Stateteachcol193031stat

Page 1

BULLETIN OF THE

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

Vol. XVI, No.

4.

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY

June, 1930

Catalogue

I930J93I

Entered as second-class matter November

12,

1914,

at the post office at

Farmville, Virginia, under the act of August 24, 1912.


CALENDAR 1930 JANUARY

JULY

JANUARY w T

w

T

F

s

1

2

3

4

5

7

i

9 10 11 12

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 13 14

15

16 17 18 19

212 2

23 24 25 26

8

5

M T

6

7

s

1

2

8

9 10 11

M

B

1

4 6

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 20

27 28 2 3 30 31

26 27 28 29 30 31

1932

1931

9

4

M T w T

5

6

7

JANUARY

JULY

V

B s

1

2

8

9 10

M T w T

r

8

1

2

3

4

8

9 10 11

3

5

7

6

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

8

3

M T w T

4

5

6

7

F

s

1

2

8

9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

FEBRUARY

AUGUST

FEBRUARY

1

2

8

9

1

6

3

4

5

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 10 11

12

2

4

3

5

7

8

6

7

13 14 15 16

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 17 18 1 9 20 21 22 23 23 24 25 26 27 28

252 5 27

24

3

4

5

6

2

8

9 10 11 12 13 14

7

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

5

6

7

8

3

4

5

7

6

8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

23 24 25 26 27 28 29

MARCH

SEPTEMBER 1

4

2

7

4

|

2

8

9 10 11 12 13

3

5

6

1

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

28 29

30 31

MARCH 3

1

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30

31

2

FEBRUARY

AUGUST

1

7

1

2

8

9

3

4

5

6

10 11 12 13

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 1 5 17 18 19 20

4

5

2

8

9 10 11 12 13 14

3

MARCH

SEPTEMBER 6

1

7

6

7

4

1

2

8

9 19 11 12

3

5

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

6

7

1

4

1

2

8

9 10 11 12

3

5

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 2 3 24 25 26 27 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 3 9

27 28 29 30

29 30 31

..

_,

27 28 29 30 31

30 31

OCTOBER

APRIL 2

1

3

4

5

.

6

7

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12 13

14

6

8

7

10 11 12

9

5

4

2

S

9 10 11

15 16 17 18

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 19 20 2 122 23 24 25

26 27 2 8 29 30 31

27 28 29 30

MAY 4

5

6

7

5

6

2

3

8

9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

7

2

8

9 10 11

3

4

5

6

7

3

4

6

7

2

8

9 10

3

4

5

6

7

2

1

2

8

9

8

9 10 11 12 13 14

3

4

5

6

7

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 16 17 1 8 19 20 21 22

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

3

4

31

5

6

7

2

8

9 10 11 12 13 14

2

1

7

4

5

16

17 18

6

19J20

28 29 3

31

9

7

1

8

9 10 11 12 13 14

3

4

5

2

6

7

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31

__

1

2

8

9 10 11 12 13

3

4

5

6 6

7

JUNE

1

2

8

9 10 11 12

3

4

5

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 21 22 2 3 24 25 26 27 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 29 30

8

1

DECEMBER

JUNE

9 10 11 12 13

8

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 14 15

3

7

..

DECEMBER

1

6

MAY

NOVEMBER 1

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 2 5 26 27 28 29 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30

30

5

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

..|..

4

2

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

9 10 1 1 12 13 14 15

JUNE

3

1

1

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

MAY 8

5

APRIL 3

1

26 27 28 29 30

1

2

4

1

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

NOVEMBER 1

OCTOBER

APRIL 3

1

28 29 30

27 28 29 30 31

5

6

7

1

1

2

8

9 10 11

3

4

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30


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LYRASIS

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Main Entrance


BULLETIN OF THE

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

Vol. XVI, No.

4.

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY

June, 1930

CATALOGUE REGISTER FOR 1929-1930

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR

Fall Quarter Begins

1930-1931

September 24.

Winter Quarter Begins January 1. Spring Quarter Begins March 17.

The

published by State Teachers College Farmville, Virginia 1930



TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE Calendar Appointments

5 _

-

State Board of Education Officers of Administration Officers of Instruction

6

_

7 8

10 16 17 18

Standing Committees Student Assistants Officers of Student Organizations Class

Gifts

19

General Information

:

History of the College Purpose Location _ College Plant Training School Facilities and OrganizatioiL

The College Year The Summer Quarter Expenses

21 21

22 22 22 23 24 24 25 25 26 26 27 28 28 29 29 29 30 30 30

_

v

State Scholarships Discipline

,

^

Student Government Association _ Religious Life of the College Young Women's Christian Association Virginia Normal League

u

Cunningham Memorial Loan Fund _ State Loan Fund Association of Alumnae Library and Literary

Reading

Room

Societies

Debate Club

Kappa Delta Pi

Society Society Pi Gamma Mu Society Pi Kappa Delta Society The Joseph E. Johnston Historical Student Publications

Alpha Kappa

Gamma

Prize -...

Courses and Certificates Entrance Requirements and Classification Requirements for the B. S. Degree Requirements for Teaching in Training School Record of Students Explanation of Numbers and Credits Instrumental Music

_

31 31 31 31 31 32 33 34 34 35 36

_

36

-

37 39 41

Courses of Study: Course I Course II Course III

-.

-


Table of Contents Departments of Instruction: Biology Chemistry and Education

Physics

_..

English Fine and Applied Arts

Geography History and Social

Home

_....

Sciences

Economics

Latin

Mathematics

Modern Languages Music Physical and Health Education Reading and Dramatics

-

42 45 47 55 61 65 70 76 80 82 86 90 93 97

Students

99

Recapitulation

115

List of


CALENDAR —Wednesday, September 24— quarter Friday, December Noon —Christmas Holiday begins. Wednesday, December 31 —Return 1931 —Thursday, January — Winter quarter Tuesday, March 17— Spring quarter Thursday, April Noon —Easter Holiday Tuesday, April 8:15 A. M. — Classes resumed. June 9— Close of Session. 1930

Fall

begins.

19,

to College.

begins.

1

begins.

begins.

2,

7,

Note

:

The dormitory

Rooms

will

September

will

old or new,

All students,

be open Tuesday, September 23.

are expected to

come on

that day.

not be reserved later than 9 A. M., Wednesday,

24, except in cases of special arrangement.

All students

who

expect to teach in the Training School must

report to the Director of the Training

September 24.

School not later than


APPOINTMENTS Wednesday, September

24.

—Auditorium— 8:15 — Room 21 —All new students applying 8:15

^All

first-year students.

for advanced

standing.

10:15

—Auditorium—^AU students above

first

year.

Thursday, September 25. 8:15

—Auditorium—All

first-year students.

Friday, September 26.

8:15

NOTE:

—Regular

class

work

begins.

Students reporting for schedules should bring with them re-

from the Registrar and from the be shown before schedules will be made. ceipts

Treasvu-er, as these receipts

must

See printed schedule of recitations for detailed appointments.

A

fine

schedule

of fl.OO will be charged each student

made before September

26.

who

does not have her


THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

Mr. Thos. G. Bubch

Mr. Robert

Martinsville,

W. Daniel

Mr. Herbert M. Harris

Lynchburg, Va.

JuDGE Robert M. Hughes

Norfolk, Va.

Miss Rose McDonald

Berryville,

Hon. E. Lee Trinkle SuPT. Jos.

W. Saunders

Va.

Brandon, Deal P. O., Va.

_ ^

_

-

Va.

Roanoke, Va.

Newport News, Va.


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

J.

L.

JARMAN,

LL.D.

President

JOHN

WYNNE,

P.

Ph.D.

Director of Teacher Training

SAMUEL

M,

HOLTON,

M.A.

Principal of Training School and Supervisor of Secondary Education

GRACE

E. MIX, M.A. Assistant Principal of Training School

JENNIE M. TABB Registrar, Secretary to the President, Secretary of the Faculty

MARY WHITE COX Head

of the

Home

CAMPER JAMISON

MRS. BESSIE Dietitian

V. HINER Treasurer

WINNIE

MARY McCAULEY SNEAD,

B.A.

Librarian

EDITH

M.

MARSHALL,

B.S.

Assistant Librarian

SUSAN W.

FIELD, M.D.

Resident Physician

WILLIE

McKEE,

R.

'Resident

MAUD

K.

R.N.

Nurse

TALIAFERRO

Postmistress and

SAMUEL

L.

Manager of Supply Room

GRAHAM

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds

VIRGILIA

I.

BUGG

Assistant Registrar

FRANCES

SHELTON

B. Assistant

MRS.

Head

of the

Home

LAURA ANDERSON MOSS Assistant to Treasurer

MRS.

EMMA BUGG BLANTON Night Matron


Officers of Administration

MOLLIE

H.

BLANTON

Clerk in Registrar's Office

RACHEL

K.

HENDERLITE

Clerk in Registrar's Office

POTTS

M, VIRGINIA

Secretary to the

MRS.

Head

of the

Home

EVA HETERICK WARREN Assistant in

MRS. HALLIE

K.

Assistant in

MRS. NETTIE

D.

Assistant in

Home

Department

LAING Home

Department

HURT Home

Department

HOUSTON BLACKWELL Assistant in

Home

Department

MRS. ALICE PEERY Supervisor of Dining Hall

MRS. ANNIE

FARRAR SHELTON

Assistant to Dietitian

MRS.

MARY MORGAN PROVINCE Supervisor of Pantry

MRS. LILLIAN

NUNN

V. Supervisor of Laundry


;

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION

J.

L.

JARMiAN,

LL.D., President 1886-1889

University of Virginia,

MARY BARLOW,

B.S.,

;

LL.D., Hampden-Sydney College.

M.A.

Professor of Physical and Health Education B.S., diploma in Health Education, and M.A. Teachers College, Columbia graduate Poss6 School of Physical Education, Boston, Mass. University Summer Course, Institute of Gymnastics, Denmark. ;

*MARY HELEN BARNES,

B.S.,

M.S.

Associate Profesor of English B.S. in Education and M.S. in English, University of Virginia; Summer Courses, Oxford University, England.

VIRGINIA BEDFORD,

B.S. Assistant Professor of

Fne and Applied Arts Summer

University of Missouri

Education,

B.S.

in

lege,

Columbia University.

;

Course,

Teachers

Col-

LEON

E. BELL, B.A., M.A. Associate Professor of Education M.A. and Master's Diploma in Education, B.A. Northwestern University Teachers College, Columbia University graduate student. University of Chicago, and Boston University. ;

;

ADA RANDOLPH BIERBOWER,

B.S. Superznsor, Prospect Rural Training School B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University.

WARREN

BOWMAN,

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. D. Professor of Education

B.A. Bridgevrater of Chicago.

Bridgewater,

College,

PAULINE CAMPER,

B.S.,

Va.

;

M.A.

and

Ph.D.

University

M.A.

Supervisor of R^iral Education B.S., M.A. and Diploma as Director

of Rural

Education, Teachers College,

Columbia University.

E. CARTER, B.S., M.A. Supervisor of Grammar Grades, Campus Training School B.S., M.A. and Diploma in Normal School Sui)ervision, Teachers

ALICE

Columbia University.

MYRTLE CASH,

B.Ed.

Assistant Professor of Geography B.Ed. Illinois State

Normal

University.

KATHLEEN DOUGLAS CLEAVELAND,

B.S. Supervisor, Worsham Rural Training School B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers.

*On

leave of absence.

College,


;

Officers of Instruction

11

CAROLYN COGBILL Grammar

Part-Time Assistant Supervisor of Training School Diploma State Teachers

CoUegre,

FarmviUe

;

Summer

Campus

Grades, Courses,

University

of Virginia.

FLEETA COOPER,

B.S. Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences George Peabody College for Teachers graduate student for one

B.S.

;

year.

University of Chicago.

MARTHA

W. COULLING,

L.I.

Profesosr of Fine and Applied Arts George Peabody College Martha's Vineyard Summer School student under Fred W. Daniels and W. T. Bear, Chautauqua Summer School student for two years. Teachers College, Columbia University Applied Arts Summer Summer Course, University of Chicago. School, Chicago L.I.

;

;

;

;

;

M.

BOYD COYNER,

B.A.,

M.A.

Professor of Education B.A. Concordia College

two

years,

M.A. University of Virginia

;

;

graduate student for

Columbia University.

OTTIE CRADDOCK,

B.A.

Assistant Professor of Fine and Applied Arts Summer Courses, University of Virginia B.A. Roanoke College work under Dr. Frank N. Freeman, of University of Chicago. ;

;

special

MARY LOUISE DRAKE,

B.A., M.A. Assistant Professor of English B.A. Randolph-Macon Woman's College

M.A. University of Virginia.

;

*HELEN DRAPER,

B.S. Assistant Professor of

Modern Languages

Summer Courses, University of VirB.S. State Teachers College, Farmville ginia and Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt. ;

SUSIE

VANN FLOYD Part-Time

Assistant

Training School Diploma State Teachers

Supervisor

Grammar

of

Campus

Grades,

College, Farmville.

NANCY FOSTER,

B.A., M.A. Assistant Professor of English

M.A. University of Virginia B.A. Mississippi State College for Women graduate student. Summer, University of Virginia. ;

RAYMOND HOLLIDAY FRENCH,

B.S.,

M.S.

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Physics Summer Courses, Virginia PolyB.S., M.S. Vrginia Polytechnic Institute ;

technic Institute.

JAMES

M.

GRAINGER,

M.A.

B.A.,

Professor of English M.A. University of North Carolina Columbia University, 1926-27.

B.A. University of Cincinnati student,

*On

leave of absence.

;

;

graduate


Officers of Instruction

12

E.

MYRTLE CRENELS,

B.S.

Professor of Geography graduate student, George PeaB.S. George Peabody College for Teachers body College for Teachers, and University of Wisconsin. ;

MARY BURNS HAYNES,

B.S., M.A. Primary Education and Supervisor of First and Second Grades,

Campus Training School M.A. George Peabody College for Teachers.

B.S.,

AIARY CLAY HINER,

M.A.

B.S.,

Professor of English M.A. George Peabody College for Teachers graduate student, George Peabody College for Teachers, and University of Virginia. B.S.,

;

SAMUEL

HOLTON,

B.A., M.A. Campus Training School and Supervisor Rural High Schools

M.

Principal of in B.A., M.A.

Duke University and Duke University.

OLIVE

;

Summer

of Teaching

Courses, University of North Carolina

T. ILER Associate Professor of Physical Education

Graduate, Sargent School of Physical Education

ANNE MEREDITH

JEFFERS,

;

student,

Pratt Institute.

B.S.

Instructor in Mathematics B.S. State Virginia.

Teachers

Farmville

College,

CEORCE W. JEFFERS,

B.S.,

;

Summer

Courses,

University

of

M.A.

Professor of Biology B.S.,

M.A. Boston University Board of Canada.

research student. University of Toronto and

;

Biological

ELLEN LUCILE JENNINCS,

M.S.

B.S.,

Assistant Professor of English B.S.,

M.S. University of Virginia

;

graduate student. Summer, University of

Virginia.

BESSIE

H.

JETER,

B.S.,

M.A.

Associate Professor of Home Economics B.S., M.A., and Teachers Diploma, Teachers College, Columbia University.

BESSIE

CORDON

JONES, B.S. Supervisor, Rice Rural Training School

B.S. State Teachers College, Farmville Summer College for Teachers, and Columbia University. ;

Courses,

George

Peabody

MARY PHILLIPA

JONES, B.S. Associate Professor of Education B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University.

LILA LONDON,

B.S.,

M.A.

Professor of Mathematics B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers M.A. and Master's Diploma as Teacher of Mathematics in Normal Schools and Teachers Colle^^es, Teachers College, Columbia University. ;


Officers of Instruction

WILHELMINA PALESKE LONDON,

13

M.A.

B.S.,

Associate Professor of English State Teachers College, Farmville M.A. and Master's Diploma aa Teacher of English in Normal Schools and Teachers Colleges, Teachers College, Columbia University. B.S.

THOS.

;

A. McCORKLE, B.A., M.S. Professor of Chemistry and Physics

B.A. Washington and Lee University years chemist in U. S. Navy.

University

M.S.

;

of

Chicago

;

five

LOUISE STEELE McCORMICK,

B.S. Assistant Supervisor of Primary Grades,

B.S.

State Teachers

College,

GRACE ELDRIDGE MIX,

Campus Training School

Farmville.

B.S.,

M.A.

Assistant Principal, Campus Training School; Supervisor of Kindergarten B.S., M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University Summer Courses, Uni;

versity of Chicago.

GRACE

B.

MORAN

Primary Supo-visor in Rural Training Schools Diploma State Teachers College, Farmville Summer Courses, George Peabody College and University of Chicago. ;

CHARLES GEORGE GORDON MOSS,

B.A., M.A. Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences M.A. Yale University. B.A. Washington and Lee University ;

MARY

NICHOLS,

M.S.

B.S.,

Assistant Professor of

Modern Languages

B.S. State Teachers College, Farmville

;

M.S. University of Virginia.

GEORGIE NORRIS,

B.S. Supervisor of Fourth Grade, Campus Training School

B.S. State Teachers College, Graduate Woman's College, Greenville, S. C. three summers graduate work. University of South Carolina. ;

FarmvUle

;

MARY

E. PECK, B.S. Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences graduate student, one year, UniB.S. state Teachers College, Farmville ;

versity of Virginia.

IDA

WOODROW

PENNEY,

B.A.,

M.A.

Supervisor of Third Grade, Campus Training School M.A., and Master's Diploma as Director of B.A. Winthrop College, S. C. Teacher-Training in Normal Schools and Teachers Colleges, Teachers Col;

lege,

Columbia University.

MARY GOODWIN

PETTIT, B.A., M.A. Assistant Professor of History and Social Sciences Summer student, TeachB.A. Duke University M.A. Columbia University ;

;

ers College, N. Y.

MARY

D. PIERCE, B.A., M.A. Associate Professor of Education B.A. George Peabody College for Teachers M.A., and Master's Diploma in Elementary Supervision, Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate student. Teachers College, Columbia University. ;


;

Officers of Instruction

14

M. VIRGINIA POTTS,

B.S.

Part-Time Instructor

in Music State Teachers College, Farmville.

B.S.

LISABETH PURDOM,

B.Mus.

Assistant Professor of Music Bachelor of Music, Brenau College Conservatory, Gainesville, Ga. Courses, Conservatory versity of New York.

of

Music,

Cincinnati

;

University

of

;

Summer

Georgia

;

Uni-

MINNIE

V. RICE Professor of Latin

Graduate Farmville College

;

Summer

Courses, Harvard University, Columbia

University.

R.

AVICE ROANE,

B.S. in Edu. Supervisor, Curdsville Rural Training School in

B.S.

Education, University of Virginia.

MARY LOUISE ROBERTSON,

M.A.

B.S.,

Assistant Professor of Physical Education B.S., M. A., and Diploma in Physical Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.

CHARLES

A. ROUSE, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of English

Ph.B., M.A'. University of Chicago

;

Ph.D. Cornell University.

*FRANCIS BUTLER SIMKINS,

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Associate Professor of History arid Social Sciences B.A. University of South Carolina M.A., Ph.D. Columbia Fellow in American History, Columbia University. ;

University

ESTELLE SMITHEY,

B.A. Professor of Modern Languages Diploma of L'Alliance FranB.A. Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Va. Summer Courses, Columbia University. caise student at The Sorbonne, Paris ;

;

;

MABEL ELIZABETH SPRATLEY,

B.S.

Instructor in English B.S.

State Teachers College, Farmville.

GEORGIANA ELIZABETH STEPHENSON,

B.S. Supervisor, Cumberland Rural Training School

B.S. State Teachers College, Farmville ginia.

EDITH STEVENS,

;

Summer

student. University of Vir-

M.A., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology B.A., M.A. West Virginia University Ph.D. University of Chicago. ;

ANNIE LAURIE STONE Supervisor, John Randolph Rural Training School Diploma State Teachers College, Farmville Summer student, Columbia University and University of Virginia. ;

*0n

leave of absence.


;;

Officers of Instruction

15

FLORENCE HAMER STUBBS,

B.S. Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers; graduate student, George Peabody College for Teachers.

O.

PHILOMENA SUPPER,

B.A., M.A. Associate Professor of Physical and Health Education Denver B.A. University of M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University ;

gradSt. Joseph's Hospital Training School for Nurses, Philadelphia Summer Courses, uate Pennsylvania School for Social and Health Work University of Southern California, and Teachers College, Columbia University.

R.N.

;

;

CARRIE

TALIAFERRO,

B.

B.S.,

M.A.

Professor of Mathematics M.A. Teachers

B.S.,

College,

Columbia University.

STELLA BOSWORTH TAYLOR,

B.A., M.A. Assistant Professor of English B.A. Fairmont State Teachers College, Fairmont, W. Va. graduate and post-graduate, Emerson College of Oratory M.A. Teachers College, Colum;

;

bia Universtiy.

SARAH BOYD TUCKER,

B.A., M.A. Associate Professor of History and Social Sciences Summer Courses, UniB.A. Winthrop College M.A. Columbia University versity of Chicago, Columbia University and University of California. ;

KATHARINE TUPPER,

;

B.S.,

M.A.

Professor of Home Economics Diploma Ontario Ladies College, Whitby, Canada B.S., M.A., and Master's Diploma in Supervision of Household Arts, Teachers College, Columbia Uni;

versity.

HELEN MAY TURNER,

B.S. in Music

Professor of Music B.S. New York University gogy

;

diploma Northampton Institute of Music PedaPaltz Normal School and University of Pennsylvania Courses, Cornell University and Columbia University.

courses,

Summer

;

New

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY,

M.A., Ph.D. Professor of History and Social Sciences M.A. Randolph-Macon College Ph.D. Illinois Wesleyan University ;

;

grad-

uate student. University of Chicago.

FRANCES WATERS,

B.S. Assistant Professor of Geography B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers body College for Teachers.

;

graduate student,

George Pea-

LEOLA WHEELER,

B.A. Professor of Reading and Dramatics

diploma and post-graduate diploma, Emerson College B.A. Smith College of Oratory ; graduate student. School of Expression, Boston, and Teachers College, Columbia University. ;

JOHN

WYNNE, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Professor of Education and Director of Teacher-Training M.A. Trinity College (now Duke University) Ph.D. Columbia Uni-

P.

B.A.,

versity.

;


STANDING COMMITTEES

Committee on College Courses of Study Dr. Jarman, Miss L. London, Mr. Grainger, Dr. Walmsley, Miss CouUing, Miss Stubbs, Miss Grenels, Miss Haynes, Miss Tupper, Dr. Wynne, Mr. Jeffers, Mr. Coyner, Miss Carter, Miss Mix, Mr. McCorkle, Miss Pierce and Miss Camper.

—Mr.

Committee on High School Course of Study

Holton, Miss

W.

Lon-

don, and Miss Peck.

Committee on Elementary Courses of Study Dr. Wynne, Miss Mix, Miss Hiner, Miss Grenels, Mjiss Haynes, Miss Carter, and Miss Cooper. Committee

on

Advanced

Credits

— Miss

Rice,

Miss

Taliaferro,

Miss

Tucker, and Miss Tabb.

Committee on Schedule of Recitations Mr. McCorkle, Miss Jeter, Mr. Coyner, Dr. Walmsley, and Dr. Bowman.

— Mr.

Committee on Annual

McCorkle, Miss Bedford, and Miss Jennings.

—Miss

Committee on Entertainments

Coulling, Miss Wheeler, Miss Bar-

low, and Miss Turner.

Committee on Chapel Program Miss Hiner. Coinmittee

on

—Miss

Chapel Attendance

— Miss

Stubbs,

Miss

Barlow,

W.

London,

and

Miss Her, and Miss

Draper.

Committee on Publicity

—Dr.

Walmsley, Dr. Simkins, Mr.

Jeffers,

and

Miss Jennings.

—Miss

Committee on Normal League Loan Fund and Miss Coulling.

Smithey, Miss Rice,


STUDENT ASSISTANTS

Library

MABEL BARKSDALE MARY ELLEN CATO CATHARINE DIEHL HELEN DUNKLEY LOUISE ELLIOTT

ALMA GARLICK JANE GREY IRBY

RUTH OWEN CORA LEE PHILPOTT ANNIE POLLARD EUNICE LINDSAY WHITE

DOROTHY WORSHAM Training School

MARGARET BOCK ELIZABETH HUGHES ADELE HUTCHINSON ETTA MARSHALL LUCY THOMPSON Laboratories

ROBERTA ALICE HAMNER—5/0/0^3; NATALIE nOlA^ADKY— Chemistry MARGARET J. LEONARD— 5fo/o^j ALLIE GARDNER OlAW'ER— Biology

MARY JANE VADEN— 5/0/0(73Instruction

MARY FRANCES HATCHETT—P/jj^/ca/ ARMISTEAD JANE SCOTT— Drawm^ FRANCES WILSON—Hwforj

Education


OFFICERS OF STUDENT

ORGANIZATIONS Student Government Association

Etta Leah Marshall Virginia M. Gurley Eleanor Grove Hogan Mary Frances Hatchett Virginia N. Robertson

President

—Vice-President Secretary Treasurer

,

Chairman of Campus League

_

_

Young Women's

Christian Association

Hutchinson

Adele

President

Rena Mae Robertson

Undergraduate Representative

Margaret Josephine Leonard

Blanche How^ard Murrell

Vice-President Secretary Treasurer

„

Martha Edge Paris Athletic Association

Laura May Smith Kappa Delta Pi

President

{National

Honor

Society)

President Grace Brov^^ning Moran Alpha Kappa Gamma {National Honor Fraternity for Leadership) President Virginia M. Gurley Pi Gamma Mu {National Social Science Honor Society)

Lucille

Norman

President

Pi Kappa Delta {Natioiml Forensic Honor Society)

Frances Wilson

President

^

Dramatic Club

Henrietta

Cornwell

..

