Stateteachcol194041stat

Page 1

BULLETIN OF THE

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

Vol.

XXVI, No.

2

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY

April, 1940

Catalogue 1940

-

7947

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1914, at the post Farmville, Virginia, under the act of August 24, 1912

office at


CALENDAR 1940

1939 MAY

JANUARY S

MT WT

F s

s

SEPTEMBER

MT W T

F S

S

M

T

W

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1 2 1 2 3 4 5 fi 2 3 4 5 fi 7 .. 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 10 11 12 13 14 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 14 16 17 18 19 20 10 18 15 IS 16 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 28 29 30 31

1

s

FEBRUARY s

MT W T

S

MT WT

F

S

SMTWT

MARCH

SMTWT

F S

SMTWT

F

M

APRIL T W T F

S

M

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F S s

M

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F S

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M

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1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31

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8 6 15 13 22 20 29 27

25 26 27 28 29

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1 2 3 4 5 6 2 .. 1 2 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 S 9 10 11 12 13 3 4 5 fi 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 IS 19 20 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 2fi 27 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

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29 30

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SEPTEMBER 2 .. 9 6 16 13 23 20

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10 3 17 10 24 17 31 24 .. 31

30 27

OCTOBER

JUNE

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 .. 11 2 1 2 3 3 4 5 fi 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 14 15 lfi 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

MARCH S

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

NOVEMBER

JULY

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 2 3 4 1 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 S 9 10 11 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 IS 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 lfi 17 18 15 lfi 17 IS 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 28 27 28 29 30 31 .. 29 30

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 3 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 17 15 lfi 17 18 19 20 21 24 22 23 24 25 2fi 27 28 31 29 30 31

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SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS

26 27 28 29 30 31

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T F S

F S S

2 3 4 5 6 .. 1 2 1 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 fi 7 8 9 14 15 16 17 IS 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 3.

FEBRUARY

OCTOBER F S

1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 .. 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 fi 7 8 9 10 11 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

23 24 25 26 27 28

DECEMBER

AUGUST F S

4 1 2 3 .. 1 2 3 4 5 fi 4 5 6 7 S 9 10 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 18 11 12 13 14 15 lfi 17 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 25 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 .. 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 28 29 30

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FEBRUARY s

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 IS 19 20 21 22 23 24

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SEPTEMBER

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F s

1942

MAY

JANUARY

M

M T WT

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS

1941

S

SEPTEMBER F S S

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APRIL S

1 .. 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 S 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 lfi 17 IS 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 2fi 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 31 .. 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 30 31

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MARCH S

1 2 3 4 .. 1 2 3 4 1 .. 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 12 13 14 15 lfi 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 lfi 17 IS 19 20 21 22 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 23 24 25 26 27 2S 29 26 27 28 29 30 .. 30 31

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NOVEMBER

JULY F S

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FEBRUARY

F S

1 1 2 3 4 2 3 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 5 fi 7 8 9 10 11 4 5 fi 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 IS 19 20 21 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 26 27 28 25 26 27 28 29 30 .. 29 30 31

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OCTOBER

JUNE

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MAY

JANUARY S

9 7 16 14 23 21 30 28

DECEMBER

AUGUST

APRIL

SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS 4 11 18

..

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23 30

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8 6 15 13

22 20 29 27

II 2 8 9 15 16 22 23

29 30


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IHHRHHHIHe

Main Entrance


BULLETIN OF THE

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA Vol.

XXVI, No.

2

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY

April, 1940

Catalogue Register for 1939-1940

Announcements

for 1940-1941

Fifty-Seventh Year Begins September

Published By

The

State Teachers College Farmville, Virginia 1940

18,

1940



Table of Contents Page

COLLEGE CALENDAR STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION ASSISTANTS TO THE ADMINISTRATION THE FACULTY FACULTY COMMITTEES STUDENT ASSISTANTS OFFICERS OF STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS GENERAL INFORMATION Problem of Choosing a College Purpose of the Teachers College The State Teachers College at Farmville Present Purposes Historical Stages of Development Commercial Education and Home Economics New Training School Facilities National Standing Location and Convenience Basis of Low Expenses

The Association College

of

Alumnae

Standards

The

College Year Diplomas, Degrees, and Certificates

Admission Requirements Credits and Courses Student Load Honors and Privileges Citizenship

Requirements

Service to Students and

Alumnae

7

8

9 9 11

16 17

18

21 21 21 23

23 24 24 25 25 26

26 26 27 27 27 28 29 30 30 30

Keeping Student Records

31 31

Transferring Credits Providing Guidance Securing Certificates Securing Positions

32 32 32

31

Expenses Expenses of Day Students Expenses of Boarding Students Expenses for Nine-Months Session Method of Payments Method of Refunds

33 33 33 33 34 34

Financial Aid to Students Service Scholarships College Work Program Scholarships United Daughters of Confederacy Loan Fund Daughters of American Revolution Loan Fund Virginia Normal League Loan Fund

35 35 35 35 35

Cunningham Memorial Loan Fund State Student Loan Fund Mu Omega Loan Fund Alpha Phi Sigma Loan Fund Gamma Theta Loan Fund Gamma Theta Alumnae Loan Fund Tri-Sigma Loan Fund Alpha Sigma Alpha Loan Fund

34

36 36 36 36 36 37 37 37


Table of Contents Page Jennie Masters Tabb Memorial Fund Junior Woman's Club Loan Fund Pi Kappa Sigma Loan Fund Physical Equipment and Facilities Administration Offices Dormitories Dining Hall

37 37 37 37 38 38 38 39 39 39 39 40 40 40 40

Auditoriums Health Service

Laundry Lecture Rooms Science Laboratories The Arts Building The Library Provisions for Student Activities Student Building

40

Gymnasium Swimming Pool Athletic

Grounds

Recreation Centers Recreation Hall Student Building as Recreation Center The Longwood Estate

Teaching Teaching in Farmville Schools Teaching John Randolph Administration of Student Teaching

Student

MAJOR PHASES OF STUDENT LIFE Physical

Life

Moral and Religious Life Social and Recreational Life Academic and Professional Life

PROGRAM OF STUDIES AND ACTIVITIES Curricula and

Extra-Curricula

Four Year Curricula Curriculum Curriculum Curriculum Curriculum Curriculum Curriculum Curriculum Curriculum Curriculum

Two

41 41 41

I B.S. Secondary Education B.A. Secondary Education II B.S. Elementary Education III

III-A

IV

B.A

V VI

B.S

VII VIII

B.S. Home Economics B.S. Physical Education B.S. in Commercial Education

Year Curricula Teaching in Primary Grades Teaching in Grammar Grades Leading to Nursing and Dentistry Leading to Clerical Positions

Curriculum A Curriculum B Curriculum C Curriculum D

.

41 41 41 41 41

42 42 42 43 43 43 44 46 47 48 49 50 51

52 53 54 55 56 57 58

59 60 61 61 62

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

63

Biology Business Education Chemistry and Physics Science for Elementary Teachers Education and Philosophy Education

63 65 68 70 70 72


Table of Contents Page Philosophy Psychology Directed Teaching Religious Education English Fine and Applied Arts

74 74 75 76 77 81 83 83

Handwriting Geography History and Social Sciences

86 86 88 88 89 89

History Social

Science

Economics Government Sociology

Home

Economics

Latin

Mathematics Modern Languages French Spanish

Music Physical and Health Education Physical Education

Health Speech

Education

STUDENT ACTIVITIES Government

Student

Young Women's

Christian Association

Association Publications

Athletic

Student

Rotunda The Colonnade Virginian Students'

Handbook Honor Societies Kappa Delta Pi Alpha Kappa Gamma Alpha Phi Sigma Pi

Gamma Mu

Sigma Pi Rho Beta Pi Theta

Gamma

Psi

Kappa Delta Beorc Eh Thorn Pi

Sororities

Student

Clubs

Debate Clubi Dramatic Club Cotillion Club

The Philosophy Club Music

Organization

International Relations Club

Orchesis

Commercial

Club

Professional Organizations Association for Childhood Education Future Teachers of America

REGISTER OF STUDENTS

ENROLLMENT FOR THE YEAR

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

91 95 97 100 100 101 102 106

106 109 110 112 1

12

112 113 113 113 113 113 113 114 114 114 115 115 115 115 116 116 1 16 116 116 117 117 117 117 117 117 118 118 118 118 118 119 142 143



.

Calendar 1940 Fall Quarter

Dec.

—Tuesday —Wednesday —Thursday 28—Thursday 17—Tuesday

Dec.

20-Friday

Sept.

Sept. Sept.

Nov.

Dormitories and dining room open.

17 18 19

Registration for Classes begin.

quarter.

fall

Thanksgiving holiday. Examinations begin.

inu^^TV^' begin. (Christmas holidays u 1941

Winter Quarter Jan. Jan.

March March

(Dormitories and dining room open.

2-Thursday

new

(Registration of

—Friday 8— Saturday 17— Monday 3

students.

Classes begin.

Founders Day. Examinations begin. (Examinations end. (Winter quarter ends.

March 20-Thursday

Spring Quarter

March April April

May May June June June

/Spring quarter begins.

21— Friday .

15

1

3—Tuesday

new

(Registration of

—Thursday, 12 :00 M. —Tuesday, 8:15 A.M.. 27—Tuesday 30—Friday — Sunday 2— Monday 10

.

.

.

students.

Easter holidays begin. Classes are resumed.

Examinations begin. Examinations end. Baccalaureate sermon. Class

Day

exercises.

(Graduation exercises. (Spring quarter ends.

Summer Quarter June

9—Monday

—Tuesday

June

10

July

15-Friday

— Saturday —Friday

July

19

Aug.

22

(Dormitories and dining room open. (Registration for first term. Classes begin.

i£ irst term

en ds (Registration rfor second term. '

Second term begins. Second term ends.


State Board of Education

J.

Sinclair Brown, President

William N. Neff Virginius

R.

Shackleford

Blake T. Newton Rose

MacDonald

Salem

Abingdon Orange

Hague Berryville

Joseph H. Saunders

Newport News

Charles E. Pollard

Petersburg

Sidney B. Hall, State Superintendent of Public Instruction and Secretary of the Board

Richmond


Officers of Administration

J.

L.

Jarman, LL.D

President

Wynne, Ph.D Mary White Cox

Director of Teacher-Training

Carolyn Cogbill, M.A

Principal of Elementary School

John

P.

C. L. Ramsey,

Virgilia

I.

Samuel

L.

Head

M.A

Principal of

of the

Home

High School

Bugg

Registrar

Graham

Manager

Business

Winnie V. Hiner

Treasurer

Mary McCauley Snead, B.A McNutt Martin, M.D

Librarian Resident Physician

Jean

Annie Farrar Shelton

Dietitian

Assistants to the Administration

Mary W. Watkins, B.S Maud K. Taliaferro Eva Heterick Warren Pearl Berger Turnbull

Secretary

to the

President and Assistant Registrar

Postmistress

and Manager of Bookroom

Home Department

Assistant in

Assistant to Dietitian

Night Matron

Lois Fraser Davis

Willie R. McKee, R.N

Mary

Resident Nurse Assistant Librarian

Swift, B.S

Carmen Clark, B.S Houston Blackwell Nettie D.

Hurt

Hallie Q. Laing Lillian V.

Nunn

Mary Morgan Province Jane Bowen Royall, B.S

Assistant Librarian Assistant in Assistant in Assistant in

Home Department Home Department Home Department

Supervisor of Laundry Supervisor of Pantry Secretary to

Head

of

Home

Catherine Diehl Lancaster

Clerk in Registrar's Office

Dorothy Perkins

Clerk in Registrar's Office



The Faculty

J. L.

Jarman, LL.D., President University of Virginia; LL.D.,

Hampden-Sydney

College.

M.A., Professor of Physical and Health Education and M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; School of Physical Education, Boston, Mass.; Summer Courses, Institute graduate Posse of Gymnastics, Denmark, New York University, Columbia University.

Mary Barlow, B.S.,

B.S.,

Diploma

in Health Education,

Virginia Bedford B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Fine and Applied Arts B.S. in Education, University of Missouri; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; Summer Courses, Columbia University.

Leon E. Bell,

B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Education

B.A., Northwestern University; M.A. and Master's Diploma in Education, Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate student, University of Chicago, and Boston University.

Home

Edna Ruth Bolick, B.S.,

Economics B.S., Instructor in State Teachers College, Farmville; graduate student, Cornell University, and Co-

lumbia University.

Pauline Camper, B.S., M.A., University.

B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Education and Diploma as Director of Rural Education, Teachers College, Columbia

Martha W. Coullinq,

L.I., Professor of Fine and Applied Arts George Peabody College; Martha's Vineyard Summer School; Student under Fred H. Daniels; Chautauqua Summer School; student under W. T. Baer, student for two years, Teachers College, Columbia University; Applied Arts Summer School, Chicago; student under Wihelmina Seegmiller; Summer Courses. University of Chicago; Boothbay Studios, Summer School of Art.

L.I.,

M. Boyd Coyner,

B.A., M.A., Professor of Education

B.A., Concordia College; M.A., University of Virginia; graduate student for Columbia University.

two

years,

Ottie Craddock, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Fine and Applied Arts and Commercial Education Roanoke College; M.A., Columbia University; special work under Dr. Frank N. Freeman, of University of Chicago.

B.A.,

Helen Draper,

B.S.,

M.A., Professor of Modern Languages

State Teachers College; Farmville; M.A., Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt.; Summer Courses, Columbia University; graduate student, three years, La Sarbonne, Paris, France. B.S.,

Louise Robertson Fitzpatrick, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education

and Diploma in Physical Education, Teachers College, Columbia University; Courses, Bennington School of the Dance, Humphrey-Weidman Studio, Emily Hewlitt Studio, and Hanya Holm School of the Dance.

B.S., M.A.,

Summer

Nancy

Foster, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of English

B.A., Mississippi State College for Women; dent, Summer, University of Virginia.

Raymond Holliday French,

B.S.,

M.A., University of Virginia; graduate stu-

M.S„ Assistant Professor

of

Chemistry and

Physics B.S.,

M.S., Virginia

stitute.

Polytechnic Institute;

Summer

Courses,

Virginia

Polytechnic

In-


The Faculty

12

James M. Grainger, B.A., M.A., Professor of English B.A., University of Cincinnati; M.A., for one year, Columbia University.

Mary Clay

Hiner,

B.S.,

University

of

North Carolina;

graduate

student

M.A., Professor of English

M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; Summer Courses, George Peabody College for Teachers, University of Virginia, Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, University of Chicago, and Duke University.

B.S.,

Samuel M. Holton, B.A., M.A., versity,

Duke

B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Education University; Summer Courses, University of North Carolina; Duke Uni-

and University of Virginia.

Mary Frances Houck,

B.S.,

M.A., Assistant Professor of

B.S., M.A., Cornell University;

Olive T. Iler,

B.S.,

Summer

Home

Economics

Courses, University of Tennessee.

Associate Professor of Physical Education

Graduate, Sargent School of Physical Education; B. ville; Summer Courses, Columbia University.

S.,

State Teachers College, Farm-

George W. Jeffers, B.S., M.A.,

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Biology Boston University; Ph.D., University of Toronto.

E. Lucile Jennings, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor of English M.S., University of Virginia; graduate student, University of North Carolina and Duke University.

B.S.,

Summer, University

of Virginia;

Bessie H. Jeter, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Home Economics B.S., M.A., and Teachers Diploma, Teachers College, Columbia University; Summer Courses, Columbia University, Cornell University, University of Chicago, and Northwestern University.

Edgar M. Johnson, B.A., B.D., Assistant Professor of Education B.A.,

M.

L.

Richmond College; B.D., Yale

Landrum,

B.S.,

University.

M.A., Professor of Business Education

B.S., Office Training School, Columbus, Ohio; M.A., New dent, New York University and University of Cincinnati.

York University; graduate

stu-

B.S., M.A., Professor of Mathematics George Peabody College for Teachers; M.A. and Master's Diploma as Teacher of Mathematics in Normal Schools and Teachers Colleges, Teachers College, Columbia

Lila London, B.S.,

University.

Wilhelminia Paleske London,

B.S.,

M.A,, Associate Professor of English

State Teachers College, Farmvillle; M.A. and Master's Diploma as Teacher of English in Normal Schools and Teachers Colleges, Teachers College, Columbia Uni-

B.S.,

versity.

Thomas A. McCorkle, B.A., Washington in U. S. Navy.

B.A., M.S., Professor of Chemistry and Physics and Lee University; M.S., University of Chicago; five years chemist

Elizabeth Hutt Martin,

B.S.,

M.A., Assistant Professor Modern Languages

B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; M.A., University of South Carolina; Summer Courses, Sewanee French School, University of South Carolina; Duke University; graduate student, Summer, Institut de Phonetique, Paris, France.

Grace

B.

Moran,

B.S.,

M.A., Associate Professor of Geography

B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; M.A., George

Mary

Peabody College.

Nichols, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor of English and Spanish B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; M.S., University of Virginia; graduate work, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt., Columbia University, University of Virginia and Pennsylvania State College.

Mary

E. Peck, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor of History

and Social Sciences Summer Courses,

B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; M.S., University of Virginia; University of Virginia and Duke University.


The Faculty Lisabeth Purdom, B.Mus.,

B.S., Assistant

13

Professor of Music

B.Mus., Brenau; B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; student of voice under Dan Beddoe, Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, and John Hendricks, University of Georgia; violin student of E. Bruno Michaelis, University of Georgia; Summer Courses, New York University, University of North Carolina and George Peabody College for Teachers.

Minnie V.

Rice, Professor of Latin

Summer

Graduate Farmville College; University of Chicago.

Courses, Harvard University, Columbia University,

Francis Butler Simkins, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences B.S., University of South Carolina; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University; Fellow in American History, Columbia University; Fellow of the Social Science Research Council.

Edith Stevens, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology B.A., M.A.,

West Virginia University; Ph.D., University

of Chicago.

Alfred H. Strick, Professor of Music Certificated Pianist, Trinity College, London, England; honors in post graduate work, London; research work, London, Paris.

Florence Hamer Stubbs,

B.S.,

harmony, counterpoint;

M.A., Associate Professor of History and Social

Sciences B.S., M.A., George

Carrie B. Taliaferro,

Peabody College B.S.,

for Teachers;

Summer

Course, Chicago University.

M.A., Professor of Mathematics

M.A., Diploma as Teacher of Mathematics and Diploma as Supervisor of Mathematics, Teachers College, Columbia University; student at Cornell University; Summer Course, University of Maryland. B.S.,

Sarah Boyd Tucker,

B.A.,

M.A.,

Associate

Professor

History

of

and

Social

Sciences B.A., Winthrop College; M.A., Columbia University; Subsequent Courses, University of Chicago, Columbia University, and University of California.

Katherine Tupper,

B.S.,

M.A., Professor of

Home

Economics

Diploma, Ontario College, Whitby, Canada; B.S., M.A., and Master's vision of Household Arts, Teachers College, Columbia University; Cornell University.

James Elliott Walmsley, M.A., Ph.D., Professor

of History

Diploma

Summer

in Super-

Courses,

and Social Sciences

M.A., Randolph-Macon College; Ph.D., Illinois Wesleyan University; University of Chicago, University of Michigan.

graduate student,

Frances Water,

B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Geography B.S., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; Summer Courses, Peabody College and University of Colorado.

Leola Wheeler, B.A., M.A., Professor of Speech B.A., Smith College; diploma and post-graduate diploma, student, School of Expression, Boston; M.A.,

graduate

Emerson College Teachers

of Oratory;

College,

Columbia

University.

Alice Curry Wynne, B.A., Education B.A., Mississippi State

B.S.Sci.,

College for

M.A., Associate Professor of Commercial

Women;

sity; M.A., George Washington University; sity of California, and University of Idaho.

John

P.

Wynne,

B.A.,

B.S.Sci., Bowling Green Business Univergraduate work, Columbia University, Univer-

M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education

Teacher-Training B.A., M.A.,

Duke

University; Ph.D., Columbia University.

and Director

of


The Training Schools

John

P.

Wynne,, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Teacher -Training

B.A., M.A.,

Duke University; Ph.D., Columbia

Carolyn Cogbill,

University.

M.A., Principal of the Farmville Elementary School

B.S.,

B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; M.A.,

C. L.

Columbia University.

Ramsey, B.A., M.A., Principal and Supervisor B.A.,

Lynchburg College; M.A., University

Pauline Camper.,

B.S.,

Farmville High School

in the

of Virginia.

M.A., General Supervisor of Student Teaching

in the

Rural

Schools B.S., M.A., University.

and Diploma as Director oi Rural Education, Teachers College, Columbia

Samuel M. Holton, B.A., M.A., General Supervisor Farmville High School B.A., M.A., versity,

Duke

of Student Teaching in the

University; Summer Courses, University of North Carolinia, of Virginia.

Duke Uni-

and University

Edgar M. Johnson, B.A., B.D., General Supervisor of Student Teaching Farmville High School B.A.,

Richmond College; B.D., Yale

Agnes Bondurant, B.S.,

B.S.,

in

the

University.

Supervising Teacher in the Farmville High School

State Teachers College, Farmville; graduate student summers, Duke University.

M. Louise Bondurant,

B.S.,

M.A., Supervising Teacher

in

the Farmville

High

School B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; M.A.,

Elizabeth Burger,

B.S.,

B.S., College of

Alice E. Carter, mentary School B.S., M.A., University.

Columbia University.

M.A., Supervising Teacher

in the

Farmville High School

William and Mary; M.A., College of William and Mary.

M.A., Grammar-Grade Supervisor

B.S.,

in

the Farmville Ele-

and Diploma in Normal School Supervision, Teachers Courses, Columbia University.

Margaret Coon, B.A.,

College,

Columbia

Summer

B.A., M.A., Supervising Teacher in the Farmville Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.A., University of Virginia.

Mildred Dickinson Davis,

B.S.,

M.A., Supervising Teacher

in the

High School

Farmville High

School B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; M.S. in English, University of Virginia.

R.

C

Gilmer, B.A., Supervising Teacher and Coach of Athletics

in the

Farmville

High School B.A.,

Mary

Emory and Henry

College.

Hankla,

B.A., M.A., Supervising Teacher in the Farmville B.A., Lynchburg College; M.A., University of Virginia. E.

Mary Burns Haynes,

B.S.,

High School

M.A., Supervisor of Kindergarten and First Grade

the Farmville Elementary School B.S., M.A., George Peabody College

in

for Teachers.

Sibyl Henry, B.A., M.A., Primary-Grade Supervisor in the Farmville Elementary School B.A., University of North Carolina; M.A., Duke University; Summer Courses, Duke University; graduate student for one year, University of

North Carolina.


The Training Schools Adele Hutchinson,,

B.S.,

15

Supervising teacher in Kindergarten and First Grade in

the Farmville Elementary School B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville, Virginia.

Georgie Norris, B.S., M.A., Grammar-Grade Supervisor in the Farmville Elementary School Graduate Woman's College, Greenville, S. C. B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; M.A., University of South Carolina; Summer Courses, Furman University. ;

Woodrow Penny, B.A., M.A., Primary-Grade Supervisor Elementary School

Ida

in

the Farmville

B.A., Winthrop College; M.A. and Master's Diploma as Director of Teacher-Training in Normal Schools and Teachers Colleges, Teachers College Columbia University.

Evelyn Cole Simpson, ville High School B.S.,

B.S.,

State Teachers

Supervising teacher of

College,

Farmville;

graduate

Home

Economics

student,

summers,

in the

Farm-

Columbia Uni-

versity.

Georgiana Elizabeth Stephenson, Farmville Elementary School

B.S.,

M.A., Grammar-Grade Supervisor

B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; M.A., Teachers College,

Annie Laurie Stone, mentary Grades

Columbia University.

M.A., Supervisor of Student Teaching Rural Training School at John Randolph

B.S.,

in the

B.S., State Teachers College, Farmville; Summers, Columbia University.

in the

in

the

Ele-

M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University;


Committees of the Faculty

Dr. Jarman, Miss Barlow, Miss Coulling, Miss College Courses of Study: Draper, Mr. Grainger, Mr. Jeffers, Mr. Laodrum, Miss Lila London, Mr. McCorkle, Miss Moran, Miss Rice, Mr. Stride, Miss Tupper, Mr. Walrasley, Miss Wheeler, Mr. Wynne.

Summer School ger,

(Administrative Council)

:

Mr. Wynne, Miss

Cogbill,

Mr. Grain-

Miss Lila London, Mr. Walmsley.

Admission and Certification: Tucker.

Miss Bugg,

Miss Rice, Miss Taliaferro,

Catalogue: London.

Mr. Wynne, Miss Bugg, Miss

Foster,

Schedules:

Mr. McCorkle, Mr. Coyner, Miss

Jeter,

Library:

Mr. McCorkle, Miss

Lila

Mr. Holton, Mr. Walmsley.

Mr. Grainger, Mr. Walmsley, Miss Lila London.

College Annual:

Mr. McCorkle, Miss Bedford, Miss

Foster.

The Colonnade: Mr.

Grainger, Mr. Coyner, Miss Jennings, Mr. Simkins.

Chapel Attendance:

Miss Barlow, Miss Craddock, Miss Nichols.

Normal League Loan Fund: Rice.

Miss

Miss Coulling, Miss Craddock, Miss Peck, Miss


Student Assistants

Administration Bettsy Briggs

Sally Dunlap

Dorothy Eades

Anne Benton

Biology

Anne

Billups

Chemistry Martha McCorkle

Isabel

Williamson

Library

Ann Boswell

Pauline Reid Reynolds

Helen McGuire

Virginia Lee Pettis

Alice Coberly

Physical Education Patricia Gibson


Officers of Student Organizations

Student Government Association Marie Eason

President

Martha Meade Hardaway Caralie

Nelson

Leigh

Alice

Vice-President

Secretary

Barham

Treasurer

Chairman

Caroline Eason

Young Women's

President

Helen Reiff

Graham

Eliza

Wise

Campus League

Christian Association

Dorothy Eades

Ollie

of

Vice-President

Gilchrist

Secretary

Treasurer

Lucy Turnbull

Freshman Councilor

Athletic Association Dorothy Fischer

.President

Kappa Delta Pi Anne

Billups

President

Alpha Kappa

Gamma

Martha Meade Hardaway

President

Alpha Phi Sigma Jean

Moyer

President

Pi Doris

Gamma Mu

Chesnut

President

Gamma Perrye

Smith

Psi President


Officers of Student Organizations

Pi

19

Kappa Delta

Moomaw

Lorana

President

Beorc Marion

Eh Thorn

Shelton

President

Farmville Chapter, Association for Childhood Education Margaret Carr

J.

Evelyn

L.

President

Jarman Chapter, Future Teachers

of

America

Burford

President

Dramatic Club Shirley

Stephens

President

Debate Club Marie

Allen

President

Orchestra Jean

Moyer

President

Choir of the College Jane

Hardy

President

Choral Club Elsye Berrye Yates

President

Orchesis Essie

Millner

President

Commercial Club Edna Harris

President

The Rotunda Frances

Alvis

Lucy Blackwell

Editor-in-chief

Business

Manager


Officers of Student Organizations

20

The Virginian Isabel

Williamson

Editor-in-chief

Sally Kerr Dunlap

Business

Manager

The Colonnade Johnny Lybrook Jane Rosenberger

Editor-in-chief

Business

Manager

Class Organizations Jane Powell Ruth Lea Purdum Mary Katherine Dodson Betsy Jennings

President of Senior Class President of Junior Class

President of Sophomore Class President of Freshman Class


General Information

PROBLEMS OF CHOOSING A COLLEGE Many

people upon the completion of their high school courses

They

have to make an important decision.

will enter the life of the

world or they will continue their education in an institution of higher learning.

Those who have found

their high school

work

their capacity will not find college

have been able to do the work required

same degree of

But those who

less difficult.

in the high school with a reason-

able degree of effort should find that they can college with about the

work almost beyond

effort.

do the work required in Those who have found

high school activities interesting probably would find the activities of the college likewise interesting.

level in a

wider

field

The

first

thing that

the high school

whether or not he will continue on a higher the kind of life he has led in the high school.

graduate has to decide

is

If he should decide to continue his education in the college,

he

should then make a study of his capacities and interests and the opportunities offered for service in the various fields of life.

After such a

study of himself and the opportunities that are available and after deciding in

what direction he wishes

kind of education that

is

to travel, he should consider the

best suited to his needs.

decided what he intends to do in

life

but

still

If he has not quite

wishes to continue his

education in the meantime, he should attend some institution that supplies

many

a liberal background in

fields.

If

he decides definitely to

enter a particular profession, he should attend the type of institution that will enable fession.

For

him

to

instance,

make

the necessary preparation for this pro-

the student

who

expects to

study medicine

should enter an institution which enables him to get the best prelimi-

nary education preparatory

to

entering medical college.

If

on the

other hand he expects to teach he should enter an institution which will

provide for him the kind of education that leads to the teaching profession.

PURPOSE OF THE TEACHERS COLLEGE In some respects the teachers college is like any other college. Its primary business is to prepare teachers for various types of service in the high schools and the elementary schools. It is therefore a profes-


General Information

22

sional institution.

But

it

is

more than

In order to be a pro-

that.

fessional institution dedicated to the training- of teachers,

must

it

also

Teachers need a

be an educational institution of broad perspective.

general background in scholarship and social experience, as do the

mem-

bers of other professions.

The

teachers college thus undertakes to help students to learn not

only those things that are especially important for teachers but also other things that are important for educated people everywhere.

many

provides

courses in which the

lar type of teaching

work

which the student

in influenced

is

It

by the particu-

expected to enter.

pro-

It

vides for supervised practice teaching through which the student learns to teach by teaching

and

in

come more meaningful and

consequence of which college courses beIt also

significant.

provides for

its

stu-

dents, even as do other colleges, courses in the fine arts, including literature, music,

sciences

;

The

and art

;

foreign languages

history and the social sciences

;

;

mathematics

teachers colleges in Virginia are different

other states in two important respects.

;

the natural

philosophy and psychology.

First,

from those

in

many

whereas teachers colleges

some states are open to both men and women, in Virginia they are open during the winter session to women only. However, they are open to men in the summer and a few men have received degrees from the in

teachers colleges of the State. leges

Second, whereas, in some teachers col-

only professional degrees leading to teaching are offered, the

teachers colleges in Virginia offer also the A. B. degree, which provides for an education in the liberal arts like that offered by the liberal arts colleges.

colleges.

They

are open to those qualified

teach and also to others

who wish

many young women who

cial zvelfare

and

of

liberal arts

young women who wish

to

to continue their general education

in the liberal arts before preparing definitely for

more,

women

In other words, the teachers colleges are for the

the State both professional institutions for teachers

expect

a profession.

Further-

to enter religious education, so-

work, nursing, and library work

may make

a selection of

courses offered that will provide for them the necessary preparatory

In some instances different curricula are proBut whether an outline of work is provided for a given occupational group or not, every student can with the help of the faculty and college authorities usually get whatever combination of training in these fields.

vided in such

fields.

courses she needs preparatory to practically any profession.


General Information

23

THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE AT FARMVILLE The

State Teachers College at Farmville represents the accumu-

lation of educational efforts for

more than a hundred

years.

Martin's

Gazeteer of Virginia, published in 1835, records that there was at the time of the writing of the book, "1 female school" in Farmville.

This

was succeeded by the "Farmville Female Seminary" (called on its corner stone "Farmville Female Academy"), incorporated March 5, 1839, and changed by amendment March 21, 1860, to the "Farmville Female College." This college, under church and private management, enjoyed a long period of successful work, directed from 1873 to 1882 by Dr. Paul Whitehead and from 1882 to 1884 by the Misses Carter, of Mecklenburg County. April 7, 1884, the property passed from the hands of its joint stock company to the town of Farmville, which on the same day deeded it to the State of Virginia as the site of the "Female Normal School." The sole purpose of the college then became that of supplying teachers for the public schools of the State. For more than fifty years the main purpose of this institution has been to supply the public schools of the State with adequately educated teachers.

Present Purposes

The progress fifty

of the State and the school system during the last

years has been reflected in a natural variation of emphasis in the

The growth and development of the college have extended its service in many forms. But the abiding purpose for which the institution was founded remains educational activities of the institution from time to time.

today as clear to the administration and the faculty as in the past. The

aim of

this

institution

is

to

supply the elementary schools and the

secondary schools of the State, whether in the ties,

cities

or rural communi-

with the best possible teachers.

The privilege of conferring the A. B. degree in no way detracts from the aim of educating young women for the teaching profession. It is

one way of recognizing the character of the courses that the

tution has long been providing for students teach.

who were

insti-

preparing to

Students working for the A. B. degree will doubtless take more

of the general courses and correspondingly fewer professional courses

than those

who

are preparing to teach.

But general courses are as

necessary for teachers as they are for others.

Young women

interested

have an opportunity to work for the A. B. degree and receive advantages that have heretofore been in a liberal education can therefore


—

General Information

24

denied them because they did not expect to teach and therefore did not wish to do practice teaching. But the main purpose of this institution has always been and will continue to be the education of teachers for the cities

and rural communities of the

State.

Development

Historical Stages of

In the very beginning this college represented the response of farsighted educational statesmen to the needs of the public school system.

The

first legislature to

assemble after the adoption of the post-bellum

constitution established on July 11, 1870, a system of public schools.

For twelve years or more the conduct of the schools was entrusted

to

such teaching forces as were found ready at hand. During this period

became evident to educational leaders that if the returns were to be any wise commensurate with their cost and the high mission of the system, some provision had to be made for the proper training of teachers. To meet this demand the Legislature, on March 7, 1884, passed an act establishing a State Female Normal School. In October of the same year the school was opened at Farmville with 110 students it

in

enrolled.

Since that time there have been three important landmarks in the history of the institution. to State

Normal School

for

In 1914 the Legislature changed the name

Women

at Farmville

to the State Teachers College at Farmville.

authorized by the Virginia

and in January, 1924,

In 1916 the College was

Normal School Board

to offer a four-year

curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Education.

In 1935

it

was

authorized by the Virginia State Board of Education to offer courses leading to the standard A. B. degree, and in 1938 to offer courses lead-

ing to the standard B. S. degree. in the

Two

recent events are so important

development of the College that they deserve special emphasis

the reorganization of the training schools and the decision of the State

Board of Education

in regard to

commercial education.

Commercial Education and

Home Economics

In January, 1938, the State Board of Education authorized the College to offer curricula in Commercial Education.

provided in

this field

:

Two

curricula are

one four-year curriculum leading to the B. S.

degree in Education and to teaching commercial subjects in the high school or to positions in the field of business; and one two-year cur-

riculum leading to clerical positions.

Because of new developments

in


General Information

Home

Economics, the

facilities in this field

The expansion

tended.

in these

two

fields

25

have been materially extogether with the recent

re-organization of the Farmville schools put this institution in a very

now expand

its program of preparing teachwhich was its original specialty, and it can also meet the needs of students interested in Commercial Education and Home Economics.

favorable position.

It

can

ers for the general high school fields,

New

Training School Facilities

For many years there existed school system. in the

One elementary

in the

town of Farmville a dual

school and one high school were housed

Training School building, and another elementary school and an-

High School building. Edward County School Board and the

other high school were housed in the Farmville

In August, 1937, the Prince

College agreed on a cooperative plan for the reorganization of the schools of the town.

As

a result, the two elementary schools were com-

bined into one elementary school which

is

now housed

in the

Training

School building, situated on the College Campus, and the two high is now housed in new Farmville High School building, situated near the College Campus. The principals and faculties of both schools are especially qualified for demonstration work and supervision. Hence the opportunities now offered students of the College for professional growth

schools were combined into one high school, which the

through student teaching are practically

ideal.

National Standing

The

privilege of granting the standard A. B. degree

and the stand-

ard B. S. degree places the college on an equal footing with the arts colleges for

As

women.

fessional rating that places

it

a teacher-training institution in the

very highest rank.

it

It is

liberal

has a proa

member

of the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern States,

which

the college

and

is

is

universities

further study.

the highest rating agency in the South.

