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o

To

all

As we

that

list

try to

to the tale

wc

show you what

tell,

befell

Of sun and shadow, laughter and tears, In this, the last of

our school-girl

years.

We now

DABNÂŤ^v 'flNCftSTER LIBRARY" -

Fk

-

-

WOtSCaLEGE :,

VllviiiJA 23901

give greeting.


-

Greeting Dedication Picture of Baby Calendar

'

Editorial

How

^,

an Editor

Dfliglitful to be

11,

Faculty

Hiillowe'en

^'

lli

l"

Domestic Departmi-nt

^^.

V.)

21

Alumna; Association Class of February. 1901 Class of June, 1901 Class of February. 1902

and February,

19u;l

44,

Nature Study Class of February, 1904

with the Little Folks

Class of June, 1904 Class of February, 1905 The Voice of the Water

57-r)9 00, 01

03

04-00

Our

OS

Song

105 100, 107

109 110, 111

Tennis Club Basinet Ball

ll:'.

Team

Witches Five from Salem L. F. C. Club Our Eastern Shore Girls Loyal Knights The Skaters' Club

70

Statistics

71

72 7:1,

Professional Hall Club

Miscellaneou'!:

Poem

74

and Grinds Jokes Advertisements. (irius

70

Qy-^T

.

104

Artists

"WeSeven"

09

The Laundry

.

102, 103

The Midninght Four

Behind the Scenes: The Fifteen Minutes Bell The Charge of the Light Brigade Dessert Day

The Singers

.

German Club

-'w

79

80-82

Life

So

47

Peisp

Mail Call

My

Glee Club

51-n:!

M,

of

4.')

4s. 49

70 77 7.s.

Organizations, Fraternities and Clubs Y. M. C. A 80 89-91 Alpha Chapter of Sigma Sigma Sorority Alpha Chapter of Kappa Delta Sorority. 93-V>o Alpha Chapter of Reta Tau Alpha Sorority 97-99 Scliool

The Junior Year Class of June. 1903

The Story

2t>-37 3'.i

:

Psychology Test

Periodicals

Chi

41-13

Classes of June, 1902,

First

^2-^0

oS,

Dreams

A

5

l:!-l-''

Trustees

An Hour

My

i'

Board of Editors

A Pkkp Behind the Scenes — Continued A Sweetheart of One of Our Girls

-'J

Ill, llTi

Town

117 lis

119 121-123 124 125 120, 127

131 132, 133 134, 135


DEDICATION. JJ/'E LOVIXGLV DEDICATE THIS ]'ULUME TO B. W. ARXOID. Ill, THE BLUE^EYED, DOUBLE-CHINNED, DIMPLE-CHEEKED, TOW-HEADED BABY OF THE FACULTY, WHO, NONE CAN DENY, IS AS HUMBLE, TRUSTFUL, INNOCENT. UNAFFECTED. LOVABLE. AND PURE AS MORI A L MAN CAN EVER BE.


SESSION

1900-1901 Be^'an Wednesda}- September 19th.

THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY, Thursday, November 22d.

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY, Monday, December 24th

to

December

EXAMINATIONS OF FIRST TERM Began Monday, Januar\-

24th.

DELIVERY OF DIPLOMAS, Thursday, Januar\' 25th.

CLASS EXERCISES, Saturda)', January 26th.

SECOND TERM Began Monday, January

28th.

EASTER HOLIDAY, Monday, April

8th.

EXAMINATIONS OF SECOND TERM Began Monday, May

27th.

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES, June 5th and

6th. 6

29th.


EDITORIAL. As

we

little

book before you, we can

be charitable

trials

Annual

nur

lay

will

in

your

and discouragements

criticisms, for little

known

it

nnl\- ask that

has

come

\

u

throuj;li

to thcise outside

an

Staff.

do not claim that The \'irginian is a volume of true literary (Jur aim is to present, as nearly as possible, some of the events which go to make up our school life, and which will bring \\'e

merit.

back to our

girls

memories of our dear old Alma Mater.

It

will

at

you of the necessity of buying photograph albums. wish to call attention to our binding which is a reproduction

least, relieve

We

Our purpose is to establish a binding which we consider a most suitable one for all annuals which mav be

of the Virginian for 1900.

issued hereafter.

Our

heartiest thanks are

due to many

friends,

whose assistance

and encouragement have been of inestimable value. We have tried to show to ^liss Rebecca Jane Whealton our ap]ireciation of her valuable advice and experience, by giving her an honorarv place on

our

staff of Editors.

Among Dr. B.

others do we especially want to thank, Mrs. Morrison, W. Arnold, Miss Woodruff, Miss Andrews, Miss CouUing,

and Miss Jeannette

\\1iite,

for tlie assistance

they nave given. F.

S.

W.


BOARD OF EDITORS. FRANCES SPROUT. WHITp:,

Lexington, Virginia,

Edilur-in-Chu'f.

REBECCA JANE WHEALTON, Honorary

Chincoteague, Virginia.

Edilor-iii-Chicf.

PAULINE CAMPER,

Sale.m, Virginia,

Business IManager.

HARRIET PARKER HANKINS, Art

Williamsburg, Virginia,

Editor.

MATTIE BOARD HENDERSON, SUSIE

WARE WARNER,

MOLLIE ALLEN PHILLIPS, ANNIE DOUGHTV,

Hampton, Virginia,

Onancock, Virginia,

ETHEL STUART COLE, HELEN

Salem, Virginia,

Essex, Virginia,

Fredericksburg, Virginia,

BL.\CKISTON, Hampton, Associate Editors.

Virginia,


How ilOR those

Delightful to be an Editor.

who have had

mation on

this subject

experience in editing an Annual, no additional inforis

needed,

we

are sure, but for the

many who have been

denied this exquisite pleasure, and have displayed their ignorance in more ways than

we feel it our duty to venture a few words of enlightenment. Of course, there is no trouble connected with it you simply press Annual forthwith appears, ready for the subscribers. At least, this

one,

of most people.

not stop to

will

tell

the opinion

you a few of our experiences and then you mayjudge

you of the 'many discussions had before

tell

The Virginian

decided that

—be

us

let

is

about pressing the button.

for yourself

We

But

and

a buttun

;

the

it

was

tinally

how-

All were agreed,

should be published this year.

—that there

was but one young lady in the Imagine our horror school capable of filling the exalted position of Editor-in-Chief. when she was pronounced by the Faculty "both mentally and physically unable to ever

said to our deep humiliation

it

undertake duties so arduous."

Soon, however, we became reconciled to our

loss,

We were now ready to one who was able to do the work was shortly found. But alas this receive the subscriptions with which we expected to be overwhelmed. for

!

world

of illusions.

is full

Time room and

after time,

when our

Manager entered

very business-like Business

said in a sweet, persuasive voice,

"Of

a girl's

course you want an Annual.'" she

was met with "Is it going to have my picture in it.'" Naturally, we were much One of the girls, who was evidently encouraged by such manifestations of interest. "Not if I know myself! I paid one dollar for one last shrewd in bargaining, said But even year, and in less than a week I was trying to get twenty-five cents for it." :

this

one

encouragement if

w-as

you were to give

real silk dress, said in the I

Poor thing

could."

But the

tears

came

!

down town.

to

me."

Wasn't she independent.'

most heart-rending accents, "No, How that reply touched our hearts

I

Is

all it

can't afford

who one

has a ;

wish

!

One gentleman, who

has supplied the Normal School girls with

rubbed

his

hands together, and said

of supreme condescension, "I'll give you a dollar and a half"

ment.

wouldn't have

when we heard from our Business Manager the which she had heard from the very lips of those poor mer-

perfect hosts of pills, smiled benignly,

we would

I

Another,

into our eyes

distressing tales of poverty

chants

" O,

surpassed by what was next heard. it

in a

Another, with

divide our last penny, actually tried to get a reduction

on

tone

whom

his advertise-

necessary to say anything further to show the pecuniary embarrassment

of some of Farmville's citizens

.'

But they were not

all

so

;

some gave what we asked


without a murmur.

If

it

hurt

them they endured

stand such tender, earnest entreaty

Some

—the pleading

it

in silence.

face of a

But who could with-

Normal School

of our difficulties were of a rather peculiar nature.

girl

.'

Several of the finest

some excruciatingly funny "grinds" had to be omitted because they hit some member of the Staff a little too hard. Other witticisms had to be omitted because sfmie of the members of the Editorial Staff were so very tender-hearted so So girls, if any of you afraid of hurting their friends or their room-mates' friends. get more than your sharenf the "grinds," remember it was because you had no influ-

jokes and

;

ential friends, or friend's friend,

And

then those pictures!

ting uj) the AN^'UAL unless

un the Staff

We

were told that

we were going

it

woulil be useless tn attempt get-

to have ever\ girl's picture in

it.

Our

pocir

Editor-in-Chief was so harassed with the subject that she dreamed one night that every family represented at the Normal School wanted a picture of every one of its members to appear in the Annual. It seemed as if the fate c>f The Virginian depended upon those pictures. One young lady when asked the object of the Annual, actually said

it

was to get the

girls'

pictures in bo(jk form.

Again, we were hampered in our work by our ignorance, inexperience and lack of

From what has been said above one might suppose that these sad conditions uid\- among the subscribers. This was evidently nut the case, for in a letter received frcim a publishing company we read with humiliation, " If you have any more tpiestions, do hesitate to ask them." And oh, how we liung our heads, when a member of the Faculty actually asked for a recei|)t lor the pa)nient of his subscripcredit.

were found

tion.

(

)ur

the subject

impaired credit ma\(jf

l;e

ilue to the fact that

finances as beneath our notice.

we have generally considered

One day

a ]Âťjor ignorant

member

of

body" stopped one of our editors and asked in the most matter-of-fact what are you going to do with the surplus fund.?" "Oh," the way, "Miss "W editor answered, in the same tone, "we are going to have an ice cream festival and the "Student

,

perhaps

start a

bank.

These are only a few of our many experiences, but are they not " \ince any one that it is "delightful to be an editor.'

sufficient

THE

to con-

EDITORS.


FACULTY. ROBERT FRAZER,

LL. D., Pn-suh;il awl Professor of

Civics

and

Elhics.

University of Vil'gillia, 1SG4 I'TOfcssor of Latin and Froncli, Florida Military Institute, Ism Principal Fauquierlnstitute. Va.. 1871-1882; President Judson Institnte, Ala., l,S.v:-lsS7 President of Mi-ssissipiii Indus;

:

;

rial Institute

WARD

LINUS

Ka/urc L.

and College,

I.,

1891-1898.

KLINE,

B. S., Ph.

and Pedagogy, and Dircc/or of

D., Psvclwloi^v

Studies.

Peabody Normal College, Nashyille, Tenn., 1SR9 Principal Hamilton Grammar .School, Houston, B. S., Harvard University, ISflG Scholar, Clark University, 1896-1.S97 Fellow, Clark UniverPh. D., Clark University, 1S'I9: I'rofessor of Psychology and Pedagogy in State Normal School ;

Tex., 1891-1803

;

:

;

sity, 1S97-1S98:

of Minnesota, 1899-1900.

B.

W.

ARNOLD,

A. M., Ph. D., English and History.

Eandolph-Macon College, 1893 Ph. D., Johns Hopkins University, 1897 Post Graduate Student. Hopkins University in History and Sociology, l.sns Professor in Emory College. Ga., 1.S'.I9-1900

A. M., .Johns

;

VIRGINIA REYNOLDS, Graduate of Normal

S.

;

:

Geogra/>/iv

and P/miotogy.

Scliool, Indiana, Pa., Is81

GAY PATTESON,

^'.

RICE,

Graduate of Oswego Normal School,

lSfi7.

Mathematics.

Graduate of Richmond Female Seminary, Mathematics in Mt. Holyoke College, 1.SS9-1S93.

MINNIE

:

1877

Student,

:

Kadclilfe College,

1-S.S7-1S.S9

;

Instructor in

Latin.

Graduate of Farmville College,

LSs;;

;

Teaclier in Farmvillc High School, 1885-1891.

FANNIE TALBOT LITTLETON,

B.

S.,

Graduate of State Normal School, FarniviUc. Va.,

Chemistrv and Physia. ls.s;i

;

li.

s.

of (Jornell University, 1900; Studied under

Dr. Mallet at University of Virginia.

ESTELLE SMITHEY,

French and German.

Graduate in Modern Languages and Mathematics, Randolph-Macon College,

Female

Institute, Staunton, Va.;

Diploma

TULA OCILLEE ANDREWS,

l.S9,'i

Sight-Singing and Assistant

Teacher in Wesleyau

in Englisl,.

Graduate of Lafayette College, Ala., isiii): L. I. of Peabody Normal Colle.s^e. in Lafayette College, 1892-1894 Teacher in F'uabody Normal College. 1SW-1S9H. :

;

of L' Alliance Francaise, Paris, 1S99.

Na'>hvilld.

ls',i2

;

Teaclier


MARTHA

W. COULLING, Drawmg and Form, and Assislanl

Graduate of Richmond High School, College,

E.

New

A. M. of Randolph-Macon

Macon Woman's

of Pealx)dy

Normal

in History.

College, 1S87

;

Student in Teachers'

A. M., Assistant in Mathematics.

Woman's

College, 1890-1898

;

College, Lynchburg, Va., 1896 Teacher of Mathematics in RandolphStudent in University of Chicago, Specializing in Mathematice, 1.S99-1900, ;

CLAIR WOODRUFF,

B. L., Assistant in Training School.

Peabody Normal College. 1894 B. L. of University of Nashville, 1895 Teacher in Alabama CenFemale College, Tuskaloosa, Ala., 1896-1897 Presiding teacher in Aniiiston College, Anniston, Ala.,

L. tral

ST.

I.

York, 1895-1896.

EDITH CHEATHAjNI,

MARY

1S85; L.

I.

of

;

;

1897-1900.

FANNIE LEARNED COIT,

Director of Gymnasium.

Graduate of Youn^ Ladies' High Sohool, ISHl, New London, Conn.; Anderpoii Noniial School of (.iyninasties, 1900, New Haven, Conn.; Supervisor of Physical Culture in Public Schools of Westerly, Rhode Island, 1899-1900.


ROBERT TURNBULL, Pkksident JOHN JACKSON, Vicf.-Pkf.sident

Hon.

Hon. Hon.

J.

W. SOUTHALL,

Sui>t. Puiilic

Lawrenccvillc, Va.

Richmond, Va.

Instruction (cx

JAMES NELSON, D. I) Hon. S. S. WILKINS Hon. WILLIAM A. LITTLE S. WARE, Esq J. Rev.

J.

P.

*Pres.

J.

W.

Hon. O.

L.

L.

WILLIS

CRUTE KENNON, Esq

W. N.

J.

A.

JENKINS

WATKINS,

Birds Nest,

\'a.

Fredericksburg,

\'a.

\'a.

Lexington, \'a

Salem,

^'a.

Portsmouth, Va. Farmville, Va.

M.

Judge A. D. * Deceased.

University

STEARNES

Proe.

\'a.

Ohatham,

WILSON, Washington & Lee

Judge

\"a.

Richmoiul,

Warrenton, Va.

TREDWA Y

T.

Richnioiul,

Berryvillc, \'a.

JEFFRIES, Esq

Judge

officio)

Powhatan, Va. Secretary and Treasurer

Farmville, Va.

.


Boniestic ^Department.

MRS. POR-IIA MISS

T,.

SARAH

MORRISON. 1'.

Hciul uf

Heme.

SPKN'CI<:R, Assistant.

MISS GENKVIFA'K HAYNES, Housekeeper. ?irR.

DR.

I!.

M. COX, Stewar.l.

PKTKR WIXSTON,

Attending

I'hvsieian.


Hluinnae Hssociation. biDENT— LELIA JEFFERSON HARVIE. President— BELLE WICKER. Sllretvry— MAUD GRAY. 1

1

1

\ ICE

isi

rer— :\rRs. LEWIS CLAIBORNE.

HE

D til

Association

most

is

inter-

ested at present in a scholarship

the

memory of Dr. John A. Cunning-

ham, which

is hoped can be estabNormal School in three

it

lished at the

Contributions

years.

to

this

have

been voluntary and have ranged from

one dollar to

alum-

All

dollars.

fifty

have not yet responded, but

na?

hoped many more

will

it

is

be heard from.

The majority of the members of the Association knew and loved Dr. Cunningham.

As

a great-hearted

a wonderful teacher, he

man and

has

left

an

impression on them and on the school that can never be efifaced.

It

seemed

very fitting, then, to honor his

A

ory in this way.

Cunningham

Dr.

tablet to

mem-

brass memorial is

to be

placed in the Assembly Hall in June.

This

is

to be given by the resident

alumnK.

A

few alumna; notes

some readers of Madeline

may

Map

is

teaching music

Randolph-Macon Womans's Lula JMcKinney cliffe

is

studying

at

Rad-

Sadie

Hardy

is

now

Mrs.

Lewis Claiborne of Lawrenceville, Va.

Mary Womach has She took a diploma

high school in Ne

at

College.

College.

Mrs.

"

interest

the Annu.vl.

at the

a position in a

Adelphi College in Brook

lyn several years ago. Lelia

Harvey

is

studying

at

Cornell University.

