Virginian1914stat

Page 1







S^^c lITirginian EDITED BY

THE

SENIOR CLASS

State Female Normal School

1914

VJ>.=&/aSJi-


Betitcatton Bctausfe

itftje

cljangeli

Ijasf fillcli

toearp

our hlut^ to

cvtpt into our toe

Jjajjpincitfitf,

IjeartjEf

totiSl)

momenta

our boofe to

ta^t,

anb 0iitntly

anb toon

to bebtcatc

toiti)

tljem,


Mrs. RoxiE Berry



l^irqinian'

g^fjc

Index to Faculty 1.

(A

"Well, now, where

dead

is

you want

It

silence for five minutes

"Oh! your

and

to

go?"

letter

reading engaged in.)

mother's half-sister's cousin was sick and you couldn't get back?

Well,

"

here

is

your excuse.

"Now,

let's

3.

"Good

graacious!

4.

"Um-hum

2.

5.

"Get

6.

"Yes,

express that

— young

in line, girls;

I'll

in

"

terms of

Haven't you been ladies

— um-hum —

get in line.

excuse you

if

7.

"Now, do you

8.

All of her troubles are

9.

"Now,

you

will

to the

if

brook yet?"

any of you have collected any old

How many

stamps?"

walk home with me."

understand that so far?" "

10.

"little ones.

where' we at?"

"Girls, after

filling

out this outline on the leaf, you

may

look up the bag

the cedar apple,

and evening primrose, writing a paragraph on each

and, oh! yes;

we

if

don't walk to Taylor's pond we'll have our

test

in

worm,

your note-book;

next week."


lITirginian

gs;^c

Faculty J.

L.

JARMAN,

B. A.,

CLIFF W.

STONE

THOMAS

R.

LL.

D

President Education Education

GARTH

MILLEDGE LEAR JAMES M. GRAINGER THOMAS D. EASON F.

A.

Geography

J.

M.

History and Social Sciences English

M.

Biology

BOYD COYNER

Assistant

MARTHA

W. COULLING MINNIE V. RICE

in

Education

Drawing and Form Latin

ESTELLE SMITHEY

French and German Chemistry and Physics Mathematics

LULIE G. WINSTON LILA LONDON CHRISTINE E. MUNOZ

Sight Singing Kindergarten Education and Supervisor of Kindergarten Physical Education Primary Methods and Supervisor of First Grade Education and Supervisor of Fifth and Sixth Grades

GRACE ELDRIDGE MIX

DOROTHY SCHARTLE MARY PHILIPPA JONES *MARY D. PIERCE

ELEANOR BRYNBERG FORMAN, Education and Supervisor of Third and Fourth Grades

BERTHA WELLS LULA WALKER *FANNIE

Industrial Phases of Education and Supervisor of Second Grade

WYCHE DUNN

LEOLA WHEELER HELEN BLACKISTON CARRIE B. TALIAFERRO CARRIE SUTHERLIN MARY CLAY HINER HANNA FENNELL CRAWLEY VIRGINIA BUGG LOTTIE CARRINGTON MAUDE K. TALIAFERRO »On

leave of absence.

Household Arts Supervisor of Rural Schools

Reading Assistant

Geography and Biology Assistant in Mathematics Assistant in English in

Assistant

in

Assistant

in

Assistant

in

English History History

Librarian

Assistant Librarian


g^^e lIFirginian' Training School CLIFF W. STONE.

B. S.,

Ph.

D

M. LEAR ELLEN J. MURPHY

Director Principal of Training School

J.

Supervisor of Seventh and Eighth Grades

*MARY D. PIERCE ELEANOR BRYNBERG FORMAN BERTHA WELLS

Supervisor of Fifth and Sixth Grades Supervisor of Third and Fourth Grades Supervisor of Second Grade and Industrial Arts

MARY PHILIPPA JONES

Supervisor of First Grade

GRACE ELDRIDGE MIX

MARY MAMIE

MAUD

E.

Supervisor of Kindergarten

PECK

E.

Assistant Supervisor of Seventh Grade Assistant Supervisor of Sixth Grade Assistant Supervisor of Third Grade

ROHR

INEZ TILLMAN

PAULINE WILLIAMSON

Grade Teacher of Fifth Grade

Business Department MR.

B.

M.

COX

Business Manager Clerk to Business Manager

WINNIE MINER

Home Department MISS MARY WHITE COX MRS. MARY PAYNE HARRIS MISS SUSIE E. ALLEN MRS. ANNIE SLATER MRS. BESSIE CAMPER JAMISON MRS. NANNIE V. BERGER DR. SARAH E. COKER MRS. ROXIE I. BERRY. R. N MISS ADELIA DODGE *On

leave of absence.

Head

of

the Home

Assistant Head of the Home Assistant in the Home Department

Night Matron Housekeeper Assistant Housekeeper Resident Physician

Trained Nurse Y. W. C. A. General Secretary


llfir^inian'

'Qi(l<i

Senior Directory MARGUERITE

ARCHAMBAULT

L.

Alpha Sigma Alpha 1912;

Fall,

Virginian;

Roanoke,

Mu Omega;

Sororlly;

Cunnmgham

Reporter of

Lilerary Sociely,

Glee Club;

Fall,

1913;

Art Edilor of

Cotillion Club;

D.

I.

R. K.

DOROTHY AVERY

London Bridge, Virginia

GEORGE BAILEY

Gray,

Censor of Athenian Lilerary Society,

Club,

1912-1913, 1913-1914;

News

;

Editor of Focus, 1912-1913;

Giftorian of Class;

Scribblers;

M.

Farmville, Virginia

Reporter of Argus Lilerary Society,

P. S.;

Dramatic Club;

1913;

Jefferson

Debating Society;

Cotillion Club.

DOROTHY EVANS BATTEN Alpha Sigma Alpha Delia;

Suffolk, Virginia Argus Literary Sociely;

Sorority;

Glee Club;

Reporter

of

Athenian

Athenian Sociely,

D.

Tennis I.

REBECCA

R. K.;

L.

Fall,

Club;

1913;

Corresponding

1913;

Team;

Senior

Secretary

,

Baskel-Ball;

Cotillion

Club;

Ruffner Debating Sociely.

BANKS

Norfolk, Virginia

Secretary of

Jefferson

Debater,

Virginia of

1913-1914, Secretary Love

Secretary Athletic Association.

Basket-Bail

Junior

Spring,

Sociely,

Ruffner Debating Society;

German

Club,

President of

German

1912;

Literary Society;

Club,

1912-

1913-1914.

ANNIE BANKS Critic

Club;

Petersburg, Literary

Pierian Lilerary Sociely;

1913;

Cotillion

Benedictine.

MARY MOYLAN BANKS

Set

Dramatic

Track Team.

LUCILE ELLIOTT BALDWIN I.

Virginia

Recording Secretary of Athenian Literary

1913;

Jefferson Debating Society

Society, 1914;

the

Reporter of Le Cercle Francais, 1912-1913;

Reporter of Class, 1910-1911;

Dramatic Club;

Virginia

Treasurer of Cunningham Lilerary Society,

Victoria, Virginia

Debating Critic

of

Society;

News

Cunningham

President of

Ellen

Editor

Lilerary

of

Focus,

Sociely;

H. Richards' Club;

1910-1911; President

of

Dramatic Club.

Intersociely

Cunningham


lITir^inian'

'^fl<i FLORENCE BELLE BATTLE

Charlottesville,

PHYLLIS CHANDLER BAYLEY Mu Omega; Athenian Literary Team;

Lawrenceville, Virginia Nonpareil Tennis Club;

Society;

Secretary and Treasurer of Cotillion Club,

W.

1913;

Senior Basket-Bail

A. N. K.

RACHEL BEAL Reporter of

Scottsville. Pierian

Literary

Society,

1913;

Vice-President

First

Treasurer of Albemarle Club,

1914,

Society,

Virginia

Albemarle Club.

Literary Society;

Pierian

1913-1914;

Pierian

of

Virginia

Literary

French Club.

CRISPIN BERGER

Danville, Vircinia

Athenian Literary Society.

MARTHA JANE Critic

1914;

BILL

Pierian

Roanoke, Virginia

Lile;ary

Track Team;

1913;

Society,

Southwest Virginia Club;

German Club;

Roanoke Club;

Recording

Secretary

Literary

Treasurer of Senior Class,

Debatmg

Jefferson

Pierian

Society;

H. Richards' Club.

Ellen

IDA HELEN BOWLES Recording Secretary of

the

Cardwell,

Virginia

Roanoke,

Virginia

Ruffner Debating Society, 1913.

CLAIBORNE BOULDIN

MARIA ADAMS BRISTOW President Senior Class.

Delegate

1913; gale

to

to

Class,

1914;

National

Delegate

to

Junior

W.

Y.

C.

Service Committee,

1912;

Secretary

President

1913;

Dramatic

President

Second Year

A. Biennial Convention. Richmond.

President

Club.

Censor Athenian Literary Society, 1910;

1913;

Class,

1911;

Blue Ridge Convention. Black Mountain. N.

Club.

Spring,

President

Student Volunteer Convention, Kansas City.

Social

1913;

Farmville, Virginia

Secretary Third Year Class.

1912;

Society,

1913-1914;

Glee Club.

1911-1912; 1909;

Virginia,

April.

1913;

Dele-

1914;

Member

Dramatic

Society,

Club,

Literary

Fall.

1910;

1912-

Society. Critic

Vice-President Athenian Literary Society. Fall.

1913;

Assistant Literary Editor of the Focus, Fall,

1914;

French Club. 1910;

Ballad Club;

Literary

1910;

Secretary of Glee

1913-1914;

Secretary

Year

Class.

June,

Treasurer Athenian

Corresponding Secretary Athenian

Athenian Literary Society. Spring. 1911;

C.

Missouri, January.

Fourth

1912;

Literary Editor

Jefferson Debating Society

Fire Girls.

Second Honor

;

Focm. 1913-

Scribblers;

Camp


Wirglnian

g^fje KATHLEEN BROWNING W.

C.

A. Biennial Convention, Richmond,

C. A. Cabinet;

Mu Omega

Delegate

to

Virginia,

Delegate Y.

1913;

Blue Ridge Conference.

Nonpareil Tennis Club;

Club;

1913;

Cotillion

Quincy, Florida

Argus Literary Society.

Ballad Club;

LYNETTE MARTHA BROCK

Smithfield.

Vircinia

Glee Club.

Athenian Literary Society;

MARIE VIRGINIA BROWN

Roanoke, Virginia

Second Vice-President of Pierian Literary Society,

1914;

Le Cercle Francais;

Vice-

Southwest Virginia Club.

Roanoke Club;

BOND BUCHER

Member

Club.

South Boston, Virginia

MARY FRANCES BRUCE

BESSIE

Vircinia

W.

Cunningham Literary Society;

1913;

Dramatic Club.

LEE BROOKS

President of

West

Bluefield,

Y.

Student Committee, 1913-1914;

Critic

Staunton, Virginia German

Athenian Literary Society, 1914;

Club.

LILLIAN PAULETT

BUGG

Farmville.

Assistant Librarian of Glee Club,

Kindergarten;

LOUISE CABELL CARRINGTON Kappa D.

I.

Delta

R. K.;

Sorority;

Virginia

1912-1913.

Charlotte Court House, Virginia

Cunningham

Literary

Society;

Love

Set

Tennis

Club;

Reporter of Cunningham Literary Society, Fall, 1913.

Big Stone Gap, Virginia

MARY CARNES Jefferson Debating Society.

KATHERINE CARTER French Club;

Houston, Virginia

Normal League;

Y.

W.

C. A.

Miller School, Virginia

ALMA CARVER Corresponding Secretary Albemarle Club, 1913;

Jefferson Society;

Ballad Club.

GERTRUDE CHARLTON Glee Club;

French Club;

Dillwyn, Virginia Ellen

H, Richards' Club;

Y.

W.

C. A.


Wirglman

'^^<i CLARK

M. ALICE Argus

McKenney,

Literary

Annual, 1913;

Vice-PresldenI

Sociely;

German Club;

1912;

Class,

Associate

MARY ETHEL CLEEK

Covington. Virginia Danville. Virginia

HOPE ALICE DADMUN Literary

Librarian.

Norfolk, Virginia Glee Club;

Sociely;

Glee

Wapwalopen Camp

1912-1913;

of

Club

Camp

Assistant

Fire

Librarian,

1911-1912;

Girls.

VIRGINIA LEE DAVIS

MARROW

Virginia of

President Ellen H. Richards' Club.

KATHLEEN GUERRANT COUSINS

Athenian

Editor

Busiiress

Hampton. Virginia

DAVIS

Hampton, Virginia Ballad Club.

Pierian Literary Society;

EMILY DAVIS

West

Censor Cunningham Lilerary Society;

H

A;

W.

Point, Virginia

President French Club;

A. N. K.;

Nonpareil Tennis Club.

LOCKEY EMILY DEEP

Elk Creek.

Recording Secretary of

the

Jefferson

Literary Society.

1913;

Virginia

Southwest Virginia Club;

"Saints."

GRACE DICKENSON

Union Hall. Virginia

Athenian Literary Society; Club;

Treasurer of .Athenian Literary Sociely;

Love Set Tennis

Reporter for Love Set Tennis Club.

HATTIE VIRGINIA DICKEY Cunningham Literary Society;

MARY

D.

I.

R. K.;

I.

Omega;

Club;

Lynchburg. Virginia

Recording Secretary of Argus Literary Sociely,

Treasurer

Virginia

O. M.

DORNIN

R.

Mu

Covington, S. S.;

of

Athletic

Association.

1913-1914;

Secretary and Treasurer of Lynchburg Club,

Art Editor of the Virginian;

W.

1913;

1912;

Cotillion

Nonpareil Tennis

Club;

French

Southwest Virginia Club;

Club;

Assistant

A. N. K.

LOBELIA DRINKARD

Appomattox. Virginia

MOLLYE DRINKARD

Appomattox. Virginia 11


l^irginian'

STf^e PERMELIA DUGGER

Brodnax. Virginia

French Club,

VIRGINIA FIELD

Emporia,

Recording Secretary

Alhenian

Literary

Society,

Assistant Literary Editor Virginian,

1914;

Athenian

President

Literary

1914.

ESTHER BROOKE FORD Kappa Delta

Front Royal, Virginia Cunningham Literary Society;

Sorority;

1913-1914;

Vice-President Student Government,

Club; 1914;

Secretary

Virginia

Sociely,

Normal

Delegate

1913;

Treasurer Cotillion Club,

1913-1914;

League,

D.

I.

Love Set Tennis

R. K.;

W.

Secretary Y.

Glee

Treasurer

Group Council Sweet Briar

to

C. A.,

Club,

1913-

1913-1914;

College,

1913;

Senior Basket-Ball Team, 1913-1914.

ETHEL FOX

Washington, Virginia

VIRGIE LEE FULLER Critic

Emporia,

CARRIE MASON GALUSHA Gamma

ELIZABETH President

S.

Dinwiddie,

Argus Literary Society;

Theta;

Virginia

Vice-President Athenian Literary Society, 1914.

Athenian Literary Society, 1913;

Virginia

Nonpareil Tennis Club.

GILDEA

Norfolk, Virginia French Club;

1913-1914;

RufFner Debating Society, Spring,

Critic

Rulfner

Debating Society.

GERTRUDE WILSON GILLIAM Basket-Ball Team. 1908-1909; Jefferson

Sociely,

Richards' Club,

Farmville, Virginia

Le Cercle Francias, 1909-1911;

1913-1914;

1913-1914;

Treasurer

of

Glee Club, 1908-1914;

Society,

Jefferson

RUTH CLEAVES Mu Omega;

Commiltee,

1912-1913;

W.

N.

L.

Cripple Creek, Virginia President

Student

Association,

Secretary

1913;

Leader

of

1913-1914;

Corresponding

Secretary

Member

Treasurer of Junior Class, 1912-1913;

Argus Literary Sociely, 1913-1914; dent

1913-1914;

Normal League.

Southwest

Cotillion

Club,

Virginia

Club;

1913-1914;

Manager

Nonpareil

Track Tennis

of

Stu-

Team, Club;

A. N. K.

HAZEL GORDY Vice-President Argus Literary Society;

Club;

Parksley, Secretary Eastern Shore Club;

Student Government Committee.

12

Ellen

Virginia

H. Richards'


"lITir^inian'

gEf2<J NAN ELAM GRAY 11

A;

President

Athletic

Senior Team,

1912-19!3; 1913;

Newport News, Virginia

Delia;

1913-1914;

Association,

Basket-Bail

Junior

President Nonpareil Tennis Club;

FRANCES ACREE GUTHRIE Argus

Literary

1913;

Chairman of

Society; the

Lvnchburc, Vir:inia

Junior

Glee Club;

1.

Baskel-Ball

Team.

1912;

Basket-Bali

Senior

W.

Committee of Y,

Service

Social

Lynchburg Club, 1913-1914;

C.

A.;

Delegate Blue Ridge Conference, 1913;

Team,

Vice-President

Nonpareil Tennis

O. M.

HATTIE STUART HALL

Lvnchburc, Vircinia

Kodak Club.

Treasurer Lynchburg Club;

LILLY TEMPLE

Secretary

Sec.eiaiy and Treasurer Cotillion Club.

Diamatic Club;

Club;

Team,

Recoraing Secretary of Argus Literary Society,

1913-1914;

President Argus Literary Society;

HARM AN

Lexincton,

Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority;

Treasurer Cunningham Literary Society;

D.

ViRciNtA

R. K.;

I.

S. S.

LUCY MARY HEATH Delta Sigma;

Roanoke, ViRCtNtA

President of Pierian Literary Society,

Vice-President Ellen H. Richards' Club. 1913; gale to

Club;

Y.

W.

Love Set Tennis Club;

Colillion Club;

W.

Y.

C.

C. A. Conference. Asheville, N.

Jefferson Debating Society;

1913;

C. A. Cabinet. 1913-1914;

Southwest Vlrgima Club.

Roanoke Club;

ROONEY MYRTLE HEATH Delta Sigma; 1914; C. A.;

Roanoke. Vircinia

Censor Pierian Literary Society,

Secretary and Treasurer Roanoke Club,

Membership Committee Y.

Southwest Vi-ginia Club.

W.

C. A.;

Secretary

1914;

1914;

French Club,

Club;

1913-

Y.

Social Service Committee

Cotillion

W.

Love Set Tennis Club;

1913.

MARGARET HELM Delta Sigma:

Dele-

French

Ballad Club;

1913;

June.

Warrenton. Vircinia

B. E. A.

N. S.;

Le Cercle Francais;

Cunnmgham

Literary

Society;

Jefferson Debating Society.

M.ARGUERITE HETERICK

Washington. Virginia

MARGARET HINER Treasurer Y.

W.

Staunton. C. A..

1913-1914;

Reporter of Junior Class, 1913; of

the

Society;

Virginian;

Reporter

German Club.

Vice-President

Pierian

Reporter of Senior Class, 1914; of

Pierian

Literary

Society,

Literary

Society,

Virginia

1913;

Assistant Editor-in-Chief

1912;

Jefferson

Debating


^fj*^ lITirginian' PAULINE WHITNEY

HOWARD

Delton, Virginia

ALICE MARSHALL HOWISON

Ashland, Virginia

Sigma Sigma Sigma; Cunningham Literary Society; Editor-in-Chief of Chairman Bible Study Committee; Assistant Librarian Glee Club; Secretary

Kindergarten;

Virginian; Kindergarten Cotillion

Association;

Club;

Debater, 1913;

Delegate

Dramatic Club;

W.

Benedictine;

Biennial

to

Convention.

Love Set Tennis Club;

Lynchburg

1913;

Track Team,

1913;

Club; Junior

A. N. K.

CARRIE IRENE HUDGINS

Port Haywood, Virginia

Recordmg Secretary Pierian Literary Society. Fall, 1913; Cotillion Club; Love Set Tennis Club; Track Team; Athletic Association; Junior Basket-Bail Team; Senior Basket-Ball Team; Hunt Club; B, "D. I."; Glee Club. Kindergailen;

C—

MARY MARGARET HUDDLE

Ivanhoe,

Critic Jefferson Literaiy Society,

Recording

Secretary,

1911;

1909;

Virginia

Corresponding Secretary Jefferson Society, 1910;

Reco:dmg

Secretary,

1913;

Southwest

Virginia

Club;

•Saints."

SALLIE

B.

HURDLE

Norfolk, Virginia

Pierian Literary Society.

MARY SHEPHERD JONES Kappa Delta;

Suffolk, Vircinia

Cunningham Literary Society;

Delta.

PEARLE JONES

Williamsburg,

Virginia

Athenian Literary Society.

NANCY LEWIS JOHNSON Kappa Delta; Kindergarten;

Farmville, Vircinia Censor Pierian Literaiy Society;

Glee Club;

LELIA FLIPPEN KABLER

French Club.

Forest Depot. Virginia

Athenian Literary Society.

ELIZABETH DEGGE KELLAM. Athenian Literary Society;

ELIZABETH KENDRICK Mu Omega; Argus Literary

.

Morrison,

.

Vice-President Ellen H. Richards' Club,

Bluefield, Society;

W.

A. N. K.;

Argus Literary Society, 1912-1913.

14

Virginia

1914.

Deutscher Sprachverein

;

West

Virginia

Reporter


Wir^inian

Wfj*^ CORINNE KEMPER

Roanoke, Virginia Le Cercle Francais:

Treasurer of Pierian Literary Society. 1913;

Roanoke Club;

Handbook. 1913; R.

Lynchburg. Virginia Alpha Sigma Alpha;

Member

1912-1913; dent

Athenian

Censor

1913;

President of Class, 191

1912-1913;

Literary

President

Society,

Lynchburg Club;

Virginian, 1914;

1911-1912.

of Student Committee.

Student Association.

of

C. A.

Southwest Virginia Club.

ELISE LECKIE Kindergarten;

W.

Editor Y.

-191 2

Secretary of Class.

;

1913-1914;

Athenian 1914;

Spring,

1

Junior

Literary

Vice-Presi-

Business

Assistant

Spring,

Society.

Manager

Nonpareil Tennis Club;

Jefferson Debating Society;

F?A*N— G!S!!?. JUANITA MANNING Secretary Class.

1911;

Richmond, Virginia

1908-1909;

1912;

Critic Jefferson Society,

1911;

President Jefferson Society,

Vice-President

1912;

1

Class,

;

1914;

Society,

the Focui,

1911-1912;

Editor-in-Chief of Focus. 1913;

1910-1914;

Blue Ridge Delegate,

Focus Pennant, 1912-1913;

1912;

Norfolk, Virginia Lexington,

Reporter of Pierian Literary Society, 1913-1914; 1914:

Onley. Virginia

ESTELLE McCLUNG

Eagle Rock, Virginia

SUSAN MINTON

Y.

W.

Newport News, Virginia Y.

W.

C. A. Conference

President

1913-1914;

C. A.,

Member

1913';

Business

of at

Student

Delegate

Committee,

Blue Ridge, N.

Manager Focus. 1913;

Delegate

Ruffner Debating Society,

Spring, 1913;

Virginia

Recording Secretary of Jefferson Debat-

Ballad Club.

GEORGIE McMATH

College,

Debater,

Lynchburg, Virginia

IRA McALPIN

of

Assistant

Glee Club;

Joint

MARY MEARS

President

Vice-

Ballad Club.

Class Poet, 1914;

ALICE McLaughlin

ing Society,

1910-

President Jeffer-

Cntic Jefferson Society, 1913;

Cunningham Literary

Critic

191

Student Commilte,

Exchange Editor of Scribblers;

1909-1910;

Class.

President Jefferson Society,

Secretary Jefferson Society;

son Society,

1913;

President

to

C,

to

Group Council

1912-1913, 1913;

Sweet Briar Delegate

1913-1914;

1914.

15

to

Second Assistant

Biennial Convention, Richmond, 1913;

Vice-

Censor Cunningham Literary Society,

Treasurer Cunningham Literary Society, Fall, 1913;

Literary Society,

at

1913-1914;

Track Team;

President Cunningham


gl^c 'llfir^inian' EDNA LORENA MINTON

Jonesville,

Virginia

Southwest Virginia Club.

ANNIE

AMANDA MINTER

Norfolk. Virginia

French Club.

LUCY LAVINIA MOORE

Farmville,

Ruffner Debating Society;

Club;

Vice-President Ruftner Debating Society, 1912-1913;

GRACE MOORMAN ISBELL

President

Victoria, Virginia

Argus Literary Society, 1913;

Society, Fall, tary

Moneta, Virginia

MOORE

E.

Virginia

French

H. Richards' Club.

Ellen

Student

Fall,

1910-1911;

Association,

Chairman Devotional Committee Y. Ridge, June, 1913;

Second Vice-President Argus Literary

1912;

Recording Secretary Argus Literary Society, Spring, 1912;

Member

Junior

W.

C. A.,

1913;

Student Committee,

Y.

W.

1912; to

Blue

B. E. A, N. S.

MARY PEARL MOOD

Smithfield,

Treasurer Pierian Literary Society;

Le Cercle

Sororily;

Virginia

Fr,

JANET KNOX NICHOLSON Kappa Delia

Secre-

Fall,

C, A. Delegate

Crewe, Virginia

Cunningham

Literary

Society;

F?A*N— G!S

!

!

?

;

Server's

Tennis Club.

BERTIE NICHOLSON

Back Bay, Virginia

MARIA O'NEILL

Crozet, Virginia

Argus Literary Society;

First

Vice-President Argus Literary Society, Fall Term, 1913;

Chairman of Missionary Giving Committee; Reporter of Albemarle Club,

1913;

Y.

W.

C. A. Cabinet;

LENA PAULETT Pierian Literary Society;

;

Virginia

Scottsville,

Virginia

Bassett,

Virginia

Secretary Albemarle Club, 1913-1914.

MARIAH WALLER PANNILL Kindergarten

Scottsville,

Albemarle Club.

MARY PAULETT Pierian Literary Society;

Albemarle Club;

Ballad Club.

French Club. 16


l^ir^inian

glljc ELEANOR PARROTT Kappa Delia

Blacksburc.

Soiorily;

sponding Secrelary

Member

Class;

I.

Cunningham Literary Sociely;

of

R. K.;

V.ce-Presidenl

Fourth

of

Virginma

Corre-

Year

1911-1912;" Assistant Business Manager of focus,

of Student Committee.

Track Team;

Southwest Virginia Club;

1913;

D.

Treasurer Cunningham Lilerary Soclely;

Kindergarlen;

Love Set Tennis Club;

Cotillion Club;

Benedictine.

ETHEL LEIGH PEDIGO

BtuEFtELo,

Mu Omega;

Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority;

German Club; Colillion Club.

Nonpareil Tennis Club;

I.

R. K.;

West

Virginia

Cunningham Lilerary Society;

Reporter Cotillion Club. Spring. 1913;

Leader

Ruffner Debating Sociely.

Junior Debater;

1913;

Fall.

D.

JOSEPHINE PHELPS

Lynchburg. Virginia

ALMA POINDEXTER

Lynchburg. Virginia

Lynchburg Club;

Normal League;

W.

Y.

C. A.;

Critic

Cunningham Literary

Society.

1913.

CAROLYN POPE

Drewryville.

