Page 1

J*-

BULLETIN OF THE

State Teachers College FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

Vol. XIII, No. 4

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY

June, 1927

Catalogue ig27'ig28

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1914, at the post Farmville, Virginia, under th.e act of August 24, 1912.

office at


Insert

Foldout/N

Here


BULLETIN OF THE

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE FAEMVILLE, VIRGINIA

Vol. XIII, No. 4

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY

June, 1927

CATALOGUE REGISTER FOR 19264927

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR

19274928

Fall Quarter Begins September 21.

Winter Quarter Begins January Spring Quarter Begins March

20.

published by The State Teachebs College Farmville, Virginia 1927

2.


Digitized by the Internet Archive in

2011 with funding from

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation

http://www.archive.org/details/stateteachcol192728stat


TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE Calendar Schedule Appointments Board of Virginia Teachers Colleges Faculty Standing Committees Business and Home Depai'tment Officers of Student Organizations Class Gifts

5

6 7

8

15 16 17 18

General Information: History of the College Purpose Location College Plant Training School Facilities and Organization The College Year

The Summer Quarter Expenses State Scholarships Discipline

Student Government Association Eeligious Life of the College Young Womens Christian Association Virginia Normal League

Cunningham Memorial Loan Fund State Loan Fund Association of Alumnae Library and Eeading Room Literary Societies Debating Club Pi Kappa Omega Society Student Publications Courses and Certificates

Entrance EÂŤquirements and Classification Requirements for Teaching in Training School Record of Students Instrumental Music Explanation of Numbers and Credits

19 19

20 20 20 21 22 22 23 23 24 24 25 26 26 27 27 28 28 28 28 29 29 30 31 32 32 33

Course of Study: Course I Course II Course III

34 36 38

Departments of Instruction: Biology Chemistry and Physics

Drawing

39 42 44


Table of Contents PAGE Education English Geography Handwriting History and Social Sciences Home Economics Industrial Arts Latin Mathematics Modern Languages Music Physical and Health Education Reading and Dramatics

List of Students Eecapitulation

46 55 61 64 65 70 75 78 80 83 87 90 94 96 115


CALENDAR

1927

—Wednesday,

September 21

Wednesday, December

21,

—Fall term begins. Noon — Christmas Holiday

be-

gins.

1928

—Monday,

—Return College. Tuesday, January 3 —Winter term begins. Tuesday, March 20— Spring term begins. June 5 — Close of Session. January

Note: The dormitory

2

will be

to

open Tuesday, September

20,

All students, old or new, are expected to come on that day.

Rooms

will not be reserved later

tember

21, except in cases of special

All students

who

than 9 A. M., Wednesday, Separrangement.

expect to teach in the Training School must

report to the Director of the Training School not later than

September

21.


SCHEDULE APPOINTMENTS

Wednesday, September

21.

—Auditorium—All students. —Rooms 30 35—All First-year students. —Auditorium—All Second, Third, and Fourth -year

8 :15 9 :15 9 :15

to

students

who

are not teaching in the fall quarter.

—Auditorium—All students who are teaching in the

2 :15

fall quarter.

Thursday, September

22.

—Auditorium—All First-year students in Course —Auditorium—All First-year students in Course 11 2 —Auditorium—All First-year students in Course 4:15—Room 23 —All students not yet scheduled. 8 :15

I.

:15

II.

:15

III.

Friday, September 23. 8 :15

A

class

work

begins.

$1.00 will be charged, each student who does not have her schedule the above progrram unless she presents an acceptable excuse.

fine of

made by

—^Regular


BOARD OF THE VIRGINIA TEACHERS COLLEGES W.

C.

LOCKEE, President

Geo. N. Conrad, Vice-President

UoBERT K. Brock, Secretary-Auditor

Harry Flood Byrd, Governor

of Virginia

(ex-officio)

Harris Hart, Superintendent of Public Instruction (ex-offico)

McIntyre Locker

EoBT. A.

W.

C.

Warrenton, Va. iliclimoiid, Va. Newcastle, Va. Fredericksburg, Va. Prince George, Va. Eoanoke, Va. Eastville, Va. Portsmouth, Va. Independence, Va. Harrisonburg, Va. Pearisburg, Va. Leesburg, Va.

George W. Layman Dr. H. M. DeJarnette

Miss Belle Webb Miss Jemima C. Hurt Benj. W. Mears

Norman J. S.

R. Hamilton Bourne

Geo. N. Conrad Mrs. Frances E. Miller Cecil Connor

STANDING COMMITTEES

Messrs. Geo. N. Conrad, Cecil Connor, George W. Belle Webb, the President of the Board and Superintendent of Public Instruction being ex-offico members.

Executive Committee

Layman and Miss

—Suueriutendent

Course of Study Committee C. Locker.

Harris

Hart,

Miss

Belle

Webb, and Mr. W.

Building Committee

—Messrs.

George W. Layman and

W.

C. Locker.


FACULTY J. L.

JARMAN,

LL.D., President 1886-1889; LL.D. Hampden- Sidney College.

University of Viiginia^

MAEY BARLOW,

B.S.

Physical and Health Education B.S. and diploma in Health Education, Teachers College, Columbia University; Graduate Posse Normal School of Gymnastics, Boston, Mass.; Graduate Emerson College of Oratory, Boston, Mass.; Summer Courses, Denmark Institute of Gj'mnastics.

MARY HELEN BARNES,

B.S.,

M.S.

Assistant in English B.S. in Education and M.S. in E'nglish, University Mary Baldwin College, Staunton, Va.

LEON

BELL,

E.

B.A.,

of

Virginia;

Graduate

M.A.

Psychology and Education M.A. and Master's Diploma in Education, Teachers College, Columbia University; B.A. Northwestern University; Graduate Student in Psychology, Education, and Philosophy, University of Chicago and Boston University.

ADA RANDOLPH BIERBOWER Supervisor, Rural Training Schools, Cumberland County Graduate State Teachers College, Farmville. Va. Summer Courses, University of Virginia and University of California. ;

OLIVE SMITH BOWMAN,

B.S.

Instructor in Biology B.S.

State Teachers College,

Farmville,

Va.

WARREN

D. BOWMAN, B.A., M.A. Secondary Education and Psychology

M.A. University of Chicago; Graduate Student in Education, University Chicago; B.A. Bridgewater College.

of

*ALMA BROWNING,

B.S. Supervisor of Sixth Grade B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers; Graduate Murfrcesboro, Tenn. Pa.

ELIZABETH BUGG,

;

Summer Course King's

State

Normal

School of Oratory,

School, Pittsburgh,

B.S.

Instructor in Geography B.S. State Teachers College, Farmville, Va.

MARY LOUISE BULLOCK,

B.S,

Supervisor of Fourth Grade B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers. •"On leave of absence,

graduate student at George Peabody College for Teachers.


Faculty

PAULINE CAMPEE,

B.S.

Supervisor of Seventh Grade and Bural Education. B.S. and diploma as director of Rural Education, Teachers College, Columbia University; Graduate State Teachers College, Farmville, Va.

ALICE

CARTER,

E.

BjS.

Acting Supervisor of Fifth Grade B.S. and diploma in Formal School Supervision, Teachers College, Columbia University; Graduate Student, Columbia University; Graduate State Teachers College, Farmville, Va.

RUTH

H. OOYNER Acting Supervisor of Sixth Grade

Graduate State Teachers College, Farmville, Va.; Summer Courses, University of Virginia and Columbia University.

M.

BOYD COYNEE,

M.A. Psychology and Education B.A.,

B.A. Concordia College; M.A. University two years, Columbia University.

OTTIE CRADDOCK,

of Virginia;

B.A.

Handivriting B.A. Roanoke College; Summer Courses, University

MARTHA

Graduate Student for

W. COULLING,

of Virginia.

L.I.

Drawing George Peabody College; Martha's Vineyard Summer School; Student under Fred W. Daniels and W. T. Bear, Chautauqua Summer School; Student for two years. Teachers College, Columbia University; Applied Arts Summer L.I.

School,

S.

Chicago;

Summer

ELIZABETH DAVIS,

Course, University of Chicago.

B.S.,

M.A.

Associate in English B.S. and M.A. George Peabody College for Teachers; Graduate Shorter ColCourses at Vanderbilt University, University of Virginia, University lege of Arkansas, Columbia University. ;

HELEN DRAPER,

B.S.

Assistant in French B.S. State Teachers College, Farmville, Va. Summer Courses, University of Virginia and Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont. ;,

REXIE

;S.

GILL

Supervisor, Bural Training School, Prospect, Prince Courses at George. Peabody College for Teachers;

Summer

Edward

Co.

Courses, Univer-

sity of Virginia.

BLANCHE

E. O.

GRAHAM

Associate in Physical and Health Education Graduate of the Sargent Normal School of Physical Education; Graduate Harvard University Summer School of Physical Education; Honorary Certificate from the University of the State of New York; Course in Orthopedics at the Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass.


Faculty

10 *J

AMES

M. GKAINGEE, B.A., M.A. Unglish

B.A. University of Cincinnati; M.A. University of North Carolina

E.

MYRTLE GBENELS,

B.S.

Geography B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers; Graduate Student George Peabody College Graduate State Teachers College, Farmville, Va. Summer Course, Columbia University. ;

;

MARY BURNS HAYNES,

B.S.

Primary Education and Supervisor of First Grade B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers; Summer Courses,

University of Tennessee; Graduate Shelby ville Female College, Shelby ville, Tenn.

MARY CLAY

BINER,

B.S., M.A.,

Associate in English B.S. and M.A. George Peabody College for Teachers; Graduate State Teachers College, Farmville, A''a. Courses at Vanderbilt University and University ;

of Virginia.

OLIVE

T.

ILER

Associate in Physical Education Graduate Sargent School of Physical Education.

GEORGE W. JEFFERS,

B.S.,

M.A.

Biology B.S. and M.A. Boston University; Research Student, University of Toronto and Biological Board of Canada.

BESSIE H. JETER,

M.A, Associate in Home Economics B.S.,

and M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University; Normal and Industrial College. B.S.

BESSIE GORDON JONES,

Graduate Georgia

B.S.

Supervisor, Eural Training School, Eice, Prince

Edward County

B.S. State Teachers College, Farmville, Va.

MARY PHILLIPA

JONES,

B.S.

Primary Education B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University; Graduate State Normal College, Florence, Ala. Graduate Cook County Normal School Chicago. ;

KATHERINE KING,

Mus.B.

Music Diploma American Institute of Normal Methods, Northvirestern University, Chicago; Post-Graduate American Conservatory,. Chicago; Assistant to Francesco Daddi, Chicago Opera Association.

ELIZABETH LEWIS,

B.A.

Assistant in English B.A. Randolph-Macon Woman's College; Graduate State Teachers College, Farmville, Va.

*0n leave

of absence.


Faculty LILA LONIX)N,

11

B.S.

Mathematics B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers; Special Student in Mathematics under Dr. William Thornton, University of Virginia; Course in Surveying, Roanoke College, Salem, Va.; Summer Courses at Knoxville, Tenn., and Cornell University.

WILHELMINA PALESKE LONI>ON,

B.S.

Assistant in English B.S. State Teachers College, Farmville, Virginia; University and at( Columbia University.

T. A.

Summer Courses

at Cornell

McCKDEKLE, B.A. M.S. Chemistr'if

and Physics

B.A. Washington and Lee University; M.S. University of Chicago; five years

Chemist in United States liavy.

ELIZABETH GLASS MARSHALL,

B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Associate in English B.A. University of Kentucky; M.A., Ph.D. University of study Oxford University, England.

ANNE

S.

MEREDITH,

of Virginia; one year

B.S.

Instructor in Mathematics B.S. State Teachers of Virginia.

HAZEL

BERJSriOE

Farmville,

College,

Va.;

Summer

Courses,

University

MILLICAN

Industrial Arts

New Brunswick Normal School in Industrial Arts Summer Courses, School of Science of the Atlantic Province, Fredericton and Yarmouth, Nova Scotia; Halifax Institute of Technology; Prince of Wales College, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, and Gorham, Maine. Graduate

;

GRACE ELDRIBGE MIX,

B.S.

Primary Education and Supervisor of Kindergarten B.S. Columbia University; Graduate Student, Columbia University; Courses, University of Chicago. C. G.

GORDON MOSS,

B.A.,

Summer

M.A.

Associate in History B.A. Washington and Lee University; M.A. Yale University.

GEORGIE NORRIS Supervisor of Third Grade Graduate Woman's College, Greenville, of Virginia and University of Chicago.

MARY

E.

PECK,

S.

C; Summer

Courses, University

B.S.

Assistant in History B.S. State Teachers College, Farmville, Va.; Courses at Golumbia University and University of Chicago.

IDA

WOODROW PENNEY,

B.A.

Supervisor of Second Grade B.A. Winthrop College, S. C. Summer Courses, University of Virginia and Teachers College, Columbia University; Winter Session, Teachers College, ;

Columbia University.


Faculty

12

MINNIE

V.

EICE

Latin Graduate Farmville College Columbia University.

TLMA

Summer

;

Harvard

Courses,

and

University

VON SCHILLING, B.S. Principal of Training School B. S. and diploma in Elementary Education, University; Student Stuart Hall, Staunton, Va. of Virginia.

;

Teachers College, Columbia Summer Courses University

ESTELLE SMITHEY,

B.A. Modern Languages. B.A. Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Va.; Diploma Paris University. caise,

FLOEENCE

;

Student at the Sorbonne, Paris

HAjVIES STUBBS,

;

L' Alliance FranCourses, Columbia

of

Summer

B.S.

Associate in History and Social Sciences B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers; Summer Courses, University Tennessee, Winthrop College, and University of Virginia.

