INALLY we to get

two

to victory.

soon

as

managed

outdoor courts, and as

official

warm weather

we

approached,

rushed out, rackets in hand, to wait our

VOLLEYBALL turn.

ITH volleyball,

one

green team, son.

When

courts were

it

shine,

rained,

we

played badminton,

we went

and

inside

re-

ceived instruction in strokes and form from

started our volleyball sea-

Miss Her and Margaret Lohr, manager.

the classes filled

began,

first

with

girls

all

three

eager to learn

or to improve our techniques in keeping the ball going.

Rain or

when

one red team and one

net,

we

one court, one

for

With Miss Her

as

Some

of us learned for the

first

time the

true use of that feathered object with which

we were

to play.

This shuttlecock, which

our teacher

we later called

a "birdie," took

many

a beat-

and Heidi Lacy manager, we learned reading and frequently had ily

its

feathers torn to

the ease and fun of the game.

As

the season neared

and greens went formed

their

its

climax, the reds

their separate

class

robin tournaments.

ways and

teams for the round-

Our

learning

now was

not just practice but actual competition for the sake of the colors.

watched

Those of us who

will never forget the battles.

Those

Being very temperamental, the "bir-

bits.

dies" could not be controlled

day.

Wind

and rain were our greatest

handicaps, but the

game

on a windy

we were

so enthused over

that neither could stop us.

Those who

didn't take

badminton

as a

scheduled class or make-up period found


enjoyment

on

in a couple of

THE CANTERBURY CLUB

games of doubles

a mild afternoon.

N Sunday night at 7:30 PING PONG

our steps always led us over to the Episcopal rectory where

iL

HE sound of shurrying

and peels of laughter and excitement

feet

re-echoed from one corner of the the other.

gym

to

Rising above this turmoil was

the sharp clicking noise of balls as they struck the paddles.

and a

fast

game

It

was Saturday pong was

of ping

night,

in pro'

held our regular

This year our program had a

meetings.

special interest, for various

members of the

came over

to give us in-

college faculty

Never

spirational talks.

without our

however,

a meeting ended,

Mr. and Mrs.

cookie jar which, because of

May's

the

raiding

first

generosity, seemed always to be

full.

Waffle suppers were another feature of a

gress.

Ping pong, as a sport that could be enjoyed

we

all

many

great

of our

Sunday

nights.

We in-

year round, was naturally one of

vited the freshmen to these and enjoyed

On

watching the friendships grow as quickly

the most popular sports on the campus.

Week-ends particularly there was no time

as the food disappeared.

Get-togethers on

the Withers' picnic grounds in the cool

when

fall

the paddles lay idle; they were con-

and spring evenings during the year prostantly in use.

vided

Because of the fact that there were ping

pong

tables in the senior "rec,"

numerous

seniors could be caught getting in a tra

practices,

ex-

hoping that someday they

might defeat their more Phyllis

few

Watts,

as

athletic dates.

make our more as

The

serious plans.

for us to

Ahce Green,

our president, kept things going smoothly

and saw that

we

stuck to our aims in what-

ever

we

Mrs.

May were our loyal advisers.

set

out to accomphsh.

Mr. and

manager of ping pong,

NORTHERN NECK CLUB

strove to increase participation in this sport.

height of interest

winter quarter,

way

another pleasant

still

when

was reached during H, do you know her?"

the ping pong touris

the question asked as

we

gather for our

nament sponsored by the Athletic Associafirst

tion,

became the talked-of event.

is

the classes engaged in this

all

contest, each

hoping fervently to be the

and thus gain

vic-

for her colors the

coveted points toward the color cup.

fall.

Just being together

Repre-

sentatives of

torious one

meeting in the

the purpose of the Northern

We

are

ginia,

all

and

from the same section of Vir-

it is

such a delightful surprise to

find that there are

among

us.

Neck Club.

numerous mutual

friends

Naturally, at our meetings our


thoughts turn to home.

Everyone gives

news

to contribute to

some choice

bit of

Concentrating

we

The

really big event of

annual hamburger feast

back yard.

"Charlie

in

Hop"

our year

is

Mr. Graham's certainly

the Christmas concert.

in

we

After Christmas

much more

we

were pr&sented

as soloists, these sfjngs

very effectively

made

With

Esther Shevick and Jean Free-

Blair,

man

the

on Christmas music,

learned three lovely folk carols.

Ann

the eagerly waiting group.

first

settled

down

U)

do

difficult

wfjrk in anticipation of

were forced to make him stop eating so

our Spring concert.

We immediately began

that he wouldn't have to take his cuts in

to rehearse

chemistry the next day.

Haehraeorum and

those hamburgers disappear.

we wrote

In the spring

home

them about

telling

that they will

and

join

come

In fact,

quite honored

letters to girls at S.

T.

C,

to Farmville next year

War

his

made

adviser,

and

job

our meetings gay and

of the Senior

Senior

crossing Strick's

A

home.

building

lawn

in the

to

sat

on the

for the concert. it

in

the date set for the con-

2,

and we were faced with the

to do.

A bit shaky in the knees,

we

never sung before.

reahzed

in

It

was then

how much we owed

to

and those bi-weekly work-outs.

We

members

Mr.

We

found our reward

Dr. Noble's smile.

Mr.

music room

T. A.

F.

the atmos'

phere was of greatest informality,

we

1

have gained much.

we held our meetings. Although our best work as

April

we had

Strick

Cappella could be seen

There

last

we had

that

A CAPPELLA a week,

it

perhaps, but with joy in our hearts w^e sang as

T.WICE

compositions, with the request that

cert, arrived

cheerful.

SENIOR

Tertius Noble

were so pleased that we learned

At

Taylor. Mr. French, as our all

when Dr. T.

We were

disappointed.

dent, Eleanor Hall; vice-president, Virginia

Ann

Amen.

double quick time so that he would not be

Directing us were the following: presi'

treasurer,

own

We

Chest constituted

secretary, Hester Sydnor,

Jubilate

he be allowed to conduct

our social service program for the year.

Mae Packett;

of our old favorites, Pueri

sent us copies of "Easter Allelulia," one of

hoping

our club. Contributions to White

Christmas and the

two

floor

we

5.IX

did

I

years ago the

J.

L.

Jarman Chapter of the Future Teachers of

around

the piano.

America came 169

into existence here at

Farm-


Its

ville.

who

purpose was to acquaint

CHI

all girls

plan to be teachers with the teaching

HI

has seen another year

organization of the state and the country.

Since that time the local chapter of the F.

now

T. A. has greatly expanded,

members over

Under

Katherine

Our purpose as

has not been uneventful,

It

Chi has made public

viccpresi'

the desire of every

Prebble,

and maintain the

we have

which are an

enjoyed a

meetings more informal so that our

member

fine spirit

There have been

life.

we

made by

who

we

but

are not

Chi cautioned those

for one reason or another

ten to hve by school rules.

we

would be

this

sufficient

had forgot'

We hoped that

and that those

at

fault

would appreciate the advice and take

Miss Gleaves, Mr. Landrum,

more

interest in the welfare of their school.

They

A

very close and lasting friendship has

gave us some interesting

new

slants

on how

developed between the members this year

our desire to make Farmville the best

a good teacher goes about the business of

in

teaching.

possible college in

Our second tea was held

Turner.

those

Wynne, Mr.

our guest speakers. Dr.

this

and traditions

criticisms,

held

of these teas

Mr. Johnson and Dr. Swertfeger.

At

has been

mem'

who

Bussinger,

It

to encourage

members to

talk over their teaching problems,

At one

purpose.

its

in a position to judge.

bers could meet with faculty

as

are

integral part of our college

feel they were

had

who

members. Although a secret organization,

most successful year. Wishing to make our

a series of teas.

has remained un-

have the ideals of us

Lucy Bowhng,

dent; Gloria Sheppard, secretary; and Alice

Lee Davis, treasurer,

go.

however.

changed

fifty girls.

the leadership of

president;

having as

come and

Realizing

faculty members. Miss Her

Mr. Preston

how many

girls

We wish

to express our deep appreciation for those

after Christmas.

time our speaker was

which to hve.

who have

are

and

and Mr. French,

so generously given their time

efforts.

tempted away from the teaching profession

The seven by the

lure of

wartime

jobs,

senior

members who

graduate this year are:

emphasized the importance of our job in training the children ers of

who

will

Mr. Turner

Nancy

Harrell,

Martha Higgins, Harriette Moore, Barbara

will be the lead-

Scott, Eleanor

tomorrow.

Wade, Mary Walker Watts,

Helen Wilson. 170


Senior

Left to right:

H. Wilson, M. Watts, B. Scott, Whittle, Bear, Sanford, N. Fleming, Higgins, Massey, Caldwell, Lovins

Junior

Front row,

Back row:

Hockey

Hockey

left to right:

M.

P. Watts,

Wright, M. Orange, L.

Elliott,

Jones, F. Lee, L. Jones, Ross, Norfleet, Ellis

Blane.

Watkins


Varsity Basketball

Front row,

Back row:

left to right: J.

Blane,

M.

Oidiige. H. WiL-un,

Tennis

Left tu

riijht:

Wade, M. Watts,

L. Elliott, R. Hill

Bentley, A. Abernathy, N. Parrish, B. Parrish, Hauser, Bridgforth, Lohr

Harrison, B. Burchett, F. Lee, P. Watts

Softball

Leit tu right:

Ritchie,

Hundley


Archery

Manager:

Golf

Shiflett

Swimming


Freshman Volleyball Team

Front row,

Back row:

left to right:

M.

A. Abernathy,

J.

Morris,

J.

Bentley,

Johnson, Geyer,

Minton

Hammock

Badminton Ping Pong

Left to right:

Left to right:

J.

Bentley, Lohr

Watts, B. Scott


Canterbury Club

Mr. May, Dondley,

Front row,

left

Back row:

A. Green, RufEn, Barksdale

to right:

Sterrett,

A. Taylor, Holloway, Rucker

Northern Neck Club

Front row,

Back row:

left to right:

Mr. French, A. Hutt, T. Hutt, H. Hutt, Bouldin.

Packett, Sydnor, Cralle

B.

Brown. A. Taylor. E. Hall


Senior

Front row,

Back row:

A

Cappella

A. Blair, Shevick, Fuqua, Shaffner, L. Messick, J. Freeman, Blackwell, Prosise K. East, Parden. Grumpier, Kimmerling, P. Maddox, Cummings, J. Messick, Murray, Lovins

left to right:

Future Teachers

Front row,

left to right:

Back row:

Galvert, B.

Of America

Mast, Holloway, Prebble, Bowling, G. Sheppard, A. Davis, Knight,

Woodward, M. Watkins,

Richards, B. Adams,

Mundy

M. Woodward, Radogna,

Via, N. Fleming


Left to right:

Higgins. H. Wilson.

Wade. M.

Watt.",,

H. M.M.re,

Chi

B. Scott.

N, Harrell


The Week-end "Monday

through Friday go Fast''

— then

oA^,T u)ce\

the wee\'end\

We

Academics were pushed

Mardi Gras, Senior and

We

last

May Day

weekend

those days

of our shells

aside for formals

presented our circus.

Sunday afternoon

came out

the

dances

Sororities gave

teas in addition to inter'

events.

we washed

So

clothes

and

ironed last month's batch. Sinatra's "Satur

our

own

the end of the

to lighter things.

and the dance wee\^cnd.

Cotillion. Pan-Hels,

made many Saturdays "a

night to remember.'^

and the

a source of unusual entertainment,

pool, a refreshing nightcap.

On

Many week-ends, however, there were no

call

and turned our thoughts

mission parties.

big

we could

fall

and spring week-ends

we

took

long walks or relaxed in the sun on the roof.

We

cooked Sunday morning breakfast in

"the building" and struggled to

brown toast

under the two surviving burners. The Sunday Night

Is

the Loneliest Night of the

day comic

Week"

strips

were our source of

Htera-

might be heard from a third'Story ture with special emphasis

window

as

some

girl

wrote a special

on the adveu'

air

tures of "Terry." mail, Postmaster,

New

York.

The

"horse

Church

services

were always an

opera" was the scene of great drama, and

part of each Sunday.

we

found a certain peace

ate

pop corn

lastest song.

to the tune of

Roy

Roger's

Saturday night Sings provided

m

a troubled world.

integral

"In our tmie" in

we

worship, a refuge


THETA SIGMA UPSILON

doing our part. Buying bonds and contrib'

war funds made up

uting to the various

a4.

.S goes the tradition,

rained the

Upon

Sigs hurried to the chapter room.

we found

counting members

a

eu'

joyed a memorable sisterhood under the

guidance of Miss Jennings, a loyal adviser.

that several

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;matrimony and government

ZETA SIGMA

PHI

seemed more enticing than a senior

jobs

Kitty Williams did not return, leaving

were adequately

fices

defi'

our chapter. Their vacant

nite gaps in

filled

of'

by Carohne

Huddle and Martha Watkins. The year ran smoothly.

Virginia Lee Abernathy,

with her quiet guidance and habitual

was

gence,

dili'

toe the

Lucy Bowhng, the

mark on the

editor, kept

15th.

Tau Chap'

ter in the headlines; Jean Prosise,

head of

the Pan'Hellenic Council succeeded beau' tifuUy with winter rushing.

As

stand'in for

Virginia Lee, Margaret Verell did more

than her share to make the chapter a vital in

Theta Sigma.

Fall rushing

Mary

Lorene Claiborne, thy Haile, Edith Jones,

Clements, Doro'

Eleanor Hall, Theresa Hutt,

Ann

Savage, Marguerite Ste'

phenson, Mabel Waddell, Martha Frances

Webb, and group

Betty

we added

sixteen

at all things

The

went

vie

full blast

Things started it

was with no

off

rushing

fall

little thrill

took

in the

we

we

received

was

present'

that

when

it

the end

we welcomed Rachel

Brugh,

flurry of

holidays,

easy.

life

At

Anne Tharlton, and our new pledges. The

as usual.

with a bang! Indeed,

ed to us at the Pau'Hellenic of

the

in

while some engaged

just

the scholarship plaque

tea.

Virginia Lee Price as

Christmas and exams was

us.

Before parting for the

gathered for an informal party

Chapter room. Our Christmas

bride.

Sue Durrett, was guest of honor. "Teddy" Bear, giving an imitation of Santa Claus,

was the

more of the

best

the end,

riot of the evening.

was four days of

we were

Winter

rush'

tense excitement.

At

both proud and happy to

pledge Charlotte Grizizard, Barbara Brown,

banquet with Dr. Jarman, Dean Smith, as guests.

A

Valentine theme was carried out with

at'

Miss Carter, and Miss Draper

were running

and others

in bridge,

ing

big social event was in the form of a

Sobered by the war, most of our

Frances Treakle, Jane Mantiply, Betty

Bond, Shirley

Billie Pruett,

efforts,

day was February 17th, when we

our money, were directed toward

tea room.

Long

De

Lois Lloyd Sheppard,

Mankin, and Mabel Lewis.

ed our Founders

tractive place cards.

as well as

no time

this

during the winter period.

The

rings

after months spent apart. In

Chapter room

To

Woodward.

new

summer, we gathered once more

suddenly upon

brought us Lena Claiborne,

our

and recounting the various activities of the

president; Jean Akers, as treas'

made us

urer,

oAi^DMIRING

Naomi Major Shipp and

year at college.

one

we

it

day; nevertheless, gay Theta

first

were missing

large part of our budget. This year

Day with will be

spirational talk given

A gala celebrat'

a banquet in the

remembered the

in'

by Mrs. Frances C.


Milton, the

first

president of Phi Zeta Si^'

boy," say the G. T.'s as they eagerly await

ma. Twelve of our "old girls" returned to

that special banquet and spring picnic, the

be with us.

two

Our

officers

were

Mary

Sterrett, presi'

dent; Roberta Davis, vice'president; Alice

Nichols, recording secretary;

Mary Wal-

ton Rucker, treasurer; Margaret Bear, cor

feasts that are really set off in high-

lights for the chapter.

Wedding

bells sfxjn

rang out the earlier

Frances Gayle. "They'll do

responding secretary; and Evelyn Grizizard,

We

Caldwell, chosen queen of the

was

untiring in interest and cooperation,

were

also

every time!"

it

Pan-Hellenic representative; Miss London,

our adviser.

own

proud of our

Phe Whittle,

were our

Ann

Blair,

secretary;

Pogue

Carol Diggs, head;

vice-head;

Betsy

May.

Last, but certainly not least, officers:

Massey, treasurer. Miss Stubbs, our

GAMMA THETA

now

part of the year for Frances Wentzel,

faith-

ful adviser has served the chapter diligently

&

for twenty-five years.

;ACH

day, each week,

each year has put something

new

scrapbook of our sorority hfe.

into the

Turning

over the blue and white-checked cover, find

all

we

As we

room playing

away about

memories of the joys

bridge, playing

the latest gossip.

closely, you'll see a

of the chapter.

Lee Garnett,

new

friend

Her name

who was

at this particular

coke

If

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Miss

we

'n

to Fall Cotillion,

Alpha

know

have known

we

which drew back

this

It

was

thrill-

among

room

we

to learn

all

We

in Ruth's, Elsie's,

the

year.

way

Our

first

to the chap-

news and

to claim

remember the sparkle

and Mae's eyes when we

learned of their engagements.

sisters.

After Christmas newly pledged Beanie

Dudley had

a buffet supper for the chapter.

Soon afterwards rushing was our

Our

coming

thought was to make our ter

it

work and bub-

news of the summer and

bling over with

our belongings.

With

again!

returned to school ready for

big plans for the

nab party.

ing to see those familiar faces again

g.ALL

those

our guest of honor

several of last year's G. T.'s.

ris

all

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA

you look

among

Leafing through a few more pages,

terest.

we

year.

the vie, dancing, but most often chatting

the

last cover,

the G. T.'s pictured as they were in

the chapter

come

turn the

that this scrapbook will always recall fond

seven Baby

chief in-

Gammies were Dor-

Ballance, Betty Burchett, Jane Burchett,

Nancy Chambers, Clare and "Terry"

Clarke, Sue Davis,

Fuller.

"All work and no play makes Jack a dull

In der's

November we had our annual FounDay Banquet in the tea-room. Before

exams, plete

we had

our Christmas part>' com-

with songs, presents, and the fun of

preparing our Christmas basket.

The

holiday passed quickly and

when we

returned to school, our thoughts turned to

winter rushing.

Luck was with us when


we welcomed

fourteen

Bowles,

Betty

"Peepsie"

Brooks,

Peggy

Cabaniss, Muriel Crostic, Betty Epperson,

Hannah, Anne Holmes, Norma

Alice

Howard, Katie Lawrence, Sue McCorkle, Ellen

McMuUen, Norma

June Snead,

we had our

night

room

That

Suttle.

party in the chapter

honor of our new

in

we

mond on forts

new

to school from the holi-

sent Marilyn and Bessy to Rich-

shopping tour. Their

a little

were quite

ef-

successful, for the lovely

chair and coffee table are our pride and

joy.