Recordmg Secrelary Club;

Cotillion

Athenian

Lilerary

Southampton

President

Vice-President Love Set Tennis Club. Assistant Lileiary

Society,

1913;

1913-1914;

Editor of the Focus.

Reporter

1912-1913.

Club.

1912-1913;

Glee

Athletic

Association;

Sociely.

1912-1913;

German

Club.

1913-1914;

II

Debating Sociely,

Vice-President Cunningham Literary Society. 1913-'914;

1912-1913;

Colillion

President

Club;

Lynchburg 1913;

Sociely.

President

Team, 1912-1913; 1913;

Club;

German

1912-1913;

Club.

Librarian

Lynchburg. Virginia Cotillion

Pierian

Club;

Literary

Corresponding Society,

1914;

Captain Senior Basket-Bail Team,

Nonpareil Tennis Club;

Alpha

Treasurer

Glee Club.

Side Center Junior and Senior Basket-Bali Teams.

Secretary

Captain

1913-1914;

Pierian

Junior

Sorority;

Literary

Basket-Bali

Intersociety Debater.

Dramatic Club.

FRANCES HARRISON PRICE Alpha Sigma

Virginia

Recording Secretary Cunningham Literary

1914;

WILBURN PRIBBLE -V:

Ballad Club.

Troutville.

President Jefferson

Virginia

1913;

Team;

Reporter Jefferson Lite.ary Sociely;

BELVA POTTER

JESSIE

Club.

Track

1913-1914;

Farmville. Virginia Delta;

Cunningham

Literary

Sociely;

Glee

Club;

Colillion Club.

LOUISE PULLIAM President

Kodak Club;

Saleivi.

Reporter Roanoke Club.

Virginia


Virginian

^Si;fjc

EVELYN GARRETT PURCELL B. E. A. N. S.;

Schuyler, Virginia

Secretary Normal League, 1912-1913;

1913-1914;

Reporter Athletic Association,

1912-1913;

Glee Club, 1913;

Y.

W.

1912-1913;

Censor Argus Literary Society, Vice-President Albemarle Club,

C. A. Social Committee, 1913-1914;

MARY FRANCES PUTNEY Argus Literary Society; Society,

Farmville, Virginia

President French Club.

Black Cat;

Debating Society;

Historian

of

1912-1913;

Class,

1914;

Dramatic Club; Secretary

Argus

Jefferson

Literary

1912-1913.

BESS RITER

Graham, Virginia

MINNIE RIDGEWAY

Roanoke. Virginia

VIOLA RIDGEWAY

Roanoke, Virginia

CONSTANCE HICKEY RUMBOUGH Second

Ballad Club.

Vice-President

Pierian Literary Society, Jefferson Society;

Pierian

Literary

Society,

Corresponding

1913;

President Lynchburg Club,

1914;

Treasurer of

Lynchburg, Virginia

German

1913-1914;

Secretary

of

Vice-President

Club, 1913-1914.

LUCILE SCAFF

Oceana, Virginia

JOSEPHINE CRAMER SHERRARD Argus Literary Society;

Crozet. Virginia

Albemarle Club.

ADDIE SNOW

Wicomico Church, Virginia

ANNIE SNOW

Wicomico Church, Virginia

MARGARET FRANKLIN SNOW

Wicomico Church, Virginia

Class Prophet.

MORRIS SPENCER

Hampton, Virginia

MARY MOORE STONEBURNER

Edinburc, Virginia

French Club.

ANNIE RUDD STONE

Rustburc, Virginia

ADELAIDE CATHERINE STORM Corresponding

Secretary

Cunningham

Hampton, Virginia Literary

Debating Society.

18

Society;

Recording

Secretary

Ruffner


IK^^fjc lIFir^intan MARY GARY TAYLOR Gamma

Thela;

Accomack,

Secretary Senior Glass. 1914;

Eastern Shore Virginia Club;

focus,

Junior Debater,

1913;

W.

to

Y.

C. A. Conference

at

Richmond,

1913;

Delia;

1913;

at

B.

Argus Literary Society;

Critic

E.

A. N.

S.;

Assistant

Corresponding Secretary Y.

W. W.

Business

Manager

C. A.;

Delegate

Blue Ridge, 1913;

Delegate

to

1912-1913;

Business

Manager of

Dramatic Club.

Y.

C. A. Convention

Virginian.

the

ALMA THOMAS Alpha Delta

Virginia

President

Buchanan, Virginia Athenian

Pi;

Literary

Corresponding

Society;

Secretary

of

Athenian

Literary Society.

HAZEL THOMPSON

MARY

Camp

Ashland, Virginia

TRAYLOR

VIRGINIA

Fire Girls;

Farmville.

MARY TREVILLIAN LILLIAN

Eastham. Virginia

MASSENBURG TROTTER

Lynchburg, Virginia

Assistant Editor-in-Chief of the Focus, 1913; Society.

1913;

Society,

1914;

MARY

T.

Argus

President

W.

1913-1914;

Critic

C. A. Cabinet;

TURNBULL

Literary Society,

1913;

Argus

Literary

Lynchburg Club;

Lawrenceville, Virginia

Mu Omega;

1913;

Reporter

Tennis Club;

Fangs;

Recording

Treasurer Fourth Year Class, 1911-1912;

Glee

Club,

Reporter French Club. 1911-1912; pareil

Society.

Cotillion Club.

Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority; Class.

Literary

Corresponding Secretary of Argus Literary

Chairman Music Committee Y.

Dramatic Club;

Virginia

Jefferson Society.

1912-1913;

Junior Debater;

Athenian

Vice-President Junior

Vice-President

President French Club. 1912;

Ruffner Debating Society;

Secretary

Glee

Club,

Cotillion Club;

1913;

Non-

Track Team.

MARY TYUS

Stonv Creek, Virginia

MARY MARGARET UMBERGER Jefferson Society;

Ivanhoe. Virginia

Treasurer Jefferson Society,

1913;

German Club;

"Saints";

South-

west Virginia Club.

SADIE MARGARET UPSON

Vinton. Virginia

Roanoke Club

LUCILE CATHERINE WILLIAMS Glee Club;

Junior Basket-Bail

Team;

Culpeper, Virginia Ellen H. Richards' Club.

19


;

lIFirginian^S

^f2<^

CORINNE MARGARET WESCOTT Baskel-Ball Team, 1913-1914;

Mappsburg, Virginia

Eastern Shore Club.

EMMA WEBB

Emporia, Virginia

Athenian Literary Society.

MARGARET AMORY WILSON Athenian Literary Society;

KATHERINE II

A;

Newport News, Virginia

French Club;

Senior Basket-Bali

Team.

WOODWARD

F.

Kindergarten;

Lynchburg, Virginia

Argus Literary Society;

Lynchburg Club.

B. E. A. N. S.;

FLORENCE MAY WELLS Y.

W.

Lynchburg, Virginia

Lynchburg Club;

C. A.;

German Club;

Missionary Committee;

JOSEPHINE WHITE V.ce-President

Senior

Censor

Class;

Argus Literary Society, 1913-1914; Vice-President Y.

1912-1913;

Student Committee;

vention;

Ballad Club.

Red Argus

Literary

1912-1913;

Society,

President Albemarle Club;

W. C. A.; Delegate W. A. N. K.; Ballad

to

the

Club;

Hill.

Virginia

Treasurer

Reporter Dramatic Club,

Richmond Biennial ConB. E. A.

N. S.;

Delta

Sigma.

ELIZABETH ECHOLS WALKUP Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority; 1910-1911;

Committee,

1910-1911;

Gala.

Argus Literary Society;

Censor

Glee Club;

Argus Literary Society,

Secretary Glee Club,

Treasurer

Jonesville, Virginia

Southwest Virginia Club;

Jefferson Society;

Ellen

H. Richards' Club.

GRACE LOUISE WELKER

Norfolk, Virginia

Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority; 1912-1913;

Literary Society,

1914;

Ballad Club;

Winner

1913;

Ruffner

Critic

Editor-m-Chief of the Focus. 1913-1914;

President

Debating

1914; Vice-President Cunningham Cunningham Literary Society Midwinter Term. 1913Dramatic Club 1913-1914; Glee Club;

Track Team;

Society,

Writer of Class Will;

of the Focus Cup, 1914.

First

S.

S.:

Scribblers;

Benedictine;

Honor Midlothian, Virginia

Sigma Sigma Sigma; Society;

Exchange Editor

Literary Editor of Virginian,

ROCHE WATKINS Literary

Class,

1911-1913.

BONNIE MAE WYGAL

of Focus,

Virginia

Student Government

1910-1911;

Junior Vice-President Student Association,

Treasurer

Ruffner Debating Society;

King's

Court

Benedictine;

Tennis

Club,

F? A»N— G !S

!

!

1912-1913;

1912-1913; ?.

Athenian

Cotillion

Club;


l^irginian'

'Qi(l^

Rules ECAUSE

of the terrible afflictions and ordeals

hands of those awful

the

tyrants,

the

we have

who

ment, and out of consideration of those

suffered at

Home

Faculty and

realms of torture, discomfort, and uneasiness of conscience, it

only just and right to hand

down

may bask

the hard

hand of Fate

will bear

warm

iRuIc0 30 to

I.

If

they obey them strictly

sunshine of Faculty approval;

not,

if

upon them.

you know nothing about your

If

1.

the

in

the

we deem

to the future generation of green-

horns the following rules and regulations. they

Depart-

come within

are to

Cla0srooms 'Tis easier to look wise

look wise.

lesson,

than to act wisdom.

When

2.

the teacher

on your tablet or playing

you know

"Bon Matin, Mademoiselle," and

take

when

4. talk,

If

it

you know how a

keep on talking 5.

If

you are

—

1.

Don't

try to

to sell

it,

2.

that

lift

depart with

French you learned

begins

in

—

Hygiene,

trying fortunes

in

French

"Au

class.

revoir,"

at school to tell

and

Greet she'll

you what

you'll be sure to miss

start

it,

much

and make up

train

it.

the rest;

only

in a basket,

open your mouth

easier on your audience.

Rule0 ^i0ccUancou0

your radiator to sweep under

single

we own

and can't carry a tune

the result will he

Uncle Robert

get

Never walk

^

a music class

in

ready

know

in

the teachers give a great deal of credit for bluff

II.

will

the

looking at a French time-table abroad

and punch your neighbor;

get

always diversion

all.

Never depend on

Advice: to

is

with your next-door neighbor.

Find a few familiar expressions and always use them

3.

your teacher with think

becomes boring, there

tit-tat-toe

file

to

move

downtown;

the town. 21

it

go

it;

it

is

too heavy.

When

you

for you.

six abreast, so the citizens

of Farmville


.

'^fl^ 3.

If

soup

shows training 4. fall

on the

If

at

you

IS

served for dinner, always

spill

2.

is

a gurgling sound

coffee on the cloth, butter a piece of bread

spot, buttered side

This

make

down,

so

it

will stick good.

No

the

There was once

Now

whole room 4.

If

It

and accidentally

let

it

spot.

Rules RegarDing Liliratp

a sacred place and must be treated with reverence.

First see that the Librarian

has changed.

eating.

one will ever see the

is

seated at the desk and occupied.

ately glide into the reading-room, seize all the interesting magazines

3.

when

home.

III.

1

Wirginiaxi

joins

and

Then immedisit

upon them.

a reading-room maintained here, but the object of this

room

placards are found hanging about containing these words, "Talk and

you;

read and you are

in a class

you hear a rap from the desk, rap back.

by yourself."


ICTir^inian

gllje

THE SAGE BUSH Speda Facuhna

A

RAMBLER

Gas Plant

family, with heavy, hard branches, long spellers, and poisonous bark. Occasionally found in Stoney Places. In planting, lake care lest some Rice be found Mix (ed) .n with the seed. If not thoroughly worked, results w,ll be disappointing. All The through the year on the twigs will be found Joke Berries resembling each other greatly. most prominent of these is the Chestnut Joke Berry, discovered during the Mill Age. Every plant has of

ihe

enemy, so beware of the Bugg. Such enemies to plants are great water lovers, and this one may be discovered about Wells. Science tells us that this enemy belongs lo the order ( ), one characteristic being its means of attack by Pecking. The Lecturea Historia is a well-known species, as statistics show. The buds or flowers in this class are late appearing sometimes. If this Lecturea Historia is cut too often, the markings will be low on the branch. If cut once or twice, a side growth, known as censury plant, appears. Such its

is

in a

way

to

Jar

Man

to his senses;

ONE OF He

but

still

it

is

For Man's good.

LIFE'S LITTLE

TRAGEDIES

drew her to him. and deliberately struck her. She made Again, and yet again, the brute repeated the blow, and still she

seized her,

no

sign

of

anger,

suffering.

But

when,

rapidly increasing fourth time, she

with

he struck her for the shrieked aloud, and her head blew

She

n>as only

a match.

off.

r

g;


lITir^inian'

gifjc

A OW

Chronicle of

it

came

report

1

M And

Now, goodly

to pass in the time of

the

great

learning

And

throughout the land of Av. ten of the children of

And when

\

Av

of

Namraj, King of Lamron, that

behold, an hundred fourscore and

they had

come

into

the

they and

land,

all

their

spy out the coun-

to

about them.

among themselves, "Behold the land of Lamron. we may find rest from our labors, free from those who

Is

it

not a goodly

did urge us on our

they pitched their tents in Lamron.

the inhabitants of

territory,

a

arose and journeyed hence.

worldly goods, they rested for a time and began try

And

tfiat

was noised abroad

people

they said

place, for here

journey?"

of

Lamron

so

Lamron had

and

settled themselves in the plains

that the strangers within

their

gates must needs

in the

more

abide in the hilly

regions.

Then Namraj,

And when "It

my

is fitting

people.

the King, gathered together all that

they were

had journeyed

to his

kingdom.

come he stood before them and spake unto them, saying: should give unto you a name by which you shall be known among

all

that

I

Henceforth you

preted, the ijounger, because

shall be called the tribe of Sroinuj,

you come but now

into a

new

which

is,

being inter-

country.

"I do beseech you, oh, tribe of Sroinuj, that you waste not your time

m

idleness,

neither spend your father's substance in riotous living.

"Arise, and get you to some trade.

And

straightway,

when

Choose you what course you

they had chosen, they 24

set to

work each

will pursue."

to his

appointed task.


:

^6^^c lUirgmian' And

came

it

pass

to

in

month of

the eighth

the sojourn in

Lamron, when they had

defeated the giant called Math, and had cast from them the Spirit of Idleness, that the rulers of the

land assembled themselves together and said unto the tribe of Sroinuj

"Forasmuch

your work has been well pleasing

as

we

given unto you, shall

will give unto

you now a new name

as a sign of our

And

were

the hearts of the people

good

And

filled

to the

with rejoicing.

few days,

In a

when,

who had

to

Lamron.

together, they

saw

departed there had returned only an hundred and

that out of the multi-

thirty

and

six.

Nevertheless, they straightway set to work, and they said one to another:

who

choose from our midst a leader, one

And when

they had cast

same who had been

came

to

and immediately

Now,

the

shall guide us

behold the one

lots,

pass that about the

this

who

cried,

stood before them

"We

Now

this tribe

was an hundred and

fourscore and seven, and the

tribe of Sroinuj

waxed exceedingly the

bold, and

same day

that

Now,

it

lo,

the

there

was added unto

that

And So the

return

Renyoc was an

whose

interpreter of dreams, for

them

their

and straightway

dreams.

the

But Renyoc

was a man of few words and exceeding modest.

from henceforth peace reigned

the time passed quickly,

unto me." lo,

was

pride

led the battle-cry of this people.

in

Lamron.

Namraj again said unto them: land from which you have come, but when you have rested

returned,

their

the ranks of the Sroines another,

same who had many times

happened

waver,

hearts of the Sroinuj.

in the

Sroines did beseech him that he should explain declined, for he

so that the hearts of the

they went forth to give battle.

midst of the battle their confidence did

shaken, and there was great sorrowing

And

was Airam,

great rejoicing

have chosen wisely."

number an hundred and twoscore and twelve,

name was Renyoc,

was

sound of battle was heard throughout the land.

number of

in

there

time another tribe of Sroinuj had invaded Lamron,

Sroines were in

Howbeit,

"Let us

on through our sojourn here."

the leader of the tribe of Sroinuj.

and with one accord they

the Sroines,

It

set out

due season, the summer was gone and winter was again upon them,

in

But when they had assembled themselves

among

being

it

land from which they had come, each

behold they did betake themselves back again

to

You

favor.

own home.

to find his

the

in

which we have

the statutes

be caller Sroines, the older, the mature."

decreed that they should return again

tude

Namraj, and

the sight of

in

and that thou hast kept

the sight of the rulers of this country,

And

"Get you back

until

there seven

immediately they did as they were bidden,

they had clothed themselves in fine raiment.

days,

and when they


—

Sr^c lIFir^inian' And saying,

straightway the other tribes were

"Let us also journey

saying:

jealousy,

"Tarry awhile;

And

yet again

the time

is

not yet

to

filled

with envy and some spake out their

Emoh.

But

"

the

others

restrained

them,

come."

Namraj assembled before him

his

chosen tribe and he gave unto

each a parchment, saying:

"This give

I

unto you that

all

men may know

of your

good deeds

the land of

in

Lamron.

"Now my

get

you out

into every part of

Av

and teach

the people that

which

I

and

people have shown unto you."

As

they departed some were loud with rejoicing, but others hung their heads, and

came up and blinded them.

tears

And Now,

from henceforth they dwelt no more the rest of the acts of the Sroines

in

and

Lamron. the mighty

works that they did, behold,

are they not written in the second book of the Chronicles of the Children of

which

is,

Lamron?

being interpreted. Black Beaut}).

Mary Putney.



Martin Boyd Coyner Honorary Member Class 1914


gl^f^e

l^ir^inian' MARGUERITE LAKE ARCHAMBAULT According lo our Dramatic Club part this young lady can play, and •I

director, that's

there's

the

only one

overdone

pari.

You see. Marguerite must ArchaMBAULT and blame

be natural. But look at the word it on thai! Besides being quite lalcnted in art, and known for her drawings, she sings, acts, and has command of a most wonderful vocabulary, and, consequently, a "Pen." In fact, her friends are trying to persuade her lo run a race with the honorable Daniel Webster, but her only answer is, "You Mephislophelian wretch, I'd rather take a header into the blue empyrean of oblivion."

—

DOROTHY' AVERY CJDoT "has

a capacity for" looking wise. and

we have found

that she really "nose" a lot. Every one except the librarian appreciates Dot's voice. When she is not running errands for Miss Rohr she IS sleeping. She is always ready to go downtown, and she is so kind hearted that she never likes to worry

Home Department enough to get pernlission. She always to bed at ten o'clock, except when she n.ghtly calls on Permelia across the hall.

the

goes

GEORGE BAILEY CJNot GeORCIe, if you please, because that makes her perfectly furious! However, it is her nature never to remam angry very long. Although she is frequently overcome by fanciful freaks I

of her imagination, that often verge on driving the

Home De-

to distraction, she is a delightful poet. She is not rather nighlmarcv. a bit dreamy; Like the ideal, true poet, she is a lover of Mother Nature, 'and spends a good part of her

partment

time conning with the dear old

29

Dame when

not on the campus.


S^^c lITir^inian' LUCILLE BALDWIN

qBm

honorary member would stand at the however, she stands far above hit though she ab us all And is not yet out of her teens, shi is by no means "green" as reading the you might think. Just the oth day I caught h Times DUpalch ,d saw over her shoulder, m in glarmg headP Then see lines, "Are Y( 1 Thinking of Going Abroad id?" Mr. Bowman! But possibly that gentlem ^•ill save her the trouble of loot ng him up who knows This much Tm lever looks her up will b certain, that whoeve 3re than satisiied kind to her. with what he finds. The gods have indeed b the ige who said, "Vanity is the and she is as frank for

Lucille

age

foot of his

cl

height;

fact, she stands

in

of smaller souls."

ANNIE BANKS wee maid in o Who is known by her fri( Though she's not much fo There

She's

And

i:

;

a

le arned

fo

r

facts

nds,

Bannie Yanks;

and wise,

we

all

sei

k

Annie Banks.

MARY MOYLAN BANKS ^Once long ago, during the days of MoylaN heard that a certain wise man

her youthful existence, .had said, "Much study

a weariness of the flesh!"— and she has never disputed the But she hasn't needed to her brains came truth of the maxim. is

to her rescue upon every necessary occasion to save the day and her reputation as "some stude." Then, too, she is one of

whom the Seniors may well be proud. it is easy to deduce that she is a generally all-round kind of a damsel, and she is, too, thoroughly attractrve and a jolly good fellow! the basket-ball stars of

So

30


'^(l<i

1{Fir^inian' REBECCA BANKS •JSmall of

dark of complexion and eyes, but bright and radiant in smiles and happiness is our Rebecca. Come what may. she smiles even through tears. Never did one little body contam so much life, conscience, thought, knowledge, enthusiasm, and mischief. ^X'hen Philosophy is mentioned, however, the mischief-making eyes light up, then take on a serious look, and Rebecca is ready for a good argument. Regardless of what the world may think, she has opinions of her own, and she will stand up for them, too. She is always in a hurry; she is never known to walk, but runs for everything— knowledge as stature,

well as material things.

DOROTHY BATTEN Dot,

known

as Pumps, is the companion piece to When first seen at S. N. S. it was always a question of which is Shoes and which is Pumps; but then we often get our shoes on the wrong foot. Please tell us what II

also

Shoes.

Dot, for if you're not downtown you're and if you are not in the hall you're in not in Wade's well, you're walking with Shoes. I just believe you're naturally bright, and you really display quite an amount of "boss sense. are your study hours. loafing

in

the

Wade's, and

hall,

if

you're

— "

FLORENCE BATTLE fl

Florence has

a "Nature

Study" craze, much

to the surprise

of her classmates. Most girls don't like to take such long walks and fool with grasshoppers and all kinds of insects, but Florence does. She follows Miss Blackiston cheerfully over hill and dale, over and under barb-wire fences, wades through rivers and climbs trees. Her only regret is that "Little Hatlie" can't be with her. Florence is quiet, but always ready for a joke and a good lime. The "Stoney Way" is her only dread for the rest of her life.

31


gJT^c

lIFir^inian" PHYLLIS BAYLEY <I"Gish" came lo us last year from Lawrencevllle and acquired fame immedialely, for she roomed on Infirmary Hall. There is never a midnight feast, parade, or anything of the kind

she

that

is

not the

first

to

be greeted with the question:

"Phyllis, have you been out of your room?" And just as regularly as she rings the bell, Mrs. Slater has to hunt until she finds her hiding in somebody's clothespress, or resting comfo.lably on the air between the bed and the wall. Her decided preference for sitting on the front row has won for her the title "Front Row Gish," hich will slick as long as we know her. But if there is o thing she likes better than silting on the front row it is— b, If she has only three cents left she will stop at some fruit stand and spend two of them f ihree lovely bananas, and then go to Blue's and get two m( = for the other penny. After she has all the bananas 1

"

she ca.

get,

That

happy. with

she needs only one thing to make her thoroughly is the Victrola. She is in her place to hear that

egularily that

always the

exceeded only by the

is

rising bell,

and

to !e

last

RACHEL SEAL <J"I chatter, cl lo lalk on eve a suffragelte leadel old maid schoolmH' little

Fairy

her heart.

in

If

she has them

leady

to

you]

you

fo:

lend a hel

is

I

go."

That's "Peanuts"

We

— always ready

wonder whether she

will

be

'^''omen," or an Her eternal question is, "Have you a )me?" as that is a subject always near for It to know the latest jokes, find her, 'ith

a cry,

'"Votes

for

noon and night. "Peanuts" is always hand to the fellow who is down.

,

CRISPIN BERGER ^If

being

gentle

and sympathetic

will

teacher, Crispin will surely have success.

being

aid

one

in

Her

love

and under-

a

standing of little children makes her especially fitted for the kindergarten work she has chosen. Her playing and her deep love and appreciation of music show that she has the true By musician's soul. Crispin likes to peer into the future. means of cards or the palm, she reads your fate like a veritable little gypsy. She is very small. According to Crispin, might does not lie in height.


'^fl<i

Wirginlan MARTHA f Martha

BILL

a fickle heart winner. The saying is thai once she wins a heart she cares no more for it, and several girls almost decided to leave school because she would not return iheir

is

Almost— we

love.

said

instead

for

they

stayed

and

helped circulate the report that Martha is fickle and too independent. Still, she is a good sort of girl, and would shine in academic work, if she could be made to realize that Domestic Science is not the only thing here worth while.

CLAIBORNE BOULDIN "A

d.aughter

of the gods, divinely

One,: a student came

Cam e

to

Now

how much

see

year

the

is

tail

for schooling;

and most divinely

came prepared

to

fooling she could do, and then

almost

over,

and we

all

have drear

clover;

But

that

Whe n

Senior,

she

ere

entered

we she

lose

her,

let

us

speak of her

dreaming— full

was

of

jokes

pranks was teeming

Now

alas!

,

we

look to her

to

adore, but her eyes are

st:

ing.

For

in

She Here 's

Training School (she to

you,

is

no longer dreaming),

Claiborne

IDA HELEN BOWLES qiDA

the Cardwell High School, a little, When she first landed she looked death of everything and everybody she saw, and everybody thought "the cat had her tongue," but she has come out wonderfully during her slay at S. N. S. (Mother always said she would send Ida to a Coming-out School.) And now she is ready to return home with a heart full of noble desires and a head crammed with psychological truths. JS.

n-eyed

like

she

slip

fr,

of a

was scared

to

girl.


g^^c lIFir^inian' MARIA BRISTOW qMy! Jack

What

of

all

But she didn't gel a forehead! trades? No! Master of all

ll

for nothing.

trades.

Her

compare with the wide range of the lOc store, from a box of tacks to a trimmed hat, from a fire builder to editor of the focus. Does she keep up with the limes? Well, if you mean being progressive, she does. The bandana is her flag and abilities

"Teddy"

is

her hero.

LYNETTE BROCK <I"Just

'cause

'Nette's

little

we

laugh

at

her."

Really,

she

pounds while Training School. She is good natured, as all of us know, and she has an extra picture in the Annual She can sing, too, and is one of the leaders in to prove il. Her favorite class is "gym," because she the Glee Club. thinks that probably she may fall off a little if she takes regularly. Of all the popular songs she thinks "Annie Laurie" isn't so

is

big as she used to be, because she lost Iwo

was leaching

she

in

the

the most beautiful,

by her

singing

it

all

the

time,

and

living with

it

side.

LEE BROOKS She came to us as an eighthgrade one, and now you can see how students can bluff. She's It Yes, life to her is an ideal dream. a Senior— a dreamer. easier, though, to get an interview with Woodrow Wilson is When once she than to get her attention when dreaming. awakes from these dreams all is bright and sunny, for she is

qShe

has grown with the school.