CARRIE SUTHEELIN,

of

M.A.

B.S.,

Associate in English M.A. Columbia University; B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers; Graduate State Teachers College, Farmville, Va. Courses at Chicago University. Cornell University, Vanderbilt University, and the University of ;

Virginia.

CARRIE

B.

TALIAFERRO,

B.S.

Associate in Mathematics B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University; Graduate State Teachers lege,

Farmville, Va.

;

Col-

Student at Cornell University.

OLIVE ESTHER THOMAS,

B.S.

Instructor in Fhysicul Education B.S. College of William and Mary; Summer Course Gymnastic High School, Ollerup,

Denmark.

SARAH BOYD TUCKER,

L.I., B.A.,

M.A.

Associate in History and Social Sciences L.I., B.A., Winthrop College; M.A. Columbia University; Summer Courses, Chicago University and Columbia University.

KATHERINE TUPPER,

B.S.

Home Economics B.S. Teachers College, lege,

Columbia University; Diploma Ontario Ladies' Col-

Whitby, Canada.

MARY WALTERS VAUGHAN,

B.S.

Instructor in Music B.S. State Teachers College, Farmville, Va.

JAMES ELLIOTT WALMSLEY,

A.M., Ph.D.

History and Social Sciences A.M. Randolph-Maoon College; Ph.D. Student, University of Chicago.

Illinois

Wesleyan University; Graduate


Faculty

FEANCES iWATEKS,

13

B.S.

Assistant in Geography B.S. George Peabody College for Teachers.

LEOLA WHEELER,

B.A.

Beading and Dramatics B.A. Smith College; Graduate Emerson College of Oratory; Post-Graduate Student, Emerson College of Oratory; Graduate Study, School of Expression^ Boston, Mass.; University of Missouri.

=JOHN

P. WTNISTE, A.B., A.M., Ph.D.

Education and Director of Teacher Training A.B. and A.M., Trinity College, N.

SAEAH MacDONALD,

C;

Ph.D., Columbia University.

B.A.

Librarian B.A. Randolph-Macon Atlanta, Ga.

Woman's

College;

Graduate Carnegie Library School,

JENNIE M. TABB Secretary to the President, and Begistrar

VIEGILIA BUGG Assistant in the Begistrar 's Office

GENEVIEVE

B. V.

HOLLADAT

Assistant in the Begistrar 's Office

MAUD

K.

TALIAFEEEO

Postmistress and

^On leave

Manager of Supply Boom

of absence, student at

Columbia University.

^Dissertation to be placed in the library, before formal awarding of degree.


STUDENT ASSISTANTS EDITH ASHER Student Assistant in Library

LOUISE BONDURANT Stiident Assistant in English

ALICE

B.

CARTER

Student Assistant in Library

MARGARET COBB Student Assistant in Kindergarten

LOUISE COSTEN Student Assistant in Drawing

CORNELIA DICKINSON Student Assistant in Training School

DAPHNE GILLIAM Student Assistant in Spanish

FANNIE GRAINGER Student Assistant in Biology and Library

MABEL GROSSCLOSE Student Assistant in English and Library

HARRIET FOSTER Student Assistant in Training School

MADELINE HILL Student Assistant in Biology

ELIZABETH HOPKINS Student Assistant in First Grade

MARGARET LUCAS Student Assistant in Training School

FRANCES MORGAN Student Assistant in Library

iSARA SPIERS Student Assistant in Library

MILDRED SPINDLE Student Assistant in Library

FLORENCE STEGEMAN Student Assistant in Chemistry

PAULINE STALLARD Student Assistant in Library

OLA THOMAS Student Assistant in Library

MARGARET WALLACE Student Assistant in InduMrial Arts


STANDING COMMITTEES —

Committee on College Course of Study Dr. Jarman, Miss L. LondoHj, Mr. Grainger, Dr. Walmsley, Miss CouUing, Miss Stubbs, Miss OrenelSj, Miss Haynes, Miss Tupper, Mr. Wynne, Mr. Jeffers, Mr. Coyner, MissCarter, and Miss Mix.

Committee on High School Course of Study L. London and Miss Peck.

—Miss von

Schilling,

Mr.

Bowman, Miss

Committee on Elementary Course of Study Mr. Wynne, Miss von Mr. Grainger, Miss Grenels, Miss Haynes and Miss Camper.

Schil-

ling,

er,

Committee on Advanced Credits ^Miss Eice, Miss Taliaferro, Miss TuckMiss Grenels and Miss M. Jones.

Committee on Entrance to High School Department Mr. Bowman, Miss W. London and Miss Draper.

—Mr.

Committee on Schedule of Recitations Draper, Mr. Coyner and Dr. Walmsley.

^Miss

von Schilling,

McCorkle, Miss Jeter, Miss

Committee on Student Standards Miss Mix, Miss Sutherlin, Miss SmithMiss Peck and Miss Taliaferro.

ey,

Advisory Ccrmmittee to P. K. 0.

—Mr.

Grainger, Mr. McCorkle and Miss

Coulling.

Committee on College Paper

—Mr.

Grainger, Mr. Coyner and Miss Suth-

erlin.

—Mr. McCorkle, Miss Coulling and Miss Hiner. Entertainments—Miss Coulling, Miss Wheeler, Mrs. King

Committee on Annual Committee on and Miss Barlow.

Commdttee on Bulletins Miss Meredith.

—Miss

Committee on Chapel Program

L. London, Miss Hiner, Mr. Coyner

—Miss

Stubbs, Miss

and

W. London and Miss

Hiner.

—Miss

Committee on Chapel Attendance Draper Com/mittee on Publicity

Miss

Barlow, Miss

Her

and

—Mr. Grainger, Dr. Marshall, Miss Sutherlin

Miss

and

JBarnes.

Committee on Admission to Teaching Miss Taliaferro.

—Mr. .Wynne,

Miss L. London and


BUSINESS

AND HOME DEPARTMENT JAKMAN

J. L.

President

WINNIE

HINER

V.

Treasurer

MARGAEET McCOY Assistant to Treasurer

BRISTOW

E. C.

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds

MARY WHITE COX Head

of the

FRANCES Assistant

SHELTON

B.

Head

Home

of the

Home

EVA HETERICK WARREN Assistant in

Home Department

HALLIE Assistant in

K.

LAING

Home Department

HOUSTON BLACKWELL Assistant in

Home Department

EMMA BUGG BLANTON Night Matron

BESSIE CAMPER JAMISON HouseTceeper

ALICE PEERY Supervisor of Dining

Boom

MARY MORGAN PROVINCE Supervisor of Pantry

LILLIAN

V.

NHNN

Supervisor of Laundry

SUSAN WILSON FIELD,

B.S.,

M.D.

Besident Physician and Medical Inspector B.S. University of Nebraska; M.D. Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania; Hospital Certificate, Hospital of Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania.

WILLIE

E.

McKEE,

R.N.

Besident Nurse Graduate of Memorial Hospital Training School

for Nurses,

Richmond Va.


OFFICERS OF STUDENT

ORGANIZATIONS Executive Board of the Student Council

Virginia Vincent Virginia Ellis

President Vice-President

Mabel Grossclose Betty Hopkins Greenhow Parker

Secretary

Treasurer

Chairman of Campus League

Young Women's Eosalind Harrell Margaret Cobb

Christian Association

President

Undergraduate Representative

Alice Carter

Vice-President

Elva Hebley

Secretary

Maud

Treasurer

Baptist Fi Kappa Omega Society (Honorary)

Evelyn Beckham Alpha Delta Edith Cornwell

President JRho

{Honorary Fraternity for Leadership) President

Dramatic Cluh

Lucy Haile Overby

President

Glee Cluh

Lucy Marsteller

President

Orchestra

Josephine Peters

President Athletic Council

Viola "Woodson

President

Dei ate Council

Evelyn Beckham

President

The Botunda {College Paper)

Edith Cornwell Virginia Boxley

Editor-in-Chief Business Manager

The Virginian {College Annnml)

Evelyn Beckham

Editor-in-Chief Class Organizations

Virginia Potts Virginia Updike

Mebane Hunt Etta Marshall

President Fourth Year Class

_

President Third Year Class President Second Year Class President First Year Class


:

CLASS GIFTS For some years

it has been the custom of the graduating class with college leave the a parting gift, as a token of their love to and loyalty. The following is a list of the gifts which have resulted from this beautiful custom

—Bible for Auditorium, Class of June, 1904 —Reading stand for Auditorium. Class of January, 1905 — Statue (Venus de Milo). Class of June, 1905 — Statue (Winged Victory). Class of January, 1906 — Statue (Urania). Class of June, 1906 — Statue (Minerva Justiniana). Class of January, 1907 —Picture (Aurora). Class of June, 1907 — Picture (Dance of the Muses). Class of 1908 — Statue (Diana Robing). Class of January, 1909 —Picture (Corot Landscape). Class of June, 1909 —Flag for dome of Main Building. Class of 1910 — $140.00 for Normal League. Class of 1911 — $140.00 for Normal League. Class of 1912 —$100.00 for pictures for Training School. Class of 1913 — $100.00 for books for Infirmary. Class of 1914 — Statue (Jeanne d'Arc). Class of 1915 —$100.00 for pictures for Training School. Class of 1916—Portrait of President Jarman, Class of 1917 —$150.00 diverted to Belgian Relief Fund. Class of 1918 — diverted to Student Friendship War Fund. Class of 1919 — $150.00 diverted United War Work Campaign. Class of 1920 — Statue (Appeal to the Great Class of 1921 — $300.00 for Student Bmldrug. Class of 1922 —$160.00 for Student Building. Class of 1923 —$150.00 for Student Building, Class of 1924 —$350.00 for Student Building, Degree Class of 1925 —Pictures for Student Building (The Cornfields by Constable and The Swiss Village of Laufenburg by Cooper), Diploma Class of 1925 —Picture for Student Building (Peace and Plenty by Inness). Degree Class of 1926— Sun Dial for Campus. Diploma Class of 1926—Banners. Class of January, 1904

$1-85.00

to

Spirit).


GENERAL INFORMATION History of the College

The

Legislature to assemble after the adoption of the established, July 11, 1870, a system of Constitution, post-bellum public schools. For twelve years or more the conduct of these schools was entrusted to such teaching force as was found ready at hand. In this experimental period nothing was more fully demonstrated than that, if the returns were to be in any wise commensurate with the cost and the high mission of the system, some provision must be made for a reliable source of supply of teachers, fitted by education and training for their work. To meet this demand the Legislature, on March 7, 1884, passed an act establishing a State Female Normal School. In October of the same year this school was opened, buildings, already in use for school purposes, having been procured in the town of Farmville. first

One hundred ten students were

enrolled the

first session.

From

the outset the school has steadily grown, making necessary from time to time, the enlargement of its accommodations. In January, 1914, the Legislature changed the name of the school to State Normal School for Women at Farmville. In January, 1924, the Legislature changed the name of the school to State Teachers College at Farmmlle.

In January, 1916, the Legislature granted to the Virginia Nor-

mal School Board the privilege of conferring degrees in education. At the next meeting of the Board this school was authorized to offer a four-year course leading to the degree of

Bachelor of

Science in Education. During the forty years of its existence the school has sent out 3,679 graduates, nearly all of whom are, or have been teachers of the public schools in the State. There have been 10,113 matriculates. Of these, a large number (besides those who have been graduated) have carried to different sections of the State some knowledge of the methods and aims of the school.

Purpose This College exists as a technical institution for the training of teachers to carry on the work of popular education in the State of Virginia. The central idea in the college is to inspire young women to enter the profession of teaching with clear and


General Information

20

accurate ideas of the various educational problems that confront the public school teacher. It is no longer deemed adequate that a teacher be proficient in subject matter only; professional training must be added. Hence, even in the academic work, the professional idea is emphasized. Incidental instruction in methods is everywhere given in connection with the presentation of subject matter. Every department in the institution lends its assistance to the department of education in inspiring the young teachers with the loftiest ideals of what the true teacher should be, and what sort of service should be given the State.

Thus,

it

becomes apparent that the purpose of the institution

give to the teachers of the State of Virginia the highest professional skill possible in the training of her future citizens. is to

Location Farmville is a healthful and pleasant town of about three thousand five hundred inhabitants. It has good schools and five churches Baptist, Episcopal, Methodist, Presbyterian, and Lutheran. Its location on the Norfolk and Western railroad, about midway between Lynchburg and Petersburg, puts it in communication with all parts of the State.

—

College Plant

The College plant consists of a group of connected buildings, a Training School, and twelve small dormitories. The main building contains an auditorium, reception hall, recreation hall, parrooms, library, class rooms, laboratories, offices, gymnasium, lockers, showers, and a dining hall. This building, together with the small dormitories, furnishes home accommoda-

lors, sitting

tions for eight hundred forty-six students. One of the buildings in this connected group is a well equipped infirmary in charge of a physician and a trained nurse who IIa'c in the building and give their entire time to the health of the students. The Campus Training School is a modern school building, planned and constructed to meet the needs of a thoroughly upto-date school.

Training? School Facilities

The Training School system

is

and Organization

composed of the

local training

school comprising the kindergarten, the elementary school,

and


General Information

21

the high school, and three rural schools, John Randolph, Rice and Prospect. The head of the department of education is also director of teacher training. In this way the professional courses of the college and the teaching in the training school are unified and associated in a way that would not be possible if the two phases of the work were under separate control. Each one of the elementary grades of the local training school is in charge of a grade supervisor. The heads of the academic departments of the college whose courses are represented in the primary, and grammar grades, observe the teaching of their respective subjects in the grades and co-operate with the general supervisors in the professional guidance of the student teachers, and of the pupils. In the high school the work of each department is under the direct supervision of that member of the college department whose special field is the teaching of his or her subject in the secondary schools. Thus the supervisor of each high school subject is a specialist, not only in the subject matter of the department but in the technique of supervision. The student teaching at John Randolph, Rice, and Prospect is under the general guidance of the director of teacher training and under the special guidance of another member of the department especially trained in rural education. In addition to these two, the teaching of the students in each school is under the direction of a supervisor. In this two-fold organization the professional spirit of the college pervades the instruction in the rural schools as it does in the campus training school and the instruction in each school is unified throughout. Every effort is made to get the student into the kind of teaching for which she is best suited, and arrangements are so made that the student who is teaching may be practically free for this work. No student is granted either a diploma or degree until she has demonstrated that she is qualified to teach.