_...

President

Debate Club

Rena Mae Robertson

_

^

President

Cunningham Literary Society

Linda E. Wilkinson

_

w

President

Ruffner Literary Society

Owen

Ruth

.-

President

,

Orchestra

Pearl Vail Johnson

President

*

Choral Club

Elizabeth

Mae Taylor

_

President

u

The Rotunda {College Paper)

Lucy R. Thompson Sara McCorkle

Editor-in-Chief Business Manager

The Virginian {College Annual) Lucille

Norman

r

-

Editor-in-Chief

The Voice {College Magazine)

Mary Ellen Cato

...^

Editor-in-Chief

-

Class Organisations

Mary

Lucille Graves

Laura Northern Smith Verna Virginia Cox Anne Janet Johnson

,

^....,

President Senior President Junior Presdent Sophomore President Freshman

Class Class Class Class


CLASS GIFTS For some years it has been the custom of the graduating classes to leave with the college a parting gift, as a token of love and The following is a list of the gifts which have resulted loyalty.

from

this beautiful

Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class Class

of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of of

custom:

1904 Bible for Auditorium. 1904 Reading stand for Auditorium. January, 1905 Statue (Venus de Milo). Statue (Winged Victory). June, 1905

January, June,

— — January, 1906— Statue (Urania). June, 1906— Statue (Minerva Justiniana). January, 1907— Picture (Aurora). June, 1907— Picture (Dance of the Muses). 1908— Statue (Diana Robing). January, 1909— Picture (Corot Landscape). June, 1909 — Flag for dome of Main Building. 1910—$140.00 1911—$140.00

for Normal League. for Normal League 1912 $100.00 for pictures for Training School. 1913—$100.00 for books for Infirmary. 1914 Statue (Jeanne d'Arc). 1915-$100.00 for pictures for Training School. 1916 Portrait of President Jarman. 1917—$150.00 diverted to Belgian Relief Fund. 1918—$185.00 diverted to Student Friendship War Fund. 1919—$150.00 diverted to United War Work Campaign. 1920 Statue (Appeal to the Great Spirit). 1921—$300.00 for Student Building. 1922—$160.00 for Student Building. 1923—$150.00 for Student Building. 1924—$350.00 for Student Building. Degree Class of 1925 Pictures for Student Building (The Cornfields by Constable, and The Swiss Village of Laufenburg by Cooper). Diploma Class of 1925 Picture for Student Building (Peace and Plenty by Inness). Degree Class of 1926 Sun Dial for Campus. Diploma Class of 1926 Banners. Degree and Diploma Classes of 1927 Orthophonic Victrola. Degree and Diploma Classes of 1928 §200.00 to Normal League. Summer Classes of 1928 Picture for Student Building (Midwinter, by Jonas Lie). Degree and Diploma Classes of 1929 Furnished The Helen Wiley Jar-

— —

— —

— —

man

Library at Longwood.

Simimer Classes of 1929

— Colonial

Clock for Longwood.



GENERAL INFORMATION History of the College

The first Legislature to assemble after the adoption of the post-helium Constitution, established, July 11, 1870, a system of For twelve years or more the conduct of these public schools. schools was entrusted to such teaching force as was found ready In this experimental period nothing was more fully at hand. demonstrated than that, if the returns were to be in any wise commensurate with the cost and the high mission of the system, some provision must be made for a reliable source of supply of teachers, fitted by education and training for their work. To meet this demand the Legislature, on March 7, 1884, passed an act establishing a State Female Normal School. In October of the same year the school was opened, buildings, already in use for school purposes, having been donated by the town of Farmville. One hundred ten students were enrolled the first session. From the outset the school has steadily grown, making necessary, from time to time, the enlargement of its accommodations. In January, 1914, the Legislature changed the name to State Normal School for Women at Farmville, and in January, 1924, to State Teachers College at Farmville. In January, 1916, the Legislature granted to the Virginia Normal School Board the privilege of conferring degrees in education. At the next meeting of the Board this school was authorized to offer a four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education. During the forty-five A^ears of its existence the college has sent out 4,520 graduates, nearly all of whom are, or have been, teachers of the public schools in the State. There have been 14,591 matriculates. Of these, a large number (besides those who have been graduated) have carried to different sections of the State some knowledge of the methods and aims of the college. Purpose This college exists as a technical institution for the training of teachers to carry on the work of popular education in the State of Virginia. The central idea is to inspire young women to enter the profession of teaching with clear and accurate ideas


General Information

22

of the various educational problems that confront the public school teacher. It is no longer deemed adequate that a teacher be proficient in subject matter only; professional training must be added. Hence, even in the academic work, the professional idea is emIncidental instruction in methods is everywhere given phasized. Every in connection with the presentation of subject matter. department in the institution lends its assistance to the department of education in inspiring the young teachers with the loftiest ideals of what the true teacher should be, and what sort of service should be given the State. Thus, it becomes apparent that the purpose of the institution is to give to the teachers of the State of Virginia the highest professional skill possible in the training of her future citizens.

Location Farmville is a healthful and pleasant town of about three thousand five hundred inhabitants. It has good schools, hotels, an up-to-date hospital, and five churches Baptist, Episcopal, Methodist, Presbyterian, and Lutheran. Its location on the Norfolk and Western railroad, about midway between Lynchburg and Petersburg, puts it in communication with all parts of the

—

State.

College Plant

The college plant consists of a group of connected buildings, a Training School, and small dormitories. The main building contains an auditorium, reception hall, recreation hall, parlors, sitting rooms, library, class rooms, laboratories, offices, gymnasium, and dining hall. This building, together with the small dormitories, furnishes home accommodations for nine hundred students. One of the buildings in this connected group is a well-equipped infirmary in charge of a physician and a trained nurse who live in the building and give their entire time to the health of the students.

The Campus Training School is a modern school building, planned and constructed to meet the needs of a thoroughly upto-date school.

Training School Facilities and Organization

The Training School system is composed of the local training school comprising the kindergarten, the elementary school, the


General Information college high school,

Prospect,

and six rural schools

—John Randolph,

23

Rice,

Worsham, Curds ville, and Cumberland.

The head

of the department of education is also director of In this way the professional courses of the college and the teaching in the training school are unified and associated in a way that would not be possible if the two phases of the work were under separate control. Each one of the elementary grades of the local training school is in charge of a grade supervisor. The heads of the academic departments of the college whose courses are represented in the primary and grammar grades, observe the teaching of their respective subjects in the grades and co-operate with the general supervisors in the professional guidance of the student teachers, and of the pupils. In the high school the work of each department is under the direct supervision of that member of the college department whose special field is the teaching of his or her subject in the secondary schools. Thus the supervisor of each high school subject is a specialist, not only in the subject matter of the department, but in the technique of supervision. The student teaching at John Randolph, Rice, Prospect, Worsham, Curdsville, and Cumberland, is under the general guidance of the director of teacher-training and under the special guidance of another member of the department especially trained in rural education. In addition to these two, the teaching of the students in each school is under the direction of a supervisor. In this two-fold organization the professional spirit of the college pervades the instruction in the rural schools as it does in the campus training school, and the instruction in each school is unified throughout. teacher-training.

Every effort is made to get the student into the kind of teaching for which she is best suited, and arrangements are so made that the student who is teaching may be practically free for this work. No student is granted either a diploma or degree until she has demonstrated that she is qualified to teach.

The College Year The

college year comprises:

the winter session of thirty-six

weeks (divided into three quarters), and the summer session of eleven weeks making the fourth quarter. The holidays are one day at Thanksgiving, and the Christ-

mas

Students are strongly urged to come prepared to Frequent trips home during the session except for special reasons are discouraged. The schedule is made on the holidays.

remain

at college.


General Information

24 six-day

mean

basis,

either

hence

classes

week-ends away from college invariably missed on Saturday, or attended without

preparation on Monday. Parents are asked to co-operate with the administration in this matter.

The Summer Quarter Ii;i the summer quarter all of the work of the first two years of Courses I and II is offered, and also classes open to Third and Fourth- Year students. This meets the needs of three groups of students those who wish by summer work to shorten the time required for graduation those who have back work or deficiencies to make up, and those who have found it necessary to leave college at the end of the first year, and, therefore, hold only an Elemenfary Certificate. These students may in three summers do the work of the Second Year, and thus receive the diploma and the Normal Professional Certificate. The sumer quarter also offers an oportunity for the teacher in service to get the two session hours of work required for the renewal of certificates, and at the same time to gain the advantages which come from professional contacts. :

;

Expenses Students must be prepared to beginning of each quarter:

make

the following payments

at the

Matriculation and College Fees

Board

;

"...'.

Totals

Fall

Winter

Spring

$ 25.00 85.00

$25.00 70.00

$25.00 70.00

$110.00

$95.00

$95.00

•

Tuition for pay students (those who do not hold the State Scholarship), payable in advance, is as follows: Fall Quarter, $10.00; Winter Quarter, $10.00; Spring Quarter, $10.00. Laboratory fees must be paid within two weeks after the beThese fees are stated in connection ginning of each quarter. with the outline of the courses in which they are required. The total expense for the session exclusive of textbooks and for a student holding the State laboratory fees is as follows Scholarship, $300.00; for a pay student, $330.00. Board, including furnished room, laundry, bedding and towels, No. reduction is made for abis $225.00 for the entire session. sence less than thirty days. :


;

General Information

25

For the convenience of patrons who find it impossible to pay the board for a quarter in advance, it may be paid in nine installments of $25.00 each, payable in advance, on the fifteenth of each month. Checks for board and fees should be made payable to the student. All money due the college should be paid to the Treasurer, and receipts taken therefor. No student is enrolled in her classes until she can show a receipt for entrance fees. No diploma or certificate is granted to an3'one until all sums due the college are paid. The Campus Fee covers subscription to the college paper (The Rotunda), Athletic Association dues. Student Association dues, Y. W. C. A. support, Lyceum Course ticket, and Debate Club fund.

Each student must supply her own textbooks. Books will be furnished at publishers' prices, with the cost of handling added. Students should come prepared to buy their books at once. The dormitories accommodate nine hundred students, and no one is allowed to board in the town unless with relatives in such cases the student must get the consent of the President. State Scholarships

The State Scholarship entitles the student to free tuition in return for her pledge to teach two years in the public schools ,of Virginia. Students applying for the Scholarship should have their application signed by their Division Superintendent before returning it to the Registrar. They will be notified if Scholarship is granted. The State Scholarship is open to residents of Virginia only. Students from other States, and those from Virginia who do not hold the State Scholarship enter as Pay Students, and pay a tuition fee of $30.00 per session. All communications of inquiry, requests for catalogues, etc., should be made to the Registrar. Discipline In the conduct of a college for young women about to assume the responsibility of a serious and dignified profession like teaching, there is little occasion for arbitrary, iron-clad discipline. Beyond the expectation that the life of our students shall conform to the requirements of promptness and fidelity to duty, and exhibit that gentle demeanor and considerate regard for others


General Information

26

which characterize refined womanhood, we have few fixed rules. This does not mean, however, that the students are absolutely without restrictions. It is the duty of the head of the home and her assistants to keep in close contact with the daily life and conduct of the students, and to provide suitable chaperonage whenever necessary. If the student is found to be falling off in her studies, neglecting duty, or exerting an unwholesome influence, prompt steps are taken for her amendment. A young woman who does not show some disposition to conform to high standards can hardly be considered good material for a teacher; so, if one is found unresponsive to patient endeavors to bring her to the line of duty, her connection with the school is quietly severed by virtue of the following order of the trustees "If, in the judgment of the President, it shall at any time appear that a student is not making proper use of the advantages which the State offers in the State Teachers College, or that her influence is in any way prejudicial to the interests of the institution, or of her fellow:

students,

it

shall

be his duty to declare her place vacant."

Student Government Association The purpose and its

of the association

is

to preserve the student

honor

to further the interests of the college as far as lies within

power.

It

has jurisdiction over the girls during study period

and in all cases in which the good name of the student body as a whole would be involved. Decisions rendered by the Student Government Committee are subject to the approval of the President. and

in the dining-room,

Religious Life of the College Although a State

institution,

and hence not under denomina-

the importance of a life higher than the intellectual, and the religious interests of the students are a matter of constant concern. There is a daily chapel exercise, with the reading of the Scriptures, a hymn and prayer. The ministers of the several denominations of the town take part in conducting these services. Through the Young Women's Christian Association, Bible Study classes are organized in each church. These classes are taught by members of the faculty, who, together with the ministers and the Sunday school superintendents, plan and outline courses of study suitable for the different groups of girls. While attendance on church services is not compulsory, every tional

influence,

this

college

realizes


General Information

27

girl is urged to join the Sunday school of her choice and to attend church regularly. The college endeavors to maintain high moral and Christian

standards, and to create an atmosphere of earnestness, that it send out young women equipped with a steady purpose to perform well and faithfully the duties that lie before them holy purpose to make the most of themselves, that they may do most for others.

may

—

The Young Women's Christian

Association

The Young Women's

Christian Association of the State Teachers College at Farmville, Virginia, affirming the Christian faith in God, the Father, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord and Saviour; and in the Holy Spirit, the Revealor of truth and source of power for life and service, according to the teaching of Holy Scripture and the witness of the church, declares its purpose to be: 1. To lead students to faith in God through Jesus Christ. 2. To lead them into membership and service in the Christian

Church. 3.

To promote

their

growth

in

Christian faith and character

especially through the study of the Bible. 4.

with

To all

human

influence

them

Christians,

society,

and

to

to devote themselves

making the

to extending the

will

of

Kingdom

in united efforts Christ effective in of God throughout

the world.

Every

invited to become a member of the Christian Association and to help it to realize its purpose through her hearty support of its activities. All officers and committees have as their sole aim the furthering of the purpose of the Association as given above. The activities themselves are in charge of student members. The Association conducts daily evening prayer services, holds special weekly Morning Watch services, urges attendance at Sunday school and church, and fosters a spirit of religious life and service. Some special features of the work are: the observance of the World Week of Prayer; the holding of Mission Study Classes for six weeks conducted by the faculty, or selected speakers; the bringing to school of a noted speaker each year to give a series of addresses on the Fundamental Principles of the Christian Religion the bringing of other noted speakers who give an international viewpoint to leading movements and foster a spirit of world fellowship among girls. girl

is

Young Women's

cordially


General Information

28

The

whole Association are numerous and vaan opportunity to aid in some part of the Christian work which will help her to realize the more "abundant life," and will enable her to grow "into the measure ried

activities of the

enough

to give every girl

of the stature of the fullness of Christ."

Virginia Normal League The Virginia Normal League was organized in 1899 by Dr. Robert Fraser, then President of the school. The object of the League

found and maintain a loan fund for those students otherwise be unable to attend college. This fund is maintained by the annual membership dues of one dollar, and by voluntary contributions from outside sources. Its aim is to help by loans, without interest, young women who wish to prepare for effective service as teachers. It offers a good opportunity to extend a helping hand to coming generations as well as this. Any contribution, large or small, will be gratefully received. All of the funds of the League are in use. As soon as any amount is returned it is loaned out again, for the demand is greater than the supply. The largest amount available for any one student in a session is $250.00. Requests for loans should be made in writing by May 10, of preceding session. For further details, write to one of the following: is

to

who would

Miss Martha W. Coulling, President. Miss Minnie V. Rice, Chairman Finance Committee. Miss Estelle Smithey, Chairman Loan Fund.

Cunningham Memorial Loan Fund The alumnae istration of Dr.

of the college

who graduated during

the admin-

John A. Cunningham, from 1886

to 1896, raised a fund, intending to establish a scholarship in memory of his faithful and loving service to them and to the State, feeling that the most fitting tribute that could be paid him would be the effort to give to those who are unable to obtain it for themselves the training for the work to which he devoted his life.

When

this

fund amounted to $1,000

it

was changed from a

scholarship fund to a loan fund and placed in the hands of the President to be used for this purpose. Five per cent interest is charged, and properly endorsed notes are required. Thus, it is proving of great assistance to some of our best students. Those wishing to obtain a loan from this fund should apply to the President of the college.


General Information

29

State Loan Fund

The college has a loan fund, which has been appropriated by the State. Not more than $150.00 per session is loaned to anyone student. The interest required is four per cent, and all notes must be properly endorsed. Application for assistance from the State Loan Fund should be addressed to the President of the college.

The

Association of

Alumnae

The Association of Alumnae includes all persons who have completed three quarters of professional work in the college. Graduates are active members, non-graduates are associate memRegular annual meetings are held at the college on Foundbers. ers' Day. The annual membership fee is one dollar. Through the Association former students are kept in touch with the college and with each other, and loyalty is fostered by interest and service. Some of the work attempted is the holding of reunions at convenient times, as at State and district teachers' meetings the dissemination of college news of interest and importance by means of circular letters and the newspaper, The Rotunda; the aiding of students by loans from Normal League ;

and Cunningham Memorial Loan Funds the organization of local chapters in many cities and counties to strengthen and render more effective the activities of the General Association and special ;

service to the college as opportunity arises. The chief interest of the Alumnae at present is the completion of the fund for the Student Building, which is designed to house

the student organizations, the physical education department, to the college in many ways. The officers for 1929-30 are President Miss Wilhelmina London, Farmville, Va. First Vice-President Miss Winnie V. Hiner, Farmville, Va. Second Vice-President Miss Otelia J. Harvie, Mattoax, Va. Secretary-Treasurer Miss Alice E. Carter, Farmville, Va. Directors Miss Lucy Allen, Lynchburg, Va. Miss Carolyn Cogbill, Farmville, Va.

all

and be of use

— — —

;

Library and Reading Room

The students are supplied with collateral reading, reference work, and recreative reading from a library of 19,405 classified volumes, reference rooms containing encyclopedias, dictionaries,


General Information

30

bound volumes of the leading magazines, and atlases, and a reading room supplied with newspapers of the State, and from large cities

outside of the State, besides

many

well-selected

depart-

mental and popular periodicals.

Literary Societies There are two literary societies, the Cunningham, and the These are an important factor in the intellectual and

Ruffner.

social life of the college.

They impart a strong impulse

to literary

a common intellectual purpose. The literary societies aim primarily to promote a real interest in literature and to afford opportunities for

work, and bring the

girls together at regular times for

self-expression to the members.

Debate Club The purpose of the Debate Club is to develop the powers of argument, clear and logical thinking, and forceful expression. Regular club meetings are held every two weeks during the session, at which matters of local and college interest are debated by the members. One public debate is held each term at which some phase of college activity is discussed and to which all the college is invited, and several inter-collegiate debates are held each year. This provides for training in thinking on one's feet and for public recognition of successful club work.

Kappa Delta Pi (National Honor Society) Beta Epsilon Chapter This society was organized as the local honor society of Pi

Kappa Omega in 1918, and was merged with the national honor society of Kappa Delta Pi in 1928. It was organized as the reneed felt by faculty and students for an organization in The society recognition of scholarship, character and service. proposes, not only to recognize and encourage such qualities, but also to contribute by definite forms of service to the intellectual and social life of the college. The standards for admission are high, and students are not eligible to membership until they have attained full junior standing. There are two kinds of membersult of a

ship: active and honorary.


General Information

31

Alpha Kappa Gamma (National Honor Fraternity FOR Leadership) Charter Member, Organized 1928

The Joan Circle of Alpha Kappa Gamma (formerly Alpha Delta Rho, local, organized in 1925) was organized to bring together a group of representative students and members of the faculty, whose purpose is to foster high ideals and high standards of leadership among the students of the college and to help in the solution of college problems through the promotion of desirable co-ordination of various interests, activities, and organizations.

Gamma Mu (National Social Science Honor The Virginia Gamma chapter of Pi Gamma Mu was

Pi

in 1927 as a branch of the National Social Science to further the scientific study of the

problems of

Society) organized Society

Honor

social science.

In addition to a high standard of general scholarship required for entrance each member must show an outstanding interest in the social sciences and must carry on while a member of the society a piece of original work in some of the social sciences.

Pi Kappa Delta (National Forensic Pi sics.

Honor Society)

Kappa Delta is the largest of three honor societies in forenThe Virginia Alpha chapter was chartered in 1928 and is

one of 126 chapters in the United States. Its purpose is to develop and maintain a high standard of skill and sportsmanship in debate and oratory.

The Joseph

E.

Johnston Historical Prize

A

prize consisting of a set of books is awarded at Commenceto the member of the Third or Fourth- Year Class who has written the best paper on some phase of the life and service of General Joseph E. Johnston, whose birthplace, Longwood, now

ment

forms a part of the college

estate.

Student Publications The Rotunda is a weekly newspaper published by the students. The editorial staff is composed of students and alumnae, who are assisted by reporters from the various classes and school or-


General Information

32

ganizations.

The paper

aims, by publishing

to keep the students, the faculty,

news of the

college,

and the alumnae informed as

to what is going on, and so, to draw them closer together. It affords valuable experience in journalistic work to those who participate in its publication. The Virginian is an annual publication which is edited and published by the student body. The Voice is a quarterly literary magazine which began publication under the auspices of the literary societies in 1928-1929.

Courses and Certificates This college offers three courses, all leading to the degree of B.S. in Education. Course I prepares for teaching in the kindergarten and lower elementary grades through the third. Course II, for teaching in the upper elementary, beginning with the fourth. Course III, for teaching in the high school. Courses I and II are so arranged that a diploma is given for the completion of the first two years, and a degree for all four. In Course III no diploma is given. student having the full diploma of the college, representing two years of professional work based on sixteen units of high-school work, may take the third and fourth years of the course in which she received her diploma, and receive the B.S. in Education. The following certificates are given by the Department of Public Instruction for the completion of these courses, as follows 1. Collegiate Professional Certificate: The degree of B.S. in Education entitles the holder to the Collegiate Professional Certificate given by the Department of Public Instruction. This certificate is valid for ten years, and renewable for ten, and permits its holder to teach in the high schools and elementary schools. 2. Normal Professional Certificate The diploma of the college entitles the holder to a Normal Professional Certificate given by This certificate is valid the Department of Public Instruction. for five years, and renewable for five, and permits its holder to teach in the elementary schools. 3. Elementary Certificate The completion of the first year of Courses I, or II, based upon graduation from an accredited fouryear high school or upon the State First Grade Certificate, entitles the student to the Elementary Certificate given by the DeThis certificate permits the partment of Public Instruction. holder to teach in the elementary schools.

Any former

:

:


General Information

33

Elementary Certificates issued as of July 1, 1930, shall be granted as two-year non-renewable certificates; those issued as of July 1, 1931, as one-year non-renewable certificates. After 1931 the Elementary Certificate shall not be issued to incoming teachers.

Entrance Requirements and Classification The following are the general regulations governing entrance and classifications Graduates of accredited four-year high schools may enter any course. Upon the completion of two years in Courses I or II, they may receive the diploma, and upon completion of four years in Courses I, II, or III, they receive the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Education. Holders of First Grade Certificates

may

who

are twenty years of

Year of Courses I or II, and upon the completion of the year's work may receive from the Department of Public Instruction the Elementary Certificate. These students should understand, however, that this work cannot be credited age,

enter the First

toward a diploma

until the required

high school units have been

presented.

All candidates for admission must

file with the registrar, not than September 1, their certificates of graduation from the high school, on blanks furnished by her. If student is applying for advanced standing, her honorable dismissal and record from the college she has attended must also be filed by this time. These blanks must come from some recognized institution or accredited school, must be made out by some member of the faculty, and must bear the signature of the head of the school from which they come. They must be sent directly to the Registrar, and not through the hands of the candidates in question. Students coming from other than accredited four-year high schools are not eligible for entrance except upon passing the College Entrance Examinations prepared by the State for such

later

students.

Because of the

strictly technical nature of the work, no credit given for courses completed at other than standard colleges. Students who re-enter college after an absence of a year or more will be expected to conform to the requirements of the later catalogue not of that under which they first entered.

is

—


General Information

34

Requirements for the

B.S.

Degree

The B.S. degree in Education requires a total of 192 quarter hours, or 64 session hours. These must be so chosen as to include the following constant: English 18 quarter hours Education and Supervised Teaching.... 45 quarter hours 18 quarter hours Social Sciences Physical or Natural Sciences 9 quarter hours Health and Physical Education 9 quarter hours

This constant is taken care of in the outlines as tabulated on pages Z7 to 41 with one exception students not choosing their major or minor in History or Geography must take as electives some time during their course the eighteen hours required in

—

Social Science.