The work

of

therefore fully recognized and accredited by the colleges

which the graduates of the It is also

Teachers College and rating organizations.

is

a

member

institution

may

enter for

of the American Association of

ranked as a standard teachers college by other


General Information

26

Location and Convenience

and thriving center educational of and Southside town. churches, and and the schools, hotels, Southside Virginia. It has good Norfolk and Western Railroad Hospital is located here. It is on the fifty miles from Lynchburg and seventy-one miles from Petersburg and at the intersection of highways leading north and south, east and

The

college

is

Farmville

Good

west.

is

situated in the heart of a progressive

the business

railroad service, bus lines,

Farmville in direct connection with the

Basis of

Low

and excellent highways place

life activities

of the State.

Expenses

Virginia students do not have to pay tuition. The expenses for them for a nine-month session are $318, while tuition charges of $20 a quarter make the expenses for students from outside this State $378. This relatively low cost to the student arises from the effort of the State to bring within reach of worthy young women the advantages of a liberal education and supply to its public schools adequately educated teachers.

Alumnae

Association of

The students.

lege

Association of It

Alumnae

serves both the college and

and keeps the college informed as

the alumnae.

its

former

keeps the alumnae informed of the activities of the col-

The Association

of

to the

Alumnae

is

problems and needs of a kind of clearing house

through which the alumnae and the college can work together to their

mutual

benefit.

It also serves to

interested in one another

and bringing them back

keep former students of the college

by organizing them into

to the college

on

local

associations

special occasions.

The Association operates in many ways. It keeps a record of former students, holds reunions, aids worthy students through the Normal League, Cunningham. Memorial Loan Fund, Jennie Masters Tabb Memorial Fund, and organizes local chapters of alumnae in counties and cities. It makes available the college news through The Rotunda, the weekly publication of the

college, and brings to the attenand needs of individual alumnae. the college on Founders Day in March

tion of the college the achievements

It holds one annual meeting at and another in Richmond during the meeting of the Virginia Education Association in November.


General Information

27

COLLEGE STANDARDS Certain standards are recognized by the administration, the faculty,

and the student body as a means of high scholarly and professional

to the achievement ideals.

and maintenance

Reasonable requirements for

entrance, for a diploma, or for a degree are necessary to secure the

recognition given the graduates of this college as teachers in the State

and as graduate students ards of good citizenship

in other institutions.

in cooperative

in part at least, for the spirit of devotion

manifest for their

Likewise the high stand-

community

life

are responsible,

which the alumnae invariably

Alma Mater.

The College Year There are four quarters of work offered each calendar year, any three of which constitute a college year.

The

student

may

enter at the

beginning of any quarter or even at the beginning of the second term of

The fall quarter is the most convenient time for most However, the spring quarter is often convenient for many students. By entering college in the latter teachers whose schools close early. part of March they may complete the spring quarter and the summer summer

school.

The winter

session

consists of three quarters, the fall quarter, the winter quarter,

and the

quarter before their schools open in September.

spring quarter.

The summer

session, or the

summer

quarter, consists

of two terms, one of six weeks and one of five weeks.

DIPLOMAS, DEGREES, AND CERTIFICATES The

college

now

offers curricula leading to the B.

S. degree in

education, the B. A. degree in education, the standard A. B. degree

and the standard B.

S. degree.

The

B. S. degree in education leads to

teaching in the elementary schools and in the junior and senior high

The A. B. degree school. and senior high school.

in education leads to teaching in the junior

All degrees leading to teaching lead also to the Collegiate Pro-

which is the highest certificate offered by the State Board of Education. Holders of the B. S. degree in education or of the A. B. degree in education may teach all subjects for which they have credit for six session hours of college work, and may also teach in the sixth and seventh grades. They may teach in the lower grades, fessional Certificate,

provided they secure credit for

five session

hours of college work in


General Information

28

courses designed especially for students preparing to teach in the ele-

mentary school, or provided they secure a minor in elementary education as indicated on page 72. The college offers also four two-year curricula. The curriculum in

primary education leads to a diploma, the Normal Professional Cerand to teaching in the kindergarten and primary grades. The

tificate,

curriculum in grammar grade education leads to a diploma, the Normal Professional Certificate, and to teaching in the upper grades. The curriculum leading to nursing and dentistry provides preliminary education for those students

who

expect to enter these

fields.

The two-year

curriculum in Business education leads to clerical positions.

Admission Requirements Students are admitted to the College in four different ways

:

They may enter as freshmen upon presentation of a certificate graduation from a public or private high school accredited by the 1.

of

Department of Education agency of any other state. State

2.

They may

in Virginia or the accepted accrediting

enter as freshmen by passing an examination given

by the College, by the State Department of Education, or by the College Entrance

Those who wish

Examination Board.

to take such

an

examination should make arrangements with the Registrar of the College before the beginning of the fall term. 3.

Experienced teachers

quirements cate

may

who

cannot meet the usual entrance re-

be admitted, provided they hold an elementary

and have taught successfully for 4.

five

certifi-

years or longer.

Students on transferring to this institution from other state

teachers colleges and other recognized institutions of higher learning

are given a fair equivalent in credit for the courses they have taken,

provided an honorable discharge

is

presented and the entrance require-

Not more than nine quarter hours of correspondence work and not more than twenty-four quarter hours of both extension and correspondence work may be credited toward a diploma. Not more than twenty-one quarter hours of correspondence work and not more than forty-five quarter hours of extension and correspondence work may be credited toward a degree. With this catalogue is enclosed a blank to be used in making appliments of the college are

cation for admission. possible.

satisfied.

Applicants should apply at as early a date as Students wishing to transfer credits from another college


: ;

General Information

29

should have the registrar or dean of their college send to the Registrar of this college a full statement of their credits, preferably before the

Students returning to this college after an

beginning of the session.

interruption of their college

work

are to

conform

to the

requirements

of the latest catalogue.

Credits and Courses

The Three

hour, abbreviated as

means one

credit class

credit

credits are equal to

credit,

is

the

"quarter hour."

one standard session hour.

In general a

week for one quarter. For instance, a hour periods a week for one quarter gives three

class period a

meeting three

Laboratory periods two hours in length give the same credit

credits.

as lecture periods one hour in length.

Some of the of

exceptions are

work

many

made

to this rule, either because the nature

requires less preparation than the standards, as in the case

courses in physical education, or because, in order to meet the

professional

work not

demands

in

elementary subject matter, the student has

of college grade, as

is

the case in arithmetic.

These excep-

tions are given in the tabulation of requirements in the various curricula in

which both

The

class periods

and

credits are indicated (pp. 50-62).

courses numbered between 100 and 200 are designed for

year students

;

first-

those between 200 and 300 for second-year students

those between 300 and 400 for third-year students

and those between However, first- and secondyear courses are interchangeable and third- and fourth-year courses are interchangeable, but not more than eighteen credits in courses numbered below 300 are allowed in the third and fourth years. ;

400 and 500 for fourth-year students.

The achievement marks she

receives.

of a student in her courses

The

significance of these

is

marks

indicated by the is

shown below

A— Excellent

E — Conditioned

— Good C — Average

F

B

I

—Failure — Incomplete

D—Fair The

mark is D. However, for a degree or a diploma must make a general average of C on all of her college work. Sometimes it is necessary to repeat certain courses or take additional courses in order to bring one's general average up to this requirement. a student

lowest passing


General Information

30

Student Load

The normal schedule of the student during any quarter is sixteen number of class hours varying with the number of laboraBy special permission the student may be allowed to tory periods. carry as much as nineteen credits provided she is in good health, has credits, the

attained a record during the preceding quarter that

is

satisfactory,

needs an extra credit to increase quality points or to meet

and

minimum

requirements for graduation.

Honors and Privileges and good citizenship The Honor Roll for each quarter is open to all stuin several ways. dents. To be placed on the Honor Roll a student must make a mark of A or B on at least three-fourths of her work for the quarter must have no failures, no conditions, no unexcused absences, and no reports from the Home Department or Student Government. The Dean's List for each quarter is open to juniors and seniors. A student must make B or higher on all of her work, with the exception of floor work in Physical Education, on which she must make C or higher. But an average

The

college recognizes superior scholarship

;

The

for the previous three quarters cannot be lower than C.

student

on the Dean's List may be absent from classes when she can use her time in ways that seem to her more profitable. Students who make an average of B on all work for the two-year diploma or a degree are graduated with honors. In awarding commencement honors the faculty takes into account the extra-curricular activities of these honor graduates, and selects a first- and a secondhonor graduate from the diploma class and a first- and a second-honor graduate from the degree class. The names of the honor students are announced at Commencement. The first-honor graduate from the diploma class makes the salutatory address, and the first-honor graduate from the degree class delivers the valedictory address. Citizenship Requirements

The long

tradition

manifested in the cooperative

administration, the faculty, and the student body

spirit

makes

of

strict

the

rules

and regulations almost obsolete. Most students appreciate the privileges and opportunities which the State has generously provided and conduct themselves as becomes citizens who wish to make the best of their opportunities and allow others to make the best of theirs. The


General Information

31

student without the disposition to do her duty and without proper re-

gard for others does not fit into the life of the community and does not measure up to the high ideals of the State in the establishment and maintenance of the college.

Home

Department and her assistants keep in and provide for proper chaperonage when necessary. Whenever a student is found failing in her work, neglecting duty, or exercising an unwholesome influence on

The Head

of the

touch with the daily life of the students,

others, every effort self,

made

is

and save her for her-

to diagnose the case

for her parents and friends, and for the State.

No

student can be

suspended or expelled by the student government without the approval (See page 112.)

of the President of the College.

SERVICE TO STUDENTS AND ALUMNAE The

college undertakes to provide several types of service to

Some

students and alumnae.

of the

more important

its

of these consist

of keeping records, transferring credits, securing certificates, providing

educational guidance, and securing positions.

Keeping Student Records

A

complete record of every student's work

trar's Office.

At

the end of each quarter every

is

kept in the Regis-

member

of the faculty

reports to the Registrar the record of the achievement of each student in each of his courses.

As soon

as possible thereafter the parents or

guardians are sent the complete record of the student's work for the quarter.

Transferring Credits

The

college not only keeps the record of students

makes provision

for sending on

demand

other institutions. For instance, the student, to

have her credits transferred

on

file

but

it

transcripts of such records to

who

for any reason wishes

to another college or university or to

another state for purposes of securing a teaching certificate there, in-

forms the Registrar.

Her

credits are then transferred immediatelv.


General Information

32

Providing Guidance

The

College makes every effort to meet the needs of students

who

wish guidance and help in selecting curricula and courses. Any student is free to consult the Registrar, the heads of the departments, and the director of Teacher-training in regard to educational questions.

The

general procedure followed in guidance

see the situation

and conditions as they

exist

is

to help the student to

and leave

it

to her to

make

final decisions.

Securing Certificates

The

College serves as an agency of the State Board of Education

in certificating its graduates.

At

the beginning of the last quarter pre-

ceding her graduation whether with a diploma or with a degree, the student is notified by the Registrar of the courses she still needs for graduation. Then the Registrar secures the certificate blank from the State

Board of Education, and has the students fill it Board of Education to be endorsed.

sent to the State is

out.

It is

The

then

certificate

returned to the college to be presented to the student just before

graduation on

Commencement

day.

Securing Positions

The its

College maintains an employment service for the benefit of

students and alumnae. Notices of vacancies are secured

intendents, principals, supervisors,

and alumnae.

The

from super-

character of a

and the qualifications of available graduates are given careful and the best person in the estimation of the authorities is recommended. The efficiency of the employment service for many years is due First, correspondence of students and alumnae reseveral factors. to ceive immediate and careful attention. Second, administrative authorities needing teachers do not hesitate to make known their needs. Third, the frankness with which the qualifications of applicants for positions position study,

are stated challenges the respect of school

officials.

In order to secure

the best possible service administrative officials should state clearly the filled, and the alumnae needing help should and promptly make known their acceptance of

character of positions to be state clearly their needs

positions or change in positions.


:

General Information

33

EXPENSES The

vast majority of the students are boarding students

and

live

made for boarding students in dining room. Each dormitory room is sup-

on the campus. Excellent provisions are the dormitories and in the

good bedding, and other necessary furniture. modern conveniences, with an abundance of hot and cold water and plenty of bathrooms. The dining room and kitchen are furnished with modern equipment and conveniences. Trained and experienced managers are in charge of the dormitories, kitchen, and dining room. Only the best quality of foods is used, and all laundry work is done in a modern laundry owned by the College. The price of board is $75 a quarter. This includes board, room, and plied with single beds,

All buildings are supplied with

laundry.

Expenses

of

Day Students

There are some students who do not live in the college. Most of community in the homes of parents or relatives. The same educational opportunities are offered the day students that are offered the boarding students. But they are expected to pay only the laboratory fees and a regular college fee of $29 a quarter, which does not include medical service. these students live in the

Expenses

The expenses many other types factors.

receives,

Boarding Students

of students are light compared with the expenses in of educational institutions.

First, the student

and no

of

This

is

due to several

pays only for the cost of the services she

profit is realized

by the

Second, food and

institution.

supplies are purchased in quantities by the State at the lowest possible cost.

Third, no tuition

The

is

required of Virginia students.

$20 per quarter for out-of-State students. The large majority of the students are from the State of Virginia and live on the campus. For this group the expenses are as follows tuition

is

Expenses

for

Nine-Month Session

Board, $75.00 each quarter

$225.00

College fees (except laboratory fees), $31.00

each

quarter

Total for the session of nine months.

93.00

.

.$318.00


General Information

34

Laboratory fees vary with different departments and are not indiAll students from without the State are

cated in the above tabulation.

Board includes room, and

charged a tuition fee of $20 per quarter. laundry for students living on the campus.

Method

Payments

of

Board is For those who find it more connine monthly installments of $25 each,

All fees for the quarter are paid before entering classes.

payable by

the quarter in advance.

venient, board

may

be paid in

payable in advance on the fifteenth of the month.

Students are not

allowed to register for any quarter at the College until

all

previously

incurred college expenses have been paid or adequately secured. student

make

the checks for

all

fees

No

credit for college

any student for a diploma, a teacher's

The

Consequently parents should

bills.

and board payable not

the College but to the student. to

own

expected to pay her

is

certificate,

to the treasurer of

work may be given or for transfer pur-

than student

poses until all financial obligations to the college, other

have been paid.

loans,

Method

A

Refunds

student withdrawing within ten days after registering shall have

fees refunded in full except the tration.

of

Students

who

sum

of $5.00 to cover the cost of regis-

for any cause, withdraw after the tenth day

of the term and before the middle of the term shall have their fees

returned pro rata.

If the student

withdraws for any cause after the

middle of any term, no refund of fees shall be made for that term, except in case of sickness, when the refund shall be pro-rated upon certificate of the college physician or

tioner.

In any case a

minimum charge

the cost of registration.

A

other reputable medical practiof $5.00 shall be

made

to cover

student withdrawing from college before

the end of a term will be charged board for the time actually in resi-

dence at the monthly, weekly, or daily rate as the case

may

be.

FINANCIAL AID TO STUDENTS Some some

students are unable to defray

all

of their expenses without

There are two general types of aid available to students. The one consists of scholarships and the other of loan funds. There are two kinds of scholarships and fourteen loan funds financial assistance.


General Information

35

In some instances the administration of loan and scholarship In all other cases applications should be made to

available.

funds are specified.

the President of the College.

Service Scholarships Students

who

obtain service scholarships

work

in the dining

room,

and assist in various departments. These scholarships vary in value from $90 to $125 a year, depending upon the type of work, and the experience and efficiency of in the college library, or in the training schools,

the student.

College

During the

Work Program

last session

Scholarships

about fifteen per cent of the student body

were granted scholarships by the National Youth Administration. They are similar in character to the service scholarships.

As

long as the

Federal Government makes this aid available to college students, this institution will receive its quota.

United Daughters of the Confederacy Loan Fund

The

Virginia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy

Noland Garnett Loan Fund.

has established the Kate

amounts is

to

$150 and

is

This

granted to a sophomore, junior, or senior

loan

who

be available.

Other scholarships or Applications should be made to Mrs. W. C. N.

Chairman,

Committee on Education, Virginia Division,

a lineal descendant of a Confederate soldier.

loans

may

Merchant,

United Daughters of the Confederacy, Chatham, Virginia.

Daughters

The Daughters

of the

American Revolution Loan Fund

of the

American Revolution have established a

student loan fund for the aid of worthy students in Virginia colleges.

Not more than $300

may borrow more loan

is

made

is

available for

any one

institution,

and no student

than $300, or more than $150 in one session.

available only to juniors

and

seniors.

This

Application should be

to the President of the College.

Virginia

The

Virginia

Normal League Loan Fund

Normal League was organized in 1899 by Dr. Robert The League maintains a loan

Fraser, then President of the school.

fund for those students who would otherwise be unable to attend colThis fund is maintained by the annual membership dues of one

lege.


General Information

36

dollar,

and by voluntary contributions from outside sources, and

is

granted worthy students without interest. The largest amount available for any one student in a session is $150. Application for loans should

made in writing, by May 10 of the preceding session to Miss Minnie V. Rice, Secretary of the Normal League, State Teachers College, be

Farmville, Virginia.

Cunningham Memorial Loan Fund The alumnae

of the college

who were graduated during

ministration of Dr. John A. Cunningham,

from 1886

a fund, intending to establish a scholarship in

them and to the State, could be paid him would be the

and loving service tribute that

to

are unable to obtain

it

the ad-

to 1896, raised

memory

of his faithful

feeling that the

most

fitting

effort to give to those

for themselves the training for the

who

work

to

which he devoted his life. When this fund amounted to $1,000 it was changed from a scholarship to a loan fund. Properly endorsed notes bearing five per cent interest are required. State Student

Loan Fund

The College has a loan fund, which has been appropriated by the Not more than $100 per session is granted to any one student.

State.

Five per cent interest

is

charged on these loans, and

all

notes must be

properly endorsed.

Mu Omega

Loan Fund

This fund was established in 1930 by the the purpose of helping students

who need

Mu Omega

Sorority for

financial assistance in order to

pursue their college course.

Alpha Phi Sigma Loan Fund This fund was established Loans are made at five per cent

in 1931

by Alpha Phi Sigma Society. who need financial

interest to students

assistance in their college course.

Gamma

Theta Loan Fund

This fund was established by

Gamma

Theta Sorority, in March, Its purpose is to

1934, at the Golden Anniversary of the College. assist

worthy students who need help

in their college expenses.


General Information

Gamma

Theta Alumnae Loan Fund

This fund was established by the

Chapter on March This fund

is

37

Gamma

Theta Sorority Alumnae

21, 1936, at the Silver Anniversary of the sorority.

dedicated to Dr.

Jarman and Alma Mater

as a testimony

of loyalty and appreciation.

Tri-Sigma Loan Fund This fund was established by Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, at the Golden Anniversary of the College in March, 1934, for helping worthy students who need financial aid in order to complete their college course. Five per cent interest is charged on these loans.

Alpha Sigma Alpha This fund was established by the Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority

March

6,

1937.

Five per cent interest

is

charged on loans.

The Jennie Masters Tabb Memorial Fund The alumnae and

friends of Jennie Masters Tabb, Registrar of

the College and secretary to the president in

1935 a loan fund in her memory.

from 1904-1934,

This fund

is

established

to be used to aid

worthy students. Junior

Woman's Club Loan Fund

This fund was established by the Farmville Junior Its purpose is to assist worthy local students

in 1938.

Woman's Club who need help

in their college expenses.

Pi

Kappa Sigma Loan Fund

This fund was established by Pi Kappa Sigma Sorority, March, 1939, for helping worthy students

who need

financial aid in order to

complete their college course.

Physical Equipment and Facilities

The buildings and equipment of the College have been provided and arranged primarily from the point of view of their usefulness and convenience. In size, number, and relation to one another the buildings give a pleasing effect because they

fit

in a well conceived plan

and


General Information

38

serve the purpose for which they were designed. The whole plant is compact rather than scattered. The various structures are so related

by connecting links that the student hardly knows when she goes from one building to another. Such an arrangement has the advantage of linking the student activities and the classroom work closely together. It enables students to move from one part of the College to another without exposure in bad weather.

It

saves time in that the classrooms,

and the dormitoand walking long distances is unnecessary. It also gives the effect of the comfort and security of a well organized home. The furniture and draperies throughout the network of buildthe laboratories, the assembly halls, the dining hall,

ries are close together,

ings are beautiful because they

fit

in a larger pattern that is satisfying.

The Administration

building faces the north and

The main hundred

feet

Offices

from High

extending the

full

Street.

length of

It

is

is

situated back about one

a three-story brick structure,

two blocks giving the appearance of a

continuous building. There are in fact five distinct buildings or wings

About midway between the Student Building, is the main entrance to the Rotunda and the Reception Hall. Down the Hall on the left of the Rotunda on entering are the offices of the President, the Business Manager, the Treasurer, and the Registrar. Down the hall to the right on entering are the offices of the Home Department and which face the

street.

or the right wing, and the Arts Building, or left wing,

the parlors.

The Dormitories The

dormitories consist of the second and third floors of the main

group of buildings, including the five wings, and Cunningham Hall, which is a new three-story brick structure, southwest of the main building.

Every building

is

supplied with steam heat, electric lights, and

hot and cold water with ample bathrooms on each floor. is

supplied with single beds and other necessary furniture.

Every room The rooms

Cunningham Hall are grouped in suites of two with connecting baths. Each building is supervised by a trained matron who makes it homelike and comfortable. in

The Dining Hall The

dining hall

is

located at the rear of the

entered from the Rotunda.

main entrance and

is

In this building are located the dining

room, kitchen, bakery, refrigerating plant, and a recreation

hall.


General Information

The

room

dining

is

in the

39

form of a Maltese cross and

will seat

1,000 students on the main floor, and 100 students in each of the two

The

balconies.

room

kitchen and bakery to the rear of the dining

are

meet the needs of the student body. The refrigerating plant on the ground floor provides for The recreation hall also on the the proper preservation of foods. gatherings after meals and on convenient for social floor is ground

modern

in every respect with a capacity to

other occasions.

Auditoriums In the Student Building, which constitutes the east wing of the

main building considered as a the

Young Women's

unit, is

an auditorium which

is

the building west of the Student Building and parallel with

general assembly

used by

Christian Association and for public lectures. it

is

In the

hall.

Health Service

The

infirmary

is

situated at the rear of the building connecting

the assembly hall with the Student Building.

It

two semi-wards, and private rooms with baths

contains one ward,

many more students than normally require medical one time. The Southside Community Hospital, one of

needs of at

meet the

sufficient to

equipped institutions of

its

kind in the country,

is

attention

the best

available for emer-

gency cases.

The Laundry The

laundry, a separate building,

is

equipped with

sary machinery for doing excellent work, and

meet the needs of the

ample

all

the neces-

in capacity to

institution.

Lecture

Rooms

In general the classrooms are on the

which

it is

main

first floor

of the various build-

For the most part same section of the building. Every classroom is well-lighted and is supplied with comfortable chairs and slate blackboards. Efficient maid service keeps classrooms and halls clean and tidy. Drinking fountains are convenient to students in going from one classroom to another. ings,

in effect constitute the

building.

the classrooms of any given department are situated in the


;

General Information

40

Science Laboratories of natural science are provided with well-lighted

The departments laboratories

and classrooms, and are equipped with modern apparatus

meet the needs of students. They are also provided with departlibraries, and all of the supplies necessary to make the students' work efficient, inexpensive, and pleasant. The Department of Biology is located on the ground floor of the postoffice wing of the main building while the Department of Chemistry and Physics is located in the Science Hall which is situated south of the main building. to

mental

The Arts Building The

division of fine

and applied

arts including

art and handwork, and business education

of the

main

economics,

housed in the west wing

All laboratories are fully supplied with

building.

The

is

home

modern

and compact arrangement of classrooms for each type of work make for comfort and efficiency in these

equipment.

large, well-lighted,

technical fields.

The Library The veniently

new

library, a

parallel with

every respect.

it.

brick building constructed in

1939,

is

con-

on High Street west of the main building and

situated

It

The

ample, conveniently arranged, and modern in

is

stack rooms, reading rooms, lounging rooms, semi-

nar rooms, and lecture hall are complete from the standpoint of service,

The library contains 32,313 bound volumes, more than 2,000 state and federal documents, 262 current periodicals, and 14 daily newspapers. comfort, and beauty.

Provision for Student Activities

The

College, in both equipment

and arrangement of

buildings, pro-

vides for the needs and convenience of students in their extra-curricular activities.

The Student Building

Student Building. serve these ends.

It

is

Street, parallel with the

the library building.

It

a large

assembly

is

intended primarily to

four-story building hall,

fronting

High

the administration quarters, and

contains a large lounge for social gatherings

an auditorium for the use of the Young Women's Christian Association and other public meetings; Alumnae office; rooms for the Stu-


General Information

W.

dent Council, the Y.

41

C. A. Cabinet, the publications, and specially

equipped rooms for the honor societies and the sororities.

Gymnasium and Swimming Pool. On the basement floor of the Student Building are a modern gymnasium and the quarters of the The gymnasium is well equipped for physical education department. basketball, gymnastics, and many features of physical education. Just to the back of the gymnasium and opening into it is a swimming pool of the most modern design housed in a building harmonizing in effect with the student building in which the gymnasium is housed. Athletic Grounds.

larged and improved. in

The athletic grounds recently have been enThey meet the needs of all students interested

outdoor sports such as tennis, baseball, hockey, lacrosse, and golf.

Recreation Centers

The Recreation Hall just beneath the dining room and back of the Rotunda is a beautiful hall in which hundreds of students assemble after dinner and on special occasions. Here they dance and sing, give their class stunts, and have good times in many ways.

The Student Building

is

a place for the more serious work of the

student organizations, but

it

is

The

also an important recreational center.

lounge, the auditorium, the Y.

specially

W.

C. A. reception room,

and the

equipped sitting rooms for the use of various societies and

sororities provide for recreational

The Longwood

and

social activities of

many

kinds.

home owned by the College. Here is one homes of the old South. In this home

Estate, just a mile east of Farmville, once the

of General Joseph E. Johnston, of the oldest and most beautiful

is

with an atmosphere of the old South the students have

teas, receptions,

and hold week-end parties. In the thickly wooded section of the estate is a log cabin where students go in groups for rest and recreation. On the Longwood Estate is the large open amphitheatre where the May

Day

festivals are held.

Here

also

is

a nine-hole golf course for the use

of the students and faculty of the College.

STUDENT TEACHING Provision

is

made

for student teaching under conditions that are

quite typical of those under

complete their college work.

which students

The two

will

have to teach after they

training schools located in

Farm-


General Information

42

ville

are typical of those found in the

tems.

The

rural training school at

more progressive

more progressive city school sysJohn Randolph is typical of the

rural schools of the State.

Teaching in the Farmville Schools. The reorganization of the town of Farmville in 1937 makes provision for

school system in the

students to teach in the Farmville Elementary School, housed in the

Training School building situated on the College campus, and in the Farmville High School housed in the excellent situated near the College campus.

new high

school building

In the Farmville schools there

is

in

every room a regular employed supervising classroom teacher with

whom

the student teachers work.

Both the classroom teachers and the

student teachers receive help and guidance from the Department of

Education and the supervisors of the various departments of the College.

Teaching in the John Randolph High School. For many years the John Randolph high school has been affiliated with the College as a teacher training center. ville.

It is situated

seven miles northeast of Farm-

In this school students teach in both the high school and the

elementary school divisions.

Students teaching in the high school are

under the direction of supervisors of the College faculty. teaching in the elementary grades are in charge of a College faculty

who

is

Students

member

of the

a supervisor of long experience and training in

elementary education and rural supervision.

Administration of Student Teaching. The Head of the Departis also Director of Teacher-Training. The Farm-

ment of Education ville

fied

Elementary School is in the charge of a principal especially qualiby training and experience in the field of elementary education, and

the Farmville

High School

is

in charge of a principal especially quali-

by experience and training in the field of secondary education. The John Randolph High School is in the charge of a principal especially fied

qualified

by experience and training for the administration and super-

vision of a rural consolidated school.

All the principals, supervisors,

and supervising teachers work together with the Director of Student Teaching to develop a unified program. Since the Director of TeacherTraining

is

also

spirit of the

Head

of the Department of Education the professional

College pervades the instruction in

all

three schools.


Major Phases of S+udent

much

In recent years

has been written about the education of the

In this institution, in order to provide for a well-

whole individual.

of the student is considered from several more important phases of the student life moral and religious, the social and recreational,

rounded development, the

Some

points of view.

Life

are the physical, the

life

of the

and the academic and professional.

PHYSICAL LIFE The

physical life of the student supplies the foundation for her

and success as a teacher. However important other Consequently, things may be, a strong healthy body is fundamental. every possible precaution is taken to safeguard the health and to develop liberal education

By

a strong constitution. well heated

providing regular physical examinations,

and ventilated dormitories, balanced meals, and regular

exercise, the college seeks to protect its students against disease in the

power of resistance in the future, and develop work without strain and nervousness. Through athletics, dancing, and regular exercise the students not only have a good time but also maintain health and vigor. But after all possible precautions are taken against disease some present, improve their their capacity to

sickness naturally occurs.

The

college therefore maintains an infirmary

and a trained nurse. There town the Southside Community Hospital to take

in charge of a full-time resident physician is

also available in the

care of emergency cases.

wholesome

living,

and the

Because of the unusually healthful climate, efficient health

and medical service not a

death has occurred in the college since 1916, not even during the great

epidemic of influenza in 1918.

MORAL AND RELIGIOUS LIFE The moral and

religious aspects of

education are considered as

important as are the physical and intellectual.

During the history of

the college a tradition of good will, cooperation, and high standards of

personal relationship has developed.

not be described

phere

it

;

it

engenders.

Such a

stabilizing influence can-

can be appreciated only through living in the atmos-

But

this

intangible influence

is

experienced by


of Student Life

Major Phases

44

both students and faculty to such a degree that

it

has become a distinct

moral force in the whole college community.

The

college

part and

a

is

home

in

which everyone

is

expected to do his

share in a give-and-take relationship with others.

Certain

modes

of life are prized and valued because in a long history they have

proved their worth and are therefore meaningful and significant to In such an atmosphere

it

is

for the

difficult

young student not

velop high ideals and a wholesome moral outlook on

The Young Women's belong,

is

all.

to de-

life.

Christian Association, to which

a strong religious force in the community.

It

all

students

provides a

training and experience for the officers and others interested in religious

The

work.

short daily devotional exercises conducted by the

members of work and time to

ministers of the town, the President of the College, and

from

faculty at Chapel give students a rest flect

on

spiritual things.

services, holds special

class

service.

Under

its

re-

The Y. W. C. A. conducts daily evening prayer weekly Morning Watch services, urges attend-

ance at Sunday school and church, and fosters a spirit of religious

and

the

auspices the

World Week

of Prayer

is

life

observed,

mission study classes are conducted by the faculty and others, a series of addresses by

some Christian

leader

is

given each year on the funda-

mental principles of the Christian religion, and noted speakers representing the international point of view address the students on im-

portant current movements.

The

Baptist,

Episcopal,

Churches of Farmville are

all

Methodist, and Presbyterian

Lutheran,

provided with good ministers

who

par-

These churches welcome They provide for students many Sunday

ticipate in the religious life of the college.

the students to their services.

Members

school classes and social functions.

members of

the churches

out the

of the college attention

of the faculty are also

and enter into the religious activities of the community. They are liberal and sympathetic in dealing with the religious problems of young people. Courses in Biblical literature are available to students especially interested in religious work. Throughlife

is

given to moral and religious

questions but without any effort to direct students into fixed moulds.

SOCIAL AND RECREATIONAL LIFE The

and balanced personality is work and to play with the college makes it easy for the

individual with a well-rounded

and attitude. The community

social in outlook

other people.

He

is

life in

able to


Major Phases of Student Life students to participate in social

ber of activities in

life in

many ways.

which the recreational and

45

There are a num-

social life are

very closely

related.

In the recreational halls students gather for dances. In the parlors

They have

which from outside the institution. The Y. W. C. A. reception to freshmen during the opening week of the college where the new students meet the upper classmen and the faculty is a delightful occasion for all. The Founders Day celebration in March in which the students, the alumnae, and the friends of the college all The Mardi Gras participate is one of the great events of the year. Ball, held on Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, is a time of fun-making and jollity. The college circus given every year by the student body is a notable event in the whole community. The May Day Festival, an annual occurrence held in the Amphitheatre at Longwood and featuring the crowning of the May queen, involves pantomime and dancing by students in expression of the spirit of an original production by some member of the student body. The Athletic Association offers an opportunity for all students to participate in the numerous sports through class tournaments and varsity competition. Some of the more serious social and recreational activities consist of a series of entertainments provided by professional musicians, actors, dancers, and speakers given in the college auditorium at intervals throughout the college year. The College Choir and the College Orthey entertain their friends.

young men and young women are

chestra offer an opportunity for

several dances a year to

invited

many

students to participate in pro-

grams for the entertainment and recreation of the whole college community. The Dramatic Club under the auspices of the department of speech offers a similar opportunity to students with some talent in the dramatic

arts.

Participation in activities of this kind lends

cance to

life.

The

meaning and

signifi-

students learn through the experiences thus pro-

vided to appreciate and enjoy the best cultural elements of the race.

They have

in

and delight

them the happy experience of cooperating

to others.

They

in bringing joy

learn to entertain themselves, to live to-

gether in a dignified, yet free and easy, atmosphere of culture and refinement.


Major Phases of Student Life

46

ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL LIFE The academic and main emphasis

to

It centers

tory.

professional life of the college constitutes the

which

all

other activities are secondary and contribu-

mainly around the courses of instruction offered in

the various departments of the college and the directed teaching of the

students under supervision. eral,

and broadening

Some

in outlook.

courses are primarily cultural,

lib-

Others are primarily professional and

designed to prepare students definitely for teaching in the elementary

and secondary schools of the State. In still others academic scholarship and the professional spirit are very closely combined. The spirit of the class work is rather free and informal. The members of the faculty and the students work together as members of a large family in which every one is expected to do his part. The students accept their instructors as friends and guides. Through such a spirit of fellowship and good-will are developed initiative, cooperation, responsibility, self-control, and other intangible qualities of personality and character. The method and spirit of the classroom are considered by the faculty as important as the content of the courses. More emphasis is placed on growth in perspective and professional outlook than on routine and mechanical performance. A well-rounded personality capable of adjustment to the demands of a changing civilization rather than the mechanically trained expert serious

work

from other

of the classroom

activities;

it

is

is

is

the controlling ideal.

The more

not separated in spirit and method

rather an integral part, although a

serious part, of the whole life of the institution.

more


The Program of Studies and Activities

The program

of studies and activities, usually called the

program

The

curricula

of studies, includes the curricula and extra curricula.

consist of the various combinations of courses leading to degrees, di-

plomas, certificates, and positions.

The

extra curricula consist of stu-

dent activities which are not definitely required of students or directly controlled by the faculty as are the curricula.

The

curricula are described in terms of courses and the extra cur-

ricula are described in terms of student organizations.

The courses

in

the various curricula are listed in tabular form, p. 50, and the student

organizations to which the extra curricula are related are listed on p. 48.

The

various courses are described in detail in the Departments of In-

struction, p. 63,

and the extra curricula are described

in detail

under

the head of student activities, p. 112.

Information in regard to constants, majors, minors, and electives

may

be found in the descriptions and tabulations of curricula and in

the descriptions of courses in the Departments of Instruction, pp. 63111.

Information in regard to student organizations

is

supplied in the

descriptions of student activities, p. 112.

CURRICULA PROVIDED Four-Year Curricula Leading to Degrees Curriculum

I.

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education and to Teaching in Secondary Schools.

Curriculum

II.

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education and to Teaching in the Secondary Schools.


of Studies and Activities

The Program

48

Curriculum

III.

Leading

Bachelor of Science in

to the degree of

Education and to Teaching and Supervision Kindergarten

the

and

in

the

in

Elementary

Schools.

Curriculum

IV.

Leading

to the degree of

Bachelor of Arts.

Curriculum

V.

Leading

to the degree of

Bachelor of Science.

Curriculum

VI.

Curriculum

VII.

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education and to Teaching Home Economics. Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science

in

Education and to Teaching and Supervising Physical and Health Education.

Curriculum VIII.