The College Year The

college year comprises two distinct sessions The winter session of thirty-six weeks divided into three quarters, and the summer session of eleven weeks making the fourth quarter. :

The holidays are one day at Thanksgiving, and the Christmas holidays. Students are strongly urged to come prepared to remain at college. Frequent trips home during the session except for special reasons are discouraged. The schedule is made on the six-day basis, hence week-ends away from college invariably


:

General Information

22

mean

either classes missed

on Saturday, or attended without

preparation on Monday. Parents are asked to co-operate with the administration in this matter.

The Summer Quarter In the summer quarter all of the work of the first two years of Courses I and II is offered. This meets the needs of three groups of students: First, those who wish by summer work to shorten the time required for graduation; secondly, those who have back work or deficiencies to make up and thirdly, those students who have found it necessary to leave college at the end of the first year, and therefore, hold only an Elementary Certificate. These students may in three summers do the work of the Second Year, and thus receive their diplomas and the Normal ;

Professional Certificate.

The summer quarter

also offers

an opportunity for the teacher

in service to get the two session hours of work required for the certificates, and at the same time to gain the advantage which come from professional contacts.

renewal of

Expenses Students must be prepared to make the following payments at the beginning of each quarter Registration Fee

Maintenance Fee Medical Fee Campus Fee Physical Education Fee

Board Totals

Fall

Winter

Spring

$ 5.00 5.00 2.00 4.00 2.00 85.00

$ 5.00

$ 5.00

5.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 70.00

5.00 2.00 3.00 2.00 70.00

$103.00

$87.00

$87.00

Tuition for pay students (those who do not hold the State Scholarship), payable in advance, is as follows: Fall Quarter, $20.00; Winter Quarter, $20.00; Spring Quarteer, $20.00 Laboratory fees must be paid within two weeks after the beginning of each quarter. These fees are stated in connection with the outline of the courses in which they are required.

The

total expense for the session exclusive of text books and laboratory fees is as follows: for a student holding the State Scholarship, $277.00; for a pay student, $337.00.


General Information

23

Board, including furnished room, laundry, bedding and towels, $225.00 for the entire session. No reduction is made for absense less than thirty days. Checks for board and fees should not be made payable to the President, but to the student herself. All money due the college should be paid to the Treasurer, and receipts taken therefor. No student is enrolled in her classes until she can show a receipt is

for entrance fees. No diploma or certificate is granted to anyone until all sums due the college are paid. The Campus Fee covers subscription to the College paper ( The Eotunda), Athletic Association dues, Student Association dues, Y. W. C. A. support, and Lyceum Course ticket. Each student must supply her own text books. Books will be furnished at publishers' prices with the cost of handling added. Students should come prepared to buy their books at once. For the convenience of patrons who find it impossible to pay the board for a quarter in advance, it may be paid in nine equal installments, payable in advance, on the fifteenth of each month. The dormitories accommodate eight hundred forty-six students. For applicants in excess of this number board is obtained in private families at prices about equal to those given above. No student, however, is allowed to board outside of the building without the consent of the President.

State Scholarships

The State Scholarship entitles the student to free tutition in return for her pledge to teach two years in the public schools of Virginia.

Students applying for the Scholarship should have their application signed; by their Division Superintendent before returning it to the Registrar. They will be notified if Scholarship is granted. The State Scholarship is open to residents of Virginia only. Students from other States, and those from Virginia who do not hold the State Scholarship enter as Pay Students, and pay a tution fee of $60.00 per session. All communications of inquiry, requests for catalogues, etc., should be made to the Registrar. Discipline

In the conduct of a college for young women about to assume the responsibility of a serious and dignified profession like teach-


General Information

24

ing, there is little occasion for arbitrary, iron-clad

discipline.

Beyond

the expectation that the life of our students shall conform to the requirements of promptness and fidelity to duty, and exhibit that gentle demeanor and considerate regard for others which characterize refined womanhood, we have few fixed rules. This does not mean, however, that the students are absolutely without restrictions. It is the duty of the head of the home and her assistants to keep in close contact with the daily life and conduct of the students, and to provide suitable chaperonage whenever necessary. If the student is found to be falling off in her studies, neglecting duty, or exerting an imwholesome influence, prompt steps are taken for her amendment. young woman who does not show some disposition to conform to high standards can hardly be considered good material for a teacher so, if one is found unresponsive to patient endeavors to bring her to the line of duty, her connection with the school is quietly severed by virtue of the following order of the trustees: "If, in the judgment of the President, it shall at any time appear that a student is not making proper use of the advantages which the State offers in the State Teachers College, or that her influence is in any way prejudicial to the interests of the institution, or of her fellow students, it shall be his duty to declare her

A

place vacant."

Student Government Association The purpose of the association is to preserve the student honor and to further the interests of the college as far as lies within its power.

during study period cases in which the good name

It has jurisdiction over the girls

and in the dining-room, and in all of the student body as a whole would be involved. Decisions rendered by the Student Government Committee are subject to the approval of the President.

Religious Life of the College

Although a State

institution,

and hence not under denomina-

tional influence, this college realizes the importance of a life higher than the intellectual, and the religious interests of the students are a matter of constant concern. There is a daily chapel

with the reading of the Scriptures, a hymn and prayer. The ministers of the several denominations of the town take part in conducting these services.

exercise,


a

:

General Information

25

Through the Young Womens Christian Association, Bible Study classes are organized in each church. These classes are taught by members of the faculty, who, together with the ministers and the Sunday School Superintendents, plan and outstudy suitable for the different groups of girls. services is not compulsory, a carekept ful record of attendance is by the Home Department and the Bible Study Committee of the Y. W. C. A., and every girl is urged to join the Sunday School of her choice and to attend church regularly. The College endeavors to maintain high moral and Christian standards, and to create an atmosphere of earnestness, that it may send out young women equipped with a steady purpose to line courses of

While attendance on church

—

perform well and faithfully the duties that lie before them holy purpose to make the most of themselves, that they may do most for others.

The Young Womens Christian Association The Young Womens Christian Association of the State

Teach-

ers College at Farmville, Virginia, affirming the Christian faith in God, the Father, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord

and Savior; and in the Holy Spirit, the Revealer of truth and source of power for life and service, according to the teaching of Holy Scripture and the witness of the church, declares its purpose to be 1.

2.

To lead students to faith in God through Jesus Christ. To lead them into membership and service in the Christian

Church. 3. To promote their growth in Christian faith and character especially through the study of the Bible. 4. To influence them to devote themselves in united efforts with all Christians, to making the will of Christ effective in human society, and to extending the Kingdom of God throughout

the world.

become a member of the Young Womens Christian Asociation and to help it to realize All its purpose through her hearty support of its activities. officers and committees have as their sole aim the furthering of the purpose of the Association as given above. The activities themselves are in charge of student members. The Association conducts daily evening prayer services, holds special weekly Morning Watch services, urges attendance at Sunday School and Church, and fosters a spirit of religious life and service. Some

Every

girl is cordially invited to

special features of the

work are

:

the observance of the

World


General Information

26

Week

of Prayer; the holding of Mission Study Classes for six weeks conducted by the faculty, or selected speakers the bringing to school of a noted speaker each year to give a series of addresses on the Fundamental Principles of the Christian Religion the bringing of other noted speakers who give an international viewpoint to leading movements and foster a spirit of world fellowship among the girls. The activities of the whole Association are numerous and varied enough to give every girl an opportunity to aid in some part of the Christian work which will help her to realize the more abundant life, and will enable her to grow into the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ. ;

'

'

'

'

'

'

'

Virginia

Normal League

The Virginia Normal League was organized in 1899 by Dr. Robert Fraser, then President of the school. The object of the League is to found and maintain a loan fund for those students who would otherwise be unable to attend school. This fund is maintained by the annual membership dues of one dollar, and by voluntary contributions from outside sources. Its aim is to help by loans, without interest, young women who wish to prepare for effective service as teachers. It offers a good opportunity to extend a helping hand to coming generations as well as this. Any contribution, large or small, will be gratefully received. All of the funds of the League are in use. As soon as any amount is returned it is loaned out again, for the demand is greater than the Supply. The largest amount available for any one student in a session is $250.00. Requests for loans should be made in writing by May 10, of preceding session. For further details write to one of the following: Miss Martha W. Coulling, President. Miss Minnie V. Rice, Chairman Finance Committee. Miss Estelle Smithey, Chairman Loan Fund.

Cunningham Memorial Loan Fund the administration of Dr. John A. Cunningham, from 1886 to 1896, raised a fund, intending to establish a scholarship in memory of his faithful and loving service to them and to the State, feeling that the most fitting tribute that could be paid him would be the effort to give to those who are unable to obtain it for themselves the training for the work to which he devoted his life. When this fund amounted to $1,000 it was changed from a

The alumnae

of the College

who graduated during


:

General Information

27

fund to a loan fund and placed in the hands of the President to be used for this purpose. Five per cent interest is charged and properly endorsed notes are required. Thus, it is proving of great assistance to some of our best students. Those wishing to obtain a loan from this fund should apply to the President of the College. scholarsliip

State Loan Fund

The College has a loan fund, which has been appropriated by the State. Not more than $150.00 per session is loaned to any one student. The interest required is four per cent and all notes must be properly endorsed. Applications for assistance from the State Loan Fund should be addressed to the President of the College.

The Association of Alumnae of Alumnae includes all persons who have completed three-quarters of professional work in the college. Graduates are active members, non-graduates are associate members. Eegular annual meetings are held at the College on the Saturday preceding Baccalaureate Sunday. The annual membership fee '

The Association

is

one dollar.

Through the Association former students are kept in touch with the college and with each other, and loyalty is fostered by interest and service. Some of the work attempted is the holding of reunions at convenient times, as at State and district teachers' meetings; the dissemination of college news of interest and importance hy means of circular letters and the newspaper. The Rotunda; the aiding of students by loans from Normal League and Cunningham Memorial Loan Funds; the organization of local chapters in many cities and counties to strengthen and render more effective the activities of the General Association and special service to the College as opportunity arises. The chief interest of the Alumnae at present is the completion of the fund for the Student Building, which is designed to house the student organizations, the physical education department, and be of use to the College in many ways. The officers for 1926-27 are President, Miss Ada Bierbower, Farmville, Va. First Vice-President, Miss Mary Armstead Holt, Hampton, Virginia. all


General Information

28

Second Vice-President, Miss Kate Trent, Fredericksburg, Va. Directors, Miss Otey Helm, Roanoke, Va., Mrs, Martha King Bugg Newbill, Eichmond, Va.

Library and Reading Room

The students are supplied with collateral reading, reference work, and recreative reading from a library of 14,160 classified volumes, reference rooms containing encyclopedias, dictionaries, bound volumes of the leading magazines, and atlases, and a reading room supplied with newspapers of the State, and from large of the State, besides popular periodicals.

cities outside

mental and

many

well-selected depart-

Literary Societies There are two literary societies, the Cunningham, and the EuffThese are an important factor in the intellectual and ner. social life of the college. They impart a strong impulse to literary work, and bring the girls together at regular times for a common intellectual purpose. The literary societies aim primarily to promote a real interest in literature and to afford opportunities for self expression to the members.

Debate Club The purpose of the Debate Club is to develop the powers of argument, clear and logical thinking, and forceful expression. Regular club meetings are held every two weeks during the session, at which matters of local and college interest are debated by the members. One public debate is held each term at which some phase of college activity is discussed and to which all the college

is

inter-collegiate debates are held This provides for training in thinking on one's feet

invited,

and several

each year. and for public recognition of successful club work.

Pi Kappa

Omega Society (honorary) Organized 1918

This society was organized as the result of a need felt by faculty and students for an organization in recognition of The society purposes scholarship, character, and leadership. not only to recognize and encourage such qualities, but also to contribute by definite forms of service to the intellectual and


:

General Information

29

The standards for admission are high and candidates are chosen by the student members of the society social life of the College.

with the approval of the faculty.

There are three kinds of memand honorary (alumnae).

bers: students, associate (faculty),

Student Publications The Iloiunda is a weekly newspaper published by the students. The editorial staff is composed of students and alumnae, who are assisted by reporters from the various classes and school organThe paper aims, by publishing news of the college, to izations. keep the students, the faculty, and the alumnae informed as to what is going on, and so, to draw them closer together. It affords valuable experience in journalistic work to those who participate in

its

publication.

The Virginian is an annual publication which published by the student body.

is

edited and

Courses and Certificates .

This college offers three courses, all leading to the degree of Course I prepares for teaching in B.S. in Education. the kindergarten and lower elementary grades through the third. Course II, for teaching in the upper elementary, beginning with the fourth. Course III, for teaching in the

high school. Courses I and II are so arranged that a diploma is given for the completion of the first two years, and a degree for all four. In Course III no diploma is given but if at the end of two years, a student has so selected her work that she has six session hours each in two subjects, three session hours in Education and one session hour in Health Education, she may be granted a special certificate by the Department of Public Instruction, if she so desires.