She

will take B. A. in June.


Class of jFebvuav^ lOOl.

BESSIE WELLS, PRESIDENT.

^L\R10N MICHAUX WATKINS, SECY AND TREAS.

Colors

:

TOblte anO ©old.

^otto

:

Class

fforvvar!).

IRoll.

LILLIAN LEE CHEATHAM. BESSIE ROSSER CARPER. ]\IERCY

MARGARET

CRIM.

HESSIE LEE CHERNAULT.

JOSEPHINE GOODWIN. LILLIAN VIRGINIA HOOK. IDA BELL SHARPE. PEARL EAKIN WATTERSON.


Class Sono of jFcbvuav\>, 100 1. TuNK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; " Tenting on

We

toiled

Many

the Old

and moiled

Camp Ground."

in the dear old school.

the hours we've spent

In mastering Martin, Tarr and James,

And

others as \vc went.

C bonis.

Man^

are the hearts that are seekint;" the right.

Waiting

Many Fiir

(or the ha]l])^"

dawn;

are the hearts aching tn-night.

we must sodu be gone.

Parting to-night, parting to-night, Parting with our old class-mates.

We

have studied

Out

in the

anil

worried and

world we

To make our way and By doing

we're through.

reach the goal

well our part.

'Tis the last farewell to

We

now

start.

our dear old

halls;

bid a sweet adieu

To training school, anil teachers And friends we love so true.

dear.


©fficers.

REBEOC'A JxVNE W'lIEALTON, PRESIDENT.

SARAH FRANCES HOGG, VICE-PRESIDENT.

JEANNETTE DANDRIDGE WHITE, SECUBrARY AND

ervior. Class

/Iftotto

IRoll.

ALICE ATKINSON.

EMMA JOHN

BARNE.S.

PAULINE CAMPER.

ELWOOD COX. MARY ELIZA DENNY.

JESSIE

BEULAH HENRIETTA FINKE. MARTHA WATKINS FLOURNOY. MATTIE BOARD HENDERSON. SARAH FRANCES HOGG. MARY LOUISE HOGWOOD. NANNIE HOUSER. JENNIE

C.

M. JACKSON.

NINA LATIMER. JOSEPHINE ELICE LUCK. MARTHA MILLER. NELLY JAMES MUNDAY. ELIZABETH PALMER.

MOLLIE ALLEN PHILLIPS. MILDRED POWERS RENICK.

MARY LEWIS SELDON. EDITH STE G LEDER. REBECCA JANE WHEALTON. frances sproul white. ji:annette dandridge white. ANNIE whitehead. I

JANIE WILLIAMS.

LUCY HENRY WOOD. 26

:

TUEASl'IlEIi.

©nc ipurpcsc, ©iffcrcnt patbs.


History of the Class of June, E

all

know

phshments

the tcmltncv of :

beings to exaggerate their

all

may be

credulity

Our

ginia entered the stretch befrjre us,

number grew

strictly

on September

B

First

Class.

we undertook

when many

1898,

20,

So,

true.

make no

taxed, please accept our statements, and

history began

own accom-

temptations to boast, and

recorded has the inestimable value of being

here

fall

human

frail

but this class has resisted

1901.

girls

e\i-r\thini;

although \our

investigations.

from

all

parts of

\'ir-

Although homesick and dreading the toilsome

(pur

with a

tasks

Each succeeding term our

will.

only seven of the original class remained, when, in the

smaller, until

of nineteen hundred, we

t(.>ok

up our onerous duties

And much

as Seniors.

to

our soiTow, when one of the seven, Lucy Stubbs, had to leave school on account of sickness, there others, of

remained only

whom we

are justh"

the tale of our early struggles.

six to tell

pnmd, ha\e joined

way

us along the

But many

until at

present

our class numbers twent\-six. First, I will

mention

a few interesting

number decreased we were designated

facts

about

"The

ored us with that epithet; certainh- not we ourselves. not a bit conceited, but

Before our sacred

Six."

"Seven Sages."

as the

I

won't say

Conceited.-"

who hon-

Oh, no! we are

we do think there has never been a class quite as brilliant, as For instance, who cari explain the cause good as ours.

earnest, as industrious, or as

of a rainbow and actually measure the refraction and reflection of light in the rain

drops like

Emma

Barnes.?

more experiments, she

After a few

will

probably mount

the rays of light and land in " Infinity."

And who can pen poetry that will move the hearts of others as dois Louise HogThe parodies she has written on Longfellow's poems will outli\e Homer's

wood.'

Iliatl. At least they would have done so, if the Professor of Literature had not torn Louise also has them up accidentally (?) and consigned them to the waste basket. the valuable attribute of always being aheati of time. She may be found standing outside the Church every Sunday morning, waiting for the sexton to open the door.

We

are sorr)' this can not be said of each

Sarah Hogg. period singing

more

patriotic

In the Training School,

"The

cjf us.

and musical being than our own dear for her to spend the Star Spangled Banner," instead of teaching the fundamental

Surely there never existed a

it

is

nothing unusual

rules of arithmetic.

Bessie

Palmer excels

in

gymnastics.

Basket-ball,

climbing and even the ladder walls possess

infinite

chest

charms

honor of being the baby of the class. Janie Whealton is our dignified and bebived President. 29

weights,

for her.

clubs,

rope

She also has the

She has ever been an


She possesses

unusual strength. called tact

Even the

thus

;

it

is

an unlimited degree that indefinable "something"

impossible for the Faculty to deny any request

Having never received

her captivating smiles. direst

its

who could

never

will jiass

I

form

Luck, to

class-inate, josie

Xow,

in

stern President will gladly yield any point

trouble in

anil

unselfish enthusiasm has fostered a class spirit of

and by her

inspiration to the class,

gi\-e

;

a

when she goes

"Not

Marv

the stars.

her.

Passed," she does not

know

whom

" Verv

"

Good

and " Excellent

''

but seldom come,

the principal parts of the Latin verb "/yii/m."

whom we

on to those

I,'enn\- is

made by

him with one of

therefore she can not sympathize with her less brilliant

have welcomed into our midst from time

Man\' of them outshine those already mentioneil as

to time.

to

our optimistic

sister.

She

far as

the sun outshines

finds,

" Tongues in trees, books in running brooks. Sermons in stones, and good in everything."

None

of Annie Whitehead's pennies go to swell Uncle Pat's coffers

spent on Pen-\- Pictures.

It

is

;

they

are

all

a well-known fact that she excels in drawing, antl

if

you care to look on her easel at present, you will find a painting of Achilles, who is hanging u|) l)\' one heel, while his mother, near at hand, is briskly applying the rod. especially Lucy Wood. All of us are unmoved by the charms of the opposite sex

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

\\'lien

stud\ing physiology she found the heart to be the most interesting organ of the

bo(h-,

and

in order to

reach more accurate conclusions about

decided to do some original work

in

its

workings, she has

heart breaking.

no matter how importHer lean face and hungry look are due to the fact that she gets locked out of the dining room nearly ever)- morning. If ^du should meet a little girl whose pompadour is exactl)' three times as large as If she can't remember when to use "sit," "set," her head, that is Nellie INIunily. It is

against the principles of Alice Atkinson to be on time,

mav

ant the occassion

"lie" and "lay,

"

be.

she yet retains the high ambition of seeing, sooner or

later,

one of

the opposite sex weep.

Our

snail

is

words when she

Nannie Houser. is

reciting, but

It is

the custom of the class to take naps between

like the

proverbial tortoise, she has reached the goal,

many of the hares who started out more swiftly have been left behind. Now we come to the prodigy of our class, Jennie Jackson. There is no problem

while

in trigonometry that she

stumble.

The

cannot solve, no sentence

in

Cicero over which she will

Professor of Psychology does not understand better than she the nice

distinctions between affection and emotion and even Faraday and Maxwell could get some valuable suggestions from her concerning the dielectric theory of electricity. We are proud to have among us one whose mind is as deep as MoUie Phillips'. Li fact, it is so deep that it is a difficult matter to fish up anything out of its fathom;

less depths.

She considers Titchener and Tyndall light reading, suitable to while

away the long hours a summer afternoon. Her life motto is: " Haste makes waste." After speaking of so

who

is

more

many

Never has she been hurried or excited.

exceptionally brilliant girls

nearly like the ordinary

human 30

being.

it

is

a relief to

come

Martha Flournoy never

to

one

diil

or


said a wise or a funny thing in her

of

life

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

at

but the class does not agree with

herself,

least that

her.

is

humble

the

Kindness

is

iipinion she has

one of her chief char-

and "Kind hearts are more than coronets." will reveal is compiling a spelling book, and if you won't betray me the title: "A Cumplete Gide too Authogrofy. Then there is gentle, sweet, curl_y-hcaded Mattie Henderson. To kni>w her is to love her; so it is not surprising that Mr. Angel Lion Eugenio Amatlci) \'ingerrungi acteristics,

Jessie

Cox

1

has succumbed to her charms.

We

fear that she will

find

it

convenient to teach

English in Porto Rico with only one pupil.

Here comes

little,

timid

Janie Williams,

who

is

afraid

Training School; nevertheless, she has more bravery than fully

of the children in the

many

of

us,

fur she

man-

stood her ground when she encountered Tarr, and did nut get stuck; neither did

" Pitch" follow in his footsteps, as

The

often the case.

is

charming, dimpled INIartha

latest addition to the class is

most interesting thing

in the

world

is

a skeleton.

^Iiller.

To

Just the mere sight of one

her the

moves

her to tears. Dignified, lady-like Beulah Finke

to hear

is

some edifying remarks, ask her

in the Civil

one of the favorites of the class. to explain how General Lee lost

If

you wish arm

his right

War.

In spite of her enthusiastic devotion to

art, iNIary

Selden

is

often found staring

We are seriously into nothingness as if her mind were far away from her painting. afraid she will have " Fitz " and give up her ambition to be an artist. girl sadly informs crest-fallen Edith Steigleder takes everything literally, and if a us that she has been "sat upon," Edith immediately has a mental picture of the girl lying in a horizontal position, with the teacher sitting on her. Our talented Business Manager, Pauline Camper, has decided that she is especially qualified to help manage the affairs of a certain Episcopal church, and we fear that the profession of teaching has not inducements enough to hold her. Nina Latimer is the small and dignified hostess who presides at the midnight If you should happen to ask her if she likes feasts held on "Professional Hall."

botany, she would exclaim with tearful e3'es, " In/aiidu?n hibes rcnovare dolonim." Jeannette White is one of the best teachers in the Training School. No mischievous And so well urchin dares to stick his neighbor with a pin while she is in the room. does she teach geography that one of her pupils informed his mother that the "earth rotates on its axis four times a year and that causes the seasons." And, last but far from least, comes Frances White, the efiicient Editor-in-Chief of Common sense and cheerfulness are her constant companions. In the Annual staff. the future, when we hear that she is in Germany as a disciple of Esculapius we will proudly say, "She was in our class at the Normal School." Among the red-letter days of our sojourn here is one that we shall long rememwdien we attended the first reception given by the "Baby of the Facult)." ber And now, in the first year of the new century, we have reached the goal. The journey has been sometimes pleasant and sometimes wearisome, but we will remember It grieves us to part from the kind only the delightful parts as we look back over it. managers of the Home Department, the self-sacrificing Faculty, and our dear Alma Mater, but we must separate and press on towards the "One purpose, different

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

paths."

JOSIE

E.

LUCK.


THE NAUGHTY NOUGHTYONES. Now,

who do you

pray,

think

we

are,

With hearts so light and gay ? W'c feel so very happy We could dance and sing alway. )ur minds are full of wisdom. (

And our Oh,

A

doft't

hearts are

full

of fun.

you wish that you could be

naught}- noughty-one.?

Our teachers

say we're faithful.

Tho', no doubt, they think we're dear; TIkn-

know

of dreaded "pitching-day

We'\'e never

had a

Sometimes, they

fear.

— —

sa\, we're noisy

Really bois'trous in our fun

But do vou think that very strange In naughty noughty-ones

We

shall

always be remembered

As the most That from

Was

.?

this

ever

conceitetl class

famous Normal School

known

to pass;

But we should like to have \"ou know We've nothing left undone. That coulil ever be expected

Of such naughty noughty-ones. We've struggled through equations.

And

"originals" we'\e proved;

Analysis of fractions was

A subject dearly loved. We mastered "change of

seasons,"

English, too, we've fairly done;

Yet

this

is

only half we

know

Smart naughty noughty-ones 32

!

"


There's Latin \\ e

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Freneh and

took them

Then,

thinkinj,r

Te> Civics

we

all

hail

not enough,

did run;

Music toeik for recreation, Drawing studieil, just for

And

(iernian, tou-

ever\' one,

fun.

yet the goal hatl not been reached

By naught\' noiight\-ones.

By experiments and

We

failures

ha\-e learned Ps}-chology:

Pedagogy, too, we've studied hard.

And

General History.

Observation and reports we matle I

)ur

minds

just fairly

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

spun

Over work we found in Senior Year Poor naughty noughtv-ones !

At

last

has

come

a glad,

sad day.

When we must sa\- giiod-bye To class-mates, friends and teachers Good-bye to all At last our work is

I

Our This

is

dii)lonias

Good-bye! over.

we have won.

the very last you'll see

Of naughty noughty-ones

!

33

dear.

I


Last Will and Testament of the Class of 1901.

the

rWll]'"..

tA

class of the Nurnial

,^T;nluatilll;

friends, i-eUiti\es

anil

alumnae,

huntlred ami one, Ainni Domini, \vc

Scliool

hereby, on

ilo

make our

last will

of ^'ir^inia, fifth

tliis

in

and testament.

can bequeath to }'0U can not compensate for \\hat you

the presence nf

day of June, nineteen

Of

course,

that

all

never

will lose in us, for

you sustained such iixeparable loss. we bequeath Big Martin and any of the Farmville cats means or fair also Mademoiselle Elise Beaussant. whose

before in the departure of a graduating class have iMrst, to the

Senior

B

Class

which you can get by foul bones you

The The

on the

oscalsis

;

exceedingly useful and interesting.

will find

left

foot

is

She

is

not complete, ho\\e\er.

missing, and the phalanges of the right

hand

also.

acetabulum and the condyles of the right femur to which the gastrocneuims muscle joins by its tendon, are both slightly disfigured, but the odontoid jinjcess As in the which rises from the second cervical vertebra suffices for all that is missing. left

presence of a skeleton you can imagine

kinds of things you might,

all

with Madamoiselle Beaussant, just think of her as complete, and you sure, its

dead loads of valuable knowledge.

its

charts

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

but not

least,

we

leave to

A

Class

the Senior

" Present Worth

"

we

oil,

;

you will find of great and Second Grades and

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

you the darling little pupils. we bequeath Tarr, Titchener, "Stocks and Bonds, "

of candles,

are

w'hich

value for standing children behind, especially in the First

To

dealings

We also bequeath to you the Training School

four broken clocks, three trash baskets,

last,

in \<i\w

will obtain,

lamp, and alarm clocks

;

the

also the pleasure of criti-

B Class, who take so much pleasure in criticizing us, who took so much pleasure in criticizing the graduating class of Februar}-. To the Geology Class we bequeath the cabinet and all its contents in the Science

cizing the Senior

Hall, the pleasure of taking those five-mile ramliles up-hill and down-hill in search of

rocks, a trip to

map

\\'illis'

IMountain,

anil,

wliat

is

greater than

all

of these, the beautiful

drawn by Misses Hogg, Hogwood, and

representing the geology of Virginia,

Phillips.

'Po the

the

H., S 0.|

Junior ,

H

A

C,

and Junior B Classes we bequeath the use of the laboratory, and

H N

hearts' conteTit, anil plentv of

Og they want, the

ammonia

privilege of

making Ho S

to counteract the acid, lest they ruin

all

to their all

their

aprons.

To

the Zoology Class

we bequeath the

the dissecting apparatus in the " pretty

long,

little

34

checked aprons of the previous

leather cases,"

all

the fowls of the

class,

air,

the


beasts of the

field,

and the

sea. All the rats you desire may be caught one dozen have been caught there in a single night.

of the

fishes

in the domitory, since as man)' as

and frogs you

All the snakes, snails, cray-fish, tad-poles

need, can be found in

will

Farmville, or in the noble waters of the immediate vicinity, the

Appomattox and

To

the verdant First

and longitude.

when

A

They

the entire globe. tute

Little

BufiTalo, the

Lithia Springs.

who law

Class,

will

find

much

sn

yet to learn,

must useful

tliis

in

their

we bequeath almost

first

attemjjts

at

lati-

southern part of Africa has sustained a slight injury, but

'l"he

the present condition of affairs in that country

is

considered, this fact occasions

would lie well, no duuht, fir us also to leave the First A's a good store of advice, which we have learned by hard experience. Do not feel discouraged " on your first seven tests. if you get " Not Passed Seven is a lucky number. It isn't and all things, 3'ou know, have an end. so bad as getting " Not Passed " on thirteen The Faculty will tell you that you come and go from the class room in a much uKire orderly manner than even the grave and reverend Seni<jrs. no

surprise.