With

the din and excitement of rushing,

accompanied by the

strains of "Cocktails

Two," "ohs and ahs" over

for

the Ouija

Board, and the general chatter of voices,

girls.

next memorable event was Mardi

The

Gras with our

days,

Nancy

Soyars,

and Hildrian

Having returned

members.

future

We were literally tickled to death to pledge

own Mary Walker

in the

we welcomed eleven new pledges: Corinne Boland, Mary Eames, Betty EweU, Doris

It

was

Jean Hancock, Augusta Hargan, Shirley

wonderful to have so many of the old

girls

Harper,

court; then

came Spring

Cotillion.

has been a great year with Miss Hall

It

as

our adviser and our

Ruth,

officers,

presi-

dent; Lillian, vice-president; Boots, secre-

and

tary;

jobs

done superb

Jean, treasurer, have

and shown remarkable

Mary

Anna

Harrison,

Alfreda

Payne,

ry

back with us again.

Kucera,

Jer-

Faye

and

Peterson,

Wolfe. April brought on because

it

was then

sorts of big times

all

we

that

twentieth anniversary.

celebrated our

Longwood became

our home for the week-end and the pleasant

capabilities.

scene of

many

MU OMEGA

They were memo-

reunions.

ries of never- to-be

Miss

forgotten events.

Wheeler, alumnae, old

girls,

and new

girls

gave us a combination that could have no

OING Room?"

The

old

over to the Chapter

familiar question

Mu

once again current among the

we resumed

our happy gatherings.

good to

our room take on

see

was

O's as It

other outcome but the best ol fun, and the

was

homelike

its

PI

appearance after being

left

ties of friendships that will

strengthening of last forever.

KAPPA SIGMA

through the

summer months with only our inanimate

E

possessions as reminders of livelier days.

Tuesday meetings, Sunday parties,

teas,

holiday

and informal get-togethers, how-

returned to school this

year amid the usual September downpour,

but our

spirits

Our gay

cleared the chapter

Christmas party will ever be remembered

tomary

clutter,

ever,

soon became

for the joys

we

actualities.

shared exchanging

for the beauty of the Chapter

gifts

Room

we began

room

of

its

in earnest

cus-

on a

and

year which will remain in the minds of

dec-

many

orated with the Christmas tree, candlelight

and the greens of the season.

After

were undampened.

we had

as the best Pi

Our memories fall

are

Kap

year ever.

many and

pledge party, honoring

golden

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the

Dot May;

the


tea for

Mrs. Busch, our golden anniversary

breakfast; the Christmas party in jeans 'n shirts,

which followed

it;

we

attended

and the slumber party

ten

Nancy Duncan, Frances

pledges,

Hahn, Joyce

Mittie

Maude

Betty Scoggins,

Mary

Virginia Travis;

Martha Higgins

tree,

and the whfjle room was "decked"

Hutt,

Savage,

and

earnestly

presiding at meetings; hours spent in the

Miss Dabney for

at securing

In

to keep, the fun

our cabin party and the food the

a patroness.

way

May

in

Martha

Spring rushing;

damp

eyes,

we consumed;

Russell,

the

Senior

farewells, packing,

Our Christmas

licious,

and we

room

Ginny

party;

and good-

ALPHA SIGMA TAU Alpha Si3ma Tau,

have had a busy year, with many

remember and

turned in the the chapter

fall,

activities

store for pleasant recol'

As

lections in the future.

we

soon as

we

re-

immediately cleaned

room and rearranged

ticipation of a visit

panied

each

der's

Day Banquet

in

huge success, although

it

We A. S. T.'s were proud of our twenty whom we

ing.

We were more than happy to welcome

many alumnae

pledged after Winter rush-

Gwen

Dorothy fin,

Fult2;,

Ackiss, Jean Camper,

Jean Ganzert, Helene Grif-

Lorene Haynes, Fredrika Hubbard,

Charlotte

Edith

Hutter,

We

Jane

Kirkland,

Nancy Magner, Peggy Moore, Dorothy Overton,

Anna Ward

Peery, Louise Pe-

gram, Betty Plunkett, Jean Pritchett, and

Kathryn Rainey. a fitting

background

for our spring picnic, at

which the

were the honored

A successful year

from the

guests.

efforts of faculty adviser.

Miss Bedford and our ertson,

president;

president;

seniors

Sally

officers:

Rob-

Lucie McKenry, vice-

Ehzabeth

McLean,

recording

secretary;

Dorothy Gelston, corresponding

secretary;

Anna Lee

Blanton, treasurer.

in an-

SIGMA SIGMA

SIG}vL\

enter-

The Foun-

November was

we

Miss added

stfjry

girls

qA^.MID

tained her with informal parties and discussions in the chapter room.

we exchanged.

gift

to the spirit of the season.

from Mrs. Carrie B.

Stable, our national president.

in

de-

"knocked ourselves

really

Nichol's traditional Christmas

resulted

to

was

out" laughing at the verses that accom-

Longwood provided

bye to Pi Kap for another year.

E, in

supper

Jody Cook, Ahce Coon, Mildred Davis,

Court; sun baths on the

roof;

green.

be

had a beautiful

to our chapter

at

wouldn't stay up; everyone looking lovely

and Sprye

it.

we made

the curtains in the chapter

at spring banquet;

realized

we had

Spring's balmy weather,

more memories

our joy

parties;

us almost

new

Ellen Temple,

nab

fjn

We

we

chapter room playing bridge and Hstening to the "vie"; coke 'n

Cvhristmas sneaked up fore

Garnett,

Azeele

Hill,

Hunnicutt,

Spotswood

transportation.

ad'

Miss Her, friend and

Winter rushing and our

viser;

of the limited and uncertain conditions of

a

did not have as

to return this year because

cheery greetings,

girls

loaded with boxes took their belong-

ings

from the chapter room where they had

been stored during the summer. ing of the

room constituted the

The first

clean-

signs of


in

activity

Sigma and the beginning of

another grand year for the Alpha chapter.

At

the end of

and happy

to

fall

was

tuated the maid of honor in a rich melon colored dress of the same design and the

the time spent in the

hght of

this

chapter

room each Sunday when we

gath-

ered in the afternoon for after dinner cof'

These hours have made for themselves

fee.

a permanent place in our sorority memories.

We

were pleased

end of winter

at the

rushing to welcome Corrine Baker, Susan

Dickinson,

Ann

Hume, Carol

Jenkins,

Ehse

Haskins,

Jeanette

George

Mary Ann

Frances Livesay,

Ann

Lewis,

Morriss, Elea-

nor Overbey, Betsy Scott, Shirley Slaugh-

Nancy

ter,

Squire,

and Berkley Richard-

queen

in

pure white

satin, the spirit of

New

Russia.

Betsy Caldwell reigned over the

Day

festivities

with her maid of honor

Hume. Chosen seniors,

Marilyn

Ann

Higgins, Marilyn Johnson,

Blair,

Martha

Lucy Manson

Sharpe, Virginia Terrell, and kins.

Elise

were seven

as attendants Bell,

May

Those representing the

Mary Watjuniors

were

Frances Lee and Jackie Par den.

The sophomore Joan Davis, King,

Lynn

Mary

court members included Russell East,

Mary

Jane

Spyre, Virginia Travis, and

Nancy Whitehead.

"Peepsie"

Brooks,

Theresa Powell, and Berkley Richardson

son, as pledges.

Mary

ruffled trains, the court accen-

we were proud

Helen Hope Worsham, and Ann Mingea had become our new pledges. The highyear

gowns, with

that Eloise Stancell,

rushing

know

Dressed in blue taffeta

the Soviet Union.

Shelton Whitehead, a former Al-

represented the freshmen.

pha, visited the chapter this year, returning as a visiting alumna.

We

also celebrated

the forty-seventh anniversary of our founding,

and Mabel Lee Walton, national

presi-

dent, honored us with her presence at this time.

Dora Walker efficient rell

Jones, in her capable

and

way, headed Sigma. Nancy Har-

served as vice-president; Carlotta Nor-

fleet as

dox

as treasurer.

Mad-

Miss Pauline Camper,

our faculty adviser, was a constant inspiration to

MAY DAY

recording secretary; Emily Carper

as corresponding secretary; Katharine

all

of us.

T was when annual

over 23?

May

May

New

day for us

up

for

our

Day, the Russian Chronicle

KuaZilarich assisted

chairman.

ground and

a gala

signed

under the capable direction of Miss Emily

MAY COURT ITH Longwood

girls

as a back-

Russia as a theme, the

Court represented each repubhc of

which to choose half of

by Dodie Jones, student

There was

a

wide range from

parts, including the first

modern dancers

in ''The Trinity"

contrasted with those Russian folk dancers


in the last half

umvirate."

who composed "The

was hard

It

Tri-

to decide whether

was

the costuming or the unusual dancing the

Original Russian designs of the Holiday

Walk Group drawn by strikingly

form.

The

college art students

By2;antine

disintegrated,

the Czar, the

way was made

reborn through

Kolomey Ka

for a nation

masses.

its

COTILLION CLUB

and nimble foot walk

that either costume or dance

was more

W,

ITH mascuhne

out-

more scarce than

The

With

faiths in their nation.

of the dancers so well that one couldn't say

standing.

the blending of the old

as the peoples reaffirmed their

and

color

in

vivid stripe of the

set off the intricate

we saw

new

supremacy of the old church, the nobility

more spectacular.

were

Chronicle

with the

ingeniousness of the costumI.

partners

M.

and Tech and V.

ever,

not up to the usual quota,

we

again called

ing committee converted old sheets into

on our shirts

and

skirts.

local

Hampden-Sydney V-12"s and

Materials were almost im-

some of our old

favorites

on furlough to

fill

possible to obtain.

We

felt

To

pose.

that our

May Day

understand Russia

is

our prom cards.

had a pur-

to

know

Our bang-up

whose

dance season got

year's start

with

a

on No-

Fall CotiUion,

history has long been underestimat-

bember 11th, which surpassed ed.

off to

her

Russia's past has been rediscovered;

We

wildest dreams.

her present, reappraised; and her future, of

The Vagabonds

predicted.

of our

all

danced to the

strains

as they appropriately

"You Were Never LoveHer"

played

for

In the "Trinity" the levels of old RusJohnnie, our president. sian society

ern dance.

were represented through mod-

The

Ruth Brooks and her troop

of thirty-five

supreme with

C2;ar reigned

Fall

Goats did a special job with that green

the influence of the Greek Orthodox.church

and yellow crepe paper, which

The

directly beneath him.

petty nobility

most

lent a

enchanting background for our new dresses,

ranked third with the majority of the peo-

and

flowers,

moods.

festive

Everyone

ple falling in the lower class of oppressed

smiled

and danced

"Queekie"

happily.

masses.

New

Trower's Russia was the theme of the

Committee arranged

for

the

last

music. part of the chronicle.

The Triumvirate In January

which included the peasants, the worker, girls to

the soldier,

ern dance.

was symboHzed through mod-

The queen

represented the

we

asked sixty-seven

become members of the

new-

They,

club.

under the guidance of the chairman, took

new care of the decorations for Spring Cotillion.

spirit of

the

Russia; the court, the republics of

Soviet

Republic.

From

the

various

provinces came the folk whose interpreta-

Even though we eliminated the usual noon Tea Dance, we

tions of their traditional dances reflected a

ing of April 14th

Slavic culture.

Caldwell,

Through

these contrasts in the Russian

was

looking as

dream, led the

figure.

all

a

after-

thought the even-

"huge one." Betsy

if

she were but

Nu

had

its

a

annual


ceremony and gave

bracelets to

senior

its

following

Monday and Tuesday

some of us had a knock-down drag'out spring cleaning job done on our rooms.

un'glamorous goats, living

in

The

Beauty and grace are probably

Sharpe:

Bell's

mighty voice

remember her warm smile and

mortal fear of

at

demands of the old

rigid

had earned

was

over,

girls.

Tuesday

their right to

By

A. K. G. and

president of

the time

the Dramatic

become true

Cotil-

Club she demonstrated her

efficient leadership.

Wade:

night, they

Club members.

lion

As

also

assur-

Goat Court,

gladly enough cooperated with the not too-

the ra2;zing

we

Lucy's most noted attributes, but like to

ing manner.

Marilyn

which makes her truly

companionable.

members.

The

indescribable essence

EUie

in her capable

the Ideal Class President;

is

hands the

affairs of

have been smoothly and

skillfully

class

admin-

Additional laurels are due for her

istered.

SENIOR PERSONALITIES

our

athletic prowess, her concentration of gray

matter, and her luscious looking feather cut.

'ELL:

The major triumph Whittle Service has been the keynote of :

of Marilyn's busy Hfe at Farmville

is

doubtPhe's hfe at S. T. C.

the creation of the 1945 Virginian;

less

toriously

ion we've long had of her, thanks to her scintillating inspirations for class tions,

circuses

vitality,

shall

and other

produc-

projects.

enthusiasm, and exhuberance

Her

U.

Cross unit.

Williams:

not forget.

handling of problem-cases justified our

faith

in

her as President of the House

Council. Tiny, vivacious, and gay, Higgins fills

— "personaHty

Hacky has memorably

and confidence;

filled

of proportion,

all

makes

that

manship

the demanding

her thoughtful judgment,

as

life

"Y"

president she

and her

valuable.

The epitome

Wilson:

Student Body President. Her sense

exudes graciousness,

Birdie

situation, her pleasant friendliness,

as office of

is

keen appreciation of beauty, of knowledge, of

in abiHty,

Phe

and sense of

We especially admire her adroitness in any

plus."

Moore: Apparently unlimited

stick-in-the-mud,

has climaxed four years of calm leadership.

our connotation of the hackneyed but

apt phrase

No

for her ready laughter

humor.

poise,

flled

on government, the A. A., the

O. Committee, and our new Red

S.

famed

we

Higgins; "Little Higgins," by her unruf-

grati-

tude and deep respect, she has worked meri-

her originality and cleverness are reflected

on every page. Thus she clenches the opin-

Winning our

in her

on the Athletic

field

tinguished her term as

Abundant thanks

and her superb leadership are substantiated

lating

by a joy of Hving, an easy charm, and that

Longwood.

those

of

Good

Sports-

everyday contacts as well

gay

—Helen A. A.

has

dis-

president.

to her, also, for manipu-

Sunday afternoons

at


Theta Sigma Upsilon

left to right: J. Anderson, Lotts, B. Boone, Verrell,

Front row,

M. Watkins Back row:

A.

Wood, Bowling,

Adams, West, Conner

Left to right:

Akers, Miss Jennings, Prince, Parson. R. Bell. Green, Prosisc,

M. Stewart

M. Woodward.

\".

Abernathy,


Phi Zeta Sigma

Front row, left to right: Weeks, A. Nichols

Second row: E. Grizzard, Holloway, Godwin Back row: M. Williams, Spradlin

Front row,

left

to

right:

A.

Bell,

Durrett, Feitig, Lassiter, D. Smith

Second row: V. Treakle, L. Harrell, N. Scott, K. Tindall, Rucker, G. Back row: R. Davis, Sterrett, Key, Blane, Dondley, McRea, M. Bear

Newman


Gamma

\un)i

lo'v.

Back row:

Front row,

left to right:

Back row:

Massey,

Pitts,

Ult

iii

iiijlii:

Theta

Mi'tin, Hayward, Wentzel, Beatty,

Hundley

Harvic, White, Lear, Walker, Leech, H. Fuller, Whittle

A.

Blair,

Hewlett, V. Terrell, McLear, Brothers

Agee, Grumpier, Caldwell, C. Diggs,

J.

Page


Alpha Sigma Alpha

Left to right: Thompson, Surface, D. Turley, Harvey, D. Owen

Left to right:

M. Watts,

R.

Brooks, L. ElHott, Derieux, Myers, Riddick, Dale, Ritchie,

Overstreet, L. Upshur, B. Johnson,

Bralley, K. East

M. Upshur,

B. Parnsh,

N. Parrish, Stonner, Burford, M. Wilson,


Mu

Ome^a

Left to right: Bland, Bi'sese, Sheffey, Sollenburger, Parden, Blackwell, Bradshaw, Halstead, Gibson, L. Boone, Prebble, R. Hill, V. Woodward, Cobbs, Apperson, Knapton, Shaffner, Nixon, Williams, M. Bell, Wade, Moling, Calvert, B. Adams, D. Harper, Murray

Front row,

left

Back row:

F.

to

right:

H. Bennett, Ingle, Kimmerling

Shacklcford, Cruser, Shuffleharger,

].

Davis, Loyd,

M. Orange


Pi

Kappa Sigma

Left to right:

Lett to right:

Lynch,

J.

P.

Maddox, 0:hn, Mapp, Loving, Higgin^, MLlntyrt,

i

H, Hutt, Trower, Higgins

SLWard,

Smith

Left to right: Lohr, Spyre, J. Tucker, Cook, Saunders, H. Hutt, Austin, Pebbles, Miss Her

S. East,

Fuqua, Hunt, Bracey, Ayers, V. Shackleford,


Alpha Sigma Tau

Cheatwood,

left to right:

Masloff, Pullcn, Headlee, Gelston,

Ellis,

L, Jones, Wright Edmunds, McKenry, A. Blanton, McLean,

A. Carter,

Front row.

Back row:

left to right: Hoge, Rowc, D. Bennett, Garrison Second row: Bruch, A. Nichols, Bobhitt, Droste, Peary, Danie Back row: Ramsey, Bibb, Kellam

Front row,

S.

Robertson


Sigma Sigma Sigma

Ross, Jarrett, Sharpe, D. Jones, L. Baker, Norfleet,

Front row,

left

Back row:

Summers, Rives, Riech,

to right:

F. Bell,

M. Orange, Montgomery,

Dillard,

Whitehead H. Moore, M. Watkins, N. Wilkerson

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fe Front row,

left

Back row:

N. Harrell,

to right;

F.

M. Wells, M. Ellett, F. Lee, Almand, N. M. Johnson, Crouch, Parham, Hauser

Butt, Connelly,

B. Scott,

Smith, H. Lacy,

M. King


Front rnw, Icll to rii;lit: Vaughan, Young, Carper, B. Jonc^ Second row: K. Maddox, A. Dickinson, Timmins, M, Shiflet, H. Wilson Back row: C. Butt, Minetree, Overcash, Patterson, Stokes, V. Dale, Philhower, McGuire,

May Day

Front row,

left

to right:

Committee

Diggs, Ozlin,

M, Orange,

F.

Lcc, D. Jones,

Ellis.

Trowcr

B.

Wood, Hawthorne


May

BETSY CALDWELL ^ueen

Court

ELISE HUME Maid of Honor

MARY JANE KING

LUCY MANSON SHARPE

MARY WATKINS

FRANCES LEE

JACKIE PARDEN

MARILYN BELL


For 1945

MARILYN JOHNSON

VIRGINIA TERRELL

LYNN SPYRE

NANCY WHITEHEAD.