Leading

to the degree of

Bachelor of Science in

Education and to Teaching Business Subjects,

and

to Positions in the Field of Business.

Two-Year Curricula Leading Curriculum A.

Leading

to the

to Special Fields

diploma and teaching in the kinder-

garten and primary grades.

Curriculum B.

Leading to the diploma and teaching in the grammar grades.

Curriculum C.

Leading to nursing and dentistry.

Curriculum D.

Leading

to clerical positions.

EXTRA CURRICULA PROVIDED I.

II.

Student Government Association.

Young Women's

Christian Association.

III.

Athletic Association.

IV.

Student Publications.

V. VI. VII.

Honor

Societies.

Student Clubs. Sororities.


;

The Program

of Studies and Activities

49

THE FOUR-YEAR CURRICULA To meet tional

the needs and interest of different educational and occupa-

groups of students, the College provides eight different four-year

curricula. in the

Three of the curricula lead

to teaching in the general fields

elementary and secondary schools

;

two, to a liberal education

three, to specialized fields of work.

degree in education and to teaching and senior high schools Curriculum II leads to the A. B. degree in education and to teaching in the junior and senior high schools and Curriculum III leads to the B. S. degree in education and to teaching in the elementary schools. For the benefit

Curriculum I leads to the B.

S.

in the general fields of the junior

;

;

of students

who have completed

or partly completed the

work

for a

diploma in one of the two-year curricula, Curriculum III-A, representing a modification of Curriculum III,

Curriculum

V

IV

is

provided.

leads to the standard A. B. degree,

leads to the standard B. S. degree.

The completion

and Curriculum

of either of these

curricula meets the requirements of those students seeking a liberal

education or a foundation for graduate

To meet

work

in the universities.

the needs of students preparing for specialized fields of

work, three curricula are provided.

Curriculum VI leads to the B.

S.

degree in education and meets the requirements of students preparing

home economics, or for positions in homemanagement. Curriculum VII leads to the B. S. degree in education and meets the requirements of those preparing for teaching and supervision in physical and health education. Curriculum VIII leads to the B. S. degree in education and meets the requirements of students preparing to teach commercial subjects in the junior and senior high schools, or for specialized positions in the field for teaching positions in

making and

institutional

of business.

A

major and two minors are required in Curricula I, II, IV, V, and VII. The major consists of courses totalling 36 quarter hours the first minor consists of courses totalling 27 quarter hours and the second minor consists of courses totalling 18 quarter hours. The gen;

;

eral requirements in regard to constants, majors,

and minors are

indi-

cated in connection with the tabulations of various curricula, and the specific

requirements in terms of courses are indicated in the descrip-

tions of the offerings of the different departments.


of Studies and Activities

The Program

50

Curriculum Leading

to the

and

The minimum

to

I

Degree of Bachelor of Science in Education Teaching in the Secondary Schools

constants required in quarter hours for this degree

are: Art or Music, 9; English and Speech, 18; Geography, 9; History,

9; Health Education, 3; Physical Education, 6; Psychology, 9; Science

(2 Sciences), 24; Social Science, including Government, 9; Secondary

Education, 9; Philosophy of Education, 9; Directed Teaching, First

Year

Class Periods Fall

English 101, 102, 133 Biology or Chemistry 131, 132, 133

9.

Winter

Credits Fall 3

3

3

14

14

15

3

3

3

3

3

4

4

4

Physical Education 101, 102, 103

3

3

3

Major and Minor

6

6

6 2

16

16

18

Health Ed. 104

Winter Spring

Spring

Second Year English 205 and one other course Speech 210 Psychology 261, 262, 263

3 3

3

Major and Minor

6

6

Physical Ed. 226, 227, 228 Geography, History, or Social Science

3

3

3 3

3 3

3

3

6

6

6

6

3

3

1

1

1

3

3

3

3

3

3

18

18

18

16

16

16

Third Year Education 335, 336, 337 Chemistry, Biology, or Physics

Major and Minor

3

3

3

3

3

4 6

4 6

4 6

4 6

4 6

3 4 6

3

3

3

3

3

3

16

16

16

16

16

16

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3

3 3

3 3 3 3

Geography, History, or Social Science

FOURTIi Year

Teaching 400 Education 441, 442, 443 Major Music or Art Health Education 305

3 3 3 3

Elective

3

3

6

15

18

18

3 3

3 3 3

3

3 3 3 3

6

15

18

18


.

The Program

of Studies and Activities

51

Curriculum II Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education and to Teaching in the Secondary Schools

The minimum

constants required in quarter hours for this degree

are: Art or Music, 9; English and Speech, 18; Foreign

Language

(in

one language), 18; Geography, 9; Health Education, 3; History, 9; Mathematics (or nine additional hours in foreign language), 9;

Secondary Education, 9; Philosophy of Education, 9; Physical Educa6; Psychology, 9; Science (two sciences), 24; Social Science, in-

tion,

cluding Government,

9.

First

Year

Class Periods

Winter

Credits

Winter Spring

Spring

Fall

English 101, 102, 133

3

3

3

3

3

3

Major and Minor

6

6

6

6

6

Physical Ed. 101, 102, 103... Subjects listed in constants. Health Ed. 104

3

6 3 6

3

1

1

1

6 2

6

6

6

20

16

16

3

3

3 6

3

3 3

6

6

Fall

6

18

18

1

17

Second Year

English 205 and one other course Speech 210

Psychology 261, 262, 263. Major and Minor

3 ..

Physical Ed. 226, 227, 228... Subjects listed in constants.

3

3

3

3 3

6

6

6

3 3

3 3

3 3

1

1

1

3

3

3

18

18

18

16

16

16

3

3

3

3

3

3 3 3

Third Year Education 335, 336, 337 Health Education 305

3

Major Minor or other subjects from

3

3 3 3

9

9

9

9

9

9

15

18

15

15

18

15

constants

3

Fourth Year Teaching 400 Education 441, 442, 443 Major, Minor or constants quired

3 3

3

3 3

3

3

3 3

3

3

9

9

9

9

9

9

15

15

15

15

15

15

3

re-


The Program

52

of Studies and Activities

Curriculum III Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Education and Teaching and Supervision in the Kindargarten and in the Elementary Schools

The minimum

to

constants required in quarter hours for this degree

English, 30; Psychology, 9; General Mathematics, with emphasis

are:

on advanced arithmetic, 6 Art, 9 Writing, 3 Music, 9 Physical and Health Education, 12; Geography, 9; History, 15; Government and ;

Social Science,

12; Science

(man

relation to the biological

in

;

Economics, 9; Elementary Education, 9; Philosophy of Education, 9. First

Year

Class Periods Fall

English 101, 102, 133 Science 209, 210, 211 History 131, 132, 133

Mathematics Art 110 Music 114 Writing 101

and

Home

physical world), 21;

Directed Teaching, 9

;

;

;

131, 132, 133

Winter

Credits

Winter Spring

Spring

Fall

18

18

16

15

3

3 3

3

3

3

3 3

3 3 3

Home

Economics 110 Physical Ed. 101, 102, 103 Speech 201 Health Ed. 104

3

2

23

20

Second Year

Psychology

261, 262, 263...

Sociology 201, 202

Economics 201 Geography 112, 121,

122,

3 3

3 3

3

3

3 113, 203, or

123

English 228 Physical Education 205

Writing 102 Art 210 Music 115, 116. Home Economics 210 Physical Ed. 221, 222, 223..

3

3

3

3

3 3

3 3

3

2

2 3 3

3

3 3

2

2

3

3

3

3

3

1

1

1

18

20

16

16

18

14


The Program

of Studies and Activities

53

Third Year Education 361, 362, 363 Chemistry, Physics or Biology History 347, 348

3

3

3

3

3

3

4

4

4

4

4

4

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

Government 333 English 315, 316, 317 Music 214 or 215 Home Economics 310 Art 310

3

3 3

3 3

3

3

3

3

16

16

FOURT]i

Teaching 400 Education 441, 442, 443

3 3 3

Physical Ed. Elective English 405 Speech 302 Electives

3 3

16

16

16

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

1

1

16

Year 3 3

3 3

3 3

1

3

3

3

8

6

6

8

6

6

17

18

18

15

16

16

Curriculum III-A Curriculum III-A

is

a modification of Curriculum III for students

who have already completed a two-year curriculum leading to the diploma. Upon their return to the College they should take Curriculum III-A rather than Curriculum

III.

Total credits required for degree

189 quarter hours. First

Year

Same

as in Curriculum A, (I-A), B, (I-B), or the equivalent.

Same

as in Curriculum A, (I-A), B, (I-B), or the equivalent.

Second Year

Third Year Class Periods Fall

Psychology 343 Education 361, 362, 363 English Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics) Physical Education Free Electives

Winter

3 3 3

3 3

4

4

3

6

16

16

Credits

Winter Spring

Spring

Fall

16

16

16

14

15

15

15

Fourth Year Education 441, 442, 443

3

3

History, Social Science, or

Geography Free

Electives

3

3

9

9

3 12

15

15

15


The Program

54

of Studies and Activities

Curriculum Leading

The minimum

to the

IV

Degree of Bachelor of Arts

constants required in quarter hours for this degree

Art or Music, 9 English and Speech, 18 Foreign Language (in language), one 18; Geography, 9; Health Education, 3; History, 9; Mathematics (or additional hours in foreign language), 9; Philosophy, 9; Physical Education, 6; Psychology, 9; Science (two sciences), 24; Social Science, including Government, 9. are

;

:

;

First

Year

Class Periods Fall

Winter

English 101, 102, 133

3

3

Major and Minor

6

6

Credits

Spring

Fall

3 6

3 6

6

Additional subjects from constant

Physical Ed. 101, 102, 103 Health Ed. 104

6

6

6

3

3

3

2 18

18

20

Winter Spring 3 6

3 6

111 6

6 1

16

16

3

3

3 6

3 6

17

Second Year English 205 and one other course Speech 210 Psychology 245, 246, 247

Major and Minor

3

3 3 3

6

6

3 6

3 3

3 3

3 3

3

3

3

18

18

18

16

16

16

Additional subjects from constant

Physical Ed. Elective

3 3

3

6

111

Third Year Health

Education 205

Major and Minor

3

3

6

6

6

6

6

6

9

9

9

9

9

9

15

18

15

15

18

IS

Additional subjects from constant

Fourth Year Philosophy 421, 422, 423

3

Major or Minor

3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

Additional subjects from constant or elective

9

9

9

9

9

9

15

15

15

15

15

15


.

;

. .

The Program

of Studies and Activities

Curriculum Leading

The minimum are:

to the

55

V

Degree of Bachelor of Science

constants required in quarter hours for this degree

Art or Music, 9; English and Speech, 18; Geography, 9; History,

Mathematics, 9 Physical Education, 6 Health Education, 3 Psychology, 9; Science (in three sciences), 36; Social Science, including Government, 9. First Year

9

;

;

;

Class Periods

Biology or Chemistry 131, 132,

133

English 101, 102, 133 Physical Ed. 101, 102, 103

Major Minor

Credits

444444 111

Fall

3 3 3 3

Winter

3 3 3 3

Health Ed. 104

Winter Spring

Spring

Fall

3 3 3 3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

2 16

19

18

1

14

14

15

3

3

Second Year

Psychology 245, 246, 247 Chemistry or Biology 131, 132,

3

4

133

English 205 and one other course Speech 210 Physical Education Elective.

Major Minor

3 3 3 3 3

3 3

3

3

1

1

1

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

Electives

3

3

19

19

19

17

17

17

3

3 3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3 3

3

15

15

15

15

Third Year Art or Music. Mathematics History Health Education

3 3 3

Major Minor

3 3

.

.

15

3 3 3 3 3

15

3

3

3

Fourth Year Science

3

3

3

3

3

3

Physics 441, 442, 443.

4

4

4

4

4

4

Geography Minor or Electives Major or Eltxtives

3

3

3

3 3

6

3 3 3

3

3 3

3 3 3

16

16

16

16

16

16

Social

.

.

6


The Program

56

of Studies and Activities

Curriculum VI Leading

to the

Degree of Bachelor of Science in Education and Home Economics, and to Specializing in

to

Teaching

Foods and Nutrition

The

constants or core subjects in quarter hours are:

English, 18;

Psychology 9; Art, 9; Physical and Health Education, 9; Social and Economic Problems, 9; Government, 9; Chemistry, 18; Biology, 9;

Home

Economics, 48. First

Year

Class Periods Fall

Art 131, 246, 242 Chemistry 131, 132, 133 English 101, 102, 133

Home

Ec. 100, 101, 102 Health Ed. 104 Physical Ed. 101, 102, 103

Chemistry 200, 201, 242 English 205 and two other courses Home Ec. 201, 202, 203 Home Ec. 204 Psychology 261, 262, 263 Health Ed. 205 Biology 351 Physical Ed. 226, 227, 228

Winter

Credits

Spring

Fall

Winter Spring

3

3

3

3

3

3

4

4

4

4

4

4

3 3 2 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3

3

3

3

18

16

16

Second Year 4 4

111 3

3

15

14

14

4

4

4

4

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3

1

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

19

19

19

17

3 3 3 3

3

3

111

3

17

17

Third Year Education 335, Philosophy 441

Home Home Home Home Home

Ec. Ec. Ec. Ec. Ec.

336, 337 312, 300, 301 307, 314, 309

313 316 Biology 370, 348 Elective Sociology 404

3 3

3

3 3 3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3

4

3

3

3

4

3 3

3 3

3 3 15

3 3

16

18

15

16

18

3

3 3 3

3

3

Fourth Year Education 400

Home Home

Ec. 401, 403 Ec. 406, 411 Physics 444

Government

457, 461, 333

Philosophy 442, 443 Electives

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

3 3

4 3 3

3 3

3

4

3

3 3 3

3

15

16

3

3

3 3

15

16

18

3 3


The Program

of Studies and Activities

57

Curriculum VII to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Education and to the Teaching and Supervising of Physical and Health Education

Leading

Constants required same as those in Curriculum First

page

I,

Year

Class Periods Fall

Biology 131, 132, 133 English 101, 102, 133

Music

114, 115, 116 History 131, 132, 133

Geography

50.

Winter

Credits

Spring

Fall

24

14

Winter Spring

4 3 3 3

121

Physical Ed. 101, 102, 103 Physical Ed. 212 Physical Ed. 242, 243, 244 Health Ed. 104

3

3

19

Chemistry 131, 132, 133 Psychology 261, 262, 263 English 205 and one other.... Home Economics 210 (elective) Biology 351 Physical Ed. 245, 246, 247 Physical Ed. 226, 227, 228 Physical Ed. 251, 252, 253 Physical Ed. 308, 309

22

Second Year 4 4

16

4

4

4

4

3

3 3 3

3 3

3

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

3

16

16

3

3

3 3

3

3 3 3

3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3

22

22

16

3

3

22

17

3

Third Year Education 335, 336, 337.,. Sociology 201, 202

3

Government 333 Speech 341 Fine and Applied Art 246. Health Education 305.... Physical Ed. 346, 347 Physical Ed. 354, 355, 356. Physical Ed. 342, 343, 313. Elective or minor

3 3 3

3

3

3 3

3 3

3 3 3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3

18

21

3 3

3

1

1

1

1

1

3

3

3

21

14

17

17

3

3

3

3 3

1

Fourth Year Teaching Education 441, Geography

442, 443.

Physical Ed. 457 Electives

3

3

3

3 3

3 3 3

6

9

6

3 6

9

6

18

15

15

18

15

15

3 3 3 3


The Program

58

of Studies and Activities

Curriculum VIII Leading

Degree of Bachelor of Science

to the

Teaching Business Subjects, and

to

in Education,

and

to

Positions in the

Field of Business

The

tabulation below

business subjects.

is

for students

who

Those who are preparing

are preparing to teach

to enter the field of busi-

ness will take electives instead of the education courses prescribed. First

Year

Class Periods Fall

English 101, 102, 133 Bus. Ed. 101, 102, 103 Bus. Ed. Ill, 112, 113 Bus. Ed. 123 Bus. Ed. 131 Geography 203 Science 210, 211, 212

Mathematics

Spring

Fall

22

24

16

Winter Spring

3 5

5

2 3 3 3

100

Physical Ed. 101, Health Ed. 104

Credits

Winter

102, 103

24

15

16

Second Year Bus. Ed. 201, 202, 203... Bus. Ed. 211, 212, 213... Bus. Ed. 221, 222, 223... Bus. Ed. 232 Bus. Ed. 233 English 204 Speech 230 Psychology 261, 262, 263., Geography 231 Physical Ed. 226, 227, 228.

3

3

3

1

1

1

5

5

5

3

3

3 3

3

3

3 3 3

3 3

3

3 3

,

3 3 3 3

3

3 3

1

1

1

3

3

3

3

3 3 3

23

20

23

17

14

17

Third Year Education 335, 336, Bus. Ed.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3 3

3

3 3

3

337

Economics

462, 463, 461 English 356 Sociology 402, 405 Bus. Ed. 311, 312 Bus. Ed. 321 Bus. Ed. 322 Bus. Ed. 323 Health Education 305

,

3 3

3 3

3

3

3

3 3

3

,

Electives

3

3

15

18

15

15

18

15


The Program

of Studies and Activities

59

Fourth Year History 348, 448 Education 441, 442, 443. Education 400 Bus. Ed. 401 Bus. Ed. 402 Bus. Ed. 403

3 3 3

3

3

3 3

3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3

3

3 3 3

3 3

Electives

3

5

3

5

5

3

5

14

15

17

14

15

17

THE TWO-YEAR CURRICULA To meet the common needs and interests of different educational and occupational groups who do not expect to remain in college for four years, four two-year curricula are provided. Curriculum A, consisting of the first

two years of Curriculum

III with certain modifi-

cations to provide for student-teaching in the second year, leads to the

diploma, the

Normal Professional

Certificate,

and

to teaching in the

kindergarten and primary grades. Curriculum B, consisting of the

two years of Curriculum

student-teaching in the second year, leads to the diploma, the

Professional Certificate, and to teaching in the

riculum

C

consists

of

two years of Curriculum VIII and

The

first

year of Curriculum

A

is

Normal Cur-

grades.

Curriculum

D

consists of the

leads to clerical positions.

and of Curriculum

as Curriculum III with one exception. tion 122

grammar

an outline of courses providing preliminary

preparation for dentistry and nursing. first

first

III with certain modifications to provide for

In Curricula

A

B

are the

same

and B, Educa-

substituted for one other three-credit course in the first year.

In the second year of Curricula

A

and B, students who teach

in the

Farmville Elementary School take Teaching 200 instead of three threecredit courses listed in the second year.

Those who teach

in the rural

schools receive 15 credits for teaching instead of the courses outlined

for the quarter in which they teach.


The Program

60

of Studies and Activities

Curriculum Leading

to

a Diploma and

to

A

Teaching in the Kindergarten and

Primary Grades First

Year

Class Periods Fall

English 101, 102, 133 Science 209, 210 Education 122 History 131, 132, 133

Mathematics Art

Credits

Winter

Spring

Fall

22

18

17

17

3 3 3

3

3

3

Winter Spring

3 3

131, 132, 133

110

Music 114 Writing 101

3 3 3 3

Home

Econ. 110 Physical Ed. 101, 102, 103 Speech 211 Health Ed. 104

3

21

15

Second Year

Psychology 261, 262 Sociology 201, 202 Health Education 205

Geography

112,

113,

123

3

3 3 3

English 205 Education 315 or English 315.

Writing 102 Art 210 Music 115, 116 Physical Ed. 214, 215 Teaching 200

3 3

3

3 3

3

2 3 3 3

3 2

3

2

22

20

2

1

9

9 19

3

3

3

2

3

*

17

18

17


The Program

of Studies and Activities

Curriculum Leading

to

B

a Diploma and to Teaching in the First

Year

Fall

Winter

Grammar Grades

Class Periods

English 101, 102, 133 Science 209, 210 Education 122

Credits

Winter Spring

Spring

Fall

18

17

16

3 3 3 3

3 3

3

3

History 131, 132, 133

Mathematics Art 110 Music 1 14 Writing 101 Home Econ.

61

3 3 3 2

131, 132, 133

110 Physical Ed. 101, 102, 103 Speech 201

3

20

20

15

Second Year

Psychology

261, 262 Sociology 201, 202 Health Education 205 Geography 121, 123, 203 English 205 Education 315 or English 315.

Writing 102 Art 210 Music 115, 116 Physical Ed. 214, 215 Teaching 200

3 3

3 3

3 3

3

3 3

3

2

2 3

3

2

3

3 3

3

2

23

Curriculum to

9

18

17

Fall

Economics

Electives

101,

17

C

Year

Class Periods

...

18

Nursing and Dentistry First

English 101, 102, 133 Biology 131, 132, 133 Physical Ed. 101. 102, 103. Speech 211

2

1

9

Leading

3

3

3

20

Home

3

Winter

Credits

Spring

Fall

Winter Spring

3

3

3

3

3

3

4

4

4

4

4

4

3 3

3

3

1

1

1

102....

3

6

3 6

6

6

3 6

6

19

19

19

17

17

17

3

3


The Program

62

of Studies and Activities

Second Year English

3

4

4

4

3 4

3

4 3

3 3 3

3

1

1

1

205

Chemistry Physical

131,

132,

133..

Education

,

Biology 370... Health Education 205..,

Economics Sociology

201 201

Psychology 245, 246, 247. Economics 201

Home

.

.

3 3

3 3

,

3

3

3

3

6

19

19

3

.

Electives 19

Curriculum Leading

3 3 3 3

Mathematics

100

Physical Ed. 101, 102, 103 Health Ed. 104

3

6 17

17

17

D

Year

Class Periods Fall

English 101, 102, 133 Ed. 101, 102, 103 Ed. Ill, 112, 113 Ed. 123 Ed. 131 Geography 203 Science 210, 211, 212

3

to Clerical Positions

First

Bus. Bus. Bus. Bus.

4

Credits

Winter

Spring

Fall

22

24

16

Winter Spring

3 5 5

2 3 3 3

24

15

16

Second Year Bus. Ed. 201, 202, 203.... Bus. Ed. 211, 212, 213.... Bus. Ed. 221, 222, 223.... Bus. Ed. 231 Bus. Ed. 233 English 204 Speech 230 Psychology 245, 246, 247.. Geography 231 Physical Ed. 226, 227, 228.

3

3

3

1

1

1

5

5

5

3

3 3

3

3 3

3 3 3

3 3

3 3 3 3

3

3

3

3 3 3

23

20

23

3 3

3 3

3

3 3

1

1

1

17

14

17


Departments of Instruction

BIOLOGY Mr. Jeffers, Miss Stevens, and Assistants Students intending to major in biology are advised to minor in either chemistry or mathematics.

Because biology teachers are

fre-

quently called upon to teach general science, students not choosing

chemistry as a minor are urged to elect general chemistry and general physics early in their college course.

The

is

four session hours

first

nine courses listed

State requirement for science teachers

each in biology, chemistry, and physics.

A

major

in this

department requires the

below.

In first

all

courses in the department of biology except those of the

year, the

number of laboratory hours

as minimal, since students

may

indicated should be regarded

frequently find

it

necessary to give more

than the required time in order to complete the assigned work.

Lab-

oratory fees must be paid at the Treasurer's Office before entering classes.

Biology 131, 132, 133.

General Biology.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 2 single credits each quarter. Fee: $2.00 each quarter.

and 2 double periods a week; 4 Mr. Jeffers, Miss Stevens

Fall quarter: the general principles of biology and a survey of the animal kingdom. Winter quarter: prehistoric man; the structure and function of the important systems of the human body. Spring quarter: general survey of the plant kingdom; the essential features of structure, reproduction, and classification of plants.

Biology 231, 232, 233.

Botany.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 2 single and 2 double periods a week; 4 credits each quarter. Fee: $3.00 each quarter. Alternating with Biology 333, Miss Stevens 334, 335. Not offered 1940-41.

Fall quarter:

type forms of cryptogamic plants.

tion, assimilation, metabolism, and growth of plants. phology, classification, and ecology of seed plants.

Winter quarter:

nutri-

Spring quarter: mor-


Departments of Instruction

64

Zoology.

Biology 333, 334, 335.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 2 single and 2 double periods a week; 4 Fee: $3.00 each quarter. Alternating with Biology 231, credits each quarter. Mr. Jeffers 232, 233. Offered 1940-41.

type study of the more important groups of invertebrates. comparative anatomy of the vertebrates. Spring quarter: identification, classification, and economic importance of animals, particularly Fall quarter:

Winter quarter:

those of Virginia.

Methods

Biology 330.

in Science.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a zveek; 3

credits.

Alternating with and

may

be

Mr. Jeffers

substituted for Chemistry 300.

Construction of courses of study; methods of teaching as applied to recidemonstration and field work.

tation, laboratory,

Advanced General Biology.

Biology 346, 347, 348.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 2 single Fee: $2.00 each quarter. credits each quarter.

and 2 double periods a week; 4 Mr. Jeffers

A

course similar in scope to General Biology but adapted to advanced students and modified to meet the needs of teachers in the elementary school.

The

Biology 349, 350, 351. Fall, winter,

Biological Sciences.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Mr. Jeffers Fall quarter: principles of biology. Winter quarter: fundamentals of inheritance and development. Spring quarter: the elements of anatomy and physiology together with personal applications.

Biology 352.

Mammalian Anatomy.

Offered any quarter.

1

single

and 3 double periods a week; 4

Fee:

credits.

Mr. Jeffers

$3.00.

This course gle species

is

may

be taken only with the consent of the instructor.

A

sin-

dissected in detail.

Biology 370.

Bacteriology.

Offered every quarter; 1 single and 3 double periods a week; 4 credits. Fee: $3.00. Miss Stevens

A

general survey of bacteria and the techniques used in their study.

Biology 400.

Biological Conferences.

Offered any quarter, and period a week; 1 credit.

may

be repeated for credit by a student. 1 single Mr. Jeffers, Miss Stevens

Assigned readings in current biological journals, with reports. only to students approved by the instructor.

Open


Business Education

65

BUSINESS EDUCATION Mr. Landrum, Mrs. Wynne, and Miss Craddock

The Department

of Business Education meets the needs of stu-

dents preparing to teach business subjects in the junior and senior high

and of students preparing for positions

schools,

The

in the field of business.

courses in the four-year curriculum leading to teaching and to

business positions are indicated on page 58.

ment

Courses in this depart-

are also offered as electives for students in other fields.

who expect

Students

Education 335, 336, and 337, Philosophy of Education 441, 442, and 443, and Teaching 400. Those who to teach should take

are not preparing to teach should substitute for the required courses in

Education certain others in the Department of Business Education or departments that will prepare them definitely for specific types

in other

of

work

Such

in the field of business.

substitutions

must be approved

by the heads of the departments involved. Students preparing to teach in the secondary schools or preparing

may take a major in Business Education. A major in Business Education consists of the courses prescribed in Curriculum VIII. Students specializing in other curricula may take a minor in Business Education, which consists of the following courses for business positions,

:

Bus. Ed. 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 203

Bus. Ed. Ill, 112, 113, 211, 212, 213 or Bus. Ed. 101, 102, 103, 201, 202, 203 Bus. Ed. 123, 221, 222, 223, 311, 312

Students

who

desire to prepare themselves for clerical positions in

business offices, and

who do

not expect to remain in college for four

years should take the two-year curriculum in Business Education. This

curriculum consists of the given the tificate

title

fulfilled.

Business Education. 100. Fee:

two years of Curriculum VIII and is A ceris tabulated on page 62.

of completion will be given after the requirements of this cur-

riculum have been

One

first

of Curriculum D, which

Typewriting for Personal Use.

class each quarter; 5 periods a $2.00.

week; 2

credits.

Miss Craddock

Mechanism, operation, and care of the machine, knowledge of the keyboard, correct position, carriage throw, carbon copies, stencil typing, and the mimeograph. Not open to students in Department of Business Education.


Departments of Instruction

66

Business Education 101, 102, 103.

Typewriting.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 5 periods a week; 2 credits each quarter. Miss Craddock Fee: $2.00 each quarter.

Mechanism, operation, and care of the typewriter. Establishment of Correct techhabits of rhythmic and accurate writing as the basis of speed. nique of arrangement, tabulation, centering, carbon copies, etc. Use of standard stroking tests and accuracy and speed tests. Writing once during the year for five minutes without error. Attainment of a speed of 30 words a minute, net, with not more than five errors. Business Education 111, 112, 113. Fall, winter,

Shorthand.

and spring quarters; 5 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Mrs. Wynne, Mr. Landrum

Mastery of the principles of Gregg shorthand. Reading shorthand plates and practice in writing sentences and letters. Development of ease in dictaAccuracy emphasized as the basis of speed. Ability tion and transcription. to take dictation at the rate of 60 words a minute and to transcribe easily and accurately.

Business Education 123.

Elementary Accounting.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Mr. Landrum, Mrs.

Wynne

Fundamental principles of accounting. Theory of debits and credits; journalizing and posting; use of special journals; trial balance, balance sheet, profit and loss statement, and closing entries; business forms as needed; personal accounting.

Commercial Education

131.

Handwriting.

Fall, winter, or spring quarter; 2 periods a

week;

1 credit.

Miss Craddock

Definite training in the use of rapid and legible writing needed in business affairs. Not required if penmanship meets satisfactory standard.

Business Education 201, 202, 203. Fall, winter,

Fee:

Typewriting.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter.

$2.00 each quarter.

Mrs. Wynne, Miss Craddock

Most advanced form work, including manuscripts, proof reading, stenetc. Error analysis and remedial work. Use of duplicating machines. Development of speed with rhythm and accuracy in the arrangement of un-

cils,

organized material. Writing once during the year for ten minutes without error. Attainment of a speed of 50 words a minute, net, with not more than five errors. Attention to methods of teaching typewriting. One hour a week extra for laboratory work. Business Education 211, 212, 213. Fall, winter,

Shorthand.

and spring quarters; 5 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Mrs. Wynne, Mr. Landrum

Development of a shorthand vocabulary with a review of the principles and special attention to phrasing and to the rapid execution of word signs. Dictation and transcripts of varied types of material. Ability to take dictation at the rate of 100 words a minute and to transcribe accurately and attractively.


Business Education Business Education 221, 222, 223. Fall, winter,

67

Accounting.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Mr. Landrum, Mrs. Wynne

Partnership and corporation accounting, with special attention to the classification of accounts; problems of accruals and deferred charges, reserves, and manufacturing costs. Financial statements and reports.

voucher system;

Business Education 232.

Merchandising.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Mrs. Wynne, Mr. Landrum

Problems in retail store management, organization, and personnel; buying and selling policies; modern sales organization; selling problems and practices; sales campaigns; personal selling. Business Education 233.

Secretarial

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 Fee: $1.00.

and Office Practice.

credits.

Mrs. Wynne, Mr. Landrum

Qualifications, training, and duties of a secretary. Special attention to general attitude, confidential affairs, and the relation of secretarial work to other phases of office work. Mail and postal information; indexing and filing. Acquaintance with various office machines; different types of office procedure

and

details of secretarial

equipment and work.

Business Education 300. 3

Office Experience or Selling Experience.

credits.

The completion

minimum

of 300 clock hours of successful experience under conditions approved by the head of the Department of Business Education. Work done preferably during the summer and completed before the beginning of the senior year. All Business Education students, including prospective teachers, urged 'to secure positions of a

in either office or selling position,

either during summer or at other convenient time. The 300 clock hours of work to be performed in same position. Credits not to be substituted for

regular course requirements.

Business Education 311.

Advanced Accounting.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Mr. Landrum, Mrs.

Wynne

Advanced phases of partnership and corporation accounting; interpretation of accounting reports and incomplete records; miscellaneous accounting problems. The accounting process; the function and sundry methods of accounting.

Attention to methods of teaching accounting.

Business Education 312.

Federal Income

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Tax Accounting. Mr. Landrum, Mrs.

Wynne

Income tax legislation; income exemptions, and computation of individual income taxes; returns for estates, trusts, partnerships, and corporations; accounting administration and procedure. Business Education 321.

Marketing.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

The

functions, activities, to consumer.

from producer

Mr. Landrum, Mrs.

and problems involved

in

Wynne

transferring goods


Departments of Instruction

68

Business Education 322.

Business Law.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Mr. Landrum, Mrs.

Wynne

Law

relating to business; technical principles involved in contracts, neLaw of contracts as applied to partnergotiable instruments, and agency. ships, corporations, bailments and carriers, and sales of real and personal property. Practical drafting of legal documents.

Business Education 323.

Insurance.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

The

Mr. Landrum

credits.

insurance company, description of life insurance policies and their uses. Property insurance, health and accident insurance, social insurance, and liability insurance also included. organization of a

life

Business Education 337.

Principles of Business Education.

Spring quarter ; 3 periods a week

;

3 credits.

Mr. Landrum

General survey of the historical development of commercial education, its field, and its aims; special investigations, surveys, reports, and readings. Particular attention to the business curricula for Virginia high schools; methods of teaching commercial subjects; commercial testing and remedial work.

Business Education 401.

Business Organization.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Theory and methods

zation;

Mr. Landrum

practice of business organization, different types of organiof financing; problems of management.

Business Education 402.

Money and Banking.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Mr. Landrum

Theory of money and banking; deposit and earning operations of different types of banks; inter-bank relations. Present-day monetary and banking problems; relation of banking to business. Federal Reserve System. Business Education 403.

Advertising.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Mr. Landrum

Principles underlying advertising as a marketing force; its economic and social aspects. Policies and objectives; selection, use, and cost of various media. Character and personnel of the advertising organization; advertising campaigns. Displays, preparation of copy, and other practical work as feasible.

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS Mr. McCorkle, Mr. French and Assistants

The department

of

chemistry and physics includes courses

in

chemistry, physics, and science for teachers in the elementary and

secondary schools.


Chemistry and Physics

69

A

major in chemistry requires thirty-six quarter hours of chemA major in physical science requires twenty-four quarter hours istry. of chemistry and twelve quarter hours of physics. Those students who expect to teach general science in the high schools are advised to take twelve quarter hours of biology.

A

first

minor

in

chemistry requires twenty-seven quarter hours of

A

first minor in physical science requires twelve quarter chemistry. hours of chemistry, twelve of physics, and science 210.

A

second minor requires six session hours of chemistry.

Chemistry

131, 132, 133.

General Chemistry.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 2 single and 2 double periods a credits each quarter. Laboratory fee: $3.00 each quarter. Mr.

week; 4

French

A

course for beginners including the history, preparations properties, reactions, and uses of the more important elements and their compounds. The laboratory work of Chemistry 133 is a study of the metals from the viewpoint of qualitative analysis.

Chemistry 200, 201.

Organic Chemistry.

Fall and winter quarters; 2 single and 2 double periods a week; 4 credits each quarter. Prerequisite : Chemistry 133. Laboratory fee: $4.00 each quarter.

Mr. McCorkle

An

elementary study of the chemistry of carbon and

Chemistry 204. fee:

its

compounds.

Physiological Chemistry.

Spring quarter; 2 single and 2 double periods a week; 4 $4.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201.

credits.

Laboratory

Mr. McCorkle

Introduction to Physiological Chemistry.

Chemistry 300, 301, 302.

Quantitative Analysis.

Offered on demand; 4 double periods a week each quarter; 4 credits each Fee: $4.00 each quarter. Mr. McCorkle

quarter.

Applied volumetric and gravimetric analysis. Arranged to suit the needs of the student in so far as the laboratory equipment will permit.

Chemistry 303.

Qualitative Analysis.

Offered on demand; 4 double periods a week; 4 credits.

Fee:

$4.00

Mr. McCorkle

An

advanced course in qualitative

Chemistry 330.

The Teaching

of

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

A

analysis.

High School credits.

Science.

Mr. French

study of the aims, purposes, and methods of teaching secondary school science, laboratory problems, and management.


Departments of Instruction

70

Chemistry 341, 342,

General Chemistry.

343.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 2 single and 2 double periods a zueek; 4 Laboratory fee: $3.00 each quarter. Mr. French credits each quarter.

133,

This course covers the same general topics as Chemistry but is adapted to advanced students. Physics 441, 442, 443.

131,

132,

and

General Physics.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 2 single and 2 double periods a week; 4 Laboratory fee: $4.00 each quarter. Mr. McCorkle credits each quarter.