Each candidate for a degree selects at the beginning of her year a major and a minor subject. The major may be selected from the following departments Biology, Chemistry and first

:

Physics, English, History and Social Sciences, Home Economics, Latin, Mathematics, Modern Languages, and Music. The minor may be selected from the same group or from Fine and Applied Arts, Geography, or Physical and Health Education. Students taking their degree in Courses I and H, have Elementary Education as their major subject. The student in Course HI is free to choose any major for which she has the required prerequisites. The minor is subject to the approval of the head of the department in which the stu-

doing her major work. average of C on the four years of work is required of all candidates for the degree. In addition to the above requirements, students who expect to do their graduate work at the University of Virginia should be sure of having one year of mathematics and two years of a modern language in college. The number of quarter hours required for a major or a minor in the various departments is listed in the departments. The residence requirement is one year beyond the Second Year. dent

is

An

Requirements for Teaching in the Training School Believing that

it is

a great injustice both to the student herself to allow a student with

and to the pupils in the Training School


General Information

35

serious academic deficiencies to continue her course and probably fail at or near the time of graduation, the faculty has made the following requirements for entering upon either her apprenticing

or her teaching in the Training School. 1. No student who has more than one F or more than five periods of extra work may enter upon either her apprenticing or her teaching. 2. In Courses I and II one-half the student's grades shall be C or higher. In Course I an average of C or higher must be made on three of the following subjects English, Arithmetic, In Course II an Geography, Education 101, 115 and 121. average of C or higher must be made on three of the following subjects English, History, Arithmetic, Geography, Reading, and :

:

Education 121. 3. In Course III

in average of C or higher must be made on the student's major and on her minor. Temperamental and physical unfitness should sometimes debar a student from attempting to teach. But such students may, in the judgment of the faculty, be allowed to remain in college, taking academic subjects only.

Record of Students

A

record of each student's

work

is

kept in the Registrar's

office.

Reports from the various members of the Faculty are handed in every two weeks, and every student who is not making a passing grade at that time is notified. At the close of each quarter, reports for the term are sent to parents or guardians. The work of students is graded as follows A, B, C, D, E, I, and F, D is the lowest passing grade, E denotes a "condition," I, incomplete work; F, a failure. student who fails on 50% or more of her work the first quarter is put on probation the second quarter, and must make at least an average of D on all of her work the first year in order to be permitted to enter college for the second year. To be placed on the Honor Roll a student must make a grade of A or B on at least three-fourths of her work for the quarter; must have no failures, no conditions, no unexcused absences from class or Chapel, and no reports from the Home Department or Student Government. :

A


General Information

36

Explanation of Numbers and Credits In general all First- Year courses are numbered in the one hundred group, all Second-Year courses in the two hundred group, all Third-Year courses in the three hundred group, and all Fourth-Year courses in the four hundred group. However, all First and Second-Year work is interchangeable and all Third and Fourth- Year work is interchangeable. Third and FourthYear students are not permitted to take more than six courses numbered below three hundred. The credit hour is the "quarter hour" representing one hour a week extending through a quarter of eleven or twelve weeks. It is equal to one-third of the standard "session hour" and represents one of the following combinations or the equivalent: 1. One recitation or lecture hour per week extending through the quarter and requiring one and one-half or two hours' preparation.

A two-hour laboratory period extending through the quarand requiring one hour's outside work or preparation. In the tabulated course of study, page 37, the figures in the columns show the schedule hours, which are also credit hours, unless otherwise stated for example, a class scheduled to meet three times a week for a quarter, receives three credits or one 2.

ter

;

session hour.

Some exceptions to this rule are made either because the. nature of the work requires less preparation than the standard, as is the case in Physical Education, or because, in order to meet the professional demands of elementary subject matter, the student has to do work not of college grade as is the case in Arithmetic. These exceptions are noted in the tabulated list, page 37, and also in the departmental statements. Instrumental Music

No instrumental music is taught in the college except as preparation for orchestra work. Students desiring piano lessons can get them from private teachers in the town.


COURSE OF STUDY COURSE Leading to Teaching

in

1

930

I

Kindergarten and Lower Elementary Grades Winter

tFall

Spring

FIRST YEAR

A Education 101

Educational Psychology

B

3

C

A

3

"3"

B

C

A

3 3

3 3

3 3 2 2

3 3 2 2

B

c

3 3 3

Psychology of Reading English 101, 102, 103— Composition, Literature. {Eno-lish 116 Child Literature

Education 115

3 3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

Geography

111, 112, 113

Geography and 3 3

JMathematics 111, 112, 113— Arithmetic JMusic 111, 112 tArt 111, 112, 113 Writing JArt 101, 102 JPhysical Education 101, 102,

2 2

103—Practice.

.

.

3

22 16

3

3

3 2

3

2

2

3 3 22 17

2

3 3 2 2

3 3

i 2

3 3

1

2 2

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

22

20

19 14

17

19 14

22

15

22 16

22

16

3

3

3

2

2

2 3

17

SECOND YEAR 3 3

3

3

Education 215 Pre-School Child §Education 200^Teaching En<'lish 217 JReading 211

3 3 3 3 3

3

3 2

3 2

3 3

Sociology 201, 202

3 3

jMusic 213 HArt 102 Writing

1

JPhysical Education 214, 215

3

3

3 3

19 18

20

20

17

17

15 15

3

12

3

3 3

12

19.

3

3 3

3

3

3 3 3 3

2 1

15 15

3

3

3

19 17

18 16

20 16

15 15

fThe class is divided into three groups. A, B, and C. Group A will teach in the Fall quarter Second Year; Group B in the Winter quarter, and Group C in the Spring quarter. Education 121 and 122 for each group come in two quarters immediately preceding the teaching, which causes a shifting of the other subjects. JMusic 111, 112, and 213, Physical Education 101, 102, 103, and 215, Art 111, 112, 113, and 101, one hour's credit each quarter; Mathematics 111, 112, and 113, Physical Education 214, Reading 211, and English 116, two hours' credit each quarter. §Students who teach in the First Grade will take Kindergarten Teaching 211 as part of It is desirable that students choosing Kindergarten and First Grade required teaching. teaching should have some musical ability. Those students who teach in the Rural Schools receive three hours' extra credit for teaching in lieu of Education 215. ^A certificate of proficiency, or a satisfactory standard in writing is required of all students entering Courses I and II. Those who cannot furnish this certificate must take Art 101 until excused. Art 102 is a method class required of all students in Courses I and II. of the


Course of Study

38

COURSE I— Continued THIRD YEAR Education 341, 345, 441

Fall

Winter Spring

Individual Differences; History of Education

Philosophy of Education English Science fElectives jPhysical Education

3 3

,

Schedule periods Credit hours

3

3 3 3 6 3

18 16

18 16

18 16

3 3 12

3 3 9

3

18 18

15

15

15 15

3

6 3

3 3 3 6

FOURTH YEAR Education 461, 462, 463 Elementary Education History and Social Science tElectives or Teaching Schedule periods Credit hours

3 9

fTo be chosen in the various departments from those courses which are open to Third and Fourth-year students. The elective teaching is subject to the approval of the Director of Teacher Training and is adjusted to fit the case. Credit, three hours. Students who expect to teach in the Rural Schools after graduation should take Education 448 as an elective. JPhysical Education in Third Year, one credit each quarter; three courses to be selected from one-credit courses open to Third and Fourth Year students. Students in the Fourth Year are strongly advised to take Physical Education as above, the three one-credit courses to count as a three hour elective, but may take any other three hour elective if they prefer to do so.


Course of Study

COURSE Leading to Teaching

in the

39

II

Upper Elementary Grades Winter

tFall

Spring

FIRST YEAR

A Education 101 Education 121

Educational Psychology Elementary Education

B

C

3

3

A

B

C

A

B

C

3

3

3

3

English 101, 102, 103 Reading 121

Composition, Literature.

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3

3 3

3

3 3 2

2

2

2

3 3

Geoe;raphj' 121, 122, 123 tMathematics 121, 122, 123

3

—Arithmetic

3 2 2 2

tMusic 111 tArt 121, 122, 123 tArt 101, 102 Writing {Physical Education 101, 102, 103

Credit hours

3

"3'

3

3

3

3 3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

21 15

20

20

20

16

16

16

2 2 3

21 15

3 3

3

3

3

3 3

2

2

2

1

3'

2 "z

3

20 16

21 17

3

3

2 2 3

20

21

16

15

SECOND YEAR Education 202 Psychology of Learning Education 12], Elem.entary Education

3 3 3

3

3 12

§Education 200 Teaching English 103 Literature English 227, 228 {Reading 222

3 12 3

3

3

3 3

....

3 12 3

Sociology 201, 202

3 2

.

.

3 3 2

3 3

2

3 3 2

3 3

3

3

3

21 18

20

20 16

1 .

.

15 15

"3' 2

3 3 2

1

3 .

3

3

3

tMusic 222, 223 HArt 102 Writing Physical Education 106 Health Education {Physical Education 224, 225.

3 3

3

3

21 19

20 17

20 17

3

15 15

17

15 15

fThe class is divided into three groups. A, B, and C. Group A will teach in the Fall quarte Second Year; Group B in the Winter quarter, and Group C in the Spring quarter' Education 121 and 122 for each group come in the two quarters immediately preceding the teaching, which causes a shifting of the other subjects. {Music 111, 222, and 223, Physical Education 101, 102, 103, and 225, Art 121, 122, 123, and 101, one hour's credit each quarter; Mathematics 121, 122, and 123, Physical Education 224, and Reading 222, two hours' credit each quarter. tA certificate of proficiency, or a satisfactory standard in writing is required of aU students entering Courses I and II. Those who cannot furnish this certificate must take Art 101 until excused. Art 102 is a method class required of all students in Courses I and II. of the


Course of Study

40

COURSE II— Continued THIRD YEAR Education 341, 345, 441

Fall

Winter Spring

Individual Differences; History of Education

Philosophy of Education English Science

3

3

3

3 3

3

fElectives jPhysical Education

6 3

3 3 6

Schedule periods Credit hours

3

6

3

3

18 16

18 16

18 16

3

3 3

9

3 3 9

15 15

15 15

FOURTH YEAR Education 461, 462, 463

Elementary Education History and Social Science

fElectives or Teaching

Schedule periods Credit hours

3 12

18 18

fTo be chosen in the various departments from those courses which are open to Third and Fourth-year students. The elective teaching is subject to the approval of the Director of is adjusted to fit the case. Usually the minimum requirement is three hours, and the maximum fifteen. Students who expect to teach in the Rural Schools after graduation should take Education 448 as an elective. JPhysical Education in Third Year, one credit each quarter. Three courses to be selected from one-credit courses open to Third and Fourth Year students. Students in the Fourth Year are strongly advised to take Physical Education as above, the three one-credit courses to count as a three hour elective, but may take any other three hour elective if they prefer to do so. Teacher Training and


Course of Study

COURSE Leading to Teaching

41

III in

High Schools

FIRST YEAR

FaU

Winter Spring

Biology 131, 132, 133 or Chemistry 131. 132, 133 English 101, 102, 103 Composition, Literature. .

.

tMajor fMinor fEleotive §Physical Education 101, 102, 103

Practice

Schedule periods Credit hours

18 16

18 16

18 16

SECOND YEAR 233 Educational Psychology; Learning; Secondary Education English 205 and two other courses in English

tEducation

231,

232,

Psychology

of

tMajor fMinor fElective §Physical Education 224, 225, 236

Schedule periods Credit hours

18 16

THIRD YEAR

JEducation 341 -Individual Differences JEducation 345 History of Education {Education 334—Secondary Education

1

[ J

tMajor Government 333 Physical Education 30(y— Health Education tElectives §Physical Education

Schedule periods Credit hours

18

16

FOURTH YEAR TEducation 400 Teaching Education 444, 435, 441

Administration of Secondary Secondary Education; Philosophy of Education

Schools;

TMajor or Elective Schedule periods Credit hours

16 16

16 16

16 16

tFor requirements concerning Majors and Minoi-s, see page 33. tin order to balance the work of the Education Department, all three of these courses are offered every quarter, and the class is so divided that a student gets one each quarter. §Physical Education 101, 102, 103, 225, 236, one hour's credit each quarter; Physical Education 224, two hours' credit. "Third Year students may take any three one-credit courses open to Third and Fourth Year students. Fourth Year students are strongly advised to take Physical Education as above, the three one-credit courses to count as a three hour elective, but may take any other three hour elective if they prefer to do so. HThe Major must not be required more than two quarters in the Fourth Year. Those students who elect teaching in the Rural Schools do all of their teaching in one quarter and take the necessary additional elective work the other two quarters.


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION BIOLOGY MR. JEFFERS, DR. STEVENS AND ASSISTANTS

The work of this department is planned to prepare teachers of Biology for the high schools of the State; the first year aims to give a foundation for Psychology and Health Education. Students intending to major in Biology are advised to minor in either Chemistry or Mathematics. Because Biology teachers are frequently called upon to teach General Science, students not choosing Chemistry as a minor are urged to elect General Chemistry and General Physics early in their college course. major in this department requires the first ten courses listed below. A minor requires courses 131, 132, 133 and either

A

231, 232, 233 or 333, 334, 335. In all courses in the biological department except those of the first year the number of laboratory hours indicated should be regarded as minimal, since students may frequently find it necessary to give more than the required time in order to complete the assigned work. Laboratory fees must be paid at the Treasurer's Office within two weeks after the beginning of the term.

Three periods a 133. General Biology. one double. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Fall Quarter (Biology 131) Elementary Zoology, including

Biology

week, two

131,

132,

single,

the general principles of Biology. An introductory course giving a survey of the animal kingdom with some consideration of theoretical Biology. Winter Quarter (Biology 132) Human Biology. Prehistoric man, the structure and functions of the various systems and glands of the human body as a basis for courses in Psychology.

A

genSpring Quarter (Biology 133) Elementary Botany. kingdom, together with the more essential features of classification, structure and reproduction of plants. eral survey of the plant

Laboratory Fee: One

dollar each quarter.

Biology 231, 232, 233. Botany. Four periods a week, two two double. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. Credit,

single,

four hours each quarter.


Biology

43

Plant Morphology. Fall Quarter (Biology 231) type forms of Cryptogamic plants. Winter Quarter (Biology 232) Plant Physiology.

A

study of

A study of metabolism and growth of plants. Spring Quarter (Biology 233) Seed Plants. A study of the morphology and classification of seed plants. Elective in second and third years of Course III. nutrition, assimilation,

Laboratory Fee

:

Two

dollars each quarter.

Biology 333, 334, 335. Zoology. Four periods a week, two two double. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. Credit,

single,

four hours each quarter. Fall quarter (Biology 333) Invertebrate Zoology. type study of the more important groups of invertebrates. Winter quarter (Biology 334) Vertebrate Zoology. Continues but does not presuppose Biology ZZZ. Spring quarter (Biology 335) Systematic Zoology. The identification, classification and economic importance of animals.

A

Elective in Second and Third Years of Course III.

Laboratory Fee

:

Two

dollars each quarter.

Biology 33 L Methods in Biology. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours.

Three periods a week.

The construction of the course of study, a study of the methods to be used in teaching Biology as applied to the recitation, laborademonstration and field work. Required of all students majoring in Biology.

tory,

Biology 346, 347, 348. Advanced General Biology. Four periods a week, two single, two double. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, four hours each quarter. course similar in scope to Biology 131, 132, 133, but adapted

A

to

advanced students.

Open to third and fourth year students. Laboratory Fee: Two dollars each quarter. Biology 351. Human Physiology. Three periods a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. course covering the main facts and more important advances in human physiology together

A

with personal applications. year of Biology in College.

Biology 352.

Open

Sanitation.

to students

who have had one

Three periods a week.

Winter


Departments of Instruction

44

A

Credit, three hours. study of community hygiene, quarter. Open to water supply, food supply, immunity and disease. students who have had one year of Biology in College.

Genetics. Three periods a week. Spring quarthree hours. An elementary course dealing with the principles of heredity and their application to evolution and eugenics. Open to students who have had one year of Biology in College.

Biology 353.

ter.

Credit,

Biology 460. Histological Technique. Two double periods a Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, two hours, each quarA laboratory course in the methods of killing, fixing, imter. bedding, sectioning, staining and mounting tissues. Open to a few qualified students subject to the approval of the instructor. Laboratory Fee Two dollars each quarter.

week.

:


Chemistry and Physics

45

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS MR. MCCORKLE, MR. FRENCH

The aim of this department is to give the students some knowledge of the facts of modern science and to prepare them to teach Chemistry and Physics in the high schools of the State. A major in this department requires the following courses Chemistry 131, 132, 133, 200, 201, 202, 300, 301, 302 or 303 and 331.

The requirement

for a minor

is

the

first

six courses of the

major.

A fee of $5.00 each quarter is charged all students taking Chemistry or Physics, except those taking Chemistry 331 and 203.

Four Chemistry 131, 132, 133. General Chemistry: periods a week, for three quarters, two single and two double course intended each quarter. Credit, four hours each quarter. for beginners in college chemistry, including the history, preparation, properties, and uses of the more important elements with their compounds, and the theories underlying their reactions. The laboratory work of Chemistry 133 is a study of the metals from Elective in First Year or the viewpoint of qualitative analysis. Second Year of Course III.

A

202. Organic 200, 201, Chemistry. Two and two double periods a week. Fall, Winter, four hours Credit, and Spring quarters. each quarter. The class work aims to give a thorough elementary knowledge of the more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The laboratory work gives practice in the preparation of typical compounds of these series with a study of the characteristics of these compounds.

Chemastry

single

Chemistry

History of Chemistry. Three periods a 203. three hours. Beginnings of science, philosophy of the ancients, views and aims of the alchemists, iatrochemistry, The development of chemical phlogiston period, modern period. theory with biographical studies of the leaders and the characterLectures and assigned readings of source, istics of each period. Prerequisite, Chemistry 133. reprints, etc. week.

Credit,

Chemistry

300.

Quantitative Analysis {Volumetric).

Four


Departments of Instruction

46

double periods a week. Credit, four hours. The students perform experiments illustrating typical methods and principles of volumetric analysis and hold individual or group conferences with the instructor.

Chemistry 301, 302. Quantitative Analysis {Applied). Four double periods a week. Credit, four hours each quarter. These courses are open to students who have had Chemistry 300, and will be arranged to suit the needs of the student in so far as laboratory equipment will permit. Chemistry

Qualitative Analysis. Four double periods Credit, four hours. The work will consist of a study of the theory of solution and equilibrium from the viewpoint of chemical analysis, and the analysis of unknown materials. Elective.

a week.

303.

Spring quarter.

Chemistry

331.

The Teaching of High School Chemistry. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours.

Three periods a week.

This course includes a study of the aims, purposes, and methods problems of laboratory management, and library reference work. in the teaching of secondary chemistry, together with the

Chemistry week

343. General Chemistry. Four 341, 342, for three quarters, two single and two double each quarter. Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, four hours each quarter. This course covers the same general topics

periods a

as covered in Chemistry 131, 132, and 133, but adapted to advanced students.

Physics 441, 442, 443. General Experimental Physics. Four periods a week, two single and two double. Credit, four hours each quarter.

Mechanics, molecular physics, heat, magnetwork illustrated by ex-

Class ism, electricity, sound, and light. periments. Individual laboratory work. Fourth Year students.

Open

to Third

and


Education

47

EDUCATION DR.

BELL, DR. BOWMAN, MISS CAMPER, MISS CARTER, MR. COYNER, MISS HAYNES, MR. HOLTON, MISS JONES, MISS MIX, MISS MORAN, MISS PIERCE

WYNNE^ MR.

the College Training School and the supervisors of the rural schools are also members of the Department of Education.

The supervisors of

The Scope of

the Department.

In addition to the instructors

Department of Education includes the supervisors of the College Training School and the supervisors in the four rural training schools. The College Training School is not only an integral part of the college but is the center around which the courses in education have developed. The increase in the enrollment of the college and the demonstrated efficiency of student teaching under the direction of expert supervision have led to an agreement between the college and the public school officials of Prince Edward, Cumberland, and Buckingham counties whereby a large part of the teaching in the schools of

in education in the college, the faculty of the

John Randolph, Prospect, Worsham, Curdsville, Rice, and Cumberland is done by students of State Teachers College, under the guidance of supervisors selected on the basis of successful experience and special training for this particular sort of work. Education Courses and Teaching. Preparation for teaching is regarded as a gradual growth in the understanding and control of the various elements that enter into the learning-teaching process. The basis for the understanding and control in this process is the experience of the young teacher as a student. Consequently, the aim in general is the development of the teacher through having her live the life of a teacher in so far as possible. The courses in education and the work in the training schools proceed simultaneously in such a way as to enable the student to do better teaching in consequence of her classroom work in the college, and also to enable her to gain, through her teaching, a basis in experience for fuller appreciation of her professional and academic courses. In order to safeguard the interest of the pupils in the training schools and to prevent embarrassment and nervousness on the part of the beginning teacher, courses in education are so arranged that the student is gradually led into the work of full responsibility in teaching. In order to make the courses in education meet the requirements of the training schools and the various forms of public school service, differentiated and spe-


Departments of Instruction

48

lower elementary, cialized courses are offered in three fields upper elementary, and secondary schools. Courses in the history of education, psychology, and philosophy enable the student to gain a perspective not provided in the more specialized courses. :

The demand for teachers defirural schools is recognized in the Department of Education. The rural training schools and adequate transportation facilities make it possible to give the same degree of experience in the participation in rural school work as is Courses in Rural Education.

nitely qualified

for

work

in

given in the College Training School to students who expect to teach in the city. The courses in rural education and those in sociology provide the necessary specialization for students who expect to become community leaders and teachers in village and consolidated rural schools.

Required Courses. The curricula of the college are designated The required courses as Course I, Course II, and Course III. in the Department of Education are as follows

Diploma

in

Course

Education 101, 115, 121, 122, 223, 200,

I.

202, required of

students.

all

Education 215 required of Campus Training School. Education 211 required of

students teaching in the

all

students teaching in the

grade.

first

Diploma

all

in

Course

quired of

all

II.

Education 101, 121, 122, 200, 223 re-

students.

Education 202 required of all students teaching in the College Training School. Education 202 (or Sociology 202) required of all students teaching in the rural schools.

Degree

in Course I and Course II. All courses listed above as requirements for diploma. Education 341, 345, 441, 461, 462, 463.

Degree

in

Course

III.

Education 231, 232, 233, 334, 341, 345,

400, 435, 441, 444.

Education 101. Educational Psychology. Three hours a week. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Required in Courses I and II. General survey of the field of psychology as applied to education with special reference to teaching in the elementary school.


Education

49

of human traits considered at variincluding observation, memory, reasoning, and feeling. Some attention to questions of personality, individual differences, and the measurement of intelligence.

The nature and development

ous

levels,

Education 121, 122, 123. Elementary Education. Three hours a week for three quarters. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours each quarter. Required in Course I and Course II. An introductory course in elementary education. Development of principles of teaching, including observation and participation in the training schools, conferences with supervisors, and class discussions of principles and practices.

A

study of Education 121. Profession and Management. teaching as a profession, including the pupil relationship, public relationhsip, relationship to members of the profession, and personal improvement management, including such topics as records, marks, classification, discipline, physical condition of room, arrangement of equipment, and allied activities. Class discussions based on observations in the training schools, text books, and reference materials. ;

A

Education 122. Course of Study and Participation. study of the state course of study and its proper use as a guide to instruction. An analysis of various phases of the prescribed curriculum in the light of principles discussed in text books and practices observed in the training schools. Three to four weks, depending on the length of the quarter, in participation in, and gradual assumption of teaching responsibility under the direct guidance of supervisor under whom student is to teach in the subsequent quarter. Education

223.

General Method.

The development and

plication of principles of general method.

ap-

Comparison of various

authoritative formulations of method. Evaluation of student's own teaching during the same quarter, on the basis of principles Materials of text books, descripof method accepted as valid. tions of teaching, and references used as basis of class discussion.

Education a week.

115.

The Psychology of Reading.

Offered every quarter.

Three hours Required

Credit, three hours.

Course I. Mastery of mechanical difficulties, cultivation of reading taste, development of power to get thought, materials, and methods of

in

procedure in the several stages of reading, practical means of

test-


Departments of Instruction

50

ing reading ability with reference to standards, diagnosis, and remedial work. The psychology and methods of teaching the related subjects of oral and written composition and spelling considered in connection with the teaching units of reading.

Education 200. Directed Teaching. Twelve hours a week. A Group in Fall quarter, B Group in Winter quarter, and C Group Credit, twelve hours. Open to students of Courses I and II who meet the academic requirements for admission to teaching. Required for the Diploma. Supervised teaching in the College Training School or in one in Spring quarter.

of the rural training schools.

Education

202. Psychology of Learning. Three hours a Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours. Required in Courses I and II. Problems of learning with special reference to pupils in the elementary grades given a more intensive study. The different

week.

phases or types of learning reviewed the problems of transference of training and the physical and psychological conditions of learning considered the principles and laws of learning that have general application developed and the measurements of ability and accomplishment in the elementary school subjects given some at;

;

;

tention.

Education 211. Kindergarten Teaching. Three hours a week. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Required of all Second Year students who teach in the

first

grade.

Supervised teaching experience with children of the pre-school age, from four to six years.

Education 215. The Pre-School Child. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Required of all students in Course I who teach in the College Training School. Relation of society to childhood prenatal life of child nutriPsychology of early tional and physical care in early childhood. childhood consideration of the origin and development of human traits; physical and mental habits of the young child; methods Especially adapted to of preventing nervous strain in children. the needs of students who will conduct parents' meetings in connection with the kindergarten and lower grades. ;

;

;


Education

51

Education

231. Educational Psychology. Three hours a week. Required in Course III. Credit, three hours. Subject matter and methods of psychology; the psychological, physical, and social factors involved in experiencing; the nature and development of human traits special application of facts and principles to the activities of pupils of high-school age. Fall quarter.

;

Education week.

232.

Psychology of Learning. Three hours a Required in Course Credit, three hours.

Winter quarter.

III.