ANN

BLAIR

MARTHA HIGGINS

THERESA POWELL

"PEEPSIE' BROOKS. BERKLEY RICHARDSON". \TRGINIA TR.^\"1S

MARTHA RUSSELL EAST

JOAN DAMS


Cotillion

Club

Officers

Left to right:

Caldwell.

M. Johnson, Trower, Massey

\

V^=

{

i

X:«=»*..

C^

^. ^


Lucy Mianson Sharpe


1.

"The Gleaners."

2.

That 8:05

3.

Me

and

smile!

my shadow

4.

Here eomes the

5.

When

6.

A

rose

eircus.

Rome, do as the Romans. bct\\-een two sharpies.

7.

Gasoline shortage.

S.

A

9.

Farm\nlle"s co-ed, the Black

in

1 0.

\-ie\v

Your

from junior building.

a-\le

shows.

Hawk.


1

They

2.

She's got

what

3.

Come on

team.

4.

Four

ride together. it

takes.

steps to beauty.

5.

Leg

6.

Bessy with coke appeal.

7.

A

8.

art.

jolly

freshman.

9.

10.

Not on the laundry list. The forgotten senior. Sun worshippers. "No more

11. I said,

breakfast.'


Senior Statistics VmCIMA A.; V.

AHK](NATIiy:

I.Ki;

W. C. A.J A.

Y.

chil., 1, 2, :i, Vifjo-Fremdent, ! I; llrorr KM IlLMri, 2, Historian, 8, TrcaKllilhi :i, H;iiiiu I'i, 4; I'i Ciimma Mu, 4; l>lli SiKriia, I; SpiniiKli CIuIj. :i; 'I'hi'la SiKlna

iliaii.lil.iiiKlii'r^ \..

'I.

incT,

1;

Alpha

Ups'ilon, 3,

I'rcHiil.'iil,

LOREEN

I;

Ibirjif

Ki(Mi..riiiiK

Mu

H.orc Kb Tborrj. ACJICH;

'.

'I'..wii

(lirlK

cliil.,

I,

'I'rcasuriT,

2,

3,

1.

W. (^ A.; A. A.; .Slmb-nl Si-CTClary.

A.

4,

2.

C.

Publicity

A.,

Y.

W,

A,:

C.

A.

:',;

A. A,; "VirKinian" .Staff, 2, 4, Art Cdb'tje Choir, 2, 3, 4; Junior A Cappella, IVi, 2, 3, 4; .Mav Dav, 3; U, .S. II. I. 2, 3. 4; SpaniKh Clidi. 3; Latin f.lub.

CantJrrbury Club;

MARCARUT HMZABETH BEAR:

C. A.; A. A.; Alpha I'hi Sigma, 1, 2; Commercial Club, 2, 3, 4; Ch.iial Club. 1, 2; F. T. A., 1, 2; GranddauRhti-i's Club; Pegasus, 4; Canterbury Club, 2, 3, 4; "Rotunda" .Stalf, 2, 3, 4; "Colonnade" Staff, 3, 4; Var.sit.v Ba.-jkctliall, 1, 2, 3; Varsity Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Phi Zcta Signia, Corresponding Secretary, 3, 4.

.JOSEPHINE BEATTV:

Y.

W.

C. A.; A. A.; CotilFellowship, Council, 4;

lion Club, 3, 4; Westminster

Gamma

ROHKRT'A DAVIS:

3.

Club,

4;

1,

2,

Who

3, in

4;

Pi

Gamma

May Day,

Mu, 3,

1,

3,

4; Cotillion Court, 4;

May

American Colleges and Universities: Pan-Hellenic Council, 2; Alpha Phi Sigma, 1, VicePresident, 2; U. S. 0. Chairman. 3; Orchesis, 3, 4; Pi Kappa Delta, President, 3; Debate Club, 1, Treasurer, 2, 3, 4; "Rotunda" Staff, 1, Feature Editor, 2; Circus Ringmaster, 3; Class Officer, Vice-l»resident, 2, 3; Class Production Chairman. 3; Class Historian;

Mu Omega,

Quiz Team, 3; "Crv Havoc," 4; Head, 3.

Vice-

ANN BLAIR: Y. W. C. A.; Freshman CommisSophomore Commission; A. A.; Choir, 1, 2, Vice-President, 3, President, 4; Intermediate A Cappella, 1; Junior A Cappella, 2; Senior A Cappella, 3, 4; Chapel Choir; Choir Quartette, 3, 4; Circus Court, 2; Jlardi Gras Court, 3; May Court, 3, 4; Commercial Club, 1, 2; Cotillion Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; "Rotunda" Staff, 1, 2; "Colonnade" Staff, 3, 4; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, JIusic Chairman, 3, Staging Chairman, 4; Campus League Representative, 1, Chairman, 2; Student Government, 2; A. C. E,, 3. 4; F. T. A., 3, 4; "Midsummer Night's Dream." 4; War Council, 2; Gamma Theta. Vice-Head, 4. sion,

BETTY MARIE BLACKWELL: Y. W. C. A.; A, A.; College Choir, 1, 2, 3, 4; Intermediate A Cappella, 1; Junior A Cappella, 1; Senior A Cappella, 2, 3, 4; Madrigal Group 4; Cotillion Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Wesley Foundation, Secretary, 4; Mu Omega, 1,

League

T.

1

•'

JEAN DEAN: C. A.; A. A.;

Transfer from Mailison College; Y.

Sigma Sigma Sigma.

CAROL DfGGS:

W.

Y.

A.;

C.

A

A.

Dramatic

;

Club, Staging Chairman. 3. Vice-Pn-si.i.nt. 4 Town Girls Club. 1. 2. 3, Secretarv. 2; Cc.tilli.Mi (bib > 3, 4; May Day. 1. 3. Staging and l'r..p.rli li'airman. 4; "Virginian" Staff, 4; Pan-llellenii ( .juucil 3; Gamma Theta, President, 4.

BETSY BROOKS DILLARD:

MARTHA

.MARTHA HITE: daughters Club,

.

Psi.

President, 3, Historian, 4.

V.

W.

A.; A. A.; 42 Club, 2. Vice-

Canterburv Program Chairman, 4;" Phi Zeta Sigma 3;

CAROLINE CRITTENDEN HUDDLE: A. X.; Pi Gamma Mu. 3. Treasurer.

minster Fellowship,

1,

W.

Y.

A.;

A.

Day.

1,

A

'

WestChairman Church Coopera-

2.

C.

tive Committee. 3. Secretarv. 4; A. C. T. A., 4; Cotillion Club, 4;' Chairman

May

OLIVE BRADSHAW:

W.

Y.

C. A.; A. A.;

lion Club, 3, 4;

W.

E,

:

4-

3

F

Dining Room Standards Committee, 4; Sigma. Social Chairman. 4.

Student 4; 2; Pi Kappa

BETTY EDWARDS:

Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; Latin 1. 2. 3. 4; Choral Club. 1, 2, 3; Debate Club, Dramatic Club, 1; Mav Dav, 1. 2; Canterburv Club, 4; F. T, A,, 4.

Club.

NELL T. A..

Club,

chesis, 2, 3, Treasurer. 4; Leader, 4; Choral Club, 1; May Court, 2, 3, Queen, 4; Gamma Theta.

MARY WILLIAM CALVERT: Y. W. C. A.: A. A.; 1, 2; Kappa Delta Pi, 3, 4; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Cotillion Cluli. 4; Ib.u.-ie Council, 2, 4; Newman Club, 2, 3. SiTictarv. 4: F. T. A.; Choral Club, 1. 2; Choir, 3, 4; Chapei C.unniit-

4;

JOY'CE

CHEATWOOD: 3.

A. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Pega4; Cotillion Club, 1, 2, 3, 4;

M. CLAIBORNE: pha Phi Sigma; A. C. E.,

Sigma Upsilon.

3.

W. 4;

C. A.: A. A.; AlF. T. A.. 4; Tliefa

W. C

Y.

W.

Y.

2.

3,

Y. W. C. 4; Riding 4; Theta

ELISE HUME: \. W. C. A.; A. \.: Cotillion Club. 2, 3, 4; Pegasus. 2, 3. 4; HJJ Club. 2. 3. 4; Mardi Gras Court, 4; May Court, Maid of Honor. 4: Sigma Sigma Sigma. Cotillion Club; French Circle, .Spanish Club; Pi Kappa Sigma.

\. W". C. A.: A. A.: Vice-President. 4;

HERSEV HUTT: Y". W. C. A.- A. A.: Alpha Phi Signia, 1, 2; Commercial Club. 2. 3. 4. A'iee-President. 4; "Colonnade" Staff. 3, Business Manager. 4; Northern Neck Club. 1, 3, Pr<>sident, 2. 3: Cotillion Club. 4 Pi Kappa Sigma, Secretarj-, 3. Treasurer. 4. THERESA HUTT: Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; Commercial Club. 2. 3. 4, Treasurer. 4; "Rotunda" Staff, 3, 4; Northern Neck Club. 1. 2. 4. Secretary. S; Canterbiu-y Club; Theta Sigma Upsilon.

MARY

AN"NE JARR.\TT:

Y.

W. C.

A.,

Chairman

Affairs Committee, 3. Vice-President, 4; Alpha Kappa Gamma; Pi Gamma Mu. 3. 4: Pi. 3. Treasurer. 4; Alpha Phi Sigma, 1. Trea.surer, i; Choral Club, 1; Choir. 2 : Junior A Cappella. 2; Granddaughters Club. 1, Secretarv, 2. ViceI^resident. 3: War Chest Chairman. 3; Mav Dav. 1. 2: War CounciL 4; F. T. A.; CoHPicn Club. 4; JL C. E., Membership Chairman, -i; \\ u.j s wTio in American Colleges and Universities; Sigma Si$:ma Sigma, Directory Chairman. 3. Social Service Chair-

A.

A. \

\

\

-

F

Home Economics

C. A.; A. A.

from Averett ColPresident, 4; College Choir, ;

Gamma

Theta.

MARY ELIZABETH FUQUA:

Y". W. C. A.; A \ tbimma Mu, 4: Kappa Delta Pi; U. S. O. 3. Nice-Cliairman. 4; Commercial Club, 2, 3, President, 4; Dramatic Club, 1. 2, 3, 4; B. S. I'.. 2. VicePre.'^idcnt. 3. Publicitv Chairman, 4; Choral Club. 1: College Choir, 2, 3, 4: .fmiior A Capiiella. 3; Senior A Cappella, 4; Cotillion Club, 4; Eastern Shore Club. Treasurer, 3. 4; Pi Kappa .Sigma. ;

Pi

Y.

W.

C. A.: A. A.

W. C. A.; A. A.: Y". Club. 2; French Circle. President. 4; Spanish Club; F. T. A.. 4; Canterburv Club. President, 4; Town Girls Club; Theta Sigma Upsilon. Dramatic

.v.;

Kappa

Tran>;fer

ALICE TAPPEY GREEN:

Y.

A.; A.

Phi Signia. 1:

;

EDITH GARCIA:

LENA

C.

Madrigal Group, 3. 4 3 Student Government, 3 V. W. C. A., Chairman Sing Committee, 3, 4: Cotilliim Club. 3. 4; Spanish Club; Red Cross Committee.

Alpha Phi Sigma.

Alpha Sigma Tau.

W.

R.\Y FLEMING:

3, 4: Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4.

BETSY ANNE FOX: Pi Gamma Mu, 3,

lege;

sus, 1, President, 2,

Y.

CARMEN FLORES:

C.

Mu Omega.

1, 2. 3. .Secretary. 4.

Public

ALICE FEITIG:

Alpha

A.; A. A.; OrCotillion Club. 2. 3, Mardi Gras Court, 3;

Y'.

Granddaughters Club,

:

Mu Omega.

BETSY CALDWELL:

1;

SPOTSWOOD HUXXICXTT:

SARAH LEE EAST:

Committee.

W. C. A.; A. A.: Gnnd4; Home Economics Club. Dav Costume Committ««, 3.

3.

C.

2, 3, 4, Treasurer. 3. President Staff, 1, 2, 3, 4; "Virginian" Staff 1.,

2,

V. 2,

A.:

Club.

Sigma Upsilon.

MARY LOUISE DONDLEY: May Day,

1.

\iee-I^esident. 4; .May F. T. A.. 4. 4

Fairfas Hall- Trans-

from W. C. U. N. C; Y. W. C. A.: A. A.; C.itilClub; Commercial Club. 3, 4; F. T. '.\ 4Sigma Sigma Sigma.

4;

V. A.; A. A.;

MRGI.VIA HIGGISS: V. W. C. A.: A. A.; Alpha Kapf>a Gamma; Student GoveniDUfnt. 4: llouM- Council. 2. .Se<T.tar>-. 3. Preiideiit. 4; Kr.-^timan Commission; Sophomore C<>mmi<*ioti: Student Standar.ls. 4; In-amatic Club. I. 2; A. V. E.: .May Day. 1; May Court. 2, 3, 4; Cirriu C<jurt. 3; Pegasus. SefTetar)-, 2; C. S. O. Coinniilt««. 4; Whn'f Wlio in American CollegeH ami IniTenilien; Cotilbon Club. 1. 2, 3. 4; Pi Kappa Sigma S«roritjr. Vice-President. 3. President. 4; Chi.

fer

"Colonnade"

W.

i'.umm'MAim Clutfisan,

C'ounrtl,

;

lion

Gamina

Founilation

2, 3, 4; F. T. A.

ELIZABETH IIARVF.V: V, W. C. A.; A. A,; Alpha I'hi .Sigma. I. 2; Hi-^m: Kh Th«fn. J. 3. 4; F. T. A.. 1, 2; Latin Club. 1; "Vireinian" Staff, 2, 3. BufineiiH Manager. 4; llouw Council. •. 4; Cotillion Clul>. 4: Alpha Sigrna Alplia.

(

3,

L'|/>iliiti.

V.

MARY

Pi

A. A,;

Club, 3, 4, House Council, 2; Wesley Foundation, Secretary, 2; Granddaughters Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; -Pan-Hellenic Council, 4; Phi Zeta Sigma, Treasurer, 3, Vice-President, 4.

W.

SlKina

HAMI.I.\:

Treaiurer, 3. Vice-I're-«i<lent, 4; Chi.

Campus Gamma Mu, 4; Com-

C. A.;

mcrciiil

ALFNE BOSS: Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; A. C. E., 3, President, 4; F. T. A., 2, 3, 4; Eastern Shore Club. Phi Sigma. 2; Kappa Delta Pi, 3, 4; Dramatic Club, 2, Head of Acting Group, 3; Debate Club, 3, 4; F. T. \., 2, Vice-President, 3; Spanish Club, 1; Cotil-

A, J A. A,

XA.NCV IIAIiKFXI,: V. W. C. A.; \. A.; Pi Garnrna Mu. Vici-l>r<ii>leTi(. I; Kapra IVla I'I. %, 4; floerc Eh Th/>ni, 4; Al|>ha Ka|>i'a «;aTnma. 4; Cotillion Club. 2. 3. 4; F. T. A,. 4; K«l Cnjw Committee, SecTelary. 4; Ch»ral Club. I; l>nna1iiClub. 2. 3. 4; "Prunella." 4; Sigma .Siisma Slifma.

4;

4.

tee, 3;

W.

Y. Representative, 4;

F.

Theta; Transfer from Peace Junior College.

Kappa Gamma,

2, 3,

Colb-g,.;

ALICE LEE DAVIS: Y. W. C:. A.; A. A.; A. 2, 3, Treasurer, 4; Home Economics Clidi 3; B. S. U., 4; Alpha Phi Sigma.

MARILYN BELL: Y. W. C. A.; A, A,; Student Standards, 4; "Virginian" Staff, 3, Editor, 4; Alpha Who's

VIUGINIA DALK: Tramf.r from l(a,lf„rd VV. C. A.; A. A.: Sigma Sigma Signia.

V.

W.

Y.

v..

'llieta

KOSALIK AN.NK Wiwley

2,

A.;

Uho,

3, Vice-President, 4; Latin Club. 2, 3, 4, Vice-President, 4; Canterbury Club, 2, 3, 4; F. T. A., 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi, 3, 4; Alpha Phi Sifjma, 2; House Council, 4. I'i

W.

V.

V. W. C. A,; A. A.; CViral 1; .V.rHheni Sii-V. riul.. I, t, Trnmurrt. Z, l're«id«it, 4: Home VA-ntinmif J'lul.. I, 2, Z, 4;

Club.

(;ariinia

;<;

Courjcil. I.

iMAliOAUHT BARKSDALE:

-A;

KLKA.VOK HAM,:

W.

V.

1,

.Sigma

<i\\i.y.: V, w. i:. s.: \. l>»y, I. z. X; CtilMiim Mub, Club, 4: O/mrw-rr-lal duh, Z. t; V. T, ,*.. 4; (i:imnu ThHa.

Ma)

i,

AI.ICK HAI.I

\.

liapliKl

I;

KH,\xcKS WKsr/.Ki. \: "I'runella," 2; 2, <!, 4; (tf'IfliK

I,

imimalK- Club,

4.

Cbainnan. 2;

A.: A. C. 2. Vic-ITi'Mi-

A.;

::,

COUKLL:

f;i.KA.\OU

2;

Edilnr.

.IRAN fJRAY AKKU.S: Y, W. ('. F. T. A.; Theta Siurna UpHlon.

E.;

3,

ItidiiiK

OuH-ifa. Sfcr,.|ary,

rUASCDS (IIPDMIAVKIt:

4.

A. A,; \. W. ( A.; Clul), 1, 2, 3, Ki-orotai-.v, 4; Cnijirjicriiiil The French Circle, 1.

deJit,

CDHIl.S: V. W, C, A.; A. A.; Choral Club, I; "Rotunda" .Staff, 2, 3. 4; Club, I; Commercial Club, 2, ;i, 4;

IIKI.I.N

Club,

man.

li.lta

4.

FAY B\"RD JOHNSON; Y. W. C. A.; A. A.: Student Council. 1: Dramatic Club. 1. Chairman of Play Contest. 2. Busine^ Manager. 3, 4; Stud^it Standards, 2, Chairman of Calendar. 3, 4: "Rotunda" Staff, 1. 4. Feature E*lilor. 2. 3; "A'irginian" Staff, 2; "Colonnade" Staff. 2. 3, 4: Orch^is. 4; Chapel Committee. 2 ; Westminster Fellowship Council. 2 : Who's Who in American Collesres and Universities; Mu Omega. Editor of "Circle." 3, Alumnae Secretary. 4.

MARILYN \nRGIXIA JOHNSON:

T.

W.

C. A.:

A. A.; Granddaughters Club. 1. 2. 3. 4: Choral Club. 1; Dramatic Club. 2. 3, 4: "The Ivorv Door." 3; Cotillion Club. 1. 2. 3. President. 4: Manii Gras Court. 3; May Court. 3. 4; Pan-Hellenic Council. 4: Secretarv. Class Officer. Vice-President, 4: Commercial Cluii. 2, Vice-l>esidenl, 3: Who's Who in Amai.^in

Colleges and Universities;

Rush Chai

Sigma Sigma Sigma.