Any former student having the full diploma of the college, representing two years of professional work based on sixteen units of high-school work, may take the third and fourth years of the course in Avhich she received her diploma, and receive the B.S. in Education. The following certificates are given by the Department of Public Instruction for the completion of these courses, as follows 1. Collegiate Professional Certificate The degree of B.S. in Education entitles the holder to the Collegiate Professional Certificate given by the Department of Public Instruction. This :


General Information

30

certificate is valid for ten years,

permits

its

and renewable for

ten,

and

holder to teach in the high schools and elementary

schools.

Normal Professional Certificate The diploma of the college Normal Professional Certificate given by Department the of Public Instruction. This certificate is valid for ten years, and renewable for ten, and permits its holder to 2.

:

entitles the holder to a

teach in the elementary schools. 3. Elementary Certificate The completion of the first year of Courses I, or II, based upon graduation from an accredited four-year high school or upon the State First Grade Certificate entitles the student to see entrance requirements, below Elementary Certificate the given by the Department of Public Instruction. This certificate is valid for six years and renewable for six, and' permits its holder to teach in the elementary :

—

—

schools.

The completion of the first two Certificate : years of Course III, provided they include six session hours each of two subjects, three session hours of Education and one session 4.

The Special

hour of Health Education, entitles the student to a Special Certificate given by the Department of Public Instruction. This certificate is valid for six years, and renewable for six, and permits its holder to teach the two subjects mentioned above in the high schools of the State.

Entrance Kequirements and Classification The following are the general regulations governing entrance and classifications: Graduates of accredited four-year high schools may enter any course. Upon the completion of two years in Courses I, or II, they may receive the diploma, and upon completion of four years in courses I, II or III they receive the Science in Education.

Degree of Bachelor of

Students coming from colleges, academies, or private schools equivalent of high school work, are admitted to the same conditions as high school gradu-

who have done the upon trial, subject ates.

Holders of First Grade Certificates^ who are twenty years of age, may enter the First Year of Courses I or II, and upon the completion of the year's work may receive from the Department of Public Instruction the Elementary Certificate. These students should understand, however, that this work cannot be credited ^See Courses and Certificates,

3,

above.


GrENERx\L

INFORMATION

31

toward a diploma until the required high school units have been presented. All candidates for admission must

with the Registrar not later than September 1, their certificates of graduation made out on the blank furnished by her. These blanks must come from some recognized institution or accredited school, must be made out by some member of the faculty, and must bear the signature of the head of the school from which they come. They must be sent directly to the Registrar, and not through the hands of the candidates in question. Students coming from other than accredited four-year high schools are not eligible for entrance except upon passing the College Entrance Examinations prepared by the State for such stufile

dents.

Because of the strictly technical nature of the work, no credit is given for courses completed at other than standard colleges. Students who re-enter college after an absence of a year or more will be expected to conform to the requirements of the later catalogue not of that under which they first entered.

—

Reqitirements for Teaching in the Training School Believing that it is a great injustice both to the student herself and to the pupils in the Training School to allow a student with serious academic deficiencies to continue her course and probably fail at or near the time of graduation, the faculty has made the following requirements for entering upon either her apprenticing or her teaching in the Training School. 1. No student who has more than one F or more than five periods of extra work may enter upon either her apprenticing or her teaching. 2. If more than half the student's grades fall below C, the grades count as three-fourths (75%) credits, thus making it necessary to repeat one-fourth of the classes in which she has received D. 3. In Courses I and II one-half the student's grades shall be C or higher. In Course I an average of C or higher must be made on three of the following subjects: English, Arithmetic, Geography, Education 101, 111, and 115. In Course II an average of C or higher must be made on three of the following subjects: English, History, Arithmetic, Geography, Reading, and Educa-

D

tion 121. 4. In Course III an average of C or higher the student 's major and on her minor.

must be made on


;

General Information

32

Temperamental and physical unfitness should sometimes debar a student from attempting to teach. But such students may in the judgment of the faculty be allowed to remain in college taking academic subjects only.

Eecord op Students

A

record of each student's work

is

kept in the Registrar's

office.

Reports from the various members of the Faculty are handed in every two weeks, and every student who is not making a passing grade at that time is notified. At the close of each quarter, reports for the term are sent to parents or guardians. The work of students is graded as follows: A, B, C, T>, E, and F. D is the lowest passing grade, E denotes a "condition" or incomplete work, F a failure. A student who fails on 50% or more of her work the first quarter is put on probation the second quarter, and must make at least 50% of her work the first year in order to be permitted to enter College for the second year. To be placed on the Honor Roll a student must make a grade of A or B on at least three-fourths of her work for the quarter must have no failures, no conditions, no unexcused absences from class or Chapel, and no reports from the Home Department or Student Government. All students who meet these requirements have the Honor Roil card enclosed with their report.

Instrumental Music

No

instrumental music desiring this work can get

is it

Students from private teachers in the town. taught in the College.


General Information

33

Explanation op Numbers and Credits In general all First-year courses are numbered in the one hundred group, all Second-year courses in the two hundred group, all Third-year courses in the three hundred group, and all Fourth -year courses in the four hundred group. However, First work all and Second-year is interchangeable and all Third and Fourth-year work is interchangeable. Third and Fourthyear students are not permitted to take courses numbered below three hundred except in special cases and with the permission of the Committee on Advanced credits, in which instance the credit is reduced to two-thirds value unless additional work is done.

The credit hour is the ''quarter session hour" representing one hour a week extending through a quarter of eleven or twelve weeks. It is equal to one-third of the standard "session hour" and represents one of the following combinations or the equivalent: 1. One recitation or lecture hour per week extending through the quarter and requiring one and one-half or two hours' preparation.

A two hour laboratory period extending through the quarand requiring one hour's outside work or preparation. In the tabulated course of study, page 34, the figures in the columns show the schedule hours which are also credit hours, unless otherwise stated; for example, a class scheduled to meet three times a week for a quarter, receives three credits or one 2.

ter

session hour.

Some exceptions nature of the work

made

because the standard, the than requires less preparation as is the case in Physical Education, or because, in order to meet the professional demands of elementary subject matter the student has to do work not of college grade as is the case in Arithmetic. These exceptions are noted in the tabulated list, page 34, and also in the departmental statements. to

this

rule are

either


—————— ——— —

.

.

COURSE OF STU DY— 1927 COURSE

I

Leading to TExIchtng in Kindeegaeten and

FIRST YEAR Education 101 Educational Psychology. Education 111 Early Childhood Education Education 112 Early Childhood Education Education 115 Psychology of Beading English 101, 102, 103 Composition, .

.

A

B

3

..

,

.

.

.

.

.

.

Literature ^English 116 Child Literature Government 201 Geography 111, 112, 113 Geography and

3 3

Nature Study ^Mathematics 111, 112, 113 Arithmetic for Primary Teachers ^Music 111, 112 ^Drawing or Industrial Arts 111, 112, 113 ^Writing 101, 102 Physical Education 106 Health Education ^Physical Education 101, 102, 103

3

.

Winter

..

3

..

..

3

..

..

3

3

3

3

3

3

2 2

2

3

3

3 .

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 2 2 o

3

3

3

3

3

2 2 1

2 2

3

3

22 22 22 16 17 16

20 22 19 15 16 14

22 19 22 17 14 17

Fall

ABC

ABC

SECOND YEAR

B

Education Education Education Education Education

Winter

C

3

.

Spring

.

2 3

3

.. o

ABC

3

2

Schedule periods Credit hours

.

ABC

.

3

.

202 Psychology of Learning.. 111 Early Childhood Education 112 Early Childhood Education 213 Early Childhood Education 215 Pre-School Child ''Education 200 Teaching 'Kindergarten Teaching 211 or English... English 205 Advanced Composition ^Reading 211 History 211, 212 -History of Civilisation Government 201 Sociology 201, 202 ^Music 213 'Writing 102 Physical Education 106 Health Education "Physical Education 214, 215

Lower Elementary Grades

iFall

3

..

3

..

..

Spring 3

3

.,

9

9

9

3

3

3

3

3 3

..

..

..

..

3

..

3

3

..

3

2

.

3 3 3

3 3

.

..

1

3

..

3

3

3

20 15 19 18 20 15 15 19 20 17 15 17 16 16 15 15 18 17 ^The class is divided into three groups, A, B, and C. Group A will teach in the Fall quarter of the Second Year; Group B in the Winter quarter, and Group C in the Spring quarter. Education 111 and 112 for each group come in the two quarters immediately preceding the teaching, which causes a shifting of the other subjects. ^Music 111, 112, and 213, Physical Education 101, 102, 103, and 215, Drawing 111, 112, and 113, Industrial Arts 111, 112, and 113, and Writing 101, one hour's credit each quarter; Mathematics 111, 112, and 113, Physical Education 214, Reading 211, and English 116, two hours' credit each quarter. ^Students who teach in the First Grade will take Kindergarten. Teaching, the others will take English Literature 234, 235 or 236, or American Literature 131, 132 or 133. It is desirable that students choosing Kindergarten and First Grade teaching should have some musical ability. Those students who elect teaching in the Rural Schools substitute a course taken with their supervisor for Education 213, and additional teaching for the other course that accompanies teaching.

Schedule periods Credit hours

''A certificate of proficiency, or a satisfactory standard in writing is required of all students entering Courses I and IT. Those who cannot furnish this certificate must take writing 101 until excused. Writing 102 is a method class required of all students

in Courses I

and

II.


Course of Study

— 1927

35

COURSE I— Continued THIED YEAR ^_,,

Fall

.

^Education 341, 345, 442 Individual Differences; History of Education; Curriculum in Elementary School English Science

8 3 3

^Electiyes

^Physical Education 341, 342, 343

Advanced Practice

Schedule periods Credit hours

Winter Spring 3

3

3 3

6

3 3 6

3

3

6 3

18 16

18 16

18 16

FOURTH YEAR Fall

Education 443, 441, 445 Curriculum in Elementary School; Philosophy of Education; Elementary School Supervision and Administration 3 History and Social Science 3 ^Electives or Teaching 9 ^Physical Education 2 Schedule periods Credit hours

17 16

Winter Spring

2

3 3 9 2

17 16

17 16

3 3 9

^In order to balance the work of the Education Department, all three of these courses are offered every quarter, and the class is so divided that a student gets one each quarter. be chosen in the various departments from those courses which are open to Third and Fourth-year students. The elective teaching is subject to the approval of the Director of Teacher Training and is adjusted to fit the case. Usually^ the minimum requirement is three hours, and the maximum fifteen. ^Physical Education 341, 342, and 343, one hour's credit each quarter. Fourth-year students may take any Physical Education numbered above 400.

^o


——————— — — —

.

.

Course of Study

36

...

— 1927

COURSE II Leading to Teaching in the Upper Elementary Grades FIRST YEAE Education 101 Educational Psychology ... Education 121 Principles of Teaching Education 122 Principles of Teaching '... English 101, 102, 103 Eeading 121 History 122, 123 American History for Grammar Grade Teachers History 121 History of Virginia Geography 121, 122 Geography for Grammar Grade Teachers ^Mathematics 121, 122, 123 Arithmetic for Grammar Grade Teachers ^'Music 121 ^Drawing or Industrial Arts 121, 122, 123 ^Writing 101, 102 Physical Education 106 Health Education ^Physical Education 101, 102, 103 .

ABC 333 ABC

.

3

3

3

3

.

3

3

3 3

.

3

.

3

3

.

Spring

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

.

3

3

2 2

2

2 3

2

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

.

2

.

2

2

2

2

..

2 2

..

1

..

2

3

3

3

3

3

3

.

21 20 20 15 16 16

Education 202 Psychology of Learning Education 121 Principles of Teaching' Education 122 Principles of Teaching Education 223 Principles of Teaching .... 3 'Education 200— Teaching 9 English 227, 228 Juvenile Literature, English for Grammar Grades ''Reading 222 History 121 History of Virginia Government 201 Sociology 201, 202 Geography 123 Geography for GrammarGrade Teachers =Music 222, 223 "Writing 102 Physical Education 106 Health Education ^'Physical Education 224, 225

20 21 20 16 15 16

21 20 21 17 16 15

ABC

ABC

Winter

SECOND YEAR A iFall B

3

.

ABO 3

3

.

Schedule periods Credit hours

Winter

iFall

Spring

3

..

3

3 .

.

.

.

.. .

.

.

3

3

..

3

3

..

9

..

3

..

3

3

..

..

3

3 o O

..

3

..

..

3

3

3

3

3 3

3

3 2

2

..

2

..

..

1

3 3

.. ..

2 1

3

.

3

3 9 3 3 .

.

3 3

3

..

2

2

..

..

3

3

3

3

Schedule periods Credit hours

20 20 15 15 18 17 17 15 21 15 15 17 16 16 15 15 16 15 ^The class is divided into three groups, A, B, and C. Group A will teach in the Pall quarter of the Second Year; Group B in the Winter quarter, and Group C in the Spring quarter. Education 121 and 122 for each group come in the two quarters immediately preceding the teaching, which causes a shifting of the other subjects. ^Music 121, 222, and 223, Physical Education 101, 102, 103, and 225, Drawing 121, 122, and 123, Industrial Arts 121, 122, 123, and Writing 101, one hour's credit each quarter; Mathematics 121, 122, and 123. Physical Education 224, and Reading 222, two hours' credit each quarter. 'Those students who elect teaching in the Rural Schools substitute a course taken with their supervisor for Education 223, and additional teaching for Education 202. *A certificate of proficiency, or a satisfactory standard in writing is required of all Those who cannot furnish this certificate must students entering Courses I and II. take Writing 101 until excused. Writing 102 is a method class required of all students in Courses I and II.