She is rather slow, loo, in making very fond of a good time. her friends, but when once gained she is ever true and loyal to Regardless of these qualities, we are sure she will make them. an excellent pedagogue and labor diligently for the cause. 34


a

STfjc

lITir^inian' MARIE BROWN <I"BoAz" Eating

hal

bright

her

is

and

occupation,

f

"Pear

without

She

a

,s

especially cone

and she has "the mildest

from the Magic City, and she's hardly ever seen Crank on many subjects, !0AZ is always ready to help. and the gentlest heart." nerry

KATHLEEN STEELE BROWNING

IJust an adorable lump of humanity "the opposite of dreamy, she laughs at sentimental woe; her eyes are always bright and beamy." She is wonderfully clever, too. from making happy stump speeches to deluding a certain debonair professor into thinking that she

is a shark on civics (Behold!— our midst.) But at intervals she does take a keen being irresponsibly frivolous, never to the extent of Ing "Tuff," of just natural vivacity; and when she

marvel

in

delight

in

illy

do

:

pcarh of thought

'tis

time

up

to

nd take

notice.

MARY BRUCE CJMarv

From Florida, the land of the "fountain of youth." Hi befo have a day dreamer. One Id take her for a good listener during an interesting sation, but sh n't thinking about you her thoughts far away dreaming. Look into those mystical bl read the solution of the "mystery of all this lintellii

i

'Mary Jane" has she

is

three ch,

shy

:ht;

of

Scotch

de

Bobby Burns

;

but

terislics.

To

ho

are kn

to

th

to

those

who

those

her

I

nd adds to intelligence ed our iireatesl poels; apropos, Mary perhaps of her ancestors did


'^^<i

l^ir^inian' BESSIE

BUCHER

Bessie has ihe looks of a staunch suffragelle. Whether she happens to be one or not is of minor consideration, since she is one of those human encyclopedias and knows all the points on either side of the question. BESStE is good natured and kind hearted, and never seems to know when she is being imposed on. Because of this we fear that a great many people borrow her nature study notes after she has carefully written them up. Bessie may have the laugh on us in this case, however, because she knows that she knows, and knows that we do not know all that she knows, even if we do have her notes. (I

LILLIAN PAULETT

qWe

ha »e

pillar

of S.

fou rd

N

mate for Carrie

c

not

S.,

necessarily

BUGG Hudgins.

sticks!

A

Two

solid

possessor

of

foremost among them being modesty. When No ah bui ih ark and called the animals two by two, Brother Noah said, the B ucc and th e ca nel side-stepped in. "Get a hump on you The camel did. but the BucG didn't. pen for what the And you can nc

many

qua

e

ties

1

'

didn't

LOUISE CARRINGTON that she is a lovable and left Charlotte, or the "Coal House," changed cars at Duck's Puddle, and LouiSE has always arrived in Farmville to abide at S. N. S. been noted for her wit. She has on hand a few bright statements to make on every occasion, and it is positively astounding to note the points which she usually makes in her witticisms.

<IHave

attractive

you

LouiSE

girl?

on September

already

guessed

4,

1912,

In her reviewing of past events we find her reading president our sixteenth connection with manuscripts in In the room directly above Louise's, r sides her (Lincoln) At all times we se the two one and only "case" Janette. nelodious together, and at evening one may often hear the Truly," "1 Love Yc chanting of their two favorite selections !

,

and "Love

Me

and

the

World

is

Mine."


gl^c lIFirginian (CATHERINE CARTER qMy,

She Is good natured, loo! Palm reading Kate is congo on a midnight feast, but of course she never goes. If she ever breaks a rule we are sure the Home Department would never survive the shock. ain'l she

and burning tinually

fat!

the midnight oil are her specialties.

planning

to

ALMA CARVER •I'Tis hard to gel round some people; 'tis hard to see through some people; but how much harder to get at some people. You can't be a battering ram and bombard some people, but

what can you do? life

Just gradually wait for them to unfold the within, as Frcebel would say. After you get that far with

Alma

you're

all

happy, laughing

at

right, this

and so is she. world of woe.

She's

carefree

and

GERTRUDE CHARLTON And

here is a girl, who, though very modest, yet possesses talent that has long since been discovered by the inhabitants of S. N. S. She sings— so 1 have been told— most sweetly, and likewise instructs the infant mind in the art of drawing. They say that when her temper's once aroused she is quite awe inspiring in her wrath, but her unfailing good nature has failed to disclose any of the symptoms of the indwelling tiger, and we believe that he is only a lamb, after all; at any rate, Gertrude has lots of friends. •5


STfje

Wirginion ALICE CLARKE

—

<!" "Little Clarks' merry chatterer, lovable and bright, even though she is about as big as a minute." This is what one of her friends wrote, and we confess we do not know how to

improve upon

it,

much.

Alice

But one little hint: Would you ever no intention whatever of teaching?

guess

that

Rumor

has answered the momentous "Just as soon as I graduate."

thus:

has

has

that

it

she

question

MARY CARNES qU

an like a streak of lightning and won day for the S at the Field Day exercises? Yes, the very one. And also the one that laughs on occasions when mirth is entirely out of place, .nd, also, most important of all vho shone as a housekeeper m in the eyes of many, the girl the Training School. With th ;e qualities, what can we expect but that she will leap into somi man's heart, laugh at him, protesting into obedience, and ther run his house to suit herself! she the

i

that

the

ETHEL CLEEK ^"A

—

long time ago. in the month of September" you know She telling a tale of long ago makes you think of Ethel. is a prim, little old-fashioned lady like our great-great-grandmothers were, and what is ihal some wise, modern sage said: "An old-fashioned girl in these days is a rare gem"?


f^c

ID^ir^inian KATHLEEN COUSINS <IThis

maid

has been endowed with a good-nalu.ed. sympalhetic disposition, and is a real "Cousin" Io all ot disposilion partly accounts for her excellence in the line of giggling. In vain she tries to suppress her "giggles" while in the act of playing huge jokes on the unsuspecting Lucile. Sometimes we wonder how she managed to persuade Madame Dignity to abide with her in the Training School, but this honorable madame could not bear the strain fair

jolly,

Her cheery

us.

and we find "Katrine" playing her same old role. It thought that she has a beau, for she sings from morn till night, 'tis always a "Carroll." and we wonder why but such are the mysteries of life. long, is

and

HOPE ALICE DADMUN q Behold! her

voice!

une gross Femina! But she needs Tennis is considered splendid exe

great deal of practice in this line, and a rough occasionally, she gives promise of lengthening.

it.

or look at

With a olT »nd tumble

EMILY DAVIS Emmy Lou!

Sounds

like some sort of a book we've heard 'What a pity that the author didn't have our Emmv Lou in d when she picked that mischievous character. She's the sort that lakes well with everybody, and from anybody too. of.

Its is her specialty along the "clep" line. 'With no harm meant, she was asked to write the focus' Fool's Calendar, and we must remember that to be a good fool is no small thing. have our doubts about Emmy and Williamsburg, because— whal is that saying about fools and wise men?

We

39


g^f?*^

Wirginian MARROW

DAVIS

say about a person when hardest knock we can we've only seen one side. harm man or beast. But it must

hard lo know what you can't knock thcin in some way. tjll's

give

is

terribly

that she

is

sided;

oile

Marrow

that

lo

The

is.

never was known to awfully tiresom. to be good, dignified, quiet, and willing So wake up, Marrow, and shock us just once by getting to class late. It would do us all good. be

to

?

do, all the time,

VIRGINIA LEE DAVIS Virginia ha s had many va ried e xpen ences a nd is always filled w th sta tlmg news, whi ch no thing could nduce her to tell. er most striking chara terisl c is that wh ch th e Educalional Depa tment calls the "inq iring turn o min d;" in other w ,rds. c uriosity. She is rathe r inc med lo tease, and so fond of jokes that she enjoys the m ev en wher she herself happens to be the victim. <11

i

H

GRACE DICKENSON <I to.

Grace

is

a girl who;

She makes an

ide al

just naturally loves to tell "things"

confide

Grace's chief

deli^

—

Morton, marvelous ir cidents about her one hobby This last-nam d character is none other than her little Junior. nephew unless he be an angel, as we are sometimes led to believe. Grace is a c onscientious, e; irnesi worker, and always manages to keep busy. Did any one ever see Grace when she offer a liberal didn't have some little duty to perfc rm? to

relate

—

We

reward for

this

information.


gr^e

Wrg'inlan HATTIE DICKEY qXo

look al Hattie S. N. S. a lillle g.il hair? What a diffe

ho lid believe that she came to a big bow of black ribbon on her time does make! With the black bow replaced by psy he, and dresses almost to the ground, It is no wonder that „_. admirations make the modest maiden blush. For Hattie receiived the vote for being the most modest the

in

and was

class,

much persuasion and placed by often

that

that

misleading,

Hattie

ilh

ce

modest and her own which she uses ,nd s

is

so

overpowered

that

consented

have her picture taken

o

si

shia

to

of o ur Senior Man. in th is case they are

it

was only

Though quite

after

statistics

true.

are

Why,

retiring that she has a

knock peculiarly her friends' doors so they can come her if th 1 is full of people, and yet lodesly availeth ich, for to be Hattie's friend

yet— her

considered

small thing.

3

i

,

MARY ROSALIE DORNIN <IMary Rosalie Dornin

or

"M. D."— she

wil

either— calls Lynchburg her home, but her heart m Bristol. is very much interested in the lives of wise and obie men especially Earls. Although voted the t loafer in the Senior Class, "M. D." has often been kn 3 study Civics. She is nothing if not talented, and we ex| her name numbered with those of the great artists. She not admit her genius along this line, but that's modesty, in which i

She

l

quality

she

nowise

is

bounded, and double chin.

all

S.

lacking.

N. S.

"M.

D.'s"

will miss her

popularity

is

not

happy gurgles and her

MARY ESTELLE DRINKARD <IBy way of

MoLLYE is no belter than the best the worst. What more than a happy could be expected from a spoiled child? "I can't stay at this place," and "The Training School will end my career," are her favorite complaints. On the other hand, there is a side to MollVe's nature that desires expression in other fields than those purely academic. She dotes on a back seat in class, and has exhibited rare talent and skill for drawing hearts on the desk during Psychological discussions. Nothing gives her more amusement than a long talk on the keeping of a cozy home. Doubtless she will some day acquire her heart's desire, for she has more than one bachelor brother. and

no

medium

worse

of

II

introduction.

than

virtue


gEf^c

lirir^inian' LOBELIA DRINKARD head manager of the firm, "Drinkard Brothers." On becoming a Senior she has comprehended the significance of the term by assuming quite a grown-up air. No longer does she bemoan that "she can't get the hang of the thing." Strange to relate, she has a wonderful interest in the advancement of Agriculture. Her knowledge on the subject is marvelous. She can tell you all about the application of capillary attraction to farming; and such things as the formula for Bordeaux Mixture seems to have been a native tendency. The world will yet be shocked with some new theory that she will propound. As further evidence of her interest in the ÂŤj)

Billy

is

welfare

of

suffragette

monial

humanity,

movement.

bureau

for

the

she is thoroughly interested in the ambition is to establish a matriunappropriated, unadmired, S. N. S.

Her

spinsters.

PERMELIA DUGGER CJPermelia entered school in 1910 so young that she was stunted in growth. Her good spirits have won her many admirers here, but she does not care much for girls, she says, because she admires strong characters. Although always ready for any escapade that may come up, she at times spends weeks upon the campus, while she pays strict attention to work.

LOCKY EMILY DELP •JLocKY came

Farmville January, 1912, on the train that runs only once a week from Grayson County. She took up her abode in "The Old Maids' Inn," and surely she has done to

much credit to the Inn. Locky certainly did get into deep water when she came to the '"Wells" in the second grade. My! but those children had to walk a straight line for "MisS DelP." The greatest thing about Locky's personality was that she was always "on the job" when you needed any help, such as getting hooked up, and other small matters. She is naturally conscientious and serious (as all old maids are), and has raised the morals of this institution quite perceptibly.

42


'^^<i

lITir^inian MALIN EVANS whose avoirdupois is only equaled by liei good nature, came to us from South Boston two years ago. MaliN holds a leather medal for being the laziest girl in the Senio. Class— and would undoubtedly allow a mosquito to sting her to death before fatiguing herself by raising her hand to kill qiVlALIN,

the

offending

We

insect.

to come She has expressed her

enough energy

then stop foreve, more, but

be well equipped

to

imagine

can't

Stale

the

to

how

she

ever

raised

Female Normal School.

teach school one year and haven't a doubt but ihal she will

desire

to

we

pick flowers off a century plant.

VIRGINIA FIELD *l|VlRClNtA FtELD, H hose ;e stock of kn knowled ithto be out bounds, came to from Emporia, in which town, rumor has It, she posted a 1 similar to the following: -Wanted—

Some one have done

amount of

disturb

to it,

h.

r

self-complacency." for

she

still

No

possesses

a

one seems

to

considerable

She walks with an

and talks with an air, and /hen she asks you a question, combining with it a characteristic lilt of her chin, you may be very sure there'll be no stopping her until she has had it factorily. No one appreciates a good joke more than she, and the only weakness we know to accuse her of is that of concealing "midnight feasters" in her wardrobe. (Other points, and good ones, may be gotten from a close study of her the self-sar

material.

air,

picture.)

ESTHER FORD qShe

swears that this pictun IS not half as good looking as she is, but be assured, gentle eader, ihat ihis is nol Esther's fault, for she made no less th n six trips to the photographers, with a total of sixteen sitlin"" Esther comes to us from Front Royal, Virginia, and she urely does have a hard lime getting she comes back to school from the holidays she misses not les than eight trains by about two and a half seconds. Ford is ar1 extremely familiar name around these parts, and in other plac too, it seems, for every day she gets two big, fat letters f way down yonder m Alabama. Esther's ab ity to sleep through any and everything, and a capacity to ea, m a.iiiu proportions, are recorded as wondrous happenings at the N lal. All in all, she's a wise :

1

'

old

girl,

and

h.

quite a

good deal.


g^ge ID^ir^inion' ETHEL FOX ÂŤI"Where're you

"Where on

from,

Ethel?"

"Washinglon,

Virginia."

And

she begins lo tell you of a country store and one church, even if It is 26 miles from the railroad. She has been here some time now, and by the process of evolution EtHEL has come lo be "Rooney." don't know why she should be "Rooney," unless it means that she has crawled out of that quiet shell to show us what she can do. Lung power! Well, I should say she has it. Just happen to pass by Third Grade and you'll see her manipulating with her pitch pipe and grabnice

lillle

earth

thai?"

is

burg, with

ils

usual

We

bing for atmosphere.

VIRGIE FULLER CJ'VlRCIE hails from Emporia, in Greensville, but, contrary lo the suggestiveness of the name, she is not at all green, for

which we are thankful, since we have had her presence at N. S. for two years. She is a loving and sympathetic ViRClE friend, but woe unto him lo whom she may be hostile.

S.

most respects a very courageous girl, but she will believe "spooks." In fact, some nights she can scarcely sleep for which rush into her imagination. However, we are hoping she will outgrow this trait as she grows older. The day is already fast coming when she will see the ludicrous side of this situation, as she sees it under all othei trying circumstances. is

in

in

the frightful apparitions

CARRIE GALUSHA qRun giggles.

for

the doctor,

Who

is

it?

quick!!! say

You

Somebody it

has a case of the

Oh!

CarRIE GalUSHA?

is

Let me give you a chronic with her. Look n/ mischief hint; that is, if you are contemplating any mischief for Carrie; she's sure lo be around wh. o a military school f you You'd think she had been to hand. don't worry,

then,

it's

i

l

saw her sway back.

One

thing

Carrie's people insist in think that's a predicament, isn't it? 'l-I

wee

cai can't

Carrie's

understand all

light."

i

5

that

Now


gifjc

lO^ir^inian' ELIZABETH GILDEA Elizabeth soon made

herself k,now.n in her chisses by her argumentative frame of m ind. the She is generally kilOWI spokesman of her c lass. since she haIS that "ner\'y" way of saying what s he thr.nks or. all occaisio ns. dec ided She ha. view on every sub,e<:l und.er the sun a nd is ever re'ad^y to start an argument. ELtZABETH would ma,ke her fortune ,f sh e wi3uld •I

,

:

i

establish a

school

training

s

for

deba ters

GERTRUDE GILLIAM <I

Behold

streak,

this

sings

and

tall

Hke

a

Gertrude knows

stately

bird

everything

suffraget

She

;!

talks

a

blue

quite independent, s (?) and worth kn iwing. and she is in

the possessor of many rare qualities (?). You know she independent by glancmg over the Sei ior statistics. Really, picture doesn't give one the slightest sight into Gertrude's personahty, but cant you see that she is a "perfect lady"? Gertrude can argue well, but has ne: ;r been known to be lact

IS

this

ii

:d,

since she

Try

obtait

ult

ally

her

RUTH GLEAVES qThis

fine specin

n of young

womanhood

is

a product of that

famous by the Aliens, but has shown such an e.xtent that we have bestowed of being our "Madame President of Student Government. Ruth is a whole-souled, lovable girl, with »ide circle of friends— else we would not have her as our sidenl. must confess, however, that she carries her jre worship to extremes, as is shown by her fondness for ,oks and Hills. hope that she will soon overcome this ikness and take her place as a leader in the great Woman's of Virginia Opposite tendencit upon her the hon pari

ade to

We

We

frage

M •15


TO*^ l^ir^inion' HAZEL GORDY Hazel! We find in her a balm and pinches of our school life. Her insight into and nature is deep and wonderful. That her intellect is gigantic may be proved by the Senior statistics. But. with all her wisdom and seriousness, she has a keen and unique sense of humor. She considers the "bungalow" style of architecture the most ideal. V. V.'s Eves she asserts to be the best American novel yet produced. ' She is an ideal friend!

f Here

our

is

llllle

witch.

for all culs

life

NAN GRAY ^Consider

of the

the lilu

—

they

field.

toil

not, neither

do they spin like fise with Nan. Yet Solomon, with all his wisdom, was not a on the way lo son "education test." you'd run up on a meek I don and lo vly figure with: "Honey. I'l ly crazy know a word about this test." In a f i\v days she'd be flaunting No explanalii in needed or given. Most a lest paper marked E. any time of the day or night you come upon a group of ""What wilt Nan girls lalkmg in stage whispers, and then: start next!" with an exclamation poi nl after it. Just ask the Home Department, especially the n ight matron, who has to can't feed her onions so she can find her in the night. The tale would be tell you much about her bodily activ ilies. too long and wearying, but she danc es like the wind, and on the basket-ball field her guard is wo rn and "hath a lean and hungry look;" she's some good pitch^ ir when she's not excited. t

;

We

FRANCES GUTHRIE <1|

Frances

id to such an extent that she gave orked hard enough at the basketJun rs and Seniors to get some reward. always happy. nd smiles continually so the dimple cheek will show Her chief characteristics are loafis

an

athlete,

game belween

Frances

m

is

her right

ing

and

Several

Study"

the

candy.

She

never

v

"H

she really took her of the shelf to study, but the

times off

half-hour

The

eating

i

She

herself appendicitis. ball

of

greatest

joking with friends joy of Frances' life

she can "rush" the

4(i

new

girls.

s

,J

known to study. Book of Nature It

was a pleasant ^.-to drop an Argus

who happened is

that she

is


—

'^fl<i

lIFir^inian' HATTIE HALL ^ There

no half-way business about Hattie: when she goes into a thing it is with her whole heart and soul, especially if i( is something that has got to be done. She'll be sure to do it well. She is studious, quiet but it is not always the is

;

person that talks most who iioes most. While she is a worker, she is fond of sports. On lovely warm days one may see Hattie wending her way, after school hours, to the tennis court or baskel-ball field to participate

LILLIE

m

the sports there.

HARMAN

Lexington a town teeming with Sc uthe rn ardor and fervor LiLLIE cam e with all-Soutl- ern patriotism of her native village deeply rooted in her nal ure. She WOl Id have Hved a l,fe of ease he re had she not had a roo mm ate who was a n equally ardent Yanke and vhose con /ers on LiLLEE cons idered her chief b lisiness n life. Many and fie ce were the b. Itles waoed. and vho kn ws wha wonders Lit. ,IE mighl have accomplished here had sh e not be en obliged to ise her lime lelhng of the exploit of Le andja ckson? CJStraighl

from

—

,

ROONEY HEATH qRoONEY

daughter of the Old South. With her and quaint face, she steps, as it were, from the ante-bellum days into the present. And RoONEY has decided to be a teacher, but in this world one never can lell. All we know is that she receives a great many large, square packages, and we are all invited to Room 85 afterwards. She also gels a suspicious supply of "Farmville dailies." but, of course, we are not called upon to share those as we do the candy. is

large blue eyes

47

a

true


gTf^c

Wirglnian LUCY HEATH "Ever

Pierian banner higher!" has been Lucy's olio ever since her arrival at S. N. S. Her ardor may be d as follows: "I live a Pierian and die a Pierian." If you should ask her what three things were nearest her heart she would answer, first, the Pierians; second, tennis; and third, ihe

raise

theories in leaching. You can not blame her for the since she can win a game over any man in the faculty, nor for her love of latest teaching theories, since her life in latest

tennis,

was a bed of roses. Dr. Stone early her air of a "born teacher," and was heard to do not know exactly what MlSS Heath is drivthat lesson, but 1 dare say it is one of the latest I can not keep up with them all as she can."

Training School

the

succumbed remark: ing

at

to

"I in

theories.

MARGARET HELM No, that's not the name of a sideshow, merely the epithet by which a brown-haired, brown-eyed who expecis lo make "that awful teaching" her life work, known. During several years at the Normal she was conLittle

[

Hell."

s,

is

victed three

HAZING! The Department

times of

last time, besides causing to be mortified, she also raused by an incensed rat throwing a tin pitcher across the room at her (and hitting her). One thing can be counted on when Hell is around— dull care is forced away. Maybe that's why people always are glad to see her

a

member

of

a

suffered

Home

the

swell

head,

MARGUERITE HETERICK qShe's

the

the

girl

They say you Sunny Jim

Virginia. in

other

way.

from can'

Marguerite's running when you eat sandwiches or but It's

well the

a great lo

thing

boriow.

teacher

-J8

when

h

unique

thai

see the

clair

first 1

a

burg,

town

pla

close

for a

n

the

:ond.

'Washingto

cows

beil

smiling line, 'Watch out

in yc you'll get crun^ though, and s( e of us would do step behind ambition was to keep o stepping to Hampden-Sidney to

smile,

Her


g^ljc

lITir^inian MARGARET MINER <I"Peg

My

o'

Heart" looks

petulant, but

she

Isn't.

She has

the most decided opinions unlike most women. But 'twould lake "all the king's horses" to make her express them sometimes. Some members of the faculty have been fortunate enough to extract her views on some questions— formal giammar. foi

Margaret

instance.

is

as true as steel

and her heart

scientious scruples,

PAULINE

is

to

her ideals and con-

pure.

HOWARD

•I"P0LLV" arrived in our midst just about the lime the cornerstone was laid. She hails from Southwest 'Virginia near the Allen outlaws. Now don't worry, for she neither an outlaw nor shows any symptoms of developing you may drop mto her room any Sunday morning and find this good "Puritan" snugly in bed, with the atmosphere teeming with the suggestion: "Don't wake me up, for I'm dreaming;" -^'es, dreaming, perhaps, of the laurels

abode of

the

resembles

into one,

she

for

win and as

to

IS

school,

as a

a

future

instructor

in

some

little

one-room

"community force."

ALICE HO'WISON to put Alice in a small paragraph: there luch of her. First, there Is her inqulsiliveness. bad you say > Yes. in some people, but not in Alice. Sh. as ks you questions with an air of solicitude. She wants lo V so she can help you. O. Henry says some people are to be heads, some hands, some shoulders; Alice is of the' she lulder type, and her young shoulders seem made to bear olhi burdens. Then, there is her dignity, so well shown, as Mr 5. Telfer, when she made her success in the Dramatic

qit

no easy task

IS

A

,

1

Clulb

1

Diay.

and

abillity,

Dramatic ability, you say? Yes, and singing managing and directing ability, for is she not

ng and directing what we hope will be the best Annual itten out by S. N. S.? And then there is— but we can't ^rything, but we refer you to Tux, and you ask her if just about the best person you can hope to find. t


a

g^fje

l^ir^inian' MARY MARGARET HUDDLE ^Huddle — just

the mention of the word brings up a menial young lady who used to sit m a rocking75 and either crochet, eat apples, or write lesson plans. Occasionally she varied the program by throwing a word of sarcasm at a chance visitor. Or, if one roomed on the hall with Huddle, the picture comes to mind, a rather sleepy-eyed, yet sleepy girl, with a towel on* her arm, toothbrush and cake of soap in her hands, rushing madly to the spigot after the breakfast bell had long since stopped ringing. What we most admire her for is her utter indifference to every

picture of a certain

chair

in

single thing.

CARRIE IRENE HUDGINS fickle little flirt to S. N. S., and smce then old "Cih" has been one of the pillars of the Normal, /en if she did gel here a few days after the cornerBright, vivacious and pretty, she has made stone Wi laid. many fri ids al school, and will long be remembered by everything there, from "Gyp" to Dr. Jarman. CI

In

1909 a "Gayle" blew a

;ver

SALLIE HURDLE At Psyche, rom the regions tha ar e holy la nd! al ways, n fire -escape r Lishes, in b urgl ar attacks breakfast. We often wo nder how there and righ in place. always it one with s o simple a nam e could ere ct s o noble a stru cture fat turnover. surnic on the cer =brum; Still, it ,s there— S ome imes we feel Ihal rounded o 1 all sides by nothing. ru shing 1 spasms. especially carr ed out hab, SaLLIE ha extracted he pearl of vonc erful oysters fro m whi :h she ha

qAh,

i

i

capacity to learn.


gTf^e

Wirginian NANCY JOHNSON <IIf you're ever in need of some one lo break the news gradually, gel Nancy! Bui there's one ihing sure, when she talks

makes you sil up and lake notice. Curiosity, like measles and mumps, generally makes its appearatice early in life, but, like these diseases again, a bad case may break out later in life. So it IS with Nancy. Brimming over with fun, and with no little common sense, she's dead attractive. she

MARY SHEPHERD JONES an ordinary name. Her teachers is That just gives Mary the jim-jams, call her MaRY Jones. because, for some reason or other, she hobbies on that Shepherd, so we do call her Mary Shepherd. Mary Shepherd first, she thi, ks ever ybody else is ha s Iw o ma n deff cts; br ghle than she is and seco nd, s he ust will let he r tongue

ll'Whew!

That surely

all

i

sli

ssing

th = te

If. Ihe latter m ght b termed obust specimen like you th nk Wei I'm here to er desf rves any symp athv ha ve mumps, ptomaine he neve r gets any. She

p sonnetimes,

th

abc

lyou

in

spite of hers

"

instinct

Do

.

ihal

anythi ng

po of sym jathy br ght.

e

el e,

iho se

bi

t

will

shf

ch eeks

a? too

rosy

get

one word

and eyes

too

PEARLE JONES least bit sensitive about her native town. In fact, she is rather proud of being the Pearle's favorite of 'Virginia's ancient capital. She loafing plac e during meditation hour is the reading room. 'What Pearle can't do with IS a specia pet of the librarian's. a needle a id a piece of thread isn't worth mentioning, and the Although this manual Ira ining teacher gloried in her skill. maid is innocent and unsophisticated looking, she is. little

<IPearle

not the

is

Williamsbu rg.

"Pearle"

nevertheles especially.