It

;

We

bequeath

To To To To To To

the Psychology and Pedagog}' Classes the Geometry Class

— Miss Patteson.

— Miss Reynolds — Miss Spillman. the Latin Classes — Miss Science Hall

antl

— Dr.

:\Iiss

Kline.

Littleton.

the Library

Rice.

the English and History Classes, and to Benjamin William .VrnoUl,

|r.

|r.

Dr. Arnold.

— — — —

To Mary Frayser Miss Coulling. To Lucile Kent Miss Cheatham. To Ollie Johnston Miss Andrews. To the Gymnasium Miss Coit. To the Training School Miss Woodruff. To Mrs. Morrison, Miss Sarah, Miss Haynes, and To the State Female Normal Sclnii>l Dr. Robert

Last, but not least, to the

the

memory

town

bi>ys

Mr. Cox

A// the

girls.

Frazer.

and to Hampden-Sydney boys we bequeath

of hidilen hats and sewed-up overcoats

:

also an invitatiim to C(.ime again

next year.

To dining

the new girls we bequeath room for the first time and

blush or be embarrasseil

Ailvice.

see three

miu hear half

if

Don't be bashful when ynugninto the hundred and twenty eyes upim ynu don't ;

a

dozen old

girls

say:

"The more

they

come, the worse they get, "nr, " Well, she is the ugliest, greenest one I have seen yet," or, " I know she is an old maid, with her hair slicked back, just coming to freshen up her

mind

a bit."

Dun't

let

your emotions "get below the collar"

night of your arrival, you hear sung under your

"Home, is

Sweet Home."

Don't get impatient

blistered, the question:

likely to visit

you

"Are you

a

new

tluring the session, dun't

fail

if

window

you have

girl.'"

If

in

to

if

mi

tin-

first

solemn, doleful tones,

answer until your tongue

you have

a brother

who

is

to take advantage of every o[)portanity


to

tell

it,

because the old

take a

girls will

gi'eat deal

of interest inyou

You must

( ? ).

room within three minutes after the breakfast bell rings. If you down four minutes after, don't feel hungr}' or homesick when, looking

enter the dining

happen to get

through the glass door, you see

all

the happy girls within, while you without, can

hear their merry chatter, and the busy click of knife and fork.

Bid your appetite be

far."

Frazcr means an}- harm

if

have not ma-tric-u-la-ted

he

still

" Smokey Alley

To

"So

the dinner bell will ring at one.

sa3-s in

will please

o'clock bell for the breakfast

si.\

;

near and yet so

Don't think Dr.

the chapel every morning for a week

do so

at

once."

But above

all,

" All

:

who

don't mistake the

bell. "

we bequeath the odor of fried beef to " Professional Hall the recipe for making more noise than any other hall, and the directions for having midnight feasts. Have your basket of " edibles " brought up the back way let arcipe down from the window and up comes the basket. It's just as easy much easier than the scolding you will get when IVIrs. M. catches you that night. To "Liberty Hall " we bequeath the directions for "tying up the stairs" and " doing as you please;" to "Ghost Alley" the memory of spooks and hobgoblins; to " Select Corner " the memory of a low-turned lamp, of an old umbrella with a hole "

:

;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

burned

in

.

.

.

of an alarm clock with hanil pointing to the hour one, of the sound of

it,

on the creaky

foot-steps !

!

all

!

stairs,

of hurry and confusion, of a blown-out lamp, and of

quiet.

you all these valuable possessions and so much advice, you will wc take away something that we can not leave behind. We are going to take awav with us a better knowledge of how to use our faculties, of how to make our lives more useful, of how to make "the little corner that we are going out to influence somewhat less ignorant, somewhat better than it was before we enSince

we have

not think us

tered

left

.selfish if

it.

To

the Faculty and the directors of the

Home

Department we bequeath

a

hearty

we have spent with them. We take with us a lasting rememberance of the kindness they have shown us and of the advice they have given us. 'What wc have received we shall endeavor rightly to use, and whatever of success in future 3'ears may come to us, we shall ever attribute appreciation of

t(5 its

all

they have been to us during the time

rightful .source

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; our Alma Mater. Gr.aduating Class of June, 1901.

(Siff?ied)

36


'Mid the Hills of Old Prince Edward. Tune â&#x20AC;&#x201D; " Mid

the Green Fields of Virginia.

Mid the hills of old Prince On the Appomattox bank,

Edwaiil,

Stands the dear old school we love surpassing have swift flown by us

well.

Many months Since w-e

And

We

left its

busy

halls,

the grief the parting gave us

are far away, 'mid

none can

tell.

changing scenes.

We've fame and honor won, But we'd give

it all

just for a single day.

To meet with our old class-mates, And see the teachers true At the dear old Farmville Normal

far

away.

Cbotus.

There are loving class-mates The happy girls so dear.

Our

hearts are longing for

there.

them day by

(.lay.

There we spent life's golden hours. On the Appomatto.x bank, At the dear old Farmville Ni.irmal

far

away.

In the school yard in tild Farmville, Oft we wandered 'neath the trees.

Talking of the liapp\- time, so far away. our work would all be over.

When

And diplomas would be won. And we'd say good-bye fore\'er and Yes, the wish

We

left

Our

came

true,

one day

for aye.

in June,

the dear old school,

hearts have been so heavy since that day.

if we could but see it, and wander thro' those At the dear old Farmville Normal far away.

Oh,

halls.

I.VNIE

37

Williams.


fcbruar^,

Class of Colors

1902.

— Garnet and Gukl.

— American Beauty. — omnibus.

Flower iNIorro

P"ideles in

©fficers.

MAKY ELLA CLARKE

WILLIE nAKUISOX JlOOKE, I'KKSIDENT.

VlCL-l'JlUNlDiO.NT.

J[.\1;Y

ANNE wade,

iSi;ei:i;TAi;Y

.\.\'ii

TnE.\.siKi:n.

IRoll Call.

EFEIE JOSEPHINE IIATE^IAX, Arou.sT.\ Oh'.nty. JIARY ELLA CLARKE, Amei.lv Cuuntv. LELIA ALICE CIlI'iMBLEY, Pii..\kki Cocntv. MARY POAVER EAIiTHIXG, W.unvjCK Coisty. ELIZABETH KATHLEEN HALL, Pulaski County. WILLIE HARRISON MOORE, Meckleneukg County. EMMA ESTHER OWENS, Sfotlsylvanma County.

NORA

P.AS1I.\YER PlLSWOIiTH,

II

ALICE ELIZABETH SNELL, Henkiu

MARY ANNE WADE, HELEN

PiiiNC-Ji;

County. County.

ENiiico i

ED^v.u!u County.

M. WINSTON, Washington County.


CLASS OF FEBRUARY,

1902.


DREAMS. i<(

)>[

physicilosical sitlc sleep

tliL-

wnrk

sjieeial

is

is

a rest or recuperation of the whole body;

its

to

renew and restore the wasted nervous system, sense cnxans

is

comparatively bloodless in profound sleep,! yet

and muscles.

Though

the brain

anmunt of

conclusive evidence of a certain

cerebral activity during

thi-

"there

whule

is

periiid

of sleep; and there can be nu doubt that the vast majority of our dreams never crime to our knowledge.

Some

"

authdrities sav that

we remember only those dreams which

occur during the period when we are just going to sleep or just awakenin,g. Dr. Louis

Robinson compares the current of ideas which pass through the sleeping

brain to an invisible and silent river, flowing by without betraying

where there

made by What

is

a splash of a fish or of a falling stone; or w-here

its

presence, save

some foaming eddy

is

projecting rocks that break the smooth surface of the current. the silent stream

ruffles

There are several theories

?

For instance, a

stimulation of the peripheral sense organs.

in

hot bricks to his feet and dream of walking over hot plow-shares. the door might be interpreted as a

Another theory be owing to the

is

that

dreams

momentum

lowing dream serves to

i>eal (if

tlay,

One

field.

fall asleeji

is

with

Again, a rap nn

thunder or the roar of a cannon.

are caused by central stimulation.

of the

the

man may

That

is,

or the passiveness of the mind.

they

may

The

fol-

illustrate the first:

Miss Littleton, our chemistry teacher, dreamed that she was sitting on the front porch of her home.

It

was

late in

sensation of dread possessed her.

on an inclined plane of

air that

great bronze equestrian statues.

appeared very small

the twilight, almost dark.

Suddenly

extended

and wide throughout the whole heavens

far

Some were

in the distance, for

near her and larger than

they reached as

far as

nized the statue of Lee as the one she had seen in Richmond.

41

1S93,

sec.

others

She

She recog-

She became more and

There was no sound, and yet the huge horses pawed the

fXitehener, "A Primer of Psychology," p. liW. Louis Robinson, in "Nortll American Review," ed. Dec, J Dr,

life;

her eyes could

heard a sepulchral voice at her side say, "There arc Lee and Jackson,"

more terrified.

a peculiar

She looked up and saw coming down toward her

air

and slowly


upun

atlvanced

view were

calmly guided by their bronze

her,

She realized that

riders.

her

in

the bronze statues that had ever been erected, and she expected every

all

minute to be trampled under foot by the horse reached her, she awoke,

At

vast cavalry.

before the

last, just

first

terrified.

She remembered the next morning that on the preceding day she had been looking over a

new

chemistry, and had particularly noticed the treatment of alloys.

supposed that the statement made

When

the

in the

dream comes because of the passiveness of the mind,

made then

childhooil; for impressions

in early life sink to the

These lower centers being controlled by the higher ones, are latter are asleep;

and that

is

why we

often

a

year

is liveil

accept

this

and

as real

it

— even every object

In our sleep there

fact

to call

as

that the dream-life differs niarvel-

true,

its

no matter how

Every thing that we

no commo-

this causes

see, hear,

touch, taste or

— makes an impression on

the outside through the sense channels.

is

there

the brain.

reality in

experience

W'ith

This lawless

— oneexcitation

owing to the lack of means with which to

is

no background serving In the waking

question.

place today with what occurred yesterday, an event of this this year's

all

fantastic.

any other.

our dreams

check what may happen

no data

the

possible to convey telepathic

due the irregular distribution of attention

is

much chance

reality of

we know

in a fast-moving train

come from

mixture of impressions

The

when

a mixture of messages brought by involuntary recollection and of

is

those which seem to

has just as

free to act

In the dream-world one person easily glides into another;

But why are they so fantastic' smell

is

it

minute; an ocean crossed by a step, and

in a

We

apt to be of

causing them to dream of the things that the agent

But notwithstanding

ously from the waking-life.

tion there.

is

it

lower brain centers.

dream of childhood.

Facts are not wanting to show clearly that

messages to sleeping persons, desires.*

She then

book about bronze suggested her dream.

that of the previous year,

as a basis for life

test

or

comparison

we compare what takes

week with one of

last

week'

and so on, thus distinguishing

the different periods of time, the present, the past and the future, but in the dream-life all

time

is

present time.

We may

dream because of peripheral or

dreams a prophesy of what a year or

One

is

to be

?

who

visited this

some town

two ago, told the following. night he dreamed that as he walked

towards him a friend

whom

Hudson, "The

Law of

Psychii:

down

a certain street he

he had not seen for six months.

he noticed that his eye was black and very ^

central stimulation, but are not

Mr. Wheat of Brooklyn,

Phenomena,"

p. 182.

much

saw coming

As he approached him

swollen, as though he had been in a


fight.

When

reply was,

they met, Mr,

â&#x20AC;˘] eame

.so

Wheat asked

his friend

what was the matter.

near being in a fight at Coney Island that

I

His

friend's

was struck with a

brick."

At the breakfast table mind.

On

his

way

dreamed the night would meet found

his

before, the

his friend.

friend's

ne.xt

morning he

to business, as he

related his

was walking

di:)wn

the

street

it

from

whole scene came back to him and he wonilered

When

"I came so near being

in

asked

a fight at

his

of which he

Strange to say, he did, and, what was more marvelous

eye both black and swollen.

black eye, he replied,

dream and dismissed

if

he

still,

he

what gave him the

Coney Island

that

I

was

struck with a brick.

Rebecc.\ Jane Whealton.


Classes of June, 1902, anb dfebruar^, 1003.

3unior

a

an^ Junior

TB.

©tftccrs.

ETIIKL STEM'AKT C'OLK,

I'lvsitk-iit,

^il'llTrsVI.VAXIA Cn.

ANNIE

S.

DOI'GHTY,

Vife-rresideiit,

ACOOJIAC Co. .Jl'LIA A. SCAIJCiS, Secretary and Treasure Sl'll'lTSYLVANIA Co.

Class .IIONNIE

IRoll.

EMMA BRACEY,

Prin'ce

Edwakd

Co.

CORA LEE COLE, Spottsylvania Co.

ISA

McKAY COMPTOX, AVakrex Co.

MABEL FURR, LouDoux

Co.

c;arrie sturdivant goode, Mecki.enbukg Co.

HARRIET PARKER IIANKIX8, Janes City Co.

M. SADIE HENDERSON, Naxsemoxd Co.

CARRIE VIRGINIA HIX, Al'PO.MA'lTOX Co.

FLORENCE WINFIELD, DiXWIDDIE Co.

MARY FRANCES POWERS, Clarke Co.


CLASSES OF JUNE,

1902,

AND FEBRUARY,

1903.


THE JUNIOR YEAR. HE

extension of our course of study was an experiment of absorbing interest to the Faculty. Each teacher saw in the Junior year an opportunity for better in her department, and plans were made with enthusiasm which were intended culminate in a course, not of a college grade it is true, but far better than that to We hoped the new course, requiring one more term, given in most high schools. would materially raise the grade of the school, since it was introduced at the point when a student's mind has begun to show the results of the training in the lower classes, and she was thus fitted to grasp more advanced subjects with intelligence. We expected that w-e could send out pupil teachers into the Training School with more But we have been confi-onted with a maturity and far better prepared than hitherto. The Normal course of three years, with its diploma, was estabserious difficulty. lished to give the few who should find it impossible to take the full four-year course leading to the Classical or Scientific diploma, an opportunity for our professional hoped that a large training and an accredited recognition of that opportunity. majority of our students would take the longer course, offering as it did better and more extended work than we had been able to give before. But, although in the readjustment of courses necessary in making so many changes, we could not expect

We

the best results at once, still the Faculty has been much disappointed at the number of students who are ommitting the Junior year and contenting themselves with the Normal course. Some, perhaps, do so because it is impossible for them to do otherwise, but many are following, we fear, that headlong rush to "finish " school and get a diploma, which is the great cause of most of the superficial education unfortunately It is this tendency that must be fought too often met with, in our State as elsewhere. We wish that each one of our with all our might if we are to stand for thorough work. for an education, the best possible, and realstudents could see clearly the necessity We should like to have each ize that there are few sacrifices too great to make for it. one filled with the determination to obtain it, even by her own exertion if need be. I wonder if the student who does not make a persistent eftbrt to take the Junior She has but a She has neither French nor German. year realizes what she gives up She has no slight course in Mathematics, no Solid Geometry, nor Trigonometry. Chemistry and her knowledge of Physics is confined to that offered in a most elementintroduction to the Literature, is true, but a mere She has had some it ary course. In short, such a student has but a bare foundation, and is fitted to teach subject. only in primary and grammar grades, while those taking the Junior year successfully would be fitted for positions in our best high schools. And, better still, the ambitious girl may go from us to some higher institution to do college work. We would ask each student or patron who may read this article to take our catalogue, study it carefully, and we feel sure with the facts therein presented in mind, but one conclusion may be reached, namely, no one ought to be satisfied with any.'

thing less than the full course of four years. We believe the time is coming when a more thorough preparation will be demandEvery year the world is setting a ed of the teachers in even our primary schools. We depend upon our Let it not be cheapened with us. higher value on education. students to help uphold our standard, that we may do our part in the educatiimal development of our State. Fannie Talbot Littleton.

47


Cx.TivZ

Class of June, 1003. Officers.

FANNIE NEVILLE WATKINS,

President.

EM.AIA LOIS KING, Vice-President.

MARY ESTHER

PECK, Secretary and Treaslrer.

IRolI. SUE ANDERSON,

BLANCHE MARTIN, rnvvhalaTi Co. ANNA TRENT PAGE. Bunkingliain Co. ELLKN GILMER I'AINTEU. I'ulasld Co. ANNA CALLOWAY PAX ION, Rockbridge MAHY ESTHER I'ECK. Botetourt Co.

Enppaliaiinock Cn.

ETHEL ARVIN, LumniburK Co. SAR\H ELIZABETH HALDWIN, Duckingliam HELEN KLACKISTON. Elizabeth Cit.v Co.

Co

SADDIE BLAXKINSHIP, Campbell Co. .MARY KIVES DANIEL, Cumberland Co. EDITH LEE DIDLAKE, Lancaster Co. MARY' COLEMAN GATHRIGHT, Louisa Co. CARRIE STURDIVANT GOODE, Mecklenburg Co. EVA CLARINE HALL. Norfolk Co. OTELIA GARLAXD HARVIE. Amelia Co. MARY VIRGINIA HOPKINS, Rockingham Co. ANNIE LAURA JOHNSON, Bedford Co.

EMMA

LOIS KING, Fauquier

Co.