A

beginners' course in general college Physics.

Household Physics.

Physics 444.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a zveek; 3

credits.

Mr. McCorkle

A

survey course in physics based on the needs of students of Economics with emphasis on the physics of the modern home.

Home

Science for Elementary Teachers Elementary Science.

Science 209.

Fall and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Miss Moran For description see Geography Science 210, 211, 212.

209.

Elementary Science.

Fall and winter quarters, 210 ; winter and spring quarters, 211; spring quarter, 212; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Mr. McCorkle, Mr. French

Selection and organization in typical life-activities of those elements of knowledge, astronomy, chemistry, geology, and physics that supply a background in these fields for teachers in the elementary grades in their use of the new Virginia Course of Study.

scientific

EDUCATION AND PHILOSOPHY Mr. Wynne, Mr. Coyner, Mr. Bell, Mr. Holton, Miss Camper, Mr. Johnson, Miss Grady, and Principals, Supervisors, and Supervising Teachers of the Training Schools

The courses grouped under rected Teaching,

of the Department of Education and Philosophy are

five

heads

:

Education, Philosophy, Psychology, Di-

and Religious Education.


:

::

:

Education and Philosophy

The required

constants in Curricula

71

VI, VII, VIII include:

I, II,

Psychology 261, 262, 263 (Psychology 245, 246, 247 substituted for Psychology 261, 262, 263 in Curriculum VIII for students who do not expect to teach.)

Education 335, 336, 337

(Home Economics 337

in

336, 337 substituted for Education 336,

Curriculum VI.)

(Business Education 337 substituted for Education 337 in

Curriculum VIII.) Philosophy 441, 442, 443

Teaching 400 for students preparing

The

to teach.

required constants in Curriculum III include

Psychology 261, 262, 263 Education 315, 316, 361, 362, 363 Philosophy 441, 442, 443

Teaching 300

The

required constants in Curriculum

IV

include

Psychology 245, 246, 247 Philosophy 421, 422, 423

The

required constants in Curriculum V, C, D, and in Curriculum

VIII for students preparing

to enter the field of business include:

Psychology 245, 246, 247

The

required constants in Curricula

A

and

B

include

Psychology 261, 262 Education 122, 315 (2 Id)

Teaching 200 is made in the Department of Education and Philosophy major and three minors. The major in Philosophy and Psy-

Provision for one

chology consists of the following courses

Psychology 245, 246, 247

Psychology 342, 343, 344 Philosophy 421, 422, 423, or 452, 453, 454 Philosophy 424, 425, 426


::

Departments of Instruction

72

A minor in

Psychology consists of the following courses

Psychology 245, 246, 247 Psychology 342, 343, 344

A

minor

in

Philosophy consists of the following courses

Philosophy 421, 422, 423, or 452, 453, 454 Philosophy 424, 425, 426

who complete the requirements for a degree in CurricuCurriculum II may qualify themselves for teaching in the

Students

lum

or

I

primary grades by taking a minor in elementary education.

minor

in elementary education requires eight session

Such a

hours or twenty-

four quarter hours, which must include some teaching in the elementary grades.

Education Education

A

Techniques of Teaching and Management.

122.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. and Curriculum B.

Required in Curriculum

Miss Camper

Observation in the elementary grades of the training schools. Study of specific problems of teaching and management arising out of observations. Accumulation and organization of teaching materials. Reports and dis-

Education 263.

Child Development.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Camper

credits.

Characteristic traits and stages of development in the nursery school, kindergarten, and primary grades. Emphasis on mental health and the growth of personality in young children. The last quarter of psychology for Home Economic students.

Education 315, mentary School.

316.

The Teaching

of

Reading and Language

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

A

and Curriculum B.

in the Ele-

Required in Curriculum Miss Cogbill

(For description, see the Department of English, English 315, 316, 317.)

Education 335, 336, 337.

Secondary Education.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Required in Curricula I, II, VIII, but Ec. 335, 336, 337 may be substituted in Curriculum VII, or Business Ed. 335, 336, 337 may be substituted in

Home

Curriculum VIII.

Mr. Holton, Mr. Johnson

Historical background of current principles and practices in the secondary schools of the United States with special reference to Virginia. Problems of administration and management in the secondary schools as they are Teaching as a related to the work of the teacher, particularly in Virginia. profession, including professional ethics. Curriculum and method in the secondary school involving unit teaching and the proper use of the Virginia Course of Study. Observation in the training schools. _


Education and Philosophy Education 338.

73

Educational and Vocational Guidance.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Elective for s ophomores

and

Mr. Holton

juniors.

Principles

and practices of educational and vocational guidance.

Oppor-

tunities in different fields of study and vocational occupations. Personal qualifications required in various professions and occupations. Considerations involved in choosing curricula, courses, and vocations. Methods employed in

development of guidance programs. Education 361, 362, 363.

Elementary Education.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters, 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Required in Curriculum III. Miss Camper

Historical background of current principles and practices in the elementary schools of the United States with special reference to Virginia. Problems of administration and management in the elementary schools as they are related to the work of the teacher, particularly in Virginia. Teaching as a profession, including professional ethics. Curriculum and method in the elementary school involving unit teaching and the proper use of the Virginia Course of Study. Observation in the training schools.

Education 377, 378.

Core-Curriculum Seminar.

Offered zvinter and spring quarters; 3 periods a week or the equivalent; 3 Mr. Johnson with Assistance of Other Members of the Faculty

credits.

Analysis of the subject matter listed in the Virginia Courses of Study Core-Curriculum of the high school. Outline of integrating topics involving the social studies, English, science, mathematics, and art for the eight, ninth, and tenth grades. Selection of references appropriate for each topic. Definite preparation for student teaching in the Farmville High School and also for teaching in the Core-Curriculum in the high schools of the State. for the

Education 401.

The

Junior

High School.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Elective for juniors and seniors.

Mr. Holton Essential features of the junior high school in the light of the principles of education. Special emphasis on methods in teaching, the curriculum, and the extra curriculum.

Education 403.

Individual Research.

Every quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. Elective for juniors and seniors. Mr. Wynne, Miss Cogbill, and Supervisors

The

pursuit of

some plan

of study in the field of education or teaching,

approved by the Head of the Department.


Departments of Instruction

74

Philosophy Philosophy 421, 422, 423.

Types

of Philosophic Thought.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Mr. Bell Required in Curriculum IV.

Different philosophic approaches to the nature of the world and man, such as idealism, materialism, realism, and experimentalism. Implications of different points of view for education, religion, government, business and industry.

Philosophy 424, 425, 426.

History of Philosophy.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Elective; required for a major or minor in Philosophy. Mr. Bell

Greek philosophy, with special study of Plato's Republic. Hellenistic, Meand Renaissance philosophy from Bruno to Descartes. Modern philosophy from Descartes, including recent thought as represented by Russell, Royce, Dewey, and Whitehead. dieval,

Philosophy 441, 442, 443.

Philosophy of Education.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a zveek; 3 credits each quarter. Required in Curricula I, II, III, VI, VII, and VIII ; prerequisite for Education Mr. Wynne, Miss Camper, Mr. Bell 335, 336, 337 or the equivalent.

Important modern theories of education as they have developed histheir foundation in science and philosophy; their basis in social economic, political, and educational conditions; their implications for school practice with special reference to curriculum, method, administration, and torically;

supervision.

Philosophy 452, 453, 454. Fall, winter,

Philosophy and Civilization.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Mr.

Elective.

Examination of the more important theories tions, their foundation in science and philosophy, nomic, and political conditions, and their bearing the fields of economics, government, religion, and

Wynne

of modern social institutheir basis in social, ecoupon current problems in education.

Psychology Psychology

245, 246, 247.

General Psychology.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Required in Curricula IV, V, C, D, and for students preparing to enter the field

of business in Curriculum VIII.

Mr. Bell and Mr. Coyner

Principles and methods employed in the field of psychology. First quargeneral nature of human traits and their relation to environmental influences; the physiological basis of behavior, feelings, emotions, motivation, and intelligence. Second quarter: sensory activities and experiences, habit forming, remembering, thinking, and general effects of specific training. Third quarter: the whole human being in action; the factors that make up a well-rounded personality and their development. ter:


Education and Philosophy Psychology

261, 262, 263.

75

Educational Psychology.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Required in Curricula I, II, III, VI, VII, A, B, and for students preparing to teach in Curriculum VIII. Mr. Bell, Mr. Coyner, Mr. Holton Fall, winter,

Growth and function of the conscious processes; growth and development of physical and motor abilities and capacities; laws and principles of learning as applied to practices in the elementary and secondary schools; nature and practical implication of individual differences. Psychology

342.

Applied Psychology.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. Prerequisite : one year in psychology.

Open

to

juniors and seniors.

Mr. Coyner

Applications of the findings of modern experimental psychology to problems in the fields of business and industry, law, medicine, and religion.

Psychology

343.

Psychological Measurements.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a iveek; 3 Prerequisite : one year in psychology.

Common

credits.

Open

to juniors

and

seniors.

Mr. Coyner

and graphical methods of measuring ability and Principles of constructing tests; practical experience in administration and interpretation of the results of tests. statistical

achievement.

Psychology

344.

Modern Psychological

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 Prerequisite:

Theories.

credits.

Open

to juniors

and

seniors.

Mr. Coyner

one year in psychology.

Conflicting attitudes of different schools of psychology with respect to the methods of psychology, the subject matter of psychology, and the interpretation of psychological phenomena as revealed in the thought of leaders in structural psychology, functional psychology, "behaviorism," Gestalt psychology, and psycho-analysis.

Directed Teaching Teaching

200.

Directed Teaching for Sophomores.

Offered every quarter, periods per week varying with conditions. 9 credits for teaching in the Campus Elementary School; 15 credits for teaching in the rural schools. Required in Curricula A and B. Mr. Wynne, Principals, and Supervisors

Teaching under supervision in either the Campus Elementary School or one of the rural training schools. Conferences with supervisors involving consideration of principles and procedures represented in the students' own teaching and management. Choice of schools and grades given students in in

so far as possible.

Teaching

211.

Directed Teaching in the Kindergarten.

Offered every quarter, periods per week varying with conditions ; 3-9 Correspondingly fewer credits required in Teaching 200.

credits.

Miss Haynes and Miss Hutchinson Directed teaching and management under supervision in kindergarten of the Campus Elementary School. Considerable experience in dealing with children of the pre-school age. Conferences with the supervisor involving problems of method and management in the light of accepted principles and procedures.


Departments of Instruction

76

Teaching

300.

Directed Teaching in the Elementary School.

Offered every quarter; 9 or more periods a week, varying with conditions; 9 credits for teaching at Farmville, and 15 credits for teaching at John Randolph. Required in Curriculum III, and of students enrolled in other curricula who are

working for a minor

in elementary education.

Mr. Wynne, Principals, and Supervisors Teaching under supervision in the elementary school at Farmville or in the elementary school at John Randolph. Conferences with supervisors and the Director of Teacher Training, involving a consideration of principles and procedures represented in the students' own teaching. Choice of schools and grades is given students in so far as possible.

Teaching 400.

Directed Teaching in the High School.

Offered every quarter, 9 or more periods a week, varying with conditions: 9 credits for teaching in the Farmville schools, and 15 credits for teaching in the rural training schools. Required in Curricula I, II, VI, VII, and VIII.

Mr. Wynne, Principals, and Supervisors Teaching under supervision in the Farmville schools or in the rural training schools. Conferences with supervisors and the Director of TeacherTraining, involving a consideration of principles and procedures represented in the students' own teaching. Choice of schools and grades given students in so far as possible.

Religious Education Religious

Education

321.

The Old Testament Background

of

the

Church.

Miss Grady

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

History of the Hebrew people, beginning with the call of Abraham and continuing through their slavery in Egypt. Their exodus and conquest of the Promised Land. The times of the judges, the kings. The exile and subsequent return to Jerusalem, and rebuilding of the Temple in 516 B. C. Religious Education 322.

The

Life and

Winter quarter; 3 periods a zveek; 3

The

of Jesus.

Miss Grady

credits.

Fulfillment of past of Christ as revealed in the four Gospels. Implication for the Christian life in the modern world.

life

prophecy.

Religious Education 323.

The Early

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

The beginnings Epistles.

Works

of the Christian Close of the apostolic age.

Religious Education 458.

The

Christian Church.

Miss Grady

credits.

Church.

The Book

of Acts,

Paul's

Religious Experience.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Mr. Johnson

Varieties of religious experience and their psychological conditions. Their influence on the individual. Their ethical and social significance.


English

77

ENGLISH Mr. Grainger, Miss Hiner, Miss W. London, Miss Jennings, Miss Foster, Miss Nichols, Mrs. Martin, Miss Cogbill

The work tion

and

in the English

literature

and

secondary schools.

Department includes courses

in teaching the

The courses

in

composi-

language in the elementary and

in composition give practical training

in the effective use of the usual forms of oral and written discourse,

especially with reference to the needs of teachers.

The

courses in

lit-

erature increase the student's knowledge, appreciation, and enjoyment

of good reading for the worthy use of leisure and as an influence in the growth of character and personality. Preparation for teaching is given by courses in literature for children and in methods of teaching

The attempt

English.

is

made

constantly to suit the

work

to the im-

mediate needs and possibilities of the students and to their prospective needs in teaching.

work with

The English Department

the active co-operation of

English in

seeks to co-ordinate

that of the other departments in the College

all classes.

all

Many

and

its

to secure

instructors in maintaining the use of

good

student activities also furnish motivation

for the study of English.

A

major

in English requires the following courses:

102, 205, 231, 232, 233, three English courses chosen

numbers 405 or

A

equivalent,

first

minor, the

from those with

hundreds and four hundreds, English 338, English

in the three

its

English 101,

and

either English 441, 442, or 433.

minor requires the

first

nine in the above

list,

a second

first six.

English 101, 102.

Composition and Grammar.

Fall and winter quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Required

in all curricula.

Freshman composition. and write

effectively

work to enable the students to talk Spoken English more emphasized in the winter. A review of English grammar

Practical

and acceptably.

the fall term, written English in Parallel reading with bi-weekly refor corrective and teaching purposes. ports. Additional individual instruction in elementary English for freshmen

who need

it.

English 103.

Literature.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

A

credits.

Not

offered in 1940-41.

general introduction to literature with intensive study of typical masand with a view to future reading. Supplementary composition as needed and as a creative activity.

terpieces


Departments of Instruction

78

English 204.

Business English.

Fall and winter quarters;, 3 periods a zveek; 3 credits. Required in Curriculum VIII. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. No credit if English 205 or 228 has been taken.

Practical

work

English 205.

and written English adapted to the needs of freshthe kinds of speaking and writing used in business.

in oral

men and emphasizing

Composition and Grammar.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a zveek; 3 credits. Required in except HI and VIII. Prerequisite: English 101 and 102.

No

curricula

credit if English 204 or 228 has been taken.

The 101

all

third term of required composition continuing the work of English in a more advanced way. Opportunity for creative writing.

and 102

English 228.

Composition and Grammar.

Winter and spring quarters; 3 periods a zveek; 3 credits. Required in Curriculum III. Prerequisite : English 101 and 102. No credit if English 204 or 205

Miss Hiner

has been taken.

Oral and written composition based on the study of the principles underlying the teaching of grammar and language work in the grades. English 231, 232, 233.

English and American Literature.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 Required for a major or a minor in English.

credits each quarter.

A rapid survey of British and American Literature. chosen authors and masterpieces.

Intensive study of

Fall, winter,

English 231, English 232,

From the beginnings to the formation of the United The Romantic Movement in English and American

States.

Litera-

ture.

English 233,

The

Victorian and later writers.

English 315, 316, 317.

Language Arts

in the

Elementary School.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Miss Cogbill, Miss Hiner, Miss Foster Required in Curriculum III.

A consideration of an adequate program in the language arts in the elementary school with special attention to such topics as readiness for reading and written expression, beginnings in language and reading, oral and written expression both creative and interpretative, the mechanics of writing and reading, the development of language skills in relation to needs, reading for study in both the text and reference materials, the cultivation of appreciation and good taste through a study of children's literature, suitable materials, recent studies in the field, diagnostic and remedial work. Directed observation.

English 315, 316. Teaching of Language Arts. English 317, Children's Literature.

English 321, 322, 323.

American Writers.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. The most representative authors by sections. English 321, The South, Miss Jennings. English 322, The North, Miss London. English 323, The West, Miss Nichols.

Fall, winter,


English

79

English in Secondary Schools.

English 338.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a week, 3 credits. Required for a major in English in Currictda I and II. Prerequisite : two years of college English.

Miss London Definite preparation for teaching English in secondary schools, with particular reference to the activities in language arts proposed in the Virginia Curriculum for Secondary Schools.

English 341, 342, 343. Fall, winter,

The Novel.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Miss Foster

Reading and study of representative English and American novels with English 341, one novel each by a survey of the development of the type. Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Hardy, with others to illustrate the history of the novel; English 342, American fiction; English 343, recent fiction in English. English 344, 345.

Literary Types.

Winter and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

credits each quarter.

Miss Hiner Study of the principal types of

literature.

English 344, types of poetry;

English 345, types of prose.

English 347, 348.

Shakespeare.

Winter and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

credits each quarter.

Mr. Grainger

Ten

plays selected for study, others for reading. Shakespeare's life and the criticism of his works. English 347, tragedies; English 348, comedies.

English 351, 352.

The Short

Story.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

English 351 not

Miss Jennings

offered in 1940-41.

English 351, the American short story with emphasis on the development of the type; English 352, short stories from Great Britain and other countries, with emphasis upon the work of Stevenson and Kipling.

English 355.

Tennyson.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Jennings

credits.

Reading and study of the principal poems and of the English 356.

life

of Tennyson.

School Journalism.

Fall quarter, 3 periods a week; 3 credits. Prerequisite: English 204, 205, or 228. Open to Third and Fourth Year students and to qualified Second Year students. Required in Curriculum VIII.

Practice in writing for school and other publications. The study of representative national and local papers and the workings and influence of the periodical press in relation to the modern mind.

English 357, 358.

Modern

Poetry.

periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Prerequisite: English 101, 102, and 103 or 133. English 357 not offered in 1940-41. Fall

quarter;

3

Miss Jennings in contemporary 358, British.

Studies

English

poetry in

English.

English

357,

American:


Departments of Instruction

80

Senior Composition and

English 405.

Grammar.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. Required in the last year of Curriculum III, and for a major in English in Curricula I, II, IV, and V.

Final course in composition and grammar.

English 441, 442, 443. Spring,

The English Language.

winter quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

fall,

Mr. Grainger

A

study of the development of the English language. English 441, 442, Chaucer and Middle English; English 443, Introduction to Old English.

Modern English; English

English 444, 445.

The

Essay.

Winter and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

credits each quarter.

Miss Foster Reading and study of English 447, 448.

classic

and contemporary essays.

Biblical Literature.

Fall and winter quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Mr. Grainger

The reading from Moulton's Modern Reader's

Bible, of selected books as of their central meanings and their reRecognition of the principal literary types found in the Bible and the general character of biblical poetry and prose. English 447, Old Testament; English 448, Testament. literary wholes lation to living.

and the interpretation

New

English 454.

B

Advanced Writing.

Given upon demand; 3 periods a week; 3 on English 205, or the equivalent.

credits.

Prerequisite:

a grade of

Mr. Grainger

Practice in writing under supervision; for students showing interest and

some

ability.

English 455.

Browning.

Miss Hiner

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Reading and study of the principal poems and of the English 460.

life

of Browning.

Honors. Course in English.

and spring quarters of the senior year; equivalent

to an average of one period a week throughout the year; 3 credits for the year; degree awarded "With Honors in English." Open to students with a major in English, who, at the end of the second quarter of their junior year, have attained an average of B or above in English and of C or above in their total work. Mr. Grainger, Chairman of Committee

Fall, winter,

Individual study, research, or creative writing, under the guidance of a committee of the English Faculty, in a field chosen by the student with the approval of the Head of the Department. Frequent regular conferences with the Committee. Monthly reports of progress. Final paper and oral examination.


Fine and Applied Arts

81

FINE AND APPLIED ARTS Miss Coulling, Miss Craddock, Miss Bedford

The department

of fine and applied arts includes courses in fine and writing. Under the head of art are listed the courses including fine arts and industrial arts, and under the head of writing are listed the courses including remedial work and the teaching of writing. The contents and procedure employed in these courses arts, industrial arts,

are selected with reference to the special needs of teachers in the ele-

mentary and secondary schools.

A major requires:

Art 131,

132, 133, 201, 202, 246, 310, 345, 346,

347, 348, 342 or 443.

A

first

minor requires: Art 131, 132,

133, 201, 246, 310, 347, 348,

and 443.

A

second minor requires eighteen hours in

Fine and Applied Arts 110.

art.

Elementary Art Education.

Fall quarter; 5 periods a week; 3 credits.

Fee:

$0.50.

Miss Coulling, Miss Bedford Principles of color

and

applications.

Use and demonstration

of art

me-

diums, creative design, lettering, poster making, and crafts related to the interests and abilities of the kindergarten and elementary grades. Related art appreciation.

Fine and Applied Arts 210.

Elementary Art Education.

Winter quarter; 5 periods a zveek; 3

credits.

Fee:

$0.50.

Miss Coulling, Miss Bedford Landscape, nature, figure, and animal drawing, principles of perspective, creative composition, and clay modelling. Emphasis on simplified methods of drawing for elementary teachers. Related art appreciation.

Fine and Applied Arts 310.

Elementary Art Education.

Spring quarter; 5 periods a zveek; 3

credits.

Fee:

$0.50.

Miss Coulling, Miss Bedford Constructive activities related to social studies, geography, history, and and functionally integrated in the elementary curriculum. Matemethods developed for use with different grades. Related art

literature, rials and

appreciation.

Fine and Applied Arts 131,

132, 133.

General Art Structure.

and spring quarters; 5 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Miss Coulling, Miss Bedford Fee: $0.50 each quarter. Fall, winter,

Principles of design and Color theory and application to harmonies. composition in functional creative problems applied to textiles, costume, room Functional interiors, clay modeling and pottery, and flower arrangements. Lettering for form, skill and use in decoracrafts for home and school use. Principles of perspective drawing in line and tive and commercial design. form. Creative landscape composition in various mediums and techniques.


Departments of Instruction

82

Fine and Applied Arts 201.

Charcoal Drawing.

Art 131, Miss Coulling

Fall quarter; 3 double periods a week; 3 credits. 132.

Fee:

Prerequisite:

$1.00.

Fine and Applied Art 202.

Clay Modeling and Pottery.

Winter quarter; 3 credits; 3 double periods a week.

Fee:

$1.00.

Miss Coulling Fine and Applied Arts 242.

Art Appreciation.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Fee:

$0.50.

Miss Coulling

A

survey course of fine and practical arts to develop appreciation and give a basis for good judgment.

Fine and Applied Arts 246.

Crafts.

Open to any Miss Bedford

Offered every quarter; 3 double periods a week; 3 credits. student.

Fee:

$2.50.

Emphasis on skill and creative beauty in hand crafts. Use of materials and tools as vocational recreation; weaving, wood decoration, block printing, and stenciling of cloth, appliqued and tooled metal, leather tooling and lacing, cardboard construction, and book binding. Fine and Applied Arts 247.

Advanced

Crafts.

Offered every quarter; 3 double periods a week; 3 credits. Prerequisite:

Art

Fee:

$0.50.

Miss Bedford

246.

Special creative problems in advanced crafts with emphasis on originaland beauty. Metal work and jewelry.

ity, skill,

Fine and Applied Arts 342.

Art Appreciation.

Winter and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Coulling

This course covers the same general topics as Art 242 but advanced students.

Fine and Applied Arts 345.

is

adapted to

Blackboard Sketching.

Spring quarter; 3 double periods a week; 3 Fee: To cover expenses.

credits.

or equivalent.

Art 132 Miss Coulling

Prerequisite:

Course given with special reference to value for illustrative purposes for elementary grade teachers. Fine and Applied Arts 346.

Color and Design.

Fall quarter; 3 double periods a week; 3 credits. 201.

Fee:

$1.00.

Prerequisite:

Art

131,

and

Miss Bedford

Color in theory and practice applied to pure design and composition. Creative problems using various mediums and materials. Critical analysis of color and composition.


Geography Fine and Applied Arts 347.

83

Lettering and Poster Design.

Winter quarter; 3 double periods a week; 3

credits.

Fee:

$1.00.

Miss Bedford Lettering for spacing, form, and advertising design.

Fine and Applied Arts 348.

as related to general poster

skill

and

Figure Drawing and Composition.

Spring quarter; 3 double periods a week; 3

credits.

Fee:

$1.00.

Miss Bedford Figure drawing in various mediums working for proportion and unity. Compositions related to illustration and poster design.

Fine and Applied Arts 403.

Drawing and Composition.

Spring quarter; 3 double periods a week; 3

credits.

Fee:

$1.00.

Miss Bedford

Drawing and composition in various mediums with emphasis on work and techniques of painting in water color. Fine and Appplied Arts 443.

creative

Art Appreciation.

Miss Coulling

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

History and appreciation of painting from the Renaissance to the present.

Writing

101.

Remedial Handwriting.

Offered every quarter; 2 periods a week; 1 credit. Required of all students preparing to teach in the elementary grades. Those who have attained a standard of proficiency of 80 on the Ayres scale may be excused from Writing 101.

Miss Craddock Definite instruction in diagnosing individual difficulties and in remedial work in order to secure a legible product with a minimum expenditure of time and energy.

Writing

102.

The Teaching

of Handwriting.

Offered every quarter; 2 periods a week; 2 credits. preparing to teach in the elementary grades.

Required of

all

students

Miss Craddock

The development

of modern handwriting, including psychology, philosoindividual differences. Progressive improvement through self-evaluation. Recognition of individuality. Consideration of means of maintaining standards in all written work. Attention directed to the abilities listed in the Virginia Tentative Course of Study as a basis of checking results.

phy and

GEOGRAPHY Miss Moran, Miss Waters

The

subject matter of geography includes materials

natural and the social science

fields.

from both the

Since major emphasis

is

placed


Departments of Instruction

84

upon the

life

in geography

A

first

of people as

may

minor

Geography 131,

A

it

is

related to natural environment, courses

be counted as credits in social science. in this

121,

department requires nine courses, including

and 331.

second minor requires six courses.

Geography

112.

Geography

of

Type Environments.

Fall and winter quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Miss Moran

Life of people in regions of varied types; natural environmental factors that help determine human activities as exemplified in the Belgian Congo, the Sahara Desert, Mediterranean Lands, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and the extreme northern lands.

Geography

113.

Social Studies.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Moran

Unit work in social studies, dealing with food, clothing, and shelter, emphasizing geographic factors in their production; means of transportation and communication. Subject matter organized for unit teaching, as suggested in the Virginia Tentative Course of Study.

Geography

121.

Principles of Geography.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Miss Waters

The fundamental principles underlying climate and weather; the chief types of climate, their characteristics, causes, and distribution. Principles developed through study of activities in varied regions which best illustrate man's adjustment to his natural environment. Works of United States Weather Bureau studied through current weather maps as well as textbook explanations. Geography

122.

Geography

of the Americas.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Waters

Economic and commercial activities of man in the major regions of North and South America, as modified by natural environment. Special emphasis upon natural regions of Virginia. Subject matter presented with idea of giving a definite background of knowledge for teaching in the upper elementary grades. Texts of college grade required, but efforts made to familiarize students with basal and supplemental texts and materials needed in teaching.

Geography

123.

Geography

of the Eastern Hemisphere.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Waters

Geographic interpretation of the economic and commercial activities of in the eastern hemisphere; emphasis upon British Commonwealth of Nations, Northwestern Europe, the Mediterranean Lands, China, and Japan. Point of view similar to that in Geography 122. Suggestions for organization of subject matter for unit teaching.

man


Geography Geography

131.

Geography

85

of the Lands.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Waters

credits.

The

earth's surface features, their origin, and the agencies which modify them; relationships between cultural and natural landscapes, as they reflect the importance of physiographic conditions in man's activities. The more common rocks and minerals. Rocks and surface features of the present as they reveal some of the interesting geologic changes of the past.

Geography

203.

Economic Geography.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a zveek; 3 credits.

Miss Waters, Miss Moran and conservation of natural resources; the The importance of inventions and discoveries in their exploitation and conservation; the geographic factors that have aided in the location and growth of industrial regions, trade centers, and trade routes, and in the growth of great distribution, development,

nations.

Science 209.

Science for Teachers in the Elementary Grades.

Miss Moran

Fall and spring quarters; 3 periods a zveek; 3 credits.

Selection and organization from the fields of botany and zoology of materials that supply a background for teachers in the elementary grades. Group and individual work in field, library, and laboratory. Practice in writing units related to aspects of the centers of interest suggested in the Virginia Tentative Course of Study.

Geography and

231, 232, 233.

Geography

of South America; Europe; Asia

Africa.

Spring,

fall,

and winter quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

credits each quarter.

Miss Waters

A

geographic interpretation of economic and social conditions in the various countries, with emphasis upon those natural factors which have apTrade relations and their geoparently aided or hindered development. graphic bases. Colonies and mandatories, and the problems encountered in attempts to develop them. Current news related to studies. Geography 231, South America; Geography 232, Europe; Geography 233, Asia and Africa.

Geography

331.

Problems

in the

Teaching of Geography.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Moran

Objectives in the teaching of geography; means of realizing the objectives; selection and organization of units of work, employing the many types of activities suggested in the Virginia Tentative Course of Study.

Geography

341.

Historical

Geography of the Americas.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

A

credits.

Miss Moran

brief survey of early European commerce and trade routes as influenced by geography; conditions leading to the discovery of America; how each permanent settlement on the continent became adjusted to environmental conditions; expansion from Atlantic seaboard to Mississippi River; problems of transportation leading to purchase of Louisiana Territory and expansion beyond the Rockies; problems of slavery resulting from this expansion and leading to Civil War; and a study of vast resources leading to development of the United States into a world power.


Departments of Instruction

86 Geography

342.

Geography of the

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Bible.

Miss Waters

credits.

Palestine and neighboring districts; importance of geographic conditions Especial emphasis upon regional contrasts within Palestine. Present-day conditions compared with those of Bible times.

in their history.

Geography

343.

Geography of

Virginia.

Miss Waters

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

An

intensive study of the natural regions of Virginia, noting apparent relationships between types of agricultural and industrial activity and condiEmphasis upon possibilities for greater detions of natural environment. velopment in future. Suggestions for unit studies organized around centers of interest listed in Virginia Tentative Course of Study.

Geography

344.

Conservation of Natural Resources.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Waters

credits.

Accomplishments and objectives of the conservation movement in the United States; soil erosion and other problems involved in the utilization of agricultural and grazing lands; reforestation of submarginal farm lands; value of reforestation to Virginia; reclamation of swamp land and arid lands; inland waterways and their use; conservation of water power and mineral resources; wild

life;

planning as a phase of conservation.

Geography

441, 442, 443.

Geography

of Current Problems.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Fall, winter,

Miss Moran

Major problems discovered from current periodicals. Intensive study of those problems that seem most vital and interesting. College texts and other library sources used in discussing these questions: To what extent are geoWill graphic conditions responsible for the existence of these problems? their solution be influenced by geography? Geography 441, Current Problems of the Americas; Geography 442, Current Problems of Europe; Geography 443, Current Problems of Asia.

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES Mr. Walmsley, Miss Tucker, Miss Stubbs, Mr. Sim kins, Miss Peck

The work

of this department, as at present organized, includes the

classes in History

and

in three of

the Social Sciences

:

Economics,

Government, and Sociology. In History, a major requires:

History 131, 132, 133, 234, 235,

236, 347, 348, 349, 450, 453, and Social Science 335.

A

requires eight courses in History and Social Science 335.

minor, six courses in History.

first

A

minor second


History and Social Sciences

A

major

87

in Social Science requires Social Science 335,

and eleven

courses in Social Science so chosen as to include three in Economics, three in Sociology, and

two

in

A

Government.

first

minor requires

eight courses in three social sciences and Social Science 335

;

a second

two Social Sciences including Social Science 335. Students preparing to enter social welfare work should take at least thirty credits in Sociology and Social Psychology, twelve credits minor

six courses in

in Biology,

and nine credits

in

Economics.

History History of Western Civilization.

History 131, 132, 133. Fall, winter,

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Miss Peck, Mr. Simkins

The background,

social

and economic, of modern

life

as

it

has grown

from primitive times. History 234.

Contemporary European History. Miss Tucker, Mr. Simkins

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Liberalism and imperialism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, liances,

World War, and

History 235, 236.

al-

reconstruction.

Early American History.

Winter and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

credits each quarter.

Miss Tucker, Mr. Simkins

The economic and the end of

its

social background of sectional struggles of the 60's.

History 347, 348.

America from Colonial days

to

Later American History.

Fall and winter quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Mr. Simkins, Miss Tucker, Mr. Walmsley History 347, the United States from the Civil tury; History 348, the

History 349.

New

World

War

to the twentieth cen-

Freedom, the World War, and the

New

Deal.

Politics.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Mr. Simkins, Miss Tucker, Mr. Walmsley

The relation of the United World Organization. History 350, 351, 352. Fall, winter,

A

States to the problems of Imperialism and

Current History.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Mr. Walmsley

study of the collection and editing of news, the study and interpretation of newspapers and magazines, the evaluation of history as it happens.


Departments of Instruction Advanced Virginia History.

History 443.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

A

detailed study of

two or three

Mr. Walmsley

credits.

political crises in Virginia history.

Latin-American History.

History 447, 448.

Fall and winter quarters; 3 periods a

week; 3

credits each quarter.

Mr. Simkins History 447, the exploration, colonization, and early history of Latin America; History 448, the national periods of the Latin American states including their relations with Europe and the United States.

The Growth

History 450.

of the British Empire.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

The growth

Mr. Walmsley

credits.

of the British colonies and empire into the British its present problems.

Common-

wealth of Nations and 1

History 453.

Southern History.

Fall and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Mr. Walmsley, Mr. Simkins

The geographic and and the educational

social forces that

rise of

the

New

made

the Old South, the economics

South.

Seminar in History.

History 470.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Mr. Walmsley

credits.

A

research class in problems of Southern History. The class is limited to ten students ranking highest in grades and showing evidence of ability to do research work, with preference given to those who have had one class in

Southern History.

Social Science Social Science 335.

The Meaning

of the Social Sciences.

Fall and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. major and minors in History and in Social Science.

The

place of the Social Sciences in a democratic

Required for

program

all

Mr. Walmsley of education.

ECONOMICS Economics Fall, winter,

201.

Elementary Economics.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

The elements

credits.

of production, exchange, distribution, they affect the daily life of citizens.

Economics

460, 461.

Miss Tucker

and consumption

as

Economic History.

Winter and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

credits each quarter.

Mr. Simkins

The

historical background of economic movements and forces; the story of industrial revolution, transportation, currency and banking problems, labor

and

capital.

(460 in Europe, 461 in America.)


History and Social Sciences Economics

462, 463, 464.

Fall, winter,

89

Economic Principles and Problems.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Mr. Walmsley

The principles of economic theory and the basis of the economic problems of modern society.

GOVERNMENT Government Fall, winter,

333, 457, 461.

Governmental Principles.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Mr. Walmsley, Mr. Simkins

The study

of democratic principles as extended to national problems, given in 333, is carried over into 457 in a study of principles underlying state government with especial reference to Virginia conditions and problems, and is continued in 461 in a study of the principles and operation of the major European government against a background of American practice.

Government Fall, zvinter,

442, 444, 458.

Governmental Problems.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Mr. Walmsley

Government 442 (Practical Politics) is a study of the principles, organization, and actual working of political parties in the United States; Government 444 (International Relations) is a study of international trade and porivalry with research into present steps toward world peace; Governis the selection of national and international ploblems for critical study in class debates and public speeches.

litical

ment 458 (Debate)

SOCIOLOGY Sociology 201.

Introduction to Sociology.

Fall and winter quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Miss Stubbs

A

consistent and integrated presentation of sociological theory; with concrete illustrative material; a study of human behavior and social life with its two-fold task; a description of human personality and of social organization.

Sociology 202.