BEATRICE EDINGTON JONES: Marv Washington College; Y. W.

LUCY MESSICK:

from

Transfer

A. A.; Col-

C. A.;

Choir,

1,

W.

Y.

A.:

C.

X

JANE W.VRING RUFFIN:

College

A.;

A.

Committee, Head, 1; Commercial Club, 1, 2;

Chapel

4;

3,

2,

"Rotunda"

Staff. tor, 3, Editor, 4;

News

1,

W.

Editor,

A.;

C.

A.

Managing

2,-

A.; Edi-

Y. W. C. A., Cabinet, Library Chairnnin, Publicity Chairman; A. A.; Hh lliorn; Flench Club, Secretary, 3, 4; "RoEditorial Staff, 3, 4; "Colonnade," Poetry Editor, 4; "Virginian," Literary Editor, 4; Cotillion ('lull, 3, 4; Westminster Fellowship Council, 3; VicePresident, 4 Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities; Mu Omega Sorority; Transfer from Bel-

Alpha Kappa Gamma, 3, Secretary, Mu, 3, 4; Beorc Eh Thorn, 2, 3, 4; Kappa Delta Pi, 3, 4; Sigma Pi Rho, Editor "Tributum," 3, President, 4; Alpha Phi Sigma, 1, 2; Latin Club, 1, 2, 3; F. T. A., 1, Secretary, 2; Debate Club, 3, 4; Varsity Debate Team, 3; "Colonnade" Staff, 1, 2, 3, 4; "Virginian" Staff, 2; War Council, 4; Student Standards, 4; Red Cross Committee, 4; U. S. O. Committee, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club, 1, Publicity Chairman, 2, 3; Canterbury Club, Cotillion Vice-President, 2, Worship Chairman, 3 CTub, 4 Who's Who in American Colleges and Uni-

War

ha\en College.

versities.

EDITH LEACH .lONES: Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; Alpha Phi .Sigma, 1, 2; Pi Gamma Mu, 3, Social Chairman, 4; Theta Sigma Upsilon.

Cotillion Club,

Choir, 2, 3. 4; Intermediate A Caiipella, 2; Madrigal Group, 2, 3, 4; Conimereial Club, 3, 4; May Day, 2, 3; F. T. A., 4; Cotillion Club, 2, 3, 4; Sigma Sigina Sigmi. lege

DOR\ WALKER MIXES:

Y. W. Kappa Delta

,

K,iii|i:i

\|].li,i

I'.i

Aiiiiiiil,

"III.'

J.

'

3;

i,

1,

<

t:

i;.iiiiTi!:i,

hi.nn.Mi,

::;

'

lub,

(

Ii"n

3,

2,

Male

Home

Committee, 3;

Eco-

nonii'is Cluli, 1. 2, :>. 4, Pifsident, 3; House Council, May Day Committee, 2, 3 Stuil.iit Stan.hinls. :i 2 i'. t! Chairman, 4: Cotillion Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Council, 4; Sigma Sigma 'Sigma, President, 4. â&#x20AC;˘

:

RACHEL .JOYNER: Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; F. T. A., 4; A. C. E., 3, Vice-President, 4 B. S. U., Statistical Secretary, 3.

1.

2,

2, 3, 3, 4;

4;

Student Government, Treas-

3.

nri-r.

SARA DAILEY MOLING:

3,

A.;

Gamma

Pi, 4; 4; "The

Campus League,

Door," 3;

Hee.

1i;i]Iiii;lii

A.

A.;

C.

Madrigal Group, Cotillion Club,

4,

H.i.Tc

tunda,"

;

MARY FKANCES MOON: Home

Choral Club, 1;

W.

Y.

A.;

C.

Ecooraics Club,

1,

;

;

A.;

A. 3,

2,

EDITH SANFORD:

4;

ELIZABETH ANNE House Council,

3,

W. C. A.; A. A.; 4; A. C. E., 3, Sec-

.lONES:

Y.

4; F. T, A.,

ISABEL KEY:

Y'.

W.

C. A.;

A,

Commercial

A.;

Staff, 1, 2, 3, Editor, 4; College Choir, 3, 3, 4; in American Who's

Who

3,

Canterbury Club;

4;

GEORGIA KSIGHT: Pi Rho,

4;

Gamma 4;

2, Secretary,

Psi,

Club,

Spanish

1, 2; Uniyersities,

Colleges and

Mu Omega. Y.

W.

A. A.;

C. A.;

Sigma

Beorc Eh Thorn, 4; College Choir, 3;

Choral Club, 4; F. T. A., B. S. U., Greater Council,

LUCY LINGO:

Y.

W.

3, 4; Latin Club, 3, 3, Vice-President, 4.

C.

A.;

A.

A.;

4;

HARRIETTE SUMTER MOORE:

W.

Y. Delta

A.;

C.

Pi; Alpha A.; Alpha Phi Sigma; Kappa Kappa Gamma, Treasurer; "Virginian" Staff; Class President, 1; Student Government, 2, Secretary, 3, Cotillion Hall President, H2O Club, President, 4; 2; Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities; Sigma Sigma Sigma; Chi.

A.

WNN LOVmS:

Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; EDITH 1; Kappa Delta Pi, 4; Granddaughters Club, 1; Monogram Club, 2, 4, Vice-President, Secretary, 4; Choral Club, 1; Orchesis, 1, 2, 3, 3; Choir; Junior A Cappella, 2; Senior A Cappella, 3, 4.

HELEN MARIE McGUIRE:

Y.

W.

C. A.;

HELEN MUNDY: Club. 4; F. T. A.,

ALICE NICHOLS: Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; Kappa Delta Pi, 3, Vice-President, 4; Debate Club, 1, 4, Secretarv, 2, Pre.'iident, 3; Pi Kappa Delta, 2, 3, I'r.-siii.nt. 4; ran-Hcllenic Council, Secretarv, 3; .Uplia I'iii Sigma. 1. 2; Boerc Eh Thorn, 3, 4; "Rotunila" Stall, 4; "Colonnade" Staff, 4; Hockey Team, 1, 2, 3, 4; House Council, 2, 3, 4; Phi Zeta Sigma,

A,

MARGARET PARK: Alpha Phi Sigma,

3;

2;

;

retary, 4.

PATRICIA MADDOX: Y'. W. C. A.; A. A.; Alpha 4; H.O Club, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic Club,

Kappa Gamma, 3,

Music Chairman,

2;

2; "VirCotillion Club,

"Prunella,"

ginian" Staff, 3, Managing Editor, 4 2, 3, 4; College Choir, 1, 2, 3. 4, Vice-President, 2, 4; Senior A Cappella, 1, 2, 3, 4; Madrigal Group, 1, 2. Director, 3, 4; Chapel Choir, 2; College Quartette, 3: "Rotunda" Staff, 3; Senior Dance Chairman, 4; Red Cross Committee, 4; Orchesis, 4; May Day, 1, 4; Pi Kappa Sigma, Social Chairman, 3, Corresponding Editor, 4. ;

HELEN

ANN MASLOFF: Transfer from College; Y. W, C. A.; A. A.; Kappa Delta F. T. A.; Beorc Eh Thorn, 3, 4, ViceRush ChairPan-Hellenic Council. 4 4 .'Vlpha Sigma Tau.

MARGARET Pi,

3,

4;

President,

man;

;

;

M.YRGARET POGUE MASSEY: Peace

Head

Junior

from

Transfer

Y. W. Day Chapel,

College;

of Student

C. A., Cabinet, 4; 4; Cotillion Club. 3, Student Government, 4; Red

Secretary-Treasurer, 4; Cross Committee, 4; Gamma Theta, 3, Treasurer,

A. A.; F. T. A., Treasurer, 3, 4.

4;

Y.

W.

4.

Wesley Foundation

A.; Council, C.

W.

A. A.; Y.

C. A.; Eastern

Staff, 3, 4.

BARBARA ANN SCOTT: Council,

1,

3,

2,

4,

Y. W. C. A.; A. A., Assistant Manager, Basketball, 2, Volley Ball Man-

General Manager Basketball,

1,

ager, 3, Vice-President, 4; Varsity Basketball Squad, 1, 2, 3; Alpha Phi Sigma, 2; Pi Gamma Mu, 4; Student Government Representative, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Commission; "Rotunda" Staff, 1, 2, 3; "Virginian" Staff, 2; Monogram Club, 2, Vice-President, 4; Riding Club, 1; Sigma Sigma Sigma; Chi.

JOSEPHINE SHAFFNER: Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4; Beorc Delta PI, 3, 4 Choral Club,

Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; Eh Thorn, 3, 4; Kappa

Granddaughters Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Phi Sigma, 2; Choir, 2, 3, 4; Madrigal Group, 2, 3; Senior A Cappella, 3; Pianist, Junior A Cappella, 3, 4; Mu Omega. ;

1

;

Economic-s Club,

3.

3,

W.

Y.

C.

A.;

4.

4;

Sigma Sigma Sigma.

MARY PRESTON SHEFFEY: HELEN MAY PHILLIPS: A. C. A.; V. C, F.; Pi Gamma Mu.

A.

E.; Y.

W.

C. A.;

W.

Y,

C. A.; A. A.;

Westminster Fellowship, Publicity Chairman; SpanPresident, 4; Kappa Delta Pi, 3, Re-

ish Club, 3, porter, 4 ;

Mu Omega,

I.

Treasurer,

4.

VIRGINIA PRINCE: Transfer from Madison

W

Y.

College Pan-Hellenic Council, 3; Theta

C. A,; A. A.;

GLORIA SHEPPARD:

Gamma

Sigma Upsilon.

1,

Sigma,

Y.

W.

C. A.; A. A.; Alpha Phi

Beorc Eh Thorn,

2,

1,

2, 3, 4,

2.

1,

3,

4;

4,

Transfer from Stratford T. PULLEX: W. C. A.; A, A.; Granddaughters Club, 3, 4; F. T. A.. 4; Cotillion Club, 3, 4; Alpha Sigma

VIRGINIA

College; Y.

Tau,

3,

Phi

Gamma .Staff.

4; ;

W.

Y.

C.

A.;

A.

A.;

Al-

Sigma, 1, 2; Kappa Delta Pi, 3, 4; Pi Mu, 4; Beorc Eh Thorn, 2, 3, 4; "Rotunda"

1,

Mu,

3,

4;

Y.

W.

C.

A.

A.;

A.;

Pi

Alpha Phi Sigma, 1, 2 F. T. A., May Day, 1; Dramatic ;

A. C. E., 3, 4;

4;

3,

JEAN CARTER SMITH: Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; Pegasus, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchesis, 2, 3, 4; HnO Club, 2, 3, President, 4; Cotillion Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; May Day, 2, 3, 4; Pan-Hellenic Council, 4; Pi Kappa Sigma.

MARGURITE STEPHENSON: A.; A. C. E.; Theta

T.

W.

C.

A.;

A.

Sigma Upsilon.

MARY THOMPSON

4.

VIRGINIA RADOGNA. pha

2,

Club.

Corresponding

Kappa Delta Pi, 3, 4; College Choir, Secretary, 3, 4; Junior A Cappella, 1. Director 4; Senior A Cappella, 2, 3, 4; Madrigal Group, 2, 3, 4; F. T. A., 4; "Colonnade" Staff, 1; President of Pan-Hellenic Association, 4; Theta Sigma Upsilon. Secretary,

2,

3,

4;

"Virginian" Staff, 2 F. T. A.. 3, 2, 3; Spanish Club; B. S. U., ;

Dramatic Club, 1, Phi Zeta Sigma.

STERRETT: Y. W. C. A.; A. .\.; Alpha Phi Sigma, 1, Corresponding Secretary, Mu, 3. Historian, 4; Beorc Eh Thorn, 4; Pi F. T. \., 1, Treasurer, 2; Spanish Club, 1, 2; Pegasus, 2, Secretary, 3, 4; "Rotunda" Staff, 1, Advertising Manager, 2, 3, Business Manager, 4; Choral Cappella, Club, 1; College Choir, 2, 3, 4; Junior 2, 3; Canterbury Club, 2, Secretary, 3, Treasurer, 4;

Gamma

A

Phi Zeta Sigma, Historian 3, President,

4.

JIILDRED LORRAINE RAIFORD: A. 4;

A.;

Home Economics Foundation,

Weslev Head, 4.

SALLY UdHERTSON: Kappa (i:iMiMia. Mu, 4; Alpha

Y. W. C. A.; Club, 2, 3, Vice-President, Secretarv, 3; Commission

4;

Y.

W.

Kappa Delta

I'hi

Sigma,

2;

MARGARET STEWART: Choir,

Presiilent,

Gamma

Gamma 3,

4;

Y.

W.

C. A.; A. A.;

Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Canterbury President, 4; "Colonnade" Staff, 4; 3, "Rotunda" Staff, 3, Head Typist, 4; Pegasus, 1, 4; Day, 1, 2; Phi Zeta Sigma, Treasurer, 4.

May

2,

3,

4;

4;

Commercial

W. 3,

C. 4;

A.;

A.

A.;

Kappa Delta

Theta Sigma Upsilon.

EVELY'N STOVALL:

Y.

W.

C.

A.; A.

A.;

Home

Economics Club.

VIRGINIA M.\NGET TERRELL:

Y. W. C. A.; Psi, 2, 3, Vice-President, 4; Debate Vice-President, 4; Student Standards Dramatic Club, 2, 3, E.Kecutive Board, 3, 4; "Prunella," 2, "Ivory Door," 3, "Cradle Song," 3, "Cry Havoc," 4, "Midsummer Night's Dream," 4;

A.

A.;

Club,

Gamma

2,

3.

Committee,

4.

MARY WALTON RUCKER: Club,

3,

Y. Club,

C. A.; A. A.; Alpha Pi, 3, 4; Pi Psi,

Dranuitic Cluli, 1, Property Chairman, 2, 3, President, 4; Class Treasurer, 4; House Council, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer, 3, Vice-President, 4; Cotillion Club, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3; Who's Who in .\merican Colleges and Llniversities: Alpha Sigma Tau, Vice-President, 3,

F. T. A., 4;

ELIZABETH DOROTHY MAST:

S.WAGE:

D.

Shore Club, 1. 2, 3, 4; Chairman of Nominating Committee; Red Cross Committee, 4; "Colonnade"

Pi, ."Vverett

A. A.; Alpha 4; B. S. U., 1,

C. A.; A. A.; F. T. A.,

Home

W.

C. A.; A. A.; Alpha Phi Sigma, 1, 2; Cotillion Club, 4; "Colonnade" Staff, 3. 4; Commercial Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Eastern Shore Club, 2, 3, 4; Pi Kappa Sigma. Y.

A.;

LUCY MANSON SHARPE: Y. W. C. A.; A. A., Council, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 4, President, 3; Secretary, 4; Alpha Kappa Gamma, 3, President, 4; Home Economics Club, 2, 3, 4; May Day Committee, 2, 4; U. S. 0. Committee, 2, 3; Kappa Delta Pi, 4; Cotillion Club, 2, 3, 4; F. T. A., 4; May Court,

1

ELIZABETH ANXE MAPP:

C.

Pi. 3,

4.

A. A.; A. C. E., 3, 4; F. T. A., 4; Choral Club, 1, 2, 3; Granddaughters Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Theta Sigma Upsilon.

JEAN PROSISE: ELIZABETH McLEAN: Transfer from Mary Washington College; Y". W. C. A.; A. A.; Choral Club, 2; College Choir, 3, 4; Junior A Cappella, 3 F. T. A., 4; May Day, 2, 3; Cotillion Club, 4; Alpha Sigma Tau, 2, Corresponding Secretary, 3, Recording Sec-

2,

W. 2;

A.;

2, 3, Costume Chairman, 4; "Prun"The Ivory Door," 3; Granddaughters Club, 2, 3; Cotillion Club, 2, 3, 4; Alpha Phi Sigma, 2; Pi Gamma Mu, 3; Mardi Gras Chairman, 4; Spanish Club, 2, 3; U. S. O. Committee, 3; Pegasus, 3, 4; War Council, 4; "Colonnade" Staff, 3, 4; Circus Quci-ii, 4; Red Cross Committee, 4; F. T. A., 4; Sigma Sigma Sigma.

1,

Y. 1,

VIRGINIA PARSON:

Dramatic Club, ella,"

Y. W. C. A.; A. A.: Choral 4; Latin Club, 3, President, 4;

3,

B. S. U., 3, 4.

Eastern

Alpha Phi Sigma,

Psi, 3,

GERTRUDE MOORE:

Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; French Club. 1, 2; B. a. U.. 1, 2, 3, 4, President, 4; Y. W. A., President, 3 ; F. T. A., 4.

Secretary, 4.

Shore Club, 4; Dramatic Club, 1; A. C. E., 2, 4; Choral Club, Treasurer and Business Manager, 4; Canterbury Club, 1, 2.

Gamma

3;

2,

Club, 3, 4; Phi Zeta Signni.

JANE K\APTON: Y. W. C. A.; A. A.; Student Standards, 4; "Virginian" Staff, 2, 3; "Colonnade"

Y. W. Kappa Delta

Phi Sigma, 1, 2;

4.

:

retary, 4.

Gamma

Pi

4;

4;

Mardi Gras Queen, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3, 4; May Court, 4; "Colomiadc" Staff, 3, Art Editor, 4; "Virginian" Staff, 3, Art Editor, 4; F. T. A.; Cotillion Club; Sigma Sigma Sigma.


ELSIK I'llllMI'SlJN: \. W, C. A.; A. A.; Iloiiii. Kc.jnoniicK Cluh, I, >. ;t, l',vyi,l..ril I; "Viririrjian" 4; Ciitillic.rr; Miiy ll;i.v; Alj.liii Siifriw Alpli:i: lU'^Rtnir, 4.

mSH

TUOWKR:

V, W. C. A.; A. A.; DnimnHv cliil., I, 2, 3, A«KiHtatit UubIiii^™ MaiiCnlillM.n ('lull, 2, g, BuHinoKH ManiiK'-r, 4; iiKcr; PreBidcnt, '.i, 4; KastLTii SIkmc <'Iii1i, Secretary, 2 Htudent StaiiilanlB. 4; Chairman of I'diiit HyHtcin; "Rotunda" Staff, 3, 4; May Day Committic, X. 4, Bii8ine88 Manager, 4; l*i Kapjia Sif;nia, I'an-liellenre Alternate, 3, RecortlinK .Seeretary, 4.

C'A'niKHINK

W. C,

A,; A, A,; Couniil .Secretary, 4; Monogram Club. 3, 4; ClaiM (llllccr, .Sccrrtary, 3, 4; MardI Oran Court, 4; Choral Club, 1, 2; Vamlty Banketball, 2, 3. 4; Var»lty Hockey, 2, 3; War Council, 3, 4; Fire Warden, 3; Fire Chief. 4; May Day, 2; Cotillion Club, 3, 4; r>r. chc.aiK, 3; Alpha Signui Alpha. I'an-llcllenic Alternate. 4; Chi. V.