Analysis of the learning process in different fields comparative methods of learning; effects of conditioning general factors on accomplishments transference of training laws of learning; special application of principles in the field of secondary education. ;

results of different

;

;

Education 233, 334, 435. Secondary Education. Three hours a week for three quarters. Education 233 offered every quarter. Education 334 offered every quarter. Education 435 offered Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Required in Course III. An introductory course in secondary education. Development of principles of teaching through observation of and participation in instruction, conferences with supervisors, and class discussion with instructor. Education 233. Curriculum and Organisation. Analysis of instruction through observation in the training schools. Formulation of curriculum objectives in the major and minor subjects of individual students. Elaboration of cardinal principles of secondary education. Employment of cardinal principles in the evaluation of current practices in secondary education in Virginia with special reference to school organization, curriculum, allied and vocational guidance. Conferences with supervisors and class discussion with instructor. activities,

Education

334.

Curriculum and Method.

Development of

tentative principles of general method; continued evaluation of instruction observed in the training schools on the basis of principles of method, objectives of subjects formulated in the pre-

ceding quarter, materials listed in special method courses gradual assumption of teaching duties organization of units of work suggestive of procedure to be followed in subsequent teaching; observation in training schools, conferences with supervisors, and ;

;

class discussion.


Departments of Instruction

52

Education 435. Method and Instruction. Examination of Study of different the various formulations of general method. Revision of principles attitudes toward the problem of method. tentatively accepted in the preceding quarter. Evaluation of instruction in which students are then engaged on the basis of revised formulation of the principles of method. Education 341

Psychology of Individual Differences. Three Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Re-

hours a week.

.

quired of all Third Year students. study of the variations in human traits and abilities and their causes race, family, sex, age, and experience brief survey of the tests used in accurate measurement of individual differences; the significance of individual differences in teaching and supervision, and in society in general

A

;

;

Education 342. Applied Psychology. Three hours a week. Offered Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. A study of the developments of

modem psychology. Special attention to the applications of psychology in the professions, in vocational guidance, and in abnormal behavior. Students given considerable freedom in the choice of material for study. Education week.

Educational Measurements. Three hours a 343. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Open to Third and

Fourth Year students.

A

course in the construction of tests and the use of tests in classifying pupils, diagnosis, teaching, measuring efficiency, and Statistical and graphical methods developed. vocational guidance.

Education 345. History of Education. Three hours a week. Required of all Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Third Year students. general survey of the field of history of education with special reference to changing conceptions of method, curriculum, and administration in response to social demands.

A

Education 351, 352, 353. History of Philosophy. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Fall Quarter Greek philosophy, with a special study of Plato's :

Republic.


Education

53

Hellenistic, Medieval, and Rennaissance phiWinter Quarter losophy from Bruno to Descartes. Spring Quarter: Modem philosophy from Descartes, and after Hegel, Bradley, Bonsaquet, and recent thought represented by Russell, James, and Dewey. :

Education 400. Directed Teaching. Four hours a week. Three quarters. Credit, four hours each quarter. Open to Fourth Year students in Course HI who meet the academic reRequired for the degree. Teaching under supervision in the College Training School or in one of the rural training schools. In so far as practical, students expected to teach two quarters in their major field, and one quarter in some other field.

quirements for teaching.

Education

441, 442, 443. Philosophy and Principles of EduThree hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Education 441 offered every quarter and required of all Fourth Year students Education 442 offered the Winter quarter and elective for Fourth Year students Education 443 oflfered the Spring quarter and elective for Fourth Year stucation.

;

;

dents.

A

consideration of the various interpretations that have been placed upon such topics as organism and environment, mind and matter, individual and society, nature and nurture, method and subject matter, learning and behaving, change, progress, and democracy. The varying interpretations considered with reference to their bearing upon such general features of educational practice as method, curriculum making, supervision, administration, types of education, the profession of teaching, and the educational responsibility of the public.

Education

Administration of Secondary Schools. Three Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Required of all Fourth Year students in Course HI, study of administrative problems of the secondary schools 444.

hours a week.

A

from the standpoint of the teacher. The teacher and the public; the teacher and the school staff the teacher's responsibility for his own personal improvement the teacher and records and re;

;

ports, discipline, marks, supervision, classification, promotion, sical

phy-

equipment, and similar topics.

Education 445, 446, 447, Elementary School Supervision. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each


Departments of Instruction

54

Elective for Fourth Year students majoring in Elemenquarter. tary Education and expecting to enter the field of elementary supervision. consideration of such factors as the determination of a supervisory program, the analysis of practice in method in teaching, the use of the course of study, managerial activities, and professional standards. Formulation of standards for guidance in the evaluation of method in teaching, use of the course of study, managerial activities, and professional practices. Principles developed for guidance in the improvement of practice on the basis of the standards. Participation in practical supervision such that the student may test and improve the standards of supervision developed in the more formal phases of the course.

A

Education 448. Administration and Supervision of Rural Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three Schools. hours. Open to Third and Fourth Year students who are preparing for work in rural education. general survey of the field of administration and supervision with special reference to rural education. An intensive study of practices and needs of rural education in Virginia and neighboring States.

A

Education 449. Rural School Supervision. Three hours a week for three quarters. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Open to Fourth Year students preparing for positions in rural school work. Practical supervision in the rural training schools associated with the College.

Education 461, 462, 463. Elementary Education. The Major Course. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Required in the Fourth Year of Course I and Course

A

II.

study of the objectives, materials, psychology of subjects, principles of method, and development of standards for the guidance of practice in the elementary schools with special reference to Virginia. Special consideration of the proper procedure involved in the construction and use of courses of study in the elementary school. Emphasis upon any particular topic, such as objectives, materials, psychology of subjects, general method, supervision, management, and administration, to meet the needs of the class and of the individual members of the class in view of the practical work for which they are preparing.


English

55

ENGLISH MR. GRAINGER, MISS HINER, MISS W. LONDON, *MISS BARNES, MISS FOSTER, DR. ROUSE, MISS JENNINGS, MRS. TAYLOR, MISS DRAKE, MISS SPRATLEY

The work

of the English Department includes courses in comliterature. Those in composition aim to give the needed practical training in the correct and effective use of the everyday forms of oral and written discourse, especially with reference to the needs of teachers. The courses in literature aim to increase the student's knowledge, appreciation, and enjoyment of good reading for the worthy use of leisure and as an influence Further improvement of each stuin the growth of character. dent's equipment for teaching is accomplished by acquainting her with the best literature for children, and by courses in methods of teaching English in its various branches in the grades and high school. The attempt is made constantly to suit the work to the actual needs and working possibilities of the student, and to her prospective needs in teaching. The English Department seeks the active co-operation of all teachers in the college in making

position

its

and

work effective. For graduation the following courses

in

English are required

Course I—English 101, 102, 103, 116, and 217. Course II— English 101, 102, 103, 227, and 228. Course III English 101, 102, 103, and 205, and two other courses chosen from those offered in the First or Second Year. A major in English, (in Course III) requires the following

courses English 101, 102, 103, 205, 131, 132, 133, 234, 235, 236, 331, 332, 441, and three additional courses selected from those numbered in the three- or four-hundreds. minor in English requires the first ten courses listed in the major requirement. For students in Course III who are looking forward to the possibility of teaching in the upper elementary grades English 227 and 228 are also recommended as electives. degree of B.S., in Education, taken after completing Course I or II, requires one year of additional work in English, chosen from courses open to Third and Fourth Year students.

A

A

English quarter. *On

101. Composition A. Three hours a week. Fall Practical work to enable the stuCredit, three hours.

leave of absence.


Departments of Instruction

56

dents to talk and write effectively, in the forms most needed by Three hours of the time scheduled for this class are Required in all given to a study of the use of the library.

teachers.

courses.

Prerequisite

:

The passing

of entrance tests in English.

See

English 91.

English quarter.

Composition B. Three hours a week. Winter 102. Credit, three hours. continuation of English 101. on writing, with review of English grammar for cor-

A

Emphasis rective and teaching purposes.

English

Literature. 103. Credit, three hours,

Required

Three

in all courses.

hours

a

week.

Spring

A

course, introduced by Smith's What Can Literature Do for Me, consisting of general reading in such literature as every teacher should know, with intensive study of selected masterpieces, and the planning of individual quarter.

courses for future reading. Supplementary Required in all courses. as needed.

work

in composition

Two

hours a week for one course providing intensive drill and practice in oral and written composition suited to the needs of the students. Required in addition to English 101 for all entering freshmen who fail to pass the preliminary test in English.

.English

quarter.

91.

Special English.

Fall quarter.

No

credit.

A

English 205. Advanced Composition. Three hours a week Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. for one quarter. Training in the kinds of writing and speaking which teachers need as leaders in school and community life. Required in Course III, Prerequisite:

English 101 and 102.

English 116. Child Literature. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered every quarter. Credit, two hours. survey of literature for children. Analysis and selection of types of literature suitable for children in kindergarten and primary grades. Special emphasis on choice and presentation of poetry. Methods and practice in story-telling. Adaptation and dramatization of stories. Required in Course I.

A

English 217. English in the Primary Grades. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered every quarter. Advanced work


English

57

and written composition based on the study of the prinunderlying the teaching of language and their applications

in oral ciples

primary grades. Required in Course Prerequisite: English 101 and 102.

in the

I.

English 227. Juvenile Literature. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, three hours. A survey of literature suitable for youthful readers, including periodicals. Selection and analysis of literature, with suggestions for leading young people to love books and profit by reading them. Required in Second Year of Course II. English 228. week for one

English in the Gramfnar Grades. Three hours quarter. Offered Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three, hours. Advanced work in oral and written exposition, based on the study of the principles underlying the teaching of grammar and language work and their applications in the grammar grades. Required in Second Year of Course II. a

Prerequisite: English 101 and 102.

English

131,

132,

133.

American

Literature.

Three

hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. A survey with wide readings to trace the development of American ideals: Fall quarter (English 131), Southern literature; Winter quarter (English 132), a survey of American literature to 1865; Spring quarter (English 133), American literature since 1865.

Open

to First

Year

students.

English 234, 235, 236. English Literature. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. study and survey of British national ideals in literature as bearing on modern life, especially among English-speaking peoples. Fall quarter (English 234), the Romantic Period; Winter quarter (English 235), the Victorian Era and more recent literature; Spring quarter (English 236), a chronological survey of the main

A

periods, chief aspects, students.

and great

writers.

Open

to

Second Year

English 251. Poetics. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. study of the forms of poetry in English and the establishing of standards for judging it, and practice in verse writing. Open to students on recommendation of the English Department.

A


Departments of Instruction

58

English quarter.

252.

Credit,

Modern

Poetry. three hours.

A

Three hours a week.

Spring study of the chief contem-

porary English and American poets.

Open

to

Second Year

students.

English 331. The Teaching of Literature in the High School. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered Winter quarter. Advanced work in oral and written exposiCredit, three hours. tion based on the study of the principles underlying the teaching of literature and their application in the high school. Required in Third Year of Course III, for those who take English as a major.

English 332. The Teaching of Composition in the High School. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Advanced work in oral and written discussion based on the study of the principles underlying the teaching of composition and grammar in the high school. Required in Third Year of Course III, for those who take English as a major. English 344 and for

two quarters.

hours each quarter.

Literary Types. Three hours a week 345. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three

A

study of the principal types of literature.

Winter quarter (English 344), the types of poetry; Spring quarter (English 345), the principal prose types. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

English 347 and 348. Shakespeare. Three hours a week for two quarters. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Ten plays selected for study, with rapid reading of other significant plays, and of the life of Shakespeare, and Winter quarter (English 347), tragedies; Spring quarter (English 348), comedies. Open to Third and

criticism of his works.

Fourth Year students.

English 351 and 352. Story Writing. Three hours a week for two quarters. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Practice in the construction and writing of stories, especially of the type suitable for children and young folks. Winter quarter (English 351), children's stories; Spring quarter (English 352), short stories. Open to Third and Fourth Year students and to qualified Second Year students.


English

59

English

354. Public Speaking. Three hours a week. Spring Credit, three hours. Study and application of the of effective participation in public discussion, with discussions of the conduct of this type of activity in the high school. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

quarter. principles

English

Journalism. Three hours a week. Fall quar356. three hours. Practice in writing for school and The study of representative national and other publications. local papers the workings of the daily and periodical press, its aims, standards, functions, and limitations in relation to the pubCredit,

ter.

;

lic

mind

in

modern

life.

Open

to

Third and Fourth Year

stu-

dents and to qualified Second Year students.

English 341, 342, 343. The Novel. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Fall quarter (English 341), a study of one novel each by Dickens, Thackeray, and George Eliot reading and discussion of others a rapid outline of the history of English fiction. Winter quarter (EngSpring quarter (English 342), lish 343), recent English fiction. a rapid survey of the history of the American novel with a study of one novel of each type; particular emphasis on the recent and contemporary American novels and a study of new tendencies. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. ;

;

English 441, 442, 443. The English Language. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. A course in the development of the English language. Fall quarter (English 441), a survey of the development of Modern English; Winter quarter (English 442), a study of Chaucer and the Middle English period; Spring quarter (English 443), an introduction to Old English language and literature. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. English quarter.

444.

Modern

ous contemporary and classic

Year

Three hours a week. Winter Reading and discussion of numeressays. Open to Third and Fourth

Essays.

Credit, three hours.

students.

English quarter.

445.

Open

Three hours a week. Spring Instruction and practice in adto Third and Fourth Year students.

448.

Biblical Literature.

Essay Writing.

Credit, three hours.

vanced composition.

English 447 and

Three hours a


Departments of Instruction

60

and Winter quarters. Credit, three reading, from Moulton's Modern Reader's Bible, of selected books as literary wholes, the interpretation of their central meanings, and their application in life. Study of the principal literary types as represented in the Bible, and the general characteristics of Hebrew poetry and prose. Fall quarter (English 447), Old Testament; Winter quarter

week for two

quarters.

hours each quarter.

(English 448),

Year

New

Fall

The

Testament.

Open

to

Third and Fourth

students.

English

455.

Browning.

Reading Credit, three hours. and of the life of Browning.

Three hours a week. Fall quarter. and study of the principal poems Open to Third and Fourth Year

students.

English

Fall Literary Criticism. Three hours a week. three hours. study of the principles and methods of judging literary productions, applied in the reading Open to Third and Fourth Year students. of current literature.

quarter.

458.

Credit,

A


Fine and Applied Arts

61

FINE AND APPLIED ARTS MISS COULLING, MISS BEDFORD, MISS CRADDOCK

The purpose of the work in this department is to develop an appreciation of the beautiful, train the powers of observation and secure a creditable degree of skill, and originality in expression.

Students choosing fine and applied arts as a minor are required complete eighteen hours of academic work in the department, and at least one term of teaching. to

Two hours a week for three 112, 113. one hour each quarter. Constructive activities covering records, food, shelter, clothing, tools and utensils, and Applied Art

quarters.

111,

Credit,

transportation correlated with other subjects, together with principles of color, design, art appreciation and drawing. Fall quarter (art 111). Records involving, lettering, booklet, construction, poster making and simple projects in record keeping. Landscape composition, use of color mediums, color theory and principles of design. Christmas projects. Winter quarter (Art 112), food construction of grocery store and other food agencies, health posters and food charts. Tools and utensils clay modeling of figures and bowls. Toy-making, balanced and wooden toys Spring quarter (Art 113), clothing of cardboard and wood. weaving rag and roving rugs for doll house, and sewing stuffed dolls. Comparison of weaves and materials in cloth. Shelter building and furnishing play or doll house, constructing furniture for play house. Transportation comparative study and conSandtable projects relating struction of transportation models. Methods of teaching and correlation of subject to all studies. matter emphasized in every quarter. Required in Course I. Students may enter at beginning of any quarter.

Fee One :

dollar each quarter.

Fine and Applied Arts 121, 122, 123. Two hours a week for three quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. Fall quarter (Art 121), lettering and poster making. Color theory and applications. Design principles of balance, rhythm, domiLinoleum nance, subordination applied in projects of the course. block and stencil made and applied. Winter quarter (Art 122), principles of curvilinear and rectilinear perspective, drawing of Pose drawing. objects singly and in groups, decorative treatment. Sandtable projects and their relation to other subjects. Spring


Departments of Instruction

62

Principles of landscape comNature drawing and development of design units

quarter (Art 123), clay modeling. position.

Picture study. applied to decoration of objects. Methods of teaching the subject in the grammar grades emphasized with each phase of work as it is taken up. Required in Course II. Students may enter the course at the beginning of any quarter.

Fee:

One

dollar each quarter.

Fine and Applied Arts 131, 132, 133. Three periods Fall, Winter, Spring quarters. a week, two double, one single. Credit, three hours each quarter. Fall quarter (Art 131), lettering, monogram, poster making. Color theory and applications. Principles of design applied to definite projects, designing with C and S curves. Making of block print and stencil. Winter quarter (Art 132), theory of curvilinear and rectilinear perspective applied in object drawings in line, charcoal, color in light and shade and decorative treatments. Spring quarter (Art 133), landscape composition worked out in- different mediums. Clay modeling. Craft projects. Courses 131 and 132 required of students who take Home Economics as a major or a minor. Students may enter at the beginning of any quarter and take any quarter as a separate unit. Elective in first and second years of Course III. Also open to Third and Fourth Year students. Fine

Arts 341, 342, 343. Charcoal. Three double week for three quaretrs. Credit, three hours each quarDrawing in charcoal from cast. Clay modeling. Open to ter. Third and Fourth Year students. Students may enter at any periods a

quarter.

Prerequisite:

Fine and Applied Arts 131, 132, and 133 or

the equivalent.

Fee

:

One

dollar each quarter.

Fine Arts 345. Black hoard Drawing. Three double periods Offered any quarter upon demand. a week for one quarter. Given with special reference to the use of Credit, two hours. drawing for illustrative purposes in primary and grammar grades.

Fee

:

To

cover

all

expenses.

Fine and Applied Arts 346. Arts and Crafts. Three double periods a week for one quarter offered any quarter on demand. Credit, three hours. course offered to students as avocational recreation, or to Course III students using Drawing as a minor.

A

—


Fine and Applied Arts

63

Emphasis on simple projects of inexpensive materials. Cloth treatments, crayonex, stencil, block print, hatik and tie and dye; cardboard construction and book and magazine binding, parchment lamp shades, enameling, gesso decoration, and simple leather tooling and lacing. Open to second, third and fourth year students.

Fee

:

To

cover

all

expenses.

Fine and Applied Arts 347, 348, 349. Poster Making. Three double periods a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Open to Second, Third and Fourth Year students. Fall quarter (Art 347) Lettering for spacing, form and accuracy. Related to general illustrated posters. Winter quarter (Art 348) Figure drawing in various mediums working for proportions and unity. Related to poster medium. Spring quarter (Art 349) Parts of figure for details of structure. Figure work in design. Portrait work related to poster medium.

— —

Fee

:

One

dollar each quarter.

Fine Arts 441, 442, 443. Art Appreciation. Three periods a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Fall quarter (Fine Art 441) Winter Architecture. quarter (Fine Art 442) Sculpture. Spring quarter (Fine Art 443) Pictures. Elective for Third and Fourth Year students of any course. Students may enter at the beginning of any quarter. Each student pays a dollar for use of texts and buys about

a hundred pictures.

Applied Art 101 and 102. Handwriting. The work in handwriting aims first, to make good writers, and second, to prepare Direct, specific, students for efficient teaching of handwriting. tested methods of teaching, coupled with the ability to write well, can alone produce the desired results. The muscular movement method, adopted by the State Board of Education for use in the schools of the State, is taught in this course.

101. Handwriting. Two periods a week for DefiOflFered every quarter. Credit, one hour. nite instruction and drills on handling material, posture, movement, and the mechanics of writing. Required of all students entering Courses I and II, who do not present a certificate of proficiency in writing. Students who show a certain proficiency in writing may be excused at the discretion of the instructor at any time during either term, but may be required to return to the

Applied Art

one quarter.

writing class

if

they show poor writing in other classes.


64

Applied Art

Departments of Instruction

102, Handwriting. One hour a week for one Offered every quarter. Credit, one hour. The psychology of handwriting, adapting methods to the physical and mental development of the child, the place of formal drills, standard tests, the technique of class instruction, the physiology and hygiene of writing, measuring the results with the scales of Locker, Freeman, and Ayers, and the correlation of handwriting instruction with other written work in the curriculum.

quarter.


Geography

65

GEOGRAPHY MISS CRENELS, MISS WATERS, MISS CASH,* MISS

MORAN

The aim of this department is threefold to train the student to observe closely and accurately the world in which we live, to note the forces at work moulding its surface and fitting it to be the home of man, to reason accurately upon the phenomena presented by observation, and to express clearly and concisely the conclusions at which she may arrive to lead her to wider sympathies and broader views through the study of the races of mankind, their homes, industries, habits, and general responses to prepare her to teach geography in to physical environments the public schools. minor in this department requires seven courses selected from those open to students in Course III. Geography 131, 132, and 331 are required. :

;

;

A

Geography 111. Geography of Type Environments. Nature Study. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours (geography, two; nature study, one). study of the life of peoples in varied type regions made with the idea of showing how natural environmental factors help to determine human activities as exemplified in the Belgian Congo, the Nile Valley, Arabia, the Tigris-Euphrates Valley, and the Kirghiz Steppes. College texts paralleled by materials used in lower grades. Fall nature experiences, with emphasis upon common trees, birds, insects and flowers. Work in the field by both group and individual supplemented by library readings. Required in

A

Course

I.

Geography 112. Geography of Type Environment. Nature Study. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit three hours (geography, two; nature study, one). continuation of Geography 111. Life activities as determined by natural environmental factors in the Mediterranean Lands, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Norway, France and Tundra. Each student required to develop a unit of work on Eskimos, Indians, and Japanese. Winter nature experiences with deciduous trees, conifers, winter bird residents problems of maintaining a balanced aquarium and caring for pets and indoor gardens weather charts changes in position of rising, setting and noon-day sun recorded.

A

;

;

• Part-time

work.


Departments of Instruction

66

Library readings on economic values of trees, birds, domestic and wild animals and poultry. Required in Course I.

Geography

113. Industrial and Commercial Geography. NaThree hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours (geography, two; nature study, one). A study of industries dealing with our food, clothing and shelter, emphasizing the

ture Study.

controlling factors in their production; means of transportation texts paralleled by materials avail-

and communication. College able for the primary grades.

Spring experiences with transient and summer resident birds, flowering plants, insects, frogs problems of restocking aquarium and indoor gardens. Frequent field trips supplemented by library readings. Required in Course I. trees,

;

Geography 121. The Principles of Geography. Three hours Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. brief study of a week. the earth's surface features and the agencies which modify them the fundamental principles underlying climate the chief types of climate, their characteristics and distribution. Principles developed through a study of human activities in varied regions which best illustrate man's adjustment to his natural environment. Required in Course II.

A ;

Geography

122. Geography of the Americas. Three hours Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the economic and commercial activities of man in the major regions of North and South America, as modified and affected by the

a week.

natural environment. Subject matter presented with the idea of giving the student a definite background of knowledge for teaching in the upper elementary grades. While texts of a college grade are required, every effort is made to familiarize the student with the basal and supplementary texts and materials she will need to know when she begins active work as a teacher.

Required

in

Course

II.

Geography 123. Geography of the Eastern Hemisphere. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the economic and commercial activities of man in the eastern hemisphere with the emphasis upon The British Empire, Northwestern Europe, The Mediterranean Lands, China, and Japan. The point of view in this course is the same as that in Geography 122. Required in Course II.


Geography

67

Geography 131. Geography of the Lands. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the earth's surface features, from the standpoint of their origin, the agencies which modify them, and their influence on man. Elective in First

and Second Years of Course

Geography

132.

Winter quarter.

III.

Climates of the World. Three hours a week. Credit, three hours. study of the funda-

A

mental principles underlying climate; the chief types of climate, their characteristics and distribution. Man's response to each type.

Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

Geography

133.

Geography of North America.

Three hours

A

Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. study of the a week. Emphasis placed on man's natural regions of North America. response to the geographic environment of each region. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

Geography 231. Geography of South America. Three hours Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. study of the a week. natural regions of the continent. Emphasis placed on the present economic development of the countries and the possibilities for future development. Trade relations emphasized also. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

A

Geography

232. Geography of Europe. Three hours a week. Credit, three hours. study of the influence of geographic factors on the development of the European nations. Special emphasis placed on world powers. Current questions concerning Europe also stressed. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

Winter quarter.

A

Geography

233. Geography of Asia and Africa. Three hours Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the independent countries of these continents with emphasis on the natural resources of each, and on the possibility of future development. A study of the colonies and mandatories with the idea of determining the value of each to the mother country. Current questions stressed. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

a week.

Geography

Problems in the Teaching of Geography. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of objectives in the teaching of geography means of realiz331.

Three hours a week.

;


Departments of Instruction

68

ing the objectives selection and organization of units of work, the teaching of which will accomplish these objectives map interevaluation of classroom procedure. pretation standard tests Open to Third and Fourth Year students. ;

;

;

;

Geography

Visual Aids in Geography. Three hours a Credit, three hours. Course in collecting, preparing, interpreting, and using illustrative materials,

week.

332.

A

Spring quarter.

such as pictures, exhibits, maps, and

Open

to

slides, in

classroom work.

Third and Fourth Year students.