Community Organization.

Winter and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Stubbs

A

continuation of Sociology 201 with emphasis the last of the quarter upon a practical study of typical community organizations in Virginia, such as Community Leagues, Junior Leagues, Boy Scouts, 4-H Clubs, and Woman's Clubs.

Sociology 301.

Social Progress.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a zveek; 3

credits.

Miss Stubbs

A

study of the significance and meaning of other studies in their relations to the culture pattern as a whole; the awakening of the fascination of research in fields of potential interests.

Sociology 302, 303.

Social Psychology.

Winter and spring quarters of odd years; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Stubbs

A

study of the processes of intersocial stimulation and their products in

the form of social attitudes and values, status, personality, and leadership.


Departments of Instruction

90

Sociology 343. The Family and Personality. Spring quarter of odd years; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Tucker

Interpretation of human behavior, case studies, family life, and personality development, interaction of parent and child in unstable homes.

Sociology 344.

Contemporary Social Movements.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Tucker

credits.

Revolution, nationalism, race consciousness, distinctive contributions of Eastern and Western Civilizations cosmopolitanism.

Sociology 400.

Social Change.

Miss Stubbs

Fall quarter ; 3 periods a week, 3 credits.

A

study of current social problems in a changing world with emphasis

on American problems. Sociology 401.

The Negro.

Spring quarter ; 3 periods; 3

Miss Stubbs

credits.

A

study of the American Negro and race relations ticular reference to the South; lectures and field studies. Sociology 402.

problems with par-

Population Problems.

Spring quarter; 3 periods; 3

Miss Stubbs

credits.

A

study of the quantitative and qualitative aspects of population as a primary agency of social change. Sociology 404.

Child Welfare.

Miss Stubbs

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

A

constructive study of child welfare from the standpoint of the teacherschool situation; studies and observations made locally and in city centers with the cooperation of the Virginia Public Welfare Department. Lectures

and

clinics.

Sociology 405.

Urban

Sociology.

Winter quarter of even years; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Stubbs

A

study of the process of urban growth with its complex social organization and the problem of adjustments, with emphasis on the recently and rapidly developed forces and tendencies; the interdependence of rural and urban elements, consideration of future national policies for rural America.

Sociology 406.

Rural Sociology.

Spring quarter of even years; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Stubbs

A study of rural society, its organization and changes, from the point of view of important backgrounds, recent developments, and significant trends, with emphasis on the recently and rapidly developed forces and tendencies; the interdependence of rural and urban elements, consideration of future national policies for rural America.


Home Economics Sociology 443 or 444.

91

Social Problems.

Winter quarter, even years; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Tucker

credits.

Sociology 443: Virginia's social problems and the process of solution. Sociology 444:

A

national problem, evaluation of plans and progess in

solution.

Sociology 445.

Character Adjustment.

Spring quarter, even years; 3 periods; 3

Miss Tucker

credits.

The

negative approach to character development, criminal personality, attitudes, causes, treatment, effects, teacher's work in prevention, police schools.

HOME ECONOMICS Miss Tupper, Miss Jeter, Miss Houck, Miss Bolick

The general aims home economics

of this department are to prepare students to in the public schools, to give training

teach

and ex-

perience in the scientific administration of the home, and to qualify

These aims arise from the fact that the College has been selected by the State Board of Education for the education of home economics teachers for the junior and senior high schools of the State. The courses outlined in Curriculum VI (see page students to

become

dietitians.

56) meet the standards set by the State Board of Education and the

The

Federal Authorities.

students enrolled in this curriculum are

under the general guidance of

The department important respects

;

of

this

department.

home economics has expanded

its

facilities in

this fact necessitates increasing the teaching staff.

now has an excellent practice division in the Science Building and a new practice house together with the necessary equipment to provide actual experience in laboratory work and home management. ArrangeIt

ment with Farmville schools, as well provide ample facilities for student

as with the rural training schools,

teaching.

The Campus nursery

school affords for students excellent experience in child guidance and

development work.

The

courses in Curriculum

work

are so arranged that the students

istry

and for positions

may

VI and

the practical

qualify for teaching chem-

in dietetics as well as for teaching

home

eco-

nomics.

A major in home economics requires the following courses Home Economics 100, 101, 102, 201, 202, 203, 204, 300, 301, 307, 309, 312, 313, 314, 316, 336, 337, 401, 403, 406, 411. There is no minor in this :

department.


Departments of Instruction

92

All laboratory fees

must be paid

at the Treasurer's office before

registering for classes.

Students planning to be dietitians should take

Home

Economics

404, 405, 450, 451 in place of electives.

Home

Economics

Grammar Grade

Home

110, 210, 310.

Economics

in

Elementary and

Teachers.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Required in Curriculum III. Miss Tupper and Miss Jeter

Problems of the individual and society as centered in home life. Standard of home living and values of personal and social development for the individual as a member of society and of the family. First quarter: aspects of the home life of the child from the kindergarten through the second grade. Second quarter: features of the broadening home life interests and activities of the child from the third through the fifth grades. Third quarter: aspects of the home life of the early adolescent child through the sixth and seventh grades.

Home

Economics

100.

Clothing Design and Textiles.

Fall quarter; 2 double and 1 single periods a week; 3 credits. first

and second

Elective in

Miss Tupper

years.

Principles of clothing construction with practice problems including designing, fitting, and making clothing wth related art and textiles.

Home

Economics

101, 102.

Foods and Cookery.

Winter and spring quarters; 2 double and 1 single periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Elective for first and second year students. Laboratory fee: $2.00

Miss Jeter

each quarter.

application of scientific principles to food preparation. The composiproduction and cost of foods. Food preservation. Meal planning, preparing, and serving.

The

tion, sources,

Home

Economics

201.

Nutrition.

Fall quarter; 1 single and 2 double periods a week; 3 credits. second year students. Laboratory fee: $1.00.

Elective for

Miss Jeter

and their relation to health. The fundamental Planned for physical education majors and minors as well as home economic principles

of

nutrition

majors.

Home

Economics

202.

Costume Design and Historic Costume.

Winter quarter; 2 double and 1 single periods a week; 3 Prerequisite : Art 131. first and second years.

credits.

Elective in

Miss Tupper

Individual Line, color, pattern, and texture in clothing design. in care of clothing, bugeting, corrective dress design, and grooming.

Home

Economics

203.

Dress Design and Tailoring.

Spring quarter; 2 double and 1 single periods a week; 3 second and third year students. Practical application, stressing cutting

proached from standpoint of home sewing,

made

clothing.

problems

Open to Miss Tupper

credits.

and manipulation of fabrics. Aptailoring, and purchase of ready-


Home Economics Home

Economics

204.

Fundamental Problems

93

in Clothing Construction.

Winter quarter; 2 double and 1 single periods a week; 3 second and third year students.

Problems involving techniques and designs.

Home

Economics

300, 301.

in

Open to Miss Tupper

credits.

handling different types of materials

House Planning and Furnishing.

Winter and spring quarters; 1 double and 2 single periods a week; 3 credits Open to third and fourth year students. Miss Tupper

each quarter.

The house, its construction, furnishing, decoration, and care. The structural and decorative design of the house and its furnishings. Elective either quarter.

Home

Economics

307.

Home Management.

Spring quarter; 1 double and 2 single periods a zveek; 3 third and fourth year students.

Elective for

credits.

Miss Houck

The optimal development of individual members and the family group within the home through planning, guiding, and directing human and material

resources.

Home

Economics

309.

Home

and Field Projects.

Spring quarter; 3 double periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Tupper and Miss Jeter Special home and community problems developed for improvement of family life. Opportunity is afforded through practice for adapting methods and work to specific family situations.

home and

Home

Economics

312.

The Economics

of Consumption.

Fall quarter; 3 single periods a week; 3 fourth years.

credits.

Elective

in

third

and

Miss Tupper

Problems of identifying, comparing, and establishing standards for buySources of information investigated and evaluated in terms of consumer buying problems and habits.

ing household textiles.

Home

Economics

313.

Food Purchasing

for the

Home.

Winter quarter; 1 double and 2 single periods a week; 3

credits.

Fee: $3.00. Miss Jeter

Problems confronting the family when purchasing foods. Sources of information. Laws affecting the consumer. Labeling, grading, and standardization of foods.

Home

Economics

314.

The Family

in Society.

Winter quarter; 3 single periods a week; 3 credits. fourth year students.

and Miss Houck

Elective for third

Modern problems in the social relations of the family, with special env phasis on education for family life.


Departments of Instruction

94

Home

Economics

315.

Child Development and Guidance.

Fall quarter; 3 single periods a week; 3 fourth year students.

credits.

Elective for

third

and

Miss Jeter

Various aspects of the mental, social, and emotional development of Environmental factors affecting behavior and growth. Methods of guidance. Observation and participation. children.

Home Economics

316.

Lunch Room Management.

Spring quarter; 2 double and 1 single periods a week; 3 and fourth year students. Fee: $4.00.

credits.

Elective for

Miss Jeter

third

The

organization, equipping, and managing of school lunch rooms in various types of schools and communities. Large quantity cookery with practice in the local school lunch room and cafeteria. Visits to city and rural schools providing school lunches.

Home

Economics

336, 337.

Home

Economics Education.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Required in Curriculum VI. Miss Houck Aided by Members of Other Departments

Principles and aims of education in their application to home economics education in Virginia; formulation, elaboration, and use of general principles of education; planning and evaluation of instruction; marking and reporting pupil progress; professional organizations and relations; analysis of conditions of the home and family life in Virginia involved in the development of the vocational program in home making; critical examination of theories and practices of curriculum making in home economics; analysis of research related to curriculum making and teaching in the field of home economics; and relations of home economic education to the activities of out-of-school youth, adult education, and community programs.

Home

Economics

401.

The Teaching

of

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. students majoring in home economics.

Home

Economics.

Required

in

the fourth year of

Miss Houck

Theories and practices of home economics curriculum construction evaluated in terms of research in this field and present-day courses of study. Units of work organized in relation to consumer's needs in food, clothing, textiles, and housing, and the problems involved in teaching them translated in terms of aims, management, laboratory planning, use of materials and equipment, including reference books.

Home

Economics

403, 404.

Nutrition and Dietetics.

Winter and spring quarters; 2 double and Prerequisites: Home Economics 101, 102, 201.

1 single periods a

week; 3

credits.

Fee: $2.00 each quarter.

Miss Jeter of foods. The fundamental principles of human nuand the application of these principles to the feeding of individuals and families under varying physiological, economic, and social conditions. Second

The chemical nature

trition

quarter planned for students entering the

field of dietetics.


Latin

Home

Economics

405.

95

Experimental Cookery.

Fall quarter; 2 double and 1 single periods a week; 3 credits.

Home

Economics

Experimental work their preparation.

Home

Fee:

101, 102, 201, 313.

Prerequisites:

Miss Jeter

$4.00.

and individual problems relating to foods and Discussions, reports, and demonstrations.

Economics

in class

406.

Clothing Problems of the Family.

Fall quarter; 2 double and 1 single periods a week; 3 credits.

and fourth year students.

Open to third Miss Tupper

The psychological, sociological, and economic aspects of clothing the family, with related problems in clothing children of different age levels and using frequently discarded sources of materials.

Home Economics

411.

Home Management

Offered every quarter; 4 credits.

Required of

Residence. all

home economics students. Miss Houck

Students live together for one quarter in family-sized groups in a house for correlating theory with practice in all

where opportunity is provided phases of home management.

Home

Economics

450, 451.

Institutional

Management.

Fall and winter quarters; 2 double and 1 single periods a week; 3 credits.

Miss Jeter

An

opportunity for the students to observe and assist in planning, buyand serving food in large quantities in the college tea rooms

ing, preparing,

and kitchen.

LATIN Miss Rice

The work

of this department

is

planned primarily to prepare

teachers of Latin for the high schools of the State.

B. A. and B. S. major, 36 hours. First minor, 27 hours.

Second minor, 18 hours. Prerequisite to choosing a major or a minor in this department:

Three units of Latin. Latin 101, 102, 103.

Rush

Latin.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 5 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter; Miss Rice without major or minor credit.

A

rapid survey of forms and syntax, illustrated by short passages from representative authors; a more detailed study of certain masterpieces.


Departments of Instruction

96

Virgil's Aeneid,

Latin 141.

I, II.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Miss Rice

Roman mythology and

religion; the Augustan Age; life of Virgil and the upon his poetic genius and literary art; epic poetry;

effect of environment hexameter verse; grammar and composition.

Latin 142.

Virgil's Aeneid,

IV, VI.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Rice

credits.

The

structure of the Aeneid as a masterpiece of design and execution; Virgil's influence on past and present; grammar and composition.

Latin 143.

Virgil's Aeneid,

VII-XII.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

The

Miss Rice

credits.

Interpreter of Life for All Time.

Latin 241.

Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Miss Rice

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Mythology; scansion; derivation of words; grammar and composition. Latin 242.

'Horace and Catullus.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Rice

credits.

Latin lyrics and their influence upon modern writers; scansion;

grammar

and composition. Latin 243.

Roman Comedy.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Latin 341.

Miss Rice

credits.

Captivi from Plautus; Adelphoe from Terence. Greek and Roman comedy; the staging of plays.

The

origin and history of

Intensive Study of Cicero's Orations.

Miss Rice

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Brief history of the last century of the republic; personality and career of Cicero; comparison between Caesar and Cicero; typical structure of a Roman oration; practice in sight-reading; derivation of words; grammar and composition.

Latin 342.

Livy's

Roman

History.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 Parts of Books

I,

Miss Rice

credits.

XXI, and XXII; grammar and

composition.


Mathematics The Teaching

Latin 343.

97

of Latin.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a zveek; 3

Miss Rice

credits.

The

present high school organization and the Latin curriculum; source of vocabulary for first-year Latin; first-year Latin in relation to the grade in which it is taught and to the general aims and values of classical study; methods of presentation; proper emphasis upon geography, ancient life, and historical connection; use of maps, pictures, and various classroom helps; books for use of teachers and for reference purposes of pupils.

Latin 441.

Pliny's Letters.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Miss Rice

Study of Roman life in the time of Domitian and Trajan; contact of Christian ideals with pagan thought; grammar and composition. Latin 442.

Cicero's Essays.

Winter quarter (elective); 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Rice

credits.

Miss Rice

credits.

Miss Rice

Horace's Satire and Ars Poetica.

Latin 443.

Winter quarter

(elective)

;

3 periods a week; 3

General account of the history of

Latin 444.

satire.

Studies in Tacitus.

Winter quarter Latin 445.

credits.

(elective) ; 3 periods a

week; 3

Advanced Syntax and Composition.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Rice

credits.

MATHEMATICS Miss London, Miss Taliaferro

The work

of this department

is

planned primarily to prepare stu-

dents to teach mathematics in the elementary and secondary schools of

The

the State. the

demands of

effort is

made everywhere

to link

up the work with

real life.

Since teachers of high school mathematics are often called upon to teach arithmetic either in the high school or in the upper elementary grades, in this

it is

strongly urged that students

who

choose a major or a minor

department take as elective work some time during their course,

preferably in the

first

year, Mathematics 131, 132, 133, or Mathematics

300.

A

major

in this

department requires:

146, 251, 252, 253, 331, 332, 341, 342, 343,

Mathematics 144, 145,

and 430.


Departments of Instruction

98

A

first

minor requires: Mathematics 144, 145, 146, 251, 252, 331

or 332, and three other courses.

A

second minor requires six of the courses given above.

The year gree

is

of mathematics listed in the constants for the A. B. de-

by the student, with the approval of the professor, from by the department. The aim is to give as wide a

selected

the courses offered

view of the

field as

previous high school preparation will permit.

Prerequisites for choosing a major or minor in this department:

One and

one-half units of algebra and one unit of geometry.

Mathematics Fall, winter,

131, 132, 133.

Arithmetic for Elementary Teachers.

and spring quarters; 3 periods each week; 2 credits each quarter.

Miss London

How

to obtain desirable outcomes in the form of arithmetical skills and through the integrated units growing out of the centers of interest suggested by the Virginia Course of Study, and through direct teaching. Place of arithmetic in the social order shown through the quantitative side of these activities. A study of the more common social activities requiring arithmetic with emphasis upon modern business methods. Some attention given to the keeping of accounts, and to the making of personal and household budgets. The historical development of number concepts and systems. abilities

Mathematics

300.

Advanced Arithmetic.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss London

An

advanced course in arithmetic planned primarily to meet the needs of who have mathematics as their major or minor subject and who wish one quarter of arithmetic as an elective. Treated from the standpoint of the arithmetic needed by the individual in life today. Such topics as banking, the handling of money, and commercial papers, home-owning, insurance, both property and life, investments, and the number side of various indusstudents

trial activities.

Mathematics

100.

Commercial Arithmetic.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Miss London

The arithmetic of modern business practices and customs. Short methods, accuracy and speed in calculations. Laws, customs, and forms of business as affecting elementary business papers. Mathematics

144, 145.

College Algebra.

Fall and winter quarters; 3 periods a

week; 3

credits each quarter.

Miss Taliaferro treatSome review of high school algebra in relation to ment, in relation to its use in college algebra, and in relation to the principles of learning and teaching. Study of various topics of college algebra, with especial attention to the elementary theory of equations.

more extended


Mathematics Mathematics

146.

99

Trigonometry.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Taliaferro

credits.

Study of the properties of the trigonometric functions and the solution and oblique triangles. Emphasis upon trigonometrical analysis in immediate application and as a tool for higher mathematics. right

Mathematics

251, 252.

of its

Analytic Geometry.

Fall and winter quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Miss Taliaferro Principles and applications.

Mathematics 253.

Solid Geometry.

Spring quarter; 4 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Taliaferro Study of the principles of solid geometry with emphasis upon the method of analysis. Mathematics

330.

Advanced Plane Geometry.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Miss Taliaferro

credits.

An

extension of elementary geometry opening to the prospective teacher of mathematics and to other students interested in mathematics the field of modern geometry: the study of the circle and the triangle, and some theorems of historic interest.

Mathematics

331, 332.

The Teaching

of

High School Mathematics.

Fall and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Miss Taliaferro Discussion of the objectives of high school mathematics. General prinsecondary education applied specifically to the teaching of mathematics. A study of the presentation of typical parts of the different branches of the subject. Special attention to the Virginia Course of Study for general mathematics. ciples of

Mathematics Fall, winter,

341, 342, 343.

The

Calculus.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

credits each quarter.

Miss Taliaferro Principles

and

applications.

Mathematics 430.

History of Mathematics.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Taliaferro

Study of the evolution of mathematical knowledge and its relation to the progress of human civilization. Application for the purposes of enrichment to the teaching of mathematics in the secondary schools.


Departments of Instruction

100

MODERN LANGUAGES Miss Draper, Mrs. Martin

The

courses of the

Modern Language Department

are designed to

meet the needs of students preparing to teach modern languages in the secondary schools, and to fulfill the requirements of those interested in a liberal education

ments and courses

in

and the degree of Bachelor of Arts. French and Spanish are listed below.

Require-

For graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, a constant of modern language and 9 hours of Mathematics is required. If the student wishes, she may substitute an additional 9 hours of the same modern language for the mathematics. A major requires 36 hours for both A. B. and B. S. degrees. First minor 27 hours second minor, 18 hours. It is urged that majors or minors in this department elect two or more years of a second modern language or of Latin. 18 hours of a

:

;

French French

101, 102, 103.

Fall, winter,

Beginners' French.

and spring quarters; 5 periods a week; 3

For students who have not had

the prerequisite for a

credits each quarter.

major or minor

department. This course does not give major or minor credit, but the constant for the degree of Bachelor of Arts.

A

may

in this

count as

Miss Draper

French grammar, Avith special emphasis on pronunciation and conversation. Reading of simple texts. careful training in the elements of

French

131, 132, 133.

Fall, winter,

For

all

Intermediate French.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

students offering two or three years of preparatory French.

Miss Draper

A ing of

general review of grammar;

modern

French

prose.

241, 242, 243.

Fall, winter,

Prerequisite:

composition, dictation, conversation, read-

Survey of French Literature.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter.

Miss Draper

Intermediate French.

A

study of the most important writers from the Middle Ages to the end of the nineteenth century. Reading of representative works. Written reports.

French

301.

Practical Phonetics in French.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

For Juniors and

Seniors.

Miss Draper Practice in the phonetic alphabet. Recitations and reading aloud.

Systematic exercises in pronunciation.

Use

of

phonograph records.


Modern Languages French

101

Advanced Grammar and Composition.

302.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Prerequisite:

credits.

Intermediate

Miss Draper

French.

A review of French grammar; study of French idioms; based on texts; and translations into French of English texts. French

composition

Methods of Teaching French.

303.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a quarter; 3

For Juniors and Seniors. Miss Draper

credits.

A study of the modern methods of teaching French, with special reference to the direct method and its application; the selection of textbooks; the use of realia in the classroom; practical demonstrations of class work. French Fall

Oral Practice.

331.

quarter;

3 periods a

(Not offered 1940-41.)

quarter;

3

credits.

Prerequisite:

Intermediate

Miss Draper

French.

Linguaphone, vocabulary development;

French

drill

on correct pronunciation.

French Literature of the Nineteenth Gentry.

432.

(Not offered

1940-41.)

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

For Juniors and

Seniors.

Miss Draper

A

detailed study of the literary movements of the century. outside reading of texts; written and oral reports.

French

French

433.

Civilization.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Class and

(Not offered 1940-41.) credits.

For Juniors and

Seniors.

Miss Draper

A

study of the development of the French nation; the geography of France; French life and culture.

Spanish Spanish 101, 102, 103.

A

Course for Beginners.

and spring quarters; 5 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Foundation course prerequisite to courses credited for major or minor. Mrs. Martin Fall, winter,

To be

included in total requirements for graduation but not in credits for

major or minor. Spanish 131, 132, 133.

Intermediate Spanish.

Mrs. Martin

3 credits each quarter.

A

continuation of the study of the mechanics of the language with emphasis on business usage.

Spanish 241, 242, 243.

Survey of Spanish Literature. Mrs. Marti n

3 credits each quarter.

A

study of the literary movements in Spanish literature as shown in the

works of some

of the

most representative

writers.


::

:

Departments of Instruction

102

MUSIC Mr. Strick, Miss Purdom

The aims lectual,

and

of this department are to emphasize the aesthetic, intel-

social values of

music

;

to

broaden the conception of the

function of music in the public schools; to prepare the grade teachers to teach

music in their respective grades; to prepare supervisors and music in elementary and high schools to help stu-

special teachers of

;

dents in the use of the singing voice;

and

to develop

an understanding

and appreciation of the best music through group participation in song and through directed listening to the world's greatest musical literature.

The

required courses in Curriculum III

Music 114,

115, 116, 214, or 215.

Music 301, 440, and 460 may be taken

A major

in

as electives.

music requires the following courses

Music 114, 115, 116, 214, and 215.

Music 314, 315.

Music 201. Music 352, 353. Music 451, 452. Music electives 2 courses.

A

minor

in

Music

music requires the following courses 114, 115, 116.

Music 314, 315, and 341. Music 352. Electives provided:

Music 401, 460, 361. Music 301, 302, 303. Music.

Group Singing.

Every quarter; 1 period a week; no dents.

A

credit.

Required of

all

Freshman stuMiss Purdom

general background for music education through vital experience in and listening to music, with singing as the core activity.

participating in


Music Music

114, 115, 116.

Fall, winter,

103

Elements of Music.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 2

credits each quarter.

Miss Purdom designed to acquaint students with the elements of music certain musical techniques. Note reading, song singing, and elementary ear training are studied. Students are required to become familiar with the staff, key and meter signatures, relative pitch names, chromatics, simple rhythmic and tonal figures. Careful attention is given to the correct use of the singing voice. The second and third quarters' courses continue the technical features of the first. Part singing, written dictation, different forms of the minor mode and simple triads are topics treated.

This course

and

to equip

Music

is

them with

214.

School Music Materials and Problems in Lower Elementary

Grades. Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Prerequisites: Music 114, 115, 116. Miss Purdom

This course is designed to help with music problems found in the lower elementary grades. The child voice, rhythm work, grade choruses, use of simple instruments, part singing, dramatization and creative work, program building, the technique of teaching with a phonograph and the presentation of music in the school room are topics treated. A special study will be made of the songs listed for these grades by the state supervisor of music. Appreciation work includes recognition of form, mood and expressiveness, the tone Continued development of the stuquality of instruments and voices, etc. dents own musical equipment is stressed.

Music 215. School Music Materials and Problems mentary Grades.

in the

Upper Ele-

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Miss Purdom Prerequisites: Music 114, 115, 116.

This course is designed to help with school music problems found in the upper elementary grades. The same general topics listed in Music 214 will be treated, using illustrative materials on the upper elementary grade levels.

Music

201.

History of Music.

Miss Purdom

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Significant periods in music history; composers development and use of instruments.

Music

314.

and

their works.

The

School Music Materials and Problems in the Junior High

School. Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Mr. Strick Prerequisites: Music 114, 115, 116. '

is designed to help with school music problems in the Junior Grade choruses, rhythm work, the changing voice, use of instruments, part singing, dramatization and creative work, program building, the technique of teaching with a phonograph, teaching music from an appreciative basis, and the presentation of music in the school room are topics of this course. Appreciation work includes, recognition of form, mood, and ex-

This course

High School.

pressiveness, the tone quality of instruments, voices, etc. All material listed by the State Supervisor of Music for Junior High Schools will be studied. Continued development of the students own musical equipment is stressed.


Departments of Instruction

104

Music

315.

School Music Materials and Problems in the Senior High

School. Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Prerequisites : Music 114, 115, 116. Mr. Strick

This course is designed to help with the school music problems in the Senior High School. The same general topics listed in Music 314 will be treated, using illustrative materials of Senior High School level. study of the organization, training and conducting of choruses, bands, and orchestras Further attention is given to the students own musical adwill be made.

A

vancement.

Music

301, 302, 303.

Fall, winter,

An

General Music Appreciation.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3 credits each quarter. Mr. Strick

elective course in the general appreciation of music, for

advanced

students.

Music

352.

Elementary Harmony.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Music 114, Miss Purdom

Prerequisites:

115, 116.

A study will be made of the following topics. Scales, keys, simple and compound time problems, intervals and transpositions, chords, cadences, keyboard practice, original melody writing, harmonization of given melodies. Music

353.

Elementary Harmony.

Spring quarter, 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Prerequisites:

A tion.

continuation of Music 352. Chords Harmonization of original melodies.

Music

Music

114, 115,

Miss Purdom

116, 352.

361.

in

minor Dominant chord modula-

Orchestra.

Offered every quarter; 2 periods a week; 1

credit.

Open

to all students.

Miss Purdom Students desiring to elect Orchestra must play acceptably a simple composition for the Director of the Orchestra. Study of the works of modern and classical composers and participation in public performance.

Music

401.

Advanced Choral Work.

Offered every quarter; 2 periods a week; 1 credit.

Mr. Strick

A choir of forty voices will be selected from the regular Choral Club to do advanced work in choral singing, with lectures on hymnology, oratorio, and general choral work.


Music Music

440.

105

General Problems in School Music.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 2 periods a week; 2 credits each quarter. Prerequisites: Music 114, 115, 116 and Music 214 or 215 or 314 or 315.

Mr. Strick This is a survey course designed to meet the changing needs in the Music Education program. Different views in regard to procedure and materials will be presented and discussed. An evaluation of the purposes and standards of school music and their relation to the whole program of education is attempted. Reports on assigned topics are required.

Music

451.

Music Appreciation.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

The media, ments.

Mr. Strick

credits.

quality of vocal and instrumental music. National tendencies.

Study of

instru-

Early folk music.

Music

452.

Music Appreciation.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

Mr. Strick

credits.

Continuation of Music 451. Early church music. Development of instrutheir influence. Study of smaller forms of music. Beginning of

ments and

opera, oratorio, and suite.

Music

460.

Choral Club.

Offered every quarter; 2 periods a week; 1

credit.

Mr. Strick

Students desiring to elect choral club must have voices tested by Director of Music Department, and upon selection may register for course. Study of best classical and modern choruses and preparation for one formal program each quarter.


Departments of Instruction

106

PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION Miss Barlow, Miss

Iler,

Mrs. Fitzpatrick, Dr. Martin

This department has a two-fold purpose: sional courses in physical

first to

and health education that

provide profes-

prepare stu-

will

dents to direct play and recreational activities, teach hygiene, and con-

duct school health service programs for

all

It is

desirable for the high school student

ing college.

crafts,

who

wishes to specialize

and health education to have a year of physics before enter-

in physical

worker

second, to provide opportunity

;

students to engage in developmental and recreational activities.

It is desirable for the teacher

in the field of recreation to

dramatic

art,

have

and experience

of physical education or a

ability in music, dancing,

in scouting, camping,

hand-

and various

sports.

The swimming

pool will be open to students at certain hours for

Those desiring this privilege must and wear the regulation swimming

recreational purposes.

the

swimming pool

A

office

register at suit.

The

suits are

Physical and Health Education requires:

Physical

regulation suit

is

required in

all

activity classes.

purchased through the college.

A

major

in

Education 101, 102, 103, 212, 313, 226, 227, 228, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 251, 252, 253, 354, 355, 356, 342, 343, 308, 309, 346, 347, 457, and Health Education 305.

A

first

minor requires: Physical Education 101,

102, 103, 226, 227,

228, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 251, 252, 253, 354, 355, 356, 308 or 346, 347, and Health Education 104 and 305.

A

second minor requires: Physical Education 101, 102, 103, 226,

227, 228, 243, 245, 246, 251, 252, 253, 347, and Health Education 104

and 305.

Physical Education Physical Education 101, 102, 103.

Freshman Physical Education.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter. Miss Iler, Mrs. Fitzpatrick, Dr. Martin first year students.

Fall, winter,

Required of

all

First quarter, personal hygiene, and practice in games, gymnastics and second quarter, rhythms and elementary folk dancing; third quar-

athletics; ter,

swimming and

athletics.


Physical and Health Education Physical Education 210, 211, 212.

107

Swimming.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter.

Open

to all

Mrs. Fitzpatrick Instruction and practice in elementary, intermediate, and advanced swimming and diving. Physical Education 212 helps to qualify students to take the Junior and Senior Life-Saving Test of the American Red Cross. Regustudents.

swimming

lation

suits required.

Physical Education 214, 215.

Principles

and Methods

in Physical

Edu-

cation.

Physical Education 214, fall and winter quarters; 215, zvinter and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 214, 2 credits; 215, 1 credit. Required in Curricula and B. Prerequisite: One or more practice courses in Physical Education.

A

Miss Barlow Instruction in the principles and techniques involved in the conduct of physical activities adapted to the interests and needs of chldren in the elementary grades.

Physical Education 221, 222, 223. Elementary Schools.

The Teaching

of Physical Education

in the

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter. Required in Curriculum III. Prerequisite: one or more courses in physical edu-

Miss Barlow

cation.

Principles and techniques involved in the conduct of physical education material in the elementary schools and community recreation centers.

Physical Education 226, 227, 228. Secondary Schools.

The Teaching

of Physical Education

in the

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter. Prerequisite: one or more practice in Curricula I, II, VI, VII, VIII. Miss Iler courses in physical education.

Required

Instruction in the principles and techniques involved in the conduct of physical activities adapted to the interests and needs of children in junior and senior high schools and community recreation centers.

Physical Education 242, 243, 244.

Fundamentals of the Dance.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter. to all students. Required of majors in physical education.

Open

Mrs. Fitzpatrick Practice in fundamental rhythms, skills, and techniques in dance moveof eurhythmies and percussion as related to simple dance forms.

ment including elementary study

Physical Education 245, 246, 247. Fall, winter,

Open

Tap and Character Dancing.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter. and fourth year students. Required of majors in physical Mrs. Fitzpatrick

to second, third,

education.

Special practice in tap, clog, athletic, and character dancing suitable for Sandals or leather-soled gymnasium college.

upper grades, high school, and shoes required.


Departments of Instruction

108

Physical Education 251, 252, 253. Fall, winter,

Open

Seasonal Sports.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter. and fourth year students. Required of majors in physical

to second, third,

Miss Iler

education.

Practice and study of techniques in sports.

Fall quarter (251), hockey, field ball, speed ball, soccer, and tennis; winter quarter (252), basketball, ring tennis, paddle tennis, and volley ball; spring quarter (253), lacrosse, baseball, field and track, archery, tennis and golf fundamentals.

Physical Education 308.

Physiology of Exercise.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Biology 351, Open only to majors and minors in physical education and nursing.

Miss Barlow Effect of neuro-muscular action upon the organs of the body; principles underlying the development of organic vigor and the conservation of energy.

Physical Education 309.

Kinesiology and

Body Mechanics.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Biology 351. to majors and minors in physical education and nursing.

Open only

Miss Barlow Analysis of bodily movements involved in types of muscular activity in relation to posture, the development of motor skill, growth of the body, and physical efficiency. Physical Education 313.

The Teaching

of

Swimming.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a week; 1 credit. Open to all students. Required of majors in physical education. Prerequisite : Physical Education 212, Mrs. Fitzpatrick and the approval of the instructor.

Organization of class work, analysis of strokes and diving, and practiceteaching of these under supervision. Physical Education 332, 333, 334.

Fundamentals of the Dance.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 3 periods a to second, third, and fourth year students.

week; 1

Open

A

credit each quarter.

Mrs. Fitzpatrick

course similar in scope to Physical Education 242, 243, 244, but adapted

to advanced students.

Physical Education 342, 343.

Dance Composition.

Fall and winter quarters; 3 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter. Open to second, third, and fourth year students. Required of majors in physical education. Mrs. Fitzpatrick Prerequisite: Physical Education 242, 243.

Dance composition from various standpoints. Sketches and dances presented for criticism. Dance as an art form. Use of the dance in dramas and festivals. Students doing outstanding work and interested in continuing the work may become members of Orchesis.


Physical and Health Education Physical Education 346. Education.

History and Principles of Physical and Health

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

Required of majors

in physical

Miss Barlow

and health education.

A

109

historical survey of the field of physical and health education; present practice, theoretical concepts and underlying principles.

day trends and

Physical Education 347.

Recreational Leadership.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. Open to second, third, and fourth year students. Required of majors in physical education. Miss Iler

A study of the organization and management of playground activities and community recreational programs. Training in leadership in school and community recreational clubs, and extra-curricula activities. Includes scouting and camp craft. Physical Education 354, 355, 356.

Principles of Coaching Athletics.

Fall, winter, and spring quarters; 2 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter. Open to third and fourth year students. Required of majors in physical education. Prerequisite : Physical Education 251, 252, 253, or equivalent. Miss Iler

Techniques and practice in coaching and officiating in seasonal sports. Prevention and treatment of athletic injuries, including massage. Physical Education 457.

Corrective Physical Education.

Fall quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. Required of majors in physical Miss Barlow Prerequisite : Physical Education 308, 309.

and health education.

A

study of principles of physical diagnosis, remedial exercise, and mas-

sage.

Health Education Health Education

104.

Personal Hygiene.

Offered winter and spring quarters; 2 periods a week; 1 credit each quarter. Dr. Martin all first year students.

Required of

Essentials of healthful living; regulation of personal habits; control of

emotional states; prevention of pathological conditions.

Health Education 205.

School and Community Health.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Miss Barlow

Principles of health education and procedures in the conduct of school health programs as required in Virginia under the West Law.

Health Education 305.

School and Community Health.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

A

Miss Barlow

course in scope similar to Physical Education 205, but adapted to ad-

vanced students.


Departments of Instruction

110

SPEECH Miss Wheeler This department gives opportunity for acquiring the techniques

and

skills in

the various aspects of the speech arts and prepares students

to teach reading

A

and the speech

arts in public schools.

dramatic club, under the direction of this department, gives op-

portunity for the development of special talent in any phase of play production.

Any

student

may

register for the apprentice period of three

Those who show most ability are elected to full membership the club and are assigned to work in one or more of the departments.

months. in

The departments

are: acting, stage design, costume, make-up, lightand business. Several one-act plays are presented before the club, and two public performances of full-length plays are given each year. It is the aim of the director to give each member of the ing, property,

dramatic club sufficient training to enable her to direct a play. Speech 210.