.VANNIK OI'IIKI.IA WKHH: V. W, C. A.; A. A.; Dramatic Club. I, 2, 3; Home I'i, .3, 4; Iv.inomicM Club, 2, 3, Treaiiurer, 4; CranddauKhterx club, 1, 2, TreaKurer, 3, I'rcHidcnt, 4. Kapiia Delta

MARTHA ANNK UI'SHUR: I'i

Y.

W.

A.: Staff, 3, 4;

(iamnia Mu, 4; "Colonnade"

c.r.iu:!

ilaughters Club, 1, 2, 3. 4; Coniniereial Clul), 4; May Day, 1. 2; Alpha Sigma Alpha.

VFROINIA VIA nomics Club, Club, 1; A., 3, 4.

1,

Town

\V. 2,

3,

A,; A. A.;

C.

Choral

4

Club.

A.;

A.

C.

2,

3.

1

;

Deb.ile

Ciils Clul

W.

C. A.; A. A.; iriiiia, 3, 4; Kappa I'hi Sigma, 1, 2; I'i Miretary, 2, l're»id.

Mnli: iide 4; Chi.^s ii 4; Cotillion I'lul.. -i gram Clul), 2. Seerct:ii\ -I'r iMsin-.r,

ma Mu,

FAITH WKKKS:

Y.

W.

A. A.; Alpha

C. A.;

3;

(ll'HKIJA R. WHIITI-K; Y. \V. C. A.; A. A., Council. 3, 4: Alpha Kap|>a i;anilr]a, 3, 4; Kappa Delta I'i. 3. 4; Student Council. 3. Vitc-I'reiiidcnt, 4; orthesis, 3; Monogram Club, 3, Secretary-TreaHUrer, I; Clioial Club, 1; War Council, 4; t". S. O. ComMMtlr,-, oCliairinan. 3, Secretary-Treasurer. 4; StuIrhi si.iii l.irds, 2; Rod CroRs Committee, Cljairtnan. I: ,,ii!li,„i Club, 2, 3, 4; Who's Who in Anicriciin ..il.-iUniversities; fJamma Theta, Vice-Head,

Z. 2; rv/till><m Club. %, •; fl'/<»>- O<uoz, X; Mlijd<-iit <;<ivenirn<-t<t. 4; War 0/«n'-il. 4; Omi-jfa,

Caniriia cll.

Mu

I'ni,

IIKLK-V G. WII-WKV: V, W, C. A.; A. A.. 0<«m I. Il.xkey Uanaxer. 2, Treauirer, 2. ff^Mnt. I Vamily Uaiketl>all. 2. 4; Varrily ti-^\<n, 1. 2, « M«n<«rain < bib. Z. 2, 4; CU» <««'/». Tr«OKir*T, 2

cil,

Student

Standardji,

Cotillion.

2.

1.

4;

C'i:jnc(l,

I'fiiterNitif'n;

I'hi

1. 2, Ueorc Kh Thorn, 3, 4; Kapr>a Delia I'i, 3, 4; Debate Cluh, 3, .SeiTetary-Treasurer, 4; Spanish Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; "Roliin.la" Staff, 2. 3; Library Staff, 2, 3. 4; I'hi Zeta Signia.

SigirKi,

M'l

2, 3,

l<ir,

MAUV WALKKR WA'ITS:

I, I'rMi'lent, 2; Korrw Fy^xv/ntin Clot,, 4; "Viritinian" Staff. Z, ltv/t/x(ni|>tii/- MtW.-rtmiii»t«- Fe||»«>tii|i fV/tmciJ. z, 2, •;

Sigma.

i'hi 1,

.

Staff,

Stulml Goi^nim^fit,

4;

2,

MLaU.

"VirKiliUn"

4;

2,

2;

4

War

Who'M

Who

Siffrna

Sterna Siifrna; ttrthfri$; Chi.

Collets

.%m»Ti'-ain

in

Traiufer (rwi

l.lfll.LK WI.V.STO.V;

Maluxn

af«^J

<VjJ-

le-e; V, W. C, A.; A. A.; l;ran<l>Uuctit<-r> Club, I, «. 3, 4; Home K'-onnmica Club, 2, 2. 4: i;auinu Paf. 2, 2, 4, Treaiiurer, 4; l>nimatfc Club. 2, •*l'rTjj»**lla.'' 2; K. T, A. KiM-utive C.iuneil, 4; Cotilli'in tinb. t. 3,

4

;

Sigma

Sigrna

Sit^na.

MATTIF, WIX.STO.V:

W.

V.

C. A.: A. A.

(

:;,

I'lrsiiLni

l;

,

Varsity Basketball, 1, '1, ::. I; \\\v\ Wlm in \iim'I ican College.s arul l'iii\iTs)lh's: Slii^l.iil Shniii.ink, I; F. T. A., 4; Spanish Club. Seiretarv. 2; \lu nrri.j;;!. Head, 3; Chi.

I

SARAH CI-ARKE

I

(

:;,

4.

s,.c,,.i.,iy,

WfJOl):

Y.

W.

C. A.: A. A.

MARY FRASKLIS WOODWARD:

MARY

WATKINS:

nade" Mardi Sigma.

W.

C. A.; A. A.; GrandClionil Club, 1; DraCloh, 2, 3, 4; "ColonStaff. 4; F, T. A., 4; Re.l Cross Committee, 4; Gras Court, 4; .Mav Court, 4; .Sigma Sigma E.

daughters Club, matic Club, 2, 3

Y.

S.VKA BIRD WILLIAMS: Y. W. C. Committee Chairman, 2, Treasurer, 3. I'n Alpha Kappa Gamma. 3, Vice-President.

Social 4;

.,

ident. I

Alpha

:

Of

Register

86,

New

86

Castle....

Abernathy, Alice Ann; Stony Creek, 86,

Abernathy, Hilda Mae; Cochran

174, 86,

172 160

Abernathy, Virginia Lee; Cochran 31, 126 (2), 132, 156, 187 Ackiss, Gwenth Vyvien; 262 James River 73 Drive, Newport News

Bailey, Virginia Norfleet: Lawrenceville.-

Adams, Elizabeth Viannah; 5705 Lowry 64, 112, 126, 144, St., Richmond 158,

176,

Adams, Nancy Virginia; Redoak Addleman, Annie Maria; Cumberland, Addleman, Lucie Meade; Cumberland

191

73,

187

73,

1

12

86

124,

64,

126,

1414 Notto73

Anderson, Virginia Waller; R. Box 13 3, Midlothian

D.

F.

Agee, Marjorie Colleen; R.

F.

D.

31,

Andrews, Betty Tom; Greendale Farms, Roanoke Anthony, Annette Price; 322 Yeardley

Farmville

Akers, Jean Grey; Gladstone Allen,

73,

189

32,

187

Mary Emma; Ford

Apperson, Edith Ballard; Culpeper

Allen, Nellie Katharine; Enonville,

64

Newport News Atkinson, Marion Ruth; 71 Main

108,

156

73,

194

Allen, Rose Lillian; Prospect

S.

74,

F.

D.

127

2,

Franklin

74.

192

Box 822.

Mayague:, Puerto Rico Road, Roanoke

13.

74,

Box

Farmville Alvis, Margaret

112

64 110,

Anderson, Dot; Chatham

Babb, Jean Stuart; Ivor

Mary

Bagley,

158

Bailey,

32

Bailey,

Ann; 3310 Memorial

Ave., Lynchburg

Edmunds: Jivz, 108, 126, 157, 158,

175

65

Bear, Margaret Elizabeth: Churchville. 32, 139, 155, 171,

188

Car\- Frances: Place. Roanoke

1126 Brightwood 65

Ivanhoe. N.

C. 33, 113, 189

Crewe Bell,

86.

Louise; 25th

St.,

1,

87

...^

Ann

Gray: Chatham

Box 86

".86.

Marion Josephine; R.

F.

61, Brookneal

Mildred Ellen; R. Box 61, Brookneal

HI, 129

65, 188

Frances Lasley: 656 Blvd., Col. Heights, Petersburg 65. 194

Virginia

Beach

33,

74,

32.

Bell.

108,

Mildred Hurt; Rocky Mount

Altizer, Lovice Elaine;

"

Barnes. Pauline Elizabeth: 1512 Brookland Parkway, Richmond _

Beaver, \^irginia Carolyn: R. F. D.

192

73 64,

87 Margaret Mae; Ashland Avenue, Bedford _ 87, 111 Ballard, Sara Magraret: Bedford 74, 111 Barger, Lucy Kathryn: 525 Taylor St., Lexington

Bcatty, Josephine:

Alphin, Carolyn Teaford; Amherst, Altice,

87 _...

143

Ayers, Madelyn Marie; 106 Riverland

Almand, Nancy M.; Kenbridge Alphine, Alene Mildred; Zuni

194

Jones; 4607 Colonial

Beard,

Rd..

W., Roanoke

Avellanet, Felicidad Milageos;

Dcms

161

W.,

Mary Fulmer: Abilene

191

St.,

74,

1401

Baker,

St., S.

_...74, 160,

Barksdale, Margaret

Apperson, Helen Virginia; 102 Botetourt

Austin, Bcttv Jane;

7J

Roanoke

86,

Ballard,

86 74

Ave., Lynchburg...

Atkinson, Virginia Elaine: R. Glen Allen

Maple Shade

Baker, Louise Bass: 1211 2nd

Ballance,

1.

110

2,

Baker, Corinne Hines; 1810 Lane, Richmond

86

86

Barnes, Willie Jane: Whalcyville

Ave., Norfolk

Hilton Village

Agee, Loreen Kathryn; Farmville

187

Anderson, Jean E.; Pedro 64, 157, 158 Anderson, Martha Ella; Andersonville.... 86

Rd.,

Aebersold, Margaret Jane; way Ave., Richmond

127

Anderson, Grace Gilliam; Clarkton....74, 111 Anderson, Jane Guthrie; R. F. D. 2, Farmville

1,

Students

Anderson, Estaline Hope; Andersonville, Abbott, Margaret Eleanor;

Kappa UelU

A.:

Sigma.

And

Index

V. W. C. A.: Fi, 3, .SwTetar)'. 4; M(Aa I'hi Secretary. 2; Be*jrc Eh TtKrfn, 2, Trea*u-e-, 3, President, 4; "Rotunrla" StalT, I. 2. 2. 4; F. T. A., 1, 2, 3, I-resident. 4; Pi Gamma Mo. 4; Grandflaughters Club. 1, 2, 3, Rei«.rter, 4: Theta Sigma Upsilon, A.

2. .1, 4; 4; ('.itillion

1,

F.

D.

158

Bell, Lucille

74

Allen: Kenbridge..

Marilvn Bemice: 12 South Dcxiley Ave., Richmond. 33, 63, 107 (2), 126.

Bell,

D.

1.

74,

HI, 112

128.

149.

141,

156,

158,

191,

196, 203

1,

65,

112

Bell,

Rosa Lee: Kenbridge

_

65, 157


Braga, Maria Julia Ferreira; Rua Manuelito Moreira 81, Fortaleza Ceara,

Bellamy, Zita Charlotte; Venable Hall, Pine St., Farmville Bellinger,

Brazil

Miriam: 910 Greenway Court,

Norfolk

Bralley, Lucy erate Ave.,

Dorothy Lillian: 923 Windsor Avenue, R. C, Roanoke,

Bennett,

74, 111, 142, 160,

193 191

Bridgforth,

Chatham

74

Bennette, Marion Doris; R. P. D., AltaVista

87

Bentley, Jeane Louise: 701 Virginia Ave., S. R., Roanoke 87, 143, 174 (2), Bentley, Kathryn Starks: R. F. D.

Oxford, N.

No.

172

5,

C

87

Betty Maurice: Timberlake Road, Lynchburg 73, 74, 125, 193

Bibb,

Catharine Fishburne: St., Staunton

18

West

Frederick

87

Tennie Elizabeth: R. Chase City

Bigger,

Bisese, Eleanor

D.

F.

2,

Ann: 4915 Gosnold Ave.,

64, 65, 126, 140, 141, 143,

144,

Blackman, Mary Louise; Courtland Blackwell, Betty Marie; 620 Belleville Rd., R. C, Roanoke; 33, 111, 112, 157, 176,

Dorothy

Blair, Elizabeth

Chatham

Ellen:

W.

Ann: Third Avenue,

Nancy; Gloucester

Bland, Virginia Sutton;

Point.. ..65, 111,

West

197

160

Point.. ..74,

191

Blane, Flora Louise: Alton, 65, 110, 171, 172,

188

Blankenship, Eugenia High St., Franklin

Anna

Boaz, Margery

Kathleen:

87

Ann;

193

34,

87

Stuart

Boland, Corinne Elizabeth; St., Falls

Farmville

87,

D. No.

F.

87 110

Booher, Julia Trigg; Box 127, Abingdon,

Bouldin, Lela Evelyn;

126,

Remo

87,

Bouserman, Dorothy Marie; Rice Bowles, Betty Jeanne; Masonic

142 175

87

Home,

Richmond

75

Bowling, Lucy: Andersonville, 65,

113, 126,

176,

Brace, Margaret Plunkett; 3515 Staunton Ave., Charleston, W. Va 75,

Bradley, Dorothy Irene;

Vernon

Bradshaw, Olive Ayers; Rice

187

192 87

Hill

34,

127

115

Lee;

George

St.,

139,

156,

65,

Franklin

190

St.,

65, 123, 144,

189

75

87 75

St.,

75,. 124,

140

Brushwood, Anne Elizabeth; 4808 Colonial Ave., Norfolk

75

Bryant, Edith Carr; Branchville

66

Buck, Alice Eliza; 3441 race, Baltimore 18, Md

66, 112

A

Buck, Margaret Ann; 407

191

Ellen;

Beech

W. Va

75

Mary Susan; Willis Mary Armistead; Wicomico Chambers, Dorothy Leith; Red House Chambers, Nancy Holroyd;

88 75

W. Va

Maben,

Norma

Chandler, St.,

88 88

:

Lois;

1630 N. Monroe

Tallahassee, Florida

35

Chandler, Rosa Mae; Clover

76 76 88

Anne Wmgfield; Dillwyn

Charlton,

Chase, Marian Leigh: Mappsville

Cheatwood, Helen Joyce; 3513 Grove Ave.,

Richmond

127,

35,

Bower; Willard Ave., Phoebus

Christian, Constance

Christian, Elizabeth Claire;

HI

South 76,

920 17th

88,

Claiborne, Evelyn Lorene; Skipwith

3 5

2nd Ave.,

Mary Ann; Dinwiddie

Clark, Claire Antionette; 1512

88,

129

76,

111

Avondale

Avenue, Richmond

88

Mary August: Prospect Cobb, Eva Chappell; 3317 Second Ave., Cobbs, Helen Chapman; 234 Richelieu

140

Cock, Betty Deuel: 325 Armistead Ave.,

Burford, Katherine Clare: Amherst-. -.66,

190

Gladys

2412

Christine;

Burchett, Betty:

Avenue, Roanoke

Poplar

Lynchburg

87 87, 146,

Butler,

Virginia Blueiield,

Butt, Freddie

Curtis;

88,

Ann; 30 Court 66,

St.,

195

Caldwell, Elizabeth Bacon; Sweet Briar, 4, 34, 171, 189, 196,

198

76

Callahan, Lois Katharine: R. Danville

F.

D. No.

3,

Calvert, Mary William: Box 245, Lynchburg, 34, 108, 111, 126, 143, 155, 176,

187

88

Cooke, Phyllis Page; La Crosse, 76,

140,

HI,

155,

160,

Cooper, Josephine Doris:

Main

76

St.,

311

195

88

South

Farmville

Copenhaver, Frances Ellen; 204 High

St.,

36,

Copley,

Mary

Corell,

Eleanor Bane; Portsmouth,

112

Roberta: South Hill

36,

191

192

Cooke, Josephine Holliday: 107 Middle Street, Portsmouth

Ave.,

Camper, Jean Elaine: Orange 75 Carbonell, Esther: 119 N. E. 11 Terrace, Miami, Florida 66, 143 Cardwell, Mae: Concord Depot 75 66, Carper, Emily Claiborne; Rocky Mount, 66,

Hill; Cluster Springs....76,

Farmville

Harriet Long; Hillcrest,

88 194

Coon, Alice Virginia; 2330 Greenland Avenue, Roanoke 88

88

76,

Cooke, Willie Agnes; Burkeville

Cabaniss, Margaret Lee; 405 Fourth Ave., Farmville

36

88

Connelly, Shirley Mae; Gladys

Conner, Reba

158

Oak

Carolyn Bachel: Ringold Collins, Margaret Irene; Big Stone Gap.... Connelly, Judith Scott; Lebanon

HI

526 Elizabeth

Appomattox

155,

88

146 127

Button, Margery Jeanne; 1036 Wakefield Rd., R. C, Roanoke 75,

Gale,

139, 191

Richmond

Collie,

Ports-

75,

66,

Colgin, Edith Geraldine; 331 Royal Ave., Col. Hgts., Petersburg

108 (2), 144, 156, 194

Butt, Mary Cameron; Place, Portsmouth

Hampton

172

1920 Jefferson

W. Va

36,

Coleman, Geneva M.; Wellville Coleman, Nell Bernice; 316 South Fourth St.,

114 Linden Ave.,

Suffolk,

76

Richmond

St.,

139

Bunch,

161

76

Claiborne, Lena Madison: Skipwith Clark, Anne Temperance: 511 Franklin

127

St.,

Newport News

75, 112,

Mary

193

Chick, Virginia Rae; Prospect.. ..35, 110, 127

Stewart: Lawrenceville, 75, 139,

Farmville

158

210 Washington

Clements,

Guilford Ter-

193

88

Patricia St., Bluefield,

Clark,

161

Boothe, Carolyn E.; Wakefield Aline; Hadlock

Castle,

Bruch, Beatrice Angela; 811 Maiden Lane, Roanoke 75, 143, 193

mouth

110 87,

172

Brown, Barbara Lee; Saltville 87, 158, 175 Brown, Barbara Westbrook; 202 James River Drive, Hilton Village 66 Brown, Dorothea Hobson; 1015 Colonial Avenue, Norfolk Brown, Jeanne Duncan; 202 James River

St.,

Boone, Beverly Chandler; 1229 Graydon Ave., Norfolk 74, 158, 187 Boone, Lois E.; R. F. D., Carrsville .74, 191

Mary

110,

Burton, Mrs. Violet Bloomer; Keysville.

3,

Farmville

Boss,

Brothers, Betty Suffolk

St.

156,

Catlett,

193 "74

Bond, Mary Jane: 108 W. Alexandria Ave., Alexandria Bondurant, Betty Clark: 504 First Ave.,

Carter,

Burchett, Jane: 114 Linden Ave., Suffolk

1000 Park

Church

Bonn, Audrey Lee: R.