,

always ready

to

tease Sally

and Emma,

the laltet


META JORDAN id--fat It's a good Ic oking people, bu ther it spe iks well for " an 11 windyou kn ow the rest. Meta has the greatest fondn ess for augh, "g' and ha s a very lendc r spo in her hear for 'those ro manli oon hin ers" that abou id In West Virgin a.

flM ETA

pily ihe

li

i

we

ely.

many

h. ve so

s chool

far

,

agre eable

so

"

fat

'1

s

1

LELIA FLIPPEN KABLER She <ILelia is certainly what you would term a "warbler, has done wonders with 5th Grade music, and sh, incessantly anything from "Casey Jones" to "Li Lorraine. Loree." As soon as any one begins to know thi

—

songster they begin

She can keep a

to

secret

love her.

—

The

reason for

a wonderful quality

this is

among

obvious

schoolgirls

ELIZABETH KELLAM qOoes

look

s

BETH un haps the she is an certainly

Bui who

way?

1

i

Yes. some one has likened Elizagloves. Permust be handled with gloves proves that and you are species of the Cactus family

a

deli^

Lte

ct

that

ihe

nknowi

flower to be handled with

to "get stuck" if y' an imagine anybody rubb hope you will meet her som ire

what you have missed by not knowir

52

;

the wrong way. Elizabeth the wrong day, for you don't know

rub her g

her.


gl^c l^ir^inian' CORINNE KEMPER •JCoRINNE

ren inds

seven sons and

)ne

the

story

daughter

CoRlNNE

at

We

That is what a what we know

of

us little

no one lo, .king youngest child, this naughty \ /o:ld for

them

doubt

she

hope she won't before

she

do

s.

that

she

.

the

is

c

bunga

isl" little

all"

any hard knocks in "Prince Charming."

get

meets to

be the

"There Wert

runs:

that

the youngest of

will

imagii able

ELIZABETH KENDRICK •I

Elizabeth

though, she

contrary

persists

entire,

is

but

in to

from Bluelield, but she to all established and

fast

is

set

She

Bluefield.

is

not

getting over

rules

of

it,

tradition,

West Virginia commonly known as a

ranking Virginia second, not

to

"law breaker," not because she has any objection to breaking any rules that happen to cross her path, but because midnight feasts, that easy road lo fame, are much too slow and lame for her.

She

lambles during class-lime while the

long

delights in

"Miss Kendrick

teachers inquire vainly for

humor

jusi

the

the

windows with

right

"movies."

Now

six

thinks

or

eight

that she

to Nature Study, "Brooks" (?).

R.

is

she

for

or. if she is ih loads of fun to sneak out other girls and go lo the out she devotes most of her time

it,

for

;

it

loves

the

hills,

flowers,

and

ELISE LECKIE

•ILeckie, "made you of fire, spirit, or dew?" Surely such a rare combination of girlish charm and irrepressible joy is no ordinary damsel. Leckie is the kind of girl worth cultivating, for

she

is

so

big

herself

that

she appeals

lo

the belter

forces

thai are in one. and calls to the lop the besi that is in them. Dependable? Yes-s,ree! You can always depend on Elise whenever any kind of school aclivity requires brains. Even so— and a dear damsel, 'lis told abroad!


g^fjc

Uir^inion' IRA McALPIN fJWho

maid? Wait a minute; three see her name, but what's in a going to throw light on the subject, then there's still another guess coming your way. sweet little, neat little girl? Surely you're "getting warm," Irene. But deplorably thin, you say? Two guesses gone, remember. said it? Dear. You've hit it. Just a queer little, dear little girl, she is, in spite of that name of hers. guesses.

name?

this,

is

Oh,

If

demure

this

yes,

1

you think

little

know you that's

A

Who

A

ESTELLE McCLUNG little specimen of humanity ha among her friends for her ready wit and penetratsarcasm. She is very fond of assuming a myste which causes as much curiosity as a French Fashic,n Book! When she is induced and a great deal of tact to interpret. "Oh! you just ought to know to explain, all she will say is: my 'Latest'!" Her favorite pastime is sleeping throug;h breakfast, but at least she has managed to collect enouglr friends

•JThis happy-go-lucky

reputation

mg

while here

to

bring her a

roll

or two.

ALICE McLaughlin J

Alice, of "mildest manners and of

ature

personified.

Her

forte

is

gentlest

walking.

heart,"

The

is

good

question

as

whether she or Miss Blackiston excels in the love of this Although known by a few mile" pastime is much discussed. to be favored with the "gift o' She d s, ho^ ever exercise her inclined to try her powers. to be alone she has but vocal talents, and whenever she wish to sing "My Laddie, My Laddie." >

54


grf2c

Wirglnian

^M

GEORGIE ADA McMATH Generous to a fault, good natured, very appreciative ol jokes which do not concern herself, is this only girl fron Onley. Her favorite pastime seems to be devouring "the lates fiction and anything in the line of "eats." Her usual topic of conversation is that of (k)Nocks both hard and otherwise •J

JUANITA MANNING

^A

Her command

hefly child, with a precocious mi id! language of the poets is marvelous

of

No one doubts but every poem written sir ce "Beowulf," and she has stored m her spacious brain pr celess fragments from each. Rosamond Juanita! The very name is romantic. She never sees the ground, but fixes her eyes on the stars and makes us all wish (in psychology class) that \ /e could indulge in her flights of fancy for fancy most of it all IS though the deluded professors look into her beanling face and wonder at the mmd of one so young. the

.

that she has read

MARY MEARS J

To

>

for

be

the

m

She

rk.

cramming have

never trusting life

3erfecll>

at

that

S.

for

frank

points;

she

she

viev tests

may

life

her

s

r jokes ncerely thus making

howe' soon 1

pplaui e

caused the explanation of Faculty and Home Department beini notwithstanding these failinss, she is

An

(????).

idealist

00

up

ndpoinl,

fa

by

along the Harris.

h.

the

1

de.

N. S. more en

further reference see Mrs.

right

li'

froi

d

of abse recipii

ready eping

sle

,

has both


'^^<i

Wirginian AMANDA MINTER qOo

your Latin well enough to know what Some part of the verb lo love. It must be lovcJ: that's how we translate it, anyway. She enjoys fun thoro ughly, but there are times when she withdraws

you

ren lember

Amanda mean s? (o

he

from

the

frix

Amanda!

clous

Lc ve

is

world to write poetry. good material for poems.

Keep

up,

it

EDNA MINTON [Edna do

not

engage

in

what you would

call

free

i

easy conversation. She stales what she has to say stale: firmly and we, poor mortals, are afraid to deny it, howe much we may doubt. She is a rather unusual specimen humanity, to say the least, and we wonder greatly how will turn out. The most current rumor is, however, that

will go

down

in

history as a second Mrs. Caudle.

SUSAN MINTON willowy young lady came lo us from Smithfield not rushing in upon us and making us notice her at once, as do many of the damsels who invade S. N. S. every Sep<I In

1912

this tall,

lember, but calmly, quietly, dignifiedly (a word coined lor The first her benefit), makmg her way slowly and surely. "Do you girl who chanced to know her asked her friend: "You'd Girl: Friend: "No." know Susan Minton?" better."

And 56

that's the

way

all

of us feel.


gr^c lITir^inian MARY PEARL MOOD «IMaRV

is

from

ihal

section

of

ihe

Old Dominion known

as

home of hams and the palace of peanuts— Smilhfield. For two years Farmville has been her adopted home, and, somehow or other— no one could ever tell why— we have grown fond of her, and hate lo see her leave. Mary was an extremely Ihe

childish

before

child

she

became a leaching Senior, but that You would not believe it, is really quite grown up and

had a wonderful effect on her. in the Training School she

but

dignified.

ISBELL <lSo

attractive

is

MOORE

her personality, and so dignified

of handling it, that it is good to call her that to every one she lends her ear, but to like her because everybody else does, and To her the troubles of the spinster band

each sex.

plaintiff

has expaciated

comes

there

upon

the

is

her

way

friend, and to know few her voice. You

because she's square. are carted, and after

fickleness

of

the

other

consolement: "Cheer up! That's not such a bad term for them, knowing of her strange affection for Kats. There are sundaes and Sundays, but Sunday Night Specials are Isbell's pet creations, laden with chocolate and cherries, but. mark you,

All

men

the

whole

never-failing

the

are animals."

effect

is

particularly Green.

LUCY MOORE q Before

our first snow came this was the report: The snow has reached Lucv Moore's head; it will be he.e next week. But how much nicer than being fat! Such height enables you lo look down on the earth, and. likewise have people look up lo you. You are quiet and sensible. May there be MoORE like

Lucy, 57


grije

lUir^inian" GRACE MOORMAN is Grace, but, oh, her dignity! The joys of being late are hers, for Grace has never been known to be anywhere on time, except to the third grade. She adores the "surplice" effect, and will very likely wed a minister. hope she will. It is the only thing we can think of at present that just exactly seems to suit her.

<ISmall of stature

We

BERTIE NICHOLSON land whose palace which dreal ide.

are

that

of the

rosy

d and

of the

Sometimes a

ue under a cloudy sky, ace is lifting its glitterle again. She is sweet

tu

tint

othe all

and always she is bubbling was ever anything accomplished good qi lities. Her faults are

breeze,

r

but

her

full.

On

day day

of them

is

that she

is

November— late— and ii

a dreadful hurry.

JANET KNOX NICHOLSON who would have this?

This

fair

thought that "Cre-wee" could produce damsel Is dramatically, poetically, as

acrobatically inclined;

and when

it

comes

to

narrat-

Janet always lakes the "yellow dawg"! JaNET does not ntrude herself into other folks' affairs, but attends to her own The result of this is two-sided: First, the honor^ have gone to girls who were greater politicians than she, but, second, when the final grades are received she is always on top. Janet honors us with her presence at least four days out of each week, but after that she forsakes "Polly," and Louise, her "case," to spend blissful days in the town ng,

here the rooster crew(e).


'^fl<i

llTir^inian' MARIE O'NEILL <IIf ever you visit Crozel, notice the general attitude of the population. If every person you meet is cheerful, looks glad

be alive,

to

Marie has Marie

that

there

favors

much

we

don't

that she

us

who

hard to keep off a smile, then Bui then that doesn't show only shows that the population while Marie every day grows so

trying

is

for

S.

N. S.

not all right.

slenderness,

It

and rounder that they fear she has lost forever and thinness they so greatly admire. But here

fatter

litheness

that

fact,

in left is

mind

that.

In

fact,

we

are so

much

the

other

way

is one of our best girls, and there are few, indeed, of are not proud of Marie's friendship.

MARIAH 'WALLER PANNILL •IMaRIAH, whatever

the time or weather, is happy. She takes in her work, and is happiest in the kindergarten. worst failing, if it may be so called, is taking the opposite view from others— anything for the sake of an argument. 'RiA has domestic aspirations, made known to us by her use of the

great delight

Her

Brum.

In our dreams

we

see her a kindergarten

teacher in

Japan.

ELEANOR PARROTT S. N. S, received quite a bird named "POLLV," coming from V. P. I., where she had acquired much in dealing with "kiddets." She immediately put in application for a kindergarten course, and has had no reason to regret it. She has a patent on luck. In the first place, this picture flatters her to death; and then she has learned to bluff exceedingly well. By her use of these talents, PoLLV has become quite an expert in playing "Rook" and other "birdish" games, and, for some unknown reason, she has made a study of proverbs. She has even invented a new game called CI

In

the

fall

of

1911

skill

"Proverbs," interest

is

59

but

why

she

has

suddenly

more than we can understand.

developed

this

holy


d

UTir^inian"

g^f^c --

-

-

.

LENA PAULETT

-V:-'.::;i-S^

you going, little mi id?" And the blushing girl replied: "I'm going to S. N. S., sir. if you please." And to S. N. S. she came. The place did its worst for her, yet never once (?) did she lose that s Afeet politeness that made 'hile politeness was shown lo be slill mo.e sweel, when once hei supervisor called: "You, Mary Paulelt, c me here. and she actually ed abo

"Where

are

a whisper:

"It

<I

L'^ 1 H ^^m^

fi

"

not

sister,

I."

is

it

jj ^R^

tI

Wf^^^^^^^

IP

lT nl •-||

MARY PAULETT ;xislence, that her her nature, and so even he have yet to quiet presence disturbs not her fellow-man see her mixed up in any of the foolishness d strife which at qu t, and she moves times makes geese of us. Her manner are along, mindful of her own business and odv else's. glad of it to contrast with some of the

<ISo peaceful

is

We

We

1

^^

v^ 1

ETHEL f What And

M

airy, fa ry creature

« hen we

vision

ndeed—

%

hispe r that ainly,

L. is

nan

cha rms, an physical accompanies mor e tha 1 her shar than e nthusiastic abou her car t

to

nlake

t

leaching the young ide a

60

our

ir

V

e

e

her

life

how

to

s

m dst? O jr Ethel! n our m nd's eye a

see

allu ring

fair.

besides

and ex pects

PEDIGO

th is

IS

irre sislible

of grey a

n

she, a nd possessing.

persona

as

wo

k— the

hoo

.

noble

ily

She

atler.

w ould'be

er

is

which more

pedagogue.

Pi- ofession

of


fl<i

lIFir^inian' JOSEPHINE PHELPS Large, robusl. handsome, molion ever exhibited, and c

Josephine

thing

th

<I

/er

in

to

perpetual

die with a corkscrew,

and eceives entreaties from a Books could be wnlten in an attempt to cover Josephine's advances in the scholarship line. She makes equations jump ihrougS hoops, anc jug the deep subjects with wonderful skill. If you ever lerson who shows any of the above signs, you will kn Josephine, because those people wriles

forty

day.

lelti

plays

basket-ball,

"don't occur" oftei

ALMA POINDEXTER Child of the Muse

is she— a lover of poetry and a dreamer. is nothing she likes better than a moonlight night and a copy of Mrs. Browning. Alma is dignified, yet contains a bounty of dry wit. and no one enjoys a joke any more than she. But she is not content to live in dreams alone she is intellectually alive, and always has a word ready at the right time, even if she is s/oll> and has to "coin" the word sometimes. Alma is indeed a "combination of contradictory qualities," bul she is a delightful companion and a true friend. <I1

There

CAROLYN POPE <]|To see the serious, thoughtful CaROLVN, one would never connect her with the gay, mischievous Caro, for Caro comes most often at midnight, and by her presence makes some poor victim suffer. But with the return of day Carolyn comes back— the wise, thoughtful lady who puzzles over all sorts of problems, and occasionally rides a hobby, which once took the form of a Hypnotist, and the steed being a good one, the journey lasted almost to the death of some of her friends.

And

yet.

when Carolyn and Caro

some one made when she

first

"She'll dance her

On

her nimble

blend, the prediction that entered the Normal is strangely

way

little

into

feet."

hearts


glTfjc

lITir^inian' BELVA POTTER Belva would make a good subject for a psychological research. When we think of shades of difference, the rainbow fades into insignificance when compared to Belva. She varies <||

from

the

lovable,

we have

dignified,

carefree, sufficient

indifferent

fun-loving failh

Belva,

or

"Boonie."

we can remove

"Belvidere,"

We

are

told

mountains,

the

to

that

but

if

can

any one remove BelVA after she has duly considered a quesare sure that tion and formed an opinion of her own? the faith would have to be exceedingly strong. are not sure whether BelVA will try for the Marathon Races, the Grand Opera, or staking a claim out West.

We

We

JESSIE FRIBBLE •IDing!

Uh-ho!

dong!

The

open eyes, and

last sweet tones of the breakfast bell. parting notes of a lingering slumber, two half"Is the wondering voice of Jessie greets you:

the

that the six o'clock bell?" To her long string of cases must be added sleep, because she courts the same much as Romeo courted Juliet. In high-class vaudeville and light, melodramatic creations she figures well, her latest cast being Billy Basketball in "The Sad, Sad Fate of a Schoolgirl Heart." She is very sociable, usually choosing the earliest rational time after light bell to stroll and visit. Sometimes she does not get home until morning, having been unavoidably detained in rooms numbering from 105 to 18. Study spells to Jessie: "Put off until test time the absorptions of necessary ingredients useful for such times only, and her motto might well be found in every action: "On with the dance, let joy be unconfined." '

FANNIE PRICE If you do "Precious jewels come in small packages." Her favor believe this then you don't know "Little Fannie." motto is: "Every cloud has a silver lining," and she li, Even Trainin School cri •up to it in a remarkable degree. E cisms and 2A Latin are unable to produce a frown! we are forced to state that she has one fault: She is cc Her latest attacl sidered quite a heart smasher. of the "Quinn-sy." This seems to be a hopelesi be added to our siring of rent pillow slips. ^I

.

62


gr^c

Wirglmari LOUISE PULLIAM •11911

he

thrusi

Louise

here.

so

h< IS

gotten

ing

Y.

Sunday

W.

s

not our

fault

good side of the

she

thai

is

Home De-

of

her noted devices of fooling when I say Louise has loads of

;

to V. P. I., but she's "Moore." Louise is a very and when it comes to collectndoubtedly found he ling.

Blacksburg

1

:

earnest

is

it

the

partment by mea ns of sc people. But I al n not jo friends. She has fnends never salisfied, ar d alvvay

ants

chool w,

r.

C. A. du

EVELYN PURCELL qCo please,

on

but

mions

taters,

in1,

the

to finiish

c

haunt ing

1":

.de;1

in IS

there

Take

.

:

as

that

there-that

still

nd nothing needs

the seas

i

t

s easoniiig

you takes

more

Zn"'nnidnight feasts aind'Tals^' In class we ha>/e cha nee for no hun™blew ord to expi ess oursi;lves. the nliie tinre bein g voted to Evelyn for a proinuloation on the subject of drf'ams as distingiu.shed from mare:s. °Som e day we hope to see Ih e headlines of the Richmond Dispatch read as follows: "Short, but to-the-point lectures on how to operate gas plants on small scales. Evelyn Purcei.l, B. A.. Ph. D." <

MARY FRANCES PUTNEY "Mary Cary," she "Martha." The combination •3

Like

is sometimes "Mary," sometimes of these two distinct personalities an interesting person to study. Many her only as "Mary." They recognize her leader-

makes

MaRY Frances

people

know

But we, who have known flirt. have been privileged to see the deeper and know how fully and how perfectly

The\, call her a butterfly' or

and loved her side

of

her

for years,

nature,

"Martha" supplements "Mary." friendship,

has

noble

ideals,

was "Martha" who wrote

"Martha"

and

the

strives

pathetic

capable of true reach them. It stories of child magazine, and it

is

to little

life which appeared so often in our school was "Martha's" intellect and application that made record MaRY leaves at her alma mater.

ti3

the brilliant


Wf^e ICTirginian' MINNIE RIDGWAY

Minnie is quiet and re ;erved thinks much, but speaks little, She has never been knc wn to speak of her private affairs, SO her most inlimate fnei ids do not know to a certainly what fl

she

Is

foiward

looking

longing

for

and

country

the

of

to.

now and

accidentally d;opped

However, then,

for

we

from

a

few

words

gather that she has a into practice her

putting

Household Arts.

VIOLA MAE RIDGWAY Ola !,ie

spends

it

little,

is

but

working

to

she's all get out of

right.

work.

But Such energy! She can't help it,

though, for her natural tendencies are inclined that way. ever,

when

the

't

g. i

)rn

id

How-

a promised Civics

test, a very rare a professional crammer, store away into her head the night before isn't Viola is noted for forgetting her assigntime. But, in spite of this, she is happy, and

inevitable

nes,

she

till

WORKS.

night.

She

is

Her hobby

is

the

rocking-chaii

She novel her favorite being "Saint Elmo." continued form, and receives it in daily installreads, marks, learns, and inwardly digests every en she sleeps. "What care I when I can lie lake life at its very best?"

BESS RITTER qin September

r'X

of the year 1912, the halls of S. N. S. became familiar with a daughter of the town of Graham, Virginia. While with us, Bess contracted quite a case on a certain member of the Home Depaitment. and quite frequently this lady, on her rounds over the building, would leave scribbled on a lily-pad a very touching note to her ardent Notwithstanding the many tears she shed over the admirer. Training School, and the long, weary nights she struggled (?) with her numerous studies, she now leaves us to go back to her

home town, with 64

the smile of victory

on her countenance.


S^^c lIFirginian' CONSTANCE RUMBOUGH ÂŤ1

Coming from Lynchburg,

her

to

be a mighty

municative, and her as we'd like If

you hope

fine

for that to,

but

to visit

the

as she does, you'd naturally expect little uncomwhich she is.

A

girl,

reason

we

don't

know

as

much about

what we do know is all to the good. other side of the world and look into

Mission Field, you'll find Constance there doing wonders. For the rest of her, in life is to be admired!

ihe

Such a mission see

the

statistics.

LUCILLE SCAFF CIThis scurity

studious-mi ded for

the

flowers of the

grr iter

Sen

.r

lass

part

manages of

Class that

the is

to

time.

"born

keep herself in obShe is one of the to blush unseen and

on the desert air;" the desert air is When Lucille comes around every one merely the faculty, must give up their rocking-chair, for she can not study, talk Never has she been or read without rocking continually. known to stay m bed until time for the breakfast bell, and they

times goes

say sh

Her motto

down

in

time to open the doors.

i

JOSEPHINE SHERRARD qShe true

belongs

optimists,

to

that small class of people

who

laugh

away

their

who

fears.

are

known

Speaking

as

of

laughing, "Joe" has a laugh that sounds like spontaneous comShe has a studious isles. bustion, and is as contagious as ntly towards history. turn of mind that turns most pie

65


'^^^ lITir^inian ADDIE SNOW CJThe only fal

of

spile

in

(rouble with all

AdD[E

is

ihat

will not use

s he

Anti-

She has heard, she

her friends' pleadings,

menacer, a: nd nothing can induce Poor AdDIe! If only ihe could realize that her to take it. health is a minor consideration compai ed with the slender. willowy figures now in vogue.

says, thai Anti-fat

is

a health

;

ANNIE SNOW JAnnie .h

for

is

bl

young a man.

a countenance which might beguile She does not but her ideals are higher. for height, plenty of il, with

with

I

,

She wishes

Equipped inderness to match, and coal-black hair and eyes. th these, AwNtE would be happy, but since she is hopelessly ort, not to say "dumpy." with flaxen hair and sky-blue eyes, :

she is doomed to lifelong unhappiness she changes her point of view.

fear

urse,

—

unless,

of

MARGARET SNOW dark-haired beauty (?) came to J" Since then her energy has been exthe "Northern Neck." hausted in the production of a superfluous amount of auburn She is known as the "wit" of the class. Especially "curls." are is she noted for her charming originality, and her remarks "Crook" always looks on the quoted by all who know her. optimistic side of life, and her ringing laughter may be heard throughout the dormitories at any hour of the night.

qjhis

66


'^(l^ "lITirginian' MORRIS LOUISE SPENCER MBg;ggg3j^;g.f,':vvy:

p

^^^Kft/^PH |:-^.

W^ Pimm

H ji

•I

Though Morris always has more work

do

she

in,

il

is

always politely inleresled

lo

in all

do ihan lime lo olher folks and

She is seldom seen wilhoul a "case" or Iwo in her Iram lo make her forgel such trivial mailers as allending class " is meetings. She is calm and cool until the name "E mentioned, then her hair curls naturally. She is never at a ihings.

last-go the

something to say, for the "idiom." "I've got the best for you," always serves the purpose. She hath faculty of speaking the kind word that turneth wrath.

for

loss

trade

happy

away

H

flll ANNIE RUDD STONE qShe comes

a voice that only the echoing fitly descri be!— inclined to be slightly frivolous, "do-or-die" air. She takes gym whenever she feels so disposed which is seldom— since she considers that rcises in her own room she can take belter exerci which exercises in massaging her face into more "Frenchy" lines, he adores anything French. to

us with a voice

four walls can

and with

^^^^^ w^mghtf

a

y

^m MARY MOORE STONEBURNER qHere

^pH^I ^^r

takes

]

girl

things

who in

the

takes herself seriously, and, in fact, she

same mood of dignified

silence.

She

limb and heavy of frame, but notwithstanding all this, Mary is a most skilled acrobat. The stunt which has brought her the most notoriety is the tighl-rope dance, which MaRY used to be actually she can do with wonderful agility. fat and chubby, but a harrowing experience (?) has reduced Mary is one of the Senior's best tennis her several pounds. players, and "Take notice, fellows! She is a Domestic Science is

\^^^T^

all

a

is

large

of

teacher." fi7


6^f2<^

lUirginian" ADELAIDE STORM "For

And

-you may depend on't— so there's an

she

if

she

if

she

I'l,

little woman, but yet a sweeter disposition is to no one, and Brains! !!— they are certainly not a twinkle of her eye, and she has stumped you. Tests are never nightmares, and daily work is only a pleasant Each night as the lights dream. Her only fault is spooning.

<IA

willful

found

be

in

Just

nil.

see two girls strolling down the hall from the fire escape, then a sudden stillness, a door opens, a good-night kiss, and Adelaide scampers off to bed.

wink you

MARY GARY TAYLOR She may

•ICary! possesses

not be a "Phoebe" the

just

three-cornered

a

Into

genius

smile

adjective used brings to

use of the broad of

Nature's

Mary Gary

she

is

mind one of

The

a.

When

same.

affliction,

si

she

ver.

The

"classy."

Tiply

her chief

how

,•• but she her mouth

twists

Is

weakness s, the an endo A-ment

which she Is not in the least respo nsible. comes from the land of e ise and idleness comfor

monly called

Eastern

the

Notwithstanding

Shore.

she

this,

which has enabled Gary of the Virginian. true friend to those whom she likes, but cares not for those whose personalities do not appeal to her. In short, she in a great measure like the fabled owner of the one little rl, for when she is good she is very, very good, but when she )ssessed of a decidedly

manage

to

bad she

is

the

Industrious turn,

business

affairs

horrid."

ALMA THOMAS I

You

K,^^n.

ha

......

,

v^«.

.

O

iLMA

Readers, turned ihe pages of greets

eyed, spirited young maiden. anxiously awaiting her turn. Normal with "Tommy," you

you,

alias

"Tommy,"

No doubt Had you ht

'"

'

1

ident at the

<

in

the

the Training manner, and

school

in

School

we do

add

also

to

dignity ^.,.„.,

way

she

is

especially

not

should itil

th.

the

wee

Idnight

ed"

in

nd her out

to

.

"Tommy

not feel one bit afraid to

bring others up in the

68

will

that 2,

,

Her

Farrr....„. /ille.

keen-

'

'

would ely kn always present when there is any tnder why Yo on Sunday night. Do you worry, for "Tommy" will ntertain you, - -.. small hours of morning, havi ,g been a member of creed

little

this

the

' '

they should go.


gJTfje

lIFir^inian HAZEL THOMPSON q Dining-room

girls keep ihe trail to Mrs. Ha rris' room beseeching extra radiators on account o Thomp-

warm

pretty

hall

That Hazel is gifted as a teacher is common lalk, but commoner still is the thought that she has become so entangled m a "Cobb- web in which the bmding influence will be strong and hold her so fast that she will find little time for teaching. Those (and there are many) who are fortunate 'nough to understand her peculiar sarcasm and apparent re erve find themselves bound to her in a strong and lasting frier dship. SON.