Basic Principles of Speech.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. II,

Required

in Curricula

Miss Wheeler

IV, V, and VII.

Development and use of the speaking voice. Correction of defects in speech and voice. Opportunity for application of skills learned, in the reading of short selections of poetry and prose, in brief talks and reports, and in other speech activities. Speech 211.

Elements of Speech and Oral Interpretation.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits.

A

and

A skills.

Required

in Curricula

Miss Wheeler

I.

and speech training. Practice in voice and speech Correction of individual defects. Oral interpretation of literature and

brief course in voice

story telling.

Speech 201.

Voice and Diction.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3

credits.

Required in Curriculum

III.

Miss Wheeler Intensive course in development and use of the speaking voice. Phonetics.

Speech correction.

Speech

302.

Oral Interpretation of Literature.

Spring quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 Prerequisite: Speech 201.

credits.

Required in Curriculum HI.

Miss Wheeler

and techniques acquired in Speech 201, in read-

Application of the skills ing the various types of literature, in extemporaneous talks, in brief reports and in other types of speech activities. Especial emphasis on oral reading as an educative exercise for the development of the individual.


Speech Speech

230.

111

Public Speaking.

Offered every quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 credits. VIII.

Required

in

Curriculum

Miss Wheeler

Practice in various types of public speaking, extemporaneous and prepared. Correction of speech defects. Ease and naturalness of manner, pleasing tone quality, clear enunciation, correct pronunciation, and adequate vocabulary.

Speech

341.

Plays and Festivals.

Winter quarter; 3 periods a week; 3 or Physical Education.

credits.

Required for major

in Music Miss Wheeler

Various types of dramatic entertainment suitable for presentation in pubschools plays, festivals, and pageants. Opportunity for study and application of the principles of play production: stage design, costuming, lighting, make-up; practice in planning and producing festivals and pageants. lic

—

Speech 441, 442, 443. Fall, winter,

History and Development of Drama.

and spring quarters; 3 periods a week; 3

credits each quarter.

Miss Wheeler

A study and survey of the development of the drama, particularly in England and America. Fall quarter, brief study of primitive and folk drama of various countries. Greek and Roman drama as bearing upon development in England. More careful study of beginnings of drama in England. Winter quarter, Elizabethan drama. Shakespeare's predecessors and contempoParallel raries carefully studied, briefer notice being given to Shakespeare. reading, class study, and criticism of plays. Spring quarter, Modern English and American drama. Modern trend of drama as to subject and technique contrasted with earlier forms. Study of significant modern dramatists and of contemporary dramatic criticism.


Student Activities

The

extra-curricular, as well as the curricular, activities are in-

cluded in the program of studies and

and study

They

activities.

are related to

same way that the classroom

the various student organizations in the

The

activities are related to the various subjects.

descrip-

tion of the student activities below corresponds to the description of

courses in the departments of instruction.

STUDENT GOVERNMENT The whole The

student body

is

organized for purposes of government.

business of the organization

bodies,

the

Council

is

conducted by two administrative

is

The Student

Student Council and the House Council.

headed by the President of the Student Body.

Representa-

from each of the four college classes are on the Council. The officers are elected by the student body, class representatives being chosen tives

by the classes themselves.

It is the

duty of the Student Council to en-

The House

force the general rules and regulations of the college.

whose president

by popular vote, has as its duty the enforcement of dormitory rules and regulations. The Student Government not only is a means of maintaining wholesome standards of Council,

citizenship

also elected

is

and of representing the will of the student body, but also method of learning to perform the duties of citizen-

supplies a direct

ship in the larger life of a democratic society.

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION The Association in the The administrative

C. A.

assisted

is

a branch of the national Y. is

by an advisory committee of the

ber of religious activities.

meetings are held. dents.

College

direction

From

in the

W.

hands of the students

faculty.

It

promotes a num-

Daily prayer services and weekly devotional

Usually these exercises are conducted by the stu-

time to time some recognized religious leader

is

brought

campus by the Association to discuss with students questions of and help individuals with personal religious problems. Through the Association Bible study classes are organized in each of

to the

religious interest

the churches of the town.

The

organization through

its

committees


Student Activities

113

welcomes new students individually and sponsors a reception

men

early in the

fall.

It

to Fresh-

likewise provides informal entertainment for

other groups of students from time to time during the year.

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION The

Athletic Association includes the whole student body.

The

Athletic Council consisting of students and a faculty adviser has control of

both inter-mural and inter-collegiate sports and contests and

tends to

all

the business of the organization.

at-

Contests between classes

and between organizations are held in tennis, basketball, baseball, hockey, volley ball, lacrosse, and swimming. The new nine-hole course at Longwood gives students an opportunity to play golf. In collegiate sports teams are maintained in tennis, basketball, and hockey.

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS The students of the college sponsor four publications, The RoThe Colonnade, The Virginian, and the Students' Handbook. The Rotunda is a weekly newspaper, which keeps the students and

tunda,

faculty informed of the college as observed

from the point

news and the

interests of the college

of view of the students.

It

not only ex-

presses the attitude of the students towards various phases of college life

and current

activities but also exerts

an important influence in the

development of the ideals of the community.

The Colonnade

is

a literary magazine to which students,

of the faculty, alumnae, and others contribute.

It

form some of the results of the thinking and writing done and among its friends.

The Virginian

is

the year book of the college.

sponsible for the art work, the editing, and the publication.

Each

for the year.

members

publishes in literary in the college

Students are re-

management of the

issue represents a cross section of the college life

highly valued by the

It is, therefore,

members of

the

graduating classes. Students'

Handbook

is

the

manual of

ing the conduct of the students. tions

rules

In addition,

and regulations governit

contains the constitu-

and by-laws of the Student Government Association, the Young Christian Association, and the Athletic Association, and

Women's

briefer descriptions of such organizations of the Dramatic Club, the


Student Activities

114

honor

and the Pan-Hellenic Council.

societies,

tion textbook for

all

new

It serves as the orienta-

students in the college.

HONOR

SOCIETIES

There are two types of honor

societies in the college.

The

first

consists of those organizations that are comparatively general in char-

and not confined to any department or section of college life. are open to all students who meet the high standards of excelThere have been establence required in scholarship and character. lished on the campus local chapters of the following national organizaKappa Delta Pi, Alpha Kappa Gamma, and Alpha Phi Sigma. tions The second type includes a number of societies which place most emphasis on special fields. There have been established on the campus four of these national honor societies Pi Gamma Mu, Sigma Pi Rho, Beta Pi Theta, and Pi Kappa Delta. Of this type also are the local organizations, Gamma Psi and Beorc Eh Thorn. acter

They

:

:

Kappa Delta Pi broad sense.

Its

is

a national honor society in education in the

membership

consists of students interested in the

activities of the teaching profession including all fields.

ship in this organization

is

The member-

confined to students of the Junior and

Senior years, whose scholarship ranks in the upper fourth of that of the student body.

The Beta Epsilon Chapter 1928.

It

society

of

Kappa Delta Pi was organized in Kappa Omega, a local honor

represents the development of Pi

founded

in

1918 in response to a need

felt

by the faculty and

students for an organization through which scholarship, character, and

Ten years later it was merged into which emphasized the qualities recognized by Pi Kappa with an additional emphasis on a professional outlook as broad

service might be given recognition.

Kappa Delta

Omega

Pi,

as the college itself in

all

of

its

departments and

activities.

Alpha Kappa Gamma, national honor society for leadership, was It represents the merging of local societies which had been founded in order to bring together groups of representative students and faculty members, whose purpose was to foster high ideals and standards of leadership. Alpha Delta Rho, organized in 1925, became the Joan Circle of Alpha Kappa Gamma and was one of the organized in 1928.


Student Activities charter

members

of the organization.

115

Its field of

tion of desirable coordination of various activities

work and

is

the

promo-

interests of the

college.

Alpha Phi Sigma is an honorary society confined to A grade Its membership is confined to students of high scholValedictorians and salutatorians of high schools are autoastic rating. Other students in any class of the matically eligible to membership. The college are eligible when their scholarship becomes satisfactory. Delta Chapter, the local chapter of this society, was established in 1930 with seventy-five members. The activities of this organization are designed not only to benefit its membership but also to further interest in scholarship in the whole institution. teachers colleges.

Gamma Mu

is

a national social science honor society.

pose of this society

is

to further the scientific study of the problems of

Pi

The

social science.

Pi

Gamma Mu, was

Virginia

Gamma

The

pur-

chapter, the local organization of

In addition to a high standard

organized in 1927.

of general scholarship required for entrance each

member must show an

outstanding interest in the social sciences and must carry on while a

member

of the society a piece of original

work

in

some of

the social

sciences.

Sigma Pi Rho

(first

organized at Farmville in 1930), became a

organization of which nition to those

is

of Sigma Pi Rho, the local Alpha Chapter, is to give recog-

The purpose

national organization in 1932.

the Virginia

who have shown

a deep interest in the field of Latin

and have attained a certain scholastic standing, to afford them further opportunities in the work, and to create in others an interest in Latin. Beta Pi Theta is

is

a national French honor society and

to organize representative

men and women

its

in universities

purpose

and

col-

advance the progress of literary French who will maintain a high standard of scholarship who will encourage individual effort of social service and the highest ideals of a liberal education; and

leges

who

will

;

;

who The

and award merit in productive French literature. Pi Zeta chapter of Beta Pi Theta was established in the college will recognize

in 1930.

In order to be

eligible,

scholarship in French, students

general scholarship.

they have

full

in addition to a

must

Students are not

junior standing.

high standard of

also attain a high standard of eligible

for

membership

until


Student Activities

116

Gamma in

was

established

1932 to give recognition to those students of the college

who show

Psi

a local honor society in fine arts.

is

It

and attain a certain scholastic standard; to create and foster these interests in new students and to render art an

interest in the field of art

;

service to the college.

Pi Kappa Delta honor

largest of three ter

was chartered

in

a national forensic honor society. It

is

1928 and

chapters in thirty-six states.

a high standard of

Beorc

skill

Eh Thorn

has adopted for

its

the

one of the one hundred and fifty-nine

is

Its

purpose

and sportsmanship

is

and maintain and oratory.

to develop

in debating

a local honor society in English founded at

is

Farmville, in October, 1935. it

is

The Virginia Alpha Chap-

societies in this field.

The

three

Old English rune

name, symbolize the quest of

letters,

which

literature to

which

members are pledged and the inspiration and discipline which it affords. The society seeks to encourage creative writing and the study

the

of literature. It gives

active support to the publication of the college

its

and sponsors

literary quarterly

visits

of distinguished writers to the

college.

SORORITIES The character.

ways

sororities

found

They assume

to render

in the

Teachers College are professional in

professional obligations and seek in various

an educational service.

They

establish student loan

funds, support libraries, and engage in other educational undertakings.

Of

the eight educational sororities in this institution

Sigma Sigma

Sigma, Alpha Sigma Alpha, Pi Kappa Sigma, and Alpha Sigma Tau are national;

Gamma

Zeta Sigma are

local.

Theta,

Mu

Omega, Delta Theta Alpha, and Phi

Several of these organizations have provided

loan funds to help needy and deserving students

made

their

way

in the

college.

STUDENT CLUBS In addition to the various honor societies there are a number of clubs that appeal to the interests of different groups.

Among

the

more

active of these organizations are the Debate Club, the Cotillion Club,

the Dramatic Club, and the music organizations including the Choral

Club, the College Choir, and the College Orchestra.


Student Activities The Debate Club

is

117

a student organization in which opportunity

is

given to experiment with and participate in the various forensic activi-

This club undertakes to train students for intercollegiate debates ties. and public speaking contests. The record in debate and oratory has been outstanding during the past few years.

The Dramatic Club is open arts. The 150 members

to all students interested in the dra-

matic

of the organization are divided into

groups according to their varied

tastes,

and these groups provide dra-

matic entertainment for the meetings of the club as a whole.

The

club

and producing high school plays and sponsors

gives training in coaching

an annual play contest among the high schools of Southside Virginia.

Under

the direction of a competent coach the Dramatic Club each year

gives a fall and spring production for the entertainment of the whole college

community.

The

an organization with a membership of two whose primary aim is the promotion of good dancing. The club sponsors two major dances each year, one in the fall and one in the spring. These dances have come to be regarded as Cotillion Club

hundred and

is

fifty students

important events in the social

The Philosophy Club problems of philosophy.

is

life

of the college year.

a group of students

The

who

are interested in

organization meets once each

month

for

recreation and discussion of philosophical questions, and sponsors lec-

by members of the faculty of from other institutions.

tures in philosophy vited guests

The Music Organizations of the college.

They

and

in-

of the college are the College Choir, the

Choral Club, and the Orchestra. life

the college

These are important factors

select their

members through

in the

try-outs at the

beginning of the session and give several concerts each year.

The International Relations Club

who

consists of a group of students

are interested in present world conditions.

The

organization meets

weekly for discussions of questions of diplomacy and of peace and war. A feature of this club is its participation in State and regional conferences on world relations held under the auspices of the Carnegie Foundation.


Student Activities

118

The Orchesis is an honorary dance group organized May, 1933. The group creates its own dances and usually sponsors a dance program in the winter and helps with the College May Day in the spring. Members are selected from those who have taken at least two quarters of Modern Dance. The Commercial Club is an organization of the students in the Department of Business Education who are interested in becoming better informed in regard to teaching commercial subjects and problems in the field of business. The programs of the regular monthly meetings involve lectures and discussion of business problems of current interest.

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS There are

in the

College two organizations whose interests are

primarily professional in character.

Eligibility to these organizations

depends largely upon the students' professional qualities rather than on their

academic standing.

The Association for Childhood Education tion

composed of nursery

and others who are interested concerns

a national organiza-

and primary teachers the education of young children. It

in

with the conservation of child

itself

is

school, kindergarten,

life

through securing a

and providing better opportunities for their development. The local organization grew out of the Primary Council which was organized on our campus in 1927, and later became affiliated with the national A. C. E. Students who teach in the kindergarten and primary grades are eligible for membership. better understanding of children,

The Future Teachers of America is a national organization of prospective teachers enrolled in colleges and universities, and in high schools.

schools

The

local organizations are called F.

and chapters

in the colleges

and

T. A. clubs in the high

universities.

The

F. T. A.

chapters are affiliated with the local state and national education associations.

They

serve as training schools for the improvement of pro-

fessional relationships.

The

November, 1939 and received Association in 1940.

J.

Jarman Chapter was organized in charter from the National Education

L.

its


Register of Students

1939-40

WINTER SESSION Name and Year Abernathy, Rachel Olivia, 2 Ackiss, Geraldine Collier, 2

Adams, Mary Frances, 1 Adams, Mary Jacqueline, 3 Adams, Ruby, Aretta, 4 Agnew, Lillian Boswell, 1 Alderman, Irene Thelma, 3 Alexander, Virginia Francis, 2 Allen, Dorothy Ethelwynn, 1 Allen, .Tacquelyn, 2 Allen, Louise Baird, 4 Allen, Marie Bird, 3 Allen, Nancye Alfriend, 1 Allen, Peggy Ann, 2 Altomare, Aseita, 3 Alvis, Doris Elizabeth, 1 Alvis, M. Frances, 4 Anderson, Dorothy Elizabeth, 1

Anderson, Irma Estelle, 1 Anderson, Martha Waller, 1 Anderson, Vivian Mae, 4 Andrews, Charlotte Grey, 2 Andrews, Elva Kathryn, 1 Andrews, Florence Dillard, 1

Madge

Angell,

Via,

1

Applewhite, Louise Parham, 3 Armfield, Fredna Elizabeth, 2 Arnold, Mary Prince, 2 Atkinson, Margaret Esther, 3 Austin, Harriet Betsy, 2 Averitt, Carol Lee, 3

Avery, Eugenia Charlotte, 3 Ayers, Betty Mae, 1 Ayers, Eleanor Ann, 2 Bailey, Bailey, Baird,

Dorothy Anne,

3

Frances, 2

Miriam

Iris,

Anne

Neville,

Burkeville,

1

Baron, Vera Frances, 2 Barrett, Elizabeth Thomas, 2

Nottoway

310 Calhoun St., Galax 838 Northumberland, Roanoke Farmville, R. F. D. 5, Cumberland 206 Middle St., Portsmouth

Hebron, Dinwiddie Gate, Bland Hebron, Dinwiddie

White

708 First Ave., Farmville

Blue Point, Long Island, N. Y. 3310 Memorial Ave., Lynchburg 3407 Memorial Ave., Lynchburg Andersonville, Buckingham Halifax, Halifax Pedro, Essex 817 Beverly St., Covington 241 Sycamore St., Petersburg 304 First Ave., Farmville R. F. D. 1, Lynnhaven, Princess Critz, Patrick

Anne

Sussex Oldtown, Grayson Waverly, Sussex Hampden Sydney, Prince Edward Jarratt,

Blacksburg, Montgomery Stonega, Wise Holdcroft, Charles City 512 Greenwood Road, Roanoke 238 Carolina Ave., Roanoke Wakefield, Surry 811 119

2

Baker, Nellie Walker, 1 Baldwin, Betty Zollickofrer, 1 Baldwin, Martha Ann, 2 Ball, Harriet Haile, 1 Barbee, Lois Johnson, 4 Barham, Alice Leigh, 3 Barksdale, Virginia Sutherlin, 2 Barlow, Agnes Lee, 2 Barlow, Elizabeth Louise, 2 Barlowe, Ruby Lora, 1 Barnes, Betty Louise, 1 Barnes, Letha Thomas, 1 Barnett,

City or County

Dolphin, Brunswick 322 66th St., Newport News Danripple, Halifax Kenbridge, Lunenburg 3604 Decatur St., Richmond

W. 5th St., Winston Salem, N. Cambridge Ave., Roanoke

Pamplin, Prince Edward High St., Farmville

705

Island, Catawba Queen Salvia, King

The

&

Covington, Alleghany 308 North St., Portsmouth 351 Woods Ave., Roanoke Smithfield, Isle of Wight

209 High St., Farmville Lawrenceville, Brunswick 501 Hamilton Ave., Roanoke Baskerville, Mecklenburg Box 264, Berryville, Clarke R. F. D. 3, Martinsville, Henry 514 Kensington Ave., Roanoke

C.


Register of Students

120

Name and Year

City or County Newsoms, Southampton Box 364, Holden, W. Va. Sandidges, Amherst 315 High St., Petersburg

Barrett, Pauline Antoinette, 2 Bartlett,

May Harman,

1

Beard, Julia Stelle, 1 Beasley, Ethel Lemoine, 1 Beaton, Wilcey Katherine, 1 Beck, Mary Klare, 2 Beckner, Geraline Edith, 1 Bellows, Elizabeth Willard, 1 Bellus, Margaret Louise, 2 Belote, Alice Magruda, 1 Benton, Anne Lillian, 3 Benton, Nellie Brooke, 1 Benton, Sally Hoggard, 1 Bernard, Elizabeth Williamson, Berry, Gloria Paquieta, 1 Berry, Julia Maie, 1 Berry, Mabelle Hamilton, 1 Billups, Margaret Anne, 4 Bishop, Doris Leighton, 1 Bishop, Helen Lenore, 1 Blackwell, Lucy Steptoe, 4 Bland, Nancy Goode, 3 Blevins,

Rebecca Mae,

1806 Prentis Ave., Portsmouth Butterworth, Dinwiddie Troutville, Botetourt White Stone, Lancaster 408 Beach St., Farmville

Cape Charles, Northampton Locust Dale, Madison Locust Dale, Madison 213 1

1

Blount, Lena Catharine, 3 Boatwright, Elizabeth Gordon, 2 Bodine, Catherine, 2 Boggs, Olive Louise, 2 Bondurant, Nancy Leigh, 1

Booker, Mary Emily, 2 Booth, Alpha Christine, 2 Booth, Carman Louise, 3 Booth, Sarah Wyche, 3 Booth, Carolyn E., 2 Boothe, Eleanor Leah, 1 Borden, Virginia Crews, 3 Borum, Myrtle Leigh, 3 Boswell, Anne Colgate, 2 Bourne, Jean, 3 Boutchard, Betty, 1 Bowen, Ellen Gibson, 4 Bowen, Jane Thornhill, 2 Bowen, Mildred Ann, 2 Bowles, Mary Frances, 1 Bowles, Norma Burns, 2 Bowling, Margaret Louise,

Bowman, Mary

Elizabeth,

S.

Main

Boone

St.,

Suffolk

Mill, Franklin

High St., Charlottesville Burkeville, Nottoway Burkeville, Nottoway R. F. D. 4, Box 19, Norfolk 518 Avon Rd., Roanoke La Crosse, Mecklenburg 1128 E.

Warrenton, Fauquier Boydton, Mecklenburg 13 Va. Ave., Roanoke 203 Mitchell Ave., Salisbury, N. C. New Canton, Buckingham Bowling Green, Caroline

Island, Goochland 245, Blacksburg, Hurt, Pittsylvania

Box

Montgomery

Vinton, Roanoke 808 Green St., Danville Rocky Mount, Franklin Wakefield, Sussex Wakefield, Sussex 606 Lyons Ave., Charlottesville Rice, Amelia Ill Carroll Ave., C. H., Petersburg

Wytheville, Wythe 2512 Orcutt Ave., Newport News Tazewell, Tazewell 505 Elmwood Ave., Lynchburg 511 High St., Farmville

1 1

Boyd, Virginia C, 4 Boyette, Peggy Lou, 1 Bradshaw, Ann Amory, 2 Brandon, Faye Louise, 3 Brickert, Anna Marie, 2 Briggs, Betsy Aldrich, 2 Briggs, Helen Louise, 1 Brinkley, Mary Elizabeth, 1 Brisentine, Sybil, 2 Britt, Alice Lee, 1 Broda, Estelle Victoria, 4 Brogan, Geneva Grace, 1 Brookfield, Dorothy Elsa, 2

Masonic Home, Richmond 517 Commercial Ave., Clifton Forge ,715 Carter Rd., Roanoke Draper, Pulaski

McKenny, Dinwiddie

A

1618 St., Portsmouth 807 Marshall St., Hampton 107 Park Rd., Suffolk 506 Second St., Farmville 1408 N. Hartford St., Arlington 2917 Seminary Ave., Richmond jR. F. D. 1, Box 185, Suffolk Prospect, Prince Edward 1523 Barton St., Portsmouth

3704 King

St.,

Portsmouth

Callaway, Franklin 204 W. 47th St., Richmond


Register of Students

Name and Year

121

City or County

Brooks, Anne H., 1 Brooks, Airs. Thomas, 2

601

Brown, Edna Mae, 1 Brown, Gay Ward, 2

202 S. Main St., Suffolk 89 N. Princeton Circle, Lynchburg Farmville, Prince Edward

Ave., Hopewell Westmoreland, Westmoreland

Brumfield, Josephine Gunn, 1 Bryant, Iris Christine, 3 Bryant, Mary Alice, 1 Bryant, Nancy Hall, 4 Bryant, Ruth Louise, 3 Buchanan, Agnes Dinwiddie, 4 _

Branchville,

Waynesboro, Augusta Waynesboro, Augusta Wachapreague, Accomac Tazewell, Tazewell 376 Albemarle Ave., Roanoke 307 Mallory Ave., Hampton

Burford, Mary Evelyn, 4 Burge, Katherine, 2

Amherst, Amherst Appomattox, Appomattox Tappahannock, Essex 619 Euclid Ave., Lynchburg Hallwood, Accomac Locust Dale, Madison Dinwiddie, Dinwiddie

Burgwyn, Anne M. G., 1 Burnham, Virginia Hughes, 2 Burroughs, Rachel Elizabeth, 2 Burwell, Gertrude Willis, 1 Butterworth, Lena Hyman, 2 Buyers, Jane Terry Clay, 1

11 Pine

Bernice Lee, 3 Callis, Virginia Mildred, 4 Campbell, Margaret Eggleston, 2 Campfield, Virginia Mae, 1 Canada, Josephine, 2 Cannaday, Carolyn Hale, 1 Cantrell, Harriet Camp, 2 Cardwell, Annie Marie, 2 Carlton, Josa Virginia, 3 Carlton, Mabel M., 2 Carper, Sarah Blanche, 2 Carr, Ethel McAlister, 3 Carr, Margaret Anne, 4 Callis,

Carr, Mary Jean, 1 Carr, R. Yates, 3 Carrington, Anita Mildred, 4 Carrington, Elizabeth Jane, 2

St.,

Christiana, Pa.

Lunenburg Mathews

Meredithville, Sales,

Highland Springs, Henrico 502 W. Frederick St., Staunton Lennig, Halifax Spring Valley, Grayson 1222 Third St., Roanoke Concord Depot, Campbell 425 Virginia Ave., Roanoke Farmville, Prince Edward ,205 Broadway Ave., Roanoke 1408 Lakefront Ave., Richmond 916 Carter Rd., Roanoke 405 Prichard St., Williamson, W. Va. R. F. D. 2, Charlottesville Saxe, Charlotte Burkeville, Nottoway Concord Depot, Appomattox Grove Park, Roanoke Burkeville, Nottoway

Mary Owen

Carter, Elizabeth Jane, 2 Carter, Rebecca Dale, 4 Carter, Sarah Frances, 2 Chambers, Sarah Elizabeth, 2 Chaplin, Corilda Lee, 2 Chapman, Doris Dalton, 2 Cheape, Florence Yvonne, 2 Chelf, Anne Josephine, 2 Chesnut, Doris Ray, 4 Childress, Dorothy McDonald, Clarke, Jean Scott, 4 Clayton, Imogen Gordon, 1 Clements, Ellen Pauline, 1 Cline, Elizabeth Ann, 4 Cline, Helene Albine, 4 Cline, Sara Frances, 2 Coalter, Margaret Elizabeth, 4 Cobb, Martha Frances, 2

Southampton

Semmes

Ave., Richmond Smithfield, Isle of Wight Dry Fork, Pittsylvania

2918

Buchanan, Winifred Webb, 1 Bulman, Hallie Hume, 1 Bundy, Elizabeth McClung, 4 Bunting, Margaret Anne, 2 Burbank, Hazelwood, 4

Carson,

Brown

Blairs, Pittsylvania

304 Bath

1

St.,

Clifton

Forge

Falling Springs, Bath <Rocky Mount, Franklin Charlottesville 605 S. East St., Culpeper 923 Dacian Ave., Durham, N. C. Christiansburg, Montgomery Martinsville,

Henry

Bedford Manquin, King William Stuarts Draft, Augusta Stuarts Draft, Augusta 726 Park

St.,

Virginia Ave., Roanoke R. F. D. 4, Richmond, Henrico 610 West 29th St., Richmond .503


Register of Students

122

Name and Year

City or County

Cobb, Mary Ann, 2 Cobb, Minnie Frances, 2 Cobb, Sadie Eloise, 3

Wachapreague, Accomac Drewryville, Southampton Charlotte Court House, Charlotte

Coberly, Alice Marie, 2 Coberly, Rosalie Dolan, 3 Cock, Anne Renalds, 3 Cock, Jack Renalds, 3 Cocks, Anne Lillian, 3 Cogburn, Alice Clay, 2 Cogsdale, Josie Lee, 4 Cohoon, Alice Goode, 1

1607 Berkeley Ave., Petersburg 1607 Berkeley Ave., Petersburg 325 Armistead Ave., Hampton 325 Armistead Ave., Hampton 600 Buffalo St., Farmville 826 Maiden Lane, Roanoke

Newsoms, Southampton 113 Franklin St., Suffolk Greenfield, Nelson

Coleman, Esther Montague, 2 Coleman, Nahrea Irby, 2 Coleman, Virginia Ayles, 2 Cook, Mary Myrtle, 3 Cooke, Genevieve Ashby, 3

iCrewe,

Copley, Bernice Lucille, 4 Copley, Mary Roberta, 3 Costello, Carroll Camilla, 1 Costello, Marguerite Virginia, 4 Cottrell, Martha Louise, 2 Courter, Rosa Jackson, 3 Courtney, Thelma Sawyer, 3

Covington, Anne, 1 Cox, Mary Louise, 3 Crawley, Laura Nell, 4 Crawley, Martha DeMoval, 3 Crews, Mary Louise, 1 Crider, Katie Whitehead, 3

915 Green St., Danville Walters, Isle of Wight Hampden Sydney, Prince

Crystal Hill, Halifax

Cambridge Arms, St. Paul Baltimore, Maryland

1

1

Mary

1

Dawley, Dorothy Eloise, 3 Dawley, Virginia Powell, 2 Dawson, Helen Vernell, 1

2914 Victoria Ave., Norfolk 3101 Stonewall Ave., Richmond Lodge, Northumberland 709 Center Ave., Roanoke 815 S. Main St., Blackstone Buchanan, Botetourt

Dawson, Millian Henrietta, 2 Deacon, Dorothy Douglas, 1 DeBerry, Rachael, Wiles, 3

DeLong, Helen Elizabeth, 1 Desaix, Mae Carman, 2 Dew, Antoinette Gwathmey, Dickens, Bessie L., 2 Dix, Marie, 4 Dix, Mary Frances, 2

Harborton, Accomac

McKenney, Dinwiddie Raccoon Ford, Orange Box 1069, Richmond Sebrell, Southampton 1707 Richmond Ave., Lynchburg Smithfield, Isle of Wight Naval Mine Depot, Yorktown, York Courtland, Southampton Bassett, Henry 3126 Lamb Ave., Richmond

Dorothy Elizabeth, 4 Dorothy Wilson, 3 Lucy Otey, 1 Mallory, 1 Nette Elizabeth, 2 Virginia Elizabeth,

34,

Wytheville, Wythe 1017 Euclid Ave., Bristol R. F. D. 1, Farmville, Cumberland Fincastle, Botetourt 35 Day Ave., S. W., Roanoke

Darby, Margaret Cox, 1 Dorothy Dade, 4

Marie,

&

Star Route, Zuni Stony Creek, Sussex

Crocker, Susie Pearl, 3

Davis, Davis, Davis, Davis, Davis, Davis, Davis, Davis,

Edward

Cumberland, Cumberland

Crowder, Marie Neaves, 2 Crowgey, Emma Louise, 2 Crumley, Dorothy Sue, 3 Crute, Dorothy Pettice, 1 Cunningham, Mary Louise, 4 Currie, Sara Rhodes, 1 Custis, Llewellyn, Kathleene,

Nottoway

410 Grove St., Vinton Wirtz, Franklin 2018 Hanover Ave., Richmond Kenbridge, Lunenburg South Hill, Mecklenburg 2115 Hanover Ave., Richmond 2115 Hanover Ave., Richmond 3906 Seminary Ave., Richmond Amelia, Amelia R. F. D. 3, Box 31, Winchester

2

164 Pasadena Place, Hawthorne, N. Kilmarnock, Lancaster Capron, Southampton Urbanna, Middlesex Berryville, Clarke

J.


Register of Students

Name and Year

City or County

Dodl, Patricia Marie, 1 Dodson, Mary Katherine, 2 Dodson, Nellie Dean,_ 2 Dooley, Helen Virginia, 3 Downing, Betty Lee, 2 Draine, Bertha Carlton, 1

Farmville, Cumberland 517 Maryland Ave., Norfolk

Avalon, Northumberland Bedford, Bedford 1209 Chesapeake Ave., Newport News Walkerton, King and Queen 420 County St., Portsmouth Jeffs Post Office, York 709 High, Farmville Toano, James City Scottsville, Albemarle Lexington, Rockbridge Lexington, Rockbridge 409 Harbor Ave., Cape Charles Nassawadox, Northampton 914 Spring Garden St., Greensboro, N. C.

Drewry, Barbara Mae, 1 Dryden, Mary Anne, 1 Dudley, Jane Frances, 4 Duer, Nan Ellen, 3 Duncan, Alice White, 1 Dunlap, Sally Kerr, 4 Dunlap, Sue Teaford, 2 Dunton, Beatrice Elexene, 2 Dunton, Sudie Doughty, 4

Dupuy, Nancy Reid,

2

237 Rosalind Ave., Roanoke 528 Hampton Place, Portsmouth 2721 Rivermont Ave., Lynchburg 2614 Lamb Ave., Richmond 2614 Lamb Ave., Richmond 3403 Noble Ave., Richmond Blackstone, Dinwiddie

Fades, Dorothy A. Warwick, 4 Earnest, Ora, 2 Easley,

Anne

Carrington, 3

Fason, Caroline Rennie, 2 Eason, Marie Gary, 4 Ebel, Selina Ellen, 1 Echols, Thelma Louise, 2 Edmonson, Mary Sue, 3 Edwards, Alice Gwendolyn, 1 Edwards, Katherine Arendall, 4 Elam, Frances, 1

Baskerville,

Emma

Emma

Emma

Beaumont, Powhatan 511 Greenwood Rd., Roanoke R. F. D. 1, Lexington, Rockbridge Clarkton, Halifax Clarkton, Halifax

Jane, 2

Engleman, Plelen Hamrick, Epperson, Eloise Scott, Epperson, Lavinia Sue,

Mecklenburg

Lawrenceville, Brunswick Courtland, Southampton Prospect, Prince Edward Jennings Ordinary, Nottoway 406 Washington Ave., Roanoke 106 E. Third St., Farmville Dry Fork, Pittsylvania

Ellett, Anne Hubbard, 1 Ellett, Frances Leigh, 3 Elliott, Mrs. Florence Cutts, 4 Elliotte, Jamie, 3 Ellis, Emil, 4

Engleby,

123

1

1 1

Ettinger, Laura Beulah, 4 Evans, Virginia Mae, 2

Lawrenceville, Brunswick

Fahr, Betty Beale, 3 Faison, Elenora Dejarnette, 3 Farley, Marian, 4 Farmer, Phyllis Frances, 1

2903 Moss Side Ave., Richmond 323 S. Main St., Lexington Merry Point, Lancaster 6 Prospect Ave., Onancock Prospect, Prince Edward

Farrar,

Betty,

Concord Depot, Campbell

1

Fauntleroy, Mary Dearing, 1 Feagans, Eleanor Virginia, 1 Felts, Marjorie E., 1 Felts, Texie Belle, 2 Ferguson, Caroline, 2 Ferguson, Jeannette Estaline, 4 Finey, Margaret Anne, 1 Firesheets, Virginia Greenwood, Fischer, Dorothv Lina, 4 Flanagan, Martha Jane, 4 Fletcher, Patsy Gordon, 3 Folk, Eleanor Camper, 1 Ford, Carolyn Frances, 3

Altavista, Campbell R. F. D. 3, Lynchburg, Ivor, Southampton

Campbell

Boykins, Southampton

Chatham Rd., Roanoke Onancock, Accomac Crewe, Nottoway Main St., East Ishp, N. Y.