Geography 341. Historical Geography of America. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. A brief survey of the history of early European commerce and trade routes as influenced by geography; conditions leading to the discovery of America how each permanent settlement on the continent became adjusted to environmental conditions expansion from the Atlantic seaboard to the Mississippi River; problems of transportation leading to the purchase of Louisiana Territory and expansion beyond the Rockies problems of slavery resulting from this expansion and leading to Civil War; and a study of vast resources leading to the development of the United States into a world power. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. ;

;

;

Geography

Geography of the Bible. Three hours a 342. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of PalesPresent-day conditions compared tine and neighboring districts. with those of Bible times. Open to Third and Fourth Year week.

students.

Geography

Three hours a An intensive study Credit, three hours. of the natural regions of Virginia, with the diea of determining to what extent Virginia's geographic conditions have influenced and

week.

343.

Geography of Virginia.

Spring quarter.

will always influence the state's development. Emphasis upon the possibilities for greater development in the future. study of the objectives of the State Chamber of Commerce as presented in the "Five-five Plan." Open to Third and Fourth Year

A

students.

Geography

441. Current Problems of the Americas. Three Credit, three hours. From current Fall quarter. periodicals the class discovers the major problems confronting the Americas, selecting for intensive study those that appeal to

hours a week.


Geography

69

them as the most vital and interesting. Each student is then given the privilege of selecting from the college texts and other library sources that material which seems to her most helpful To what extent are geographic in answering these questions :

conditions responsible for the existence of these problems? Will their solution be influenced by geography? Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Geography

Current Problems of European Countries Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Problems selected and developed, with Credit, three hours. Open to Third and Fourth Year slight modifications, as in 441. 442.

and Their Possessions.

students.

Geography

443. Current Problems of Asia. Three hours a Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Problems selected and developed, with slight modification, as in 441 and 442. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

week.


Departments of Instruction

70

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES WALMSLEY, MISS TUCKER, MISS STUBBS,

*DR. SIMKINS, MR. MOSS, MISS PECK, MISS COOPER, MISS PETTIT

DR.

The work

of this department

is

planned with three definite

own valuation of text book Statements, to apply the facts thus determined to conditions of real life, and to organize knowledge in a form that is teachable. Especial stress is laid on the fact that no one text contains complete truth on any question and that the real teacher no longer No day's work is considered satisfactory teaches from the book. that does not show evidence of research beyond the text book aims

:

to teach students to

make

their

assignment.

A

major in this department requires the following courses History 131, 132, 133, 234, 235, 236, 347, 348, 349, 331, and two additional courses selected from those numbered in the four hundreds, or two courses in Social Science. minor requires six courses in History or six courses in

A

Social Science.

suggested that students who take a major in History and consider the probability of teaching in the upper elementary grades take History 122 and 123 in lieu of 235 and 236. It is

who

History

History of Virginia. Three hours a week for Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Virginia's influence upon the history of the country and the part her Required in great men played in the nation's development. 121.

one quarter.

Course

II.

History 122, 123. American History. Three hours a week First quarfor two quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. ter (122), treats America's history to the Civil War; Second quarter (123), begins with the period of the Civil War and inThe subject cludes a study of our history to the present day. matter of this course is so presented as to give through actual experience in study and in class work methods that are transferWhile a college text and college able to the grammar grades. references are used as a basis for this work, students are introduced to a number of elementary texts. This is done to stress the importance of supplementing the State-adopted text and that prospective teachers may learn to recognize the merits and demerits of elementary histories. Required in Course 11. *On

leave of absence.


History and Social Sciences

71

History 211, 212. History of Civilization. Three hours a week for two quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. An orientation course in the development of modern Hfe from savage days, through the growth of nations, to the present day.

quired in Course

Re-

I.

History 131, week for three

European History. Three hours a 132, 133. Credit, three hours each quarter. quarters. History 131, in the Fall quarter, is a survey of the ancient world with special emphasis on the factors which influenced the develop-

ment and achievements of early Europe the contributions made by the Orient and the early Western nations to modern civilization. History 132 and 133, in the Winter and Spring quarters, after ;

a brief review of Medieval History, include the Renaissance, the geographical discoveries, the Reformation and the CounterReformation, the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution and its outcome. Open to First Year students in Course III.

History a week.

movement

234.

Reconstruction

Course

a

Contemporary European History.

Credit, three hours. quarter. of the 19th and 20th Centuries the

Fall

;

Problems.

Open

to

Three hours

The Liberalistic World War and

Second Year students

in

III.

History 235, 236. Early American History. Three hours week for Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours

each quarter.

History 235 includes the Colonial Background, the

American Revolution, Founding the National Government, and the Jeffersonian Policies. History 236 includes the New Nationalism, the Jacksonian Democracy, the Advance to the Pacific, Sectionalism and Civil War. Open to Second Year students in Course

III.

History 331. The Teaching of History in the High School. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. In addition to the professionalized subject matter given in the other courses in history, this course is offered to give a systematic study of some problems peculiar to the field of teaching history to high school students. It treats of the definition and aims of history, the organization of courses, the use of sources and collateral reading, methods of presentation, making history real, including historical pageantry, and the special qualifiations of the history teacher. Required of all Third Year students who choose a major in this department.


Departments of Instruction

72

History 347, week for three

348. Later American History. Three hours a quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. History 347, in the Fall quarter, the United States from the Civil War to the Twentieth Century History 348, in the Winter quarter, the period of Roosevelt, Wilson, and the World War. ;

World Politics. Three hours a week. Credit, Spring quarter. The relation of the United States to the problems of Imperialism and World Orangization. Open to Third and Fourth History

349.

three hours.

Year

students.

History 441. Political History. Three hours a week. Credit, three hours. Fall quarter. brief course in the history of political thought and political parties, especially in the United States. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

A

History 442. Practical Politics. Three hours a week. Credit, Winter quarter. three hours. study of the actual working of political parties in the United States. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

A

History 443. week.

Advanced Virginia History.

Credit, three hours.

Spring quarter.

Three hours a

A

detailed study

of two or three political crises in Virginia history.

Open

to

Third and Fourth Year students.

History 444.

International Relations. Three hours a week. quarter. Credit, three hours. study of international trade and international peace. The methods used today to draw nations closer together and to regulate the difficult questions arising from national prejudices. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

A

Fall

History 447, week for two

Three hours 448. Latin American History. quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Offered alternate years. course in the geography, (447), colonization, and early history of Latin America. (448), study of the national period of the Latin American States, including their relation with Europe and with the United States. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

a

A

A

History 451, 452. The British Empire. Three hours a week two quarters. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three

for


History and Social Sciences

7?i

A

study of the formation and present influence of the British Commonweahh, involving a brief treatment of colonialism, imperialism, and federation. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

hours each quarter.

History 454. Oriental History. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. study of the conflicting interests of the Far East as affected by world politics. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

A

History 455.

Classic Civilization. Three hours a week. three hours. Winter quarter. course dealing with those phases of Roman life, as affected by Greek culture, which left their impress on the life and the language of the Romance countries. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

A

Credit,

History 457.

some

Open

American Problems.

Three hours a week. three hours. An attempt to evaluate of the elements entering into the social America of today. to Third and Fourth Year students.

Spring quarter.

Credit,

Government 201. Citizenship. Three hours a week for one course quarter. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. in the problems of American citizenship, with a study of the Required in actual working of the American Government.

A

Courses

I

and H.

Government

Three hours a 333. American Government. Offered every quarter. Credit, three quarter. hours. study of the more advanced problems arising from the attempt to extend a democracy to the control of national

week for one

A

questions.

Required

in

Course HI.

Government 457. State Government. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the principles underlying states government, with special reference to Virginia conditions. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Economics 461, 462, 463. Economic History and Theory. Three hours a week. Credit, three hours each quarter. Economics 461, in the Fall quarter, is designed to show the historical background of the economic movements and forces. The industrial revolution, transportation, currency and banking problems, economic effects of the growth of population,


Departments of Instruction

74

unions and industrial combinations are considered. in the Winter quarter, and 463, in the Spring quarter, treat of the principles of economic theory and of the economic problems of modern society. Open to Third and Fourth rise of labor

Economics 462,

Year

students.

Three hours a and Winter quarters. Credit, three Introductory Course, Elements of sociological theory hours. Influences of environillustrated by practical, social problems. ment. Human nature. Contacts, primary and secondary, group Population, its quantity and quality. conflicts. Co-operation. Heredity. The family. Required in Courses I and II. Sociology 201.

week for one

Introduction to Sociology. Fall

quarter.

Cominunity Orffanization. Three hours a Offered Winter and Spring quarters.

Sociology 202.

week for one

quarter. three hours.

A

constructive study of community orCredit, ganization and social progress with particular reference to Virginia. Theories and principles of community organization. Special study of typical community organizations such as, playground and recreation centers school community centers community church centers country life movement American Red Cross public welfare movement public health movement community leagues and county councils federation of social agencies and social surveys. Required in Courses I and II. ;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

Sociology 341. Principles of Sociology. Three hours a week. scientific study of society Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. in order that human relations may be better understood and in order to help people arrive at wise decisions as to social policies. The topics treated are Social population social forces social Practical application of principles is made in the soluprocesses. tion of real problems. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Sociology 341 or Sociology 201 is prerequisite to other courses

A

;

:

;

in Sociology.

Three Sociology 342. Principles of Sociology continued. Credit, three hours. Social hours a week. Winter quarter. processes continued social products the principles of anticipa;

;

Practical apsimulation, individualization, and balance. Open to Third and plication in the solution of real problems. Fourth Year students. tion,

Sociology 343.

The Family.

Three hours a week.

Spring


History and Social Sciences

75

quarter. Credit, three hours. The history of the human family. The influence of Christianity upon marriage and family customs. The industrial revolution and its effect upon the family. Evi-

dences of the maladjustment of the modern family to social conditions. Current Causes of disharmony within the family. theories of reform. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

W

ell-Being. Sociology 441. Problems of Social Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Problems of income; questions of health and physical welfare. Open to Third

and Fourth Year students. Sociology 442. Problems of Social Well-Being continued. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Three hours a week. Questions of health and physical welfare continued; problems of mental hygiene. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Sociology 445. Criminology and Penology. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The problem of crime and criminals the making of the criminal history of punishment; modern penal institution; the machinery of justice. ;

Open

to

;

Third and Fourth Year students.

A

Sociology 460. Social Research. seminar course. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Open only to students who have already shown unusual ability in research work in some one of the Social Sciences. definite study is made, under supervision, of a local problem, and only results that are a contribu-

A

tion to

knowledge are accepted.

Elective under restrictions.


Departments of Instruction

76

HOME ECONOMICS MISS TUPPER, MISS JETER

The general aim of this department is to home economics in the public schools, to

train students to teach

give some training in the scientific administration of the home, and to prepare students

become dietitians and institutional managers. major in Home Economics requires the following courses Home Economics 131, 132, 133, 231, 232, 233, 331, 332, 341, 342, 343, 345, 441, 442, 443, 445, and one of the following: 444, 446. In the third and fourth years, the additional courses required for this major take the place of the same number of electives. There is no minor in Home Economics. to

A

Home Economics 131. Principles of Sewing, and Textiles. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Credit, three hours.

The study

of stitches, seams, The principles of dress construction are studied and applied in the making of Students furnish their own materials. a simple wash dress. Elective in First Year of Course HI. Students taking this course may not receive credit for Home Economics 201. Fall quarter.

materials,

and trimmings

suitable for underwear.

Home Economics

132 and 133. Elementary Foods and CookThree periods a week for two quarters, two double, one single. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each ery.

A

quarter. study of the composition of foods, the principles underlying their preparation, the sources, manufacture, and cost of foods and the preparing, planning, and serving of meals. Elec;

Year of Course HI. Laboratory Fee Two dollars.

tive in First

:

Home Economics

Elementary Foods and Cookery. Three

231.

week for one

quarter, two double, one single. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. continuation of Home Economics 132 and 133. more advanced study of foods, with special emphasis on food preservation, and table service. Elective in Second Year of Course III.

periods a

A

A

Prerequisite: Home Economics 132 and 133. Fee: Two dollars and a half.

Home Economics

232.

week, one double, two

Costume Design. Three periods a Winter quarter. Credit, three

single.


Home Economics

77

hours. The appHcation of the principles of design to the entire costume. study of line, form, and color in their relation to the individual. And the study of suitability of design to materials and articles of clothing. Elective in Second Year of Course III.

A

Prerequisite: Art 131 and 132.

Home Economics 233. Principles of Sewing, and Textiles. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Practical struction

work

in the application of the principles of dress con-

A

by students.

study of textile fibers, with simple tests, such as could be used in the home, made to detect adulterations.

Elective in Second Year of Course HI. Students taking this Students furnish their own materials. course may not receive credit for Home Economics 202.

Home Economics

and

Principles of Sewing. Three single. Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. The study of stitches, seams, materials, and trimmings suitable for underwear and simple dresses. study of sewing courses and a list of equipment. Elective in First and Second Years of Course HI. Students furnish their own materials. Students taking these courses may not receive credit for Home Economics 131 and 233.

periods a

201

week for two

202.

quarters,

two double, one

A

Home Economics 203. Dressmaking. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The making of an afternoon silk dress and a gradTypical garments made for children of different uation dress. Both drafted and commercial patterns used. Elective in ages. First and Second Years of Course III. Students furnish their own

materials.

Home Economics nomics.

331 and 332. The Teaching of Home EcoThree hours a week for two quarters. Winter and

Credit, three hours each quarter. Spring quarters. Planning courses of study for the various types of schools. careful survey of the problems of equipment, and laboratory planning. Application made to the practical problems growing out of teachRequired in the Third Year of all students choosing a ing. major in this department.

A

Home Economics 300. House Planning and Furnishing. Three periods a week, one double, two single. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The house and its construction, furnishings,


Departments of Instruction

78

and

decorations,

harmony ture, etc.

The study

house materials, colors, and arrangement of furniThird and Fourth Year students.

care.

of

in furnishings, the selection

Open

to

Home Economics 342. Home Nursing. Three periods a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of preventive measures and care of the sick in the home when the service of a professional nurse is not required; of the equipment and care of the sick room; and of aids in emergencies, and accidents. Open to Third Year students. Fee One :

dollar.

Home Economics 343. Household Management. Three This periods a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. course consists of a study of the position of woman as an economic factor in the social world. The question of buying, budgets, systematic care of waste, home ideals, division of labor, efficiency, and economy are discussed. Open to Third Year students. Fee One :

dollar.

Home Economics

346. Advanced Foods and Cookery. Three quarter, two double, one single. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. In this course more experimental work in class and individual problems relating to foods and their preparation, is given. Consideration will be given to problems of organization, equipping school lunch-rooms. Open to Third

periods a

Year

week for one

students.

Prerequisite:

Fee Four :

Home

Economics 132, 133, and 231.

dollars.

Home Economics

441.

Nutrition.

one quarter, two double, one

Three periods a week for

Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The presentation of the fundamental principles of human nutrition, the application of these principles to the feeding of individuals and families under varying physiological, economic, single.

and social conditions. Open to Fourth Year students. Prerequisite: Chemistry 131, 132, and 133, Household Chemistry, Home Economics 132, 133, 231, and 346. Laboratory Fee: Two dollars and a half.

Home Economics 400. Dressmaking. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Winter quarter. Credit,


Home Economics three hours.

Home Economics 203, but for more Third and Fourth Years. Students furnish

Similar to

advanced students. their

own

79

Students taking this course

materials.

ceive credit for

Home

may

not re-

Economics 203.

Home Economics 443. Millinery. Three periods a week, two double, one single. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The making and covering of frames, trimmings, and the renovation of materials. One fabric street hat made, and two spring hats, one a street hat, and the other a dress hat. Open to Fourth Year students.

Home Economics

444. Advanced Clothing. Three periods a for one quarter, two single and one double. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. The aim of this course will be to round out and supplement with the student all supplementary courses Illustrative matter for clothing in clothing, textiles, and design. problems in teaching will be prepared. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

week

Home Economics 445. Menu-Making, and Marketing. Three periods a week, two single, one double. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. The planning of menus for various occasions with definite allowances. The marketing is done by the students. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III. Alternating with Home Economics 344. Prerequisite:

Home

Laboratory Fee

:

Economics Three dollars.

Home Economics 446. riods a week, two double, three hours. Dresses made ing her dress and making Students furnish their own

132, 133

and 231.

Advanced Dressmaking. one

Three pe-

Spring quarter. Credit,, of soft materials, each student designher own pattern to suit the design. single.

materials.

Home Economics 451, 452, and 453. General Problems in Home Making. Three periods a week, one double, two single. Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each The various problems of the home are considered. This course is for students who have had no work in Home Economics, but who desire a general knowledge of the scientific handling of home problems. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Fall,

quarter.


Departments of Instruction

80

LATIN MISS RICE

The work of this department is planned to prepare teachers of Latin for the high schools of the State. major in Latin requires the following courses: Latin 131, 132, 133, 231, 232, 233, 341, 342, 343, and two courses selected

A

from those open to Fourth Year students. A minor requires the first two years of the major and Latin 343 as an elective

in

Third Year.

Prerequisite to choosing a major or a minor in this department Three high school units in Latin. :

Latin ter.

Latin ter.

Roman

131.

Three hours a week.

History.

Fall quar-

Credit, three hours. 132.

Lyric Poetry.

Three hours a week.

Winter quar-

Credit, three hours.

Latin

133.

Spring quarter.

Grammar and

Composition.

Three hours a week.

Credit, three hours.

Latin

231. Life and Literature of the Romans. Three hours Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Roman life as seen in Roman literature; life and literature of the Romans as a factor in modern civilization brief history of the Latin language and its relation to English.

a week.

;

Latin 232. Life and Literature of the Romans. Credit, three hours. a week. Winter quarter. of Latin 231.

A

Latin

Three hours continuation

Intensive Study of Caesar. Three hours a week. Personality and career of Credit, three hours. Caesar, significance of his conquests, his writings as history and as literature; Roman military system; geography of Gaul; sentence structure and word order drill in the building of a vocabulary*; practice in sight-reading. 233.

Spring quarter.

;

Latin 341, Intensive Study of Cicero. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Brief history of the last century of the republic; personality and career of Cicero; compari-


Latin son between Caesar and Cicero

;

81

typical structure of

a

Roman

oration; practice in sight-reading.

Latin 342. Intensive Study of Vergil. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Roman mythology and religion the Augustine age life of Vergil and the effect of environment upon his poetic genius and literary art Roman epic poetry study of the hexameter, essays on Vergil from standard ;

;

;

;

works.

Latin 343. TJie Teaching of Latin. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The present high school organization and the Latin curriculum sources of vocabulary for first-year Latin first-year Latin in relation to the grade in which it is taught and to the general aims and values of classical study methods of presentation proper emphasis upon geography, ancient life, and historical connections use of maps, pictures, and various classroom helps books for use of teachers and for reference purposes of pupils. ;

;

;

;

;

;

Latin ter.

Three hours a week. Fall quarStudy of Roman life in the time of Elective in Fourth Year.

Pliny's Letters.

441.

Credit, three hours.

Domitian and Trajan.

Latin

Three hours a week. Essays. Elective in Fourth Year.

442.

Winter quarter.

Credit, three hours.

Latin

443.

Spring quarter.

Latin ter.

Satire and Ars Poetica. Three hours a week. Credit, three hours. Elective in Fourth Year.

Roman Comedy. Three

hours a week. Fall quarFive plays to be selected from Flatus Elective in Fourth Year.

451.

Credit, three hours.

and Terence.

452. Roman Philosophy. Three hours a week. Winter Selections from Lucretius' De Credit, three hours. Ndtura. Elective in Fourth Year.

Latin quarter.

Rerum

Latin

453.

Advanced Grammar and Composition.

hours a week. Spring quarter. in Fourth Year.

—

Credit, three hours.

Three Elective

Note. Rush Latin is given for the benefit of students in Course III who have not had the necessary prerequisites for the regular

work

in this department.


82

Departments of Instruction

MATHEMATICS MISS LONDON, MISS TALIAFERRO, MRS. JEFFERS This department offers courses in arithmetic, algebra, geomtrigonometry, analytical geometry, calculus, electives, a course in history of mathematics, method courses in teaching arithmetic in the elementary schools, and in teaching mathematics All work in the department is given in the secondary schools. with a full appreciation of the need for vitalization in all school work, and the effort is made everywhere to link up the work with etry,

the demands of real life. Since teachers of high school mathematics are often called upon to teach arithmetic either in the high school or in the upper elementary grades, it is strongly urged that students who choose a major or a minor in this department take as elective work some time during their course, preferably in the First Year,

Mathematics 121, 122, and 123, Arithmetic for Grammar Grade and High School Teachers. A major in Mathematics requires the following courses Mathematics 141, 142, 143, 241, 242, 243, 331, 332, 341, 342, and 430. A minor in Mathematics requires the following courses Mathematics 141, 142, 143, 241, 243, and 331. Prerequisites for choosing a major or minor in this department One and one-half units of algebra and one unit of plane geom:

etry.

Mathematics 111, 112, 113. Arithmetic for Primary Teachers. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, two hours each quarter. professional treatment of the subject matter of arithmetic as taught in the elementary schools, including a consideration of the aims and outcomes to be desired, and a mastery of the skills and techniques of the subject. Mathematics 111 {Fall Quarter). Historical background, number concepts and number systems, psychological principles and general methods applied to arithmetic, the laws of drill, motivation, gradation, and rationalization. Wide reading for breadth of perspective. Mathematics 112 (Winter Quarter). The grade placement of topics for the seven grades of the elementary school, with detailed consideration of the first four grades. Definite methods of classroom procedure for these grades discussed, with emphasis upon the four fundamental processes and upon the laws underlying their habituation. Mathematics 113 {Spring Quarter).

A

A


Mathematics

83

broad treatment of such topics as percentage, banking, measurements, graphs and other business practices for the twofold purpose of illustrating the characteristics of good problem material, and good problem technique and at the same time of giving to the future teacher that mastery of her subject essential to successful teaching.

Diagnostic tests and remedial work distributed throughout the year serve not only to bring the student's efficiency up to standard, but furnish the best possible basis for the discussion of methods, and at the same time give practice in the use of work books, the grading of tests, and the establishing of norms. Personal and household budgets discussed, and an account book kept through one quarter. Mathematics 111 or 112, preferably both, must precede Mathematics 113. Required in Course I.

Mathematics

121,

122,

and

123.

Arithmetic for

Grammar

Grade and High School Teachers. Three hours a week for three In general treatment, quarters. Credit, two hours each quarter. these courses are similar to the ones outlined for Mathematics 111, 112, and 113, with the difference that here the emphasis is upon the social activities requiring arithmetic rather than upon the skill acquiring phases of the subject. Mathematics 121 {Fall Quarter). Same as outlined for Mathematics 111. Mathematics 122 {Winter Quarter). Grade placement of the topics for the seven grades of the elementary school, with detailed consideraEmphasis upon the teaching of common and decimal fractions and upon the principles underlying these Mathematics 123 {Spring Quarter). Topics covered processes. same as in Mathematics 113, with more attention to problem technique and methods of teaching. Diagnostic tests and remedial work distributed throughout the year same as for Mathematics 111, 112, and 113. Personal and household budgets discussed, and an account book kept through one quarter. Mathematics 121 or 122, preferably both, must precede Mathematics 123. Required in Course tion of the last four.

II.

Mathematics

141,

142,

and

143.

Freshman Mathematics.

Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each Mathematics 141 {Fall Quarter). Algebra and Trigquarter. onometry. Mathematics 142 {Winter Quarter). Analytic Geometry and Algebra. Mathematics 143 {Spring Quarter). Cal-


Departments of Instruction

84

and Algebra. Course III.

Elective

cuius

First

in

and Second Years of

Mathematics Fall quarter.

begun

in

College Algebra. Three hours a week. 241. continuation of the course Credit, three hours.

A

Freshman Mathematics, covering the usual

topics of Elective in First and Second Years of Course

college algebra. III.

Mathematics 242. Analytic Geometry. Three hours a week. Credit, three hours. continuation of the Spring quarter. course begun in Freshman Mathematics. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

A

Mathematics 243. Solid Geometry. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. The subject matter of Elective in solid geometry treated from the college viewpoint. First and Second Years of Course III. Mathematics 134. College Geometry. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. An extension of highschool plane geometry which includes some review of that subject from the professional standpoint. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III. Mathematics

Calculus. Three hours a week. Fall quarPrinciples and applications. Elective in Third or Fourth Year of Course III. No credit unless followed by Mathematics 342. ter.

341.

Credit, three hours.

Mathematics 342. Calculus. quarter. Credit, three hours. 341. Elective in Third or Fourth

Three hours a week. Winter continuation of Mathematics Year of Course III.

A

Mathematics

331

and

332.

The Teaching of High School

Three hours a week.

Spring and Fall quarters. discussion of the objectives of high school mathematics some historical background for appreciation purposes general principles of secondary education applied specifically to the teaching of mathematics a study of the presentation of typical parts of the different branches of the acquaintance with mathematical educational materials, subject as magazines, books, and instruments; suggestions for auxiliary

Mathematics.

Credit, three hours each quarter.

A

;

;

;

;


Mathematics

85

mathematics clubs, pupils' notebooks, field work; observation in the Training School. Required of all students who choose Mathematics as a major or minor. activities, as

Mathematics

430.

Winter quarter. Fourth Year of Course

week.

Mathematics

Credit, three hours.

Three hours a

Elective in Third or

III.

Projective Geometry. Three hours a Credit, three hours. An introductory Elective in Third or Fourth Year of Course III.

week for one course.