MARY TRAYLOR Why,

•I

much

you're just the person I wanted tell you. You know I heard from

to

see.

to

come. Isn't go "But hear that he

that

fine?"

haven't

I

"Really,

told

I

have

MaRY,

though,

' the I've

you the most exciting part "

so

to-day, and

'• hes coming up "Yes, yes, I know, bul ing up here next week. I can hardly wait for

"Comlime

to

got

to

yet.

I

hear about It to morrow." And when she came back MaRV met her with: He's a botanist, a lover of nature. 'What a coincidence!" a great lover of

is

'"Well,

I'll

MARY TREVILLIAN Mary,

she's qu te cont ary.' •Well, no she always does eve rybody a sks her to do Sh up indiv dua ity for Mu phyalily, and fron Tram ing School res ulls s e s ee that "the e IS melh od n he madn Mary a Iway dc es her duly Once he had . lesson"pi. n to hand n wh ich she did I't fir ish before Ihe sever o'clock bell rang, and Miss Mary refused to let her lake the

^1"1V

plan she

e

ven

lo

i

she

or

not.

has

istr ess

given

her supervisor.

would

have

Had

summoned

not a a

trying to bluff.

friend

messenger

come boy.

to

her rescue

Her

When

chie^

called on in class her answers never vary, and to every question she always replies: " characleristic

"For mstance, 69

is

I

mean, you know, you know,

I

mean-


g^^c l^ir^inian' LILLIAN

TROTTER

No What a pity! She is <IHave you met Trotter? Perhaps you have liked. just the kind of girl you would ha\ bout the halls with her head clutched seen her clashing madly You see he has so much trouble. It is either in her hands. And ting or a lost coat all of the time. an Argus open ake leading parts in the Dramatic Club. when one has ise, so that one has to study awfully hard, and hasn't much to put one in despair, isn't it? However, there lining to Trotter's particular cloud, because he t

ubles are

all

imaginary, so she always comes out right.

MARY TURNBULL <lHere comes one bursting-over mass of energy. If there evei was a lucky girl it is Mary T. She's the kind who surprises you in class. It really is very interesting to call on her when you know she hasn't looked at the lesson, and have her give It's surely you a very sensible answer. How does she do it? 'We call that Brains. "M. T." a great labor-saving device. Bui what's in a name? 'Well, if you want to find out, first happy slip up to her when she's not looking and call her.

A

spread from the tip of her tilled chin to her curly eyebrows. You just can't help from being happy when she's around. She has a convincing way that makes you swear by what she says at least that's the way she manages her "Bills. smile will

—

'

MARY TYUS how old id quiet, but, oh! caln maidish! Her quick, sharp command n the Training School Marv! Where have give promise of a Militant Suffragett Mother Goose must have had before? d that n n "Mary, Mary, quite she wrole her epic her in mind whe *' contrary

qEven

tempered,

mild,

i


grtjc lli^irqinian' MARY MARGARET UMBERGER you have already guessed that Mary (sometimes Mar£;aret, Marguerite, Maggie or Margie ) is simply devoted to Cream of Wheat. Well, 1 just know that's why she has rosy cheeks and a kind of a healthy look. Margaret spends most of her ftTie in the infirmary. I don know whether it's hecause that's a good place to get Crea rn of Wheat, or because there's a right nice Berry over there. <j]I

bel

1

SADIE IRENE UPSON

qR 3wdy,

always ye! ing. and almost running the Ho ne Deparinlent mad, SaDIE has made he rself kn n to evt ry girl who has attended scho ol du ing her tay here She it w as who and by instituted the higher c ailing of a •• nidnight r jmble her enthusiastic leade ship many a girl ha s been 'led to the brml, of the rotunda o f the Receptio n Hall, th -re to jurnp over into the dizzy depths of ih at Great Unkno ,vn

ELIZABETH ECHOLS WALKUP Unobtr usive and retiring, and absolutely ineligible to the How many of us can say that? She was Knockers Club.

we knew her musical abilities, but now what we know about her, and would like She's quiet, yet full of fun, and we'd like to have mo e like her around if for no other reason than that nd closed uths good lo ha deep thinke: here

a v hile

before

we know We to know more.

71

like


g^fjc

llTir^inian' ROCHE WATKINS qWas

imous Citadel whose name resembled it If it was not not in France? it was, since we want to make a comparison. RocHE is Fr ench and like a Citadel, firm, steady, and strong in her friendships. Oh. wonderful! the comparison can be carried on still further, for she has a wall of reserve about her difficult o penetrate, but once in we have Ine same feeling we imagine those in ihat French Citadel had: glad that we are in and orry for those outside. Ihere not once a

fair

this

f

And w as

maid's?

we hope you

will all beli ve

EMMA <I

"Laugh and

Emma

the

R.

WEBB

world laughs with you"

She has

is

the policy

which

admirable quality of being able and when the darker side becomes unpleasantly in evidence, she consoles herself by saying: "Well, it might have been worse." The word worry is entirely foreign to her vocabulary, and we envy her her calm, unruffled mind. She is always kind and thoughtful, and her cheery smile lends a ray of sunshine to those about her. Although Emma is very sound in both mind and body, she deems it wise to keep in touch with a reliable Insurance Company, and it appears to be a Mutual Benefit to each. to

see

follows.

that

the brighter side of

life,

GRACE WELKER ,he isto ask Grace which She lo say "Oh, horrors!" or donkey. Just get h( mind it a bit now, and taken all together, she has a immate told me that, Utoo. and her roommate pretty good disposition Grace has a way of winning people to her by being just hcself. We wonder how she can take on so much responsibility

lit

not

necessary

Yankee

doesn't

—

with so much ease, for the editor's chair alone has been an but recommend her to the New York T uneasy one. Mr. Grainger says he can alway if this doesn't suit, assistant if he has to send her

We

72


gEfjc

Wir^lnian MAY WELLS ^Well,

And she wears a smile ille thai of the latest importations from Lyn_._ out to be quite a favorite among the not joking when I say that her admirers

May!

well, this

She

.ff.

le

is

d

has bio

.nd

id boys.

I'm

Albert nd end with Zacharias. May certainly nderstand the „.. irt ^^ "bluffing." of With a good reputa firmly established, she jjiotecus proceeds to lo roll roii on a bed of oc ithe... _.._ ilead of the "profs" by that coy little „. „1, U__ future r... L:J. £_! ile and an inlellectual look Her bids fa to be past at S. N. S., which. short, is enough sa tvilh

.

1

CORINNE WESCOTT not always the person

who talks the most that does the Nor does the person know the most who does the mosi CORINNE does not do much talking, but at test times lo make a big haul and catch up with the best She loomed up out of the darkness last Thanksgiving ing the Juniors how lo guard. Her special study is in where she seems She managed lo escape

tionary,

or

find

words enough

to

write

the special spellina class

how-

lo

which she should be commended.

JOSEPHINE WHITE q Hurrah

N. S.! Why? Because it has leauliful Doll. Albemarle County always did try to send of note, such as Monroe and Jefferson; this time, h. it is the "female of the species," and it is none other than Joe White that brings it notoriety. S. N. S. is co-owner with Albemarle of the honor. The general opinion concerning this last is: "Now, she's a real nice girl." Speaking of for S.

though whu who! Oh, my dear, don't mention it, it is similar to a "sack of meal," and the lady walks very h like her grandmi ther's favorite duck. I'll bet you one

figures,

but

thing,

though,

if

!

you

the most popular they

73

i

ask anybody in school •ould say JoE White. 'ould

who was


gr^c lITirginian' LUCILLE WILLIAMS Normal

dr nd ha us in her womanish and is not particularly fond of books, because she says they don't mix well with boys. Like all human beings, she is fickle, and has quite a number of names in her book of "cases." Dancing is her favorite pastime, and she knows all the steps, from the "Ole Virginia Reel" to the latest in "rag." She can sing, too, and is also

^"Cille"

ribbon,

enlered

now

but

She

atlire.

the

she

excelling

is

In

all

knee kn of

loves lo have a good time,

very fond of "ice-cream cones." ll is not an to see her coming up a side street eating one.

uncommon

thing

MARGUERITE AMORY WILSON qit

IS

7:25

m.,

a.

ind

and wide-strelched m( the covers.

be terrible ball.

the

If

"Is if

it

we were

there's the

dot.

lo

b,

Marguerite, with half-closed eyes

slowly emerging from underneath up?" she says, and wouldn t it But just mention basketlazy? a practice at 6 o'clock a. m. she'll be

uth,

tirr t

to

all

is

get

that

Taking

it

all

together,

this

old girl

is

true

blu

KATHERINE WOODWARD •IKatherine, Katie and Puss— these three—but Mayonnaise; the very name is of these is Puss.

the like

greatest

a bell

back from afternoon classes to the turmoil of Wesson oil and eggs. The chief industry of the damsel is to sleep through moonlight rambles, as well as one class of If your heart has never been particular educational value. bombarded, don't encounter Katie until it is strongly fortified, because the necessary credentials of like warfare are her Two brown eyes and wispy brown locks are the most own. Once to every girl and dangerous weapons of the battery. lo

toll

her

Comes the The name

1

is

ii

its

place.

Bible story.

Can't you guess?

Her laughter brings moisture to the weary brow of the night matrons, especially about twelve o'clock, when peals come forth from all parts of the wing in which Kat is imprisoned.


gr^c

WiTglmari BONNIE MAE qOne yet

all

is

"Eleven,"

Bon

WYGAL

eleven o'clock on dining-room hall, and as well, but when the little monster, time, calls out: the lowering herd winds slowly o'er the lea, with

minute

to

Senior privilege room, which is along the above-said hall, sleepy the wind shaking the building or IS Bonnie returning to earth?" No, she isn't all skin and bones, because she has designs on the male of the species. Special writing appeals to her only through the instructor, and some day she aspires to be spouse to the motorman of a corn the lead, from Bonnie's paradise, and in

voices

raise

the

all

question:

the

"Is

planter.

ELIZABETH 'WALL Elizabeth has

the advantage over most of us n that she has really and truly taught school besides thee 1 ng School, loves to relate her adventures during thait m om"e ntous time. "Why," she says, "1 used to keep in some of thos e big boys and lecture them for hours. I really enjoye d doubt •I

She

1

whether the boys did, for Elizabeth is onte o makes you feel like an earthworm if you hajve

We

.

the

kind that

fallc

n into her

Farewell to the Seniors FARE-YOU-WELL, O steps

^'ou leave us here

Seniors!

watch you depart and wonder the journey

your work in the

and

may

set forth

prosperity

as brave

if

the time will

and appreciation shower

coming years, may you look back

Urged by your

exaniple,

we

to us

shall

their blessings

us.

You

all

your

N.

upon you.

complete In al!

S.

Sometimes,

your hearts that feeling of

have

set

a high standard for

go onward and upward

reached the height of triumph which you have attained. our wishes could carry you God-speed over

in

gloom we

In

too, shall

the halls of S.

and know

among

paths your foot-

feet.

come when we,

and light-hearted from

fellowship that has always been so strong us here.

to travel the

have trodden, having made them easy for our wandering

until

we,

too,

have

Again, fare-you-well, and

difficulties,

truly,

then, yours

be a smooth pathway.

A

if

would

Junior,


'JUirginian'

Stijc

^

T

some time

in the life

some

which

task

it

is

woman, he

of every man, or

seemingly impossible

the feelings of the person

upon

whom

to

confronted with

Such

are

of prophesy-

falls the necessity

Having meditated

body of classmates.

ing the future lives of a large

is

accomplish.

great length upon the most feasible plan for performing this stu-

at

pendous

feat, to

to the primitive

no

avail,

I

method of

believe

—

yes,

foresight, the

must be so

it

—

I

shall resort

Taghairm.

now I lie out on the verge of the precipice, The ground is dank and cold, the wind blows; and even Cold shivers run up and down the stars above seem to look on me with pitying glances. my spine, my hair stands on end, my teeth chatter, and a feeling of horror fills me. Everything is turning black, and I seem to sink down, down

The

goat has been slain and sacrificed, and

awaiting the mighty revelation.

Where am

I,

of the supernatural, I

seem

streets

the

be

to I

am

and what and

Bucher.

Marrow

which

some great metropolis, possibly

in

meet I

Among Davis,

Young

of

to the door,

I

the other

find a

Ladies."

the capital.

I

am

in the

As

title,

I

of the Faculty are

MolHe Drinkard, and Ethel 76

realm

wander through

"Seminary

for

Cleek.

my

the

Training

In the principal, a white-haired, stately

personage none other than

members

Ah,

my gaze?

pass are veiled in mysteries of futurity.

confronted by a great stone edifice bearing the

Minds and Morals

who comes

sights are these that

the scenes through

dame,

former classmate, Bessie

Dorothy Avery, Gertrude Charlton, They are instructing girls from the


"How

following texts:

The I

of these

first

at

lines

me

directs

my

head nurse

for the

What

side.

of Intellect Con-

Varies Inversely as the Sixth Root of the Containing Body.

Has Been Effectually Proved by Misses Annie and Rebecca Banks." my former schoolmates have achieved such things! Among

This

possible that

paper,

in the in

find that there

I

America.

Definite

Rachel Beal, and perpetual

Here tials

is

smile

is

movement on

a

towards

steps

this

Hurdle.

Sallie

by

Hatlie

Hall,

Its

Alma

foot to establish an

Can

it

be

other things

Anti-Grouch League

end have been taken by Kathleen Cousins,

success seems

Carver,

sure

the

since

discovery

of

the

and Mary Dornin.

Galusha,

Carrie

an essay by Lobelia Drinkard on "Emphaticness and Firmness, the Chief Essen-

of Character."

The

Superintendent

is

now coming towards me,

conduct me through the building.

by reason of

their quiet

They

nurses.

manners and cheerful

me

escort

first

bringing two nurses

dispositions,

alternately imparting

this

time

we have made

movement

the rounds, so

to the next place of interest, the

the auspices of Ida Bowles,

Berger,

Lillian

exceeding those of

My

and

Madame

next destination

Why, modest way

is

Army.

true

Virgie

for the revival of the Latin tongue. I

must bid

new orphan asylum.

my

friends farewell

This

institution

the children receive kindergarten instruction

Bugg, and Nancy Johnson, the

has chosen

Grace Dickenson

impulses of uplifting the suppressed, has joined the Salvation

Fuller and Lee Brooks are starting a

the nurses

and Kathleen Browning,

has developed into a philanthropist of world-wide fame;

By

to

who

Virginia Davis,

Then we proceed on our way, knowledge concerning our former friends. Martha Bill

Agriculture as her vocation, making a special study of the "bean."

to her old

are

have proved to be excellent

the office of the Chief Surgeon,

to

who

These are Florence Battle and Hattie Dickey, who,

administers laughing gas to morbid patients.

me

come,

to

black head-

all this in

is

The Amount

Law.

Scientific

seems

Bessie

interest to visit in the city.

While waiting by

lying

is

by Moylan Banks and

"

by Dorothy Batten.

to various points of

"New

page?

Human Bemg

"

Life,

the City Hospital.

is

the top of the

Enjoy

to

paper which

shall glance over the

tained in the

"How

me and

overjoyed to see

Study Without Mental Exertion,

to

and

Clairborne Bouldin,

latter

of

whom

has

set

is

and

hie

run under

from Crispen forth

methods

Montessori. the

Supreme Court.

Who

is

this

coming down the

street

Nan Gray, just the same as ever. Nan informs me in a that, together with Mary Carnes and Frances Guthrie, she has risen to great heights in the field of Athletics. The other two are seeking still greater things along this line, but on account of heart trouble Nan is going to give up her present vocation and start a series of Chautauqua lectures on "Living on Two Minutes of Work towards me?

none other than

Per Year." 77


We

now

—

this

room

the

Lou has

floor.

The Heath

Mr. M. B. Coyner.

are running

madly

and

to

is

of

fro across

learn

I

are

twistmg himself into a number of fantastic

In a distant corner,

He

who

The middle

gymnasium.

a large public

is

seen directing these exercises, which

may be

sisters

shapes,

taking exercises for the development of muscle

stature.

The

whom

next persons

I

Mary Bruce and

encounter are

coveries in Domestic Science.

the latest thing in styles

Just in

moment an aeroplane

Just at this

Archambault and Carrie Hudgins on

are seated Marguerite

and

passes overhead.

way

their

newly erected

a

is

the

statue,

the court,

I

forced

to

sit

in

am

my way

soon on

the

gallery.

to

Harmon, and Virginia

The

the theater.

However,

do not mind

I

On

building in search of familiar faces.

her husband,

of

Elizabeth Gildea occupying the chair of the Chief Justice, while

find

the jury are Lucille Baldwin, Lilly

here long, and

statue

Arrived

Living Fidelity, whose features are identical with those of Margaret Hiner.

among

In

Paris to study

to

flirtations.

Congressional Hall

front of the

The former made new dis-

Alice Clarke.

has just published a volume of sentimental poems, while the latter has

at

This

established for the purpose of turning out

occupied by a number of children

"rushing."

is

me

next place which attracts is

lessons in

it

large

this

is

not cardcases, nor bookcases.

The

and

What

part.

"E. L. Davis, Case Manufacturing"?

sign,

Emmy

proves to be the place which cases

where our ways

arrive at the business section,

manufacturing establishment with the

the

front

row

this, is

Field.

I

do not remain I

am

and anxiously scan

the

house being crowded,

seated Phyllis Bayley, with

whom she hypnotizes with a Victrola. As might well be expected, she has Among the spectators also are Margaret Helm, now a great Sunday-

on a new waist. school worker;

Alice Howison,

Grady, who has become two slender beings

in

who

has gained fame

Surely they are familiar.

the rear?

Lynette Brock and Catherine Carter,

Can is

there be

any one

in the business

world;

else

whom

a higher class of vaudeville.

I

who

The

Maria Bristow

tell

is

curtain

rises.

chief comedian;

are these

are none other than

have got a patent on flesh-reducing

know?

Ford, and Ethel Fox are among the chorus Carrington and George Bayley,

They

and Hazel

Who

proficient in all branches of mental research.

The

evening's

Alice

exercises.

program

Dadmun,

Esther

while the wits of the evening, Louise

girls;

practical jokes.

The show is over and I slowly wend my way towards the depot. I must be home by morning. As I go along I pass many, many happy homes in which I spy the following Permalia Dugger, Marguerite of my classmates who have entered into holy wedlock

—

Heterick, Marie Brown, and Pauline

Howard. 78

I

arrive just in time to catch the train.


W^S^fjc lITir^inian' What They

this

is

commotion going on about me?

are sitting just

ahead of me, and as

old strain from "II Trovatore, the conductor

two

tickets to

"

"Home

to

There

are

bride and

a

groom aboard.

the train pulls out they softly sing that sweet

Our Mountains.

Cripple Creek

I

recognize

in

"

Just as the gentleman hands

the lady

my

Ruth

old friend,

Gleaves.

The

train roars

How

and thunders along.

drowsy

I

feel

!

Everything

is

assuming

an appearance of inkiness!

How

Ugh!

The but

sun

is

cold

just rising

...

I

it

and

is!

Where am

I?

Oh!

I

the earth will soon be astir.

have had the revelation.

This have

I

remember;

How

it

is

the

Taghairm.

weak and nervous

suffered for

my

I

classmates.

Margaret Franklin Snow.

feel,






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E



l^ir^inian'

glf2c

OUR QUEST Poem, 1914

Class

As

We

and

heart

in

V fare

Bound on

ul

forth.

wondrous

a

que;

Tis for the silver star that, long So runs the tale the brave Ser' Deep in the sparkling water of From which he drank beside the

One day

do

to

He

like a jewel

A

it

the perfect life

gain.

star

of

silver,

bore

li£

on mossy

the spring

nk,

drew, dripping, shir ng, pur

fashioned with a

So delicate it spoke of things And, like the splendid stars of It

to

gleaming there,

something silvery, mystic, breathing

He knelt low near And from its depth

A

spring

while fully bent upon a quest

For deeds

saw

:nlus founc

^-ay of life

skill

divine.

gold above.

radiant points.

five

Wondering, Serventus heard a voice speak "Within your hand you hold

That

points the

The The

first

way

the

magic

lo

star

into the perfect life.

point bids you follow Purity;

next,

seek Beauty,

for she lives to tint

Things common with her soft-toned glow;

Then, following,

find

Happiness everywhere.

And make

of her a friend of

The

fourth point says Love.

star's

E'er after keep her

And show

spirit

in

all

it

God and

then for

Peace.

her you win

As on

in flowing

She all

When

points the

way

it

to

cruel unrest will cease."

cadence came the voice,

Serventus bowed his head

in

reverence.

ceased the voice, Serventus raised his he speaking, broke the sacred silence there;

Thou,

The

fellow-man—

and makes

pulses sympathetic for the wi >rld; lastly.

When

"O

hi

your heart.

In love that strikes your heart

And,

true.

When

in a simple, living love,

First for our

With And,

most

the spirit of the silver star.

giver of

all

Purity, and Love,

!ll


——

g^gc llfir^inian' And

Happiness, and Beauty, and of Peace,

Accept I

am

To

my humble

thanks, though poor they be;

unworthy one of

the most

be the keeper of

But, fervently, with

there

all

guard the treasure

I'll

White-robed Purity

let

shall

my

humble duties of

of me,

is

my

guide

it

life.

with me;

live

Sweet Beauty, rosy hued, In

all

shining star!

this

ever find

I'll

every day;

Happiness, the laughing, blue-eyed sprite,

Unwaning,

pursue through each hour;

shall

I

Then, Love, all-golden

Her

spirit,

My

soul

And

my

shall

heart;

glow and broaden

with her help

Peace, hidden half

twilight's purpling clouds.

in

By

this

swear

I

to

my

to give

To following the spirit of this star And Thee, O Christ, Thee who gave as he turned a vision barred his

For

light.

God and man;

Will of her own accord then come good blade

her

in

serve both

I'll

keep

shall

I

well within the circle of

So wonderful and glorious

that

me. life

it

me."

way.

he fell-

Fell at the feel of Christ!

Serventus rode away, his heart made

light

With rainbow-tinted joy. "The silver star, and what became of it," you as The wheels of time in their perpetual move. Turn quickly round the circle of man's years. In time, Serventus died.

A

life

so rich in Purity

'Tis said he lived

and Love

And

Happiness and Beauty,

That

in the

At

the

Had Had The

—was

Peace;

her

life

own

found her lingering with him

desire till

his sun

set.

silver star, too, passed

There

No

end

too.

purple twilight of his

still

is

hope, and

it

way

upon

its

may

yet be found;

one knows where, nc»r how, nor when,

The

legend

is

that

he

Must be a-searching

And

w ho

finds the star

for the perfect life

serving others daily in his search.

it

see:


S^fje As

Uir^inian' one

in

heart and sou!

We

now fare forlh. Bound on a wondrous TIs for Ihe silver star. The sacred, silver slar. Guiding by

To

its

slender,

quesl.

glean

Purity. Love. Beauty.

Happiness, and Peace.

To The The

be found only by souls

who hunger

perfect

life,

and

for in

Their quest serve daily

Whom

they can.

JuANiTA Manning.


School Scenes


— —

MEMORIAM

IN

GENEVIEVE MASON HAYNES BORN IN

BERRYVILLE. CLARKE COUNTY. VIRGINIA APRIL

1856

12.

DIED AT THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

JANUARY

16.

1914

'WELL DONE, THOU GOOD AND FAITHFUL SERVANT' Angel voices sweetly singing, Echoes through the blue dome ringing. News of wondrous gladness bringing

Ah! On

'lis

Heaven

at

last.

jasper threshold standing Like a pilgrim safely landing; See the strange, bright scene expanding the

Ah!

'tis

Heaven

at

last.

Wh at

-What a glory! a c ty! Kar beyor d the br igh est story Of the ages old a nd hoary—

Ah!

No No Song

a

tea r

'tis

He

drop

1

al

last.

ver falleth.

a pi easure e\ er palleth, to song fore ver calleth— He ave 1 al last. 'tis

Ah!

Portia Lee Morrison,


gE^c ICrirginian"

O

Alma

Whose

Mater, gentle, strong, and

careful

true,

hand has led us day by day.

Receive our heart's devotion

now we

To-day we gladly

feet

turn our

Into the path of service, with clear

Which

Of

pray.

anew view

Let the ray

thou hast given lo us.

thy bright, guiding star shine on our way.

And

shed

If hearts

And

its

sacred light on

should weaken, or

sluggish

The

purposes

Oh,

let

memory no more

we have

thy altar

fires,

we

all if

do.

hopes should

fall.

recall

received from thee, still

burning bright.

Rekindle courage and dispel the night.

And

guide us onward

lo eternity.

M.