Box

508

1

136,

Avon

206 Second Ave., Farmville

Box 119

227, Warrenton Broad St., Salem

Virgihna, Halifax


Register of Students

124

Name and Year

City or County

Amherst, Amherst 437 London St., Portsmouth Concord Depot, Campbell

Ford, Carolyn Louise, 3

Foreman, Margaret Anne, Foster, Margaret Elise, 1

1

Fowlkes, Virginia Bliss, 2 Foy, Mrs. R. E., 3 Francis, Irene Bane, 4 Franklin, Margaret Kent, 2 Fraughnaugh, Ruth, 1 Frazier, Helen Rose, 1 Fulton, Nancy Louise, 3 Furniss, Beatrice Estelle,

120

Annie Elizabeth,

Grade

Viola,

Gee, Mrs. Frances Gentile, Bridget

Saxis,

1

Montgomery Wake, Middlesex London Bridge, Princess Anne Keysville, Prince Edward

3

Special

George, Anna Davis, 3 Gerlaugh, Margaretta, 3 German, Lillian Frances, 2 Geyer, Iris Frances, 1 Ghigo, Mrs. Ruth Dunnington, Sp Gibboney, Carrie Beatrice, 2 Gibson, Hazel Patricia, 3 Gilchrist, Ollie Graham, 4 Gilliam, Coralee Miller, 3 Giovannoni, Jennette, 1 Glasgow, Annie Elizabeth, 3 Golladay, Helen Eloise, 1 Goode, Sarah Massie, 1 Goode, Virginia Blair, 4 Gooden, Marjorie Florence, 3 Gough, Lelia Pauline, 1 Grabeel, Gene, 3 Graff, Irma Douglas, 2 Grainger, Martha Ann, Sp Grant, Effie Louise, 3 Gray, Helen, 3 Gray, Katherine Nelson, 4 Gray, Lilly Rebecca, 1 Greeley, Charlotte Louise, 1 Green, Doris Marie, 1 Greenall, Margaret Eulys, 1 Greig, Elizabeth Jane, 4 Gresham, Charlotte Friend, 1 Grigg, Roberta Antoinette, 1

Guinn, Edith Ruth, 1 Gunter, Emma Elizabeth, 2 Guthrie, Mrs. Elizabeth H., Hale, Gertrude Henkel, 3 Hale, Ivy Mae, 1 Hall, Jean Addison, 2 Hall, Jeanne Carolyn, 1 Hall, Luella Byrd, 2 Hall, Martha Louise, 3 Hall, Nell Sue, 3

Accomac

Blacksburg,

1

Hahn, Dorothy Mae, 2

Farmville

Sparta, Caroline 545 Stratton St., Logan, W. Va. R. F. D. 4, Danville, Pittsylvania

1

W,

Anna,

Rd., Danville St.,

White Gate, Giles 2021 Grove Ave., Richmond

Gardner, Anne Lee, 3 Garland, Mabel Beatrice, 2 Garrett, Garrett,

Kemper

410 Buffalo

1

408 Beech

St.,

Farmville

198 S. Main St., Suffolk 100 S. Elm Ave., Portsmouth 311 Starling Ave., Martinsville

4114 Bramley Lane, Richmond 301 First Ave., Farmville Hampden-Sydney, Prince Edward 313 Bridge St., Farmville 3N-84 45th St., Astoria, N. Y. 2317 Vincent Ave., Norfolk Famplin, Appomattox 520 Rittenhouse St., Washington, D. C. 314 Westover Ave., Roanoke Scottsville,

Albemarle

Dinwiddie, Dinwiddie

Chase

Box

City, Mecklenburg 835, Lynchburg

Dillwyn, Buckingham

Rose Hill, Lee Ill Walnut Ave., Roanoke

Edward Newport News

Farmville, Prince

328 52nd

St.,

Chatham, Pittsylvania Gloucester, Gloucester 89 33rd St., Newport News 104 Arbutus Ave., Roanoke 647 Kenyon St., N. W., Washington, D. C. Bassett, Henry Bosedale, Covington 80 Linden Ave., Hampton 58 S. King St., Hampton 322 Brown Ave., Hopewell 3606 Chamberlayne Ave., Richmond Farmville, Cumberland Montibello Hill, Charlottesville Front Royal, Warren

Long

Island,

Windsor, 16 5th

St.,

Campbell

Isle of

Wight

Pulaski

Hallwood, Accomac 209 Sherwood Ave., Roanoke 209 Sherwood Ave., Roanoke


Register of Students

Name and Year Hall, Nina Lee, 1 Hall, Virginia Alice, 1 Hamilton, Grace Elizabeth, Hamlin, Myrtle Marie, 3

Hammock, Martha

Rebecca, Handley, Ruth Elizabeth, 1

125

City or County

Wachapreague, Accomac South Boston, Halifax Pamplin, Prince Edward

1

Appomattox, Appomattox Blackstone, Nottoway Boykins, Southampton Palmyra, Fluvanna Palmyra, Fluvanna 932 North St., Portsmouth Burkeville, Nottoway

1

Hannah, Alice Roberta, 1 Hannah, Ashley Bell, 1 Hanvey, Miriam Vion, 2 Hardaway, Martha Meade, 4 Harden, Marion Lee, 4 Hardy, Mrs. Annie A., 4 Hardy, Betty Jarman, 4 Hardy, Elizabeth Goodwyn, 3 Hardy, Helen Wiley, 1 Hardy, Jacqueline Marcella, 1 Hardy, Jane Elizabeth, 4 Harman, Stella Hogan, 2

Dillwyn, Buckingham Boone Mill, Franklin 405 Beech St., Farmville Kenbridge, Lunenburg 405 Beech St., Farmville

McKenney, Dinwiddie 418 Oak St., Blackstone 2306 Hillcrest Ave., Roanoke

Harper, Betty Page, 1 138 Manteo Ave., Hampton Harper, Sue Semple, 1 3218 Hawthorne Ave., Richmond Harper, Mrs. Virginia Fitzpatrick, Sp..622 Oak St., Farmville Harrell,

Winnie

Masonic Home, Richmond R. F. D. 2, Box 122, Norfolk

Virginia, 2

Harrington, Helen Frances,

1

Harris, Ada Moore, 2 Harris, Edna Stanhope, 2 Harris, Inda Gay, 1 Harrison, Lois Christine, 1 Harry, Mildred Lansdale, 4 Harvey, Carolyn Cushing, 2 Harvie, Mary Anderson, 1 Haskins, Harriette Anne, 3 Hastings, Dorothy Anne, 2 Hatcher, Geraldine Mae, 4 Hatton, Jean Elizabeth, 1 Hawkins, Betty Cleo, 2 Hawkins, Helen Marie, 2

3301 Dill Ave., Clarksville,

1130 E. High St., Charlottesville Warfield, Brunswick 204 S. Main St., Suffolk Curdsville,

Buckingham

3912 Seminary Ave., Richmond 347 Creek Ave, Hampton 211 N. Mallory St., Phoebus R. F. D. 1, Box 476, Salem 3920 Park Ave., Richmond 612 Day Ave., Roanoke Culpeper, Culpeper 308 High St., Blackstone Kenbridge, Lunenburg '

Hawks, Dorothy Maxine, 4 Hawthorne, Kathryn Lloyd, 2 Haydon, Louise Luttrell, 2 Haymes, Jeanne Alice, 1 Haymes, Mary Fidele, 1 Heard, Marian Lee, 3 Heermance, Georgiana S. L., 1 Henderson, Ruby Lee, 4 Hendricks, Louise Elizabeth, 1 Hening, Ruth, 1 Herald, Lottie Louise, 1 Hillsman, Hallie Meredith, 1 Hillsman, Lucy Elizabeth, 3 Hoback, Frances Ellen, 2 Holladay, Ann Morton, Sp Holland, Alice Anne, 1 Holland, Mary Louise, 4 Holmes, Hazel Juanita, 4 Holt, Marjorie Eileen, 3 Honeycutt, Florence Lynnette, Hopkins, Nancy Saunders, 3 Home, Madge Evelyn, 2 Horsley, Katherine D., 4

Richmond

Mecklenburg

Northumberland Langley Field, Elizabeth City Langley Field, Elizabeth City 220 Robertson Ave., Danville Charlottesville, Albemarle Callao,

Blacksburg,

Montgomery

Long

Island, Pittsylvania 25 Byron Ave., White Plains, N. 10 High St., Logan, W. Va. 313 First Ave., Farmville 313 First Ave., Farmville

1

Y.

Richlands, Tazewell Farmville, Prince Edward 107 South Broad, Suffolk R. F. D. Holland, Nansemond Union Level, Mecklenburg Matoaca, Chesterfield R. F. D. 1, Farmville, Cumberland Rocky Mount, Franklin Tazewell, Tazewell Lovingston, Nelson


Register of Students

126

Name and Year Hoskins, Emily Hume, 3 Howell, Rosemary Wesley, 4 Howell, Sue, 2 Howell, Virginia Asenath, 3 Hoyer, Helen Elizabeth, 4 Hubbard, Lena Rebecca, 1 Hubble, Ruby Lee, 4 Hudgins, Ellen Rebecca, 1 Hudgins, Frances Eugenia, 3 Huff, Louise,

1

Hughes, Frances Ernestine, 1 Hughes, Margaret Elizabeth, 2 Hughes, Mary Venable, 2 Hughes, Polly Bransford, 2 Hume, Ruth Isabel, 1 Hunt, Arlene Guthrie, 2 Hunt, Thelma Norma, 1 Hunter, Nelda Rose, 2 Hurff, Emily Ann, 2 Hurt, Nell Eva, 2 Hutcheson, Eleanor Barksdale, 4 Hutcheson, Grace Collier, 1 Hutcheson, Jane Lee, 2 Hutchinson, Emma May, 3 Hutchinson, Jane Mankia, 1 Hutchinson, Julia Sara, 3 Hutchinson, Sarah Virginia, 2 Hutchison, Ella Florence, 1 Hutter,

Imogen Risque,

2

Jackson, Betty Lou, 3

James, Cynthia Ashton, 1 James, Margaret Edmonds, 4 Jarman, Mary Chlotilde, 4 Jarratt, Katherine Eppes, 3 Jeffries, Mary Helen, 4 Jennings, Betsy Jane, 1 Jennings, Elizabeth Hope, 2 Jester, Miriam Langston, 1 Johns, A. Penultima, 1 Johnson, Anna Margaret, 3 Johnson, Dorothy Lavinia, 2 Jollett, Sarah Burton, 2

Mary Jane, 3 Mattie, 3 Ruth Elizabeth, 2 Anna Browne,

4

Elies Rebecca, 2 Gladys Virginia, 2

Kathleen,

1

Marian Elizabeth, Martha Jane, 3

Mary

Charlotte, 2

Ruth Elizabeth, 2

Shawver Mill, Tazewell Church Road, Dinwiddie 93 Hampton Roads Ave., Hampton Nathalie, Halifax Victoria, Lunenburg

Nuthush, Lunenburg Nuthush, Lunenburg 335 S. Fourth St., Wytheville R. F. D. 3, Farmville 1407 Sauer Ave., Richmond 510 S. Main St., Farmville R. F. D. 1, Lynchburg Raccoon Ford, Orange Nathalie, Halifax R. F. D. 2, South Boston, Halifax LaCrosse, Mecklenburg Driver, Nansemond 209 Spring Hollow Ave., Roanoke Blacksburg, Montgomery

McKenney, Dinwiddie 25 Second Ave., Farmville

Harborton, Accomac

Herndon, Fairfax Craddockville, Accomac 1308 Stockley Gardens, Norfolk

Newport, Craig R. F. D.

1,

Lynchburg

High

N. C. 201 Nelson St., Williamsburg Havre (ie Grace, Md. Kendall Grove, Northampton Crozet, Albemarle 105 Lee Ave., Stony Creek Culpeper, Culpeper 710 First St., Roanoke Madisonville, Charlotte Military Rd., Suffolk Farmville, Buckingham Covesville, Albemarle 230 Penne St., Suffolk Standardsville, Greene

Stephenson, Frederick South Hill, Mecklenburg South Hill, Mecklenburg Farmville, Prince Edward

Jolliffe,

Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones,

116 Linden Ave., Lynchburg 1009 Elm St., Hopewell

1100 Forest Hill Drive,

Jacobs, Vera Helen, 4

Jolly, Jolly,

City or County

1

Buffalo Junction, Mecklenburg Concord Depot, Campbell Earls, Amelia 806 Appomattox St., Hopewell Monterey, Highland Wellville, Dinwiddie

809 High

St.,

Farmville

Point,


Register of Students

Name and Year Kash, Frances Vivian, 1 Keck, Frances Elizabeth, Keesee, Sara Belle, 4

City or County R. F. D. 2, Lynchburg, Campbell 745 Loyal St., Danville Sycamore, Pittsylvania 228 Thornrose Ave., Staunton

3

Pauline Carroll, 2 Kennett, Margaret Loyd, 2 Kent, Elizabeth Ann, 4 Keller,

Hardy, Franklin Columbia, Fluvanna Chase City, Mecklenburg Alberta, Brunswick Charlie Hope, Brunswick Toano, James City Onancock, Accomac

Kibler, Elva Mae, 3 Kibler, Rachel Wilson, 3 Kidd, Mary Elizabeth, 1 Kilby, Patsy Jean, 2 .

.

Kilmon, Eugenia Hardy, 2 King, Minnie Gertrude, 1 Krenning, Evelyn, 3 Kunz, Baylis Elizabeth, 1 Laird, Betty

McClung,

Tangier, Accomac 415 S. 4th St., Wytheville 1045 Rivermont Terrace, Lynchburg R. F. D. 1, Lexington, Rockbridge 306 River Rd., Hilton Village 507 Jackson Ave., Lexington 312 Second St., Farmville R. F. D. 2, Salem 227 Denver Ave., Lynchburg New Castle, Craig 231 44th St., Newport News

1

Lankes, Emily Elizabeth, 1 Latture, Roberta Fulton, 3 Lawhorne, Mildred Louise, 1 Lawrence, Dorothy, 2 Lawson, Sarah Virginia, 1 Layman, Eloise Grey, 2 Lee, Doris Elizabeth, 2 Lee, Florence Whiting, 3 Leftwich, Juanita Grey, 1 Le Grand, Elizabeth Labelia, 4 Leonard, Doris Corinne, 1 Lewis, Helen Elizabeth, 1 Lewis, Mary Elizabeth, 2 Ligon, Camillia Blanton, 1 Ligon, Mildred Scott, 2 Lindamood, Hannah Ruth, 2 Long, Helen, 2 Looney, Eveline Mackreth, 1 Loving, Mrs. Elizabeth Harris, 4 Loving, Ruth Vivian, 3 Lovins, Margaret Godsey, 1 Lowry, Velma Rebecca, 2 Loyd, Eugenia Penn, 2 Lucy, Betty Allen, 2 Lupton, Evelyn Mae, 3 Lybrook, Leona Grayce, 1 Lybrook, Johnny, 4 Lyons, Margaret Ann, 1

108 La Salle Ave., Bassett, Henry

M cCoy,

Mary

Hille, 3 Eliza, 1

McDaniel, McDaniel, Kitty Grey, 1 McDowell, Mrs. Helen R., 4 McFall, Madge Vass, 3 McGinnis, Jane Frances, 2 McGuire, Helen Virginia, 2

Hampton

Appomattox, Appomattox 75 Lowell St., Lynn, Mass. 122 Westover Ave., Roanoke 639 Jefferson St., Danville R. F. D. 1, Farmville, Cumberland

Mecklenburg Stony Creek, Sussex

Clarksville, St. Paul,

Wise

521 Falls Rd., Rocky Mount, N. C. R. F. D. 2, Pamplin, Prince Edward Louisa, Louisa

Cumberland, Cumberland 306 8th Ave., St. Albans, W. Va. 1217 Creston Ave., Roanoke 123

Sherwood Ave., Roanoke

Wythe Place, Norfolk Fincastle, Botetourt Fincastle, Botetourt

6112

1667 S.

McAfee, Alyce, 2 McAllister, Marjorie Stratton, 1 McCaleb, Martha Lee, 2 McCalley, Shirley Anderson, 2 McCaskill, Barbara Brand, 2 McConnell, Elizabeth Ethelwyn, McCorkle, Martha S., 4 McCoy, Elizabeth Price, 1

127

1

Sycamore

St.,

Petersburg

1006 Edgehill Rd., Richmond 615 W. 33rd St., Richmond 112 Shore St., Petersburg 128 N. 32nd St., Richmond McDonald's Corners, Ontario, Canada Agricola, Amherst 203 First Ave., Farmvdle

Monterey, Highland Monterey, Highland 3307 Wilson Ave., Lynchburg Concord Depot, Campbell

Williamsburg 1041 Main St., Danville 402 Allison Ave., Roanoke 110 2nd St., S. Roanoke


Register of Students

128

Name and Year

City or County

Mcllwaine, Helen Randolph,

McKenry, Mrs. Ellen

Scott,

MacKenzie, Theodosia, 2 McLain, Mabel Ellen, 4 McLaughlin, Bertha Dotger, McNeal, Edna Mae, 1 McPherson, Ethel May, 3 McRae, Elizabeth, 2 Maclay, Nancy Douglass,

1595 Berkeley Ave., Petersburg Cumberland, Cumberland 406 Middle St., Portsmouth St. Stephens Church, King and Queen 2027 Greenway, Charlotte, N. C. Fairport, Northumberland 703 Jamison Ave., Roanoke 703 Main St., South Boston

3

Sp

3

Hilton Village, Warwick 718 S. Adams St., Petersburg Lawrenceville, Brunswick 219 Brown St., Petersburg 311 Bridge St., Farmville 1001 Rowland Ave., Norfolk

1

Mahone, Mary Armistead, 4 Mallory, Frances Parham, 1 Mann, Aggie Louise, 2 Mann, Frances Estelle, 4 Markland, Aline Downing, 1 Marshall, Ann Elizabeth, 1 Marshall, Judith, 3 Marshall, Mary Alice, 3 Marshall, Susan Jane, 2 Martin, Jean Bruce, 3 Martin, Myrtle Frances, 4 Mason, Mary Meade, 2 Mauney, Mary Vera, 3 Maxey, Octavia Anna, 4 May, Catherine Elizabeth, 1 Mayes, Dorothy Elizabeth, 2

Mayo, Ora Walker, 1 Mayton, Martha Alice, 2 Meacham, Ernestine Henley, Meggs, Jennie Ethel, 4 Menefee, Dorothy Lee, 3 Messick, Eleanor, 1 Millner, Essie Robetta, 4 Minnick, Carolyn Virginia, Mish, Margaret Grayson, 1 Mitchell, Mitchell, Mitchell,

Victoria,

Lunenburg

1718 Kemper St., Lynchburg Amelia, Amelia Victoria,

Lunenburg

Lanexa, New Kent Dry Fork, Pittsylvania 2 Vista Ave., Lynchburg 1008 East 10th Ave., Hickory, N. C.

Powhatan, Powhatan 1436 Eureka Circle, Roanoke Stony Creek, Sussex Schuyler, Nelson 3

„

1

.

506 Colonial Ave., C. H., Petersburg 306 N. Stafford Ave., Richmond Marion, S. C. 99 Carolina Ave., Roanoke 709 Avenel Ave., Roanoke 315 52nd St., Newport News 1702 Richmond Ave., Lynchburg 8 Fordan St., Lexington

Northumberland

Marian Virginia, 2

Reedville,

Mary Edythe, Mary Walker,

815 29th St., Newport News Culpeper, Culpeper 107 35th St., Apt. 8, Newport News 1814 E. Boulevard, Petersburg Mt. Airy, N. C. 1608 Chapman Ave., Roanoke Chatham, Pittsylvania Reedville, Northumberland

1

4

Moger, Ruth Prudence, 1 Moody, Genevieve Rachel, 3 Moody, Margaret Louise, 1 Moomaw, Lorana Tillman, 4 Moore, Betsy Emma, 1 Moore, Emily Flynt, 2 Moore, Hattie Cleveland, 2 Moore, Nancy Hodnett, 2 Moore, Pauline Elizabeth, 1 Moore, Susie Lyle, 1 Moore, Virginia Anne, 1 Morris, Mildred Lovell, 2

Sutherlin, Halifax Chatham, R. F. D. 3

612 Victoria Ave., Hampton Kenbridge, Lunenburg 219 Pearl St., Suffolk

Rocky Mount, N. Nottoway

530 Park Place,

Morris, Virginia Lockett, 2

Burkeville,

Moss, Nancy Ward, 4 Motley, Mary Will, 1 Mottley, Mary Anna, 2 Mottley, Virginia Louise, 2 Moyer, Jean Vernon, 3 Murray, Patricia O. C, 1

Tazewell, Tazewell

Muse, Eloise, 1 Musselman, Virginia Mercedes,

C.

Chatham, Pittsylvania Farmville, Buckingham R. F. D. 2, Farmville 1702 Prentis Ave., Portsmouth 134 N. Peninsula Drive,

1

Daytona Beach, Fla. 1516 Matthews Terrace, Portsmouth 806 N. Barton St., Arlington


Register of Students

Name and Year Naff,

Nancy Fahey,

City or County

308 Rosalind Ave., Roanoke

2

Nease, Hilma, 1 Nelson, Caralie, 3

N elson, Opal

Irene,

Martinsville,

810 Grove 1

Niemeyer, Gloria Marie, 1 Niemeyer, Lucrece Bilisoly, 2 Nimmo, Marjorie Lois, 4 Frances, 2

Noell, Jennie Crews, 3 Nuckols, Ada Clarke, 1

Nunnally, Edith Hatchett, 3

Oakes, Alma Louise, 3 Oakes, Judith Virginia, 4 Oast, Ethel Blanche, 2 O'Farrell, Mary Margaret,

Kenbridge, Lunenburg Pamplin, Prince Edward 1050 Lechie St., Portsmouth Box 688, Rosedale, Covington Box 688, Rosedale, Covington 3321 Wilson Ave., Lynchburg

1

O'Farrell, S. Virginia, 2 Ottinger, Kathleen, 1 Overbey, Martha Allene, 2

Owen, Owen, Owen, Owen, Owen, Owen,

Betsy Carolyn, Betty Mae, 3

1

Emily Louise,

3

Chatham, Pittsylvania 113

S.

Pearl

St.,

Rocky Mount, N.

C.

Victoria, Lunenburg Jarratt, Sussex Jarratt, Sussex Wilborne Ave., South Boston

Mildred Rose, 4 Sarah Wade, 1 Virginia Sue, 4

Wilborne Ave., South Boston Forest, Bedford

Padgett, Lucille Helen, 1 Page, Irma Harrison, 1 Painter, Louise Earle, 3 Palmer, Louise Armstead, 4 Palmer, Muriel North, 1 Palmer, Ruth, 1 Pankey, Evelyn Ivey, 2 Papas, Marion Isabell, 1 Parcell, Virginia Louise, 1

Parham, Frances Worthington, Parker, Elizabeth Ann, 2

1

Parker, Mary Virginia, 2 Parks, Augusta, 2 Parks, Mahalinda Kellam, 1 Parrish, Martha Catherine, 1 Parsons, Ruby Mae, 2 Partridge, Esther Ruth, 2 Patterson, Agnes Meredith, 1 Patterson, Frances Gilmer,

St.,

Vinton, Roanoke 110 Grove St., Farmville 12 Md. Ave., Gaithersburg, Md. 243 N. Main St., Suffolk 620 Park Ave., Portsmouth 101 Brewer Ave., Suffolk Serpell Heights, Farmville Gretna, Pittsylvania R. F. D. 2, Richmond, Henrico 210 W. 12th St., Richmond

Nicol, Josephine Bell, 2

Emma

Henry

South Boston Masonic Home, Richmond Clarksville, Mecklenburg

1

Newcomb, Dorothy Anderson, Newman, Josephine Hope, 1 Newman, Nellie Kathryn, 4

Noblin,

129

Onancock, Accomac West Broad St., Richmond

3900

Cullen, Charlotte 2703 Marlboro Ave., Norfolk 2307 Buena Vista Rd., Winston-Salem, N. C. New Canton, Buckingham

1

South Hill Onancock, Accomac Pamplin, Appomattox Haymarket, Prince William

Emily Estelle, 1 Payne, Dorothy Marie, 2

Paulette,

Pavne, Nell Byrdine, 1 Payne, Roberta Fox, 3 Peerman, Martha Elizabeth, 2 Peery, Katherine Hall, 4 Peery, Mary Martha, 2 Perry, Betty Evelyn, 1 Persinger, Charlotte Elizabeth,

1500 Sunset Ave., Rocky Mount, N. C. 202 Richelieu Ave., Roanoke Merry Point, Lancaster Crystal Hill, Halifax Lawrenceville, Brunswick New Canton, Buckingham R. F. D. 1, Farmville, Cumberland 103 Wasena Ave., Roanoke 1607 Westover Ave., Petersburg 406 Glasgow St., Portsmouth Homeville, Sussex Parksley, Accomac

1

144 Holbrook Ave., Danville Tazewell, Tazewell Tazewell, Tazewell 605 Arden Rd., Roanoke 525 College Ave., Salem


Register of Students

130

Name and Year Petticrew, Mary Elizabeth, 3 Pettis, Virginia Lee, 4 Pettit, Mary Anne, 2 Pharis, Rose Putzel, 1 Phillips, Catherine Curie, 3 Phillips, Charlotte Stockley, 1 Phillips, Rebekah Louise, 2 Philpott, Elizabeth Maxine, 2

Agnes Evangeline, 3 Agnes Virginia, 1 Margaret Mason, 4 Pierpont, Nancy Clayton, 3

Pickral, Pierce, Pierce,

Pilkinton, Ella Marsh, 1 Pippin, Muriel Edgerton, Pittman, Billie, 2 Plunkett, Nancy Eudora, Polley, Virginia Ann, 4

Pope, Frances Bland, 4 Poston, Janie Katherine, Powell, Ann Wescott, 1 Powell, Frances Wesley, Powell, Powell, Powell, Powell, Powell,

1

1

3

Purkins, Virginia Beverley, 2 3

Radspinner, Catherine Louise, 2 Raiford, Frances Cleopatra, 2 Ralph, Elizabeth, 1 Ramirez, Romanita, 4

Ramsey, Eugenia Elizabeth, 2 Ramsey, Helen Glynwood, 2 Rapp, Ellen Elizabeth, 2 Rash, Gladys Virginia, 1 Read, Amy Ray, 1 Reid, Betty Evans, 1

Eva

Helen Dorothy, 4

Box 289, R. F. D. 3, Hampton Philpott, Henry Chatham, Pittsylvania Nansemond

Whaleyville,

Courtland, Southampton

Pugh, Carroll Wade, 1 Pugh, Katherine Lee, 2

Reid,

Martinsville

3

Price, Anne Fleenor, 1 Price, Katherine Elizabeth, 1 Price, Katherine Holcombe, 1 Fride, Florence Bernice, 1 Pritchett, Frances Beatrice, 3 Pritchett, Nell Clay, 1 Prosise, Annette Susan, 2 Prosise, Mary Marshall, 3

Reiff,

St.,

Hampton, Elizabeth City Melfa, Accomac 242,

1

Katherine, 2 Lucie Ellen, 2 Nancy Jean, 1

Evelyn M.,

Brown

Box

1

Nannie Lucille, 1 Power, Lula Johnson, 1 Power, Mary Carrington, 4 Pratt, Jane Frances, 1

Quillin,

Fork Union, Fluvanna 317

Warrenton, Fauquier 194 W. Main St., Salem 306 Somerset Ave., Richmond Fremont, North Carolina

Jane Buffin, 4

Purdum, Ruth Lea,

City or County 1540 Brandon Rd., Roanoke 212 South Linden St., Richmond

Lois, 2

Riverview Place, Hollins, Botetourt

Lynchburg

Drewryville, Southampton Rice Rd., Farmville 12 Denter Hill Court, Petersburg R. F. D. 1, Box 100, Mason's Creek Rd., Norfolk 341 La Salle Ave.,

Hampton

Wachapreague, Accomac Union Level, Mecklenburg 406 N. Lexington St., Covington Esmont, Albemarle 517 Locust Ave., Charlottesville 517 Locust Ave., Charlottesville Wellville, Nottoway Rice, Prince Edward

285 East Main St., Wytheville Brookneal, Campbell R. F. D. 3, Box 202, Petersburg 27 S. South St., Petersburg 27 S. South St., Petersburg

Wilson, Dinwiddie Wilson, Dinwiddie Charlotte Court House, Charlotte Phenix, Charlotte R. F. D. 3, Danville 1510 Avondale Ave.,

904

High

4008 Ivor,

St.,

Wythe

Richmond

Farmville

Ave.,

Richmond

Southampton

Lynchburg San German, Puerta Rico Drewryville, Southampton 100 Pennsylvania,

Box

292,

Sydnorsville, Franklin 606 Azeele St., Apt. 4, Tampa, Fla. Blackstone, Nottoway 721 Blair Ave.,

Hampton

1056 W. Beverley St., Staunton 307 Pine St., Farmville 108 Lansdowne Court, Lansdowne,

Penn. Reveley, Evelyn, 2 Reynolds, Mrs. Pauline R., Sp

705 Carter Rd.,

Roanoke

410 Second

Farmville

St.,


Register of Students

Name and Year Rhodes, Eva Lewis, 1 Rice, Margie Lucy, 3

City or County

Windsor, Isle of Wight 3207 Seminary Ave., Richmond

Rice, Mary Bernice, 2 Richards, Virginia Gray, 3 Richeson, Mabel Lucille, 4

R. F. D.

Mary Mary

Virginia, 1 Ritchie, Jane, 2 Robbins, Dorothy Elizabeth, 2

Roberts, Martha, 2 Robinette, Bunnie Francis, 3 Robinson, Florida Ashby, 3 Rogers, Anne Jones, 1 Rogers, Mary Rosalie, 1 Rollins,

Dorothy Buhrman,

3

W.

Franklin

St.,

Richmond

Johnsontown, Northampton 1040 Pine St., Norton Big Stone Gap, Wise 711 Locust Ave., Charlottesville

Crewe, Nottoway

Saunders, Catherine Clyde, 2 Saunders, Jane Harrison, 1 Saunders, Martha Anne, 3 Saunders, Nancy Virginia, 1

Margaret Bernice, 1 Nancy Hope, 3 Savory, Mildred Butterfield, Sawyer, Ann Hinton, 1 Saville, Saville,

1

Scales, Elizabeth Lesueur, 4

Schlobohm, Philippa Elizabeth, 4 Beale,

4013

119 35th St., Newport News Tazewell, Tazewell Mattoax, Amelia 2711 Floyd Ave., Richmond 31 Prospect St., White Plains, N. Y. 625 Carolina Ave., Norfolk

Agnes, 4 Nancy Ann, 1 Sanford, Jane Cabell, 1 Sanford, Louisa Frazer, 2

1

Eleanor McCartney,

South Boston, Halifax Bovce, Clarke

121 Peyton St., Winchester Shelmore Apt., Lynchburg

Sale, Sale,

Anne

Farmville

S.

230 55th St., Newport News Melfa, Accomac 1902 N. Quincy St., Arlington 838 W. Washington St., Petersburg 603 Virginia Ave., Roanoke

Rose, Virginia Graves, 1 Rosebro, Frances Brown, 2 Rosenberger, Jane Louise, 4 Ross, Vivian Elaine, 1 Rouse, Carolyn Towe, 1 Royall, Ellen, 2 Rucker, Sarah Anne, 3 Rudd, Alice Virginia, 2 Ruger, Helen Karlene, 1 Russ, Marguerite, 4

Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott, Scott,

3,

Sycamore St., Petersburg Amherst, Amherst

618

Ridgeway, Oza Pollard, 2 Riggan,

131

1

Ellen Kendall, 1 Harriet Jones, 2 Jean Arnold, 3 Mary Jane, 1 Pauline Hamilton, 4 Stella Crockett, 1 Scruggs, Bessie Lee, 1 Sears, Jeanne, 1 Seebert, Alice McFaddin, 1

Seward, Helen Kevan, 3 Seward, Sara Elizabeth, 2 Sexton, Elizabeth Lochridge, Shanklin, Dawn Sheppard, 1 Shannon, Mary Louise, 2 Shelburne, Elizabeth Ann, 2 Shelor, Janelle, 4 Shelton, Grace Mildred, 1 Shelton, Ruby Marion, 4

1024 First St., Roanoke 402 Buffalo St., Farmville Hilton Village, Warwick 3631 Watson Ave., Norfolk 719 Byrd Park Court, Richmond Blue Ridge, Botetourt Capron, Southampton Murat, Rockbridge Murat, Rockbridge 423 S. Sycamore St., Petersburg Farmville, Prince Edward Cascade, Pittsylvania 348 54th St., Newport News 203 Washington St., Portsmouth Virginia Apt No. 6, Suffolk Eastville,

Northampton

Orange, Orange 544

Elm

Ave.,

Roanoke

Parker St., Onancock Orange, Orange Box 312, Onancock, Accomac Second St., Farmville 1701 Boiling Ave., Norfolk Tazewell, Tazewell 1537 Berkeley Ave., Petersburg 5

1

Midlothian, Chesterfield 2506 Fairview Rd., Raleigh, N. C. 3607 Fort Ave., Lynchburg 2025 Rosewood Ave., Richmond Rocky Mount, Franklin Fincastle, Botetourt R. F. D. 2, Chase City, Lunenburg

Chase

City,

Mecklenburg


Register of Students

132

Name and Year

City or County

Shelton, Mrs. Nellie Russell, 3 Sheppard, Ethelyn Marie, 2 Shorter, Irma Lois, 2 Shulkcum, Jean Winifred, 2 Shumate, Ruth Elizabeth, 1 Sibold, Edith Jeanette, 1 Sibold, Sarah Mae, 3 Simmons, Mary Sue, 4 Simmons, Virginia Carol, 3 Sink, Jane Lee, 1

Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Snell,

Beverly Elizabeth, Doris Elizabeth, 1

1

Dorothy Juanita, 3 Dorothy Lindsay, 1 Eoline Perrye, 4 Estelle Walton,

1

Ethelyn Douglas,

1

Jeraldine Binford,

1

Julia Ellen, 2

Keith Marshall, 3

Margaret Ann, 2 Martha Virginia,

3

506 Buffalo

St.,

Farmville

Guinea Mills Charlotte Court House, Charlotte

Day

612

Oak

Ave.,

Hill,

W.

Roanoke Va.

Newport, Giles Newport, Giles Sebrell, Southampton .901

High

St.,

W estover 72

Farmville

Westend Ave., Apt. 610, New York City 1207 Maple Ave., Roanoke Lawrenceville, Brunswick Rice, Prince Edward 642 Park Ave., Portsmouth 211 W. Walnut St., Goldsboro, N. C. St.,

Victoria, Lunenburg Branchville, Southampton 2507 Arcutt Ave., Newport News Long Island, Pittsylvania 1220 _W. Franklin Ave., Richmond 321 Fudge St., Covington 253 Tazewell Ave., Cape Charles

Myra Elizabeth, 4 Nancy Vaughan, 4

Culpeper, Culpeper

Pattie Venable, 3 Virginia Louise, 4

R. F. D. 2, Brookneal, Charlotte 1510 Call St., Richmond

Virginia Winston, 4 Frances Dupuy, 2

Snow, Mamie Davis,

1

Snyder, Ada Claire, 1 Spencer, Katherine Cowherd, 2 Spencer, Sara Margaret, 1 Spinner, Judith Isabell, 2 Sprinkle, Dorothy Virginia, 2 Stargell, Nancy Carolyne, 1 Steele, Jean Elizabeth, 2 Steidtman, Lois Jane, 1 Stephens, Elva Margaret, 1 Stephens, Shirley Ann, 4 Stephenson, Margaret Louisa, 2 Stephenson, Olivia Doughtry, 4 Sterrett, Mary Louise, 2 Stevens, Charlotte, 3 Stevenson, Florence Boone, 3 Stimpson, Annie Camilla, 1 Stoakes, Joice Hathaway, 1 Stone, Anne Elizabeth, 1 Stone, Mrs. Jessie Taylor, Sp Stossel, Elsie Charlise, 1 Stoutamire, Salome Francis, 2 Stowers, Stella Marie, 1 Stras, Helene, 3 Strick, Alfreda, 2 Sturgis, Mary Catherine,

Cumberland, Cumberland

Dumbarton, Henrico Phenix, Charlotte R. F. D. 3, Farmville, Prince Altavista,

Gordonsville,

Orange

409 Pine St., Farmville 302 Piedmont Ave., C. H., Petersburg Buchanan, Botetourt Schuyler, Albemarle 1607 Lake Front Ave., Richmond 410 V. M. I. Parade, Lexington Gretna, Pittsylvania 241 E. 40th St., Norfolk Vanderpool, Highland Ivor, Southampton Rockbridge Baths, Rockbridge Arrington, Nelson

1603 Laburnum Ave., Richmond Farmville, Cumberland 1049 North St., Portsmouth 3002 West Ave., Newport News Carroll Hotel, Lynchburg Villa Ave., Front Royal R. F. D. 1, Box 242, Salem Gratton, Tazewell Tazewell, Tazewell 628 Oak St., Farmville

Nassawadox, Northampton 4 Summerfield, Elizabeth Virginia, 2... 408 Barham Rd., Roanoke

Summer, Eloise B., 2 Swingle, Ethel Lorraine, 4 Sydnor, Helen Virginia, 3 Sydnor, Lucy Lee, 1

Edward

Campbell

Baskerville, Mecklenburg R. F. D. 3, Petersburg

Mannboro, Amelia Crewe, Nottoway


Register of Students

Name and Year

133

City or County

Tate, Margaret, 3 Taylor, Mrs. Mary Glenn, 3 Taylor, May Robertson, 1 Taylor, Mildred Earle, 1

120 Fayton Ave., Norfolk Prospect, Prince Edward

Frances May, 4 Thierry, Florence Georgia, 2

Beaverdam, Hanover R. F. D. 5, Box 235, Roanoke R. F. D. No. 1, Box 24, Boone Mill South Hill, Mecklenburg South Hill, Mecklenburg Tazewell, Tazewell 518 Parkway, High Point, N. C. Cape Charles. Northampton

Terrell,

Thomas, Virginia Doris, 1 Thompson, Louis Gwendolyn, 2 Thompson, Marie Louise, 2 Thompson, Mary Gray, 3 Thompson, Pearl Price, 3 Thorington, Evelyn Marie, 3 Thornton, LaReine Harriet, 2 Timberlake, Evelyn Byrd, 2 Townsend, Elizabeth Bryan, 2 Stone, Mary Wenonah, 2 Travis, Helen Elizabeth, 2 Trice, Ruby Wellington, 1 Tripp, Barbara, 1 Tucker, Lucy Bridgforth, 3 Turnbull, Lucy Carmichael, 2 Turner, Frances Anne, 2

Turner, Lilian Ann, 2 Turner, Shirley Moore, 1 Tweedy, Marietta Lucille, Tvler, Betty Mae, 1 Tyler, Mildred Evelyn, 4

1

Onancock 120

W.