History of Mathematics.

443.

quarter.


Departments of Instruction

86

MODERN LANGUAGES MISS SMITHEY, *MISS DRAPER, MISS NICHOLS

The work of the courses in Modern Languages is designed to give students wishing to teach in the high schools of the State a mastery of the language studied, especially with respect to pronunciation, grammar, and oral expression. major in French, or in Spanish, requires the following courses 131, 132, 133, 231, 232, 233, 341, 342, 343, and two courses selected from those numbered in the four hundreds. minor requires the first two years of the major. An elective requires not less than three courses.

A

A

Prerequisite:

Three units of Latin and two units of the languages selected as a major, minor, or elective; or two units of Latin and three units of modern languages. The department offers courses in French, Spanish, and Ger-

modem man.

French French

Grammar, Pronunciation,

131.

hours a week.

grammar

Fall quarter.

Com,position.

Credit, three hours.

Three

Critical study

pronunciation based on phonics reading of simand written reproduction dictation. French 131 taken as an elective must be followed by French 132 and French 133.

of

ple texts

;

;

;

oral

;

French 132. Grammar, Pronunciation, Composition. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. This course is a continuation of the work of French 131. French

Literature and Phonics. Three hours a week. Credit, three hours. Intensive and extensive reading of texts study of phonics dictation oral and written reproduction. 133.

Spring quarter.

;

French

231.

;

Principles of

;

Grammar and

Phonics.

Three

hours a week. Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, three hours. Critical study of the underlying principles of the structure of the French language; intensive study of phonics. French 231 taken as an elective must be followed by French 232.

On

leave of absence.


Modern Languages

87

Three Principles of Grammar and Phonics. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours. The work of this quarter is a continuation of French 231. Emphasis is placed on the study of verbs.

French

232.

hours a week.

French 233. Methods and Composition. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The teaching of French; principles of Modern Language teaching; methods of instruction

organization

;

Composition: practice of

application

Open

to

principles

of

presentation

of

subject

matter.

and written use of the language; teaching, grammar, and phonics.

Second and Third Year students.

French

Three hours a week. Fall quarter. French literature with reference to the origin of the language and of the litera341.

Literature.

Credit, three hours. special

and

in oral

An

outline study of

ture.

French

Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Three Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Reading of selected plays and letters of this period with special emphasis placed upon the work of Moliere. 342.

hours a week.

French

Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Three Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The classic writers of the Seventeenth Century. Selected plays from this 343.

hours a week. period.

French

Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three Credit, three hours. The Romantic Movement in French literature with special reference to the work of Victor Hugo. Elective in Third and Fourth Years, 441.

hours a week.

Fall quarter.

French 442. Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Some study of Rostand and his work. Elective in Third and Fourth Years. French

443.

Spring quarter.

Contemporary Literature. Credit, three hours.

This course includes the readElective in Third and Fourth Years.

literature of the present century.

ing of some

lyrics.

Three hours a week. aspects of French

Some


Departments of Instruction

88

Spanish ^Spanish

Grammar

Pronunciation, Composition. Three Credit, three hours. Critical study of grammar; pronunciation based on phonics; reading of simple texts dictation, oral and written reproduction. 131.

hours a week.

^

Fall quarter.

;

Spanish

Grammar, Pronunciation, Composition. Three Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. This course is a continuation of Spanish 131. Reading of simple texts oral and written reproduction dictation.

hours

a

132.

week.

;

;

Spanish

133. Literature and Composition. Three hours a Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Reading of Spanish texts suitable for second year high-school classes.

week.

^Spanish 231.

Literature and Composition. Three hours a Credit, three hours. The reading of stories and plays of intermediate grade with reference to teaching in secondary schools.

week.

Fall

quarter.

Spanish 232. Literature and Composition. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Selected readings in prose and poetry for classes in secondary schools oral and written composition; dictation. ;

Spanish

Literature and Phonics. Three hours a week. Outline course in Spanish literature as a basis for further study of some of the great Span233.

Spring quarter.

Credit, three hours.

ish writers.

Spanish

Literature and Composition. Three hours a This course is a conCredit, three hours. tinuation of Spanish 233.

week.

341.

Fall quarter.

Spanish week. plays,

342. Literature and Composition. Three hours a Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. The reading of stories, and lyrics of medium and advanced difficulty; oral

and written reproduction;

Spanish

343.

dictation.

Literature and Composition.

ISpanish 131, taken as an 2Spanish 231, taken as an

elective, elective,

Three hours a

must be followed by Spanish 132 and must be followed by Spanish 232.

133.


Modern Languages week.

Spring quarter.

Credit, three hours.

89

This course

is

a

continuation of Spanish 342.

Spanish

Three hours a 441. Literature and Composition. Some study of the Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. origin and development of Spanish literature. Elective in Third

week.

and Fourth Years.

Spanish

442. Literature and Composition. Winter quarter. three hours. Study of Cervantes, Lope de Vega and Calderon, Elective in Third and Fourth Years Credit,

Spanish

Literature and Composition. Spring quarter. Study of Spanish writers of today. Elective in Third and Fourth Years. 443.

Credit, three hours.

German Courses in German similar to those in French and Spanish be given should there be sufficient demand for them.

will

A

beginner's course in French and Spanish

benefit of those students

who wish an

is

offered for the

elective in a

Modern Lan-

guage, and for those who have not had the necessary prerequisites for majoring or minoring in this department. This class meets five times a week throughout the year and gives three hours of credit.


Departments of Instruction

90

MUSIC MISS TURNER,

MISS PURDOM,

MISS POTTS

The aim

of this department is to emphasize the aesthetic, intelsocial values of music; to broaden the conception of the function of music in the public schools to prepare the to grade teachers to teach music in their respective grades prepare supervisors and special teachers of music in elementary and high schools to help students in the use of the singing voice; and to bring all into an understanding and appreciation of the best music through group participation in song and through directed listening to the world's greatest musical literature. Students who choose music as a major or minor are required to take all the music courses offered and Reading 341, and to pass a piano and voice test given by the Department of Music. The piano test will consist of playing a simple march, a piano selection of at least third grade, and the sight reading of any hymn or song used in the grades. The voice test will consist of lectual,

and

;

;

;

the singing of three rote songs on the piano while singing.

Music

from memory, one accompanied

Two

hours a week for one quarter. Offered Fall Credit, one hour. The first quarter of a three-quarter course leading to the teaching of music in the elementary grades. Voice training, ear training, rhythm drills, symbols of music, and beginning sight-reading. First Year of Courses I and II. 111.

and Winter quarters.

112. Two hours a week for one quarter. Offered Winand Spring quarters. Credit, one hour. Voice training, rote Written dictation. Material songs, and study of interpretation. used in Primary grades. First Year of Course I.

Music

ter

Music 213. Two hours a week for one quarter. Offered Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, one hour. Methods of teaching music in the first three grades. Child voice, and how Appreciation work. to develop it. Primary grade outlines. Second Year of Course I. Music

Two

hours a week for one quarter. Offered Voice training, part singing, song literature for grammar grades. Written dictation. Second 222.

every quarter.

Year of Course

Credit, one hour. II.


Music

Music

Two

91

hours a week for one quarter.

Winter and Methods of teaching music in the grammar grades. Problems in tone, time, and theory classification of voices. Appreciation. Grade outlines. Second Year of Course II. 223.

Spring quarters.

Credit, one hour.

Music 341. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Chorus conducting music terms classification and problems of the changing voice in junior and senior high schools. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. ;

;

Music

342. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, hours. continuation of Music 341. Material and methods of junior and senior high school. Suitable programs. Required and elective courses in each. Clubs, orchestra. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

A

three

Music 350. Sight-Reading and Ear Training. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Advanced sightreading and dictation. Open to Second, Third, and Fourth Year students.

Music

351.

Fall quarter.

Elementary Harmony. Credit, three hours.

pound time problems, intervals, and Fourth Year students.

Three hours a week. and comtransposition. Open to Third Scales, keys, simple

Music 352. Elementary Harmony. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Continuation of Music 351. Tonal tendencies and their use in melodies. Chords, Harcadences, keyboard practice. Original melody writing. monization of given melodies. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Music 353. Elementary Harmony. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Continuation of Music 352. Chords in minor. Dominant chord modulation. Harmonization of original melodies. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Music quarter.

451.

Music Appreciation.

Credit, three hours.

instrumental music. National tendencies.

Three hours a week. Fall quality of vocal and

The media,

Study of instruments. Early folk music. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.


Departments of Instruction

92

Music

Three hours a week. WinContinuation of Music 451. Development of instruments and their in-

Music Appreciation.

452.

ter quarter.

Credit, three hours.

Early church music.

Study of smaller forms of music. Beginning of opera, oratorio and suite. Classical period and its composers. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. fluence.

Music

Music

Appreciation. Three hours a week. three hours. Continuation of Music 452. Sonata, Symphony, Oratorio, Opera, Modern Suite. Romantic School. Modern Music. Open to Third and Fourth 453.

Spring quarter.

Year

Credit,

students.

460. Choral Cluh Chorus. Two periods a week. Ofevery quarter. Credit, one hour. Students desiring to elect choral club must have voices tested by director of music department, and upon selection may register for course. Study of best classical and modern choruses and preparation for one formal program each quarter. Open to Second, Third, and Fourth Year students only.

Music

fered

Music

360.

Voice Class.

Credit, one hour.

Open

to

Two all

periods a week.

Fall quarter.

students.

Violin Class for Beginners. Two periods a week throughout the year. Preparation for orchestral playing. Simple exercises and solos in first and third position.

Required of all First Year students. One Voice testing during registration. An orchestra and glee club, selected by the director of music, receive weekly training and give public concerts.

Freshman Chorus.

hour a week.


Physical and Health Education

93

PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION MISS BARLOW, MISS SUPPER, MISS ILER, MISS ROBERTSON This department, through instruction in hygienic hving and the supervision of gymnastics, athletics, and play activities, aims to develop and maintain in the students bodily health, strength, and endurance, wholesome attitudes, desirable habits and skills, to the end that they may lead more efficient lives, and by placing emphasis on the theory and methods of physical education, to prepare students to teach this subject in the grades. In order to accomplish this two-fold purpose a physical examination is given every student upon entrance, and all are required to take some form of physical education throughout the first three years. Athletics (under the supervision of an Athletic Association) forms an important part of the work. There are contests in games and athletics, culminating in a Field Day program. The object of Courses 101, 102, and 103 is to give to the student a large amount of material to use in her teaching with principles of selection, and at the same time provide opportunity for wholesome physical exercise and the development of desirable personal qualities and attributes associated with group activities. Courses 214, 215, 224, and 225 are especially designed to meet the law requiring the teaching of physical education in the grades.

There

is no major in this department. Students choosing Health and Physical Education as a minor must be physically fit and approved by the head of the departminor requires the following courses: Biology 131, 132, ment. 133, Phvsical Education 101. 102, 103, 224, 225, 236, 231, 232, 233, 300, 346. 347, 451, 452, and 453. Recommended electives Courses in general chemistry, physics, nutrition, home nursing, and all practice courses in physical edu-

A

:

cation open to Third and Fourth

Physical Education

101, 102,

Year

and

students.

103.

Three hours a week for three quarters.

First

Year Practice. hour each

Credit, one

Practice in gymnastics, mimetic exercises, elementary Talks on personal folk dancing, games and general athletics. hygiene, health of the teacher, importance of good posture and educational value of motor activities involved in physical education. Note book containing material suitable to teach in respective grades required.

quarter.

Physical Education

106.

Health Education.

Three hours a


Departments of Instruction

94

A

week. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. course following the outline of the State Board of Education, and having the following aims ( 1 ) To create in students a health consciousness and to foster health habits; (2) to help each student to secure and maintain physical efficiency; (3) to give practical ideas for maintaining a healthful environment in school and community; (4) to train teachers to make annual inspections of pupils for obvious physical defects and to find ways to have defects corrected; also to make daily inspections. Required in Courses I and II. :

Physical Education 214 and 215. Teaching of Physical Lower Elementary Grades. Three hours a week for two quarters. Credit, first quarter, two hours; second quarTraining in the

ter, one hour. Theory, methods, practice. Instruction in the technique of teaching physical education material of varied sorts adapted to the interests and needs of children in the primary grades. Ways and means of organizing school and playground activities and Play Day programs. Practice teaching within the

Required Prerequisite

in

class.

:

Course

One

or

I.

more

practice

courses

in

Physical

Education.

Physical Education 224 and 225. Physical Education in the Upper Elementary Grades and Junior High School. Same as 214 and 215, the work being adapted to the needs and interests of the upper elementary grades, and high school. Required in Courses II and

Physical

III.

Education

236.

Playground

Activities.

Three

hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, one hour. Practice in games, stunts, and athletics adapted to the average playground. Required in Course III.

Physical Education

231, 232, 233. Anatomy and Physioand Applied. Three hours a week for three quarCredit, three hours each quarter. Fall quarter (231), a ters. study of physical activity with an analysis of bones, joints, and muscles involved in fundamental, gymnastic, and athletic movements; Winter quarter (232), a study of circulatory, respiratory, and nervous systems together with applications to exercise; Spring quarter (233), a study of digestive, excretory, reproductive, and glandular systems together with applications. Prerequisite: Biology 131, 132, or equivalent. logy, General


Physical and Health Education

95

Physical Education 300. Health Education. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. course similar in scope to Physical Education 106, but adapted to advanced

A

students.

Required in Course

III.

Physical Education

346. Health Education Applied. Three Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Adaptations of subject matter and methods, and construction of health education curricula. Open to Second, Third, and Fourth Year

hours a week.

students.

Prerequisite:

Health Education

106,

or equivalent.

Advanced General 341, 342, and 343. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. Practice in all forms of physical training activity. Includes Danish gymnastics, mimetic drills, gymnastic practice in writing drills and teaching marching, calisthenics class. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Prerequisite: Physical Education 101, 102, and 103, or

Physical Education

Practice.

;

equivalent.

Physical Education 347. Playground Supervision and Leadership in Extra Curricular Activities. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Theory and practice in organization and management of playground activities. Aims and purpose of the playground as a social center considered. Training in leadership in school and community recreational clubs and extra curricular activities. Open to Second, Third, and Fourth

Year

students.

Physical Education

Clogging and Athletic Dancing Fall quarter. Credit, one Special practice in clogs, jigs, and gymnastic dancing. hour. Sandals or leather-soled gymnasium shoes required. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. (Elementary).

441.

Three hours a week.

Physical Education 442 and 443. Natural Dancing. Two hours a week. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. Practice in natural rhythms, music interpretation, Open to aesthetic dances, and their adaptation to festival work. Third and Fourth Year students.

Physical Education 445 and

Folk Dancing and ClogThree hours a week. Win-

446.

ging (Intermediate and advanced).


Departments of Instruction

96

and Spring quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. Pracand national dancing suitable for upper grades, high school and college. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Prerequisite: Physical Education 441.

ter

tice in folk

Physical Education

Coaching of Ath451, 452, 453. hours a week. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. Practice and study of technique in athletic games. Fall quarter, hockey, soccer and tennis Winter quarter, basketball, and volley ball Spirng quarter, baseball, letics.

Two

;

;

Includes discussion of organization and of athletic leagues, interscholastic and intrascholastic contests and field days. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. field

and track events.

management

—

is

NOTE] A regulation costume is required in all practice classes. purchased through the College, and costs approximately $7.00.

This costume


Reading and Dramatics

97

READING AND DRAMATICS MISS WHEELER

The aim of the reading department is to equip the student with the power of keen analysis and the abihty to extract thought from the printed page. The pupil is led to a further realization of the meaning and beauty of literature by training in adequate vocal expression of the best literature. Reading 211. Foundation Course in Reading. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered every quarter. Credit, two hours. Aims to give the student distinct articulation, correct pronunciation, freedom and ease in speaking before a group, and power Second Year of Course I. in critical analysis.

Reading 121 and 222. Reading for Grammar Grade Teachers. Three hours a week for two quarters. Reading 121 given in Reading 222 given in Second First Year. Credit, three hours. Year. Credit, two hours. A continuous course for two quar-

grammar grade teachers. Training in silent and oral reading, and study made of the problems involved in the teaching of reading. Emphasis in first quarter placed upon the problems of teaching reading; in the second quarter upon the individual needs of the student. Practice given in silent and oral reading, in the use of the voice, and Required in Course II. in speaking before a group. ters especially adapted to the needs of

Reading

Literary Interpretation and Voice Training. week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. similar to those in Reading 211, with added emphasis upon 131.

Three hours

Aims

a

voice training, public speaking, and the oral interpretation of the types of literature suitable for the high school. Elective in the First and Second Years of Course III.

Reading 341. Plays and Festivals. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the various types of dramatic entertainment suitable for school presentaOpportunity is afforded for tion, plays, festivals, and pageants. the study and application of the principles of producing, costumOpen to the Second, Third, ing, stage mechanics and make-up. and Fourth Year students. May be taken by students choosing English as a major; required of students choosing Music as a major.


Departments of Instruction

98

Reading 441, 442, and 443. History and Development of English Drama. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, study and survey of the developthree hours each quarter. ment of drama, particularly in England and America. Fall quarter (Reading 441), brief study of primitive and folk drama of various countries. Greek and Roman drama as bearing upon development in England. More careful study of beginnings of drama in England. Winter quarter (Reading 442), Elizabethan drama. Shakespeare's predecessors and contemporaries carefully studied, briefer notice being given to Shakespeare. Parallel reading, class study, and criticism of plays. Spring quarter (Reading 443), Modern English and American drama. Modern trend of drama as to subject and technique contrasted with earlier forms. Study of significant modern dramatists and of contemporary dramatic criticism. Open to Third and Fourth Year stuMay count toward a major or minor in English, in dents.

A

Course

A

III.

dramatic club chosen from the student body by the process of "trying out," gives opportunity for developing special dramatic talent. Two or more standard plays are presented each year.


OF STUDENTS-

LIST

NAME

Norfolk

H.,

G.

Charlotte,

1

Crewe Alcoma

Farmville

608

Hopewell

Brunswick Norfolk Lynchburg

Andrew, Olivia J., 3 Anthony, Martha A., 4 Anthony, Nannie S., 4

Patrick Patrick

Rockbridge

656 Northumberland Ave. Lexington

S.

Lowgap,

l..._

Mary Virginia, Baskervill, Mary M., 4

Campbell

Brookneal

Surry Surry

Wakefield Wakefield

Wight

of

Roanoke

Windsor 1802 Rorer Ave.

Greensville

Southampton Norfolk

Orange Surry

Emporia Capron 1235 Graydon Ave. Lahore .,

Claremont

Roanoke

706 Stewart Ave., S. E. 401 St. George St. Stuart

Farmville Patrick

Wise Buckingham

Wise Buckingham Vienna, Ga. Jackson, N. C.

1

Prince

Edward

Dinwiddie Norfolk 1

N. C. Virginia St. 108 High St. 2024 Stuart Ave. 415 N. Stafford Ave. 500

Richmond Richmond

Isle

Barrow,

!...„

...„

Farmville Farmville

Baker, Eugual, 1 Baker, Martha Miles, 2 Baker, Sarah Augusta, 1... _ Baker, Sarah Eliza, 3 Baker, Susie Morton, 2 Banish, Mrs. Littie, 2 Barclay, Flora McD., 2 Barksdale, Bessie C, 2 Barksdale, Mabel C, 3 Barr, Verna Mae, 1 Barrell, Frances A., 2 Barrett, Annie Frances, 2

Nansemond Suffolk

Beaty,

Wise

Bell,

Princess

Mayo, 2 Mabel C, 1.—

W

C. Stella Stella

Roanoke

Bailey, Edith D., 4 Bailey, Ethel Virginia, 2 Bailey, Virginia W., 2

Baxter, H. Gertrude, 2 Baync. Laverna M., 3 Beacham, Theodocia M.,

St.

605 37th St. 478 Rivermont Ave. L'nion,

Antrim, Elizabeth, 3 Armentrout, Frances, 3 Armfield, Nell Gray, 2 Armistead, Frances E., 1 Armstrong, A. Irving, 4 Armstrong, Estelle E., 4 Arvin, Anne Elizabeth, Asher, Julia L, 4

Buffalo

South Boston Townsville, N. C. Cedar Lane 130 Holbrook Ave. Dolphin

1

Danville

Jane,

Phenix

Halifax

Anderson, Dorothy, 3 Anderson, Edna Leigh, 2 Anderson, Katherine F., 2 Anderson, M. Elizabeth, 3

F.

Tenn

ADDRESS Raleigh Court R. 8, Box 200 717 Yadkin St.

Nottoway Buckingham

Ameen, Evelyn Virginia, 2

Eeale,

C

N.

Kingsport, Charlotte

2

Addleman, Margaret, 2 Agee, Annie Ruth, 2 Agee, Edith Mae, 4 AUred, Margaret, 1 Susie

929-30

CX)UNTY OR CITY

Vara Burke, 2 Abernethy, Emelyn A., Adams, Alice Elizabeth, Adams, Ruby Edith, 1 Abbitt,

Alston,

1

Anne

Worsham Dinwiddie 325 34th St. R. 1, Holland 126 Clay St. Princess

Wise Anne


Students

100

NAME Bell,

Margaret

E.,

COUNTY OR CITY Northampton

1

Beverly Anne,

Bender,

Bentley, Marie E.,

Staunton

1

Roanoke

1

Berry, Irby Owen, 1 Biggs, Dorothy P., 2 Black, Anne Marie, 1 Blair,

Madeline A.,

Madge,

Blalock,

Prince

Edward

Lillian

Boykin, Nancy U., 2 Bradley, Marian V., 1 Bradshaw, Mildred H., Brame, Louise L., 1 Branch, Harriet B., 2 Bray, Minnie R., 2 Bray, Miriam H., 3

_

Charlotte H., Reed, 1

_

Scott,

1

2...

Bryan, Josie Virginia, 1 Buchanan, Edna Lee, 2 Bullock,

Elizabeth,

3

C

Middlesex

332 Church Ave. 1305 10th St.

Amelia

Md. School

for Blind

Second

St.

Roxbury Amelia

Macon Ivor 105 Briarwood Ave.

Orange Front Royal Bracey Chase City

Oceana 4226 Baltimore Ave. Saluda Tazewell

Rockbridge

Lexington

_..Greensville

Emporia Michaux

Powhatan Isle of Wight Mecklenburg

1

Brown, Margaret G., 1 Brown, Martha Regina, 4 Brown. Minnie M., 3 Browning, Mary Louise, 4 Brubeck, Mrs. Norma, 2

Baskerville

Pa

.Tazewell

Briggs, Cora Lee, 1 Brightwell, Mary F., 2..._ Brinson, S. Virginia, 2 Brisbois, Vashti, 4..„. Bristow, Mary Alic^, 2 Britt, Edith G., 2 Britt, F. Marguerite, 1 Brown, L. Jane, 3

Mary Mary

Philadelphia,

4..._

St.

1147 Chicago Blvd.

Chatham

Mecklenburg Vanceboro, N. Lynchburg Amelia

Bowden, Annie Lee, 4 Bowen, Mary Ollie, 4 Bowyer, Lucille, 4

Bruce, Bruce, Bruce,

Byrd

801

Pittsylvania

1

1

F.,

Green Bay

Lynchburg Detroit, Michigan

Bland, Josephine C, 1 Blankinship, Dorothy L., 1 Blanton, Elizabeth R., 4 .^...Overlea, Md Bledsoe, Virginia, 2.... Farmville Bloomfield, Dorothy, Sp Bock, Margaret E., 3 Charles City Bollinger, Ruth V., 2 Amelia „ Bonifant, Marjorie, 2 Powhatan _ Boone, Elizabeth Rosa, 2...„ Southampton _Lynchburg Booth, Mary Qare, 1 _ Booton, Florence P., 4 Orange Warren Borden, Mary Catherine, 2 Boswell, Ethel Hall, 2 Mecklenburg _...Mecklenburg Boswell, Lila Camilla, 2 Boush, Laurie L., 1 Princess Anne Bovell,

ADDRESS Birds Nest 151 Churchville Ave. 721 Franklin Ave.

Carrsville South. Hill

.Norfolk _.Halifax

116 Ocean

JSforfolk

Route

.Nansemond .Appomattox

Hampton

View Ave. Nathalie

4,

Norfolk

Whaleyville

Pamplin

426 Newport News Ave. Norfolk 2223 Kellar Ave. Middlesex Locust Hill Winston-Salem, N. C 200 N. Spring St. Winston-Salem, N. C 200 N. Spring St. Salem 344 Va. Ave. Portsmouth 612 Webster Ave. Bluefield, W. Va 919 Augusta St. .Martinsville 46 Church St. Culpeper Rixeyville _....Beckley, W. Va 38 Woodlawn Ave. Farmville 218 Third St. Culpeper Culpeper Prince Edward Rice Suffolk 547 2nd Ave. Hampton 313 La Salle Ave. Farmville Oak St


Students NAME

COUNTY OR CITY

Mary V., Mary

2 Frances, M., 3

Carroll, Ella Carter, Alice May, 1 Carter, Elizabeth L., 1 Carter, Mary Frances,

Codd, Sarah

Norfolk

^Portsmouth

Roanoke „

1

Covington.

Walnut

Nottoway

Hill Burkeville

Hopewell

310 Riverview Ave.

Emporia Appomattox Era

Greensville _.

Appomattox Dinwiddie Prince

Edward

Green Bay Concord Depot Abingdon Kenbridge

Campbell

Washington Lunenburg „

Midlothian Drewryville 163 Douglas Ave.