B. CoYNER.


'Qi^^

IC^ir^inion

January Class, 1915 MEMBERS Elizabeth Barham

Margaret Jackson Marion Olgers

Alice Baskerville

Selma Batten Annie Laurie Boone Lola Bull NoNiE Curling Laura Eason Olive Harris

Elizabeth Painter Claiborne Perrow Katherine Richardson

Dorothea Rolston Inez Taylor Helen Wimbish




'Qt^<i

Wirg'inian Junior Class

Motto: "Climb though ihe Flower; Chrysanthemum

rocks be rugged"

Colors: Green and Buff

OFFICERS

EVELYN NOELL

President

EDITH ABBITT

Vice-President Secretary

GERTRUDE TURNBULL LILLIE HUGHES

Treasurer Reporter

ELIZABETH EWALD class roll Edith Abbitt Eugenia Adams

Lucy Allen Rosa Allen Elizabeth Armstrong Nora Ashworth Louise Bailey Ray Bailey Alice Baskerville

Selma Batten Mary A. Bell Janie Berger Elizabeth Bivins Callie Bolton Elizabeth Boggs Mildred Booker

Esther Bowles Elise Bradley

Dorothy Bratten

Mary Codd Viola Cofield Marcaret Collier

Roma Garnett Lemma Garrett Ruby Gatewood

Olivia

Compton Grace Corbin Winifred Cousins Margaret Coverston

Grace Gibb Laurice Glass Frances Goldman Kate Gray

Mary Coverston Blanche Croy NoNiE Curling Edwina Daniel Frances Davis

Genemeve Gresham

Mamie Davis

Mary Davis Nettie Davis Ruth Davis Olivia Deisher Evelyn Dinwiddie

Beulah Drabble

Louise Broocks

Virginia Driver

Ruby Broocks Martha King Bugg Lola Bull

Jessie

Lltcile Griffin

Grace Groves Kathleen Hale Cornelia Hamilton Ella Hammock Annie Hamner Mamie Hamner Elizabeth Hancock Eugenia Harris Eunice Harris Myrtle Harrison Louise Harvey

Dugger Zephyr Dunton Laura Lee Eason Emma Edwards Emily Eley Blanche Ellett

Norma Harvey Catherine Hill

Jacquelin Epes

Malin Evans

Nannie Hughes Margaret Jackson

Ethel Cheatham

Elizabeth Ewald Bessie Faircloth

Emma

Martha Christian

Elva File

Mattie Clark Bertie Cleaton

Mary Fuqua

Julia Campbell

Katherine Campbell Lucy Campbell Rosa Caplan Margaret Carter Sallie Cassidy

Nannie Garnett 100

Madge Hood Nellie Hood Fannie Hosier Lily

Hughes

Elizabeth Jarratt Jesser

Gary Jeter Harriett Johns Marion Johnson


'^(l^

Wirginlan

JUNIOR CLASS ROLL— Continued Powers

Sallie Johnson

JosiE

Lucy Jones

Julia Price Louise Pruden

Ruth

Jones

Kellam Helen Kirkpatrick Martha Lee Annie Leigh Lillian

Christine MacKan Blair Maben Lelia Mackey

Mary Martin Annie Mason Julia Mays Elfie Meredith Mary Massick Hilda Miles Miller Louise Miller

Jessie

DiDIE

MiNTON

Mildred Moore Pearl Moore

Lucy Moss Nellie Nance Mary Nanny Olivia Newbill

Evelyn Noell Marion Olgers Eva Orr Carrie Owen Cassie Pace Lena Painter Lelia Parsons Bessie Patteson

Gay Puch Dorothea Ralston Alice T. Richardson Nannie Ritsch Rosalie Robertson Rebecca Rowland

Mary Rumbouch Luna Saunders Beulah Scott Fannie Scott Elizabeth Semple Janet Smith Temple Snellinc Eunice Snidow

Marnetta Souder

Anna

Spitler

Jessie Spitler

Mabel Spratley Mary Steceman Hazel Terry Virginia Thomas Mattie Towler Martha Troughton Gertrude Turnbull Annie May Tyus Ellen Vauchan Pauline Ward Margaret Waterfield Patsy Watkins Josephine

Wayts

Hansford Patteson Evelyn Peake

Gertrude Welker MOFFETT WiLLARD

Fannie Pearcy Clara Pearson

Virginia Williams

Sallie Perkins

Clairborne Perrow Margaret Porter

Clara Powers

Flora Williams Viola Winco Lucille Wood Lizzie

Young

Maggie Zernow



^Ijc lIFir^inian' Fourth Year Class Motto: Step by step we Flower: Pink Rose

reach the goal

Colors: Green and Pink

OFFICERS

ELOISE WATKINS

President

MARIE NOELL VIRGINIA WATKINS JOSIE

Vice-President

Secretary

GUY

Treasurer Reporter

ELIZABETH PULLIAM CLASS ROLL

Brenda Griffin

Eleanor Abbitt Nannie Bercer Irene Cooper Hazel Cobb

JosiE

Ruth

Elizabeth Jarman Lottie Jennings

Mae Cox

Bertha Jones

Mattie Love Doyne Mary Belle Frantz

Aurelia Kayton Dixie McCabe Juliette Mayo Mary Morris

Annie Fulton Louise Fulton Annie Gathing

Marie Noell

IsADORE Gills

Sue Parker

Ellen Goodwin Elizabeth Pulliam Irene Rogers

Alice Smith

Pearl Tilson Madeline Warburton Eloise

Watkins Watkins

Virginia

Marguerite Wood

Mary Wynne

Guy

Jamison



Šf^e

Wirglniaxi

Third Year Class Motto: Scire le Flower: Violet Colors: L_avende

nd Wliile

OFFICERS

RUTH BLANTON LOUISE BONDURANT CLYDE ROBINSON VIRGINIA HOWISON TILLIE

President

Vice-President

Secretary

Treasurer Reporter

JACOBSON class roll

Abell Annie Avre ViRClNIA Barnett Eva Barnwell LuRA Barrow MvRLLE Bennett Julia Louise

NiLLA Bercer IVIay

Blankenship

Blanche Powers Marjorie Flippen LovELiNE Foster Bessie

Booker Greene

Helen Harris Conway Howard Virginia Howison

Nellie

Hurt

Ruth Blanton

TiLLIE Jacobson

Louise Bondurant Sallie Booker

Grace Johnson Lottie Johnson

Annie Bragg Addie Brock Fanny IVIeade Brooke

Elise Jones EviE Jones Otelia Joyner

Bessie Burgess

Jessie

Alma Burke

Kellam Acnes Knightly

Addie Callis

Lily Lee

Helen Campbell

LuTiE Lewis

Mattie Carter

Nemmie Eicon Annie Loving

Ola Channell Mary Alice Cocke Lillian Cole

Esther Covington Alma Craddock Elsie Crichton Annie Davis Marie Doyne Pearl Drake Lee Drumeller Louis Drumeller Grace Dugcer Naomi Duncan Susan Ewell

Maggie McPeak

Bessie Prosise

Rosa Puckett Annie Ragsdale Dollie Rhodes Ethel Roberts Ellen Robertson Rebecca Robertson Clyde Robinson Ruth Robinson Nellie Rogers Marion Rucker Vixella Rucker Ruth Serpell Sallie Slocomb Frances Smith Annie Somers

Ruth Soyars Hattie Stephenson Mary Thomas Beulah Tull Alta Turner

Marshall Maxey Lillian Mickle Agnes Miller Carrie Moller Maude Mosely

Aloyise Turpin Elvia Vaughan Roselia Vaughan Alice Wheelhouse

Parkelle Mundy

Grace Walker

Muse Emma Noel Arselle Owen

Martha Watson Katherine Watkins Myrtle Watts

Katherine Pannill Lucy Parks Bernice Perrow

Janie Williams

Lydia

1(15

Gabrielle Wooding

Kathleen Wimbish



'^^^ lITir^inian' Second Year Class Motto: Excelsior Flower: Violet Colors: Purple and Gold

OFFICERS

RILLE HARRIS VIRGINIA RICHARDSON

President Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer

JOSEPHINE CLEAVES

FLORENCE HUNT

Reporter

CLASS ROLL

Blanche Acee Mary Allen Eva Merle Arvin

Josephine Gleaves

Virginia

Mary Hardy AuBY Hardy

Eline Norman

LiLLiE Avis

Elizabeth Harris

Marie Price

Martha Bass Mary E. Bell

Rille Harris

Alice Putney Rebecca Racsdale

Irving Blanton Nannie Bratton LiNNETT BrOUSE Thelma Bullock Hannah Burgess

Lynwood Hines Lucille Holton

Burton Annie Cheatham Elizabeth Clements Eva Counts Della Covington

Jessie

Ruth

Harris

Florence Hunt Daisy Johnson Gertrude Jones Rosa Jones Gertrude Kennedy

Edna Kent Elizabeth Lewis Frances Lipscomb

Martha Foster

Mary Littlepage

Louise Garnett

Dorothy Loving Neta W. Marshall Ida Mason Mable Milstead LURLINE MoRING

Mary Garnett Nellie Garrett Kate Giddons Belle Gilliam

Moses

Edna Palmore

Alice Rakes

Ruth Ranson Irma Rice Virginia Richardson

Mattie Roberts Gracie Rohrer

Judith Shumate

Florence Sledd Nellie Somers Frances Strange Kyle Thomas WiLMA Topping Ruth Vest Princess Watkins

Emma White Mattie Williams


gl^c llTir^inian'

First

Year Class

Motto: Rowing,

not drifting

Flower: Daisy

Colors: While and Gold

OFFICERS

MYRA BRYANT ETHEL FOSTER PHILIPPA SPENCER

President

Vice-President

Secretary and Treasurer Reporter

BESSIE CHICK CLASS ROLL

Ellie Love Byrd Michaux Lela O'Neal Bettie Peake Gladys Ranson Pattie Scott

Myra Bryant Leslie Carpenter

Mary

Virginia Carter

Virginia Carter

Chick Ethel Foster Ruth Fudge Ida Lee Gray Della Hamilton

Bessie

Beulah Station

Ruth

Sandridge

Ruby Woosley

Cary Woosley 108


^^c

ICfir^inian'

Y.

W.

C. A.

OFFICERS

SUSAN MINTON JOSEPHINE WHITE ESTHER FORD MARY GARY TAYLOR MARGARET HINER

President

Vice-President

Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary Treasurer

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES Missionary

Lucy Heath

Social

Kathleen Browning Frances Guthrie

Social

Music

Trotter

Bible Sludy

Alice Howison IsBELL

Service

Membership

Josephine White Lillian

Commitlee

Missionary Giving

Marie O'Neil

Devotional

Moore 109


g^^c llfirginian' Student Association "The purpose honor and its

to

of

ihe

further

Association the

interest

shall

be

to

preserve

of the Students so

far

Student

the

as lies within

power."

EXECUTIVE BOARD

RUTH CLEAVES

President

ESTHER FORD LILLIE HUGHES MABEL SPRATLEY MARIE NOELL

Senior Vice-President )

J"^'"" Vice-Presidents

(

Secretary

STUDENT COMMITTEE SENIORS

Susan Minton Kathleen Browning Bessie Bucher Hazel Gordy

JuANiTA Manning

Ruth Gleaves Esther Ford

Hughes MacKan

LiLLiE

Elise Leckie

Christine

White Louise Miller ^Constance Rumbough Mabel Spratley Mary Codd

Josephine

Fourth Year

Third Year

Second Year First

Madeline Warburton Fannie Meade Brooke Gertrude Jones, Josephine Cleaves

Byrd Michaux

Year

^Elected upon graduation of Annie Banks.

110




gri^c

l^ir^inian

Focus Staff 1913-1914

GRACE WELKER GERTRUDE WELKER MARIE NOELL MARY GARY TAYLOR ELEANOR PARROTT MARIA BRISTOW CAROL^'N POPE GEORGE BAILEY LUCY GRAHAM FANNIE MEADE BROOKE MARY BELL FRANTZ

Editor-in-Chief

Assistant Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Literary Editor Assistant Literary Editor News Editor Assistant

News Editor

Exchange Editor Assistant Exchange Editor 1914-1915

GERTRUDE WELKER MADELINE WARBURTON CHRISTINE MacKAN MARTHA CHRISTIAN ELIZABETH EWALD MARY BELL FRANTZ LOUISE HARVEY

GERTRUDE WELKER EVELYN DINWIDDIE FANNIE MEADE BROOKE

MARY RUMBOUGH

Editor-in-Chief Assistant Editor-in-Chief

Business

Manager

Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Literary Editor Assistant Literary Editor

News Editor Assistant News Editor Exchange Editor Assistant Exchange Editor


^ ^gc Wirginian

I

Virginian Staff

ALICE HOWISON

MARGARET MINER

GRACE WELKER VIRGINIA FIELD

MARGUERITE ARCHAMBAULT MARY DORNIN MARY GARY TAYLOR ELISE LECKIE

ELIZABETH EWALD

Editor-in-Chief

Assistant Editor-in-Chief Literary Editor

Assistant Literary Editor Art Editor

Art Editor Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Associate Editor from Junior Class Assistant


—

Wirglnlan

gEf2ÂŤ

A ^m^ ALK

about what would happen

^^^^

struggling, pushing,

meet

directions to

ment (see yon imposing

"Oh!" bringing

was

make

their vociferous

and the student govern-

way

to their various classes.

dismay as an enterprising elbow sent her books

down among

down upon

to

the reckless feet

and she scrambled

;

for

from

and

lifting that

which Uncle Robert

painfully (from Vivian's standpoint at least) trying to convey through the crowd.

At

last

somewhat

the books,

the worse

for

wear, were recovered, and, the crowd

have mysteriously melted away, she rushed on.

to

"Oh,

not a soul's on the hall!

I

know

"Wait, Vivian, didn't you drop

be late!"

I'll

What

this?

a

and she rushed to a leisurely

"My,

I

door of room 8, but, on finding herself

to the

amble and dropped limply

was scared

peanut!

to a

up several strands of hair

that

long, lovey,

anybody "Sh-h! lull

into her seat. I

thought surely I'd be

had escaped

a relief,

their

bondage

late,

in the

she gasped, pinning

"

scramble. late to this

class?"

it,

it's

I

Oh! what

guess

only for that poor Junior

is

that

on the board, surely

Grammar.

it

isn't a

Well, you might as well

" as

there he comes."

came

in

the chatter as the roll

the inspection of the Outlook, but Vivian's

descend

love!"

breakfast?"

What

A

my

slackened her pace

inside,

the star-course?"

"Don't you think test?

did

a special delivery!

it's

"Vivian, what are you raving about, don't you know you can't be

"Or "Or

When

smell handwriting.

come? I didn't see you get it this morning at the table. Oh, Why, what on earth?" "Thanks awfully, Janet, I must run; I know I'm late. So

it

to

flying

them desperately,

her defenceless head the wrath of the belated ones,

useful attachment just in time to encounter a huge step-ladder

seeming

kill

irresistible force

way through the shoving, mass of people who were coming in opposite passage by room J, and who were striving, m

that lady's stern countenance)

card)

silence

cried Vivian in

beneath her arm

same

chattering

in the little

law of gravity (notice

spite of the

an immovable body met an

if

easy!" thought Vivian, as she pushed her

that's

I

Ready-Made Romance

to current events,

Her hand clasped

tightly

and

the

the

square,

was

called,

and soon

the class

mind was too impervious

was deep

in

to earthly sensations

Mexicans and copper miners raged on

in oblivion.

white envelope, and she frowned darkly as she 115


marnng

noted a heel print

She compared

And

of the scribbler. written her.

fortnight

—and

"Why, earth can

whose

He

was

It

the

is

me about

Oh,

wasn't at

it

meant

My

all

in

any

like

"Wake

much.

so

letter

as that,"

on

spent in cutting up people and pulling to pieces horrid skeletons. those things,

but,

of course, he

Mr. Eugene's coat and

knew

we have

hat;

never could care for

I

and how some-

in hygiene,

and, oh, yes,

might

I

and a tug

at her sleeve

tell

him

all

all

aroused her.

You'll have to get a sure enough move on you now.

up, sleepy head!

though they do say

to,

it

has some educational value."

were made, together

the inquiries about the whereabouts of the late comers

with the shameful statement of the number of minutes each one was forty individual excuses

This

quick,

were demanded

to

be brought in without

Vivian was indifferent even

but

proceeded,

recitation

Sociology. the

"What

thought Vivian.

school affairs won't interest a doctor of medicine, most

no star-course you're going

After

for

the

if

had known him but a

realize she

germs and about the house-fly and the awful microbes he carries on

the class

stir in

the

seemed as

It

he never should be allowed to walk barefoot over one's food."

his feet, so

time,

people had

letters other

way.

indefinable

might write him about the skeleton

I

I've learned about

is

letter

no doubt,

time,

partially obliterating the dashing address.

She could hardly

intimately.

first

body dressed him up

This

the letter itself

write about?

never told

A

snowy surface and

careless scrawl on another envelope to the ignominious defeat

never can write as good a

I

I

skeletons.

its

so different in an elusive,

had known her

writer

of

to the

this

and

late,

at the

fail

to

the

some

after

next class

allurement

of

however, her estrangement from terra firma was not so complete,

time,

decisive

voice

would

her

interrupt

visions.

The

calling

of

her

name

startled her to a reahzation of her surroundings.

"Miss Mason, what can you

"Er

——— a

I

"Who'll

"Why,

Weddings

thought you wanted our

"Miss Mason, earlier

Well, Miss Mason?"

don't think they're the thing at

take place at sunset. I

us about the earlier forms of marriage?"

Miss Mason the question?

tell I

tell

didn't hear the question."

I

I

own

in

all!

I

think the ideal

daytime are so unromantic

—why,

wedding should

what's the matter?

individual opinion on social problems."

don't get you.

Miss Carter,

will

you

tell

us something about the

forms of marriage?"

Vivian

sat

in

rapt attention through the rest of the recitation,

nearly faded from her face

She walked

stiffly

when

and

the color

had

the bell rang.

into hygiene class

and composed 116

herself in a dignified manner.


^Šf2<^ Virginian' "There!" she I

"you

told the square envelope,

won't think of you

—

and she placed

so there,"

hoodoo me

sha'n't

this

time, because

firmly in her book.

it

"Well, Miss Mason," said the heavy, dehberate voice, "will you lend me your

No

book a moment?

letters in

That's the surest sign v.hen they get

are there?

it,

to

carrying letters around in their books." swift color rushed to Vivian's face again, but, determined to be composed, she

The

looked around defiantly only But, anyhow,

enjoyment.

and

carefully

see

if

to it

catch Janet's twinkUng eyes fixed on her

wasn't hard

she could

who

out a small spotted dog,

At

of

attention

looked as complacent as

if

listen

class

the door to let in or

trips to

he

the dinner table Vivian

owned

whole school and

the

puzzled over her problem, and even the reappear-

still

remarks and open

pie, or Janet's teasing

from her usually observant

sufficient to call a protest

groan as she saw only a newspaper for her mail, and, taking

Then, turning through the pages

over the headlines.

it

find

to

noticed that a in

lull

had come over

the

about the

hints

to

up, glanced abstractedly the

room, and she glanced up

social

columns,

she

But, oh! she hadn't to

catch the matron's

grieved astonishment.

Vivian's eyes

fell

to the

newspaper.

"Vivian, for the land's sake, look around and see the disaster you've wrought. did you squeal out for?

"I don't dare

to.

human countenance; Harrison's shawl

"

whispered Janet, glancing I

looked once and

and company

glowing redder

is

at

This

"Letters of

all

is

how

kinds written

the

'in silent

But, oh, joy, she had found a advertisement again.

it

I

interpretations given to your thoughts

way

!

at the

never

I

Home

What

newspaper.

saw such

mortification depicted on a

Department

table,

too!

Even Mrs.

sympathy'."

She hurried

to

her

room and read over

the

ran:

Terms most

reasonable.

on any subject.

The

best

and most correct

Your communications regarded

as

Patronize us and your correspondence will become a pleasure, and

strictly confidential.

your correspondents will be charmed.

!

Address Box 410."

She took out her paper and

She would do it commenced! She dropped relief.

letter,

She even forgot

self.

caught sight of an advertisement and stopped with an exclamation.

eye upon her

unmistakable

The

write about.

to

repeated

for the

in

now, and she would

it.

ance of the bi-weekly mince

were not

pay

something interesting

learn

went forward without interruption except

was proud

to

Once more assuming

the letter in the mail the

pompous bearing

hastily

box

wrote a

at the

letter.

There

book room with a

it

was

sigh of

suitable to a Senior she sauntered into


"

Wirginlan

i^STf^e up a few,

the library to look

to the table, as she

saw

came down (alas!) on

foot,

howl,

on the same errand, and,

Gyp, who,

the fat, squirmy back of

madly rushing against

fled,

the necessary explanations there

went the

the scene of disorder

and before Vivian could

and she didn't know

bell,

her

lifting

emitting a heart-rending

who descended on

the librarian,

with the rapidity which only indignation can lend to the limbs;

make

She hastened

at least, of the multitudinous civics references.

several others evidently bent

a thing about

that old lesson.

She hurried not come,

and

to the

Training School and took her place

time the chatter

this

was

The

in class.

that no thought of

so insistent

had

professor the

topic

plan

could reach her comprehension.

"Say, Vivian, weren't you

meeting

at that class

evening.

this

was

It

the hmit,

I

just

"Child, he wrote

"Oh, have you

me

a perfect scorcher,

new

see Grace's

"Why artistic

"Sh

didn't

Made

a beauty.

She

they are, too.

you come

nature study to-day?

to

curves the earthworm can take on

It's

out of that dainty,

me

told

she

was simply crazy

"

about her, and they say

and

Why,

cases.

don't intend to do a

"

pale blue crepe effect, with the dearest

"They're the biggest

I

dress.

"

You

missed seeing the charming "

'and, then, there's your spiders'

!

he approacheth

sh!

"Well, young

ladies,

you have had

minutes, and

five

In contemplation of the topic plan?

precious minutes?

how have you

spent these five

That

Excellent!

is

worth any

one's five minutes."

Yes,

Vivian peeped furtively between the covers of her book.

it

was

She

there.

contemplated the lesson plan.

into,

"At last," she sighed that night, "this day is over, and oh! how I pity the other girls. How terrible it must be to be

but

things

the scrapes I've gotten so

absorbed

in

material

with not a touch of romance, and the dreary prospect of endless years of teaching,

with your

final

days being spent with nothing but a

cheer your old age."

And

then she thought of the letter

her civics book.

but none of them

She went felt like

to the

She was nearly back

a parrot,

dream on

it

and a cup of

strolled over to the table

cried Vivian,

left the

to her

118

book

in

room when

"I'll

just

tea to

—and was — went

to-night

it

and cautiously took down book

She

"Oh,"

and then she remembered she had

gone downtown.

she must

shelf

the civics book.

the icy water drenching her feet. light,"

book

cat,

off

in

after book,

a glass

have to turn on the

Mildred's room when they had she heard footsteps coming

up


and

the stairs,

fled in desperation;

but

came

the footsteps

still

on,

and she jumped wildly

beneath the covers as a gentle knock sounded on the door.

Two

"Good-bye, peanuts, candy, and ice-cream soda now!

campus

weeks on

solitary

the

door opened and Mrs. Sleightor was silhouetted

for mine," she soliloquized as the

in the light.

"Are you this,"

asleep,

Vivian?

maybe you'd

thought

I

and before Vivian could recover

enough

herself

to

like a

cracker so

"She's the dearest thing!" thought Vivian as she reached for the

"What

on earth are you up

Vivian

to,

—was

that

I

brought you

thank her she was gone. letter.

Mary

Miss

in

here?" came a

sleepy voice at the other side of the room.

"No;

Mrs. Sleightor brought me a

but you are missing something sure enough.

"

cracker.

"Oh,

give

me

a

Don't throw

I'm simply starved.

bite.

There,

"Well, here goes!

isn't that

Vivian put her hand under the pillow then gradually dropped off to sleep;

it,

wait."

nice?"

make

to

and

sure of the presence of the letter,

and

yes, to sleep

to

dream

and

of corned beef

blackboard borders.

It

hundred

was a

lovely

June

fairy Hght-bearers,

The

night.

velvety

and fragrant with

the

dusk was

perfume of

glittering roses.

of the girls scattered over the grass shone palely through the darkness

gay laughter rang sweetly on the

still

But

air.

this

on

his

lights

cf

for the occasional stately tread of the policeman feet

as

made

he

a

tour

The

of inspection.

part of the

hundred

with a

The

white dresses

and now and then

campus was

save

silent

rounds or the pit-pat of Gyp's the

great building

shone

forth

and twinkled when Vivian saw them through a mist of tears, as if to say: "Come, now, are you crying? Have we not shone on you many times weeping and

brightly,

pleading homesickness?

Each

fall

we

see

some with pale faces and swollen

each spring they weep afresh and are sad

to

eyes,

and yet

say farewell!"

mood and spoke tenderly: know it gives you a terribly knocked-out feeling But, then, when the next June is here the roses will

Dr. Jack seemed to note her change of

"Don't take to

know

it

so hard, Vivian.

that school days are over.

bloom over

the door of that

little

Vivian did not answer.

bungalow,

and yet

it

was

Why

to her

hadn't she written her

so provoking to

if

you'd only say what

She was annoyed with

one which heretofore had not occurred of all times!

I

have

to tell.

seriously, should

own

I

want you

to."

herself that so trivial a thing,

letters?

worry her now

at

and this

She couldn't deceive him now,


As held

answer

in

if

toward

it

her thoughts. Dr. Jack pulled something from his pocket and

to

her.

"Do you know what

He

put a small,

written on dainty linen,

"Why, what "It

your

is

this

rather

and

worn-looking envelope into

was vaguely

the handwriting

her

The

hand.

letter

was

familiar.

it?"

is

me, and

to

first letter

Vivian's heart sank

in

I

have always carried

it

my

over

heart."

dismay.

never forget your

"I'll

Vivian?"

is,

she

letter,"

first

"I

faltered.

knew

could never write

I

one as good."

"My

first

The crowd of

bell

visitors

Vivian Dr. Jack

Well,

letter?

felt

and

What

never did! rising,

made

they

their

Something seemed

vaguely troubled.

in

with the merry

to

have come between her and

moment. Dr. Jack seemed abstracted, and they sat

took their seats in the auditorium.

"Oh,

they are going to

show

the projectoscope," said Vivian, and, glad of a topic

for conversation, she told all about the gift the Seniors

explained minutely the system of graphs and

most

as the

efficient

means of

"I thought maybe you might so

am

I

girls

busy themselves with

share a

little

joke with you, and

saw

it

up

problems of in

like to see

in

show you one

company have

what

it

I

thought

really was,

it

schools to-day the needs

some other phase of our school

activities,

is it

clipping

was

Now,

first,

on

Normal

I'm going

really a joke, though

am

I

to

the

my

you may

smile.

surprise

and

gratification that

profitable business.

and

Vivian

simultaneously.

"Vivian, do you know those girls?" said Jack excitedly.

120

The now

going to show you an advertisement that

screen,

Vivian hesitated.

to

of the secret business organizations of the

a very unusual and interesting variety, and so

and found

shown

moments.

dissolved the business and applied themselves

had been carrying on a very good and

The

She

to the school.

in the

and of meeting

their precious

their future schools.

a newspaper.

to see

had presented

was being used

a surprise.

students, but this isn't a practical joke, nor

partners in this so-called

I

it

going to show some of the various and sundry things that our

School

to the

how

testing the progress of education

But Dr. Bluff had

of the individual.

girls

slowly

while the people slowly assembled.

silent

and

way

girls.

in their happiest

They

I

clanged forth and,

"

I

traced

some of our

All right!"

and

Dr.

Jack

gasped


"You don't mean to say you've let this go on all the time without saying a word. "Why, Jack, I never thought it would really make any difference." "Not make any difference? Why, maybe it won't, but it seems to me you might "

have told me sooner.

"Why,

I

was going

our correspondence.

"Yes, but

"Why, myself

if

I

it

surely

Jack,

choose.

to

makes me

you

to tell

right in the midst of

know

to

should

that

feel that

you kept

way

mum

so

at all.

I

about

it."

can write a

letter

"

have

I

want

didn't

I

funny

feel

why you

don't see

I

you, but

tell

would have been absurd!"

It

learned

at least

Jack's hearty laugh drowned out her voice and sent a rustle of astonished disapproval over the audience.

"Jack, what on earth

is

Miss

the matter?

C

is

right

behind

us,

and

she'll

be

scandahzed." "

"I can't help

it,"

"It evidently

is,

"Why, think you'd

gasped Jack;

but what

"it's

funny!

it?"

is

don't you see, they wrote mine too.

known about

and Jack went "Well, of

into another all

all

it

That's the reason

along and hadn't told

—and

I

so foolish to

felt

here you were

in

it

too,"

paroxysm.

"and

things," laughed Vivian,

to think that

Janet

knew

it

all."

"

"Well, three cheers

but

for Janet;

isn't

it

funny?

M.

B. F.

APRIL Sweet April,

Comes

smiles

in

her

or

Fair April weeps Like pearls her

To

daughter of the year, through the woodland bowers. many changing moods.

tripping lightly

This maiden,

With

fairest

tears,

delights

woods

the

warm

tears fall;

find the cause, a tiny blade

She

The

sees,

the

too

passing hours.

dreary seem she breathes a sigh.

peeps up;

she smiles, a rainbow spans the sky.

tears like jewels to her lashes cling;

Her rosy, dimpled mouth is wreathed with smiles; Springing from the sunshine of her mouth, golden glory lights the woodland aisles.

A

Spring's fragile blossoms shed their fragrance violet bed yields nectar to the bee; Now fair Narcissus breathes his spicy breath. And sweetest Echo dances o'er the lea.

now;

A

Marcarf-t R. Porter. 121


nn

QL

LITCaAKY




grijc

l^ir^inian"

Argus Literary Society Flower: While Rose Colors: Olive Green and Gri

Motto: To

see

ihe

beller

OFFICERS FIRST

TERM

LILLIAN TROTTER MARIE O'NEIL ISBELL MOORE

second term President

....