Brooks, Ruth Downs; 203 Farmville

144,

Carter, Margaret Belle; Clearwater Park,

87

Brooks, Louise Overton; 203 T. George St., Farmville 86, 87, 112, 161, 197

St.,

126,

Bobbit, Carolyn Alexander: South Hill, 65, 111, 123 (2), 126, 155, 160,

190

Kenbridge,

Sue;

75,

Buford,

708

Lee; Cumberland, 65,

140,

Concord Depot, 75,

Nola Maxine; Prospect,

Roanoke 191

87

33, 111 (2), 155, 157, 176, 189,

Blanton,

Katherine

98, Suffolk

Brugh, Rachael; 206 Cumberland

Norfolk, Blair,

Box

Joyce;

Brown, Margaret Ada; Ashland Bruce, Grace Anne; Columbia 191

111,

75,

Covington

Drive, Hilton Village

Norfolk,

Blair,

65,

87

Bennett, Sarah Elizabeth: Keeling

Bickle,

Richmond

75,

Brisentine,

5,

Wilmerton; Cumberland,

Carter, Elizabeth Lee;

Hardwicke: 1603 Confed-

Alma

Bridges,

Ann

Carter,

143

Brannon, Margaret Beryl; Drewryville

Bennett, Hilda Gertrude: 1424 Claremont Ave., Richmond 74, Bennett. Ruth Frances: R. F. D.

75,

640 Riverview

107,

111,

112,

159,

187

Corr, Elizabeth Pleasants; 202 N. Shep-

pard

St.,

Richmond

Cosey, Anna Barbara; 326 Lakeland, Florida Costa,

Eneida;

Fortaleza,

76

West Park

St.,

66,

111

Ceara, Brazil,

143

Covington, Marguerite: Charlotte C. H..

110


Cox,

Ann

88

Didlake,

88

Anne Ave., Richmond Diggs, Anna Carol; 409 A.

Cox, Dorothy Lee; Masonic Home,

Richmond

37

88,

Crawley, Marf<aret Alma; Prospect

175 1

1

1

Cregar, Cathryn Louise; Tazewell

76,

111

Cregar, June Maria; Tazewell

88,

111

Crockett, Lauretta Virginia; Seaford, 88,

111

76

Muriel Gene; R. F, D. No. 9, 88 Box 454, Richmond Crouch, Marion Elizabeth; 404 North St., Marion 76, 194 Crowder, Mary DeBerry; McKenney, 88, 1 Crostic,

1

Crowther, Barbara Ellen; Avalon..

89,

Crumpler, Minnie Lee; 114 Franklin

St.,

111

Charlottesville, 66, 111,

St.,

Cunningham, Marcheta

Irene;

77

191

E. Jef-

157,

Dodson, Sarah Lee; Mattoax Doggett, Eula Belle;

N. C. 38. 194 89

of Wight, 66, 111,

Isle

Mary Anne; 613 Highland

D(jve,

1

26

Ave.,

176

76

St.,

110 Ca«de 89 Feitig, Alice Ruth; JOT N. Mead«/w St., Richmond 40. 188 Fifield. Helen Wood; Remin^Ujn 89 Fink, Lillian Edmondt; 2801 Cortland Place. N. W.. Washington, D. C 77 Fleming. Eva Mae; Chula 77 Meming, Margaret Ruth; ChaK City,

Mary

Let;

New

67, 171, 176

Fleming. Nell Ray; Chula

Carmen

Flores,

40,

Dolores;

l'/2

Mayaguez, P. R. Flynn, Ida Frances; 518 Bancroft Ave..

Driver, Gertrude Elizabeth; Skippers

Foltz,

Martha Lou; Box

Droste, verte,

W.

Va.,

77, 113, 123 (2), 139, 141, 156,

306 A,

159,

Granby

Duffy, Edith Lee; 9550

193

First

109,

77,

Richmond

89

Margaret Jane; 210

Spiller St..

90

Fontaine, Mary Morton; Ave., Martinsville

10 Cleveland

Ford, Virginia Oliver; 504

162

St.,

Duncan, Nancy Bryan; 353 Mt. Vernon Ave., Portsmouth 89, 108, 111 St.,

77

89 Dunton, Jackie Paige; Hudgins Durrett, Susan Vandergrift; 1206 Wilmington Ave., Richmond, 22, 39, 126, 188

77 Agnes; R.

F.

D. No.

Farmville

I,

158

Fox, Malinda Jane; Eastville Francis,

Lucy

Fuller;

77

Dry Fork

90

Frank, Evelyn Hope; R. p. D. No.

Box

76,

2,

Roanoke

90

Freeman, Jean Douglas; 430 Chapel

Hampton

90. Ill

St.,

(2). 161,

Fulgham, Dorothy Ann; Carrollton Fuller,

Evelyn LaVaunne; 12 Hewitt 76, 108 Ave., Simonsdale, Portsmouth

Curtis,

77

Cedar Lane.

Hopewell Foster, Julia

89

Dunn, Betsy Jane; 500 Fourth

St.,

Wytheville

Ronce-

155,

Carr

127

Carond

W., Roanoke 67, 157, 158 Driscoll, Elizabeth Alma; 504 Kerns Ave., Roanoke 77, 143 S.

Radford

Box 727,

Blacksburg

Dillard, Betsy Brooks; Draper,

100 Grove

Farmville

Farrier,

189

E. 40th St..

Norfolk

66

112,

230

Elizabeth;

Perkins; Ave., Farmville

124 (2), 141, 155, 176, 189

Cruser, Shirley Newton; 130 LaVallette Avenue, Norfolk, 64, 66, 107, 124, 140, 156,

ferson

Thelma

Dudley, Mabel

Suffolk,

Crymes, Nancy Mildred; Surry Cummings, Dorothy Lucille; 1105

Buffalo St., 107. 128.

38.

Dondley, Mary Louise; 7091/2 West Main St., Covington 38, 155, 159, 175, 188

Amburg

Cross, Alice Elizabeth; Lawrenceville

111,

Farrier. Frances Virginia;

23

Norfolk

Cralle, Ethel Marie; Village

Crittenden, Nannie Florence;

Farmville Diggs,

Craddock, Betty Carolyn; Jefferson Avenue, Vinton

66,

Mae; 2008 Prince«?

Shirley

Isabella; Cartersville

Pennington; Gordonsville

Cowherd, Mary

Alma

Lois;

Concord, N.

96

E.

Depot

176

90 Street.

C

90

Helen Frances; 96 E. Depot St., Concord, N. C 77, 189 Fultz, Dorothy Lee; 2013 Grove St., Williamson Rd., Roanoke 90 Fuqua, Mary Elizabeth: Bay Ave., Cape

Fuller.

Fames, Mary Virgilia; Providence Forge

D 76,

190

66,

Daniel, Dorothy Hazel; R. F. D. Danville

111,

195

3,

89 76,

193

Davidson, Lucille Beckwith; Bremo Bluff

89

Davis, Alice Burks; Phenix

77

Davis, Alice Lee; Wha!eyville....37, 111,

Alma

Iris;

Dillwyn

Davis, Audrey Lee; Farmville

111,

176 129

300 Third Ave.,

191,

197 127

113,

127,

128,

178,

Davis, Mildred Courtland; Paces Davis, Sue Duval; 1717

Richmond Ave.,

Dean, Jean Marie; 406 Glenn

111,

197

39,

192

Earle;

67,

193

Ganzert, Jene Tilden; 1714 Fourth Ave., St.,

39,

158

Edwards, Frances Elizabeth; Gloucester....

40

H

Frances Lillian; 409 Buffalo

89

Virginia Cathren; 905 High

194

190

St.,

Church 64, 67, Annie Marjorie; Box 104, Gasburg Margaret Elizabeth; Box 5 3 5, Coral

Falls

St.,

67,

127,

139,

145,

Elmore, Jean Harrison; Carson 37

Farmville

89

193

77,

111

89

Epperson, Betty Lee; Lawrenceville

89 89

Evans, Ella Lorena; Brookneal Justin;

Remlik

77,

Dickerson,

Mary

Dickerson,

Nancy

Dickinson,

Anne Marie; 2027 Rosewood

190

Ewell, Bettie

Rew; Bloxom

Avenue, Richmond Dickinson, Susan Look; Ave., Front Royal

77,

195

89,

111,

129,

Pansier, Susan St.,

161

Farmer, Laura Bell; Farmville

Gelston, Dorothy Henrietta: 239 Place, Hudson Heights, N. Y

158

Hudson 67,

George. Esther Mas: 1403 Greycourt Ave., Richmond, \'a

Va

195

90

.— 174

Church 78, 127, 141, 191 Lamont: Orange. 90 Gillespie, Betr\' Gray: Grundy 78 Givers. Jean Elizabeth: 923 Washington St., Petersburg ._ 90 Falls

Gill, Bettv-

Glenn, Jane Marie: Prospect,

Godwin, Florence

89 67

Gordon, Mrs. Frances Blanton:

May; 120 South Stewart

Winchester

11.

Garrison, Ruth: Box 124, Qifton Forge, 77. 108, 193

Goddin, Elizabeth Bowis: Toano

38

400 N. Royal

125

Garnett, Frances Ellen; Curdsville,

89

Lee; Pamplin Jane; Spout Spring

90

Mendez Vigo

Gibson, Ellen Shirley; 155 Hillwood Ave.,

171,

Mariam Helen; Coeburn

St.,

Edith Maria; 58 Ponce, Puerto Rico

Geyer, Elizabeth: Chatham,

Elmore, Vivian Saunders; Carson

Estes,

Richmond Garcia,

90,

St.,

Farmville, 67, 107, 110 (2), 128, 171, 172,

188

192

St.,

Hillsville

Elder, Mildred Louise; Charlotte C.

Charles, 40, 63, 111, 112, 126. 141, 143. 176,

39

2916 Orange

Gables, Florida, 126,

DeBord, Bettye Jane; Cedar Bluff 89 deCardona, Letty; 86 Once de Agosto 143 St., Mayaguez, P. R

Mae

123,

St.,

Norfolk

Ellis,

bjack, 37,

113,

190

St.,

Edwards, Betty Tipton; North Main

Ellis,

M

176,

Emerson; Lebanon

Edmunds, Vivian

89

Davis, Virginia Roberta;

77,

Sarah Lee; 905 Randolph South Boston

Elliott,

89

Lynchburg

Derieux,

South Boston

Elliott,

J.,

Davis, Juanita Winston; Buckingham, 89,

77,

111,

905 Randolph

EUett, Margaret Binford; Jennings Ordinary 73, 77,

1360 River Road,

Davis, Joan Stack;

Teaneck, N.

89,

67, Russell;

Easterly, Shirley

Daniel, Mildred Jean; 610 Marshall Ave.,

Davis,

Martha

East,

No.

W., Roanoke

Bedford Ave.,

AltaVista East,

Dale, Virginia Frances; Homeville,

S.

Jane Kathren; 901

East,

Dale, Patsy Jane; Homeville

89

78

_ 90,

111

Inez: Smithfield 67, 112 Goode, Mar^- Ethel: Ferrum 67 Goodman, Evelyn Mae; 362 Mountain Ave., S. W.,'Roanoke, 78, 111. 125. 160 Godwvn, Josephine May: Stonv Creek,

90.

188

Ballsville

90


Nancy Randolph; 301 Park Ave., Emporia.. -.41, 126 (2), 140, 156, 177,

Gore, Elizabeth McArthur: Raiford,

Harrell,

N. C. Graham, Barbara Whitney: 530 Henry

Harrison, Ethel Squire; 403 Southampton

78

Ave., Pulaski

Graham, Mary

107 Wilson

Lucille;

W.

Beckley,

Graziani, Anne Pauline; 702 Farmville

Green, Alice Tappey: 125

S.

S.

90 78,

Virginia

Claiborne; 106

67

143

Charlotte Thomas;

90,

Gunn, Marian Lcnnis; Blackstone Guthrie, Claudine Elizabeth; Sunny Side

97

90

78,

Van Tamelen;

91

78

127,

127,

172,

lOU Godwin

Halstead, Janice Adair; Ave., Norfolk

78,

Hamlett, Christine Elpe, Sp.; R.

111,

143,

Haynes, Blanche Lorene; 4 Moss Martinsville

Farmville

Norfolk

Helmer, Mary

Burkeville

111

78, Elise;

111,

91,

140, 123,

Hill,

Joyce Eilene; Pulaski

Hill,

Rosa; Windsor

128

193

129

189 78

202 91

108,

67,

172,

191

Martha Louise; 415 South Main Blackstone

42,

127

Hodges, Sarah Le Grande: Nathalie Hoge, Mary Ellen; IOIII/2 College Ave.,

78

Hancock, Doris Jeane; 805 Orchard Lynchburg Hancock, Hazel Iris; Winterpock

Holcombe, 90 90

Hancock, Muriel Jacqueline; R. F. D. No. 2, Courtland Hanes, Annie Eloise; 121 E. Third St.,

91

91

Farmville

Hankins, Catherine Lindsay; 500 N.

Meadow

St.,

91

Richmond

Hanks, Janie Mae; 93 Eliz. Rd., Apt. D, South Hampton Apts., Hampton Hannah, Alice Marie; 315 South Main St.,

91

Suffolk

Hardy, Ruth Carolyn; Victoria Hargan, Augusta Leftwich; 1017 ferson

St.,

91 S.

Roanoke

Church

78,

Harper, Shirley Anne; 109 Columbia Falls

Jef-

91,

Hargrove, Evelyn; Aylett Harper, Doris Claire; 109 Columbia Falls

91

111

St.,

128.

191

St.,

91

Church

Harrell, Elizabeth Connally; 301 Park

91

Avenue, Emporia Harrell, Louise

Box 441,

Van

Patten; R. F. D. 3, 111, 112, 156,

Suffolk....78,

188

Holland, St.,

W. Va Dawn Annastien:

Marjorie Elizabeth;

68,

193

Courtland..

90

Oakward

Bedford

91

Hollowav, Lelia Alice; Purdy, 43, 126 (2), 139, 156, 175, 176, 188

Holman, Martha Olivia: R. F. D. Box 182, Farmville Homes, Anne Randolph; Boydton

1,

68,

House, Virginia Norton; Covington

Howard, Elizabeth Darst; 1530

View

Ave., Norfolk

Howard, Norma Ave., Roanoke

E.

110

90 91

Ocean 79

3

Estelle;

J

Mary Anne:

91

128

Jarratt,

124 (2), 126, 140, 144, 194 92 Jenkins, Carol Belle; Burkeville Jenkins, Rose Bland, 200 E. Maryland Avenue, Crewe 79 92 Jennings, Mary Frances; Appomattox Jett, Clarice A. Arthur, Sp.: 808 High 110 St., Farmville 79 Johnson, Ann Harris: Kenbridge Johnson, Betty Graves: 1411 Bellevue 79, 190 Avenue, Richmond Johnson, Fay Byrd; R. F. D. No. 2, Vinton 44, 63, 139, 144 Johnson, Joyce Virginia; 912 Rodgers 92, 174 Street, Norfolk Johnson, Marilyn Virginia: 978 LaRoanoke, burnun Avenue, 194, 197, 198 4, 31, 45, 63, Johnson, Sydnor Boiling; R. F. D. No. 1, 44, 63,

Higgins, Martha Virginia; 443 Douglas Ave., Portsmouth, 42, 63, 108 (2),

Bluefield,

Mayaguez,

Jarratt,

41, 112 Hamlin, Rosalie Anne; Surry Hammock, Lottie Grey; 210 W. Broad 90, 174 Blackstone St., St.,

13,

Puerto Rico

(2)

2510 Orcutt Ave.,

64, 67, 108 (2), 111, 124, 126, 129,

St.,

Mayaguez, Puerto Rico Maria Oliva; Box

191

13,

Jacob, Peggy Sarah; Machipongo James, Jocelyn De Hart; Old Bay Farm, 91, Havre de Grace, Maryland

Hewlett, Margaret Allene; 4231 Seminary

Hite,

Box

195

St.,

91,

Hayslett, N. Carolyn; Cliftondale Park, Clifton Forge 42,

123, 140, 156, 171, 177, 192 (2), 197,

191

D.

F.

Hilda;

194

Hawthorne, Minnie Rose; Kenbridge,

Higginbotham, Margaret Ellen; Mt. Sidney 175

St.,

68, 126,

Carmen

Irizarry,

Butterworth: DeWitt,

Avenue, Richmond, 155

R. F. D.

Nancy Anne: 72 Monroe

Irizarry,

Clarksville

Newport News

Nomini Grove,

Julia;

Ann

Hauser,

St.,

90

Crewe

Hamilton, Annie

91

Mary Coleman;

Hampton 78, 159, 189 Headlee, Anna Stuart; 3030 Nottoway

41,

3,

160

Haskins, Clarice Helen; Callands Haskins,

Ingle,

Covington (2),

Place,

Danville

No.

I

McKenney,

Jeanette;

67,

188

189 78

Anne

Haskins,

Hunnicutt, Helen Spotswood; 43 Stony Creek Hunt, Jewel Holland: Eastville 79, 192 79 Hunt, Ruth Wilda; Nathalie 68 Hunter, Mary Lillington; La Crosse Hutt, Anne Hersey: Neenah, 44, 143, 155 (2), 175, 192 (2) Hutt, Azeele Caruthers; Neenah 91, 175 Hutt, Lulie Theresa; Neenah, 44, 139, 143, 175 Hutter, Charlotte Stannard: R. F. D. 91 No. 1, Lynchburg

St.,

Hayward, Betty Lewis; 3609 Wythe

Hahn, Marian Virginia; 1203 Essex Ave., Univ. Hgts., Richmond Haile, Dorothy Lee; 1014 Taylor Ave., Richmond Hair, Doris Evelyn; Walton Avenue,

Hall, Eleanor Jenkins;

125,

67,

50 Coding

78,

127

H

2,

3005 West

Crockett;

Richmond

Drewry-

Grizzard, Evelyn Matthews; Drewryville, 67, 112, 126, 139, 142, 144,

No.

St.,

Carolina Ave.,

ville

Hale, Jacqueline

Grace

Harville, Betty Jane;

91, 111

Grimes, Carolyn Rose; 2229 Lansing 90, 111 Ave., Portsmouth Grizzard,

Roseland, 107 (2), 108, 155, 156, 190

Petersburg

Mountain

Roanoke

R.,

78

Elizabeth;

42,

Harvie, Margaret

187

78

Mary Helene; 222

Mary

110

St.,

175,

125,

Crutchfield

Harrison, Mary Elizabeth; 500 E. Guilford St., Thomasville, N. C 78, 172

Harvey,

St.,

W., Roanoke

A%'e., S.

Griffin,

3,

May; Crew

Anne

Gregory,

2nd

41,

Farmville

Green, Virginia

Gene Dare; 3711 Richmond

St.,

Grainger, Annette Burden; R. F. D. Farmville

91

Emporia

St.,

Harrison,

St.,

Va.