Course of Study

— 1927

37

COURSE II— Continued THIED YEAR Fall

Winter Spring

^Education 341, 345, 442 Individual Differences ; History of Education; Curriculum in Elementary School English Science

3 3 3

3 3 3

3 3

^Electives

6

6

6

18 16

18 16

18 16

^Physical Education 341, 342, 343

Advanced Practice ...

Schedule periods Credit hours

.

3

333

FOURTH YEAR Fall

Education 443, 441, 445 Curriculum in Elementary School; Philosophy of Education; Elementary School Supervision and Administration 3 History and Social Science 3 ^'Eleetives or Teaching 9 Physical Education 2 Schedule periods Credit hours

17 16

"Winter Spring

3 9 2

3

3 3 9 2

17 16

17 16

^In order to balance the work of the Education Department, all three of these courses are offered every quarter, and the class is so divided that a student gets one each quarter. ^To be chosen in the various departments from those courses which are open to Third and Fourth-year students. The elective teaching is subject to the approval of the Director of Teacher Training and ia adjusted to fit the case. Usually the minimum requirement is three hours, and the maximum fifteen. ^Physical Education 341, 342, and 343, one hour's credit each quarter. Fourth-year students may take any Physical Education numbered above 400.


—————— ——

COURSE III Leading to Teaching in High Schools FIRST YEAR

p^n "Winter Spring

Biology 131, 132, 133 or Chemistry 131, 132, 133 English 101, 102, 103 Composition, Literature ^Major ^Miiior ^Elective

^Physical Education 101, 102, 103

3 3

Schedxile periods Credit hours

SECOND YEAR

3 3

3

3

3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3

3

3

18 16

18 16

18 16

Pall

^Education 231, 232, 233 Educational Psyclwlogy; Psychology of Learning ; Secondary Education English 205 and two other courses in English

3 3

Winter Spring

^Major ^Miuor

3 3 3 3

3

3

^Elective

3

3

3

^Physical Education 224, 225, '236

3

3

3

18 17

18 16

18 16

Schedule periods Credit hours

THIRD YEAR {Education 341 Education

345^

Individual Differences -History of Education

Fall

^Elective

Schedule periods Credit hours

FOURTH YEAR 'Education 400 Teaching Education 444 Education Administration Education 435, 441 Secondary Ed.; Philosophy of Ed.

Schedule periods Credit hours

3

3 3 3

Winter Spring

3

3

6 3

9

3 3 6

3

3

3

18 16

18 16

18 16

.

Physical Education 106 Health Education "Physical Education 341, 342, 343

_

3

]

Government 333 Education 334 Secondary Education ^Major

"Major or Elective ''Physical Education

3

Pall

.

Winter Spring

1 3 6

5 1 3 6

2

2

9 2

17 16

17 16

17 16

5 .

.

5 1

iThe Majors, Minors, and Electives may be chosen from the courses offered by the various departments. The si 'dent is free to choose any Major for which she has the prerequisites. The Minor i., subject to the approval of the head of the department in which the student is doing her Major work. Electives must be so selected that a student not taking History and Social Sciences as a Major will get eighteen hours of these subjects during her four years. In addition to meeting this requirement, students who expect to do their graduate work at the UniverBity of Virginia should be sure of having one year of college mathematics and two years of a modern language. The prerequisites to Majors and Minors in the departments having prerequisites, are listed in these departments. Electives in the Third and Fourth Years must be chosen from courses numbered above 300, except in special cases approved by the Committee on Advanced Credits. The credit received in such cases is reduced unless additional work is done. ''In order to balance the v/ork of the Departments, all three of these courses are offered every quarter, and the class is so divided that a student gets one each quarter. "Physical Education 101, 102, 103, 225, 236, 341, 342, and 343, one hour's credit each quarter; Physical E'ducation 224 two hours' credit. Fourth-year students may take any Physical Education numbered above 400. *Th6 Major must not be required more that two quarters in the Fourth Year. Those students who elect teaching in the Rural Schools do all of their teaching in one quarter and take the necessary additional elective work the other twc quarters.


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION BIOLOGY MR. JEFFERS, MRS.

BOWMAN, AND ASSISTANTS

The work of this department is planned to prepare teachers of biology for the high schools of the State. The work of the first year aims to give a good foundation for Psychology and Health Education.

A

major in this department requires the following courses First Year, Biology 131, 132, and 133; Second Year, Biology 231, 232, and 233 Third Year, Biology 331, 341, and 342. ;

131. General Biology. Three periods a week, two one double. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. This course deals with the fundamental principles of biology. A study is made of the relation of plants and animals to their environment. Lectures, recitations, laboratory work, field work. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

Biology

single,

Laboratory Fee:

One

dollar.

Human

Biology. Three periods a week, two Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. single, one double. study of the structure and function of the various systems of the human body the special sense organs the endocrine glands and the influence of vitamines upon the body. Lectures, recitations, laboratory work. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

Biology 132.

A

;

;

Laboratory Fee:

One

dollar.

General Botany. Three periods a week, two single, one double. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the structure, development, and reproduction of the seed plants. Some time devoted to classifying plants. Lectures, recitations, laboratory work, field work. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

Biology 133.

Laboratory Fee

:

One

dollar.

Advanced Botany. Three periods a week, two one double. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the physiology and ecology of the seed plants. The morphology, development, and reproduction of the spore plants. LeeBiology 231.

single,


Depaktments of Instruction

40

tures,

recitations,

laboratory work,

field

work.

Elective

in

Second and Third Years.

Laboratory Fee Biology 232.

:

One

dollar.

General Zoology.

Three periods a week, two

single, one double. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. The morphology, physiology, development, and ecology of the principal type forms of animals. Lectures, recitations, laboratory work. Elective in Second and Third Years.

Laboratory Fee

:

One

dollar.

Biology 233. Entomology. Three periods a week, one single, two double. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The structure, life histories, and habits of insects. Methods of collecting, rearing, and preserving insects. Lectures, recitations, laboratory work, field work. Elective in Second and Third Years.

Laboratory Fee

:

One

dollar.

Methods in Biology. Three periods a week, two Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the methods to be used in teaching biology as applied to the recitation, laboratory, and field work. Methods of rearing, collecting, preserving, and mounting material for class use. Each student is required to make some mounts, charts, etc., for use in teaching. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Biology 331.

single,

one double.

Prerequisites

:

Six of the eight courses offered in biology, or

their equivalent.

Laboratory Fee

:

One

dollar.

Biology 341. Economic Biology. Three periods a week, two Credit, three hours. A study single, one double. Fall quarter. of the plants, insects, and animals of economic importance to man. A study and identification of grasses, weeds, and trees. The methods of protecting the beneficial and destroying the inLectures, recitations, laboratory jurious plants and animals. work, field work. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Prerequisites: Biology 231, 232, 233, or the equivalent.

Laboratory Fee

:

One

dollar.

Biology 342. Biological Problems. Three periods a week, two single, one double. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours.


Biology

41

A study of the origin of life. A study of variation, heredity, homology, and genetics. The methods of plant propagation, and plant and animal breeding. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Laboratory Fee

:

One

dollar.

Biology 351, 352, 353. General Science. Three periods a week for three quarters; two single, one double. Credit, three hours each quarter. Intended for those students who plan to teach General Science in the High Schools of the State. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Prerequisite At :

least

one year of Biology and one of Chemis-

try or Physics in college.

Laboratory Fee: One dollar each quarter. Biology 460. Seminar in Biology.

An

advanced course. Stusubscribe to some magazine

dents electing it are expected to such as the Quarterly Review of Biology, as well as do special reading and research. Open only to a few qualified juniors and seniors, subject to the approval of the instructor. Credits to be arranged.


Departments op Instruction

42

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS MR. MCCORKLE

Students choosing this department as the field of their major work, should take Chemistry 131, 132, 133, 231, 232, 233, 344, 345, and 346 those choosing it as a minor, should take Chemistry ;

131, 132, and 133, and either 231, 232, and 233, or 441, 442, and 443. Chemistry 347 may be taken by either group in the place of Chemistry 233.

In addition to the above a student choosing a major or a minor this department must take Chemistry 331 in the Winter quarter of her Third Year. A fee of $5.00 per quarter is charged all students taking Chemistry or Physics except those taking Chemistry 331 who pay $2.00, and those taking high school Chemistry, who pay

from

$1.00.

Four General Chemistry. 131, 132, and 133. periods a week, for three quarters, two single and two double each quarter. Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, four Chemistry

hours each quarter. A course intended for beginners in College Chemistry, including the history, preparation, properties, and uses of the more important elements with their compounds, and the theories underlying their reactions. The laboratory work of Chemistry 133 is a study of the metals from the viewpoint of qualitative analysis. Elective in First Year or Second Year of Course III.

Chemistry 231 and 232. Quantitative Analysis. Four double Fall and Winter quarters. periods a week for two quarters. Credit, four hours each quarter. The instruction is given wholly in the laboratorj^ where the student performs analysis illustrating typical methods of gravimetric and volumetric work. Elective in Second Year of Course III. Offered 1928-29. Prerequisite:

Chemistry 133 or 443.

233. Qualitative Analysis. Four double periods a week. Spring quarter. Credit, four hours. The work will consist of a study of the theory of solution and equilibrium from the vievq^oint of chemical analysis, and the analysis of unknown materials. Elective in Second, Third, or Fourth Year of Course

Chemistry

III.

Offered 1927-28.

Prerequisite

:

232.


Chemistry and Physics

43

Chemistry 331. The Teaching of High School Chemistry. Two single and one double periods a week. Winter quarter. This course includes a study of the aims, Credit, three hours. purposes, and methods in the teaching of secondary chemistry, together with the problems of laboratory management, and library reference work. Required in the Third Year of all students choosing a major or a minor in this department.

Prerequisite

:

Chemistry 133,

Chemistry 341, 342, and 343, General Chemistry. Four periods a week for three quarters, two single and two double each quarter. Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, four hours each quarter. This course covers the same general topics as covered in Chemistry 131, 132, and 133, but adapted to advanced students. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Chemistry 344, 345, and 346. Organic Chemistry. Two and two double periods a week for three quarters. Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, four hours each quarter. The class work aims to give a thorough elementary knowledge of the more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The laboratory work gives practice in the preparation of typical compounds of these series with a study of the characteristics of these compounds. Open to Second, Third, or Fourth Year students. single

Offered 1927-28.

Prerequisite:

Chemistry 133 or 343.

Chemistry 347. Household Chemistry. Two single and two Spring quarter. Credit, four hours. double periods a week. This course is arranged to meet the needs of students in Home Economics. study is made of the general chemistry of the home, foods, and such problems in modern industrial chemistry The laboratory work consists as relate to everyday home life. of the inspection, testing, and analysis of some of the more simple household supplies. Open to Second, Third or Fourth Year

A

students.

Prerequisite

:

Chemistry 133.

Physics 441, 442, and 443. General Experimental Physics. Four periods a week, two single and two double. Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, four hours each quarter. Mechanics, molecular physics, heat, magnetism, electricity, sound, and light. Class work illustrated by experiments. Individual laboratory work. Open to Second, Third, and Fourth Year students.


Departments op Instruction

44

DRAWING MISS COULLING

The purpose of the work in this department is to develop an appreciation of the beautiful, train the powers of observation, secure some degree of skill and originality in expression, and train those who have special aptitude for the subject to be teachers of drawing.

Drawing

and 113. Two hours a week for three hour quarters. each quarter. Fall quarter (Drawing 111) Lettering and poster making. Color theory and applications. Principles of design. Construction in paper and cardboard, clay, weaving. Winter quarter (Drawing 112) Object drawing and perspective principles. Bird, animal, and figure drawing; illustration, puppet show, sand table project. Spring quarter (Drawing 113) Landscape composition. Picture study. Plant and flower drawing. Methods of teaching drawing in primary grades and correlation with other subjects. First Year of Course I. Students may enter course at the beginning of any quarter.

111, 112, Credit, one

Fee

:

One

dollar a quarter.

121, 122, and 123. Two hours a week for three quarCredit, one hour each quarter. Fall quarter (Drawing

Drawing ters.

—Lettering and poster making.

Color theory and applicaPrinciples of balance, rhythm, dominance, and suborditions. nation applied in simple designs and all projects of the course. Linoleum block and stencil made and applied. Winter quarter (Drawdng 122) Principles of curvilinear and rectilinear perspective, drawing of objects singly and in groups, decorative treatment. Sand table projects and their relation to other subClay jects. Pose drawing. Spring quarter (Drawing 123) molding of bowl, vase, candlestick, tile. Principles of landscape composition. Nature drawing and development of dePicture study. sign units applied to decoration of objects. Methods of teaching drawing in the grammar grades and correlation with other subjects. First year of Course II. Students may enter course at the beginning of any quarter. 121)

Fee

:

One

Drawing and one

dollar a quarter.

131, 132, and 133. Three periods a week, two double Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, three

single.


Drawing

45

Lettering, hours each quarter. Fall quarter (Drawing 131) monogram, poster making. Color theory and application. Principles of design applied to definite projects, designing with C and S curves. Making of block print and stencil. Winter quarter

(Drawing 132)

— Theory of curvilinear

rectilinear perin line, charcoal, color

spective applied in object drawings light and shade, decorative treatments.

ing 133)

water

—Landscape

colors.

and

Spring quarter (Draw-

composition worked out in charcoal, ink,

Craft projects.

Drawing 131 and 132 are required of those who major or minor in Home Economics. All three courses are electives for First or Second Year students in Course III, and students may enter at the beginning of any quarter. These courses are also open to Third and Fourth Year students who take three double periods. Each course may be taken as a separate unit.

Fee

:

To cover

all

expenses.

Drawing 341. Three double periods a week for one quarter. Credit, three hours. Offered every quarter. Drawing in charcoal from cast. Clay modeling. Course elective in Third and Fourth years for advanced students. Prerequisite: Drawing 131, 132, and 133.