Chesterfield

Southampton Portsmouth Culpeper Greensboro, N. _

Cumberland Campbell Madison „... Southampton

C

Jeffersonton 136 E. Fisher Ave. Box 74, Farmville R. 1, Lynchburg

Madison Sebrell

Nottoway Portsmouth Mecklenburg

1

Cooper, Laura Louise, Cornwell, Henrietta, 2

Lynnhaven 614 Walnut Ave., S. W. 558 Broad St. 1607 Watts Ave., Rugby

Petersburg

Farmville Culpeper Danville

Coleman, Edith H., 3 Coleman, Frances G., 1 Conway, Vivian J., 1 Cooke, Sarah B., 1

Southampton Bedford Winchester

2 „

3 3 Virginia, 2

A., Alice,

Cowand, Mabel

Anne

Roanoke

Petersburg

Cogbill, Carolyn, 4 Cogbill, Catherine N.,

Myra

Floyd C. H. Dinwiddle Box 277, Hot Springs

Dinwiddle Bath Princess

W.

St.

Edenton, N. C. Princess Anne Rd.

101 S. Boulevard 2599 Waverly Way

Norfolk Floyd

Sp

R.,

1123

Richmond

1

„ Casey, Sue Frances, 2 Cato, Mary Ellen, 3 Cawthon, Nellie M., 2 Chambers, E. Kathryn, 2 Cheatham, Stella I., 4 CTiilton, Viola, 2 Clark, Mildred C, Sp Clarke, Gladys F., 2 Clarke, Linda Virginia, 2 Qaud, Kathryn Lois, 2 Clayton, A. Louise, 2 Clement, Kathleen C., 1 Clendenin, Nannie Belle. 1 Clevinger, S. Katherine, 2 Clingenpeel, Nell, 2 „ Clore, Ella Simms, 3 Cobb, E. Winston, 1 Cobb, Virginia S., 2 „

Cox, Cox, Cox, Cox, Cox,

Oak

Cannaday,

Costen,

ADDRESS

Farmville

Margaret, 1 Bunch, Marguerite, 1. Burgess, Elsie Nancy, 1 Burgwin, Hazel B., 2 Burroughs, Doris Virginia, 3 Burwell, Mary Custis, !...„ „ Butterworth, Pattie, 2 Byrd, Permele Sarali, 4 Bullock,

Cake,

101

Blackstone 325 Hatton

244 Lawrence

St.

Boydton 509 Beech St. Culpeper 1237 E.

Main St

Newsoms Moneta 123

Peyton

St.

.Norfolk

Buell

Norfolk Norfolk

1134 Westover Ave. 1310 Perry St.

A. Sara, 2

Buckingham

Ethel,

Pittsylvania

Chatham

Norfolk Portsmouth Norfolk

124 Poplar Ave.

1

Lois Virginia,

Lorena E., 1 V. Virginia, 2

Cralle, Florence, 4 _ Cralle, Mildred H., 3

Crane, V. Anita,

_

1

2...„

_ „

Farmville Farmville

Brunswick

Sheppards

526 Mt. Vernon Ave. 4610 Colonial Ave. 505 Appomattox St. 502 High St.

Edgerton


Students

102

COUNTY OR CITY

NAME

Augusta Cumberland Campbell

Crawford, L. Frances, 2 Crawley, Hanna L., 2 Cross,

Sue

B.,

2

New

1

Farmville

Mecklenburg

3

Nansemond

Elwood

Gwendoline,

-Roanoke Portsmouth

135 Wellington Ave.

2 Eleanor, 3 Daughtrey, Virginia, 1 Davidson, Elizabeth, 1 Davis, Annie May, 3 Davis, Elizabeth W., 2 Davis, Ella H., 1 Davis, Elouise B., 4 Davis, Estelle, 1 Davis, Francis B., 4 Davis, M. Eleanor, 2 DeBerry, Nancy H., 2 Debnam, C. Melrose, 2 Dashiell,

DeHart, Mildred F., Deitrick, Sue S., 1 Denit, Annie Etta, 3 DeShazo, Carrie H.,

Meredithville

Brookneal 255 Campbell St. Meredithville

Chatham

Mecklenburg

Clarksville

511 High St. 533 Hampton Place 1015 Gates Ave.

Farmville

Portsmouth .Norfolk Patrick

Ocean View Salem

123 161

Woolwine Aview Ave. Craig Ave. Sutherland

Dinwiddie

1

Saxe Bedford

Charlotte

Bedford

1

Elsie Mae, Dorset, Gladys L., Dortch, Lucy L., 4

R. 1, 401

Farmville

3

Dollins,

Bedford Danville

V. Odelle, 2

Drew, Ann Clinton, 3 Drew, Julia Emily, 4 Drewry, L. Elizabeth, 2

-

Mecklenburg Norfolk Roanoke Farmville Covington

Sussex Sussex Southampton Covington

2

Dryden, Rebecca, 1 Dudley, Dorothy Lee, 1 Duncan, Mary Virginia, 1 Dunkley, Helen Irene, 2 Dunning, Elsie Louise, 2

York

Dutton, Virginia E., 3

Gloucester

Earle, Rebecca G., 1 Early, Hannah Mary,

2

Franklin

Nottoway

Wythe Norfolk

High St. Moneta

Broad

St.

Nathalie Skipwith 222 14th St. Prince George

University Prince George

1 1

Louise,

201

Halifax Mecklenburg

1

Downing, Katherine F., 2 Downs, Mae Cornelius, 1— Doyne, W. Elizabeth, 1

T.

Emporia Norview

Pittsylvania

3

Dinwiddie, Sarah, 4 Dodd, Lois Patsy, 2 Dodson, Edith Pearl, Dodson, Janie E., 1

Driscoll,

207 London St.

Norfolk Brunswick Campbell Harrisonburg Brunswick

DeWitt, Annie Virginia, Catherine,

Baskerville

Greensville

Devin, Oreanna, 2

Dressier,

Virgilina

Barhamsville 106 Third St.

Kent

1

Crute, Lucille G., Cutchin, EUie S.,

Diehl,

Cumberland Concord Depot

.Halifax

Crowder, Lula J., 2 Crute, H. Cornelia, Crute, Helen M., 1

D.aniel,

ADDRESS 5, Staunton

R.

South Hill 2

Greenway Court Apts. 113 Elm Ave. 701 Pine St. R. 1, Box 34

Wakefield Wakefield Sedley 110

Main

St.

Jeffs

Rocky Mount 24, Crewe

Box

Cripple Creek 1128 Seaboard Ave.

Ware Neck

Warren

Milldale

Augusta

New Hope


Students NAME

COUNTY OR CITY Danville Pittsylvania

Martha L., 3 Edwards, E. Frances, 2 Edwards, Frances E., 1 Edwards, May Belle, 2 Edwards, Pearl E., 1 Earp,

Elliott,

Mary

Louise, 2

Elliott,

Sally

M.,

Ellis,

Louise

J.,

103

ADDRESS 162 Broad St.

Chatham

Fauquier

Nansemond

Bealton Whaleyville

Pittsylvania

Chatham

Campbell

2

Winfall Edenton, N. C.

_

Hanover

1

Ellison, Catherine D., 2 Ellison, Julia, 4 Ellison, Patricia E., 1

Greenville,

Surry Beckley,

W. Va

Petersburg

Elmore, Mildred F., 2 Epes, Mary Buford, 2

Mecklenburg Norfolk

Ashland Va. Deal

W.

Oakwood Ave.

54

321 Clinton St. Chase City

316 Pembroke Ave. 146 Linden Ave. Brussels St.

Elizabeth N., 2 Eubank, Mabel Virginia, 2 Evans, Enza Oneda, 3

Hampton

Evans, Frances A., 1 Evans, M. Josephine, 2 Ewers, Doris Louise, 1 Ewing, Tempie, 1

Essex Campbell Lynchburg Nelson

Faison, Sara Lee, 2 Falconer, Mabel, 1

Sussex

Wakefield

Amherst Albemarle Albemarle

Amherst Red Hill Red Hill

Powhatan Lynchburg

Maidens Route 3

Etheridge,

Faris, Faris,

Margaret Teel, 3 Martha Edge, 3

Isabel Agnes, Feagans, Julia, 2 Finch, Hazel A., 1

Farr,

1

Fisher, Margaret R., 2 Fisher, Marguerite, 1 Fisher, Virginia Ethel, 4 Fitzgerald, Lucy E., 2

Fleming, Claudia T., 4 Fleming, Frances, 1 Fleshman, Isabelle W., 1 Fletcher, Louella F., 2 Flippin, S. Ruth, 2 Floyd, Ruth C, 2 Floyd, Susie Vann, 3 Fogg, Doris Lucy, 2 Folk, Elizabeth R., 2 Ford, Dorothy H., 1 Ford, Frances C, 2 Ford, Medora B., 1 Ford, Nora Virginia, 1 Ford, Ruth Allen, 1 Forgie, Iva, 2

Forwood,

Miriam

F.,

1

Clifton Forge

Lane View Concord Depot 1023 Taylor St. Wintergreen

Pittsylvania

Hurt

Portsmouth

517 4th Ave.

Nottoway Richmond Nottoway Farmville Farmville

Roanoke Accomac Patrick

Covington

Warwick

Crewe 3019-

A

Floyd Ave.

Crewe 403 High St. 403 High St. R. 3, Roanoke

Hallwood Stuart 216 Riverside Ave. Hilton Village

Howertons

Essex

Nansemond Buckingham Campbell Lexington Lynchburg Lynchburg Bedford Norfolk

Edward

Foster, Elise L, 2

Prince

Fowlkes, Ellen M., 2 Fox, Elsie Page, 3 Fox, Frances E., 1 Fox, Lucile D., 1

Lunenburg Southampton Southampton Southampton

Suffolk

Arvonia Spring Mills 410 V. M. L Parade 920 Wise 914 Federal

St. St.

Montvale 1702 Lafayette Blvd. R. F. D. 1, Farmville

Kenbridge Drewryville Drewryville Drewryville


Students

104

NAME

COUNTY OR CITY

Francis, M. Deaton, 4 Frasier, Margaretta G., Frazier, Bertha M., 2 French, Mary Ellen, 1

French, Fuller, Fttltz,

2

Alma

Northumberland Cumberland Caroline „..Dinwiddie

Gale, Emily P., 3 Gannaway, Catherine,

Upperville Altavista Callao —Sunny Side Dejarnette

.Campbell

3

Virginia,

Garlick,

1

2

Rebecca, Margaret,

ADDRESS Boykins

Southampton Fauquier

Buterworth

Elizabeth City Pulaski .Washington, D. C, Apt.

1

H., 3

Smithfield

Delton

The Home,

40,

K

Gates, Sally R., 4 Gathright, Margaret E., Gee, Annie E., 2 Gee, Virginia A., 2 Germany, Lela Dale, 4 Gibb, M. Pauline, 3

Gibson, Gillespie,

Imogene, Billy

1

Lunenburg Lunenburg Monroe, La Northampton Fluvanna

2

Gilliam, Evelyn N., 1 Gilliam, Hattie J., 1 Gilmer, Josephine, 1 Glenn, M. Ruth, 3 Glidewell, Chlories, 3 Glidewell, Mary Elizabeth, Godwin, Mary Lee, 3

Godwin, Mildred E., I Goode, Beatrice A., 3. Goode, Elaine C, 2 Goodloe, Dorothy H., 1 Grant, Frances H., 2

Halloway, Hazel

Hamner, R.

Hardaway, Alice

_ 1

Wise Dancy, Ala. Prospect

1

Edward

Box

Nottoway Brunswick Nansemond .Nansemond

Chuckatuck Chuckatuck

Henry Rocky Mount, N. C. 738 Shawnee Ave. Chester 618 Maiden Lane 1831 High St. 333 53rd St.

Newport News Fredericksburg .York

Crewe Freeman

125,

-

JRoanoke Portsmouth

616 Prince

Appomattox Amherst Amherst

Edward St. Dare Appomattox Amherst Amherst

Hampton

159 Melrose Ave. Amelia C. H. 228 CoUey Ave. Ceres

.Amelia

Norfolk Bland Campbell

Evington 210 Central Ave. 163 Linden Ave.

Suffolk

Hampton Roanoke

4

1

Prince „

152

Machipongo Columbia Raven

48,

First Ave.

.Chesterfield

E., 2

J.,

Box Box

_

Big Stone Gap

Alice, 4

Hancock, Mildred,

Kenbridge Kenbridge

_

.Wise

Franklin

Graves, M. Lucille, 4 Gray, Vivian E., 2 Greaves, Verena M., 1 Green, Arianna K., 2 Green, Beulah W., 1 Gregory, Florence, 3 Gregory, Mabel P., 3 Gregory, Mary Louise, 1 Griffith, Nan E., 3 Grigg, Agnes Lee, 2 Grinnan, Catherine, 2 _ Groseclose, P. Elizabeth, 1 Gunter, Martha B., 1 Gurley, Virginia, 4 Guy, Anne E., 3 Hairston, Elizabeth, Hall, Annye J., 2

Dumbarton

Tazewell Farmville

1

J.,

7th & Sts. Farmville, R. 1

Prince Edward Henrico

1517 Roanoke

St.,

S.

W.

Hotel Burton

Danville Petersburg

821

Albemarle

North Garden

^Roanoke Farmville

410

Woods

Rome

Ave., S.

^...Continental

St.

W.

Hotel


Students NAME Hardy, Elsie R., 1 Hardy, Retta W., 1 Hardy, S. Qementine, 2 Harper, Janice M., 4 Harrell, Lydia D., 1

105

COUNTY OR CITY Hampton

_

Lxinenburg

Bedford

Roanoke Suffolk

Harris, Janet M., 1 Harris, M. Florence, 1 Harris, Mary Frances, 2. Harris, Sarah E., 2 Harrison, Alice St. A., 2 Harrison, Mary E., 2 Hart, Ada Eliazbeth, 2 _ Hart, Ruth S., 2 Hatchell, Martha, 2 Hatcher, Kathryn E., 4 Hatchett, Mary Frances, 4 Hawthorne, Kathleen, 3

Amherst Lynchburg Augusta

Hendricks, Mary W., 4 Hill, Ethyl C, 1 Hillsman, Emily B., 3 Hilton, Louise, 2 Hix, Bessie Susan, 1

Halifax

.

Mecklenburg Cumberland Suffolk

Hunter, Pauline F., 1 Hurt, A. Elizabeth, 4 Hurt, Clara Mamie, 4 Hurt, E. Louise, 2

C W. Va

Bluefield,

Petersburg

Lunenburg Princess

Kenbridge Alton

Anne

Princess Anne 215 First Ave. R. 2, Box 96 Prospect

Farmville

Portsmouth „...

Prince

Edward

Wise

Wise N. Emporia Oxford, N. C. Sunset Village Sunset Village

Greensville

Salem Salem Norfolk

_

2410 Ballentine Blvd. 510 Beech St. 510 Beech St.

Farmville Farmville

_ Holladay, Natalie V., 3 Holland, Mabel Virginia, 4 „ Holland, Suzanne, 4 Honeyman, Estelle M., 1 Howell, A. Winifred, 3 Howerton, Louise, 2 Hubard, Sara K., 2 Huddlestun, Anne B., 1 Hudgins, Nancy W., 2 „ Hudnall, Eva Irene, 4 _ _ Hudson, Ruth, 1 _...„ Huff, Lillie K., 1

Hughes, Elizabeth, 1 Hughes, Evelyn K., 1 Hughes, Josephine S., 1 Hundley, A. Kathleen, 2 Hunt, Ruble A., 2 Hunt, Ruth D., 2 Hunter, Elizabeth E., 3

Meherrin 205 Florida Ave. 311 Red Cross St. 2101 Walton Ave. 815 Shepard St.

Wilmington, N.

1

Hobgood, Inez, 3 Hogan, Eleanor G., 4 Hogan, P. Lillian, 1 Hogue, Mrs. Maude E., Sp Holladay, Emilie C, 3

Clarksville

R. F. D., Farmville 307 Central Ave.

Lunenburg Portsmouth

Hix, Margaret F., Hobbs, Flora, 3

ADDRESS Highland Ave. Kenbridge Bedford 1402 Campbell Ave., S. W. 522 W. Washington St. Madison Heights 1804 Grace St. Crimora 417

309 S. Broad S.

Suffolk Danville Petersburg

474 West Main St. 137 N. Jefferson St. Franklin

Nansemond -...Mecklenburg

Clarksville

Buckingham Clifton Forge Newport News .Patrick

Buckingham 137 Alleghany St 742 27th St. Critz

_

Max Meadows

Wythe

206 Second Ave. Ill Wills St.

Farmville Covington _

Hampton Hampton

233

Pittsylvania „.„Franklin

_

„...Franklin

Appomattox Salem

Salle

Ave.

Rocky Mount Rocky Mount Evergreen Eagle Rock

Botetourt Charlotte Charlotte

La

343 Creek Ave. Callands

_

120 Union St. Drakes Branch Drakes Branch


Students

106

NAME

COUNTY OR CITY Northampton Portsmouth

Hurtt, M. Elizabeth, 2 Hutchins, Charlotte, 2 Hutchins, Frances L., 1 Hutchinson, Adele, 3 Hutt, Iska French, 3 Huyett, Sue, 1

Suffolk Charleston, W. Florence, S. C

Mary

Sue,

Lunenburg

Dundas

Culpeper

Rapidan

1

Keysville

Dendron

Surry Norfolk Sussex Portsmouth Southampton Fluvanna Tazewell

506 Manteo St. Littleton

R. F. D. 3 Ivor

Fork Union Tazewell Signal Mountain, Tenn.

Hampton

618 Armistead Ave.

Buckingham Warren

Ore Bank

Mecklenburg

Clarksville

Milldale

Pittsylvania

Java

Staunton

19 S. St. Clair St.

Southampton Norfolk Orange

321

Halifax

Salem

Emporia 502 Victoria Ave. Stuart 537

W. Washington

St.

Keysville

201 Penn. Ave. 96 E. Church St. Littleton,

Southampton Wise

Wise

W. Va

Lafon, Elizabeth, 2 Laing, Martha Ann, 3

Craig

Lamb, Edna LaRue, 2

Winchester

1

St.

Java Roanoke Rapids, N. C.

Martinsville

Nallen,

1

Clinton

Spring Grove

Greensville

Petersburg

Franklin 28th St.

Orange

Petersburg Surry

Charlotte

W.

224

Patrick

Keeler, Margaret, 1 Keeling, Edith Maxine, 1 Keesee, Irma M., 1 Kennemur, Vashti B., 2 Kesler, Emily, 2 Kester, Barbara, 1 King, Virginia Aelise, 1 Kirkland, Ethel R., 3 Knight, Gilberta, 3

St.

Franktown

Charlotte

Hampton

Jordan, Ruth, 1 Joyce, M. Alma, 3

High

1001

Northampton

1

Mildred,

Blackstone

Farmville

Jones, Catherine, 3 Jones, D. Kathleen, 2 Jones, Ellen E., 2 Jones, Evelyn L., 2 Jones, Hildred I., 2 Jones, Isabel F., 1 Jones, Jennie Lee, 4 Jones, M. Adele, 1 Jones, Mary Agnes, 1 Jones, Mildred B., 4 Jones, S. Margaret, 1 Jordan, Elizabeth G., 2

Lancaster,

703 E. Jefferson St.

Nottoway

James, Anna Margaret, 4 James, Sara Mabelle, 1 Johnson, Anne Janet, 1 Johnson, Annie Virginia, Johnson, Elizabeth, 1 Johnson, Louise Ann, 2 Johnson, Louise P., 2 Johnson, Pearl V., 2 Jones, B. Ruth, 1

Knigh, Jenilee, 1 Kutz, Esther F.,

303 Catherine St. 1608 Franklin Ave.

Cherokee Road

Charlottesville

Ingram, Lucille B., 1 Inskeep, Helen, 1 Irby, Jane Grey, 3 Irving, Paula A., 4 Jacob,

Va

ADDRESS

Nassawadox 302 Webster Ave.

Farmville

N.

C.

Courtland Big Stone Gap Big Stone Gap Box 116

Craig Healing Springs Lewisburg, W. Va. 420 W. Clifford St. 605 High St.


Students NAME Lane, Doris C, 1 Lane, Lucie Anne, 2 Lang, Elizabeth Virginia, 1 Lawless, Cloha G., Sp Lee, Jacquelin A., 1 Lee, Madeline M., 2 Lee, Virginia B., 2 Leonard, Dorothy, 1 Leonard, Margaret, 4 Lester, Margaret, 1 Levick, Elizabeth, 3 Lewis, Mamie, 2 Libby, Allie Kae, 2 Lindsey, Mary Amanda, 3 Linney, Mary Virginia, 1 Logue, Mary E., 2 _ Long, Bertie Lee, 1 Love, Marion, 2 Lovegrove, M. Virginia, 2 Loving, Margaret E., 2 Lowe, Virginia P., 2

Luckado, Mary R., Lynch, Bessie, 2 Lynch, Melissa, 1

CX)UNTY OR CITY Surry

Surry

Temperanceville Belfry, Ky. 4001 Peakland Place

Emporia

Greensville

Williamsburg

Richmond Richmond Portsmouth Norfolk Brunswick Richmond Carrollton,

Mo

134 York St. 3414 Noble Ave. 3414 Noble Ave. 315 Fifth Ave. 615 New Jersey Ave. Charlie Hope 2517 Grove Ave. N. Jefferson St.

Nottoway

Crewe Stapleton, Ga.

Portsmouth Lunenburg Portsmouth Roanoke

308 Maryland Ave.

Kenbridge R. 3, Box 317 534 Arlington Rd. Box 38

University

Hanover

Beaverdam

Box 38 Box 38

Portsmouth Portsmouth

Eliza.,

Covington Covington

Augusta Winston-Salem, N.

Hampton 1....

1

Mary

V.,

1

McLaughlin, Elsie, 3 McManus, Margie, 1 McMillan, Mary, 1 MacKenzie, Martha, 2

Maddox,

Maribeulah, 1 Maddrey, J. Mildred, 3 Madison, Polly, 1 Major, L. Cornelia, 1 Malone, O. Virginia, 2

Appomattox

Danville

Winston-Salem, N. Bedford Portsmouth Albemarle Norfolk Farmville Culpeper

Mathews

Marshall, Emmeline, 2 Marshall, Henrietta, 4 Martin, Catherine R., 2 Martin, Francis, 1 Martin, Julia, 1 Martin, Kathryn, M., 1

C...153

N. Wheeler Middle

406

625 Shirley Ave. 526 Main St.

Dundas Melfa Whaleyville

Mathews Urbanna

Middlesex

Mulberry

Martinsville

Accomac

St.

Charlottesville

Culpeper

Southampton

Portsmouth Nelson Charlotte, N. Charlotte, N.

St.

Thaxton

Lunenburg

Marchant, Marchant,

St.

934 Holladay St. Louisa R. 3, Box 165 Blackstone 850 Grove St.

Norfolk Nottoway

Accomac

1

Qover

515

Appomattox

Mapp, Sara A., 1 March, Margaret D., 3 2

New Hope C

319 Columbia Ave.

Louisa

1

L.,

Catherine, Virginia,

Rosedale Rosedale

Portsmouth

McKenney, Annie McKissicic,

Dendron

_

Lynchburg

1

McDearmon, Margaret McGavock, Emily, 4 Janet,

ADDRESS Elberon

Accomac

McAllister, Catherine, 3 McAllister, Clara, 3 McCauley, M. Elizabeth, 2 McCorkle, Sara, 4 McDaniel, Rachel, 1

McGeehee,

107

1404

St.

Elm Ave. Faber

C

C

2112 Greenway 2112 Greenway

Harborton


Students

108

NAME

COUNTY OR CITY

Mason, Harriet B., 4 Massey, Marguerite, 1 Mathews, Margaret, 2 Matthews, Gladys, 1

Lynchburg Spotsylvania

Wise Accomac

Mawyer, Mary Ella, 2 Mayo, Mary Elizabeth, 2 Mayton, Mrs. Zada Mae,

Charlottesville 1

Farmville

Wise Wise Accomac

Mickle, Lillian Virginia, 3 Miles, Louise, 2

Halifax Dinwiddie Norfolk

Minter, Anna E., Minter, Rachel E., Mistr, Clara, 1 Mitchell, Lula, 2 Mitchell,

Winston-Salem, N.