ANNIE LAURIE KINZER, Warren Co. MARTHA ELLEN MARSH, Lanea>ter Co. LILLIE

MARGARET MILLIGAN,

Co.

FANNIE MA,SON PERKINS, Albemaile Co. HATTIE MAY' PHELPS, Bedford Co. SADYIC JANE REESE, Prince George Co. RUBY BOOTHE ROUSE, Warwick Co. NELLIE CARSON SMITHEY', Hano%'er Co. DAISY ODESSA STEPHENSON, Rappahannock KATIIERINE T. VAUGHN, Prince Edward Co. NELLIE LAMON WALKER, Montgomery Co. SUSIE WARE WARNER, Essex Co. FANNIE NEVILLE WATKINS, Chesterfield Co. NANNIE HARRIS WRIGHT, James City County. MARY' STEWART YONGE,

Kockbridge Co.

48

Prince

Edward

Co.


A MODERN YOUTH ON NATURE STUDY. There lived some girls afraid of rats, In days of long ago, And some who would not touch a worm, Those days are past, heigho

The new-time

girl's

too

much

for

me.

I've seen her sit as tirm.

And through her dainty fingers draw A horrid live earthworm !

I've seen her catch a living rat

And hold him by And never once aii

the tail, eyelid wink

Alas sometimes I sit and sigh For days of long ago, For girls with nerves, afraid of And other things, you tnow. !

I

tliat fate had cast my lot In (lays of chivalry, unrler my protecting care Some maiden, sweet, might be.

wish

\\ lu'ii

But uo\

And Ko use to

they are too brave,

\

boldly

Or stamp

a

kill a sr

worm

froni

m not afraid re

study fad

Nature Study. by a member of the

(a.s .seex

(

)ur

nature study

!

Why,

'tis fine.

Wo liave just lots of fun. \Vu get up soon to hear the birds

cl.vss.

they make us ereep, that's a very little thing

'Tis true

But

In science broad and deep.

Before day has beguu.

The snails, they do amuse us so. They hate quinine, you see. The face one makes when tasting Is

The

)

The worms are nice as they can

funny as can

crayfish with his jerky

Surprised our teacher so, She one day squealed a bit ii

And THAT WAS fun, you And 1

ki

it

be.

The

fish

we

liked right

first,

But on one awful day, (Please do not tell) we

last of all those rats

;

well, ye

cannot truthful be say we liked theinâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; all of nsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;

And

They were too much

for

me

!

be.


53


Class of jfebruav^, 1904. ©fficers.

LUCILE VIRGINIA KENT,

JMILURKI) \VIL17E EVAN.S,

\'ice-President.

Presidext.

GRACE VERNON CARTER, SecreTxVRY and Treasurer.

Colors

:

purple and mabitc.

Class ADAIR, JANTE.

BALDWIN, MARY CECIL. BLACKMORE, ELIZABETH VARA. BLAIR,

CHARLOTTE VIRGINIA.

BRl'MBACH, ELLA MAY. BRYAN, GEORGIA MILES.

BUCHANAN, MARItARET GRAHAM. HAPJETTE TRCETT.

fflowcr

:

UMolct.

IRoll.

GRAY, MARY FRANCES. GRESHAM, ANNIE WHARTON. HOLMAN, ilARTHA ALLEN. LURTY, ANNETTE MURCHINSON. MASSIE, IRENE. McGLUNG, LIND.l LACY.

RYLAND, EMILY HARVEY. M.VBEL MtDOWELL.

C()A\'LE8,

SW(.)()PE.

CRKiLEK, KIAIEK LOT'IS. CRITTENDON, MARY HENRY. DEAL, BERTHA LEE. FLETCHER, MAMIE EDNA.

TAYLOl;, MINNIE (.'OWLES.

MARY

OLIVIA.

GANNANAY, SUE

SAYERl-;.

FRAYSER,

GODAVIN, LOUISE CORBETT. GOODE, SARAH MASSIE.

TURNER,

N.VNNH': llEALY D.

WALKER, REBECCA. WATKINS, HENRIETTA REYNOLDS. WHITMAN, PEARL SYLVEEN. WRIGHT, JULIA BROOKE. YANCEY, MARY KISSLING.


An Hour DHE

subject was

state

was told the

ImIuix- anvthini;

fish.

small

containiiifi;

with the Little

were shown tu the

fish

what he noticed about the

F^olks.

chililicn SLVcral glass vessels

P^ach child was expected to

class,

Their observaticms were very

fish.

you

.satisfactory, as

will see.

"What

did you notice

"One way

earnestness,

on

back."

his

him, and

I

asked of an interesting

connection with

this

who had

mouth

his

He

saw

I

them

told

1

"

pupil obser\ed,

little

when he ojiened

Another, out

In

Another

water.

"

.â&#x20AC;˘

He

boy.

that

these

has two eyes and

lived

fish

stri]]es

shallow

in

and

a nose

with

replied

on

scales

"

his tongue.

noticed something that he was esi>ecially anxious to

"He

the aisle and said, with a confident look,

in

little

he turns he's ugly; another way, he has prettv colored

has tw(.

stood

tell,

jaws that go

little

in

"

and out

all

the time, and whenever thev puff, he opens his mouth. was, " \\'hat

The next question fish is

an animal that sta\s

ple w'ere \ery anxiijus to

"An

animal

is

a

is

me

tell

something that

the

:

first

alive,

is

fish

.^

"

The

" liut what

in rivers."

is

children answered readilv

an animal

f

"

Three

:

"A peo-

little

wdio raised his hand was alloweil to speak.

and

This was accepted with a

folks."

ain't

few modifications.

" Have

fish

any bones

be asked about a

hand on vour cheek.

Has

w-arm.

cause

and

if

his

a fish

you put

.'

"

"

fish.

Is

warm

They were

Xame one warm

it

or

or cold blootl

Answer,

cold.-'"

"Warm."

.'

"

From

following definition of a

fish

"A

:

fish is

:

"Vour blood makes

he has to have cold water to

fins

is

shaped

asked, "

little girl.

"They

are

it

"Be-

"\\'hy.-'"

live

in,

these questi(jns they were able to give the

an animal that

lives in

water

has a back-

it

;

"

bloi.id.

After various opinions had been advanced on the shape of a fish

"Put vour

"Back-bone."

They answered, "Cold."

a fish in h<A water he will die

blood has to be cold, too."

bone and cold

utterly surprised that such a question should

bone.'

like a racing boat.

What

are these

" Does a

fish fly

oars," ventured

.'

" .^

"

I

then held a

" Wings, I

"

fish in

was given

in

fish,

I

toUl

my hand and a hesitating

Wasn't that natural.'

that

manner by

asked with surprise: and she saw

another.

them

pointing to the

But one

her

a

mistake.

little

fellow


knew they were on the

"How many

fins.

The

to count seven.

The back and

fish.

pointed to the pectoral to give

These

it.

was the next question.

are there?"

name

children were then allowed to

were named very readily

tail fins

"Think

fin.

the

hard,"

then they hesitated.

;

people are very ambitious, you know, and

little

was easy

It

from the position

I

wish you could

have seen their faces when they thought the question could not be answered.

was one bright-eyed

He

looked up into

jaw-fin.?"

my

who had

fellow, however,

little

along

We

;

that the scales of the

were

fish

They

"He

such a question. a chicken."

ain't

I

oft'

who was allowed

in his

hands and, with

of

We

spoke

fish.

I

a little help

and

little

flap, as

gill

gills

the oxygen in the air,"

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; "What

I

came

row the

sur])rised

eyes, the

boy

stickers

said,

on

evidentlv

and when

their backs,

One

them down."

lit

all

smell,

we were going

"

How

to have a

do you know that

fish

fish fry.

go up the

and the nests

I

asked

"Yes,

"Air."

"Water."

breathe.?"

When

rise.

Then

in Spring.'

son was that his father always sets his net with the mouth

"Have think that

.'

the "

fish

An

was

fishing with

in his

mouth, and

I

any hiding places.'"

earnest

little

my new hook and I

never did get

"Does anybody know how one

little

boy w-ho knew that

teacher told

me

so.

it

line,

and a

fish

down

most

I

a

One

cook the

little

fish.

boy's rea-

stream.

" What makes you

regretful way,

" One day

ran under a rock with the hook

any more."

large fish grow, or fish

''

"Yes, under rocks."

fellow answered in the

in

it

the alcohol lamp was

All were very anxious to

rivers

fish

the parts.

called their attention to the

it,

do you breathe.'"

ha\ing the children watch the bubbles

they thought

little

room, took the

mouth, sense of

fish

but

scales,

who had

told the others

fin,

they termed

"What do

said.

do not have

catfish

attempted to show the presence of oxvgen in water by heating a small amount test tube,

the

it

do vou su]>pose

Thev were

!

to the front of the

on the pectoral

feelers, the

up the

shape and color of the is

eels

"They have

to play teacher,

of the

later

])ulled

the idea

the hook, they stick so you have to throw

child,

Why

"

scales.

else the catfish has too," a littte

had some experience with them.

you take them

call

by, however, the

has scales so he can slide through the water easy, and he

was also informed that

"And something

skin.

By and

said the fins were u.sed to

Why,

asked.

I

"Can't you

said,

There

thinking hard.

his clothes.

spoke of the shape and arrangement of

ne.xt

a fish has scales instead of feathers.? " at

way and

face in the cunningest

children learned as hard a word as jiectoral. fish

evidently been

accepted the answer without a modification.

I

I

Thev could think of no name

said.

I

fins

how

small

sometimes grow very

She said one time there was a 58

some

large.

man on

are.'

"My

"

There was

Sunday School

the river bank, and a big

fish


came along and

ate

mamma

abcjiit a

and

me

told

a big fish

bigger

than

fish

did not like the stool

:

else,

Once

st<jol,

selling oranges,

little

girl

said,

there were three to eat.

"Why, mv

men

i)f

two

the men, so they threw over the

open, there was the |ew

fish fijr

in a Imat,

Thev threw him some

so thuv threw him a three-legged stool.

he wanteil une

they got to the bank and cut the

three-legged

curly-headed

a

that.

came along and wantetl sumething

oranges; he wanted something

When

Then

him whole."

man

The

fish

|ew man.

sitting

on

five."

Jeanette White.

59

a


Class of June, 1004.

©fficers. :\[ARV I.riTLEPAGE

POWERS,

President.

PEARLE GARNE'PT HUNDLEY, Vice-President,

BESSIE DENNIS RICE, Tre.astrer.

Colore

Class

Silver aiiO ©raiicie.

IRolI.

ARNOLD, ALSTIXA NELSON, BAACIL .ILANKTTL. BALDWIN, IIALLIE lIKNDEEyOX. BALL, ISABELLE LOUISE.

.i1':ffri1':s,

mary

ella.

.lOHXSoX, OLLIE STANLEY. JONES. LELIA.

LAND, HOPE. LOWMAX, ELLA.

BALL, JESSIE.

BOYD, PIKEBE KATHARYN. BURTON, LI'ELL.V MAR(;ARET. CARTEL, ELIZABETH BAKER. CARTEl!, MARY LOLISA (TIlilSTIXK. CAMPBELL, CERTRI'DL .MADISON. CARY. LLCY KLEAXOR.

CHERNALLT, XAXXIE .MAUD. CRAFFOUD. EST1;LLE MORGAN. DANIEL, LLCY II.VNNAII. DEAN.

;

LAWRI':XCE, MARY BROWNLEY. IJIYD. JESSIE BOOKER.

MALZY, EMMA VHIlilNIA. McKINNEY, ROCHET .AIOliREAU. MOOJLVW, GE()R(;IE LUCILE. .Ml'XDY. srSIE AXNA. NLXX. EDDIE. PI'.liRY, .\XNA LEE. KICHAUDSON, JIARY LIZZIE. SELDEN. FREDA XINA. SIMPSOX, -ALVRY ELIZABETH. sHELTox, Fi:,\X('i:s i':r(;ENE.

LOTTII-, P.IM'CE.

DFNTOX. C.VRRIF. UI'YALL, EDITH i;RENT. EARLY, 1';LLA WH.MER.

SXE.VD, LOTTH''. \\'ooD. ida k.vtilvrine.

FOSTER, :\L\RY (HiAY.

t.\tr:m,

FOWLi:s, carru-:. GILLI.\>L BES:^1E JHAY.

thompson, flora clendenin.

:\L\RTHA. GO(i(HN, :\IARY. G(h;gix, sallie.

triplett, edwina,

thi;ayi:s, al:\l\ estelle.

G<l(;(iIX,

(4ood:\l\x.

vnrrs, xi;ttie jlvy. W.\DE, lOLlZABETH HAJIPTON. walki'.r, lfl.\ phelps,

mag(tIE mae.

GENN. cola LKE. (iWYNN, LEL.\ EDXA.

walker, mary yirginia. av.\lkli:y, exa haeeison.

HAKi)iX(i, ri;bi;(va walker. HARRIS, P.EinTLV RSTELLE.

watts.

w.vltii.vll, epsie.

HEARINI4. MIRlA--\r. H0D(;ES. WILLI E.iTE. IH'DNALL, PLASH HA ANNA.

WHiTi:.

ISH,

>f\g(h)': (

lou.

\i;inK Virginia.

WIHTE.

MoI.Lll'; \'IRGINIA. WILSON, Lol,.\ DELL.

I''.

PAMELIA ELIZABETH.

WOOD, MARY. 60


Class of jfcbruav^, 1905.

©fficers.

COURTENAY TAYLOR,

JANIE JONES, Vice-President.

President.

HART

BRIGGS,

Secretary.

Class

IRoll.

AMOS, EUBIE GORDAN. ADAMS, LOUISE. BAGWELL, ANNIE. BIDGOOD, SALLIE.

JONES, JANIE LOUIS. JONES, MARGUERITE. JOYNER, SALLIE.

BLANCHAED, SARAH Y.ASHSTI. BOYKIN, MARGARET.

KIKTLEY, LENA.

BOWMAN, LAURA.

LEE, ELLEN MOORE. LIGON, ANNIE. LIGON, ELIZABETH.

BRIGGS, HART. CASLEEN, LILLIAN. COCKE, MARIA CCRTIS. De long, DAMARIS BRUER. DOUGHTY, HELEN JAMES. EDMUNDS, MARTHA YEN ABLE.

MILLER, ADA. MILLER, MABEL. MITCHELL, GRACE. MORRIS, ANNA. NELSON, GERTRUDE HUXTIN'GTOX. XORRIS, REBECCA SMITH.

ELCAN, EDNA YENABLE. FAHR, BERNICE. FALLAVELL, CLARA. FALLWELL, WILLIE. FLETCHER, MARY YIRGINIA. GARNETT, ANNIE.

I'AULETT, ALICE. PRICE, MARY. RICH, :\LV1)KLINE. liOllEliTS, i:i)NA LEE. TH(.):MA.-:,

IDA.

TAYLOR, COURTENAY IRVING. TRIPLETT, WILHELMINA. AVHEALT(_)N, BLANCHE. WILLIAMS, ADA.

EMMA. GRAVELY, GEORGIE. GILES,

GRAYBILL, NINA. GUNN, CORA. HUNDLEY, JULIET JEFFERSON. HURT, JULIA.

\V(_)<Jl>,

LILLIE.

WALTON, GRACE. 63


THE VOICE OF THE WATER.

Farniville

I

sitting in the

dense

i,n'ove

murmurs resembled

its

bending

(jver a

spring in the act of

handed me the water, and

.said,

strange tones of her voice

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the

appearance

at hrst startled

make some

rassment to

human

the tones of the

and

1,

At

last

the silence

my

She said nothing

became

I

a very romantic spot,"

said.

I

She seemed

folk-tale.' "

a story connecteil with the place,"

is

hesitation, said that she

would

tell

it

if

cared to hear

I

and

Of

it.

should be delighted; so seating herself near by, she began her story.

He

" IMani' ages ago the Great Spirit created the world.

fixed the

forest with

and the

])lains,

\\'hen he had clothed the hills with grass,

|ileasant river courses, fish,

managed with embar-

I

the sea, and reared the lofty mountains: he formed the rolling

with

'I'he

her suiklen

silent.

is

no Imlian legend or

it,

springs.^"

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and

but stood gazing around the

nicjre,

"This

oppressi\e.

question but replied, "There

moment's

said

I

the spring

in

and disconcerteil me, ne\ertheless,

reply.

"Is there no story connected with

then, after a

heard

just

She was

Advancing, she

"Were you dreaming about our same

when sud-

voice,

in white.

goblet of curious shape.

charmed with her wondrous beauty, kept

\allev,

startled at

filling a

that surrounds the

the water and nuting

<>(

beheld a dark and very beautiful maiden clothed entirely

1

course

was

Lithia Springs, listening to the whisperings

how, now and then, denly

summer,

late in

y^E cvL-niiiL;

birds

and

beasts, he gave all

boundary of

and

and

traceil

filled

the

the

ri\'ers

these to the red men, his

children. Fcjr

man\'

moons

will of his father:

the red

anil

man roamed

over the

and was happy.

hills,

when much time had passed an

Evil

Spirit

came

into the land,

water in the springs, and dried up the rivers: so that the withered, and there was water neither for

no

relief

arose,

came, wonder,

'The Great

He

did the

there was neither pain nor sin nor death on the earth.