Fee

:

One

dollar.

Drawing

441, 442, and 443. Art Appreciation. Three periods week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Winter quarter Fall quarter (Drawing 441) Architecture. (Drawing 442) Sculpture. Spring quarter (Drawing 443) Picture Study. Elective for Third and Fourth Year students of any course. Students may enter at the beginning of any quarter. Each student buys a textbook and pictures.

a


Departments of

46

iNSTRucTioisr

EDUCATION MR.

WYNNE, MR.

BELL, MR. COYNER, MR. BOWMAN, MISS JONES, MISS BULLOCK, MISS CARTER, MISS HAYNES, MISS MIX

The supervisors of

the Training School and the supervisors of the three rtcral schools are also members of the Depart-

ment

of Education.

The Scope of the Department. In addition, to the instructors in education in the college, the faculty of the department of education includes the supervisors of the local training school and the supervisors of the three rural training schools. The local training school is not only an integral part of the college but is the center around which the courses in education have developed. The increasing enrollment of the college, and the demonstrated efficiency of student teaching under the direction of expert supervision, have led to an agreement between the college and the public school officials of Prince Edward and Cumberland counties whereby a large part of the teaching in the schools of John Randolph, Prospect, and Rice is done by students of State Teachers College, under the guidance of supervisors selected on the basis of successful experience and special training for this particular sort of work. Education Courses and Teaching. Preparation for teaching regarded as a gradual growth in the understanding and control of the various elements that enter into the learning and teaching processes. The basis for the understanding and con-

js

trol of these is the experience of the

young teacher

as a student. Consequently, the aim in general is the development of the teacher through having her live the life of a teacher as far as possible. The courses in education and the work in the training schools

proceed simultaneously in such a way as to enable the student to do better teaching in consequence of her classroom work in the college, and also to enable her to gain through her teaching a basis in experience for fuller appreciation of her professional and academic courses. In order to safeguard the interest of the pupils in the training schools and to prevent embarrassment and nervousness on the part of the beginning teachers, certain courses in education are so arranged that the student is gradually led into the work of full responsibility in teaching. In order to make the courses in education meet the requirements of the training schools and the various forms of public school service,


Education

47

and

specialized courses are offered in three fields kindergarten-primary grades, grammar grades, and high school. Courses in the history of education, educational administration, educational psychology and philosophy enable the student to gain a perspective not provided in the more specialized courses. differentiated

Courses in Rural Education.

The great demand

for teachers

definitely qualified for work in rural schools is recognized in the department of education. The three rural training schools and

adequate transportation facilities make it possible to give the same degree of experience in the participation in rural school work as is given in the local training school to students who expect to teach in the city. The courses in rural education and the courses in sociology in the Department of History and Social Sciences provide all the specialization needed by students who expect to become community leaders and teachers in village and

In the rural training schools the exists between the courses in rural education and relation same the teaching of the student that exists between the work in the local training school and the classroom work in the college. consolidated rural schools.

The increasing number of in Elementary Education. students of Courses I and II who return for a degree has made necessary the provision of a course to meet the needs of teachers who have a view to becoming leaders in the field of elementary education. Consequently, in the Department of Education are now arranged courses that are particularly adapted to the demands of teachers, supervisors, and principals in the elementarj^ schools. Also provision is made for specialization in rural education for those who expect to enter this field.

Major

The courses

offered in the

Department are as follows

Education 101. Educational Psychology. Three hours a Credit, three hours. Offered every quarter. week. General survey of the field of psychology as applied to education with special reference to teaching in the elementary school. The nature and development of human traits are considered at various levels, including observation, memory, reasoning, and feeling. Some attention is given also to the questions of personality, individual differences, and the measurement of intelligence. Required in first year of Courses I and II. 111, 112, and 213. Early Childhood Education. Three hours a week. Oft'ered every quarter. Credit, three hours each quarter. This course defines and develops the principles

Education


; :

Departments of Instruction

48

of education

from the point of view of curriculum, method, and

management. Curriculum.

In the

quarter the objectives, materials, study and the activities of children of the kindergarten and primary grades are analyzed into their essential factors. Then the principles of practical guidance are formulated with reference to each such necessary

and organization of the

first

state course of

factor involved.

Apprentice. In the second quarter the principles of education are considered in the light of (1) general observation in the kindergarten and all of the primary grades and (2) specific observation of the work of the group which the student expects to teach. Demonstration lessons are provided in the respective grades to be observed and analyzed into their essential factors principles that have been defined are applied to such necessary factors involved in teaching situations; special study is given by the student to the organization of units of work, problems of control, and questions of routine in the particular grade in which she is to teach responsibility for certain phases of instruction of increasing difficulty are assigned as preliminary to full teaching during the next term. ;

Method and Management.

In the third quarter which accompanies the practice teaching, the principles of education and the laws of learning are applied to the actual teaching in which the student is then employed. Teaching situations taken from "the student's own practical work are analyzed (1) from the point of view of method and (2) from the point of view of management, and the principles of method are formulated and applied with reference to each of the practical conceptions of the factors of instruction. Required of all Course I students.

Education week.

115.

The Psychology of Beading.

Offered every quarter.

Credit, three hours.

Three hours a

Main

topics

mastery of mechanical difficulties, cultivation of reading taste, development of power to get thought, materials, and methods of procedure in the several stages of reading, practical means of testing reading ability with reference to standards, diagnosis, and remedial work. The psychology and methods of teaching the related subjects of oral and written composition and spelling are all considered in connection with the teaching of units of reading. Required in first year of Course I.


Education

49

and 223. Principles of Teaching. Three Offered every quarter. Credit three hours each quarter. The development and evaluation of principles of teaching- in the light of both theory and practice. study of instruction in the elementary grades of the training school and available records of other instruction. The work of the first quarter consists in the development of plans of procedure for analyzing instruction into its essential factors from the point of view of (1) the course of study; (2) method; (3) management, and the formulation of tentative principles governing each such factor distinguished. In the second quarter a more intensive study and application is made of the principles formulated during the first quarter from the point of view of the practical factors of the curriculum, and the organization of units of work that the student may employ in her teaching during the next term. The work of the third qitarter consists primarily in a more intensive study and application of principles formulated during the first quarter from the point of view of the practical factors involved in method and management, in such a way as to enable the student to evaluate and improve the teaching in which she is then engaged. Required of all Course II Education

121, 122,

hours a week.

A

students.

Nine hours. A group in Fall quarter, B group in Winter quarter, and C group in Spring quarter. Credit, nine hours. Teaching under supervision in the training school or in one of the rural schools. Open to students of Courses I and II who meet the academic requirements for admission to teaching, and required for the diploma.

Education

200.

Directed Teaching.

Education 202. Psychology of Learning. Three hours a week. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours. Certain problems of learning with special reference to pupils in the elementary grades are given a more intensive study. The different phases or types of learning are reviewed; the problems of transference of training and the physical and psychological conditions of learning are considered the principles and laws and of learning that have general application are developed the measurements of ability and accomplishment in the elemenRequired in tary school subjects are given some attention. II. second year of Courses I and ;

;

Education

Kindergarten Teaching. Credit, three hours. Offered every quarter. Required of all Second Year students 211.


Departments of Instruction

50

wtio teach in the first grade. Teaching experience is given with children of the pre-school age, from four to six years. Education 215. The Pre-School Child. Three hours a week. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Eelation of society to childhood; prenatal life of child; nutritional and physical care in early childhood. Psychology of early childhood; consideration of the origin and development of human traits physical and mental habits of the young child methods of preventing nervous strain in children. This course is especially adapted to the needs of students who will conduct parents' meetings in connection with the kindergarten and lower grades. ;

;

Education

231. Three hours a Educational Psychology. Pall quarter. Credit, three hours. Subject matter and methods of psychology; the physiological, physical, and social factors involved in experiencing; the nature and development of human traits; special application of facts and principles to the activities of pupils of high-school age. Required in second year of Course III.

week.

Education 232. Psychology of Learning. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Analysis of the learning process in different fields; comparative results of different methods of learning; effects of conditioning factors on accomplishments; transference of training; general laws of learning; special application of principles in the field of secondary education. Required in second year of Course III. Education

and

435. Secondary Education. Three hours a week. Spring quarter of Second and Third years, and Credit, three hours each quarFall quarter of Fourth year. This course involves a study of the general field of secondter. ary education with special reference to method, curriculum, organization, and management. The first quarter falls into four logical stages: (1) a general survey of the problems and practices in secondary education; (2) development of principles of 233, 334,

education of general application with special reference to secondary schools; (3) formulation of plans of procedure in the studj^ of method, the course of study, organization, and management; and (4) study of some special problems through observation in the training school and examination of the practices in Virginia. In the second quarter a more intensive study will be made of the applications of the principles of method and curriculum making as embodied in the practice of the training schools. From the point of view of method each student will consider the


;

Education

51

principles that have been developed in the light of direct observation in the departments of her special interests. From the point of view of the state course of study and the work in the training schools she will organize units of work that she may employ in her practice teaching. In the third quarter the principles of method are given intensive study with reference to practical teaching in which students are then engaged. Each student will be directed in the evaluation and improvement of her teaching in the light of the principles that have been gradually developed during the whole course. Required of all Course III students.

Education

341.

Psychology of Individual Differences.

Three

hours a week. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the variations in human traits and abilities, and their causes race, family, sex, age, and experience brief survey of the tests used in accurate measurement of individual differences the significance of individual differences in teaching and supervision, and in society in general. Required of all Third Year ;

:

students.

Education

342. Applied Psychology^ Three hours a week. study of the develop"Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. ments of modern psychology. Special attention given to the applications of psychology in the professions, in vocational guidance, and in abnormal behavior. Students are given consider-

A

able freedom in the choice of material for study. and Fourth Year students.

Open

to

Third

Education

Three hours a 343. Educational Measurements. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. A course in the

week. construction of

tests, and the use of tests in classifying pupils, diagnosis, teaching, measuring efficiency, and vocational guidOpen ance. Statistical and graphical methods are developed. to Third and Fourth Year students.

Education

345. History of Ed^ication. Three hours a week. general survey Offered every quarter. Credit three hours. of the whole field of the history of education, both ancient and modern, with special reference to changing conceptions of method, curriculum, and administration in response to social demands. Required of all Third Year students.

A

Education 351, 352, and 353. History of Philosophy. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quar-


;

Departments of Instruction

52

Not given in 1927-28.

Fall quarter Greek Philosophy, with a special study of Plato's Republic. Winter quarter: Hellenistic, Medieval, Renaissance Philosophy, from Bruno to Descartes. Spring quarter Modern Philosophy, from Descartes, and after Hegel, Bradley, Bosanquet, and recent thought represented by Russell, James, and Dewey. Open any quarter to Third and Fourth year students. ter.

:

:

Education 400. Directed Teaching. Four hours a week. Three quarters. Credit four hours each quarter. Teaching under supervision in the Training School or one of the rural schools. In so far as practical the student should teach two quarters in her major field and one quarter in some other field. Open to Fourth Year students of Course III who make the academic requirements, and required for the degree.

Education

441. Three hours a Philosophy of Education. Credit, three hours. Winter quarter. Critical examination of those ideals and conceptions that serve as the theoretical foundation of our social institutions, and the formulation of principles for the guidance of educational practice in the field of method, curriculum, and administration. Required of all Fourth Year students.

week.

Education 442 and School. quarters.

The Curriculum of the Elementary Three hours a week for two quarters. Fall and Winter 443.

A

study of the obCredit, three hours a quarter. materials, and methods of the elementary schools of Virginia and other states; the objectives, materials, and methods that best satisfy scientific evidence and practical experience and the modification required in our present procedure. Open to all Fourth Year students. Required of those choosing Eljectives,

ementary Education as a major.

One period Educational Administration. a week. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours. The study of high-school management on the basis of practical teaching experience, a consideration of high-school organization with special reference to Virginia, a more general examination Education

444.

and practices of state, county, and city school administration, and federal participation in public education. Required of all Fourth Year students of Course III. of the principles

Education ministration.

Elementary School Supervision and AdThree hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit,

445.


Education

53

A

three hours. general survey of supervision in theory and practice with special reference to the elementary school. Problems involving administration, curriculum, and method are considered with reference to supervision. Principles of procedure are developed and the practice in the training school and the elementary school system of Virginia are studied in the light of these principles. Required of Fourth Year students majoring in elementary education and open to Fourth Year students of

Course

III.

Education

446. Elementary School Supervision. Three Fall, Winter or Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Practical work in the training school. Elective for seniors majoring in elementary education.

hours a week.

Education 447. Administration and Supervision of Rural Schools. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. general survey of the field of administration and supervision with special reference to rural education. An intensive study of practices and needs of rural education in Virginia and neighboring states. Required of all Fourth Year students who are preparing for work in rural education.

A

Education 448. Rural School Supervision. Three hours a week. Fall, Winter, Spring quarters. Credit, three hours. Practical supervision in rural training schools associated with the college. Open to Fourth Year students preparing for positions in rural school work. Philosophic Conceptions of Modern Science. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Given in 1927-28. critical examination of the underlying theories of modern science and philosophy and a consideration of the different implications involved for social, political, and educational institutions. Open to Third and Fourth year students.

Education

454.

A

Education

455. Ethics. Three hours a M^eek. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Given in 1927-28. The leading theories of moral conduct and their application to social situations with a view to determining one's own standard of morality. The course includes a study of Mill's Utilitarianism, Kant's Metaphysics of Morals, Spencer's Data of Ethics, and Emerson's Essays on Compensation and Self -Reliance. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.


Depaetments op Instruction

54

Education

456. Esthetics. Three hours a week. Spring quarCredit, three hours. Given in 1927-28. (1) The character of primitive art; (2) the standards of beauty in their evaluation of the fine arts, architecture, sculpture, painting, music, the drama, and of the minor arts, such as dress and interior decoration; (3) the relation of art to ethics and religion; and (4) the work of the teacher in aesthetic training. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. ter.