34th

Atlantic,

St.,

Richmond

Accomac

2022 W. Grace St., Richmond 126 Shore St., Petersburg 48 Shenandoah Rd., Hampton 101 Connecticut Ave., Lynchburg Toano, James City 503 S. Davis Ave., Richmond Drakes Branch, Charlotte 3400 Brook Rd., Richmond 1208 Bellevue Ave., Richmond 227 Academy Ave., Blackstone 403 St. Andrews St., Petersburg R. F. D. 1, Concord Depot Dunnsville, Essex 2831 W. Grace St., Richmond Cheriton, Northampton 307 Arbutus Ave., Roanoke

Upshur, Jean Snow, 3 Utt, Ella Marie, 2

Vaden, Harriette Spencer, 4 Valentine, Frances Moore, 2 Vassar, Edith Atkinson, 2 Vaughan, Doris Elizabeth, 1 Vaughan, Sadie Rebecca, 2 Vick, Marjorie Louise, 2 Vier, Patty Lou, Sp

1502 Confederate Ave., Richmond Brunswick, Brunswick

Wagstaff, Agnes Young, 4

Skipwith, Mecklenburg 100 Gates Ave., Norfolk Scottsburg, Halifax Buffalo Junction, Mecklenburg 3616 Hawthorne Ave., Richmond Rustburg, Campbell

Wahab,

Lillian Elizabeth, 2

Walden, Walker, Walker, Walker, Walker,

Edith Grey,

Annie

Belle,

1

1

Harriet Brown, 2 Lucy Lena, 4

Mary

Guinea

Virginia, 2

Wallace, Grace Louise, 1 Waller, Jane Franklin, 1 Walls, Elizabeth Virginia,

Keysville, Prince Edward R. F. D. 2, Franklin, Southampton Burkeville, Nottoway Branchville, Southampton Pulaski, Pulaski

Mills,

Cumberland

3919 W. Franklin St., Richmond 1410 Boiling Ave., Norfolk 1

Wamsley, Mary Stuart, 1 Ward, Margaret Louise, 4 Ware, Ann Burwell, 1 Ware, Josephine Roane, 2 Warner, Elizabeth Selden, 2 Warren, Dell Kennard, 3 Warren, Mary Houston, Sp Warwich, Jeanne Boisseau, 1 Watkins, Kathryn Elizabeth, 4 Watkins, Marget Ligon, 1 Watkins, Nancy Claire, 2

Lanexa,

New Kent

Millboro, Bath Box 13, Farmville, Prince Edward 83 N. Kanawha St., Beckley, W. Va. Dunnsville, Essex

Tappahannock, Essex Midland, Fauquier High St., Farmville Lexington, Rockbridge Amelia, Amelia 2128 Springfield Ave., Norfolk 312 First Ave., Farmville 711


Register of Students

134

Name and Year Watson, Georgia W., 3 Watson, Julia May, 2 Watts, Helen Wentworth, Watts, Jean Shields, 4 Watts, Myrtle Virginia,

1

Weaver, Kathryn Mae,

1

City or County R. F. D. 3, Farmville South Hill, Mecklenburg 3707 Nicholas St., Lynchburg

3

709 7th Saxis,

Webb, Betty Porter, 4 Webb, Dorothy Mae, 3

Roanoke

Accomac

304 High

Webster, Margaret Voochies,

3

St., Blackstone Emporia, Greensville Box 21, Amherst, Amherst

W. Main

Wentz, Helen Marie, 2 Wertz, May McNeil, 2 Wescott, Emily Ames, 1

127

Wescott, Mary Annabel, 3 West, Mary Owens, 2 West, Norma Lee, 1 West, Sarah Elizabeth, 3 Wheeler, Roberta Elma, 3 Whelchel, Martha Bearden, 3 Whisnant, Sarah Elizabeth, 3 Whitaker, Forrestine Lorraine, 3 White, Barbara Gresham, 1 White, Betty Faith, 1 White, Eleanor Miller, 2 White, Nelle Alice, 1 Whitehead, Ellen Katherine, 2 Whitfield, Margaret Sue, 2 Whitfield, Virginia Mae, 2

Whitlock, Evelyn Patricia, 3 Whitlow, Ann Reese, 1 Wiley, Ruth Gwendolyn, 1 Wilkerson, Violet Lucille, 2 Wilkins, Lois Angel, 2 Wilkinson, Elizabeth Penn, 4 Williams, Anne Carrel, 2 Williams, Daphne Lorraine, 1 Williams, Lora Elizabeth, 3 Williams, Mary Anne, 1 Williams, Mary Ellen, 1 Williams, Peggy French, 2 Williamson, Helen Tilden, 1 Williamson, Isabel Holmes, 4

Mary Hilda, 2 Mary Barnes, 1 Mary Louise, 1 Windham, Bess Rouse, 3 Windham, Lula Rouse, 4 Wills,

Willson, Wilson,

Winn, Flora Wilson, 2 Winn, May Turner, 2 Winslow, Jacqueline Byrd, Winstead, Ruth Whedbee, Wise, Eliza Warwick, 4 Witcher, Mrs. Mary, Sp

St.,

Brunswick, Brunswick

2 3

St., Ext.,

Schoolfield

Sherwood Ave., Roanoke

Onley, Accomac Onley, Accomac 4619 King St., Portsmouth

Onancock 940 N. St., Portsmouth R. F. D. 3, Lynchburg, Campbell 790 Armistead Ave., Hampton Woodland, N. C. 194 Warwick Rd., Hilton Village 18 Washington St., Springfield, Fairfax

Portsmouth

Linden, Warren R. F. D. 3, Roanoke

Chatham, Pittsylvania Handsoms, Southampton Handsoms, Southampton Mt. Airy, N. C.

Rocky Mount, Franklin Box 3, Clarksville, Mecklenburg 504 Park Ave., Farmville

Box

196,

Dumbarton, Henrico

Lawrenceville, Brunswick Chatham, Pittsylvania

Capron, Southampton 58 Court St., Portsmouth 58 Court St., Portsmouth 143 Carroll Ave., Petersburg Blacksburg, Montgomery 601 Pine St., Farmville 601 Pine St., Farmville Zuni, Southampton

Amelia, Amelia Lyndhurst, Augusta 1678 Berkeley Ave., Petersburg 1678 Berkeley Ave., Petersburg Wilson, Dinwiddie 858 Maiden Lane, Roanoke Northwest, Norfolk 330 55th St., Newport News

Wolfe, Elizabeth Rives, 1 Wolfe, Nancy Jane, 3 Wolfenbarger, Mary Elizabeth, 2 Woltz, Evelyn Hagood, 4

103 Chesterfield Rd., Hampton 707 High St., Farmville 519 Second St., Farmville 306 Riverview Ave., Hopewell 312 Boston Ave., Lynchburg Appalachia, Wise Nathalie, Halifax

Wood, Dorothy Lee, 2 Wood, Edith Mary, 2

Morrison, Warwick R. F. D. 3, Box 477, Petersburg

Witt, Isabel Jane, 2


Register of Students

Name and Year

City or County

Wood, Emma Pride, 2 Wood, Katherine Lucille, 4 Wood, Norma Kinsolving, 2

Amelia, Amelia 401 Wvcliffe Ave., Roanoke 1011 W. Grace St., Richmond La Crosse, Mecklenburg Long Island, Campbell

Woodall, Edna, 2 Woodall, Violet Mae, 1 Woodbridge, Reba Mary, 3 Worley, Virginia Waters, 1 Worsham, Marion Land, 3

Wortham, Geraldine

Rivers,

135

Chatham, Pittsylvania Madison Hgts., Amherst 920 N. Main St., Danville 1

Wright, Dorothy Alice, Sp Wright, Margaret Madison, 2 Wright, Winifred Ann, 1

Blacksburg, Montgomery 1000 High St., Farmville 1817 Hanover, Richmond 1000 High St., Farmville 1220 Oak Dale Terrace, Suffolk Hebron, Dinv/iddie Disputanta, Prince George

Yates, Elsye Berry, 3 Young, Anna Lathrop, 3 Young, Helen Rives, 2 Youngberg, Betty Mae, 1

2805

Zehmer, Mary Katherine, 2

406 N. Shepard

Monument

Ave., St.,

Richmond

Richmond

SUMMER SESSION— 1939 Emma

Allen, Ivy, 3 Allen, Rebecca Pruitt, 4 Alvis, Mildred O'Brien, 3 Anderson, Mrs. Hazel M., 2 Anderson, Louise H., 4

Mannboro, Amelia Airy, North Carolina Appomattox, Appomatox Cumberland, Cumberland

Anderson, Lucy Emily, 3 Andrews, Mrs. Mamie H Armistead, Frances Elizabeth, Sp

Ore Bank, Buckingham

Atkinson, Bessie Deihl, 4 Atkinson, Margaret Esther, 3 Avent, Marian C, 3 Ayres, Julia Ethel, 3

Bagby, Dorothy Ray, 3 Bailey, Elise Bennett Barlow, Elizabeth Louise, 2 Barnette, Emily Lucille, 3 Bass, Mrs. Ruth M., 3 Beach, Lillian Estelle, 3 Beach, Nina Alease, 3 Beale, Doris Inez, 3 Bellew, Helen Morton, 3 Bennett, Mary Louise, 3 Berger, Ruby Bigger, Nellie Noble, 3 Bilisoly, Virginia Isabel Birdwell, Joe A Blackwell, Martha Clarke, 3 Blanchard, Mrs. Marie T., 3 Blanton, Lou Anna, 3 Bondurant, Lucy Willa, 3 Booker, Frank Eubank, 4 Booker, Mary Emily, 2 Borum, Myrtle Leigh, 2 Boswell, Maude Alice, 3

Mount

Charlotte Court House, Charlotte Rice, Prince Edward 200 South Virginia Street, Farmville Blackstone, Nottoway Hampden Sydney, Prince Edward

Route

2,

Chester, Chesterfield

Arvonia, Buckingham

Glen Allen Rice, Prince Edward 209 High Street, Farmville 813 Denniston Avenue, Roanoke

Crewe, Nottoway Ford, Dinwiddie Ford, Dinwiddie Courtland, Southampton Saucier, Mississippi Keeling, Pittsylvania

627 Pennsylvania Avenue, Norfolk

Chase

City,

Mecklenburg

1023 A Street, Portsmouth Farmville, Prince Edward 1515 Seminary Avenue, Richmond Eastville,

Route

1,

Northampton Farmville

153 Hawthorne Drive, Danvdle Halifax, Halifax Hurt, Pittsylvania

Rice

Chase

City,

Mecklenburg


Register of Students

136

Name and Year

City or County

Hampden Sydney,

Bouldin, Mildred Turner Bowen, Ellen Gibson, 4 Bowles, Mrs. Rosebell Page Boxley, Mary Frances, 4

Cartersville,

Callis,

Exmore, Northampton R. F. D., Farmville

Michaux Wellville,

Nottoway

1503 Mozley Place, S. W., Atlanta, 220 Johnson Street, Bristol

Oak

Street, Farmville Hill, Mecklenburg Cartersville, Cumberland

South

Farmville, Prince Edward Island, Pittsylvania Gretna, Pittsylvania Farmville, Prince Edward Tazewell, Tazewell

Long

Boyce, Clarke Dolphin, Brunswick

Route Route

10, 2,

Richmond Box 24, Keysville

Rixeyville, Culpeper Rixeyville, Culpeper

Sales,

Mathews

..New Glasgow, Amherst

Amherst, Amherst ,Rustburg, Campbell Farmville, Prince Edward Farmville, Prince Edward 205 Broadway Avenue, Roanoke Farmville ^ 107 High Street, 1710 Seddon Road, Richmond Burkeville, Nottoway JBurkeville, Nottoway Blairs, Pittsylvania

Carter, Rebecca Dale, 3 Carter, Sarah Frances, 1 Christian, Susie Booker, 4 Clark, Krene Anderson Cline, Helene Albine, 4 Coalter, Margaret Elizabeth, 4 Cobb, Mrs. Annie Childress, 4

Gladstone

Temple Avenue, Danville Augusta Richmond, Henrico Crewe Wachapreague 723

.Stuarts Draft,

Cobb, Emily Sarah Cobb, Mary Ann, 2 Cobb, Virginis Scott, 3 Cocke, Vera Lacy, 3 Coleman, Laura Evelyn, 3

jWachapreague Blackstone, Nottoway Bedford, Bedford

Corbin, Krene Sally, 3 Costan, Helen Arthur, 4 Cralle, Janet Pearl, 4 Creedle, Mrs. Willie Newman, 3 Crowder, Annie Bell, 4 ,

3

Cumberland

North Holston, Smyth Meredithville, Lunenburg

Helen, 4 Bernice Lee Callis, Virginia Mildred, 4 Campbell, Maggie Mary Campbell, Virginia Louise, 3 Cardwell, Grace, 4 Carlton, Mabel M., 2 Carlton, Ruth Ophelia Carper, Sarah Blanche, 1 Carson, Dolly Juanita, 4 Carter, Harriet Cowler Carter, Mary Frances, 3 Callihan,

Giles,

Edward

New Glasgow

Boyd, Virginia, 4 Bracey, Marion Virginia, 3 Bradley, Marion Branch, Tena Miller, 4 Breedlove, Evelyn Sidney, 3 Brewer, Katherine Elizabeth, 3 Brown, Katherine Lofton, 3 Brown, Mrs. Mamie Stone, 2 Brown, Nellie M., 2 Bruce, Walter G, Sp Brumfield, Frances, 3 Brumfield, Hilda Grace, 3 Brumfield, Josephine Gunn, 1 Bundy, Elizabeth McClung, 3 Burch, Lena Mae, 3 Burge, Willie Thomas, 3 Burton, Helen Lucille, 3 Burton, Virginia Juanita, 3 Button, Doris Virginia, 4 Button, S. Elizabeth, 4

Crowder, Frances

Prince

Tazewell, Tazewell

Amherst, Amherst 559 Arlington Road, Roanoke 1301 Floyd Street, Lynchburg 2618 Fendall Avenue, Richmond Union Level, Mecklenburg Woodsdale, North Carolina Woodsdale, North Carolina

Ga


Register of Students

Name and Year

City or County

Dabney, Guelda Nuckols, 3 Dance, Alma Dennis Daughtrey, Blanche, 3 Davis, Dorothy Elizabeth, 4 Davis,

Dorothy Wilson,

137

Route

2,

Richmond

Halifax, Halifax Carrsville, Isle of Wight Box 1069, Richmond Sebrell, Southampton 801 Marshall Street, South

2

Dillard, Lester Layne, 4

Dodson, Janie Elizabeth, 4 Dowdy, Margaret King, 3 Doyle, Jean Castleton, 4

.Blackstone,

Drumheller, Ida Mabel, 3

Goode, Bedford Brodnax, Brunswick

Drummond, Annie Mae,

West Third McKenney

316

3

Boston

Nottoway Street, Farmville

Dudley, D. Lorraine, 2 Dudley, Jane Frances, 3 Dunn, Avis Zelma, 4 Dunnavant, Sylvia L., 4 Dupree, Ethel, 3

Redwood, Franklin High St., Farmville Vernon Hill, Halifax Enonville, Buckingham

Eades, Dorothy A. W., 3 Earnest, Ora, 2 Echols, Thelma Louise Edwards, Katherine Arendall Elliott, Mrs. Florence Cutts, 3 Elliott, Mrs. Grace Dickenson E'pes, Elizabeth P., 3 Evans, Enza Oneda, 4

237 Rosalind Avenue, Roanoke

709

Covington, Alleghany

,528

Hampton

Place,

Portsmouth

Blackstone, Nottoway Courtland, Southampton ,106 E. Third Street, Farmville 429 Rosalind Avenue, Roanoke 700 Main Street, Blackstone 625 Brussels Street, Clifton Forge

Mrs. Amanda Dunnavant, 4.... Crewe Frances Corinne, 4 303 Oliver Avenue, Crewe Farley, Elinor Swanner ,1525 Grove Avenue, Richmond Farley, Marian, 4 Merry Point, Lancaster Ferguson, Jeanette Estaline, 3 508 Avon Rd., Raleigh Court, Roanoke Ferguson, Sarah Elizabeth, 2 Boykins, Southampton Flannagan, Henry Alexander Chase City, Mecklenburg Flannagan, William Hamilton Chase City, Mecklenburg Ford, Dorothy Helen, 4 Arvonia, Buckingham Fraley, Margaret, 3 110 Virginia Avenue, Appalachia Fraughnough, Gladys Hattie, Sp Sparta, Caroline Fuqua, Ruth, 4 R. F. D. 5, Bedford Faris, Faris,

R. F. D. 2, Box 170, Lynchburg 107 James Avenue, Suffolk Ill Bridge Street, Farmville

Garbee, Florence Esther, 4 Gardner, Mary Lee Garnett, Edna Gertrude, 3 Garrette, Frances Christine, 4 Gates, Betty Wytt Gay, Mrs. Lizzie Brittle, 2 Geyer, Mary Malinda Gibson, Hazel Patricia, 3 Gill, Marie Woodson, 4 Gilliam, Mrs. Pearl Wingo Gillispie, Hamner Elizabeth, 4 Gills, Irene Leona

Appomattox Rice, Prince Edward City, Mecklenburg 301 First Avenue, Farmville

Chase

320 East 70th Street, Crozet, Albemarle Jetersville,

York, N. Y.

Amelia

Enonville, Buckingham Route 2, Farmville tarmville, Prince Edward 700 W. Virginia Avenue, Crewe Gloucester, Gloucester 317 Thirty-fourth Street, Norfolk St. Paul, Wise 516 Westover Avenue, Norfolk

June LaVerne Graham, Florence Josephine Gills,

Gray, Katherine Nelson, 4 Greathead, Virginia Marshall, 4 Greear, Mary Elizabeth, 3 Green, Nellie Rives, 4 Greig, Elizabeth Jane, 4 Guthrie, Mrs. Elizabeth Hendrick.

New

Rosedale ...

Route

1,

Farmville


Register of Students

138

Name and Year

City or County

209 Sherwood Avenue, Roanoke

Hall, Charligne Marie, 4 Hall, Margaret S Hannah, Sarah Elizabeth, 3

Hardy, Mrs. Annie A., 3 Hardy, Betty Jarman, 4 Hardy, Elizabeth Goodwyne, Harrell Carolyn Louise Harrell,

Ill

Holman, Mary Wortley Holmes, Evelyn Virginia, 4 Horsley, Katherine Dunscombe, Howell, Lizzie Watson, 2

Inge, Hilda Irvin, 3 Inge, Martha Virginia, 3 Isaac,

Mary Martha,

3

Jacob, Vera Mapp, 3 Jacobs, Vera Helen, 4

Jamerson,

Saltville,

Jesser, Margaret Jeter, Nancy Ora

Jett-Cranz, Mrs. Flora, 4 Johnston, M. Lucille, 3

E

Mattie

Anna Browne,

309

S.

Main

Street, Farmville

Cumberland Union Level, Mecklenburg Cartersville,

3

.

.

.

.

Lovingston, Nelson Sedley, Southampton Victoria, Lunenburg Midlothian, Powhatan

Max Meadows, Wythe Rice, Prince

Edward

Marshall Avenue, S. W., Roanoke Nathalie, Halifax Gladys, Campbell 123 Virginia Street, Farmville Charlotte Court House, Charlotte Indian Neck, King & Queen

f>2>2

Huddleston, Bedford Disputanta, Prince George Appalachia, Wise

Franktown, Northampton

Margaret

Jones, Jones,

Smyth

Moneta, Bedford Amherst, Amherst 215 First Avenue, Farmville Tetersville, Amelia 4001 Colonial Avenue, Norfolk Holston Valley Rd., Bristol, Tenn.

201 Nelson Street, Williamsburg Route 5, Danville

Jennings, Agnes Goode, 4 Jennings, Linwood Clark

Jolly,

News News

Hebron

Hillsman, Lucy Elizabeth, 3 Hillsman, Lucye Jane, 3 Hines, Edith Eloyse, 4 Hobbs, V. Mae Hobson, Mrs. Elizabeth V

Ellis

Appomattox, Appomattox Burkeville, Nottoway 102 N. Lexington St., Covington 1418 N. 22 Street, Richmond Reedville, Northumberland Farmville, Cumberland

South 3

Mauree Rebecca, 2

Hill,

Mecklenburg

Farmville, Cumberland Charlotte Court House, Charlotte

Kelley, Doris Esther, 3 Kendrick, Marie Louise, 4 King, Eura Virginia, 3 King, Jessie Lee, 3

118 Cameron Avenue, Petersburg Princess Anne, Princess Anne Princess Anne, Princess Anne Parksley, Accomac 124 Military Road, Suffolk 1507 Fillmore Street, Lynchburg Hurt, Pittsylvania

Kitchen, Irene McGregor, 4

Courtland

Kail,

Evelyn Dietrich, Lillian Ruth Mary Garland

3

Kellam, Kellam,

C.

Dillwyn

M

Hutchinson, Charles

Wilmington, N.

96 Thirty-first Street, Newport 96 Thirty-first Street, Newport Sandidges, Amherst

Harvey, Cecil Nell, 2 Harvey, Edna Earl, 3 Hawkins, Mrs. Myrtle Henderson, Dorothy Hicks, Helen Frances, 3 Hill, Nellie Moore, 3

Hudson, Eloise, 2 Hughes, Gertrude Ligon, 4 Hunt, Alma Fay, 3 Hunt, Mary R Hunter, Annie Mae, 3 Hurt, Benjamin Franklin Hutcheson, Mary Ligon, Sp

Street,

Kenbridge

3

Lena

Hubble, Ruby Lee, 3 Hudson, Dorothy, 4

Church

Arvonia, Buckingham Boone Mill, Franklin Farmville


Register of Students

Name and Year Lambert, Daisy Virginia,

City or County Blackstone, Nottoway 510 Victoria Avenue, Lynchburg

3

Landrum, Elsie Florence, 4 Lawton, Mrs. Helen Anne Lewis, John Fiimore Lewis, Lillian Maxine, Sp Lipscomb, Eunice M., 3 Locke, Louie Davis, 4 Loving, Margaret Elizabeth,

139

Michaux, Powhatan Farmville, Prince Edward 608 Buffalo Street, Farmville

Crewe, Nottoway 938 North Street, Portsmouth 3

705

Laburnum Avenue, Roanoke

McCaleb, Emily Louise, 4 McCorkle, Martha Strain, 4 McCoy, Bonnie McCutcheon, Grace Imogene, 3 McCutcheon, Russie Lucille, 3

112 Shore Street, Petersburg 203 First Avenue, Farmville 500 Mulberry Street, Martinsville Blackstone, Nottoway Blackstone, Nottoway

McFall, Mrs Elizabeth B Markham, Mrs. Annie V. D., 3 Marshall, Hilda Grey, 3 Martin, Evelyn Byrd, 3 Martin, Myrtle Frances, 3 Massey, Kathryn Jones, Sp Mayhew, Eula Ruth, Sp

'Care A. L. Bivins,

Miles, Mills,

Agnes

Mary

Virginia, 4 L., 3

Minkel, Lillian Amelia, Sp Mitchell, Calvin A., 3 Moore, Martha Martin, 4 Moore, Sara Vivian, 2 Morris, Betty Agnes, 3 Moss, Sarah Winifred, 3 Northcross,

Margaret, 4

Oakes, Alma Louise, 2 Oakes, Virginia Elizabeth, 3 Osborne, Ella Una Owen, Betty Mae, 2 Page, Mrs. Pair,

Dora

Ada J.,

Belcher, 2

3

Palmer, Louise Armistead, 3 Papas, Marion Isabell, 1 Patterson, Janie Virginia, 3 Patterson, William Stuart

Payne, Mrs. Rebecca Cocks, Sp Peck, Mildred Olivia, 4 Peebles, Hester Elizabeth, 3 Percivale, Pattie Perkins, Frances Leigh, 2 Pettway, Olivia Poteat, Mrs. Helen Hinton Powell, Mary Ellen Powell, Nannie Lucille, 1 Pratt, Marian Gray, 3 Price, Paulus Earl Pritchett, Ruth Ella, 3

Putney, Georgie Holman, 4 Putney, William Witt, Sp

Newport News

Bedford, Bedford

Avenue, Martinsville Cullen, Charlotte Dry Fork, Pittsylvania

7 Starling

126 North Ridge Street, Danville Gretna, Pittsylvania Ford, Dinwiddie Claudville, Patrick Farmville, Prince Edward

Walkerford, Amherst "Red Hill," Lexington Poquoson, York

Appomattox, Appomattox Emporia, Greenville Elliston,

Montgomery

Kenbridge, Lunenburg 1522 W. 40 Street, Norfolk Nickelsville, Scott Victoria, Lunenburg

Blackstone, Nottoway Pairs Store, Greensville Merry Point, Lancaster Farmville, Prince Edward New Canton, Buckingham

Langhorne Road, Lynchburg Prospect, Prince Edward 656 Northumberland Avenue, Roanoke 527 Washington Street, Petersburg 311 Webster Street, Petersburg Emporia, Greensville 240 S. Blake Road, Norfolk Route 3, Glenwood, Danville 169 Holbrook Avenue, Danville

Esmont, Albemarle 1004 Broad Street, Martinsville Farmville, Prince Edward 27 S. South Street, Petersburg Box 182, Farmville Farmville, Prince Edward


Register of Students

140

Name and Year

Mary Lou,

Raiford,

City or County

Green Bay, Prince Edward

2

Ramsey, Helen Glynnwood, 2

Sydnorsville, Franklin Ranson, Elizabeth Estelle, 3 Dillwyn, Buckingham Brunswick, Brunswick Rawlings, Ruby Wilkes, 2 Spencer, Henry Read, Lucile Carrington 22 Cleveland Street, Martinsville Read, Mrs. Marie Pannill Studley, Hanover Redd, Mrs. Elizabeth D., 2 R. F. D. 3, Farmville Read, Ruby Ranson, 3 Reveley, Evelyn, 2 705 Carter Road, Roanoke Reynolds, Mrs. Gertrude Gilliam, 3... 2024 W. Grace Street, Richmond Reynolds, Sallie Hunt Crider, 3 R. F. D. 3, Chatham Rigdon, Mrs. Louise Doyle, 4 McKenney, Dinwiddie Rives, Sally Royston, 3 McKenney, Dinwiddie Robertson, Bertha James, 4 Cumberland, Cumberland Robertson, Mrs. Essie Eubank, 4 Crewe, Nottoway Crewe, Nottoway Robertson, Mrs. Rosa Jones, 4 Big Stone Gap, Wise Robinette, Bunnie Francis, 3 Big Stone Gap, Wise Robinette, Trilby Josephine, 3 Jarratt, Greensville Robinson, Ruby Wright Cartersville, Cumberland Robinson, "Virginia Louise, 2 411 Webster Avenue, Portsmouth Roper, Sue Eleanor, 3 Mattoax, Amelia Rucker, Sarah Anne, 3 2604 Park Avenue, Richmond Rutherford, Margaret Frances, 3 Sadler, Gertrude Elizabeth

Buckingham, Buckingham

Sandidge, Dabney Henley, 4 Saunders, V. Welby, 4 Sawher, Ann Hinton, 1 Schenk, Mary Buford, 4 Schultz, Marie Augusta, 4 Scott, Dorothy Adaline, 3 Scott, Mrs. Lorna Smith, 3 Scott, Nell Charlton, 3

Farmville, Prince Edward 1107 Jackson Street, Lynchburg

Seamans,

Hugh Maxwell,

3

Shanks, Berniece F., 3 Shanks, Margaret Louise, 4 Shaw, Mildred Frances, 4 Shearer, Mrs. Louise Layne Shelton, Mrs. Nellie Russell, 3 Short, Mrs. Gertrude Doris, 2

Simmons, Elva Jane, 3 Simmons, Mary Smith,

3 Sinclair, Lila Wiatt, 4 Sinclair, Margaret M., A.... Slicer, Ann Britton Smith, Eoline Perrye, 3

Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith,

Mrs. Kathleen Gilliam, 3 Keith Marshall, 4

Margaret Hill, 3 Nancy Vaughan, 4 Sara Bell, 3

Theo

Virginia Winston, 4 Speight, Mary Verona, 2 Spencer, Edward Clinton, 4 Spencer, Stella Leigh, 3 Stacy, Ida Myrtle, 4 Stanley, Betty Frances, 2 Stargell, Goldie

Boggs, 4

407-A Beech Street, Farmville Route 5, Bedford Green Bay, Prince Edward Tazewell, Tazewell Dillwyn, Buckingham Parksley, Accomac Halifax, Halifax

Lee Lee Chase City, Lunenburg 846 Rivermont Avenue, Lynchburg St.

St.

Charles, Charles,

506 Buffalo Street, Farmville

Glasgow, Rockbridge Route 3, Petersburg Disputanta, Prince George Naxera, Gloucester 128 Locust Street, Hampton 707 Laburnum Avenue, Roanoke 211 W. Walnut St., Goldsboro, N. C. Oceana, Princess Anne 1220 W. Franklin Street, Richmond

Chase City, Mecklenburg Cumberland, Cumberland Petersburg Chatham, Pittsylvania Dumbarton, Henrico 165 Saratoga Street, Suffolk Buckingham, Buckingham 202 West Virginia Avenue, Crewe Pennington Gap, Wise Seaside Cottage, Virginia Beach Schuyler, Albemarle


Register of Students

Name and Year Stargell,

Nancy Carolyne,

City or County Schuyler, Albemarle Meredithville 235 11th Street, Wytheville 911 Federal Street, Lynchburg Farmville, Prince Edward

1

Steed, Sarah Frances, 4

Stephens, Frances Rebecca, 2 Steptoe, Lucy Cabell, 3 Stokes, Herbert Rieves, Stone, Esther Turner, 4

Sp

Bassett,

Strick, Alfreda Stubblefield, Sarah Belle, 4 Sturgis, Mary Catherine

Edward

Nassawaddox, Northampton .

.

Indian Rock, Botetourt Fincastle, Botetourt

.

Gretna, Pittsylvania 1716 Oakdale Road,

1

May, 4 Thomas, Doris C, 4 Thompson, Lois Dodd, 3 Thompson, Mary Gray, 3 Thompson, Sarah Holmes, Thornton, Rebecca Anne

Henry

Farmville, Prince Cash, Gloucester

Swartz, Mrs. Erne Fauber, 1 Switzer, Emma Elizabeth Gray, 3. Taylor, Rebecca Valinia, Taylor, Sara Irene, 3

141

Richmond

Beaverham, Hanover Gladys, Campbell

Terrell, Frances

Dry Fork, Pittsylvania Tazewell, Tazewell Dundas, Lunenburg

3

Midlothian, Powhatan Tazewell, Tazewell Timberlake, Mattie Belle, 4 Highland Springs Trainer, Frank Wilson Route 3, Farmville Traylor, Anna Frances, 3 701 Harrison Street, Petersburg Trear, Mary Madeline, 4 Farmville, Prince Edward Truitt, Dorothy Hazelette 214 Cedar Street, Suffolk Truitt, Helen Irving, 3 214 Cedar Street, Suffolk Tuck, Virginia Sue, 4 Blackstone, Nottoway Turner, Mrs. Murkland Dressier, 4... 517 Second Street, Farmville Turner, Ruth Winifred, 3 309 Oliver Avenue, Crewe Tyler, Mildred Evelyn, 4 2831 West Grace Street, Richmond Tice,

Mary

Elaine, 4

Vick, Marjorie Louise,

Branchville,

1

Waldrep, Emory Spur Wall, Virginia Langhorne

Southampton

Lovingston, Nelson Farmville, Prince Edward Saxe, Charlotte Nathalie, Halifax

Wallace, Doris Golda, 3 Waller, Annie G., 3 Walton, Genevieve Thomas Watkins, Janie Eilliard Watkins, Kathryn Elizabeth Watkins, Lula Epps, 3 Watkins, Nancy Claire, 2 Watkins, William Basil, 2 Webb, Virginia Gordon, 3 Weisiger, Charles William, Jr., Sp

Buffalo Junction, Mecklenburg 327 Raleigh St., Rocky Mount, N. C.

Amelia, Amelia Church Road, Dinwiddie 312 First Avenue, Farmville Kenbridge, Lunenburg 706 North Boulevard, Richmond Skipwith, Mecklenburg 410 Buffalo Street, Farmville West, Oscar Lawrence, Sp Woodland, North Carolina Whisnant, Sarah Elizabeth, 2 Lawrenceville White, Mildred Boiling, 4 143 Carroll Avenue, Petersburg Williams, Mary Ellen, 1 911 Brandon Avenue, Norfolk Williams, Meriem Ellen, 2 Pamplin, Appomattox Wilson, Ellen 4853 Washington Ave., Newport Wilson, Violetta Sprigg, 3 Virgilina, Halifax Wilson, Wilma Tuck, 3 312 Boston Avenue, Lynchburg Wolfe, Nancy Jane, 3 Wolfenbarger, Margaret Howard, 3. Appalachia, Wise Buckingham, Buckingham Wood, Mrs. Gladys Collins, 2 1224 N. Main Street, Danville Woods, Mrs. Vera Wilkins, 3 Crewe, Nottoway Woody, Lucile Rosalie, 4 Burkeville, Nottoway Wootton, Sadie Camilla

M

.

News


Enrollment for the Year

1939-40

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT Summer

Session 1939

Students living in Virginia Students living outside Virginia

357 9 366

Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors Special

13

47 171

94 students

41

Total in

summer

session

366

Winter Session 1939-40 Students living in Virginia Students living outside Virginia

885 47

932

Freshmen Sophomores

343 269

Juniors Seniors Special

172 132 16

students

Total in winter session Total

students

college

932 1,298

TRAINING SCHOOL DEPARTMENT High School

373 478

pupils

Elementary school pupils Total training school pupils Total in

all

departments

851 2,149


APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA Date. 1.

Name

3.

Address

4.

County

5.

Name

6.

Graduate of what high school

7.

Is

of parent or guardian

accredited?

it

When

New

9.

Year_

what other

A.t

work beyond high 8.

Age_

2.

institutions

have you done

school graduation?*

do you wish to enter?

or former student

10.

What

11.

Are you

Class

course do you wish to take? in

sound health as

far as

you know?-

DIRECTIONS TO STUDENTS 1.

2.

Please read carefully this catalogue.

*For advanced students: Ask the registrar of all institutions you have attended beyond high school to forward credits to the Registrar, State Teachers College, Farmville, Virginia, as soon as you decide to enter the College.

3.

Have your room assigned in the person in charge of this

Room

26.

Leave your baggage checks with

room and

the college will put your trunk in

your room. 4.

Ask any

5.

The the

girl

with a Y.

W.

C. A. ribbon

on

for information.

dormitories will be open to students on Tuesday, September 17th, and meal served in the dining room will be lunch on that day.

first


12.

Room-mate

13.

Room

14.

Remarks

15.

Sign your name here

preferred.

preferred-