194

Farmville Johnson, Virginia Ruth; Keysville Jones, Beatrice Edington; 306 High St., Salem 45, 111, 157, Jones, Dora Walker: 304 Harvey Street, Radford 46, 140, Jones, Edith

79 195

194

Leach; Holland, 45, 108, 126,

144

Jones, Elizabeth Ann; 23 Treadwell St., Berryville 45, Jones, Evelyn Beatrice: 41 Arraistead

142

Avenue, Hampton

New

Lucille Virginia; 12 North 68, 127, 171, St., Staunton Jones, Margaret Louise; 905 F St., North 92, 111, 160, Wilkesboro, N. C 68, Jones, Martha Ellen: Buckingham Jones, Ruth Hazel: Box 167, Chatham.... Geraldine Marie; Zuni Joyner, Jovner, Luverta Elizabeth; R. F. D., Smithfield 79, 46, Joyner, Rachel Pauline; Zuni

Jones,

193 171 111

79 79 108 142

504 Guilford

91, HI, 129 Hubard, Fredrika Kuper: Cumberland 79 Hubbard, Constance Marie; 213 Appomattox St., Farmville 79, 110 Hubbard, Dorothy Elizabeth; Melfa 91 Huddle, Caroline Crittenden; 3115 West Grace St., Richmond 43, 126 Hudson, Audrey Jane; Virgilina 79 Hughes, Nancy Willis; Mullens, W. Va. 91 Humbert, Dorothy Claudine: Troutville 79 Hume, Evelyn Elise; 714 Bluefield Ave., Bluefield, W. Va 43, 159, 196 Hundley, Sue; 1009 Penn. Ave., Suffolk, 79, 107, 109, 156, 172, 189

Kavanaugh, Lois Spangler: 106

Windsor Ave., R. Kearsley, Katherine;

E.

C, Roanoke Box 4, Oak

Tenn

79 Ridge,

79, 108,

Keiser, Elizabeth Mosely; Abilene

159 79

Kellam, Barbara Herbert; 113 Ohio Ave., Ingleside, Norfolk 2 Kelsey, Rachel Hope; R. F. D. Farmville

79,

No.

193

2,

80, 80,

110

111 Kennan, Joy; Raphine 68 Kent, Jean Moore; Wirtz 110 Kernodle. Iva Irene; Hampden-Sydney.. 46, 188 Key, Isabel Bertha; Bedford


Earlene

Kimmerling,

Hawhcrt;

M

1280

Avenham Avenue, Roanukc, 68,

King,

Mary

Jane;

111,

128,

176,

l';i

Box 1172, Radferd 80,

194,

Kingdom, Harriet Anne; 604 Mt. View Avenue, Blucfield, W. Va Kirkland, Edith Jane; La Crosse Knapton, Jane; Oakwood Forest, Covington 46,63, 1?? (2), Knight, Georgia Elizabeth; 507 Roberts

196

111, 112, 156, 157, Baylor; Box 613,

47,

Anna

Roanoke

158, 86,

Lacy, Helen Cecelia;

Richmond

191

80, 108, 109,

92

Leazer, Elizabeth Nell;

Box

194

Remington

Hood; 4109 Park Ave., 80,

127

Lee, Frances Herndon: 4109 Park Ave., Richmond, 68, 109, 110, 139, 140, 144, 156, 159, 162, 171, 172, 173, 194, 196 Lee. Martha Rosalyn; Craig 68 Leech, Sarah Margaret: 3012 Noble Ave., Richmond 80, 189 Lemon, Betty Jeanne; 1928 Carter Blvd.,

Roanoke

92

Vivian Inez; Chamberlayne Ave., South Boston Lewis, Doris Mae; Susquehanna Apts., Leslie,

92

Md

Havre de Grace, 92 Lewis, Elizabeth Cole; Hickory 80, 139 Lewis, George Anne; 1629 South Sycamore St., Petersburg 92 Lewis, Helen Boyes; 3306 Jeter Avenue,

Richmond

22,

Lewis, Helen Brooks; News Ferry Lewis, Mable Woody; 302 N. 2nd

92

Amherst

St.,

Winchester

Arlington

Marion

Claire; Natural Bridge, 80, Love, Virginia Allan; Chase City 92,

Mary Anna; La

Lovins, Edith

Crosse, 80, 139, 155,

Winn; Cumberland, 110 (2), HI, 145,

47,

171,

111

92 143

192 92 187 111 192

176

192

Lynn, Dorothy Vernon; Box 282, Farmville

192 193

107,

189

McMillan, Margaret Frances; Raeford, North Carolina McMullan, Ellen Russell; Rapidan McRee, Helen Blair; 5610 Grove Ave.,

92 92

St.,

Richmond

W. 80,

Richmond

188

McWilliams, Mildred Paige; 2803 Marlboro Ave., Norfolk 4 Maddox, Katherine Anderson; 321 Arlington St., Lynchburg,

Maddox,

68, 107, 124, 126, 128, Patricia Lucile; 1028 Allendale

93

195

Road, Roanoke, 48, 107 (2), 140, 157, 159, 176, 192 Magner, Nancy; Box 1005 Cristobal, Canal Zone 93, 111 (2)

Maldonado.

Isalibita;

Box 375; Mayguez,

Puerto Rico

68,

Mankin, Shirley Lee; R. F. D. No. Box 57. Richmond Manson, Elizabeth Page; DeWitt

48,

143

3,

80 69 93

Mantiply, Jane Palmer; Fishersville Mapp, Elizabeth Anne; Bridgetown,

112,

Mastain, Evelyn

176 93

Maxey, Elizabeth Lee; Ransons 81 May. Doris Gilbert; 1436 Eureka Circle. Roanoke 81, 127 Meade. Olivia Jane; 613 Forest Street, Martinsville

81

110

Elizabeth; Meherrin Messick, Julia Clay; 308 W. Main St., Front Royal 69, HI, 157,

Mingea. Anna McLean; Mont Calm. 81,

125,

Clifton Forge

129

St..

Villa Hgts., Roanoke 93. Mitchell, Betty Jane: 118 7th Street,

155,

156,

191

A\, 129 9J,

111

194

69 127 81

110 112

Box 168, Richmond 81, 111 Moore, Harrictte Sumter; Gastonia, North Carolina, 50, 63, 98, 123, 124. 126. 140, 141, 144, 159, 177, 194, 199 Moore, Peggy Anne; 413 WeÂŤ 29th .St.. Norfolk 93, III Moore. .Sarah Anne; 1 1 North Linden Street, Hampton 93 Moore, Virginia Imogene: Chatham 81 Morris, Mary Ann: 1205 Confederate Avenue, Richmond 93, 111. 161, 174 Morrison, Martha Frances; Collierstown Motley, Elizabeth Claiborne: 618

9J, 111

Gum

Lynchburg Mottley, Myra Anne; 716 Berryman Avenue. Danville

93

Mountcastle, Emma Elizabeth, Mountcastle

9J 69,

1 1

Mundy, Helen Compton; Box 317, Chatham 50, 158, 176 Murphy, Carolyn Virginia: East\-ille 93 Murray, Doris Lee; R. F. D. No. 1, Roanoke 81, 111, 157, 176, 191 Mustain, Frances Evelyn: Box 193, Bretna Mvers, Barbara Lee: 604

Worsham 81,

St.,

108, 190

N Navlor, Virginia Elizabeth: Gatun,

Canal Zone

51 81

Nevins. Margaret Evelyn: Victoria Newman, Mildred Geraldine:

Chuckatuck 81, 188 Newton. Doris Leone: R. F. D. No. 1, Chase City 81 Nichols. Alice Odell: 219 Norwood St., Lynchburg. 51. 108, 126, 139, 156, 158, 188 Nichols. Ann Pomeroy: 700 High St., Farmville 81, 193 Nichols, Bernice Nell: Clover 81. 127 Nixon, Bettv Jeanne: 1010 Amherst St., Winchester 69, 127. 191 Noel. Nancye Bruce: 705 Oak St.. Farmville Norfleet. Carlotta Buff- 123rd Street, Virginia Beach 69, 171, 194

Mary Rebecca: Holland Nve, Marv Lucretia: 119 Rockbridge Norfolk

69

Norfleet,

St..

93

176

Messick, Lucy Conrad: 308 W. Main St., Front Royal 49, 111, 157, 176 Middleton, Mary Kathryn; Mt. Jackson Millner. Mary Agnes: R. F. D. No. 1, Danville Minetree, Betty Harris; 109 Central Park, Petersburg 73, 81. 195

Abingdon

139,

Alberta 81, Moon, Caroline Payne; Shipman Mfjon, Mary France*: Shipman JO. Moore, Ellen Roberts: Culpeper Moore, Evelyn Maude; R. F. D. No. I, Prospect Moore, Gertrude: R. F. D. No. 2, Danville HO, Moore, Glennis Dare; R. F. D. No, 7,

192

Mason, Mary Hatton; 421 North Street, Portsmouth 93 Massey, Margaret Pogue: HampdenSydney 49, 123, 124, 171, 189, 198 Mast, Elizabeth Dorothy; Lynnhaven,

Minton, Betty Jane: 1339 Crescent

125,

Danville 155,

Marshall, Virginia Laura; 1504 Confed93 erate Ave., Richmond Martin, Ann Beaman: 1005 Virginia Avenue, Suffolk 26, 69, 124 (2), 140, 156, 189 Martin, Betty Mae; R. F. D. No. 2. 69 Box 218, Lynchburg Martin, Mary Garden; Toano 81 Masloff, Margaret Ann; 136 West End Avenue, Danville 48, 126, 193

49,

124,

Monahan, Pat; Black^U^ne Moneyhun, Sarah Helen; Coeburn Montgomery, Barbara Eugenia;

.Street,

Meadows, Frances

Low, Carmen Maxey; 104 Prince George Avenue, Hopewell 80, 155 Loyd, Grace Stone: 3861 Peakland St., Lynchburg 73, 80, 128 (2), 159, 191 Lynch, Mary Catherine; Lebanon, 68, 108, 126, 128, 141, 155, 156,

195

193

McLear, Patricia Walker: 3300

92

Lingo, Lucy LeCato; Pungoteague 47, Lively, Bette Bott; Box 525, Mullens, West Virginia Livesay, Frances Eulalie; 423 Southampton Rd., Emporia 80, Lohr, Margaret Hope; Brightwood, 80, 109, 123, 127, 174, 172, Long, Wilmpje Ann; 1009 N. Jackson

Loving,

92 92

St.,

Hopewell Light, Julia Porterfield; 138

Street,

128, 141,

111,

Franklin

92

106,

Richmond

Lotts,

47, 126,

Mclntyre, Margaret Arelia; Marion, South Carolina 68, McKenry, Lucie Ellen; 1806 Eads Street, 160, S., Arlington, 68, 111 141, (2), McLean, Manie Elizabeth; South Hill. 48,

92 Lassiter, Irma Hoffler; Driver 80, 188 92 Lawrence, Novella Katie; Windsor Lawrence, Ruth Eleanor; 26th and Grant 80 Streets, Hopewell Layman, Louise Cathryn; 1660 Cove Rd., 92 N. St., Roanoke Lear, Robin Suzanne; 3 Brierbridge Lane, Chapel Hill, N. C 159, 189 80,

Lee, Elizabeth

(2)

176

Franklin

2,

68, 111

113,

McClaugherty, Jacquelin; 811 North92 umberland Ave., Roanoke 92 McConncll, Gladys Bowen, Tazewell McCorkle, Susan Mildred; R. P. D. 2, Lexington 80, 107, 113 McGuire, Helen Marie; Grundy,

3002 Noble Ave.,

Laduc, Dorothy Eunice; 426 N. Fayette Street, Alexandria Lambert, Cora Alice; Bracey Lankford, Gladys Virginia; R. F. D.

No.

143

Danville

80 92

Street, Appalachia,

Kucera,

Moling, Sara Cornelia Dailey; 526 N, Braddock, WincheÂťter 49, 6J, 107,

Mary Lavonne; 3024 Montrose Avenue, Richmond McCaulcy, Nancy Conn; Leeland Hotel, Mc(;arty,

174

O Orange, Cecil Marion: Providence Forge 51. 191 Orange. Margaret Louise: R. F. D. 1. Richmond.."! 69, 109. 110. 171. 172. 194 Overbev, Marjorie Elinor: Chatham. 93, 111, 129 Overbey. Mary Cabell: Chatham. 81 Overcash, Dorothy Margaret: HampdenSydney--..69. 107. 126 (2). 128, 139. 195

Dorothv Elizabeth: ^'est Avenue, Bedford. 69, HI, 190

Overstreet.

81

\'ie\v


First Ave.,

Overton, Dorothy Mae; 608

93, 82,

Farmville

Owen, Dorothy Lewis; Sedley Oyler, Mary Jane; 2616 Shady

110 190

Lawn

Avenue, Roanoke OzHn, Virginia Constance; Chase City, 111, 113,

69,

"'

124, 126, 155, 156,

192

Prince, Virginia Drcwry; Capron Pritchett, Jean; 27 South Street,

82

Avenue, Danville

Packett, Virginia

Mae; Warsaw

Page, Jane Helen; Amherst

69,

82, 129,

Painter, Mary Caroline; Marion Palmer, Betty Ann; Crystal Hill

175 189 93

82

Palmer, Earlye Lee; 6404 Granby Street,

82

Norfolk 5 Parden, Vivian Jacqueline; Street, Portsmouth, 111,

69,

2124 King 176, 191,

141,

123,

Parris,

Virginia Estelle;

Box 188,

Schoolfield Parrish, Augusta Anne; Box 5, Chatham Parrish, Bcttie Lucille; Manassas, 82, 156, 172,

Parrish,

Nancy

^l 93

190

Ellen; Manassas,

108, 125, 172,

82,

Parry, Betty Jean; 105 High Street, Farmville 52, Parson, Virginia; Stony^ Creek Parsons, Eleanor Irene; 3454 Grove Ave.,

190

째9 187 '5

Richmond

N. 21st Ave., 93 Hopewell 70, 195 Kenbridge Ann; Patterson, Glenn 70 Paulette, Jane; South Hill 82 Payne, Jeraldine; Onancock Partin, Frances Sarah; 315

Peebles, Beverly Elizabeth;

3

321 Chesa-

peake Ave., Hampton Peery,

Anna Ward; Box

70, 141,

192

188,

", 159 Tazewell Pegram, Evelyn Louise; 323 A South 93, 128 Third St., Richmond Pemberton, Mary Constance; Warsaw.... 94 Perez, Julia Josefa Irizarry; Coronel Carr 6, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico Perkins, Lenora Willis; 250 Manor Place, 94 Danville Perry,

Lucy Evelyn; Fort Spring,

West Virginia Peterson, Ethel Alfreda; 605 Avenue, Waynesboro Petty,

Mary

Ellen;

Philhower, Jane

Wren

82,

193

94, 70,

111

Wayne 112

C; Richmond Road,

195 52 Phillips, Lillian Alleyne; Baskerville....52, 142 Pickral, Virginia Thomas; Box 182, 94 Gretna Pierce, Evelyn Marie; 308 Woodbine 70 Court, Greensboro, N. C 70, 127 Piercy, Naomi Ruth; Jefferson

Williamsburg Phillips, Helen May; Melfa

M.

Louise;

70,

Pittman, Daphne; 218 Johnson Street,

Portsmouth Nancy Boyden; 910 Redgate Ave.,

94

70,

189

187

94 193 112

139,

53,

408 Chautauqua Ave., 94 Portsmouth Quinones, Luz Aracelis; 79 Insular, Heto 143 Rey, Puerto Rico

Radogna, Virginia Katherine; Purdy, 53, 126 (2), Lorraine; Ivor

139, 54,

156, 112,

Rainey, Katherine Tredway; R. F. D. 2, Andersonville Ramirez, Iraida Graciela; Box 12, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico Ramsey, Doris Rose; 831 W. Washing82, ton St., Petersburg Ransone, Isabelle Wyatt; Buchanan Rattray, Mary Huntting; East Hampton,

176 127

94

193

70 94

Island

Reaves, Shirley Ann; Marshall Street,

South Boston Redd, Cora Lee; Box 352, Chatham Reid, Marguerite Virginia; 305 Pine

82 82 St.,

94, 110, Farmville Reid, Nanny Elizabeth; Weirwood Richards, Cholena; Toano 70, Richards, Mary Jane; Toano Richardson, Berkeley Davis; 3 30 Floyd 94, 161, Avenue, Richmond Richmond, Mary Flanary; Norton 70, Riddick, Alma Jean; Hickory Ridout, Gloria Celeste; Bracey Rieck, Judith; West Point, 82, 124, 127, Ritchie, Jacqueline Lee; Masonic Home, 70, 144, 171, Richmond Rives, Betty Louise; Box 155,

111

McKenney Robbins, Nancy Lane; Altavista Robertson, Mary Louise; Chase City

194

82,

94 94 176 197

94 190 94 194 190

82

Robertson, Sally Mildred; 422 Westover 31, 54, 63, Boulevard, Lynchburg 108 (2), 126, 128, 140, 158, 193 94 Rogers, Evelyn Lee; Nathalie Ross, Margaret Thayer; Onley....71, 171, 194 Rosser,

Emma

82

Almera; Evington

Rowe, Jane Willis; 3700 Moss Side 82 Avenue, Richmond 22 Rowe, Ruth Pleasants; Rural Retreat, 82, 193 Rucker, Mary Walton; 811 Pershing 54, 139, 175, 188 Avenue, Lynchburg Ruffin, Jane Waring; Holdcroft, 54, 63, 126 (2), 139 (2), 140, 141 (2), 144, 155, 156 (2), 157, 158, 175 Ada Lavinia; Clearbrook

Russell,

Pitts,

Norfolk

Anne; 303 Oakridge 94 Blvd., Lynchburg 70, 111 Irene; Quinton Bessie Pomeroy,

S

Plunkett, Betty

Poole, Carolyn June; Virgilina Portinaro, Regina Maria; Virgilina 70, 111 (2), 143, 160 Powell, Theresa Louise; 4300 Fauquier 94, 128, 146, 197 Avenue, Richmond Prebble, Katharine Buffington; 254 Mc-

Wane

Circle,

Lynchburg,

70, 126, 141, 155, 176, Presley, Arstelle; Council Price, Virginia Lee; 501 Pine Street, Farmville, 70, 110, HI, 112, 124, 127,

191

160

Sanford, Edith Smith; 317 N. Boulevard, 55, 126, 159, Richmond Sarver, Cile Scott; 310 W. Valley St.,

Abmgton

83,

171

194 55, 63, 109, 110, 123, Elizabeth Howison; 902 Prospect 94 Avenue, Pulaski 94 Scott, Elizabeth James; Onancock Scott, Evelyn Celia; 1003 Fillmore St.,