:

:

English

55

ENGLISH MB. GRAINGEK, MISS HINER, MISS DAVIS, MISS SUTHERLIN, DR.

MARSHALL, MISS LEWIS, MISS W. LONDON, MISS BARNES

The work

of the English department includes courses in comThose in composition aim to give the position and literature. needed practical training in the correct and effective use of the everyday forms of oral and written discourse, especiallj^ with reference to the needs of teachers. The courses in literature aim to increase the student's knowledge, appreciation, and enjoyment of good reading for the worthy use of leisure and as an influence in the growth of character. Further improvement of each student's equipment for teaching is accomplished by acquainting her with the best literature for children, and by courses in methods of teaching English in its various branches in the grades and high schools. The attempt is made constantly to suit the work to the actual needs and working possibilities of the student, The English deas well as her prospective needs in teaching. partment seeks the active co-operation of all teachers in the college in making its work effective.

For graduation the following courses

I—English

in English are required

and 116. Course II— English 101, 102, 103, 227, and 228. Course III— English 101, 102, 103, and 205, and two other courses chosen from those offered in the First or Second Year. A minor in English, in Course III, requires English 101, 102, 103 and 205 and the following First Year—English 131, 132 and 133. Second Year— English 234, 235 and 236. Third Year—English 331 and 332. (Taken as electives). A major in English, in Course III, requires all of the courses required for a minor (see above), and four others chosen from those open to Third and Fourth Year students. Course

101, 102, 103, 205,

A

degree of B.S., in Education, taken after completing Course I or II, requires one year of additional v^^ork in English, chosen from courses open to Third and Fourth Year students.

English 101. Composition A. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Practical work to enable the students to talk and write effectively, in the forms most needed by


Departments of Instruction

56

Five hours of the time scheduled for this class are teachers. given to a study of the use of the library. Required in all courses.

English

102. Composition B. Three hours a week. Winter Credit, three hours. continuation of English 101. writing, with Emphasis on review of English grammar for corrective and teaching purposes. Required in all courses.

A

quarter.

English

103. Literature. Three hours a week. Spring quarCredit, three hours. course, introduced by Smith 's What Literature Do Me, consisting of general reading in such Can for literature as every teacher should know, with intensive study of selected masterpieces, and the planning of individual courses for future reading. Supplementary work in composition as needed. Required in all courses.

A

ter.

English

Practice in English. Three hours a week for course one quarter. Fall and Spring quarters. No credit. providing intensive drill and practice in oral and written composition suited to the particular needs and interests of the students. Offered for students in any course who need this extra 104.

A

training.

English

205.

Advanced Composition.

Three hours a week

for one quarter. Credit, three hours. Offered every quarter. Training in the kinds of writing and speaking which teachers need as leaders in school and community life. Required in Second Year of Courses I and III.

Prerequisite:

English 102.

Child Literature. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered every quarter. Credit, two hours. A survey of literature for children. Analysis and selection of types of literature suitable for children in kindergarten and primary grades. Special emphasis on choice and presentation of poetry. Methods and practice in story-telling. Adaptation and dramatization of stories. Required in Course I. English 227. Juvenile Literature. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, three hours. A survey of literature suitable for youthful readers, including periodicals. Analysis and selection of literature with suggestions for leading young people to love books and profit by reading them. Required in Second Year of Course II.

English

116.


English

57

English 228. English in the Grammar Grades. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours. Advanced work in oral and written exposition, based on the study of the principles underlying the teaching of grammar and language work, and their applications in the grammar grades. Required in Second Year of Course II. English 131, 132 and 133. American Literature. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. A survey with wide readings to trace the development of American ideals. Fall quarter (English 131), Southern literature; Winter quarter (English 132), a survey of American literature; Spring quarter (English 133), contemporary literature. Open to First Year students.

English 234, 235 and 236. English Literature. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. study and survey of British national ideals in literature as bearing on modern life, especially among English-speaking peoples. Fall quarter (English 234), the Romantic Period; Winter quarter (English 235), the Victorian Era and more recent literature; Spring quarter (English 236), a chronological survey of the main periods, chief aspects, and great writers. Open to Second

A

Year students.

The Teaching of Literature in the High School. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Advanced work in oral and written exposition based on

English

331.

the study of the principles underlying the teaching of literature and their applications in the high school. Required in Third Year of Course III, for those who take English as a major or as a minor.

English 332. The Teaching of Composition in the High School. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Advanced work in oral and written discussion based on the study of the principles underlying the teaching of composition and grammar in the high school. Required in Third Year of Course III, for those who take English as a major or a minor. English 441, 442 and 443. The English Language. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. A course in the development of the English language. Fall quarter (English 441), a survey of the development of Modern English; Winter quarter (English 442), a study of Chaucer and


Depaetments op Instruction

58

the Middle English period; Spring quarter (English 443), an in-

troduction to Old English language and literature.

Open

to

Third and Fourth Year students.

English 344 and 345. Literary Types. Three hours a week Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three for two quarters. hours each quarter. Each student selects one of the principal types of literature for wide reading and intensive study, and conducts the work of the class in a brief study of it. Winter quarter (English 344), the typical forms of poetry; Spring quarter (English 345), the principal prose types of literature.

Open

to

Third and Fourth Year students.

English 347 and 348. Shakespeare. Three hours a week for two quarters. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Ten plays selected for study, with rapid reading of other significant plays, and of the life of Shakespeare, and standard criticism of his works. Winter quarter (English 347), tragedies; Spring quarter (English 348), comedies. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. English 351 and 352. Story Writing. Three hours a week Credit, three for two quarters. Winter and Spring quarters. hours each quarter. Practice in construction and writing of stories, especially of the type suitable for children and j^oung folks. Winter quarter (English 351), children's stories; Spring quarter (English 352), short stories. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. English

Three hours a week. Spring Study and application of the quarter. Credit, three hours. principles of effective public speaking, with discussions of the conduct of this type of activity in the high school. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. 354.

Public Speaking.

English

356. Journalism. Three hours a week. Fall quarCredit, three hours. Practice in writing for school and The study of representative national and other publications. local papers; the workings of the daily and periodical press, its aims, standards, functions, and limitations in relation to the pviblic mind in modern life. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

ter.

The Novel. Three hours a week. 341, 342 and 343. for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Fall quar-

English


English

59

ter (English 341), a study of one novel each by Dickens, Thackeray, and George Eliot reading and discussion of others ; a rapid ;

Winter quarter (EngSpring quarter (English 343), a rapid survey of the history of the American novel with a study of one novel of each type particular emphasis on the recent and contemporary American novels and a study of new tendencies. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. outline of the history of English fiction.

lish 342), recent

English

fiction.

;

444. Modern Essays. Three hours a week. AVinter quarter. Credit, three hours. Reading and discussion of numerous contemporary and classic essays. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

English

English 445. Essay Writing. Three hours a week. Spring Instruction and practice in adquarter. Credit, three hours. vanced composition. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. English 447 and 448. Biblical Literature. Three hours a week for two quarters. Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. The reading, from Moulton's Modern Readbooks as literary wholes, the interpretation of their central meanings, and their application in life. Study of the principal literary types as represented in the Bible, and the general characteristics of Hebrew poetry and prose. Fall quarter (English 447), Old Testament; Winter quarter (English 448), New Testament. Open to Third and Fourth er's Bible, of selected

Year

students.

English 451. Poetics. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered Winter or Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. study of the forms of poetry in English, and the establishing of standards for judging it, and practice in verse writing. Open to students on recommendation of the English department.

A

452. Modern Poetry. Credit, three hours.

English

Three hours a week. Spring study of the chief contemporary English and American poets. Open to Third and Fourth quarter.

A

Year students.

English 455. Browning. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Reading and study of the principal poems


Depaetments of Instruction

60

and of the

life

of Browning.

Open

to

Third and Fourth Year

students.

English

458. Literary Criticism. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. study of the principles and methods of judging literary productions, applied in the reading of current literature. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

A


Geography

61

GEOGRAPHY MISS GRENELS, MISS WATERS, MISS BUGG

The aim of

this

department

is

three-fold

:

to train the student

to observe closely and accurately the world in which we live, to note the forces at work moulding its surface and fitting it to be the home of man, to reason accurately upon the phenomena presented by observation, and to express clearly and concisely the conclusions at which she may arrive to lead her to wider sympathies and broader views through the study of the races of mankind, their homes, industries, habits and general responses to physical environments; to prepare her to teach geography in the public schools. ;

Students choosing geography as a minor are required to complete eighteen hours of work in this department.

Geography 111, 112 and 113. Geography and Nature Study. Three hours a week for three quarters. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. A combination of nature study and geography, planned to provide the primary teacher with a rich background of knowledge which will enable her to present in an efficient way the topics included under community study as outlined in the Virginia State Course of Study. A part of each quarter devoted to study of nature material for different seasons. Emphasis on common animals, and flowers. The first part of the work in geography deals with fundamentals of geography, industries which supply us our food, clothing and shelter; our means of transportation and communication. The birds, insects, trees

second part deals with the life of other peoples of the earth such as the Eskimo, Indian, Arab, Chinese, Japanese, peoples of interior Africa, people of the Swiss mountains, the plain of Holland, the fiorded coast of Norway, the forests in the Amazon, and the steppes of Asia. Their manners, customs and modes of living contrasted with ours.

Each student required to plan the development of at least one unit of work. Methods of teaching demonstrated in primary grades of Training School. Required in First Year of Course I.

Geography

121, 122

and

123.

Geography for Grammar Grade

Teachers. Three hours a week for three quarters. Begins in the "Winter quarter of the First year. Credit, three hours each quarter. Subject matter selected and presented with the idea of


Departments op Instruction

62

giving the student a very definite background for the teaching of geography in the grammar grades. Work of the first quarter deals with the fundamentals of geography. Topics treated during the second and third quarters are practically the same as found listed in the State Elementary Course of Study. Methods used in presenting them are those which may be modified or adapted to suit the needs of children in the upper elementary grades. Texts of a college grade are required, though every effort is made to familiarize the student with the basal and supplementary texts and materials she will need to know when she begins active work as a teacher. Required in Course II.

Geography

Geography

of the Lands. Three hours a study of the earth 's week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. surface features, from the standpoint of their origin, the 131.

A

agencies which modify them, and their influence on man. tive in First and Second Years of Course III.

Geography

Elec-

Climates of the World. Three hours a week. study of the fundaCredit, three hours. mental principles underlying climate the chief types of climate, Man's response to each their characteristics and distribution. First Years of Course III. and Second type. Elective in 132.

A

Winter quarter.

;

Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the natural regions of North America. Emphasis placed on man's response to the geographic environment of each region. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

Geography

133.

Geography of North America.

231. Geography of South America. Three hours study of the Credit, three hours. a week. Fall quarter. natural regions of the continent. Emphasis placed on the present economic development of the countries and the possibilities for future development. Trade relations emphasized also. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

Geography

A

Geography 232. Geography of Europe. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the influence of geographic factors on the development of the European nations. Special emphasis placed on world powers. Current quesElective in First and tions concerning Europe also stressed. Second Years of Course III. 233. Geography of Asia and Afnca. Three hours study of the Spring quarter. Credit, three hours,

Geography a week.

A


\

Geography

63

independent countries of these continents Mdih emphasis on the natural resources of each, and on the possibility of future development. A study of the colonies and mandatories with the idea of determining the value of each to the mother country. Current questions stressed. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

Geography

341. Influences of Geography on American HisThree hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Geographic conditions leading to discovery of the United States, permanent settlements on the continent, expansion from Atlantic seaboard to Mississippi River, purchase of Louisiana Territory, expansion beyond the Rockies, the Civil War, and the development of the United States into a world power. This course is especially helpful to those who plan to teach American history in the high school. Open to Third and Fourth tory.

Year

students.

Geography

Geography of the Biile.

Three hours a week. Credit, three hours. A study of Palestine and neighboring districts. Present-day conditions compared with those of Bible times. Open to Third and Fourth Year 342. Fall quarter.

students.

Geography week for one

Three hours a 343. Geography of Virginia. quarter. Offered Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours. intensive study of the natural regions of Virginia, with the idea of determining the equipment for industry in each region. Virginia's possibilities for future development stressed. study of the five-five plan. Virginia compared with other states of the union. First Year of Course II. Elective in First and Second Years of Course IV.

An

A

Geography

441, 442

Fall, Winter,

and

443.

Geography of World Prob-

and Spring quarters.

Credit, three hours each quartei;, From current periodicals the class discovers the major problems confronting the leading nations of the world, selecting for intensive study those that appeal to them as the most vital and interesting. Each student is then given the privilege of selecting from the college texts and other library sources that material which seems to her most helpful in answering these questions To what extent are geographic conditions responsible for the existence of these problems? Will their solution be influenced by geography? Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

lems.

:


Departments op Instruction

64

HANDWRITING MISS CRADDOCK

—

in handwriting aims first, to make good writers, to prepare students for efficient teaching of handDirect, specific, tested methods of teaching, coupled writing. with the ability to write well, can alone produce the desired reThe muscular movement method, adopted by the State sults. Board of Education for use in the schools of the State, is taught in this course.

The work and second,

Handwriting

Two

periods a week for one quarter. Offered every quarter. Credit, one hour. Definite instruction and drills on handling material, posture, movement, and the mechanics of writing. Required of all students entering Courses I, and II, who do not present a certificate of proficiency in writing. Students who show a certain proficiency in Avriting may be excused at the discretion of the instructor at any time during either term, but may be required to return to the writing class if they show poor writing in other classes. 101.