NAN GRAY RUTH CLEAVES JOSEPHINE WHITE MARY GARY TAYLOR. EVELYN PURCELL LUCILLE BALDWIN

.

.

.

.

.First Vice-President. .Second Vice-President. .Recording Secretary.

.

.

.

.Corresponding Secretary.

Treasurer Critic

Censor Reporter

.

.

.

.

NAN GRAY HAZEL GORDY MARGARET PORTER LOUISE HARVEY LOUISE MILLER

EVELYN NOELL TROTTER .FANNY MEADE BROOK LILLIAN

...ELIZABETH EWALD

MEMBERS Lucille Baldwin

Evelyn Noell Marie O'Neil

Dorothy Batten Selma Batten Louise Bondurant

Jacqueline Epes Elizabeth Ewald

Sallie Perkins

Ruth Gleaves

Evelyn Purcell

Bessie Bivins

Hazel Gordy Frances Goldman Carrie Galusha

Mary Putney

Fanny Meade Brooke Mary Bruce Martha King Bugg Julia Campbell Lucy Campbell Abie Clarke

JosiE

Guy

Fanny Guthrie Nan Gray Meta Jordan

Margaret Porter Nancy Ritch Kate Richardson

Ruth Robinson Rebecca Robinson Josephine Sherrard

Alma Craddock Ruth Davis

Sallie Johnson

Louise Harvey

Lillian Trotter

Mary Davis

Elizabeth Kendrick

Aloyise Turpin

Edwina Daniel Mattie Love Doyne Mary Dornin

Cbistine

Altha Duval

Mary Morris

McCann

Louise Miller IsBELLE

Moore

Mary Gary Taylor

Josephine

White

Katherine Woodward Helen Wimbish Elizabeth

Walkup


'^^a lIFirginian" Athenian Literary Society Motto: Colors: Gold

pledge,

self-conlrol"

Flower: White and Gold Chrysanthe

nd White

OFFICERS— First Term

ELBE LECKIE MARIE BRISTOW

President

Vice-President

VIRGINIA FIELD

Recording Secretary

MARY MOYLAND BANKS GRACE DICKENSON

Corresponding Secretary

Treasurer

VIRGIE FULLER LILLIE

Critic

HUGHS

Censor Reporter

MARIE NOELL OFFICERS — Second Term

VIRGINIA FIELD VIRGIE FULLER

President

,

Vice-President

GEORGE BAILEY ALMA THOMAS

Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary

MARY BELL

Treasurer

BESSIE BUCHER ELISE LECKIE

Critic

Censor Reporter

ANNIE LEIGH MEMBERS

McGeehee

George Bailey Phylis Bayley

ViRGiE Fuller

Lilla

Genevieve Gresham

Mary Moyland Banks

LiLLiE

Marie Noell Elizabeth Painter Carolyn Pope ViX RUCHER Ruth Serpell Beulah Scott Alice Smith

Alice Baskerville

Mary Bell Crispin Bercer

Nilla Berger Maria Bristow

Lynette Brock Bessie Bucher Mary Codd Alice Dadmun Charlotte Dadmun

Grace Dickenson Vallie Englemen Virginia Field

Hughs Nellie Hurd Elizabeth Jarrett Marion Johnson Pearle Jones Lelia Kabler Elizabeth Kellam Jessie

Kellam

Alma Thomas Mary Turnbull

Elise Leckie

Catherine Watkins

Annie Leigh

Eloise Watkins Jennie Watkins

LuTiE Lewis Blair Maben

Marshall Maxey Mildred Moore

Roche Watkins Marguerite Wilson Mary Wynne


4*^^* m^'-"-.





'^^<i llfir^inian' Cunningham Literary Society 1903— Chartered

ed

Motto: "Carpe Colors:

Gn

1904

Dii

nd While

Flower: While Carnation

OFFICERS— Fall Term

ANNIE BANKS

President

GRACE WELKER BELVA POTTER ADELAIDE STORM SUSAN MINTON ALMA POINDEXTER

Vice-President Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary

Treasurer Critic

EMILY DAVIS

Censor Reporter

LOUISE CARRINGTON OFFICERS— Midwinter Term

GRACE WELKER BELVA POTTER

President

Vice-President

EDITH ABBITT

Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary

GAY PUGH HARMAN

LILLY

Treasurer

JUANITA MANNING MARY BELL FRANTZ

Critic

Censor Reporter

MARGUERITE ARCHAMBAULT MEMBEKS Edith Abbitt Eleanor Abbitt Marguerite Archambault

Annie Banks LuRA Barrow Ruth Blanton Mildred Booker Kathleen Browning Louise Carrington Margaret Collier Emily Davis

Hattie Dickey

Evelyn Dinwiddie Emily Eley Esther Ford Mary Bell Frantz

Elizabeth Haynes

Hancock Harman Margaret Helm

Susie Lilly

Fannie Hosier Alice Howison Virginia Howison

Elizabeth Jarman Margaret Jackson Mary Shepherd Jones Ruth Jones JuANiTA Manning Elfie Meredith DiDIE MiNTON Susan Minton

125

Janet Nicholson Eleanor Parrott Evelyn Peake

Ethel Pedigo

Alma Poindexter Belva Potter

Fanny Price Gay Pugh Alice T. Richardson Adelaide Storm Virginia

Thomas

Gertrude Turnbull Pauline Ward Gertrude Welker Grace Welker Madeline Warburton


S^fjc

lITir^inian'

Jefferson Debating Society Motto: "Equal and

exact

justice

to

all"

Colors: Middle Blue and Gold

Flower: White Carnation

OFFICERS— First Term

ELIZABETH BARHAM

President

MARY TRAYLOR

Vice-President

ANNIE BRAGG

Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary

MAMIE DAVIS M. UMBERGER

MARY

Treasurer

JUANITA MANNING

Critic

OFFICERS— Second Term

BELVA POTTER CONSTANCE RUMBOUGH IRA McALPIN

President

Vice-President Recording Secretary

,

ELIZABETH PAINTER

Corresponding Secretary

GERTRUDE GILLIAM

Treasurer

ANNIE BANKS CAROLYN POPE

Critic

Reporter

MEMBERS Marguerite Archambault Eva Arvin George Bailey Lucile Baldwin Annie Banks Elizabeth Barham Virginia Barnett Elise Bradley Annie Bragg Kathleen Browning

Thelma Bullock Rosa Capland Mary Carnes Alma Carver Olivia Compton Elsie Crichton

Mamie Davis LocKEY Delp Marie Doyne

Beulah Drabble Blanche Ellett Mary Bell Frantz Rubye Gatewood Gertrude Gilliam Ruth Gleaves Lucy Heath Margaret Helm Margaret Hiner Margaret Huddle Aurelia Kayton

Carolyn Pope Belva Potter

Mary Putney Rosa Puckett Bess Ritter

Constance Rumbough Luna Saunders Elizabeth Semple Eunice Snidow

Ruth

Soyars

Elsie Leckie

Annie R. Stone Kyle Thomas

JuANiTA Manning

Mary Thomas

Ira

McAlpin Moore

Isbelle

Arselle Owen Cassie Pace Elizabeth Painter

Ethel Pedigo

Pearl Tilson Mary Traylor

Mary M. Umbercer Josephine Wayts Katherine Watkins Bonnie Wycal






gl^c llfirginian' Pierian Literary Society Motto:

"Light, more lighl"

Colors: Green and Gold Flower: Marechal Niel Rose

OFFICERS— Fall Term

HEATH MARGARET HINER CONSTANCE RUMBOUGH

President

LUC^'

First Vice-President

Second Vice-President Recording Secretary Corresponding Secretary Treasurer

CARRIE HUDGINS JESSIE PRIBBLE CORRINNE KEMPER

MABEL SPRATLEY LUCi'

Critic

Censor Reporter

PARKS

IRA McALPIN OFFICERS— Spring Term JESSIE PRIBBLE

President

RACHEL BEAL

First Vice-President

MARIE BROWN

Second Vice-President Recording Secretary

MARTHA

BILL

CONSTANCE RUMBOUGH

Corresponding Secretary Treasurer

MARY MOOD MYRTLE HEATH EMMA JESSER NANCY JOHNSON

Critic

Reporter Censor

Hurdle

Lucy Allen

Frances Davis

Sallie

Virginia Atkinson

Nettie Davis Marrow Davis

Emma

Naomi Duncan Malin Evans Nannie Garnett

Nancy Johnson Harriet Johns CoRiNNE Kemper Martha Lee

Rebecca Banks Florence Battle Rachel Beal

Martha

Bill

Annie Blankenship Marie Brown

Roma Garnett Helen Harris Lucy Heath Myrtle Heath

Jesser Lottie Jennings

Pribble

Rebecca Banks Constance Rumbough

Mary Rumbough

Ira

Mabel Spradley Annie R. Stone Margaret Waterfield Patsy Watkins

Mary Coverston

Margaret Hiner

Nonie Curling

Carrie Hudgins

Lucy Parks

Margaret Coverston

Jessie

Lelia

Mackey McAlpin Mary Mood Pearl Moore

Sallie Christian

Hansford Patterson Mary Paulett Lena Paulett Clairborne Perrow


gifjc

Uirginian"

Ruffner Debating Society Motto: "Much Flower: Red Carnation

ntal

training

more"

Colors: Garnet and Gray

OFFICERS

ELIZABETH GILDEA SUSAN MINTON

President

Vice-President

VIRGINIA WATKINS

Treasurer

ADELAIDE STORM MADELINE WARBURTON GRACE WELKER

Recording Secretary Reporter Critic

Oara Powers Sue Parker

Rosa Allen

Mary Moylan Banks Rebecca Banks Mary Bennett

Eunice Harris Elizabeth Haynes

Hurd

Elizabeth Boggs

Nellie

Esther Bowles Ida Bowles Addie Brock

Otelia Joyner

Ala Channell Jessie Duggar Lemma Garrett Grace Gibb Elizabeth Gildea

Brunda Griffin JosiE

Guy

Lucy Graham Laurice Glass

Jessie

Kellam

Mary Lancaster Mary Littlepace Carrie Moller

Mays Mayo Susan Minton Mary Martin Lucy Moore Fanny Pearcy Louise Pruden

Minnie Ridgeway Rebecca Robinson Clemmie Soles Adelaide Storm Bernice Spenser

Martha Trouchton Ancie Tillett

Mary

Turnbull Watkins

T.

Julia

Eloise

Juliette

Jamie Williams

Madeline Warburton

Watkins Roche Watkins

Virginia

Alice

Wheelhouse

Grace Welker


%




^m^ Wirglnian Alpha Chapter of Kappa Delta Sorority inactive

Founded 1897

Chartered 1902

SORORES IN COLLEGIO Louise Carrincton

Esther Brooke Ford Fannie Meade Brooke Janet Nicholson Elizabeth Jarman

Eleanor Parrott Nannie Johnson Marv Shepherd Jones

sorokes in urbe Frankie McKinney

Mrs. Eugene Gill

Mary Jackson

Lelia Jackson

chapter roll ^/p/ia— (Inacllve), Slate Normal School Alpha Gamma— Coe College

Gamma— Holllns Epsilon Epsilon

College

HoUins.

— Louisiana Slate Universily Omega — University of Kentucky

Ze(a— University

of

Alabama Woman's College

Omi'cron- Wesleyan

College for

Phi Psi— Fairmont Seminary

Rho Omega P/.!— Judson Sigma Sigma

— Iowa

Lexington,

Kentucky

Tuscaloosa,

Alabama

Lynchburg.

Women

University

University

Virginia

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

r/ie/a— Randolpb-Macon

Kappa ^/p/ia— Florida LamhJa Northwestern

Virginia

Farmville,

Cedar Rapids. Iowa

-

Virginia

Tallahassee,

Florida

Evanslon,

Illinois

Bloomington,

Illinois

Washington, D. C.

College

Marion, Alabama

Slate College

Ames, Iowa





g^ge lITir^inian' Alpha Chapter of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority Founded 1898

Chartered 1903 Publication

:

The Triangle

SORORES IN COLLEGIO Ethel Pedico

Eleanor Abbitt Martha King Bucg

Alice T. Richardson

Turnbull Gertrude Turnbull Roche Watkins Virginia Watkins

Harman

Lilly

Mary

Elizabeth Haynes Virginia Howison

Alice Howison

T.

Grace Welker Gertrude Welker Helen Wimbish

Elfie Meredith

Sallie Perkins

sorores in urbe

Anne Richardson Mildred Richardson Quarles

Thelma Blanton Marguerite Watkins

SOROR IN FACULTATE Helen Blackiston

chapter roll Alpha— St^le Normal Epsilon—HoWms

School

College

Ze/a— Slale Normal

—Union

Virginia

Hollins,

Virginia

Athens, Jackson,

University

ALUMNAE Buffalo,

New York

Oxford, Ohio

/Cappa—Maine Universily Phi— Ohio University Sigma Phi

Farmvillc,

Buffalo,

School

New York

Lewisburg,

Richmond, Virginia

West Virginia

Dallas,

Birmingham, Alabama

Hampton, Virginia Nashville,

Te

132

Texas

Georgia

Tennessee





gifjc

IJir^inian'

Alpha Chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha Chartered 1903

SOROEES IN OOLLEGIO Elise Leckie

Marguerite Archambault Alice Baskerville Dorothy Batten Selma Batten Edwina Daniel Meta Jordan

Frances Price Elizabeth Walkup Katherine Watkins Emma Lyle West Mildred Moore

Elizabeth Clements Louise Miller Mildred Booker Marie Price

Altha Duvall

SORORES IN UEBE Juliette

Hundley

Elizabeth H. Paulett May Paulett

Charley Jones

Julia

Nellie Johnson

Hattie Paulett

Elizabeth H. Price





gifjc

Virginia n^

Gamma

Theta Club

Local Club Colors: Azure Blue and While

Flower: Lily-of-the-Valley

MEMBERS Carrie

Galusha

Evelyn Noell Marie Noell Evelyn Peake Frances Strange Blair Maben Mary Cary Taylor

Genevieve Gresham Martha Lee




Gamma

1 heta Club


——

Senior Alphabet A's

M

Aichambault,

for

On whom

eyes

ail

B

To

N

is for Bayley "Front Row Gish"— soup she can eat

C

many

On

a dish.

stands for

She

Dornin

Then why

you?

can't

Be ft

fair Laura Lee. declares she's no kin

To

F

R

stands for Field,

That

Gr

S

Gleaves,

for

Who'd Than go Decked

H

in

short sleeves.

To

ditty

is for Instincts and For Interest?, too, These make the Seniors Melancholy and blue.

is

for Jones,

A

name

Pearl and

Are two

K

is

A is

quite

rare

(?);

Mary Shepherd lassies

To

V

petite

of

her head

the soles of her

beautiful all

feel.

hair;

about

antics so

rare.

stands for Umberger,

And What

is

Upson, as well; become of them

will

We

never

may

tell.

for Vision,

An

idea of

late,

Without which no woman teach in

the State.

that

for?

They're a dozen of these; They're noted for doing

Whatever they

of her looks.

see.

Thomas,

W_-What's

for Leckie.

The maiden From the top

for

Can

fair.

for Kendrick,

lot

is

For her

(page).

V

Who lives by brooks; She always has thought L

Snow;

these there are three:

She's little

I

J

for

With the known

sheaths

their

We'll write a

is

Annie, and Addie, And "Crook," you

T

for

Ritter—

We Of

Training School

Heaths From the Magic City; is

tests

Diminutive Bess she's never a quitter must all confess.

rather get leaves to the

them on

get

for

is

Chin up in the air; She'd elope with the Senior man To-nighl if she dare. is

fall.

questions

Those who know something Are always marked best.

Tommy D.

our

teaching next for

is

We

Our

Who

gracious!

There're fourteen in all; Here's hoping they'll all

for Eason,

is

My

P's for

Davis, too. they loaf and get G,

E

round as the letter. be square get no better.'

tried to

But "she don't

And If

for O'Neill

is

hope by June She'll get her a man.

reside

to

another planet.

As

gets

And we

D

Nicholson,

for

Bertie and Janet,

They seem

Carver, through in Jan.,

for

is

She

yet gotten

on time.

class

is

mind.

the logical

She has never

Of

Full

Manning,

for

is

With

feast,

For her frocks are made By a French modesle.

please.

X. Y, and Z stand for Xcel, youth, and zeal; Verify these three words

And

the

Senior

is

real


Wirginlan

gr^c

"Homeburg" N

insane desire

came over me

against the wall

and break

away and

she

bumps the home

all the din,

joy of

I

My

landing.

so glad, to be

The

again.

But never

town Hotel!"

could almost

I

The

living.

heart thrilled

steep climb

up

I

turned the corner

down

to the

Heavenly Father

for sparing

and

same peacefulness and trees, the

ran, but

the street

same houses it

seemed a

and

I

Just then

saw

all

a

Outside,

the old

wharf

me

and

I

rushed

"Baggage!

hill

saw

I

the old, familiar

down

did not

Church

the steps, glad

Arlington Hotel! I

over with the pure

all

in the least affect

my

joyfulness,

Street with a heart of thankfulness

The

yet again to tread these old familiar walks.

S

every one

to

grown more

I

just

beautiful in

to get there.

I

had

oh,

James-

Unmindful of

wanted.

very blood bubbling

anxious was

—Home!

place

boat rocking and the jar that comes

was home, home

it

my

the same, but

the house

to run,

the

same

my

absence;

Then

and on

shade

big, old

the last

the porch

I

almost

bend

in

—Mother!

knock on the door and a friend asked, "What's the History of

Education assignment for

make

the

quiet that endears

the old familiar

snail's pace, so

came

me

street,

in their

feel the

porter called,

a hotel for

rushed out onto the

window.

gradually these scenes, grown so famihar through

these months, faded

wharf.

chair hard

Stifling this desire,

campus, the shrubs budding forth with spring, the

the green

walks

oft-trod

the

in

ram a

to

wood.

to kindling

went over and seated myself

I

scenes

when

to kick something; it

Monday?" and

then

I

did ram the chair against the wall to

kindling wood. S.

M.


llTir^inian'

gTije

From

Facts

the Registrar

600 girls at the Normal. 585 look under the bed at night. 400 chew gum all the time. 200 occasionally. 500 made bead chains. 00 own umbrellas, the rest borrow. 5 own aigrettes 50 wear them. I

—

jeweled frat pin, yet when the Annual appears

I

500 598

girls girls

own pennants direct from Harvard, go down the street every day.

all

have one on.

fifteen

Princeton, and Yale.

(Permission given once a week.) girl

I

meditates on

Sunday afternoon

—

while the

rest

make mayonnaise

wash

or

hair.

1,000 stamps borrowed during the year; 25 returned. 50 crates of eggs received at State Normal. 50 (same) used on the students in various ways. 30 days have passed and Miss Mary White has only been

mortified

30

times.

The Normal Gooseberry Species

AN

N.

S.

evergreen species, with large trunk and clumsy limbs, found growing places and dense forests.

upon examination,

nating

it

from that

it

class.

Unless watched carefully

Bum

Flower.

banks).

The

At

in

Produced by sowing hayseed and grows

quickly transplanted from the nursery. but,

S.

Once thought

to be a

waste

better

if

hydrophytic plant,

was found not to possess the power of absorption, thus elimiFound struggling for life about the Haze Bush in the early fall. it

will later

become a

parasitic plant

Christmas-time found clinging

winter variety

is

to

the

sometimes a great climber and

blossoms, whose petals have a smooth texture like sheepskin. 140

and

find itself

pawpa (whose in

about the

habitat

is

June bursts forth

large into


CLUSS

AND

ORGANIZATIONS


gE^e lO^ir^inian"

The

Scribblers ch should exceed

his

MEMBERS Georce Bailey Marie Bristow Mary Belle Frantz Mr. Grainger Miss

M[ss Johnson Juanita Manning

Grace Welker Gertrude Welker

Wheeler


gTfjc

l^ir^inian

Deutscher Sprachverein WaHLSFRUCH: Dichtungund Wahrheit BlUME: Die Kornblume Farben: Griin und Gold Fuhrerin: Friiulein Smithey

BEAMTE

BELVA POTTER TEMPLE SWELLING REBECCA BANKS

Presidentin

Vice-Presidentin

Schriftfuhrerin

MARY BELLE FRANTZ.

.

.

CONSTANCE RUMBOUGH

^%

.Berichstatterin

.Schatzmeisterin

MITGLIEDER Julia Abell

Eva Merle Arom Elizabeth Armstrong Rebecca Banks Elizabeth Barham

Martha

Bill

Kathleen Browning Bessie Bucker Jessie Burton Alice Clarks Eva Counts Margaret Coverston

Alma

Craddocf;

Alice

Dadmun

Evelyn Dinwiddie Mary Belle Frantz Laurice Glass

Brenda Griffin Bessie Greene Margaret Miner Katherine Hill Elizabeth Kendrick Nita Marshall Eline Norman Ethel Pedigo

Belva Potter Constance Rumbouch Temple Snellinc Annie Somers Ellen Vaughan

Ruth Vest Elizabeth Walkup May Wells Kathleen Whitt

1^^


S^^e

Wir^inian'

LECERCLE FffAW^W Flower: Le

Colors: Blue and Yellow

Fleur-de-lis

Director: Miss

Estelle

Smithey

OFFICERS

EMILY DAVIS

President

MARGARET HELM MYRTLE HEATH JANIE BERGER MARGUERITE ARCHAMBAULT

Vice-President

Secretary

Treasurer Reporter

MEMBERS Marcuerite Archambault Virginia Barnett

Susan Ewell Annie Fulton Louise Fulton

Fannie Pearcy

Evelyn Purcell

Rachel Beale LuLA Bercer

Elizabeth Gildea

Clairborne Perrow Marie Pannill

Roma Garnett

Gay Pugh

Janie Bercer

Ellen Goodwin Myrtle Harrison Elizabeth Haynes Marianna Hamilton Lucy Heath Myrtle Heath Margaret Helm Bertha Jones Corinne Kemper

Clyde Robinson Ruth Robinson

Alice Baskerville

Mary Bercer Nannie Bercer Mildred Booker Marie Brown Louise Bondurant Katharine Carter Ola Channill Gertrude Charlton Elizabeth Clements

Mae Cox Emily Davis Marie Doyne Mary Dornin Nettie Davis Jessie

Duccer

Permelia Duccer

Dixie McCabe DiDiE Minton

Amanda Minter Lelia Mackey Mary Wood Mildred Moore

Maude Mosley Eva Orr

Mary Rumbouch Sallie Slocumb

Bernice Spencer Mary Stoneburner Grace Welker Margaret Waterfield Eloise

Watkins

Katherine Watkins Moffitt Willard lucile scaff Rosalie

Vauchan

Rose Caplon Marguerite Wilson TiLLIE Jacobson

Elizabeth Pulliam


Cotillion

Club

CFFICErS FIRST

SECOND TER Vl

TERM

EVELYN NOELL PHYLLIS BAYLEY MARIE NOELL RUTH CLEAVES ETHEL PEDIGO

MARY MOYLAN BANKS NAN GRAY

Preshent Secretary and Treasurer Reposter Leaders

(

S (

\

ETHEL PEDIGO MILDRED MOORE ELIZABETH CLEMENTS

MEMBERS Eleanor Abbitt Marguerite Archambault LuciLE Baldwin

Mary Moylan Banks Alice Baskerville

Dorothy Batten Selma Batten Phyllis Bayley

Kathleen Browning Elizabeth Clemens

Alma Craddock Mary Dornin Mattie Love Doyne Esther Ford Ruth Cleaves

Carrie Hudcins

Jessie Pribble

Lucy Heath Myrtle Heath Mary Shepherd Jo

Fannie Price Marie Price Eleanor Parrott

Elizabeth Jarman Annie Leigh Blair Maben Christine McKan

Elizabeth Haynes Alice Howison

Mildred Moore Evelyn Noell Marie Noell Evelyn Peake Carolyn Pope Belva Potter

Vircinia Howison

JosiE

Nan Gray Louise Harvey

Powers

Ethel Pedigo Alice T. Richardson Frances Strange Virginia Thomas Lillian Trotter

Gertrude Turnbull

Mary

T.

Pauline

Turnbull

Ward

Roche Watkins Jennie Watkins Helen Wimbish


MUNOZ

MISS

LILLIAN

Director

TROTTER

ANNIE BLANKENSHIP

)

.

Accompanists

j

OFFICEHS FIRST

TERM

SECOND TERM

MARIA BRISTOW MARY T. TURNBULL EVELYN NOELL ESTHER FORD BELVA POTTER ALICE HOWISON CAROLYN POPE

LOUISE

President

HARVEY

BESSIE BIVENS

Vice-President Secretary

ALMA CRADDOCK MARY BENNET

Treasurer

TILLY JACOBSON

Librarian

GERTRUDE JONES

Assistant Librarian Reporter

MARY COVERSTON

FIRST SOPRANOS Marguerite Archambault Dorothy Batten Lura Barrow Annie Blankenship

Alice Howison Louise Harvey

Elizabeth Jarman Gertrude Jones Carolyn Popl Viola Ridgeway Lillian Trotter Grace Welker Lucille Williams Elizabeth Walkup Annie Stone

Bessie Bivens

Mary Bennett Mary Coverston Ola Channel Alice Dadmun Gertrude Gilliam Frances Guthrie

second sopranos Lillian

Bugg

Mary T. Turnbull Mary Wynne

Altha Duvall FIRST ALTOS

Annie Bragg Marie Bristovv Lynette Brock

Gertrude Charlton Lobelia Drinkard Esther Ford

Ethel Fox

Evelyn Noell

Carrie Hudcins Juanita Manning

Mabel Spratley

Emma Webb

second altos

Alma Craddock

Nannie Johnson

Tilly Jacobson

Belva Potter

Helen Wimbish



Dramatic Club

"TRELAWNEY OF THE WELLS" THE PERSONS OF THE PLAY THEATRICAL FOLK

Tom Wrench

Maitie Love DoyNE

_.

Gadd

Ferdinand

JosiE

James Telfer

Jessie

Augusius Colpoys

GuY

Pribble

George Bailey Grace Welker Mary Putney

Rose Trelawney

Avonia Bunn OF the bacnicce-wells theater

(Mhs Violet) Imogen Parrolt (Ohmpic Theater) O'Dwyer (prompter of the Pantheon

Alice Howison Marguerite Archambault Mary Bell

Mrs. Telfer

Mr. Denzil

Pantheon

the

(of

Miss Brewster (of

the

Theater)

JosiE GuY Mary Rumbough

Theater)

Pantheon

Theater)

NON-THEATKICAL FOLK Vice-chancellor Sir William

Arthur Gower

)

l-

his

'

j lvj ^ranijclijldren

\

j

\

Miss Trafalgar Gower (5|V William's

(a

LuciLLE Baldwin

Annie Banks

sister)

Naomi Duncan HowisON Nan Gray

(Claras husband)

Caplain de Foenix

Mossop

LiLLIAN

'

'

Clara de FoEnix

Mrs.

Maria BrISTOW TrOTTER

Gower, Kt

landlady)

VIRGINIA

Mr. Ablell (a grocer)

MarY RuMBOUGH

Charles (a butler)

Sarah

(a

LuciLE Baldwin

maid)

Act I— Mr. and Mrs. Telfer's Lodgings

in

Number Two, Brydon

Crescent,

Clerkenwell.