Hanover

1

Richmond

Margaret,

Moore, Moore, Moore, Moore, Moore, Moore, Moore, Moran,

Hampton

1

A. Louise, 3

Buckingham

Florence, 3 G. Virginia, 4

Middlesex

Neblett,

Susan,

.Martinsville

Norfolk

1

Prince Prince Prince

Edward Edward Edward

Henrico Covington

I

1

The

Hill

Alvis Ontario

1408 Church St. R. 3, Norfolk R. 3, Farmville R. 3, Farmville R. 3, Farmville Highland Springs 409 W. Bath St.

Greensboro, N. C...200 Aberdeen Terrace Petersburg 324 Fillmore St. Princess Anne London Bridge

Nottoway Lynchburg L3mchburg

Wise Roanoke

Courtney C, 2

Audine Shirley,

Halifax

Red

Brunswick Washington, D. C

Murrell, Blanche, 4 Myers, Melissa S., 1 Myers, S. Ernestine, 2

Mae

Deltaville

242 Broad St.

Halifax Lexington

Morriss, Ava Virginia, 4 Morriss, Elizabeth E., 1 Morriss, M. Louise, 4 Motley, Laura E., 4 Mountcastle, Mildred, 1 Mullen, Melisse, 1 Munt, M. Louise, 2 Murden, Eva Leigh, 2

5

407 Allison Ave., S. W. 407 Allison Ave., S. W. Spout Spring 4 River St. Dillwyn

Salem

Lucy D., 1 Martha M., 1 M. Marion, 1 Grace B., 4 Morris, Elizabeth W., 1 Morrison, Sallie W., 2

Murphy, Hazel V., 1 Murphy, Margaret Ann,

Route

Draper, N. C. Forest

Bedford

1

Roanoke Roanoke Appomattox

Neal, Neale,

615 Irving St. Gouldin Nathalie

Ford

Culpeper J^luvanna

1

C

708 W. 29th St. 1107 Wise St. R. 4, Suffolk „. Culpeper Shores

-Nansemond

Moomaw, Harriet, 1 Moomaw, Sue, 3...„ Moon, M. Susie, 2 Alice Lee,

Norton Norton Melfa

Lynchburg

„ 1

Warwick Lane Post Oak Big Stone Gap

Parksley Lovingston 422 7th St., N. E. 615 Oak St

Nelson

_ Meador, Gladys, 3 Meador, Virginia Irene, 2 Mears, Nannie G., 2 Mecum, L. Margaret, 2 Meredith, Agnes, 2

Miller, Violet, 1 Millner, Loulie, 2 Milteer, Dorothy,

ADDRESS 310

Halifax Essex Sussex

Crewe 506 Harrison St 921 Taylor St Big Stone Gap 1147 Maple Ave., S.

W.

Clover

Bowles Wharf

Waverly


Students NAME

109

COUNTY OR CITY

Neblett, Helen Katherine, Neblett, Virginia M., 3

Newman, Frances E., 1 Newman, Frances Virginia, Newton, M. Elizabeth, 4 Newton, Roby P., 4

Qiarlottesville

Lunenburg Mecklenburg 3

Victoria Baskerville

Norfolk Portsmouth Norfolk

Norman,

Winston-Salem, N.

Lucile,

Mary

1

Nurney, Hazel G., Nuttall, Margaret

1

P.,

1

G. Raleigh Court

Appomattox Eagle Rock 632

Winston-Salem, N.

C

Chatham

Pittsylvania

Rosedale

Covington

1

Brunswick

2

Roche,

Cora Lee, 3 Pitchford, Ola S., 2 Pitchford, Winky, 2 Pittman, Sarah Edith, Pollard, Annie C, 4

Meredithville

Big Stone Gap

Crewe Frank'm 408 High St.

Nottoway Franklin Franklin

Accomac

Parksley

Brownsburg 5405 Grove Ave.

Rockbridge

Richmond Prince Edward

Accomac Bristol, Tenn Dinwiddie

Nottoway Lee Princess Anne Chesterfield

Nelson

Oxford, N. Oxford, N.

Prospect

Horsey 423 Perm. Ave. R. 4, Petersburg Blackstone St. Charles R. 2, Princess Anne „ Ettrick

Wintergreen Northfork, W. Va.

Philpott,

1

Welch, W. Va. 729 E. First St.

4

Velma L., 2 Phillips, Ruby M., 2

E.,

Dinwiddie Ky. 937 Lynwood Ave.

Lawrenceville,

Hazel K., 2 Marian E., 2

Lucie

37th St. 187

1612 Park Ave.

Lynchburg

Parker, Frances E., 1 Parks, Esther Sue, 2 Patterson, Ruth F., 2 Patteson, Mary Elsie, 2 Paulette, T. Eloise, 2 Payne, Elizabeth M., 4 Pearson, Mary M., 2 Pegram, Virginia F., 2 Perkins, V. Eloise, 3

Porter,

W.

Box

Su.^olk

Painter, Sarah Kelly, 1 Paris, Willie Alice, 4 Parker, Antoinette, 4

Peters, Petree, Petty,

St.

Dillwyn

1

Owen, Mildred, 2 Owen, Ruth E., 4 Owens, M. Eleanor, Mrs.

Main

Fentress Schley

Botetourt

Dinwiddie

Padgett,

C

Norfolk Appomattox

Orgain, Parke Leigh, 4

Sadie,

531

419 N. Main St. 904 N. W. Blvd.

Gloucester

3

Norfolk

Ozlin,

Temperanceville

Farmville Suffolk

Old, M. Virginia, 2 Oliver, Allie G., 3..._ Oliver, Mary, 1 Joyce,

Hatton St. Brandon Ave.

101

808

Buckingham Norfolk

Oden, Betty Alverna, 1 Odor, Susie E., 2 O'Flaherty, Marjorie M.,

Overall,

813

402 Bufifalo St. Tsingtao Spottswood Ave.

Accomac

4

J.,

„.410 Beech St.

Farmville Farmville Shantung, Qiina

Nichols, Katherine A., 2 Nicholson, R. Bruce, 2 Nininger, Louise F., 2 Nock, Eloise C, 1 Noel, Nancy E., 1 Norfleet, Qara J., 4

Norvell,

ADDRESS

Albemarle

2

C C

1

Amelia Bath

505 Goshen St. 505 Goshen St. Gates, N. C. Sunny Side

Nimrod Hall


1

Students

10

NAME Potts,

COUNTY OR CITY

Frances,

Norfolk

1

Powell, Dorothy V., 1 Powell, Frances L., 2 Powell, Grace E., 1

Petersburg .Southampton

Power, Helen L., Pratt, Marian, 2

Bedford

1

Stuart,

Rickertts,

Gertrude Margaret,

Ridgway, Duvahl, Ripberger, Louise Ritchie,

Dorothy,

Ritter, Ritter,

Catherine, Leslie,

Prince

Farmville Charlotte

P.,

1

2

4

Rives, Mary Ann, 1 Roberts, Carolyn P., 4 Roberts, Elsie Mae, 3

404 South

1

4

Roanoke Lynnhaven Norfolk Roanoke Lunenburg Caroline

Newport News Dinwiddie Amelia Charlotte

St. St.

Ivor

Edward

Botetourt So. Charleston,

Bluff

Jarratt

Meherrin Algonquin Park Capron Eagle Rock

Norfolk Southampton

Dinwiddie

1

Bremo

410 West Beverley

Southampton

1

2

Keller

Madison Heights 1732 Barron St.

Franklin 1

Cumberland Norfolk

1

J.,

Portsmouth Fluvanna Staunton Sussex

1

1,

Box 94 Stone Mountain

Accomac Amherst

1

Nancy M.,

R.

Bedford

Ralph, M. Virginia, 4 Ramirez, Myrtle Elvinie, 1 Randall, Mrs. Mary L., 2

Reese, Myra E., 3 Reid, Helen Virginia, Reid, Janet Alda, 2 Reynolds, Ruth E., 2 Ribble, Alice L., 3 Rice, Anne W., 2 Richardson, Gay A.,

Martinsville ^

Charlottesville

1

Cleo R., 2

Ranson, Mina Virginia, Ratcliffe, Frances A., 1 Rawlings, Willie M., 1 Rawls, Elizabeth C, 2 Rawls, Mary Thomas, Redd, Margaret C, 1 Reed, Florence N., 3

Stuart Forest

Wakefield Farmville Prince Edward Rice Norfolk 903 Hanover Ave. Norfolk 903 Hanover Ave. Franklin Callaway, Box 68 Elizabeth City, N. C Route 2 Pittsylvania Whitmell Portsmouth 327 Crawford St. Farmville 636 Oak St. Southampton Ivor Richmond 2815 Hawthorne Ave. Cumberland Guinea Mills Farmville 520 Main St. Cumberland Guinea Mills

Pulliam, Emma Louise, 2 Putney, Georgia R., 3 Putney, Nancy Lee, 2 Putney, Nellie L., 3

Richardson, Richardson,

207,

Flenry

Surry Cumberland

Pugh, Maude C, 3 Pulley, Rose B., 1

M.

Boykins

Box

Patrick

Presson, Louise, 3 Price, Bertie L., 2 Price, Grace M., 1 Priest, Margaret H., 1 Priest, Mary A., 2 Prillaman, Frances E., 1 Pritchard, Qara, 1 Pritchett, Elizabeth C, 2 Pugh, Mary Wilson, 2

Quaintance, Quisenberry,

ADDRESS 545 Spottswood Ave. 247 Hinton St.

W. Va

216 Sixth St. R. 1, Farmville 3025 Place Vendome 501 Buffalo St. Charlotte C. H. 103 Riverland Rd. "Cedar Acres," R. 1

1306 Westmoreland Park 625 Elm Ave., S. E.

Kenbridge R.

4,

Petersburg

Bowling Green Virginia State School

McKenney Amelia Madisonville


Students NAME

COUNTY OR CITY

Robertson, Doris Virginia, 2 Robertson, Helen V., 2 Robertson, Rena Mae, 3 Robertson, Virginia N., 3 Robinson, Marianna, 1 Robinson, Mary Virginia, Sp Rodgers, Alice G., 1 Rodgers, Julia E., 2 Rogers, Emily Beryl, 2 Rogers, Frances L., 1 Rollins, M. Leone, 2 Rorer, Virginia, 2 Rose, Grace M., 4 Roseberry, Ruthfrances, 1 Ross, C. Hildegarde, 1 Ross, Sparks Nina, 1 Rossie, Mrs. Sethelle, 4 Rothwell, H. Frances, 1 Rountree, Dorothy, 2 Rowbotham, Sarah, 3 Rowell, Sarah S., 1 Royall, Jane B., 1 Royall, Rachel L., 4 Royster, Kathryn R., Rucker, M. Kathlene, Rucker, S. Jayne, 4 Rucks, Elizabeth, 2

Rudd, Hettie Mae,

1

3

1

Salsbury, Sarah, 2 Sanders, Katy F., 2 Sanders, Martha L., 1 Sanford, N. Virginia, 1 Saunders, Mary Ellen, 2 Saunders, Persis, 1 Savedge, Rebecca, 4 Sawyer, Elizabeth C, 3 Scales, Mary E., 2 Scales, Sally M., 1 Schenck, Alice Lee, 2 von Schilling, Martha, 2 Schofield, Mary Frances, 2 Schroeder, Catherine E., 3 Scott, Armistead J., 2 Scott, Scott,

Church Road

Lynchburg Lynchburg Portsmouth

1307 Clay St. 1307 Qay St.

Albemarle Prince Edward Farmville Brunswick Norfolk

505 Virginia St.

Freeman 350 Campostella Rd. Messick

Chatham

Pittsylvania Isle

Wight

of

Alexandria Alexandria

Lynchburg Richmond Roanoke Norfolk

Carrsville

Ave. Heights 404 Euclid Ave. 206 N. Belmont 712 Jamison Ave., S. E. R. 4, Box 210 119

Rosecrest

Braddock

The Manse

Altavista

Surry Tazewell Tazewell Lynchburg Bedford Bedford Dinwiddie Lunenburg

Surry Tazewell Tazewell 57 Federal St.

Moneta Moneta Wilson South Hill

Norfolk

813

Grayson

St.

Max Meadows

Wythe Richmond Farmville Alexandria

3401 Chamberlayne Ave. 514 High St. 209 N. Columbus St.

Roseland Wakefield

Nelson Surry Virginia Beach

16th

St.

Buena Vista Buena Vista Roanoke Zld Washington Ave., S. W. 45 Bank St. Hampton Portsmouth 318 Broad St. Rockbridge Rockbridge

Washington, D. Tazewell

Wight

1

Isle of

Franklin

1

North Garden Hampden-Sidney

York

1

L.,

740 Linden Ave. 423 2nd St., N. E.

Charlottesville

Sarah Lee,

Scruggs, M. Louise, 2 Seabury, Martha, 2 Seay, Louise E., 2 Seay, Marion, 2 Shackleton, Elizabeth, 2 Shaner, Nancy T., 2

ADDRESS

Dinwiddie

Bernice D.,

Shaw, Evelyn

111

Appomattox Petersburg

Norfolk Buena Vista Prince

Edward

Rockbridge Mecklenburg

C

134 12th

N. E. Tazewell

St.,

Carrsville

Franklin

Vera 106 S. Market St. 1415 N. Shore Rd. Box 385

Meherrin Lexington Bracey


Students

112

NAME Shawen,

Helen,

COUNTY OR CITY Newport News Nottoway

1

2 Mildred, 1 Shepard, Mary Frances, 4 Shield, Esma A., 2 Shore, Loulie, 2 Short, Mildred A., 1 Simmerman, Mary C, 4 Simpkins, Mildred V., 3 Sheffield,

Shelton,

Polly,

Hertford, N. C.

Hampton Richmond Brunswick

Wythe So.

Sinclair,

Roanoke Danville

Northampton Princess

1

T.,

New New

Castle Castle

Naxera R. F. D., Farmville 2314 Delaware Ave, R. 2, Box 113 Birds Nest

London Bridge

220 S. Main St. C 1142 Hawk St. Petersburg Winston-Salem, N. C...327 Hawthorne Rd. 121 N. Washington St. Alexandria 407 Westover Ave. Roanoke Roanoke 352 Campbell Ave., S. W.

West Augusta S. West St.

Augusta 123

Petersburg

Curdsville Buckingham Lynchburg 806 Rivermont Ave. Crewe Nottoway Salem 6 Taylor Ave., Langhorne PI.

1

Tazewell So. Norfolk

Roanoke Brunswick

1

Petersburg Albemarle Franklin

1

Stephenson, Eunice, 1 Stephenson, Frances, 3 Stephenson, M. Evelyn, 2 Stevens, F. Catherine, 4 Stewart, Martha E., 1 Stifif, Hilda, 1 Stiff, Margaret M., 2 Stith, Dena Lee, 2 Stoutamire, A. Elizabeth, Stump, Anna C, 4 Swann, Marguerite, 1 Swanson, Jo Hines, 4 Swift, Mary E., 1

439 Newport News Ave. 1918 Hanover Ave. Lawrenceville Wytheville 1424 Chesapeake Ave. Prospect

1200 Early St. Charlotte C. H.

Charlotte Mullins, S.

Spencer, H. Elizabeth, Spencer, Josie W., 1 Spencer, Magdalene, Sp Spindle, Edith, 1 Spracher, Louise A., 1 Staples, Elsie F., 2

Marie

Anne

Lynchburg

Smitherman, Elizabeth, 4 Smoot, Frank W., 1 Snedegar, Dorothy, 1 Snidow, Mildred, 3 Somerville, Betty, 4 Souders, Easther M., 2 „

Steed, Mildred E., 3 Steere, Mildred, 2 Stephens, Mary A.,

Norfolk

Prince Edward Craig Craig Gloucester Prince Edward

Simpson, Dorothy P., 1 Simpson, Emily E., 3 Simpson, Evelyn C, 3

Staples,

Church Road

Dinwiddie

E.

Mary C, 2 Slaydon, Maude, 1 Smith, Helen E., 4 Smith, Jessie C, 3 Smith, Laura May, 4 Smith, Laura N., 3 Smith, Pauline V., 2 Smith, Rosa Mae, 1 Smith, S. Agnes, 1 Smith, Sue Virginia,

ADDRESS 139 Chesapeake Ave. _ Burkeville

501

Lancaster Petersburg

Norfolk Petersburg

Salem

101

Apollo

St.

R. 1

Alexandria

Farmville

St.

1810 Patterson Ave., S. W. 201 Duncan Ave.

Roanoke

Princess

High

Wakefield Buena Vista Millenbeck 618 High St.

Surry Rockbridge

1

Bluefield

1206 Chesapeake Ave. 635 Avon Rd. Meredithville 129 Marshall St. R. 4, Charlottesville

Anne

922 Cameron St. Virginia Beach Pilot Mountain, N. C. R. 4, Box 1


Students NAME Talley,

COUNTY OR CITY

Nellie,

Mecklenburg Lynchburg

4

Tankersley, Helen C, 1 Tarkington, Nellie E., 2 Tarpley, Elizabeth Ann, 1 Tarry, Frances H., 1 Tate, Margaret, 1 Tatum, Myrtis, 1 Taylor, Charlotte A., 3 Taylor, Elizabeth Mae, 3 Taylor, Henrietta K., 1 Taylor, Mary Elizabeth, 2 Taylor, Victoria Arm, 2 Temple, Jennie Elizabeth, 3 Terry, Mary West, 2

Thompson, Thompson, Thompson, Thompson, Thompson,

Charleston, S. Pittsylvania

Norfolk Brunswick Brunswick Portsmouth

Accomac

Tittsworth,

Beatrice,

1

2

Todd, Mary Ellen, 2 Topping, Rosalyn Virginia, 2 Towler, Woodruth, 1 Transou, Lucile A., 2 Traylor, Evelyn R., 4

Alma E., 1 Mary L., 1 Abby Lynn, 2

Trimyer, Tripp, Tripp, Tritton,

Alice

Grace

B., G.,

C

Lithia

Whitmell N. C.

2 1

Trolan, Ida Julia, 3 Truman. Shirley Irene, 1...:. Tucker, Anna L., 4 Tucker, Katherine, 2 Tunstall, Grace M., 2 Turner, Mrs. Lucy E., 2 Tweedy, Helen H., 2

McLemore

3030

_

St.

Gasburg Meredithville

909 North

St.

Harborton 615 Cherry St. King & Queen C. H.

...„

Bristol, Tenn King & Queen Roanoke Appomattox Lynchburg

Dorothy W., 2 Lucy R., 4

M. Fleetwood, M. Patsye, 1

ADDRESS Springs 250 Sumpter Ave. Box 527

Buffalo

Townsville,

Sarah H., 1 Thornton, Elizabeth D., 4 Thornton, Frances G., 3 Thornton, Mary Dew, 1 Thweatt, Gladys P., 2 Thweatt, M. Katherine, 3

Trear,

113

Riverland Rd.

101

Pamplin 314 Cabell

St.

N. Emporia

Greensville Pittsylvania

Dry Fork Vernon Hill Lunenburg Dundas Newport News 2703 Roanoke Ave. Fredericksburg.... 11 12 Prince Edward St. Amherst Madison Heights Halifax

McKenney

Dinwiddie Petersburg

1771

Wise Richmond York

Westover Ave. Appalachia 3127 Dill Ave.

Messick

_

Pittsylvania

Fredericksburg Lynchburg...„ Prince Edward

Norfolk

Nansemond Nansemond Princess Anne Ocean View

Callands „. Spot. Star Route 1110 Griffin St. R. 3, Farmville 918 Hanover Ave. Whaleyville _ Whaleyville Virginia Beach 827 Ocean View Ave.

410 Westover Ave. Lovingston Lovingston

Roanoke...„

Nelson Nelson

Nottoway ..._ Isle of Wight

Crewe

....Smithfield

Concord Depot

Campbell

Vaden, Mary Jane, 4 Varner, Margaret C, 1 Varner, Mildred C, 3

Charlotte

Vincent, Margaret F., 1 Vincent, Mary Wm., 4

Greensville Greensville

Wallace, Bertha R., 2 Waller, Thelma Ruth, 2 Walser, Grace D., 1 Walters, Martha G., 2

So.

...„

Roanoke Southampton

Norfolk Portsmouth

1114

Keysville Blvd.

Rugby

Ivor

Emporia Emporia „

1305

Jefferson

St.

R. 2, Box 89 High Point, N. C 1108 Johnson St. Richmond. 3612 Chamberlayne Ave.


1

Students

14

NAME Walthall, Walthall,

Elizabeth, Helen H.,

COUNTY OR CITY

Dante

Cumberland

1

Walton, Doris Elmo, 3

Danville

Wampler, Nell B., 1 Ward, Anna Macon, 1 Ware, Gazelle, 1 Warren, Maria C., 2 Warren, Mary W., 1

Wise

Waterfield, Frances,

R.

Farmville 216 Mt. Vernon Ave. Big Stone Gap „ 1,

N. C.

Stoneville,

Beckley, W. Pittsylvania Pittsylvania Farmville

Sp

Watkins, Anne V., 1 Watkins, Jessie B., 1 Watkins, Nancy S., 4 Watkins, Nannie G., 1 Watts, Carolyn M., 4 Watts, Cornelia J., 1 Watts, Ruth Page, 1 Webber, Doris Virginia, 1 Welborn, Nancy Pearl, 2 Wells, Mabel Virginia, 2 Wesson, Belva Lorraine, 3 West, Evelyn Wells, 4 West, Frances B., 2 West, Imogene C, 1 Wetzel, Margaret D., 2 Wheeler, Jennie F., 1 White, Eunice Lindsey, 2 White, Mary Page, 3 White, Mildred B., 1 Whitehead, Frances, 2

Whitlock, Louise D., 4 Wiley, Jane P., 2 Wilkerson, Katherine, 2 Wilkins, Margaret B., 1 Wilkinson, Linda £., 4 Williams, Annie Virginia, 2 Williams, Glessie Virginia, 1 Williams, Juanita, 1 Williams, Lucy Lee, 4 Williams, Maria Dorothy, 1 Williams, Rosa Mae, 2 Williams, Wilma Evelyn, 1 Williamson, Lucy M., 1 Wills, Sarah H., 1 Willson, Sara Virginia,

2

Wilson. Frances Anne, 4 Wilson, Lucy Irene, 3 Wilson, Nancv Elma, 1 Jewell Lake, Wingo, Ann Foster, 1 Winston, Ernestine, 1 1

83 N.

Farmville Henderson, N.

Kanawha

St.

Chatham Chatham 807 High St. Buffalo Junction

Greensville

„.N.

Emporia First Ave.

C

Richmond Clifton Forge Amherst Roanoke High Point, N. C Brunswick Brunswick Lynchburg Roanoke

584 N. William St. 812 Roanoke St. 719 McCormick St. Pleasant View-

Grove Park 106

Oakwood Court Edgerton Merchant 1114 Wise St. Ferdinand Ave. Serpell Heights

715

Farmville Norfolk.

1280

Hopewell Nelson Albemarle Dinwiddle

Bay View 213 _.

R.

Blvd. 16th St

Arrington

Charlottesville

4,

McKeimey Chatham

Pittsylvania

Milton,

Smyth

N. C.

Saltville

Forge

Clifton

Spartanburg, S. Charles City

Norfolk Norfolk

Nottoway Portsmouth Halifax

Roanoke Mecklenburg Roanoke Roanoke Roanoke

Edward

909

C

Commercial Ave. 667 Maple St. Holdcroft 1605

DeBree Ave.

Frankford, W. Va. 1264 W. 37th St. Blackstone 1504 Leckie St. Clarkton 1120 Fairfax Ave.

Nelson 521 Arlington Rd. 519 Arlington Rd.

716 Maiden Lane Farmville, R. F. D.

Henry Halifax

Wimbrow,

Va

Mecklenburg

Prince

Wimbish, Alice C, 2

Winston, Mary Edna, Withers, Anne S., 2

ADDRESS

Russell

1

1

Amelia Mecklenburg Hopewell Danville

Ridgeway Nathalie Jackson, N. C. Jetersville

Nelson 408 Spruance Ave. .1032

Main St


Students NAME Withers, Susan Jane, Witt, Jane J., 2 Witt, Virginia H., 1

ADDRESS COUNTY OR CITY Roanoke 1025 Ferdinand Ave., S. W.

1

Womack,

Lillian E., 1 Womeldorf, Cora Belle,

3

Wood, Christine G., 1 Wood, Dorothy M., 3 Wood, Mary Rose, 4 Woodhouse, Grace Virginia, 2 Woodley, Lillian M., 1 Woodson, Alma, 3 Woodson, Anne C, 2 Woodson, Dorothy Belle, 2 Woodson, Kathleen, 4 Woodson, Louise Upton, 2 Woodson, Martha Catherine, 2 Worsham, Dorothy E., 4 Wrenn, Anne Luck, 2

Dorothy

F.,

Culpeper

Culpeper

Pittsylvania Charlotte

Keysville

Rockbridge

Lexington

Buckingham

Wingina Wildwood

Witt

Fluvanna Amelia Portsmouth Henrico Campbell Campbell

Jetersville

1038 Leckie St.

Dumbarton Rustburg Rustburg Spout Spring „ Concord 914 Harrison St. 1127 Larchmont

Appomattox Campbell

Lynchburg Norfolk

Long

Campbell

Lynchburg

1

4

952

Pa

NOTE: Numbers following names of students Year (Freshman) 2, Second Year (Sophomore) Sp., Special Student. 4, Fourth Year (Senior) ;

;

Naval Ave.

Bloxsom

Accomac Philadelphia,

Island

816 Rivermont Ave.

Portsmouth

Yarbrough, Virginia E., 2 Young, Laura Margaret, Ziegler,

115

4226 Baltimore Ave.

indicate Class, as ;

3,

1,

First

Third Year (Junior)

;


Students

116

RECAPITULATION Total in College Department

'.

843

Campus Training School High School Department

83 291

Grades

374

374

Cumberland Training School (Rural) High School Department

SO

Grades

121

171

171

Curdsville Training School (Rural)

High School Department

50 152

Grades

202

202

John Randolph Training School (Rural) High School Department

85 130

Grades

215

215

Prospect Training School (Rural)

High School Department

66

Grades

176

-

-

242

242

Rice Training School (Rural)

High School Department

—

Grades

43 163

-

206

206

WoRSHAM Training School (Rural) High School Department Grades

72 163

-

-

-

235 Students in

Summer Quarter

1929

~

235 339

Total for Session 1929-30

2,827

Number

4,520

of Graduates to date