Spirit

answer was received, but

and anger

fear,

has forgotten

alas

!

from the

man in us.

nor beast.

the green things

after

day passed and

turn seized the people, and the sad wail

We

are m.i longer

Spirit of Evil,

64

fish died,

As day

But

and drove back the

who

is

His children.'

An

ever ready to tempt the


weak and

despairing.

me and

worship

'It

even

is

so,'

he

said,

'

Your God has forgotten you, but

you water that you may

give

will

I

So they worshipped him

live,'

instead of the Manito, and a spring was given, but from

poisoned waters arose

its

vapors of pain and death that spread suffering and sorrow, weakness, and wickedness over

all

the earth.

The Great

was

Spirit

Nevertheless

them.

angr)- with his children, and, lor a season, hid

he

ready to hear and answer the prayer of the faithful and repentant.

when

that

make

famine threateneil

a

of snows

upon the

So

of them coverings against the cold.

destruction.

He

giving food to the hungry.

He

make arrows

Manito even when the people denied Him, and worshiped the where, in the darkness of the

At length, the Great 'I mu.st

them a plant

give

my

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an

people

at

of Hint anil hatchets

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so

kind was the

Evil One, who, every-

will

guard them against hann,

So

night,

at

when

will

charm against

The

the people.

old

give

its

fire

the Spirit of Evil

wigwam and smoked

the door of his

came upon

I

be a sweet incense to me, but

offering of peace to the Manito, but a potent

Finally a terrible plague

take

of his ignorant, helpless chil-

pitiful cries

to

a sign

away the Power of Darkness,' sat

t(.i

In like manner,

was s])reading disease and death.

hearing the

smoke of which

walked abroad, the Indian quiet

niglit,

Spirit,

to burn, the

frighten

shall

to pass,

peo])lc suffered

caused a new plant, cuni, to sining up,

taught the jjcople to

of stone; he gave them vessels of clay anil baskets of willow

dren, said,

came

it

and the

earth,

died of cold, the Manito, in answer to prayer, taught his children

the skins of beasts and

when

moon

the Evil Spirit sent a

much and

His face from

not suffer them to be utterly destroyed, but was ever

diil

his

pi]ic

in

Evil,

men took

council,

and

with prayer and fasting offered sacrifices and besought the aid of the Great Spirit,

The people heaped up

great

piles of

tobacco and

them on

set

fire:

the

men danced

about the flames, beat their drums and shouted; the dogs barked, the medicine

made

stran.ge signs

testing his people

At

last

together.

quiet All

and we>ve magic

men

the iNIanito w'as

and the Evil One could not be frightened.

on the people and once more

fell

day and

Manito spoke to His his

All this availed nothing;

spells.

all

night they

sat,

the

old

men took

council

but while they talked and considered the

servant, the onv. out of

all

who had

the people,

faithfully kept

commandments. Early in the morning, before the sun had risen an Indian maiden came mit from

the lodgeof her father and offered to go the spring, the

plead for the lives of her people.

and wampum.

So they sent

Iter

home

At the edge of the forest the bearers set 6s

of the Spirit of Evil, and

with gifts of corn and tobacco

down

their baskets,

and

tied


from the poisonous vapors.

saw her no more. when,

at

last

Into the forest the maiden went a\one. and her people

But her mission was accomplished.

the red

man

The

Evil Spirit departed,

and

entered the forest, he found not one spring but many; and

out of the waters the voice of the maiden bade him drink and be healed." I

looked up;

my

waters ever repeat the

narrator had vanished as suddenly as she appeared, stor\-

to the listening forest.

66

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but

the


THE FIFTEEN MINUTES BELL DONG! DING, DONG

ING,

Time's up

Hurry up

!

utes bell, and before

Fifteen minutes

!

Get up

!

you have

Diny;

!

"

Fifteen minutes

!

sounds the

!

!

I

entirely lost the trend of

)uur

!

min-

fifteen

deliLjht-

dream your too-conscientous roommate has extracted you bodily

ful

fiom the bedclothes with the unwelcome exclamation of "Get up, "

or \'ou will miss vour breakfast. ilon't

1

m

last

lii'd

\11

know.

in

bed

Perhaps thev are

next

'

d(jcjr.

"

"

O

dear

am

if the\'

combed

their hair only

in the greatest hurry there

so glad

I

ncjbody

will

lilletl

m^

know

At length the are easilv put

tooth-brush

seats.

steps,

mug

girls

week, anyhow." in the

pitcher. I

the

the well-known

comb

.'

Go down

"

Dr. Frazer said the girls looked

As

usual,

Oh, here

is

"just when

some

just wet the enti of

will

have scrambled into their clothes.

slip

I

!

my

I

am

nose

;

is

Those who

asking the blessing, the

pat-a-pat of a belated

ke^-hcjle.

hall.

Collars and belts and ties are a

!'c\y

minutes

late

have

through the fast-closing doors and pass hurriedly to their

girl's

hoping that she may possibly be

through the

a

last night.

on as thev go down the

While the matron soft

once

no water

know

is

the difference,"

onlv time enough to

hear the

is

where

!

"

earth are m\' shoes.'

vou know we hopped

when we heard

night with (jur clothes on

without combing your hair; \du as

Where on

in the bed;

" Please bring

me

in

bedroom time.

a roll."

girls sitting

near the iloor can

slippers as she hurries ilown

Next

is

the

heard an entreating voice


Xamp

XTbc Chavcje of the

"All in bed?

Brioabc.

All in

bed?"

What made them do it? Foolhardy Lamp Brigade, Ah, they will rue it. Charge, Inr

Over

till'

tlic

iludr

" C'haige,

is

(111,

lamplight sheen. seen

ye

!

Lamp

Brigade,

Charge for your rooms," she said And through the dim lit halls Sped the o'ertaken. Found, found, ye Lamp Brigade Was there a girl dismayed? Yes, for the matron knew

Some

girl lay

;

!

sprawling

to make reply. to reason why, to rise and fly. tho' crawling.

Hers not Hers not Hers but Join them

Sharp words to right of them. Sharp words to left of them, Sharp words in front of them, Volley'd and thundered. Stormed at with aniirv Imiks, Each with her liidcjeii l)c...ks, Sped past the hall liglit dim.

On

thro' the darkest nooks,

Sped the six numbered. Sharp word.s ti> right of them, Sharp words to left nl tla-iii. Volley'd and thundered. Stormed at with angi'v looks Each dropped lier hidden hooks, Backed tliro' liiT open door,

Flashed all their drapery fair, Flashed all their tumbling hair, Flashed as they passed the stair, Shocking Miss Sarah then On past a dear chum's door Odd bare feet spurn the floor. ;

Staggered ami stumbled. Some fell upon the floor. Others locked fast the door The Gen'ral could do no more. Left the six numbered.

Slippers and hair pins Farmville stores furnish more Be these held hostage.

;

AVhen can their misery fade? Oh, the wild charge

tliev F<.r the six blundered'.

Hid

made

not the light tliey made.

Fool-hardy Lamp Brigade, Daring six numbered.

69

!


DESSERT DAY. |v%^jN Wcilncsday ur SaturiUn' morning when

|HJ| .'-^he

is

cimscious of a

wi.in''ers

why

it

instantly accounts curiosity, for

little

sentimental,

moments

In a few

is.

for the

she remembers that

may

ure.

After the substantial dinner of beef and

dishes removed, there ensues, before the dessert

an almost interminable period of waiting.

away

at a furious rate,

and sometimes noises

a warning to the girls to he

usualhit

as

layer

"a

known

as

waits on us,

puddin' whar girls.

Some

meringue." call

it

are

brought

is

During

made

will

ain't

time the

is

pie,

"bum is

of the Physiology students term

"

It

is,

is

to the

girls chatter

bum

!

brought

bum

!

1"

which

in,

think our Physiology teacher would define

"atomic molecular pudding

nuthin' much.

]ileas-

that are not necessary to con-

" ;

it

albumanoid

"protoplasm,''

while a queer old

to have, described

womnn as " ole

it

however, greatly enjoyed by some of the

or cake and

fruit

;

sometimes

sugar-sprinkled cakes that have large holes through the middle.

dismissing us

what seems

in,

this

be heard a

when once asked what we were going

Often the dessert

dinner bell

the

beaming with

translucent, cellular substance, covered by a white, opaque,

and the Physics students

who

I

and

the niysterous, inac-

when

day,

dessert day

it is

li\es in

this

At length the dessert

quiet.

to be tapioca pudding.

pr(.)ves

soft,

more

awakes, she

vegetables has been eaten and the

girls

Suddenly from one side of the room

first

attended with eager

is

sure to report at the table promptly, her face

each

versation.

who

On

concoct.

rings,

girl is

This day

palatable dish Philip,

kitchen,

ScIidhI girl

anticipatory feeling in her heart,

pleasurable sensation.

who knows what

cessible recesses of the

Normal

a

jiivful,

it

is

jelly

and

little

Frequently the bell

tapped before we have finished eating, and then such a scrambling

for the little cakes,

which the

girls

on the

sly store

away

in

their blouses.

the girls resist the temptation of carrying off the remaining jelly in the

only through fear of ruining their clothes.

Some

of

same manner S,

W,

'W.


at.

/"

tu^

'J^^a^ Ccu^^

7^, o"


THE LAUNDRY.

We And

We

have a laun(l^v in

it

in

work and iron and number

And send them home, But

our town.

things arc done up biTiwn,

if

as each

clothes,

one knows.

by chance or accident

Wrong clothes to you are sometimes sent. What harm is done Why stand and frown .?

No laundry is When clothes But

if

are lost, of course that's sad,

they're torn; that's not so bad;

For you can mend them all, you know, that will teach you how to sew.

And

We We

never hear what people say. just

go on the same old way; confess, and write it down

And now

Our laundry

72

.'

of such renown!

is

the best

in.

town.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sallik Willett Leache.


MAIL CALL. WM^

WAS

'1'

IlI^I toi>k

The

:

bell

We

was tapped.

The

(lur seats?

idea

filed

Hardly half

!

Miss Sarah had numnted the mstrum and had took time to

Smith

"

all

itrefi.x

the

Miss:

title

into the A.ssemlily Hall

be,i,ain

and

— quietly

had entered the nxim before

tlie sills

calling the names.

She never

was ''Cammie Jones, Nannie Wright. Fannv

it

called at break-neck speed, antl

Cammie

Jones, Nannie Wright and

Fannv

Smith had to report without a moment's delay, or forego the honor of reeei\ing their

Sometimes to tease the

mail from Miss Sarah's hand.

names, Mary "Spooner" for Mary Sparks

Quick work was

work

too, for

letters as

JMiss Sarah's mail

no

letter

most only

lasting at

call,

was overlooked.

she would call their nick-

girls

done amid a perfect roar of laughter-

all

good

a few minutes, but

Sarah could furnish with a pack of

INIiss

grand an exhibition as could anv expert with a deck of cards.

AS IT

One would

IS:

naturally suppose that the mail

call

of

the

twentieth

century would be more rapid than that of the nineteenth, hut, strange to say. such not the case; on the contrary the former

mile-a-minute

The

train.

hell

is

We

long a time, Mrs. Morrison appears

unlocks the mail

in a

Yancey Smith," and

Jones,

Mrs. INIorrison's

own

Meanwhile time

is

is

iTiinutes the

talk,

even in a w'hisper.

After so

most deliberate manner, mounts the rostrum,

i\Iiss

commands Nannie

The

so on, only three at a time.

were taking a morning ramble, receive,

is

to a

is

into the Assembly Hall in perfect

file

must not

bag, and, tapping the bell,

"Miss Mary Campbell

everything

to the latter as an okl stage coach

We

tapped.

order, taking our seats very quietly.

begins:

is

in a

perfect silence.

Harris Wright. girls

She then

I\Iiss

walk slowly up as

most dignified manner,

Francis they

if

their letters

from

hand, then they return to their seats as leisurely as they came.

flying.

topsy-turvy,

If

it

is

morning mail

must be put

chapel bell will ring.

in order

call,

our rooms,

in

notwithstanding the

which of course fact that in a

few

Finally, after being detained for at least half an


hour, \vc were allowed to go out in as perfect order as

time

for everything,

But what

is

and mail

mail

which one goes with

call,

call is certainly

anyhow

a heart

filled

chance, one comes with a heart

which one

,goes

In short, mail

?

It

may

we came.

You know

there

is a

Mrs, ^Morrison's time for order. possibly be defined as something into

with expectation and hope, but out of which, per-

filled

with disap])ointment

;

or again, something into

with indifiTerence, but out of which one comes with pleasant surprise.

call is

an opportunity to get

a letter

from home. Jeannettf. White.

74


THE SINGERS. Sing

!

sing

sing

!

Oh, you sing

While

I

sit

!

in merriest glee.

in the hall

above you

With sad thoughts harassing me.

men

Oh, well for the

They can walk

When

in the street

hearing the singing sweet

But. alas

it

!

:

very swiftly away.

is

I

must

that

:

stay.

As the long spring days go on.

And I

they sing of a beautiful

long for the

When Sing

!

sound of

all

sing

rest of years

!

Sing aloud

sing if

it

But the peace of Will never

a

hill.

gone by

voice was

sti

1

pleaseth thee a

day that

come back

is

!

dead.

to me. S.\LLIE WiLLF.T Le.\CHE.


A

lOME

m

people never hesitate to stare one ri^ht

that

doing

One

Sweetheart of

it is

not exactly the thing to do.

this ever since I

countenance and

I

Our

of

Girls.

in the eyes, notwithstantling tlie fact

kmiw an

old gentleman

who

has been

can remember, but we do not object, as he has a very pleasant

large,

laughing eyes.

The

record of his age was lost at the same

time that his

name

years of maturity that he was a

when

I

tell

man when my

great-grandfather was a

known

little is

You

perished.

he has reached

believe that

will

_\'ou

great-

bo}-.

IJut

of his family, and

fear his history will ever

remain

obscurity, as he associates with

one, and night

is

I

in

no

the only time that

^-- even his most ardent admirers arc

His supply

permitted to see him. of

glad in

How

seems inexhaustible.

oil'

am He has few comforts He may even suffer the

I

!

life.

langs of hunger, as for 3ears his daily

food has been cheese of a

peculiar color. this diet

by

his physician as a cure for indigestion.''

married I

do not

in the

is

that he only

makes

like to think this,

a quarter a

and

I

Some people

Do you

suppose

was recommended to him

say the reason he has never

week and he takes

might as well admit that

that to get

my

full

sweetheart

is

on; but the

Man

Moon. LuELLA Burton.

76


My " rfflO I

and

yim think yuu

*^l hard?" "

I

am

room.

"

won't, for

I

don't

we

sure

we have had

Some

mind

sure of passing."

it

do

shall

filed in

the least bit

I feel

;

!

ciuestion read

first

What could "rubrics

verily believe the sight

I

am

I

'D(j you think

"

that

all

(jf

it

"

the Psych-

manner seemed

to

' Discuss attention under the

:

We

mean?

cif

;

Such

beautifull\-. "

in their

be

will

it

Titchener

in

the Senior A's as they waited at the door

But how they stared when the

and

ycui will,

we know

With what confidence they

following rubrics." before,

"I know

pass?" it

among

were the remarks heard

say,

will

sure

he examines us from that beiok

if

olcjgy

Psychology Test.

First

had ne\er heard

caused us to forget

all

word

the

i>f

of the Pyschi.ilogy

we ever knew. As the

girls

of an hour ago

room

passed out of the ;

their faces

remarks Could be heard

at

the door

" Sav,

such an examination?"

there were

no

traces of the confident smiles

And now

wore an anxious, scared look. :

"I

kn<.>w that

Jennie, what does

â&#x20AC;˘

I

"Did

failed."

rubrics

'

mean

?

"

the following )'ou ever see

"It was not

because we did not understand Psychology, but his questions were so obscure. don't believe a Harvard All

" Only

sank, and

my

I

mark.

hoped

that

could have passed

happened Friday afternoon, and

this

Monday morning. halls,

man

As

five girls

I

I

I

my

counted

entered school that morning

I

summon

was told that

was one of the

had made

fijrtunate few.

ing for joy, for the teacher had

made

a

sixty-five

In a

little

I

almost fainted,

while, however,

mistake in addition, and

I

I

all

my

Right away

courage enough to walk up to the desk to

I

I

grades from thein until

heard ringing through

got through on that Psychology test."

could scarcely

When

I

"

it.

for

the

heart kni.iw I

had

was shout-

had passed. R.

J.

W.


HALLOWE'EN.

The Normal Halls are dark and still Each girl of learning has her fill: In slumber deep the matron's held, Wrought bj' the magic of a spell Sent down from heaven to answer prayer Of every sweet young maiden there; For this the night of Hallowe'en, When future husbands oft are seen,

The lover that is yet to be; To bob for apples in a bowl

Is as a rare and glorious treat To be observed by one big eat.