May.

Act II—

A

Drawing Room

m

Sir

William

Gower's

House,

in

Cavendish Square.

Act IllMiss Trelawney's Apartment

in

Brydon Crescent.

Act The Stage

of the Pantheon Theater.

A

October.

IV— Few Days

Later.

June.



gTf^e

Wirqinian'

Camp

Fire Girls

Marie Bristow Alice Dadmun Ruth Surpell

Ruth Blanton Mary Traylor Eunice Snidow Agnes Knightly



g^l2«

l^ir^inian'

Mu Omega Colors: Black and While

Flower: Funeral Wrealh

MEMBERS

MARGUERITE ARCHAMBAULT KATHLEEN BROWNING MARTHA KING BUGG PHYLLIS BAYLEY ALMA CRADDOCK MARY DORNIN RUTH GLEAVES ELIZABETH KENDRICK ELFIE MEREDITH ETHEL PEDIGO ALOYISE TURPIN

MARY

T.

TURNBULL THOMAS

VIRGINIA

152



S^f^c

Wirglnian

B.E.A.N.S. Planted Motto:

in

1910

Belter lo be a live bean ihan a dead beat

Colors: Pea Green and Pare!

Flower: Pea Blossom

TOAST Though we have Turnip

May

noses,

reddish cheeks.

and carroly

hair.

our hearts be not hard,

Like the hearts of cabbages.

Nor our remarks be

pithy.

MEMBERS Fannie Meade Brooke

Margaret Helm

"Fannie

"Maggie Hell

Louise

Miller

"Polly

Isbelle

Moore

"Issie

Evelyn Purcell Mary Cary Taylor

"Cary

White Katherine Woodward

"Pi

Josephine

"E "Jo'




'^^<i

w A N

ICTir^inian

MEMBERS Phyllis Bayley

Helen Campbell Elizabeth Clements Margaret Coverston Emily

Da\'IS

Mary Dornin

Ruth Cleaves Elizabeth Haynes Alice Howison Nellie

Hurd

Carey Jeter Sally Johnson Elizabeth Kendrick Blair

Maben

Elfie Meredith ViRCiNiA

Thomas

Gertrude Turnbull Marcaret Waterfield Gertrude Welker Josephine

White


S^^e lITir^inian'

Pi

Alpha

BESS BIVINS

FRANCES DAVIS EMILY DAVIS

NAN GRAY JOSIE

GUY

BLAIR MABEN

LUCY PARKS JESSIE PRIBBLE

NANCY RITCH VIRGINIA ATKINSON

KATHERINE

WOODWARD



6i;f2e

ID^irginian Mildred Moore Alovise Turpin

Edith Abbitt

Marion Johnson Martha Lee Sallie Perkins Elizabeth Ewald Christine

McKan

Eleanor Parrott

Mary Moylan Banks Marguerite Archambault Kathleen Browning Hattie Dickey Lilly

Harman

Fannie Meade Brooke Virginia Howison Virginia

Watkins

Louise Carrincton


F^^e lITir^inian^

Delta Sigma Colors: Green and Black

Flower: White Rose

MEMBERS Margaret Helm

Edith Abbitt

Ruth Blanton Martha Christian Lucy Heath RooNEY Heath

Gay Puch Watkins Watkins Josephine White Eloise

[Catherine


grgc lIFirginian'

The Kodak Club Motto: "Out

fo

OFFICERS

LOUISE PULLIAM

President

ELIZABETH JARRATT

Secretary

"GOOD TIMERS" Elizabeth Pulliam

Louise Pulliam

Hazel Terry

NoNiE Curling Lillian Mickle ROSELIA

Ruth

VaUCHAN

Sandidge

Elizabeth Jarrett Louise Garrett

Hattie Hall

HONORARY MEMBERS Mr. Thomas D. Eason

Miss Julia Johnson 162



Srf2e

l^^irgintan'

ELIZABETH JARMAN

MARY

T.

TURNBULL

JANET NICHOLSON ELISE LECK.IE

ROCHE WATKINS

EDWINA DANIEL HELEN WIMBISH

ALTHA DUVAL


gEfje

Wir^inian'

MEMBERS

HARRIS HATTIE DICKEY

MRS. M.

P.

LILLY

HARMAN GRACE WELKER EDITH ABBITT

GERTRUDE WELKER VIRGINIA THOMAS


gl^e IC^ir^inian' The Lynchburg Club OFFICERS

CONSTANCE RUMBOUGH FANNIE GUTHRIE LUCY PARKS HATTIE HALL MEMBERS Lucy Allen Annie Blankenship Sallie Cassidy Elsie Cleland

Ethel Cheatham Mary Dornin Naomi Duncan Fannie Guthrie Hattie Hall Alice Howison Alice McLaughlin Elise Leckie

Lucy Parks Clairborne Perrow Josephine Phelps

Alma Poindexter Jessie Pribble

Constance Rumbouch

Mary Rumbouch Lillian Trotter

May Wells Katie Woodward

President

Vice-President

Secretary

Treasurer


gr^c

faithful

lo

Wirglniari

Colors: Pink and

Albemarle"

Flower: The Apple Blossom Favorite Stunt: Ealing "Alber Favorite Trip: Going

lo

Monlii

MEMBERS Abel, Julia

O'Neill, Marie

Beal, Rachel

Paulett, Mary Paulett, Lena

Battle, Florence

Alma Cox, Mae Edwards, Emma

PuRCELL, Evelyn Sherrard, Josephine

Harvey, Louise MUNDY, PaRKELLE

White, Josephine Watts, Myrtle

Carver,

Trevillian,

HONORARY MEMBERS Dr.

J.

L.

Mr. M.

Jarman Coyner

B.

Mary

Gn


Virginian'

'^^<i

Southampton Club Motto; "Devouring PÂŤanuls" Colors: Pea Green and Yellow

Flowers: Peanut Blossoms

OFFICERS

CAROLYN POPE

President Vice-President

EDITH ABBITT ANNIE LAURIE BOONE ANNIE BROWN LEIGH

Secretary Treasurer Reporter

MARY WYNNE PEANUTS Edith Abbitt Elizabeth Barham Hannah Burgess

Annie Laurie Boone Callie Bolton Elsie Crichton Mamie Davis Pearl Drake

Bessie Faircloth

Annie Brown Leigh Fannv Pearcy Carolyn Pope Alta Turner

Mary Wynne Virginia Williams

Mattie Williams


Roanoke Club Colors: P.nk and Green

MoTTO: Climb

for

your goal

Flower: Mounlain Laurel

OFFICEES

MARGARET COVERSTON

President Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer Reporter

MARIE BROWN

ROONEY HEATH LOUISE PULLIAM MEM3ER&

Marguerite Archambault Virginia Barnett

Martha

Lucy Heath Rooney Heath Corinne Kemper

Bill

Marie Brown Elizabeth Bollinc

Lydia

Muse

Elizabeth Pulliam

Olivia Compton

Louise Pulliam

Viola Ridgeway Minnie Ridgeway Elizabeth Semple

Margaret Coverston Beulah Drabble

Honorary Member: Miss London


^fje llfir^inian'

tl^ Vu^ dU^

SL'Jiy^

Lu-i^f^,

-j'^^^Jinr^

Eastern Shore of Virginia Club Motto: "Never loo full for anolher Flower: Branch Laurel Colors: Green and While

oyster"

OFFICERS

MARY GARY TAYLOR

President

ESTHER COVINGTON HAZEL GORDY ELIZABETH BOGGS

Vice-President Keeper of Records

Handler of Currency

OTHER EVERGREENS Georcie

Lola Bull Zepher Dunton Grace Gibb Lottie Johnson

Annie Mason Ida Mason Marjorie Matthews

Honorary Member: Miss Mattie Spencer Willis

170

McMath

Sallie Slocomb Annie Somers Nellie Somers Inez Taylor Beulah Tull Corinne Wescott



c

Wir^mian

Athletic Association OFFICERS

NAN GRAY MARIE NOELL JESSIE PRIBBLE

MARY MOYLAN BANKS MARY DORNIN

President

Tennis Vice-President

Basket-Ball Vice-President Secretary

Treasurer


^^c

lirirginian'

Senior Songs and Yells

What

Recess! Rah! Rah! We're not allowed to

dear,

so

Juniors

Think we

don't

a foolish ide

Tunc __ Oh.

We're That

the

fuss;

But, nevertheless, we must confess. There's nothing the matter with

love

Dixie

:

a

sing

let's

song that

s

very

light and blithe and merry, Hoorav, Hooray, Hooray!

Gay and

girls

don't give a ha

'Senior Class! wearrag Here's luck to every one who s Senior badge, and our love sharing.

Hooray, Hooray, Hooray! Hullacaloo, calac. caloo. Who are we, who are you? Got you guessing, one and Senior,

Senior Class!

Chorus:

Senior basket-ball!

'I'm glad

1

am

a Senior,

Are you?

Are you?

To

Senior Class

and die Hooray, Hooray,

I'll

Hike, Hike. Hike, Hike, Hike, Hike, Hike—Seniors!

live

Seniors!

,rs!

Se

We

9 9 9

I

State

1

4 4

1

4

1

what

that

lasts

'till

Tune

Normal!

a zip, two a-zip, three

we

get beat

HobbI e, gobble,

we

don't

razzle,

gi'

da;

Sis be om bar,

Senior s!

Seniors!

Rah!

the

whole wo

passed!

:

the

Take ball

the flowers

from

the

Rah!

Rah!

the bees, etc.

from

Juniors,

And throw for the goal, And that's how we'll If

spells

scare

to

Seniors are we.

Get

One

that

em. Yes, we'll beat them; Senior, don't you see?

is

1

Harrlgan

know

Senior. surely are the class

Rah! Rah! S-E-N-I-O-R, We're the class

VI

YELL I

you

S-E-N-I-O-R,

Rah,

Rah,

true,

and die for he

live

I'll

rune;

Ray— Ray— Ray,

be

e'er

I'll

for Seniors,

win

the

game;

lines. Don't make any fouls by crossing the Or calling somebody's name. win. to best their doing are The Juniors But that would be a shame, game, get your fame by winning the

So

O

you Senior team!


SENIOR SONGS AND YELLS— Continued Tuna:

Turkey

the

in

Our Our

Senior

man

is

Coyner

stands for

class

Rah, Rah,

rah, rah,

rah!

rah,

rah!

Our

life's as free

As

for basket-ball.

c

are the best:

W« do not mmd ^ W^ never gel

Rally, Seniors, right this way. yell

Solomon Levi

You know we

true,

rah,

^

We are (he Jolly Seniors At the dear old S. N. S., „ We know we are the FINEST

S.,

true,

that's

all

rah— rah, rah— rah,

'"'"

Straw

Well, we are the Seniors of S. N. The dear school, we love it best,

our

work

at

a note.

and

in a motor-boat.

Chorus :

O xill

Tunc:

S— e—

is

is

n—

it

the

Chicken

way

it

the

is

is

to

fire

to

r

S-e-n-i-o-r,

Way

to

it.

We

is

But, oh, no, don't believe it, Did you hear the referee call?

the

that

^^^ ^^^ j^jj^ g^^.^^^ At the dear old S. N. S., know we are the finest class,

You know we are the best. The Juniors think that they can Us playing basket-ball,

the

to

la, la,

in.

third.

— season word. o— 'em — most end. i

la,

the Jolly Seniors, tra la,

^^

begins.

the next letter in is

Jolly Seniors, Seniors, tra

We're

the

spell Senior.

'Tis

1914

And So

to

'15

We'll

in in

the the

lead. rear.

Jolly Seniors g.ve another cheer.

the

beat

la,

la,

la,

la


W^^

lITirginian'

Senior Basket-Bali Virginia Jessie

Coach

Paulett

Captain

Pribble

Nan Gray

F

j

Jessie

a ds

Pribble (

Frances Guthrie CORINNE WeSCOTT

j \

^^

,

Team

MoYLAN Banks Belva Potter Esther Ford Helen Wimbish Phyllis Bayley Margaret Wilson

Jumping Center

cj r „i.„ t^enters oide

/ I

\

] }-

J

Substitutes


'Qi^<i

Wirglnian

Junior Basket-Bail

Team

MEMBERS Grace Walton Evelyn Noell Evelyn Peake

Emma

Coach Captain

Forward Forward

Jesser

Powers Julia Campbell

Side Center

Perkins

Guard

Sallie Johnson

Guard

JosiE

Sallie

Side Center

SUBSTITUTES LiLLiE

Hughes MOFFETT WlLLARD Evelyn Noell 176


glfjc

lIFir^inian

Nonpareil Tennis Club OFFICERS

NAN GRAY

President Vice-President Secretary and Treasurer

ELIZABETH EWALD

MARGARET COVERSTON MEMBERS Galusha

Phyllis Bayley

Carrie

Kathleen Drowning Margaret Coverston Mary Coverston

Ruth Gleaves Nan Gray

Emily Davis Mary Dornin Elizabeth Ewald

Christine

Jessie Pribble

Fannie Guthrie Elise Leckie

Sallie Perkins

Thomas Mary T. Turnbull Helen Wimbish Virginia

honoeaky members Thomas D. Eason M.

J.

B.

COYNER

177

McKan

Ethel Pedigo

Merritt Lear


liJir^inian^

grijc

Love Set Tennis Club Motto: "No

love but in

the

game"

Colors: Red and White

OFFICERS

EVELYN NOELL CAROLYN POPE

President Vice-President

MARY MOYLAN BANKS

Secretary Treasurer Reporter

JUDITH SCHUMATE MARIE NOELL members

Eleanor Abbitt

Carrie Hudcins Mary S. Jones Louise Meller

Edith Abbitt

Mary Moylan Banks Louise Carrington

Mary Codd Grace Dickenson Esther Ford Lucy Heath Myrtle Heath Alice Howison

Emma

Jesser

Evelyn Noell Marie Noell Eleanor Parrott Evelyn Peake Carolyn Pope Nancy Ritch Judith Schumate Beulah Scott


'^^<i

lO^irginian

S. N. S.

Book Store

"The Danger Mark"

Poor

"Pictorial Review"

Annual Mr. Eason

American" "Popular Weekly" "The Other Wise Man" "The Long Roll" "Smart Set" "National Pure Food" "Scientific

Main

Street

Dr. Stone

Chapel Absences Scribblers

Normal School Fare

"Harper's" "Review of Reviews"

Virginia

Field.

Louise Pulliam

Baked Hash

"The House of Happiness" "The White Linen Nurse"

Infirmarv (?)

Mrs. Berrv

Local Color The Annual arose.

Mock much

It

was

Staff

stated that

Faculty, another a alike to

The question of an entertainment for the Annual we were allowed two entertamments. One suggestion was a Circus, whereupon the Editor remarked, "Won't they be too

had a meeting.

have both?"


Wirglnian

STfje Who

Doesn't Believe

Miss Mix (talking to David Grainger in did you come to school this morning? David (who is somewhat of a dreamer,

in

Heredity?

the Kindergarten)

"Well, David, how

:

"

who

but

has

managed

to

catch the ques-

"

tion)

"Just pokin' along.

:

Dr. JarmaN do wish

the girls

if

(disgusted with the brilliant hue of the fashionable petticoats)

had

to

wear those

Seen

"Dear

Sir

I

notice that

gendeman.

either lady or

position."

For Sale

—A

for an organist

for several years,

Newfoundland dog with

full

I

"I

and music teacher,

beg

pedigree;

to

apply for the

is

kind and will

teacher had asked one of her pupils to give a sentence with the

standing in

:

sireese."

the Want Column

in

you have a vacancy

Having been both

splendid

would wear dark blue

very fond of children.

eat anything;

The

—

sireese skirts they

"The

This was the response:

it.

old red

cow was

tired,

word

notwith-

but not with

standing."

Tramp

(draining the last of the cider from the bottom of the barrel, says to the

landlady whose beverages are not of the strongest)

:

"Say,

if

you'd had another apple

"

you might

'o

had another

barrel,

eh?

"James," called mamma, "what "Nothing,

mamma;

is

a naughty fly

the matter with

lit

baby?"

on baby's head and

ISO

I

killed

it

with the shovel."


i?i


A9 THt

Town TOLK SEE

«

El?

'\%

SHE SE Eb

MER SEVF


"Virginian

'^^<i

IjOVlT liAve you.T

orirV\i>

A MIDNIGHT ADVENTURE George and Carroll planned, one

Some

i

Trying

ighl.

mischief sure lo do;

Wailing

late, unlil

were

id of

all

but

few.

Quick

they

No.

The

sped

from

old

Infi

m

to

Floor

1;

quiet of the Office

to

control

her

laughter:

tune

out,

eh?"

latest

the halls

was broke , by

the fun.

t

answer:

Mission over, joy complete, these two maids waste no lime. But,

for

the

home Central! Give me 2-8," George did gravely say. important! Call Miss Jennie, ere the b.eak

"\Vhal's

"What?" And George did quickly "Why. the spittoon, all do say."

Third Floor, run in a

letter

Y, made o

line.

Hello, It's

of day." Down she came, excited, anxiou s. lest some friend had passed away. In a whisper: "Here's our chance though we'll surely have to pay."

One day 'Til

passed and all was well, Miss Jennie grew quite angry.

To the Home Department came And laid bare the case.

'

she

Tis no use to say what happened. maids are quite at home.

for

Not till June comes, with commencem ent, Will they be allowed lo roam.

th


tY


^S^f2*^ Wirginiari We

Lest On

Forget

September 9 we our destination reached.

But echoes of our waiting have not

yet ceased.

— from We were Room paper by means Sept. 26 — Our At A. we chewed Y. W. drawing-room Sept. 27 — from we had them begun and Oct. —The Wade's and 6 — The F and Oct. communicate by means Oct. — Jarm away we "Jim." 6 — The up some Oct. And new by few hard and Oct. — on Mother Goose, To show Oct. 22 — Miss Mary reminded As Nov. 9 — At Normal begun

Sept.

overflow of humanity.

Suffering

1

led in

order to avoid insanity.

in

I

identity obvious

of a

C.

the

Several couples Results

in the

in

the rag.

extreme poetic motion;

a soothing lotion.

to give

this,

rushing season has

I

tag.

met, then

reception

is

at

its

height.

Chappel's, the popular resort, the source of our delight.

Faculty try

7

Dr.

tells

Informs us

with us

to

us dancing

adhere

if

initiate the

1

to

it,

he'll

Literary Societies proceed to

I

7

of

a sin;

is

a

girl

our

take

gaps.

fill

smacks.

hits

Seniors give classic play

our appreciation every class

let loose.

us not to throw old biscuit.

has

'twas apt to cause a fuss. a race

the

I

By Mr. Gr Nov. 20

In

Nov. 28

is

Mary

Dornin,

which Mr. Grainger won.

'Gish

By

and

"

Bayley rounds up

leading Y.

W.

C. A.

Thanksgiving came with a

But the Seniors scored

1

the day. in

a sympathetic

way.

httle bit of rain,

1—10

in the basket-ball

game.

Dinner was course and no grumbling was heard.

We were Nov. 30

Couples

too full for utterance,

strolling here

and

we

there.

Some were dark and others fair; Some were happy, some were glad; Some were sedate, and others mad.

didn't say a word.

P.


l^irciinian'

grf^e Dec.

1

—Nan Gray was — and Emmy Lou came knew make —Homeward bound was them —We were But we and 4 —A come But —Everybody back and Rushing —Miss M The we —The Annual

seen studying once in her

Better late than never,

Dec.

1

5

P. C.

to breakfast fully clad.

Because they

Dec.

1

the joyous crowd.

Visions of sugar plums on

due

all

to

were bestowed.

come.

missed the train

few did

Jan.

Mrs. Harris mad.

'twould

9

3

Jan.

life.

our advice.

is

couldn't run.

back.

their smiling faces they did lack.

5

Jan.

looking

line.

to get to chapel just in time.

Jan.

I

5

seen dressed in white.

fashion of dress

Jan.

Jan.

I

7

But

to

But

to tell

in the

you who got

8

it

all-star

Jan. Jan.

Richmond

loss.

trip

"Trelawney of

presents

performers of

whom

him did

cost.

Wells,"

the

no one can excel.

term begins with the appearance of high collars and

came,

we

saw,

did not eat.

Cheese for supper, instead of meat.

Feb.

reception given called the Junior-Senior, a concert, then a fine

Feb.

5

all

dressed

in

menu.

our best

have our features perpetuated and put

Feb.

I

3

Shouts of joy heard

all

covered

Feb.

the table.

are not able.

record his creamery

fails to

the nickel that the

Jan.

we

Room, gum was found under

Faculty

our regret. Dr. Jarman's

— Mr. Lear And 23 — Dramatic Club The 26 — The new 27 — We we 4 —A Attended —We To — Deep snow had 25 — Ah! Ah! Such I

think quite right.

met

Staff

The Annual,

the

to the test.

around. all

the ground.

sighs of distress;

Annual, has gone

186

to press.

all

kinds of pins.


a. -\AU L ja-nCE

T\.5)

MonaT-T.XI.

5^.

we

cA- a.

^ Vva. ^i» w—

V\fe<aa5 "iV^AV^jy co))

-^^ ^ \a CL

W

c\_

The Foolish Dictionary Horse-power

is

A Vacuum

a large empty space where the

is

the distance one horse can carry a

An Abstract Noun Cauliflower: Kiss:

An

"That

air

it.

this

this 'ere;

say

may have

been

door

in the

wee small

wife's done gone

Absent-minded man told

this

to college, but

what

I

want

to

say

is

that that air

ear."

policeman was watching Pat,

what my wife

college.

" don't say

blowing on

home from

" resumed her father.

lady, you

"My

at

a college education.

don't say that 'ere," said the daughter just

"Young

A

one you can't see when you're looking

Cabbage with

"Papa!

front

of water in one hour.

lives.

"

"This ear

own

pound

improper noun which few maids can decline.

"Oh! papa,

is

is

Pope

me

hours,

who was trying with all his powers when he heard him say with disgust:

to

get in his

and got disagreeable and removed the keyhole."

to the

dry goods clerk:

to get her;

would you mind

"Er — — — naming I

er

can't think for the life of

over a few things?"

me


llfir^inian'

gri2e

ÂŤ

Acknowledgment E,

The but

may

Virginian Staff, feel that your Annual is not what it should be, we have tried to mix the sedate and frivolous in hopes that you enjoy

lone advice.

have shown us that there

is

Appreciate the spint of

it.

If

you do read

something

in

it

it,

you do

of interest.

it

and don't get angry,

us a great honor, for

We

is

you

our will

wish to thank the following

Mr. Lear, Mr. Coyner, Nan Gray, Martha Bill, Margaret Snow, Janet Nicholson, Emma Jesser, Nancy Ritch, Mary Bell, Evelyn Noell, Mane Noell, Mary Putney, Mary Morris, and Mary TurnbuU. persons for their help:

ACOLLL&t ANNUAL.




ADVERTISEME/VR


Drug Store Dependability THERE being

is

in

a whole lot of satisfaction able to depend on a drug

whatever your wants may be. built on this would be pleased to add you to

store,

Our business has been fact.

We

our already long list of customers. Most Will you of the "Normalites" shop here. join the majority ? You will find us ever ready to serve you. A* i^ Established 1868.

WHITE DRUG STORE Farniville, Virginia

Wherever the Annual goes it tells

the

same thing

that

all the Girls tell

Alkahest

Lyceum System (Established 1895)

Garland &McIntosh

The Leading Southern Agency for the Best Lyceum and Chau-

Druggists

Dixie Like the Dew." 100 FirstClass Attractions Available. Over 700 Courses Booked Last Season

tauqua

Farniville, Va.

Attractions.

"Covers

tir

Kodaks, Stationery Toilet Articles and Fountain Pens

409 to 415 Empire Life Building ATLANTA. GA.

JES25HSHSHSHSHSHSa5H5HSHSH5ZSHSHSH5HSH555HSHSHSHSHSH525S5HSH5a5H5H5HSHfiBSHSHL


:

State

Female Normal School FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA Splendidly equipped for the training of Teachers

An

up-to-date Training School under expert Super-

and Critics. Every graduate is an Experienced Teacher when she receives her Diploma.

visors

Courses Academic Course Professional Course I— Leading to Kindergarten Work Professional Course II— Leading to Primary Work Professional Course III— Leading to Intermediate of

Grammar Grade Work Professional Course IV— Leading to High School Work Elementary Professional Course— Leading to Work in

Rural Schools.

For information concerning State Scholarships and work

J.

L.

offered,

JARMAN, President

details

of

address

-

Farmville, Virginia



Excelled by

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E. A. 1108

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Stationer Manufacturer of

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us your Kodak films to finish. SEND Have been finishing films for the last

Accounts of Corporations, Firms

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W.

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twenty years. Finest Kodak plant in the South. Films any size developed for 10c per roll. Send for price list.

solicited

DOYNE

Undertaker and Furniture Dealer

We

carry everything in the Sporting Goods line, such as Kotjaks. Photo Supplies, Gymnasium. Tennis and Basket Balls, Pocket Cutlery, Ingersoll Watches, Razors, Parker Pens. Fancy Box Stationery. Correspondence Cards, etc.

Mattings, Linoleums and

SEND US YOUR ORDERS

Rugs

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Heinz Pure Food Products are the output of the cleanand best equipped establishment of its kind in the Every package bearing our name is guaranteed to

est. largest

FOR BUILDING PURPOSES ALSO PLOW HANDLES Farmville Manufacturing Co. Farmville, Virginia

world. be exactly as represented. You may try our Vinegars or any others of our "S? Varieties' of Foods and Sauces-and if, for any reason, you are not satisfied, your grocer is authorized to refund you [he full purchase price. More than 50,000 visitors annually inspect Heinz Pure Food Kitchens

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To Future Teachers of Virginia WE DESIRE TO INFORM YOU THAT THE VIRGINIA SCHOOL SUPPLY CO. CARRIES EVERYTHING ESSENTIAL TO HELP THE TEACHER, SUCH AS School Desks, Recitation Seats, Assembly Room Chairs, Teachers' Desks and Chairs, School Room Bookcases, Old Dominion Patent Heating and Ventilating System, Blackboards and Blackboard Acces-

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COMPANY

18 South 9th Street

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

Books! Books! Books! Books class

For the

kinds.

all

OUR LANGUAGE

room, the farm, the home

circle,

The

of

More Than 666,250 Copies of

the pupil, the teacher.

latest

fiction.

and best books of

Books on methods

of

Have Been Shipped to the Schools of One State Alone This Session

education a specialty. .Along with these books

went

251,884 copies of Playmates,

the most attractive and teachable of

THE

MACMILLAN

PUBLISHERS Representative, W. S.

COOCH,

COMPANY NEW YORK

::

:

University. Virginia

all

the Primers.

Let

us send you some interesting reading about these books.

B. F.

JOHNSON PUBLISHING

CO.


Q[ This book is a fair sample of our^^^rKTfrpmtmg^ binding and caring for the engravings. Q Into all of our products, whether college publications or general commercial work, vve put the infinite pains necessary to insure our patrons receiving the highest quality printing.

J. P.

BELL COMPANY. INCORPORATED PMNTERS, DESIGNERS. ENGRAVERS LYNCHBURG. VIRGINIA

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