94 Melba; Stuart, 71, 111, 112, 188 F. D. 13, 94 Richmond Betty Bernice; R.

Scroggins,

Ann

Searson,

Finley; Steele's

Tavern

83

Seward, Frances Churchman; 1615 Berkley Ave., Petersburg

83, 127,

Md

Saunders, Helena Patterson; 230

71

Wayne

Avenue, Waynesboro Saunders, Katherine Louise; Christiansburg Savage, Helen Dunton; Exmore Savage, Maude Hortence; Onley, 94, 111, Savedge, Felicia Ann; Littleton

83 83 55 129 83

192

94

Shackelford, Alice Virginia; Gloucester Point 71, 111, 123 (2), 128, 156, 192 Shaclcelford, Frances Marwood; 1735 71, 191 Berkeley Ave., Petersburg Shaffner, Josephine Ayers; 105 Harbor Drive, Hampton, 55, 111, 126 (2), 156, 157, 160, 176, 191 Shanks, Margaret Louise; St. Charles Sharp, Hessie Agnes; Amelia Court

House Sharpe, Lucy Manson; 30th and Pacific Streets, Virginia Beach 4, 56, 63, 194, 196,

Shaw,

Ann Ogburn; Mary

Sheffey,

56, 63,

206 56

South Hill Preston; Marion, 113, 125, 126,

Shepherd, Betty Jane; Main Street, South Boston Shepherd, Mildred Hall; 4634 Kensington Ave., Richmond Sheppard, Gloria Frances; Walkerton, 56, 126, 71, 112,

191

95

95

176 127

Sheppard, Lois Lloyd; Stuart Shevick, Esther Ray; 2107 Idlewood Ave., Richmond....? I, HI, 129, 157, 175 Shiflet, Edna Christine; Churchville....83, 113 Shiflett, Mildred Louise; Palmyra, 71, 173, 195 Short,

Martha Jane; 454 Florida Ave.,

Richmond

95, 127 Grace Bonnev; 300 Churchill N. 83, 127 Englewood, Rd., West J

Shriver,

Shufilebarger, Anna B.; 107 Logan St., Bluefield 41,83, 107, 127, Sifford, Lettie Frances; 1621 Bellcvue

191

Avenue, Norfolk Simmerman, Nancy; Max Meadows.. ..95, 111 Sizemore, Agnes Jane; R. F. D. No. 1, Nelson

Winifred Hornsby; Yorktown.... Slaughter, Shirley Penn; 308 Warwick

Slaight,

Lane, Lynchburg Smedley, Dorothy Elizabeth; 208 23rd Street, Virginia Beach Smith, Alice Hawthorne; Lawrenceville.. Smith, Cornelia Cooke; 208 Warren St., Apt.,

2,

Norfolk

83,

83, Smith, Doris Hardy; Victoria Smith, Edna Pauline; 442 W. Washington St., Suffolk Smith, Ella Lorraine; Nathalie Smith, Ella Stone; Gretna Smith, Jean Carter; 210 Oak Street, Williamson, W. Va., 57,

129

Sauervein, Jeanne Elizabeth; Norbourne,

Upper Marlboro,

143

94, Franklin, 126, 177,

Seymour, Edith Jacqueline; Brodnax

R

Long

wood Avenue, Norfolk Barbara Ann; 4th Ave.,

Scott,

Scott, Nellie

Quillin, Iris Lea;

M.

1712 Melrose

Scherberger, Phyllis Virginia; 1026 Spots-

Lynchburg

Q

Raiford,

Maxine Yvonne; Avenue, Roanoke

Bayers,

Scott,

Guinea Mills

196

Parham, Katherine Ann; 1607 Westover 82, 194 Avenue, Petersburg 82 Park, Mabel Crute; Boydton 51 Park, Margaret Elizabeth; Boydton

187

53, 111, 126, 144, 156, 157, 160, 176, Pruett, Billie Emmett; Shawner Mill Pullen, Virginia Tunstall; 105 Floral

Putney,

P

52,

Petersburg Prosise, Jean Lathrop; Wilson,

127,

144,

145, 159,

Smith, Mary Carolyn; 903 High Street, Farmville Smith, Nannie Elizabeth; Nathalie Snead, Jean Louise; Box 85, Farmville.... Snead, Nancy June; Mulberry Road, Martinsville Sollenberger, Janet Elizabeth;

Woodstock Martha Amelia; Box

Sours,

Chatham

95 71 83

95 95

194 188 95 95 95

192 71 95

95

95

71, 127, 191 6,

71,

83


Mary Nannie; N. Main Chatham

Sours,

Street,

127

Southall, Dorothy Elisaheth; Pamplin 95, Soyars, Ncjrma Louise; Rice Spradlin, Mary Cornelia; 608 Windsor

71

110

New

Suzanna;

East

Hampton,

York

9?

Stephenson, Marguerite O'Deal; Wakefield Stephenson, Mary Virginia; Crozet Sterrett, Mary Thompson; Raphine, 57, 127, 139 (2), 175, Stevens, Margaret Kent; Box 1166,

57

188

Radford Stewart, Margaret N.; Clinchport,

83

57, 111, 126, 187 Kenbridge, 71, 108, 113, 124 (2), 126, 195 Stoner, Catharine Ammen; Fincastle, 83, 190 Stoner, Elizabeth McNeil, Fincastle, 95, 111 Stovall, Mary Evelyn; Baskerville 58, 127 Stringfield, Martha Warren; Elberton 95 Stubblefield, Victoria Katherine; Cash.... 95 Stubbs, Betty Jane; Box 134, Boone, N. C. 83

Stokes,

Agnes

Torrcncc, Alpha Mae; Appomattox Travis, Virginia Cox; 302 Boxton Ave,,

Lynchburg

Avenue, Roanoke 71, 188 Sprye, Martha Lynn; 2209 Riverinont Avenue, Lynchburg 83, 192, 197 Squire, Nancy Walton; 121 West End Blvd., Emporia 9? Stables, Gertrude Ruth; Wilson 83 Stables, Gracie Lillian; Wilson 83 Stancell, Eloisc Vincent; 218 Greensville Avenue, Emporia 83 Steele,

Tomlinson, Rebecca McCotter; Black Creek, N. C 84, III

84,

Treakle, I'rances Currcll; 305 Randolph St., Farmville 96, 127, Treakle, Virginia Eubank; 305 Randolph St., Farmville, 72, 112, 124, 126, 139, 140, 144, 156,

Trower, Catherine Rush;

Hampden-Sydney 71, 144, 194 Surface, Barbara Ann; 203 Woodland Avenue, Roanoke 72, 190 Sutherlin, Harriette Elizabeth; Sutherlin Suthers, Bettie Jane; 413 Washington

95

Avenue,

S. W., Roanoke 95 Hildrian Anne; 201 Robertson Avenue, Danville 95, 145 Swann, Emma Patricia; Box 50,

Buttle,

84,

Tatterson, Lucille Kathryn; Shadow Taylor, Ann Forbes; Hague 84, 175 Taylor, Jean Frances; Oriskany Taylor, Mary Elizabeth; Star Route,

Emporia

175

84 (2)

95

Taylor,

(2),

Taylor, Zilpha Gordy; Mappsville

129 96 96 96

Temple, Mary Ellen; Dinwiddie Terrell, Virginia Fry; 2916 Monument Avenue, Richmond 84, 189 Terrell, Virginia Manget; RandolphMacon Academy, Front Royal, 58, 158, 159, 197 Terry, Elizabeth Virginia; Pamplin 84 Thomas, Mary Lee; Farnham 96 Thomas, Mildred Lorene; Lawrenceville

Thompson,

72,

Elsie Irene;

Elizabeth;

190

96 84

Crewe

Thorp, Charlotte Crews; R. F. D. No. 1, Oxford, N. C. Tice, Marjorie June; Tazewell Timmins, Frances Geraldine; 4228 Seminary Ave., Richmond

12

V Varner, Viola Catherine; Farmville. ...84, Vaughan, Helen Page; Dolphin Vaughan, Marjorie Louise; 1128 Shef-

158

96

field Rd., Roanoke 72, 195 Vaughan, Mary Frances; Amherst 96 Verell, Margaret Virginia; 73 Pear Ave., Newport News 72, 111, 160

Via, Virginia Dare: Critz Viccellio,

Mary

59, 127,

176

Chatham

Parrish;

W 85

Walker, Elmi Gene; Skipwith Walker, Mary Virginia; 189 South Main

Mary

72,

Farley;

96 189

128 Maple Ave.,

Covington Walton, Margaret Jane; 12 Moss

96 Street,

Martinsville Ward, Ellen McCoy; Whaleyville

85,

Warriner, Martha Hoback; 409 Pine

St.,

139 97

Farmville

Watkins,

Ann

St.,

Elise;

801 South Main

72,

HI,

171,

176,

187

Watkins, Mary Ella; 304 Battery Ave., Emporia 59, 194, 196 Watson, Martha; 2907 West Grace St.,

Richmond

60, Mary Walker; Box 144, Amherst, 31, 60, 109, 110, 141, 171, 172. 177, Watts, Phyllis Jane; 2237 Rivermont

143

96

84,

96

190

Avenue, Lynchburg, 72,

109, 159,

171, 172,

E.;

174 85

Street,

Erwin, Tenn Webb, Nannie Aphelia; Ordinary

Weeks, Faith

85, 97 60, 127

Purdy, 60,

126, 156,

158,

ISS

Wells, Janice Gordon; 411 Beach Road.

Hampton Wells, Martha Cousins; Avenue, Petersburg

Mathews

97. Ill

White, Mariam Garrett; Amelia Whitehead, Nancy Everlyn: Box 469. Kecoughtan....85, 128. 145, 155, Whitlow, Mary Elizabeth; Pace*

Whitmore, Katherine Hunter: McKennev Whitten, Ruth Barrow: 106 Appomattox Street,

97

194. 197

97

72

Farmville

Whittle, Ophelia Reynolds: 1600 S. Sycamore St., Petersburg, 61. 63. 109. 110, 123 (2), 126, 140, 141. 171, 189. 205 Wiley, Barbara Jean; Nelson 97 Wilkerson, Dolly; 504 Park Avenue. Farmville Wilkerson. Lois Rebecca: R. F. D. No. J. Box 8. Farmvi'le 72. 110 Wilkinson, Nancy Trotter: Kenbridge. 61. 194

Wilkinson, Nellie Garland: Cumberland Williams, Helen Reeves: Sunny Side Williams, Joyce Anne: 3710 Glenwood

Avenue, Richmond Williams, Williams,

97 97 143

Mary Virginia: Narrows Mary Walker: Holcomb

97

Rock

85. Williams, Sara Bird: Woodstock, 61, 63. 113, 123, 124 (2), 127, 140, 141, 191.

72 1811 Matoax 85,

123, 140, 141. 156. 171. 172, 177, 195. Margaret Elizabeth: 1756 Washington 20, D. C

188

200

194

201

W.

Wilson,

190

Winn, Rebecca Tucker: Wilson 97 Winston, Lucille Woody: 1703 Seddon Road, Richmond 22. 62, 155 Winston, Mattie El: Rustburg Wolfe. Lois Faye: 446 Shawnee Avenue, Big Stone

Gap

Hopewell

Wood,

62 97

Wood, Annie Gay: Gladstone Wood, Bette Jane: 7 1 1 Frances

72, 187 Street.

62, 159.

195

Frances Derith: 228 Magnolia

Avenue, VK'aynesboro

Wood. Sarah Clarke: Wingina Woodward, Bettj- Wyatt: 72, 126. Woodward, Mary Franklin; Barhams\-ille. 63. 126, 139, 142. 156, 176,

Powell; 508 First Avenue,

Blackstone

Shackelfr^rd;

Barhamsville

Farmville

Watkins, Martha

Betty

Crigleriiville 97 Wheelock, Marion Cochran; 25 Belleview Avenue, Alexandria White, Don* Wilvjn; Cedar Bluff 97 White, Dorothy Gay; 12 N. New Street, Staunton White, Martha Lee; 4016 Hermiuee Road, Richmond 72. 189 White, Mary Sheppard; Box 981.

St., S. E.,

Park, Charlottesville, 31, 59, 63, 110, 126, 140, 166, 172, 177, 191, 204 Wailes, Clair Scott; Box 6, Amherst 85

Wallace,

E<l(;e'

Wilson, Helen Garland: 1706 Brandon Ave., Petersburg, 62. 63. 109. 110.

Waddell, Mabel Frances; Drakes Branch Wade, Eleanor Hartwell; 2672 Jefferson

Weaver, Mabel Vaughan; Rice Webb, Martha Frances; 207 New

195 Tindall, Katheryne Leigh; Hatton 72, 188 Tindall, Virginia Lewis; Hatton, 86, 96, 111 Tolbert, Ollie Mae; Victoria 95 Tolley, Elizabeth Eugenia; Natural Bridge Station

188

198

Watts,

107, 127, Margarette Lee; Box 165, 58,

Thompson, Amherst Thompson, Virginia

1

Boydton,

192,

U

Street, Suffolk

161

Nancy Elizabeth; Box 967, Mathews 95, 111 Taylor, Nancy Mina; Clarkton

156,

J2M

v/ood Ave., Richmond 61, 189 We%t, Charlotte Virginia; Surry 85. 187 West, Myrtle Aulelia; 919 26th Street. Newport Newi 97, 129

Wetherall, 161

Underbill, Martha Jane; Machipongo 96 Upshur, Lucile Derby; Chenton, 84, 155, 190 Upshur, Martha Anne; Chenton, 59, 155, 190

Heathsville

Sydnor, Hester Mae; Hague

197

Trump, Helen Virginia; Crewe 84 Tucker, Anne Spencer; Norlina, N. C 84 Tucker, Gene Stratton; McKenney 84, 192 Tucker, Mary Jo; Washington Street, South B(jston 96 Turley, Dorothy Louise; Wytheville, 190 139, 140, 84, Turner, Mary Jeane; Jamesville 96 Turner, Shirley Kay; 4 Elliott Place, Portsmouth 96 Twiford, Elizabeth Monterey; R. F. D. No. 4, Box 492, Norfolk 128

B.;

Summers, Margaret Anne; Box 95,

96

Eastville,

139,

58,

Wentzel, Caroline France*; (1)

Woodward, Mrginia

63

176 187

Lorraine:

Chuckatuck 85, 139. 191 Worrell. Helen Rose; Courtland Worsham. Helen Hope: 865 Main Street, Danville 85 Wright. Elizabeth Lee: 30 Copeland Lane, Morrison Wright. Katherine Lee: Box 101, Bowling Green 72. 171. 193 Wright. Rubv Louise: Moneta 85. 108 Wyatt, Mary Elizabeth; 1403 Irish St.. South Boston 85, 108, 124

Y Yates, Mary Rose; 3029 -Avenue, Richmond

Monument

_ 97 Yonce, \'irginia Guy: Inglewood..97. Ill (2> Young. Audrey Doris: Appalachia 97 Young. Constance Elizabeth: 207 Prospect St., Co\-ington 85, 111, 195


General Index Acknowledgment

-.

---

-

-

Administration and Faculty

Alpha Kappa Gamma..... Alpha Phi Sigma.. Alpha Sigma Alpha... Alpha Sigma Tau Archery

Monogram Club Mu Omega

103

133

Newman

136

133

Northern Neck Club

168

181

Orchesis

1

183

Pau'Hellenic Council

137

219 15

-

Club

182

38

166

Pegasus

121

135

Phi Zeta Sigma

180

Athletic Association

102

Pi

Gamma Mu

119

Badminton

167

Pi

151

105

Pi

Kappa Delta and Debate Club Kappa Sigma..

164

Ping Pong...

168

149

Rotunda

132

168

Senior

-

-

Association of Childhood Education...

.—

Baptist Student Union..

.

Basketball

Eh

Beorc

Thorn....

Canterbury Club

Chi

-

..-..-

- 170

-

Choir..

-

-

....,

-

Club

-

Dedication

Dramatic Club French Circle

Gamma Gamma

186

----

148

Senior Statistics

209

136

Sigma Pi Rho

150

- 185

'

Club

Home

121

Spanish Club

119

Softball

165

154

Sophomore Class Sophomore Class Officers Student Government

116 149

House Council Index and Register of Students Intermediate Junior

A

A

Cappella

Cappella

86

Student Standards Subtitle

181

Swimming

166

1

Tennis

165

Theta Sigma Upsilon

180

153

Title

164

Town

120

Tribute Page

101

134

211

U. S .O. Committee Views

122

Virginian

100

Volleyball

167

War War

Council

134

Emphasis Day Committee

138

153

Junior Class Officers

64

Latin Club

Page

136

64 Pi

73

169

Junior Class

Kappa Delta

73

152

- 166

-

Economics Club

207

118

Theta

Hockey

183

Snapshots

-

Granddaughters Club..

H.O

Sigma Sigma Sigma

-— .-

-

31

Senior Personalities

--

Golf

3

105

86

Psi

169

104

Freshman Class Freshman Class Officers Freshman Commission Future Teachers of America

Senior Class

-

Commercial Club.. Cotillion

Cappella

Senior Class Officers

-

Choral Club Colonnade

A

182

Page

3

Girls

Club

103 5

8

120 151

Wesley Foundation

105

Westminster Fellowship

106

Madrigal Group

1

May Court.... May Day

184

Who's

184

Y.

50

W

Who

63

A

117

.C.


Acknowledgment

W background of a

story,

your

JTHIN these pages we have tried trj present the What we have said here is only a skeleton; to

stcjry.

each individual goes the right to supply her

open

this

book there

is

recalled to

mind

own

personal details.

If,

each time you

a vivid picture oi Farmville

not have published the Virginian in vain.

1945,

Exasperation and perspiration were partners of inspiration as the editors compiled a pictorial, literary history.

we

will

That was our purpose.

Their

staff

and

its

job,

however, was lightened by

for their aid in

drawing up our layout and

the helpfulness and cooperation of the following:

Jahn and Oilier Engraving art

work.

To Mr.

Company

Brightman go our

special thanks for confident

and invaluable sug-

gestions. P. Bell

J.

Walter Brown

& Company,

Lynchburg, for printing our book and especially to Mr.

for his personal interest.

Pearsall's Studio for

making our group and individual

Miss Virginia Bedford and her lent job

on the

art

staff

who

pictures.

did an unusually complete and excel-

work.

Miss Nancy Foster whose keen eye and sense of grammar caught our

literary

mistakes.

Mr. T. A. McCorkle who was

the spark behind the entire group. His easy

man-

ner and composure gave us confidence in the most hectic experiences.

The tive to

student body, faculty and administration whose interest gave us the incen-

work.

Finally, our thanks go to Lillian, Shirley

will

an excellent and hard-working

and Sue whose help have made

this

staff

and

especially to

book possible and whose

efforts

produce the next Virginian.

Marilyn Bell, Ednor

Mary Elizabeth Rar\ey,

Busmkss Manager

Patricia Maddox, Managino Editor


DATE DUE

1

DEMCO

38-297


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