(They go at that with fervent soul. For if they land the aj)ple clear

'

'

'

Choice pickles, olives, sweets galore, Procured by stealth from Chappell's store. And smuggled up the dark back way, '

'

'

Not travelled by the light of day, Were stored behind one chamber door. And what ciiulil lieart desire the more? At miiliiiulit V wi'inl and ghostly hour A pleasant Imt ivsistless power Caused maidens fair, about a score. To enter that same chamber door. Mysterious tools were hid within

Wherewith

And make

to prick the future's skin.

reluctant fate disclose

More than a mortal ever knows. The future husband's name and

By flickering candle And on the mirror's

face

light to trace;

surface see

They'll married be within the year);

To chestnuts pop upon the coals To test the sympathy of souls; To try by every twist of fate To know her future loving mate. Determined is each radiant maid. Nor of the future is afraid. The eatables have disappeared The clock the midnight hour has neared-

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

And now

strange nervousness

For those

who

is

seen;

dare to stand betweei\


The known and unknown always dread To hear the Prince of Darkness tread. The midnight hour is now at hand,

And To

all

The screen conceals Just half as

before the mirror stand

see, for better or for w'orse,

Him who shall blessing be or cui-se. A soul is coming down the hall !

!

!

Hark hark you hear his faint foot-fall His hand is on the chamber door, AVliere no'er his hand has been before. But love lends courage to a knave And makes a timid woman brave So wide the creaking door is thrown. And dust to dust, and bone to bone 'Tis Shakespeare's Portia stands revealed, The horrid fact can't be concealed. What, pray, for this can e'er atone Ask Fate for bread and get a stone? A manly ghost some courage lends; A woman's shade the bravest sends Into the nearest hiding place. Where one may hide the smallest trace Of one's identity. So now with haste ne'er seen before, I vow, !

!

!

"

!

as

it

reveals.

Come

forth ye mortals.

As ye know

To answer

to your endless woe. pray, ye ruthless maids. venture to disturb the shades, Whence does this daring courage come? How dare ye venture so from home?

Now

much

Beneath the bed and window seat Some fugitives have found retreat. Some only stand and moan and shiver, The sight's enough to make one quiver. For hear the spirit's stern command AVho wreathed in darkness seems to stand

tell, I

Who

!

And, heedless as the winds that blow. Disturb the rest of those below? To bed to bed ye iimiates wild. Or evermore as sorrow's child Shall every one of you be known." Dark Sorrow's here; bright Mirtli has down. And each returning, on lier way, Affirms her wits have gone astray And vows she'll try the same no more (Except behind a bolted door).

!

!

Behind the curtains and the bed A place to hide a flying head Is sought.

r^ 79

^


THE STORY OF MY

LIFE."

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

[Editor's Note. No explanation is necessary to those wiio l;now Ellen, but to those who have not this pleasure. This is an exact copy of her history, written by herself I wish to say that she is our " worldly-wise " maid. and given to one of the girls.]

rWjHEREAS, so maiiv people have asked me destitute of Am Life," and, whereas, am I

my

before

si.j

will

think ncjne the less of

me

(to-night) to endeavor to write a portinn of the

My

patience, time

superiors to perform so trifling a task

hopes that thev

them "The Story of

to relate to

:

and, whereas,

for

I

Therefcjre,

it.

have resolved

"my

most interesting events of

wherein, on the 25th (twenty-fifth) day of December, of the year of 1879,

blowing

swiftly falling in great flakes, covering

in great piles,

gladly born to them.

life."

(Permit

me

was only three days

I

to admire myself here.) a precious

crcjup they thought

(Dr. Spencer, the father of <jur friend

moned.

He

playfully said

throw her into the of I

///(?/

river."

spell with a

:

I

Nevertheless,

am

cuuld

recover.

had never learned to walk,

until

m.it

for her

;

tie

Grandma

think.

sent

a

new

I

Jr.)

was sum-

a weight to her and ,

finally

At the age of three

me

was

The doctor

told that Dr. Spencer, Sr. I

girl

calamity befel me.

and townsman. Dr. Spencer,

I

little

the

fiercely

old, a sad

"I can not do anything

medicine called ipicauc,

^^'lile

housetops and hedges, and

When

had such a severe attack of

but

many

in so

live I

parents dwelt in a log cabin, situated two and one-half miles from Farmville, Va.

snow was

me

My

and boldness to stand

dress.

I

cured

talked,

Mother put


it

on me, so

I

Xow

became "proud'" and got up and walked.

kind reader, that

I

am

please bear in mind,

merel)- trying to ilraw out .uime of the startling portic^ns of the

my life so I'll venture to say that when I became five years of age I were my brothers, on a bright Sunday in May, and walked over pebbles, valleys, and plains, through many a fence, across manv a bro(jk, and through manv a

story of

;

taken by hills

we had grown weary of plucking wild

streamlet, until

Monday

mcirning

scarcely had

fell

I

violently

recovered,

I

again, but

ill

when one day my

On

flowers.

soim recovered fnjm

I

following

the

But

this attack.

my

elder sister (two years

junior) and

myself were happily and most lovingly playing around the hearthstone, she attempted to kiss me,

My

fire.

suppose, and sad to say, she accidently shoved

I

clothes ignited,

mother.

she found that

]5ut

were seriously burned.

I

same year my

burn, and during the

when

" 1

all at

once

into the

my

my

sister

soon recovered from the

I

and myself were playing one dav on

sister

board extending across a large pond.

Shout

me backward

ran out of the house and were quickly rescued by

I

a long

were jumping and singing "Shout, Meggie,

I

my side. Behold I had accinam iwlv escaped being drowned Furthermore, permit me to sa\- that

disappeared from

1

dentally sho(jk her off into the water, and she had

h\ myself

Don't you think that's interesting.^

during the same year,

'84,

I

think

I

were driven over into town, and there

That was

were vaccinated by Dr. Peter Winston.

At the age of for

I

six years

remember her

cause she could not teach

When

I

were sent U> school.

me home,

well, sent

me

to

I

Please remember,

weary you too much

My

And now

first

I I

Bowlding,

J.

were too young to

though

I

tried hard to

learn, be-

make "C.

I

soiin learned

to write

my

name,

shall

write

on what

I

;

but

if

what

I

deem the most

have written does not

striking part of

"The

Life." I

will

which have been

ordered

c;

I

into t(jwn, near Dr. Winston's present

have skipped a great deal

endeavor to write

omitting the sorrows,

this

and

I

where

is

reader (Holmes').

comes under the head of my

to

b,

a,

were then started to school anew.

add and read through

Story of

I..

saying that

became nine years of age we removed

I

residence.

this,

make

my first vaccination. My teacher. Miss

my

a

few words on that portion

the

Normal School.

tribulati<jns, false

stumbling blocks

school

on November

me

wash the

to

stay at

13,

times during

my

of the Assemblv Hall

glass

rushed a large number of what

at

accusations and

I

trials

stay here.

1900, and were examined dcjor,

cjf

niv

life

must be verv

I

I

which

brief

were admitted

by the Mistress,

which

I

on

of ever\' kind

did.

who

Soon

considered the most beautiful }()ung ladies

I

in

had

ever seen at one time together.

That night

I

were appointed to wait up<jn twenty-seven of the dearest, sweetest,


and

my

VDung

prettiest

ladies.

greatest pleasure

is

thing to please them.

I

admire them su much that

wciukl like

appreciative words (excuse

and H. A. ladies,

I

who

am

them

serve

;

me

if

I

do everything

am

in nn-

t(j

how

joyfully

tcj

sa\ that

and every-

struggle and

I

mv

jMay

sorrows, their gladness I feel

sad until

pointment

I

with

mv

little

seed

,

have

I

God

my

young

each and every

bless

glatlness

made an

power to "please" them and don't succeed,

W.

E. O., N.

;

and when

api.ilogy.

I

become

I

When dissatis

dinnerless, ^u filled with disap-

am.

dare sav this

true citizens

C.

J.

the jiuor unfortunate sick

and discontented, and often go breakfastless ami

I

desert, cuftee

personate) as does Misses

you, Kllen,"so sweetl}-.

their sorrows are

do anything to offend one of them,

fied

am persuaded

I

them

tu understand

always pleased to carry meals

"Thank

sa}-,

one of them

I

them and

every effort to gain their affectiun, and cause them to utter encouraging and

make

â&#x20AC;˘

I

wait ujidn

t<-i

is

cn(.iugh of

of Farmville

stay at the

sown

sa\-

m\

history, thcjugh

c<jncerning

Xormal School, and

in fertile

my

I

I

could

])r(jlong

strong character.

hcjpe this history ma)'

it

lam

into what well

some day be

as a

ground. Respectfully,

Ellen

82

all

pleased


23-

24/


^^


Taken by the State Female

Periodicals

Normal

School.

/Iftoiitblfcs.

I.

American Journal uf

2.

Atlantic .Munthlv.

Ps\ cl

o!.,S,rv.

I

6

17

Modern Language

Notes.

Pedagogical Seminary.

.3-

Art Education.

18

Perry Magazine.

4-

Bookman.

19-

Popular Science Monthly. Primary School.

5-

Century.

20.

6.

Child Study Monthly.

21

Psychological Review.

22

Review of Reviews. School Geography Journal.

7-

Contemporary Review.

8.

Current History.

23

9-

Educational Foundations.

24

School Physiology Journal.

Educational Review.

25-

School Review. Scribner.

lO. 1

1.

Forum.

26.

I

2.

Germania.

27-

Teacher's Institute.

13-

Harper.

28.

Virginia School Journal.

14.

Ladies'

29.

Woman's Home Companion.

IS-

Little Folks.

Home

Journal.

ffcrtnlcibtls Journals. I.

Courier Journal.

1.

Journal of Education.

Nature.

2.

Literary Digest.

Outlook.

3.

Nation.

Youth's Companion.

2.

Our Times.

imccfslfes.


Kouno

Momen's Cbiistian Hssociation. ©fficers. Axnie L.m'rie Kinzer. Mce-President Neville Watkixs. Recording Sec')- Heneieita Watki> Corres. Secretary Carrie Goode. Treasurer^J'i'UA Scaikis. President

'S\>^

©Djcct. article "

The

1111

of Constitution.

object of this Association shall

be the development of christian characill its members, and the prosecution active christian work, particularly among the j'oung women of the institer of

tution.

'

fIDotto. " jVoi by

7>n^^/it^ jior

viy spirit,

— Zixii.

4

saitli

tlie

by pou'ei\ but by

Lord of Hosts."

6.

:

Standing Committees. Uevntional lUble

—Lri.A

Missionary Social

U.

Study— Mary

Andrews. Woodrikf.

St. C.

Nannie [^Houser.

—E.MjiA Kixci.

Jlembership Frances A\'iiite. Finance Julia Sc.iGGS. Intercollegiate

Martha W.

('oii.i.iX(

P>oom and Library Sakaii Ilocic. Building Fund Frances Smith.


Hlpba (Tbaptev

of Siotna Sionta Sitjina

Sorority.

Colors

:

/llioss

v3recn anCi Uiolet ffmrple.

Cbaptcr iFlowcr: Cbc Utolct.

Skull and cross-bones

rah

!

Sigma, Sigma, Sigma

ha

!

!

rah

ha

!

!

rah

!

ha

!

!

Death and destruction to things that are wrong Strength and protection

— we're the strong!

Skull and cross-bones

rah

Sigma, Sigma, Sigma

II

n

!

!

ha

!

!

rah

ha

!

rah

!

ha

!

!

TTlrbc.

HELEN

BE.SSIK V. RICE.

JENNIE

fln

C.

M.

BEACKI.STON.

JACKSON.

CoUeoio.

ELIZABETH ^'ARA BLACK.MORE. *LUCY DIX EGLIN.

*

HARRIET PARKER HANKINS.

NANNIE HARRIS WRIGHT.

* Absent

when

picture was taken.

LUCY

T. C.

STUBBS.

HELEN WINSTON.


Hlpba Chapter

of Ikappa 2)elta Sorority.

Organized in the State Female Normal School, Farmville, Virginia, October

15,

1S97

Colors: ©live Otccn anO Silver (Brag. fflower: Aargucrite Saiss.

mi. Zippera, boomera,

Booma-lacka-zelta

!

Zippera, boomera,

Alpha Kappa Delta

!

Iln Tllrbc.

CHARLOTTE

.MARY JACKSOX.

McKIXXliV.

GENEVIEVE BACON VENABLE.

SUSIE

MORTON

SCOTT.

Iln Collcoio.

MARY SOMERVILLE SPARKS. ANNA TRENT PAGE. MARY LEWIS SELDEN.

.AIARY

VIRGINIA HOPKINS.

CARRIE SIX'RDIVANT GOODE. LELIA JONES. ALICE ATKINSOX.

FRANCES SPROUL WHITE.

ANNA CALLAWAY PAXTOX.

LUCILE VIRGINIA KENT. 93


SONG OF KAPPA DELTA. Tunicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; "Jlaryhmd,

A

faithTul Iximl

Thus linked And thiiu.nh We'll

still

l.y

of

ily Marvlaiul."

sisters \vc.

bends of dear K A,

so sixm \vc

be treasured

all

in

must

part,

each heart.

Cboius.

Oh, Kai)i)a Delta, nolile name, Far in the I'uture reach thv fame,

Well ever h.yal be to tliee. Our own K A, our dear K A.

Throughout

life's title we'll sisters

stand,

Bound heart to heart and hand to hand. Though trials come and ills betide We'll ever with each other bide.


Hlpba (Tbapter

Zctn XTau Hlpha Sovont^.

of

3f lower:

H)oulile

Ulbitc Utolet.

Colors: Curquoise DBluc anC> Steel Orav;.

Hido

kiv.j

1

Siskuni razzle dalpha,

Here we

are, heie

Zeta Tail Alpha

•fln

^\ETTIE DUNNINGTON MORTON.

lln

we

art.

!

inrbc.

SARAH ELIZABETH

PAL>n-:R

Collegio.

MARY CAMPBELL JONES. MATTIE BOARD HENDERSON.

^L^RY POWER FARTHING. FR.VNCES ^'ANfEY S^^TH.

JOSEPHINE NARCISSA GOODWIN. PEARL GARNETT HUNDLEY.

SUSIE

*

WARE WARXKK.

.MAR^' ()LI\'L\ KKASKR.

GERTRUDE MADIS(JN CAMPBELL. * .\bseiit

when

picture

was taken.


Song

Zeta

of

TuNRâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; " Aunt

Tau Alpha.

Dinah's Ouiltiiig Party.

I.

In the sk\ a

And

star glitters,

ever shine,

its light shall

this star

l'"c>r

l)nj,Hit

is

And we bow

nur Zeta Tan Alpha, before her shrine.

Cboriis.

We We

shall ever loyal be,

T.,

onr

shall ever loyal be, de.tr

beloved Zeta

Tau Alpha

We

shall ever loyal

To

each heart a strong ehord binds

lie.

II.

us,

Binds us close with truth and right;

For "Themis" we would ever cherish

And

I'roni

lier

we

ilraw our light.

III.

In each heart a love ne'er failing.

Draws us to the "Blue and mav we be forever loyal

(jray,

,'\nd

Till

time

shall fade awa)'.

IV. I'"ar

Z.

into the distant future r.

A. shall shed her light,

Clear anti searching as the golden sunbeams,

Yet pure

as violets white.


iE6tabli0be6 at State Jfcmalc IRonnal Scbool, ®ct. 15, 1900.

;\Iarv

^Iattie Board Henderson',

Nannie Harris Wricht, Frances Yancey Smith.

Ware Warner,

S ^ ,

Z, T, A,

Anna Paxton, Susie

Sommerville Sparks,

Z, T.

Z.

,

IS

S ^ 2

\\'hite,

.

,

K. A,

S S S ,

irirbe.

2.2.2. Josephine X. Cjoodwin.

Mary Booker Daniel. Z.

A,

\'irginia Hopkins, K, A.

Harriet P.\rker Hankins,

A.

.

Pearl Garnett Hundley, Z T

Mary

£i Lucy Dix Eglin,

Frances .Sproul

,

LjIII CHI

K. A.

T.

K. A.

Elizabeth ^'are Blackmore,

A.

T.

A.

K. A.

.

,


liinilKaiB?3!SSBBSiSHl!ti>3K

SCHOOL SONG.

As

a student

Hurrah

body we're

Harroo

!

specially fine,

Hurra}-

!

Fcir iiur giiiid hdiiic cuokini;

And we march thm' Hurrah

I''or

we hoard from eve

Harroo

!

Hurray

!

and peanuts we're

canch-

Harroo

!

Hurra)

!

Our

Harroo

!

Hurrah

girls

!

!

!

obedient

Harroo

girls,

Hurra}-

!

!

studies are hard, you'll not deny that.

Hurrah

!

Thev work

And

adorn,

will

!

president sa}s we're "jewels, pearls,

Orderl}-, neat,

Our

Hurra}'

!

morn,

ver)' forlorn,

We're sober, serious, studious

Hurrah

till

!

But our room with pictures we

Hurrah

pine,

Harroo! Hurray!

!

All our ])ennies

Hurrah

we never

halls in a very strait line,

tlic

Harroo off

our

Hurray

!

flesh

oft recitations are

Hurrah! Harrcjo

!

!

and don't make us

decidedly

Hurrav

!

flat.

fat.


®uv

Hvti8t8.

/nianager of art ©epartment.

HAREIET PARKER HANKIXS.

flrtieits.

MARTHA

HELEN BLACKLSTON. IRMA STAHL.

W. COULLING.

AXXIE

C. MARKLEI. MARY LEWI8 SELDON.

Mrs. W. R.

Me. R.

MORRIS.

C.

FLOURNOY.


Mc ©UC Bame: "AVe Seven." ©ur IHiCftliamC " Seven :

©lir /IbOttO:

Seven.

Sacies."

"XevekSayDie.''

©ur Class JBirO—Tyi'Ical:— TuE Owl. ur SOCiCtV! L'Cll:

' To

Wvr Tn I

AV(K.

" :

1

©ur strong IPoiUt (Jhe.vt Wisdom. ©ur Wcaft point Gkeater Conceit. ©ur Ibope "To Fi.v High." ©ur 3f ear "A Buoken 'Pixiox." — Gen. :

:

:

:

®ur

Av.

70.

Mi6tor\>.

Yes we have one. AVe have good reasons to feel proud of ourselves. AVe have never failed since we hopped upon one of the lower branches of this tree of knowledge he First B Class, where there were many others besides ourselves, but as we went up.from " high to

higher," each succeeding " pitching day," thinned our ranks until we reached the Junior B Clas.s. There we had ample room to displaj' our wisdom, for the class contained no others besides the " Seven Sages. " No sadness befell us until we reached the topmost bough set apart for Senior B's. Then our charming Lucy Stubbs became ill and had to leave us.

Seven Utile ow-els in a sad, sad fix, One fell off, then there were six.

Jur IPropbecg. To Bessie Paesieh:

all,

but one, Fate has decreed husbands; as follows

—A short, prosperous farmer. Louise Hogwood: — A dashing young military E.MM.v B.iKNEs —A physician, younger than herself Josie Luck — A rather elderly, but devout, Methodist circuitfat,

officer.

;

;

rider.

—An old, but fond widower. Lucy Stubbs: — An old bachelor, terribly set in his ways. S.\EAH

Hogg

:

^*===n*(r

©ur agreement.

We do hereby solemnly promise to each girl, when she marries, a solid silver spoon, with engraved monogram on the handle, and an owl in the bowl. We furthermore agree, that each happily married one will give two weeks' board, every summer, to Janie Whealton, who is to devote her life to teaching. io6


1.

2. 3.

Janie Whealtoii, President. Bessie Palmer, Vice President. Louise Ho?wood, Secretary and Treasurer.

Euiiiia Barnes. ,

Jo^ie Luck.

Sarah Hogg,


m^

^'GU^i Zi

Director MISS AXDREAVS. AccoMiMNisT JIISS SPILLMAX.

Sopranos.

SeconO Sopranos.

aitos.

KoKllIE Berkelkv.

Alice Atkinson.

Cora Cole. Lucy Dasiel. Edith Didlake.

Je.vnette Ba.ich.

PeAKI, Hl'NDLEY.

S.^RAH HoGli.

Anna

Charlotte McKinxey. Sally Morris. MoLLiE Phillips.

Jennie J.vcksox. JosiE Luck. Lena Marshall.

JL^RY F. Powers.

Mary

Annie Whitehead.

Neville AVathins Miss WOODRUKF. Mary' Yonge.

L. Powers.

Emma

JLvRY Baldwin. Miss Che.vtham. Miss COULLING. Willie Moore.

Barnes.

Ethel Cole.

Emily Ryland. MbjSv TuGtiLE.

Bessie Rice. Julia Scaggs.

Genevieve Vexable. Susie Warner. Nannie Wright.

Siir/i

miisir (as

Before

/rat;

'tix

P.\ge.

said)

never wade.

— Milton.


(3eintan Club. MAT'lTE HENDERSON, President.

HARRIET HANKINS,

NANNIE WRIGHT,

Treasurer and Secretary.

Vice-President.

E.

CRIGLER.

E.

J.

BAACH. H. BLACKISTON. V.

S.

S.

N.

BRYAN. BUCHANAN. L. BURTON. G. CAMPBELL. CARTER. E.

CRAWFORD

'

P.

HUNDLEY. M. HERRIN. C.

.\

B.

(iUNN.

JONES. M. JONES

B.

NELSON. B. NORRIS. E.

GRESHA^[

-\A.

MOOMAW. G.

GOODMAN.

M.

G.

MUNDY. L.

GOODE. M.

H. BRIGGS. G.

LEE. W. MOORE,

GANNAWAY.

SHELXON. TREVILLIAN. C. TAYLOR. I. TATUM. F. WHITE. C. WHITE.

E.

LAND. E.

B. DEAL. E. ELCAN. B. riNKE.

BLANCHARD

F.

KING. H.

M. CURTIS.

ENS.

PALMER. PAXTON.

A.

M. RENICK. E.

BYLAND. SEMPLE

E.

WHEALTON. M. WADE.


XTennis Club. 速fficer0. -\rOLLIF. PHILIPS. President. \'

E.M.MA KING, I C E - P R E S I D E N T

ELLEN PAINTER, Secret.vry .\xd Tre.\svrer.

,

flDcnibcrs.

ELIZABETH HALL. HARRIET HANKIXS. MOLLIE PHILH^S. ALMA THRAYES. FAXXIE PERKIXS. XAXXIE WRIGHT. ESTELLE CRAFFORIi. WILLIE TRIPLl"rT. EDDIE TRIPLETT. NANNIE TURNER. OTELIA HARVIE. OLLIE JOHNSON. PLAOIDIA HUDNALL.

EMMA KING. MISS ANDREWS. ELLEN PAINTER.

P.ESSIE

BLACKMORE.

HELEN WINSTON. GEORGIA BRYAN. ISABELLA BALL. JESSIE BALL. FANNIE SMITH.

NORA PILSWdRTH. MOLLIE WHITE. ALICE ATKINSON.

GERTRUDE CAMPISELL.

MARY

FARTPIIN(;. LITiTY.

ANNETTE

REBECC.V JANl', A\'Hi:.\LTi LELIA CnniBLKY. illSS

REYNOLDS.


Basket Ball Colors: tUbltc

XTeain.

JBlue.

aiiC>

l^Cll.

Basket ball

Hurrah-rah

!

Basket ball

1

Hurrah-rah

— — go — now — throw

Here Ready

ball

Hurrah-ree

We

!

B. B. T.

!

Hunah-rah-ree

!

!

!

!

Hurrah-ree

!

are the Lnrls of the B. B. T.

Trainer

— MISS

COIT.

fIDcmbers.

EMMA

KlXti,

-

SUSIE AVARXEE, MAEY HOPKINS, EMMA KING,

JEANNETTE

FOUWAKII. FORWAKr).

-

-

-

GlAKIl.

JESSIE COX, IRENE MASSIE,

GlAKI).

ANNA PAXTON,

MARY

ALICE ATKINSON. MATTIE HENDERSON. lUlon 2 (Samcs

—U

-

-

FRANCES WHITE, PAULINE CAMPER,

CliXTEU.

-

AVIIITE,

LUCILE KENT,

JESSIE cox,

C.M'TAIX.

-

Captaix. Center.

Forward.

-

l'(

IKWARD.

Guard. Guard.

-

SPARKS.

PEARL HUNDLEY.

Won

points.

4 (Samcs

Cic 2 Sanies.

SCORE.

..__..----...--- .... .......... ........... 2.. ......... ---------4 4

.

4

-

114

-

2 2 4 2 2

-

4

-

2

— IS

ipolntg.


f^ Mitcbcs fv^c

front

Salem tlown.

BEUI.AH FI\KE.

AIH.DREI) REXR-K. ^E-VITIE

HENDEKSOX.

PAULINE CAMl'ER.

'

Cbc weir?

JEAX'NETTE WHII-E

sietcts,

ban?

in

ban?,

IPostcrs o( tbc sea an? lani>. (Ibus Do cio about, about."


X.

jf.

C. Club.

©fiiccrs. President— MARY FRANCES POWERS. Vice-Pkesidext— EMMA LOIS KING. SECEin'.\KY—

MABEL FURE.

l^ell.

From Loudoun, Fauquier, Clarke, came Ra! Ra! Ra Re! Re! Re!

we,

!

We

are girls as

For we belong

Ra

/IP

Ra

!

Otto

Ipattlug lnnorCi

:

:

!

happy

as can be.

to the L. F. C.

Ra

!

Re

!

Re

!

Re

!

305 our bcUliancg \vc guide.

" TObcn eball

wc

tbrec meet again?

flDembers.

MARY HENRY CRITTENDEN.

MARY ELIZABETH

IDA ROSS CHAMBLIN. MARY VIRGINIA FLETCHER. JANIE LOUIS JONES. MARY ELIZA DENNY.

GOLDIE KALB BROOKS.

SIMPSON.

MERCEY MARGARET NETTIE

MAY

^'IRTS.

GERTRUDE NELSON.

MARY LITTLEPAGE POWERS.

CRIM.


it9


|;i.i.u^;.-t.-.^.<gimiÂť<-M


X. Chartered

In} tlic

X.

1k.

Hv. of

XUilUam

ant> /lisarp Collciic.

flDcmbers. loniA

.Kiiix i;aum:s.

•IKSSIK

1':L\V(I()1>

MILI)i;i;i»

KUTIJ

WILTSE EVAXS.

SAKAll EKAXCES

xiXA

(iKACE VICKXOX t'AKTEIi.

coxe.

OMEdA

IIYEK.

AXXIE WIIAKTUX (illl^snAM, AxxiE [.AiiMi-: Kixzi:i;.

II(Mi(i.

I'oAVEi; LAxnrEi;.

AVILLIE nAHKISOX ModliK.

iiExiMirrxA i;eyx()Liis watkixs.

123

I'AXXIE XEVIEIJ-: WATKLXS.


^be

Skaters' Club, ©fficers.

Phesident

— FKAXCES

WHITE.

Vice-President— EMMA KIX(4. Secuetaky PA TLINE CAMPER. TnE.i,suREK— XANXIE WKIGIIT.

Colors: 36lacl5 an& 3Slue. '

As there are such marked spelling,

we

IbolCi

me

ticibt

anO Oo not

differences of opinion

let

among

confine ouifelves to vocal demonstrations.

the

These

me

fall."

members

may

as to tlie

fIDembers. HARRIET HAXKIXS. FAXXIE PERKINS. MARY YANCEY. .TEAXNETTE A\'HITE. A XX A PAXTOX.

manner

of

be heard on Paulett's Pond

anv cold winter's afternoon.

ALMA THRAVES. SrSIE AVARNER. PEARLE HrX'DLEY. MARY HOPKIXS.


Zhc

flDibniobt dfour.

(Occasion for Ohgantzatkix

Colors: Wliite and

(iieuii

(

—Test ox Takr.

From Fear

/IbOttO

Being Caught.

of

:

The heights (?) ))y great men reached (?) and kept Were not obtained l5y sudden fliglrt But they, while their companions slept Were toiling upward in the night.

(?)

;

Un-invited Visitor— MES.

MOEEISUN. Eecreatiox

JllOriTY

BeACTEOCS

Merry Ccxxixg

BE^T Fkiexd— THE

— Feast —

1

ALAEJI CLOCK.

A. il., Sundays.

Preitv Cranky.

H.iXIlSOJIE.

Juvenile.

Jesting Daring Wakefcl.

Ibonorars /lliembers.

Candle and Umbrell.\. 125


{professional Mall Club.

Ready

for bed, liaviug fiui Here's Aunt Portia let's all run. " Juni]i in bed put out the light Here she is." Bang!!! "Goodnight."

,

Countcrsicin— Swipe me a

roll jFavoritC Ipastltnc— Being " sat upon." jfavoritc ©ccupation— Yelling. not what you do, but it's getting caught."

AottO— " It's

THE MENAGERIE "EFFECT." Fiom

the distance conies a baw

(You may know

its

CHARACTERISTIC SAYINGS. H(c)aii Bus/a-—" Uy mother looked at the eclipse through atelescope."

1

from Tessiimal Hall)

Of a "moo-oo-oo-oo." Yes,

it is

old

//.

is

full

Lncy Dan'

clothes under

Serenading our Loyal Ann,

my

bed."

— —

Aided by " any doodle-doo."

A/aria "Is 'pasco' an indeclensionable or undeclinable verb ? Lncile " It goes just like amo.' "

This from Lucy Vf. doth jjroceed.

And,

— "He! He! He! C-foing to put that —Annual." the matter?" " Wliy, what Lucy— " I've got one of those things of J.//iy

in the

'

'

as formerly agreed,

Follows Marie's

Frances (at Murphy's) "I'm so tired of walking up the steps let's ride up on the

"mew-mew-mew."

;

Then, in reverberating sounds

radiator."

From

Alice— "Say, have you heard of that awful catastrophe " " Harrietle H. — " Why, no, what it? Alice — "'Chicken' got roasted by the

the other end reboimds

Many

a "bow-wow-wow"."

"Moo-oo-oo

Any

!

!

I

Bow-wow

doodle-doo

!

!

S

!

!

— cat

?

Mew-mew !

is

!

Co(w)les."


' 8he is the jester Most popular girl.

Vaudeville

arti.st.

anil the jest." — JI. — Girl with a box.

An "

easy mark for Cupid's darts. H(e)akt Bhiggs. They come as thieves in the night." Visitors to Room

"It

may have

seen better days."

" llaM'

dour

— —Room

never

known

Willi cliildish

days."

;Mc«1i1 ycHiiiL' ladirs.

"

Cruris.

F.vxxie Perkins.

to be

74.

71.

on time

tor

—All of

anything

us.

Be.vmer.

lii'i'ii known to move and trees to speak." S. Henderson. and most divinely fair." H.iRiuBr II.\nki.ns. methinks, I would not grow so fast, Because sweet flowers are slow and weeds make haste." L. Kent. "I will not give sleep to mine eyes, nor slumber to mine eyelids." Ei,.mer Crhii.i " We took sweet converse together." M.attie, Mary and Fr.vnces. " Got will power? Well, I reckon." " I only let him kiss me once." Molly ^\'l^TE. " False, false, but oh how beautiful " ConrrEXAv Taylor.

Stiiiirs liave

"Divinely "

And

tall

since,

!

a

!

^oast Here's

to

to iprofc06ional Iball. the hall, the merry old hall,

And here's to the hearts that are true, Here's to the morrow, come what may, And

liere's to

the best

—that's vou.

final. A

very merry, dancing, singing. Laughing, quaffing and unthinking time.


statistics.

Most

Edith Steigleider

self-conscious

Mary Frazer

Most innocent Most wordly-wise

Camraie Jones

Most conscientious

Fannie

Sniilli

Nannie Wright

Prettiest face

Mary Gathwright

Best writer

Alice Atkinson

Best tallcer

Most enthusiastic Sorority

Lncile

girl

Most enthusiastic non-Sorority

Kent

girl

Annie Gresham

Most harmless

M. Fletcher

Best mimic

Emma

King

Frances White

Most popular

Rebecca Jane AVhealton

Faculty's darling

Greatest loafer

Biggest

Annette Lurty

flirt

Bessie Blackmore

JoUiest girl

Mary Powers

Most musical

Vnna Page

Greatest arguer

Most

in love

with H.

S.

boys

Stiff-necked

Biggest

'

'

Susie

spooners "

Kent

Warner

JIary Jeffries and Lee Perry

Wittiest girl

Smartest

Lncile

Marie Curtis Jennie Jackson

girl

Uncle Pat's most frequent

visitor

Percentage of

girls in love

Percentage of

girls

engaged

Percentage of

girls

Percentage of

girls

Percentage of

girls

who expect to teach who expect to get married who wish to get married

Lillian Casteen

75

percent.

50

percent.

.ST.!

per cent.

119

per cent.

IIIO

per cent.

Average height

5 feet 4 inches

Average weight

120 pounds

Average age

l.S

vears


anb (3nnb8.

(Brins

"A anil

(laughter of the gods, divmely tall

iiiii.st

divinely fair."

— MiLDKED

"The

sweetest

woman

ReNICK.

ever fate per-

verse denied a household mate."

— Miss

H.WNES.

" Sweet are the uses of adversity."

— Louise

"Nor

Hogwood.

gold nf ir gem.s can her restore.

—LrcY "She comes

'

Stuhhs.

be pretty when her face

will

in fashion."

— M.vEGAEET Jones.

"And when

she had passed, it seemed like the ceasing of exquisite music."

— Fe.vxc'Es Smith.

'And

Saul stood head and shoidders above the imdtitude."

'

Some

'

Perhaps

'

Her

say but

little

because they have but

she'll grow.

' '

— Brownley

locks are like thesunset. "

'And she did

eat.

My how !

Yet we do not

fall

say."

— Moli.ie

B.\teji.\x.

AViiite.

L.iwkexce.

C.^erie Hick.s.

she did eat "

Sallie Goticix.

!

'Most musical, most melancholy." '

little to

Ekfie

^^Mary Poweiis.

on the neck nor kiss when we come together."

— Lee Perry and — Miss AVheaetox. 'Slight robed, with loosely flowing hair." — ALrcE Atkinson. '

Mary

She would talk and talk and talk."

'

What

'

What's a good hair restorer ? "

the heart thinketh the

mouth speaketh."

— Frances

Jeaxette White,

White.

'Goin' have atis' t'day."-^OLiE Johnson. '

Fickle.

'

'

— LuciLE

'Wrapped up

Kent.

in measureless content."

'Youth, purity and innocence." '

Maey

Her hair drooped round her cheek

'The best ware comes

like

Mary Rives

Daniel.

Fe.vzer.

seaweed on a clam."

in small packages."

Ca.m.mie Jones.

132

Lucy Wood.

Jeffries,


"Whose body

When

"

lodges a mighty mind."

we

shall

"Too young and

"How much

three mjet again." infantile to

in love

"I'se wicked,

"I never dare write

"With a

still,

mighty wicked." funny

as

small voice."

"Even though

Fr.\xces and M.iRV.

be away from mother."

— Miss

a.s

I

Makie

Lowjiax.

Jennie Jackson.

with herself, and this without rival." I's

I is.

Ann'ik Doi'uirrv.

— M.vi-riE,

Curtis.

Moli.ie Piiiixips.

can."

Julia Wukiut.

vancjuished, she

would argue

Nellie Muxdy.

still."

" Like a pair of turtle doves that could not live asunder."

— Emily

" Verily, the hairs of her head are

"I am not

"Where

in the role of

ignorance

all

common men." to

is bliss 'tis folly

"Let thy discontent be

thing of beauty

is

Liliax Castixe.

Bl.\nciie Martin.

secret."

is

Sarah Goode.

Nannie AV right.

a joy forever."

" Jlighty hunters, and their prey

Ba.vcii.

Isabel HuTcnixsox.

be wise."

"Entirely too young for serious consideration."

"A

Evlaxd and Jeaneite

Henrietta Watkins.

numbered."

Cowles and Blaxchard.

man."

" Like a spear of flame the cardinal flower Burned out along the way."

— Jessie

"

A form It

"Shocks

of

— Pearle

A

perlect

To warn,

"

A

jollier

fair,

yellow hair, like the silken "

woman

I

Loy'D.

a face more sweet. ne'er hath been my lot to meet."

more

tloss

Hundley.

on the maize, hung over her shoulders." iLvTTIE HEXDERSON.

woman, nobly planned and command." Mrs. Morrison.

to comfort

ne'er spent an hour withal."

— " After us the deluge." 'uster' Alumn.e — "Not like

— — Miss

Sarah.

Staff

The

it

be."

Senior Class — "

As from a mountain's top the rainy mists of the morning Roll away: and afar we behold the landscape below us Sun illumed, with rivers, cities and hamlets, So fell the mists from their minds, and they saw the world far below them. Dark no longer, but all illumed with love, and the pathway Which they had climbed so far lying smooth and fair in the distance."

The Annual — " 'Tis pleasant, sure, to see one's name in print; A book's a book although there's nothing in't."

133


JOKES. Dr. K. (before class

Ill

Miss S. E. P.

— "They

very

is

(in

good

I-'atiguc

under

are Mr.

Anderson and

:\rr.

Cralle sup

Old Girl— "That

is

Geography Teacher

—"

to

(in

Class, reads

Miss B's

— " Miss

outline

and

lamp hook)

R., the last part

— " What

where we hang the

criticises thus

'"

Miss

B.

— "What

is

is )'ours.

''

are those for

girls

.-'

when they

are suspended."

the principal agricultural product of Virginia

" .

0\-sters.

Training' School Teacher

conjugations

and Wood."

e.\cept the last part.''

a very weak tone)

Girl (pointing

Pupils

— " What

are dealers in Coals (Cowles)

R. before Physiologv

Miss M.

had

haven't

all

"

your outline

Kew

— " You

?

Miss S. E. P.

Miss B.

Psyc/iii/dgy)

?

Miss M. P. R. posed to do

l\Iiss

A pp/icJ

it!

"

me, have vou

to

Class in

English

— "Have

you had the new and old

" }

astonishment)

— "No!

Miss

P.,

we

haven't

had anything about the age

''

of verbs

!

Miss F. W.

(a

/Grade) "fust you any more.

week before Training School think,

closes,

children, children, only

speaking in saddest tones

one moi'e week, and

to

pupils

of

I'll

not teach

price

of those

"

Children (clapping hands with delight)

Normal Girl Marchal

Neil's.?"

(buying candy at

— "Oh,

we

•'Uncle Pat's")

are so glad."

— "What

is

the


If

you ask Miss

W.

F.

\vhi> is

her favorite apostle, she

most

is

likely to say

Paul

On afternoon of April 14th. a servant brings card to certain ydung lady's room. He savs, hurrv up and come down he's been Butt(ing) around long enough. "

;

Training Scluml

bov three

Miss

feet tall,

IF.

Miss F.

J//i.r

Isn't

/,.

'fcac/ier In li//lr liny in h..\v tall

— — " Why

-'Is Dr.

(///

would a

K. a Ph.

no,

1

I).

I grade

is real

is

If

you

are a

little

twice as tall."

smart.

marching mil

the wedding march grand

Aril/imrlic class

h'<\ be wlio

V

think he

Assrnilily Hall,

lilllf

In l/ir

tunc

nf

••

Di.xic

savs

)

In

.Miss S.-

"

.'

•'S'oung Ladies, anv of Teacher nf Xalnrc Sinih In sluilcnls sludying Ihc sparnnv vou not having feet niav walk up and get them from my desk."

Sliiilcnl in Malhciiialics.

from

A

7;vr//,7

Miss A. 'Teacher

from

A

reading alniid a prnhleni

in

Algebra

—" A

prcshylerian

walked

"

to B.

— What Miss A. — ".\ preshierian." — ' Let me your book. is

that,

see

"

.^

Ah, a slight

to B.

135

ilifference,

A

pedeslrian

walked


J lll j

lilll,!,,, liil)

,„

^

|„, llHii,,,! jillUHillllllUlll

l-ll

ill

llllllPII

ill

11^

til

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III!

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1111

ili- nil lllii

MM

l

iiillllllllillllllllllll

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llllhlllllll^

S TA TE

FEMALE NORMAL SCHOOL FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA. toiJNDED qI

*

by the Legislature to educate teachers for the pTiblic schools. Free tuition for two hundred young

women. Scholarships apportioned among the counties and

cities.

Liberal courses in Language, Litei-ature, History, Sciences and Art. Professional course for teachers.

A

graded Training School in which students receive a year's training before going out to teach.

Next

session begins

September

19th.

SJ&$;;&$;!&$;;g^igSig^SS;g$;iS$;iS^;C$S!&S',&$);g^&S:^;!C$^&Si&Si&S^

CATALOGUE SENT ON APPLICATION.

%iiiiinfi""iii||iiii«inii

ifii»i«i|(iiii«ii|ii

fiNiiifi

ifiiiiiiifi

iifi

ip

fiiMif

f f

pi«iiifiii"if«»iif

ifii'iiif

w™W

fi'""»ii""'f"'"f»"


MAIN STREET, FARMVILLE, VA.

DEALER S::IN HIGH:: E A D E CONFECTIONERY (i

STATIONERY Musical Instruments

ATHLETIC GOODS

짜^

n^

Y=

..flDannfacturcrs' IRcprcsentativcs. FOR THE CELEBRATED

CHASE-HACKLEY PIANOS, FARRAND AND VOTEY ORGANS, MASON & HAMLIN ORGANS, AND COLUMBIA GRAPHOPHONES. AUO CARRY A

T

SPF.riAL

FULL LINE OF SHEET MUSIC & MUSICAL MERCHANDISE.

ATTENTION GIVEN TO NORMAL TRADE,

AND

ITS

PATRONAGE ^!^

SOLICITED.

A


lilllmiUJlLl

iiilljllii

iJlLliii

1

|i# |ill%mi^^ [ |

:riniri|[pinTipiifiiiiTP"nT;j;jriiiiT;jnTiii^^

Q. E. (2HHPPELL. FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA.

DEALER

S fation c/

IN

Confectionery,

']',

Frnits, Sc/iooi Bool^s

Normal School

and

Supplies.

^t'ii'^.-tJJt-t'u L-l>i'k,-t^'L-tfU k.'ljUlul^'L'ltfa

ijify!!itJifi^-t^.^Jl^i^ifl^uiA>--m

A COMPLETE LLNE OF

^ STYLISH „A\, iii

i^

illla.i.lt iii

i

i

f

ii

i

i'iii[ffii

illliiii ^MillIiii^ilti

dt

MILLINERY.^

llliiii,niiiiiii iillllLtiiiii|fcl]mllllli-"iiJl

ii"ny'^I|:P''iiiT^iii'iiiTfiii"r^'y^

"Jl

'* •iiBf

Illiii...iillllii.i«ll

,uii»»«lfl»i«if»»"ffs'™iJJi"i"!T[i'""ilIJ'"


iiiiH

a

ll!

iiji

fe-

(sue

4 IJAS what few of the small town I newspapers have. The people I r ** " want it for its complete local news the business public for its ex-

lU

all

ijli

WILTSE,

E. C.

FARMVILLE HERALD

liniiiiii'ji

iiin

Ill

DEALER

ll

IN

Watches and Jewelry.

;

cellence as an advertising medium the best in Southside Virginia.

Scbool, Class an?

maOc Subscription Price, $1.00 per

i

means

niLjtii.in

The

girls

far

Have they come

and

this strange ccmi-

here

to dissect the cats

He And

in the

'iJII

H]^

.'

you want

UNDERTAKERS

sweetmeat

line. it's

H^

^li"llllHllli"illlll

fnnn

PAT'S." has candies sweet and nuts sn tine,

If

l^

near.

"UNCLE

that

nj^

Barrow & Cowan,

?

are gathered

No, they are going to all

IPins

fannville .... IDirQinia.

^limi^(lMiq|jliliill[pirm|(pii.ii||||[

MAT

ff ratcrnitvi

to order.

Annum.

apples or oranges, or candy or cake,

FURNITURE

DEALERS.

"Uncle Pat" can serve you, and some money you'll make ;

For you get a dime's worth

for only a

nickel,

And

often he

pickle

4

.iJL .

11

iiii

thmws

an extra

in

— one

Big Stock. Main

Street,

Low

Prices.

Farmvillc,

Virginia.

!

i.

Jii

Ti.

iiiii.iiiiii

ti

lit

iiJi

iiili

Ill

iitiiimii^

E. T,\r,n( )w.

CHAS. BUGG & SON

BARROW COAL COMPANY DEALERS IN

..(Brocevies..

Splint, pocabontas,

an& IMrcjinia

Cit^)

Hntbracitc Coals... '

FARMVILLE, |"|

T "" T

If

f

iljii

-

W W f f

VA.

-

f

IF"'

i'"'»ilP'

Cakes and Crackers.

tieinz's Pickles

&

Olives.

FARMVILLE, VA.

J


TELEPHONE

31.

lEpcrvitbinG rND'uM'oVrE

W.T.BLANTON Šptfcian anb Jeweler. WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY AND SILVERWARE.

Dealer in

.MILLINERY.. line: Yi>r

Store next door to Planters Bank.

Irj^l I '

Y

tlie

my

recent adJitiuii to

for

'

FlXlt

AT

(Jpiical

jj^ department of several new instrmuents

fects, I

WILL

measuring and defining optical dein a better ijosition than ever to with weak and defective

am

flftrs.

IDunt's.

treat those suffering vision.

W.

T.

BLANTON,

Opt. G.,

DOXT

fIDain Street, jfannville, Da.

N. B. Davidson, Pres't. A. H.

U.

II.

Lvn.v, Vicu-l'r

CM.

FAIL TO SEE HER YOU WANT A HAT.

Walkek.

U. W. Walkei;.

,1no. J.

IF

Walkek.

Clafham, Cashier.

C. M. Walker & Sons First

Bank

National

OF rARMVlI^IiE, VA. SOLICITS

THE ACCOUNTS OF

COMMISSION MERCHANTS,

FARMVILLE, INDI-

VIDUALS, FIRMS & CORPORATIONS.

VIRGINIA.

-

Dealers

in

Hardware, Hay and Grain. DIRECTORS Dr. Peter Winston,

W.

K, H. Lynn,

T.

:

P. Gilliam, ,7,

Davis,

.J.

K. Martin.

N. B. Davidson,

Buggies, Cai'iiages, Wagons,

M. Hamlet.

Dr. J.

Harness, Saddles, Bridles. Interest

Allowed

Drafts Issued

in

on

Savings Department.

All

Parts of Europe.

Horse Goods of Every Description.


NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA -FOR=

Solid Investments

Good Looking Beaux Steady Husbands SEE

REYNOLDS BROTHERS, General Brokers Real Estate and Insurance, SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.

ISSY^-ISS

.MG

25TH STREET.

.i

OO

IPDndDtosjrapIhier I

IF

YOU WANT THE

%

Awarded Four

<ft

Diplomas

I

(4)

BEST.

Handsome Medals and

lor excellence, at btate conventions.

COLLEGE WORK PICTURES

IN

THIS

LS

OUR FORTE.

BOOK MADE BY HUNT.

I

^ \g

\


HAMLET & HAMLET

ANDERSON DRUG COMPANY

Dentists, MAIN STREET,

Office:

FARMVILLE, VA,

THE FARMVILLE LITHIA SPRINGS 0i\E

l(^t;ittHi

in the

County of Cumherland.

in

distance of the attractive town uf Virginia, situated on the main line ot the Norfolk and Western Railroad, in the midst of a picturesque landscape, and at an elevation of S'li.) feet above tJie sea level.

DRUGS,

DRUGGISTS'

SUN-

DRIES.

STATIONERY,

ETC.

Do You Need Anything

the

in

Furniture Line?

DOYNE

W. T.

MAIN STREET,

wiilkiiif;

I'aniiville,

This wonderful group of springs contains some of the most valuable medicnial waters in the world, among which the most prominent are Lithia, Chaly:

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA. Will sell anything you want for furnishing your house at a lower prirp'than can lie boutrht for elsewhere. I'liamliPT ^^iiiiv in liil; Wiilnutan.! Imitation Hard Woi.'K >i.iii - \i-i!-,, .„> ,ic llulTri-, -^i.leI

boarrts, clini;! I'l. nf every^l. nri ..

Jlagnesia. Alum, Iron and Sulj^hur. It is a channins: place in whicli to spend a tpiict hour. All are welcome to visit its sylvan shado and drink of its health-giving waters. beate,

Capital,

J43.425,

Surp.

&

Undiv. Profits.

ESTABLISHED

$62,000.

.

i

t:,

n

.in

liiMr^

,,:j,'>iii

iiihl

-ZWM

liairs Viiru-ty. (

PRICES LOWER THAN EVER.

DR.

P.

W.

BECKHAM,

1867.

Dentist, FARMVII.I.p;, VA. (

Xlicr i.xer Wiltsc's Jt-wclry Store,

Docs a General Banking Business.

FARMVILLE, VA. Your Account

Solicited.


*

»

t I

THE

I

Winston Drug Company

I *

I ^ I i i « *ti

The Corner

Drutr Store.

MRS.

_

_

.

L. L.

Farmville, Va.

KEISTER,

DEALER IN

FANCY DRESS GOODS. WHITE GOODS AND NOTIONS. SAILORS

MAIN STREET,

-

-

-

AND

CAPS.

FARMVILLE, V A.

«£**^*****************************^K**************************«


Everett

Waddey

Incorporated

Estalilishofl l.'^W.

1.S.S9.

...The...

COMPA/NY,

FARMVILLE: MlLLS :

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA.

M.\xri-.\(Tri;i:i;s

of

HIGH GRADE Fine

STATIONERY

STEEL AND COFFER FLATE ENGRAUINC.

EnBossmo and iLLunmATiNo.

...FLOURS... LEADING BRANDS

:

Pride of Farmuille™° Rich Bridge Fahily. PURE WATER GROUND MEAL

AND

College Work Carefully Looked After.

CRUTE

5/

NOEL

FARnVlLLE.

GO

W.

Crockery, Lahps.

Hk

VlRQINlA.

R.

Tk.\i>1':

FARMVILLE. VIRGINIA.

IX

DRESS GOODS ..5H0ES.. And

5^C.

C-XIKKS TO TUK

NORMAL SCHOOL

QLASSVARE '^ VOODENVARE.

ROOFING.

-

R CHARDSON

IN..

STOVES,

Tl/N

-

TO...

BROS. DEALERS

MILL FEED.

Evekvtiiixg ix the GooD.s Line.

Dry

BE SURE TO CALL ON HIH VMEN IN NEED.


WE PRINT TO PLEASE

Wis ARE PREPARED TO HANDLE ALL CLASSES OF COMMERtlAL WORK. LET US GIVE YOU PKICES.

MOOSE BROS.

CO.,

Printers, Binders and l^ulers 1000 OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT

THIS EDITION OF " Cbe IS A SPECBIEN OF OUR

MAIN

ST.,

LYNCHBURG, VA.

CATALOGUES AND COLLEGE ANNUALS PRINTED IN A NEAT AND STRICTLY UP-TO-DATE MANNER.

Uirgiiiian AVi iRK.

"


91



Virginian1901stat