Handwriting 102. One hour a week for one quarter. Offered Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, one hour. The psychology of handwriting, adapting methods to the physical and mental development of the child, the place of formal drills, motivation of writing, standards of excellence in handwriting, the technique of class instruction, the physiology and hygiene of writing, measuring the results with the scales of Locker and Ayers, and the correlation of hand"\vTiting instruction with other written

work

in the curriculum.


:

History and Social Sciences

65

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES DR.

WALMSLBY, MR. MOSS, MISS TUCKER, MISS STUBBS, MISS PECK

The work

of this department is planned with three definite aims to teach students to make their own valuation of text book statements, to apply the facts thus determined to conditions of real life, and to organize knowledge in a form that is teachable. Especial stress is laid on the fact that no one text contains complete truth on any question and that the real teacher no longer teaches from the book. No day's work is considered satisfactory that does not show evidence of research beyond the text book :

assignment.

A

major in this department requires the following courses First Year, History 131, 132, 133; Second Year, History 234, 235, 236 Third Year, History 347, 348, 349 Fourth Year, two additional courses in History or in Social Science. For a minor in this department eighteen hours in History or eighteen hours in Social Science is required. ;

;

In addition to the above, a student who chooses a major or a minor in this department must take History 331 as an elective in one quarter of her Third Year. History of Virginia. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours. Virginia's influence upon the history of the country and the part her great men played in the nation's development. First Year of Course II.

History 121.

History 122 and 123. American History for Grammar Grade Teachers. Three hours a week for two quarters. Credit, three First quarter (122), treats America's history to the Civil War; second quarter (123), begins with the period of the Civil War and includes a study of our history to the present day. The subject matter of this course is so presented as to give through actual experience in study and in class work methods that are transferable to the grammar grades. While a college text and college references are used as a basis for this work, students are introduced to a number of elementary texts. This is done to stress the importance of supplementing the State-adopted text and that prospective teachers may learn to recognize the merits and demerits of elementary histories. Required in First Year of Course II.

hours each quarter.

History 211 and 212. week for two quarters.

History of Civilization. Three hours a An Credit, three hours each quarter.


Departments op Instruction

66

orientation course in the development of modern life from savage days, through the growth of nations, to the present day. Second Year of Course I.

History 131, 132 and 133. European History. Three hours Credit, three hours each quarter. a week for three quarters. Course 131, in the Fall quarter, is a survey of the ancient world with special emphasis on the factors which influenced the development and achievements of early Europe; the contributions made by the Orient and the early Western nations to modern civilization. Courses 132 and 133, in the Winter and Spring quarters, after a brief review of Medieval History, include the Renaissance, the geographical discoveries, the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation, the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution and its outcome. Open to First Year students in

Course III.

Contemporary European History. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The Liberalistic movement of the 19th and 20th Centuries; the World War and Open to Second Year students in Reconstruction Problems. History

Course

234.

III.

History 235 and 236. Early American History. Three hours Credit, three hours a week for Winter and Spring quarters. each quarter. Course 235 includes the Colonial Background, the American Revolution, Founding the National Government, and the Jeffersonian Policies. Course 236 includes the New Nationalism, the Jacksonian Democracy, the Advance to the Open to Second Year Pacific, Sectionalism and Civil War. students in Course III.

History 331. The Teaching of History in the High School. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. In addition to the professionalized subject matter given in the other courses in History, this course is offered to give a systematic studj' of some problems peculiar to the field of teaching History to high school students. It treats of the definition and aims of History, the organization of courses, the use of sources and collateral reading, methods of presentation, making History real, including Historical Pageantry, and the special qualificaRequired of all Third Year stutions of the History teacher. dents who choose a major or minor in this department.

History 347, 348 and 349. Later American History. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter.


History and Social Sciences

67

Course 347, in the Fall quarter, the United States from the Civil War to the Twentieth Century Course 348, in the Winter quarter, the period, of Roosevelt, Wilson, and the World War Course 349, in the Spring quarter, the relation of the United States to the problems of Imperialism and World Politics. Open to Third ;

;

and Fourth Year students. History 441, 442 and 443. Political History. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. A brief course in the history of the political parties of the United States, given in the Fall quarter (441), followed by a study of the actual working of political parties in the Winter quarter (442), and a detailed study of state problems in the Spring

quarter (443).

History 444.

International Relations. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. study of international trade and international peace. The methods used today to draw nations closer together and to regulate the difficult questions arising from national prejudices. Open to Third and

A

Fourth Year students. History 447. Latin American History. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. A brief study of the colonization, independent history, and present problems of the countries most closely related to the past and future of the United States. A critical study of the Monroe Doctrine and Pan-Americanism. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

History 451 and 452. The British Empire. Three hours a week for two quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. A study of the formation and present influence of the British Commonwealth, involving a brief treatment of colonialism, imperialism, and federation. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Government 201. Citizenship. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. course in the problems of American citizenship, with a study of the actual working of the American Government. Required in Second Year of Courses I and 11.

A

Government

333.

week for one quarter.

American Government. Offered every quarter.

Three hours a

Credit, three hours. study of the more advanced problems arising from the attempt to extend a democracy to the control of national questions. Required in Third Year of Course III.

A


Departments of Instruction

68

Economics

461, 462

and

Economic History and Theory. Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, 463.

Three hours a week. Fall, three hours each quarter. Course 461, in the Fall quarter, is designed to show the historical background of the economic movements and forces. The industrial revolution, transportation, currency and banking problems, economic effects of the growth of population, rise of labor unions and industrial combinations are considered. Course 462, in the Winter quarter, and 463, in the Spring quarter, treat of the principles of economic theory and of the economic problems of modern society. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Sociology 201. Introduction to Sociology. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, three hours. Introductory Course. Elements of sociological theory illustrated by practical, social problems. Influences of environment. Human nature. Contacts, primary and secondary, group conflicts. Co-operation. Population, its quantity and quality. Heredity. The family. Required of Second Year students in Courses I and II. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III, under restrictions of extra w^ork. Sociology 201 or Sociology 341

is

prerequisite to other courses

in Sociology.

Community Organization. Three hours a Sociology 202. week for one quarter. Offered Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours. A constructive study of community organization and social progress with particular reference to Virand principles of community organization. Special study of typical community organizations such as, playground and recreation centers; school community centers; community church centers country life movement American Red Cross public welfare movement public health movement community leagues and county councils; federation of social agenRequired of Second Year students in cies; and social surveys. Courses I and II. Elective in Third and Fouth years of Course III, under restrictions of extra work.Theories

ginia.

;

;

;

;

;

Principles of Sociology. Three hours a week. scientific study of society Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. in order that human relations may be better understood and in order to help people arrive at wise decisions as to social policies. The topics treated are Social population social forces social processes. Practical application of principles is made in the so-

SociOLOGY 341.

A

:

;

;


History and Social Sciences lution of real problems. dents.

Open

to Third

Sociology 341 or Sociology 201 in Sociology.

is

and Fourth Year

69

stu-

prerequisite to other courses

Three Sociology 342. Principles of Sociology continued. hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Social processes continued; social products; the principles of anticipa-

and balance. Practical application in the solution of real problems. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

tion, simulation, individualization,

Sociology 343. The Family. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The history of the human family. The influence of Christianity upon marriage and family customs. The industrial revolution and its effect upon the family. Evidences of the maladjustment of the modern family to social conditions. Causes of disharmony within the family. Current theories of reform. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

The Population. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The problems of composition and distribution; increase and checks; birth and death rates; emigration, immigration and growth qualitative differences in the conventional classes and native ability race and race mixture. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Sociology 444.

;

;

Sociology 445. Criminology and Penology. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. The problem of crime and criminals; the making of the criminal; history of punishment; modern penal institutions; the machinery of justice.

Open

to

Third and Fourth Year students.

Sociology 446. Poverty and Dependency. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The problem of poverty and pauperism; historical institutions and methods of dealing with dependents; special classes of dependents; preventive agencies and methods. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Sociology 460. Social Research. A seminar course. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Open only to students who have already shown unusual ability in research work in some one of the Social Sciences. A definite study is made, under supervision, of a local problem, and only results that are a contribution to knowledge are accepted. Elective under restrictions.


Departments of Instruction

70

HOME ECONOMICS MISS TUPPER, MISS JETER

The general aim of this department is to train students to teach home economics in the public schools, to give some training in the scientific administration of the home, and to prepare students to become dietitians and institutional managers. Students choosing this department as the field of their major work, are required to take the following courses: First Year, Home Economics 131, 132 and 133 Second Year, Home Economics 231, 232 and 233; Third Year, Home Economics 341, 342 and 343 Fourth Year, Home Economics 441, 442 and 443. In place of one elective each term of the Third and Fourth Years students must take the following courses Home Economics 344, 345, 346, 444, 445 and 446. ;

;

:

Students with a minor in this department must take at least one year of cooking and one year of sewing. If more courses are taken, they should come in the order indicated for the major. In addition to the above, students choosing a major or a minor in this department must take Home Economies 331 and 332 as an elective in the Winter and Spring quarters of the Third Year.

Home Economics

Principles of Sewing, and Textiles. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The studj'' of stitches, seams, materials, and trimmings suitable for underwear. The principles of dress construction are studied and applied in the making of a simple wash dress. Students furnish their own materials. Elective in First Year of Course III. Students taking this course may not receive credit for Home Economics 201. 131.

Home Economics

132 and 133. Elementary Foods and Cookery. Three periods a week for two quarters, two double, one single. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. study of the composition of foods, the principles underlying their preparation, the sources, manufacture, and cost of foods; and the preparing, planning, and serving of meals. Elective in First Year of Course III.

A

Laboratory Fee:

Home Economics

Two

dollars.

Elementary Foods and Cookery. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Fall 231.


Home Economics

71

A

Credit, three hours. continuation of Home Ecomore advanced study of foods, with nomics 132 and 133. special emphasis on food preservation, and table service. Elective in Second Year of Course III.

quarter.

A

Prerequisite: '

Fee

:

Two

Home Economics

dollars

Home Economics

and a

132 and 133.

half.

Costume Design. Three periods a Credit, three week, one double, two single. Winter quarter. hours. The application of the principles of design to the entire costume. A study of line, form, and color in their relation to the individual. And the study of suitability of design to maElective in Second Year of terials and articles of clothing. Course

232.

III.

Prerequisite

:

Drawing 131 and

132.

Home Economics 233. Principles of Sewing, and Textiles. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Practical work in the application of the principles of dress construction by students. study of textile fibers, with simple tests, such as could be used in the home, made to detect adulterations. Elective in Second Year of Course III. Students furnish their own materials. Students taking this course may not receive credit for Home Economics 202.

A

Home Economics

201 and 202.

Principles of Sewing. Three periods a week for two quarters, two double, one single. Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. The study of stitches, seams, materials, and trimmings suitable for underwear and simple dresses. study of sewing courses and a list of equipment. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III. Students furnish their own materials. Students taking these courses may not receive credit for Home Economics 131 and 233.

A

Home Economics 203. Dressmaking. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The making of an afternoon silk dress and a graduation dress. Typical garments made for children of different ages. Both drafted and commercial patterns used. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III. Students furnish their own materials. Students taking this course may not receive credit for Home Economics 341.


Departments op Instruction

72

Home Economics

331 and 332. The Teaching of Home EcoThree hours a week for two quarters. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Planning courses of study for the various types of schools. A careful survey of the problems of equipment, and laboratory planning. Application made to the practical problems growing out of teaching. Required in the Third Year of all students choosing a major or a minor in this department. nomics.

Home Economics

341. Dressmaking. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The making of an afternoon silk dress, and a graduation dress. Typical garments made for children of different ages. Both drafted and commercial patterns used. Elective in Second and Third Years. Students furnish their own materials. Students taking this course may not receive credit for Home Economics 203.

Home Economics 342. Home Nursing. Three periods a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of preventive measures and care of the sick in the home when the service of a professional nurse is not required of the equipment and care of the sick room and of aids in emergencies, and accidents. Open to Third Year students. ;

;

Fee

:

One

dollar.

Home Economics

Household Management.

343.

Three peri-

ods a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. This course consists of a study of the position of woman as an economic factor in the social world. The question of buying, budgets, systematic care of waste, home ideals, division of labor, efficiency, and

economy are

Fee

:

One

discussed.

Open

to

Third Year students.

dollar.

Home Economics 344. School Lunches. Three periods a week, two double, one single. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. study of the social and economic value the organization, equipment, and management of school lunch-rooms in various types of schools and communities. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III. Alternating with Home Economics 445.

A

;

Prerequisite

:

Home Economics

Laboratory Fee

:

Two

dollars

132 and 133.

and a

half.


Home Economics

Home Economics

345.

73

Costume Drafting and Draping. Three

periods a week for one quarter, one double, two single. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. The aim of this course is to carry out the principles of design by means of drafting and draping. The student will work out her own designs and model the garments upon a dress form. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Laboratory Fee

:

Seventy-five cents.

Home Economics 346. Advanced Foods and Cookery. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. In this course more experimental work in class and individual problems relating to foods and their preparation, is given. History of cookery is included. Open

to

Third Year students.

Home Economics

Prerequisite

:

Fee:

dollars.

Three

132, 133

and

231.

Home Economics

441. Nutrition. Three periods a week for one quarter, two double, one single. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The presentation of the fundamental principles of human nutrition, the application of these principles to the feeding of individuals and families under varying physiological, economic, and social conditions. Open to Fourth Year students.

Prerequisite: Chemistry Economics 132 and 133.

Laboratory Fee

:

Home Economics

Two

10,

dollars

Household Chemistry,

and a

Home

half.

Three periods a week, one Credit, three hours. The making and covering of frames, trimmings, and the renovation of materials. One fabric street hat made, and two spring hats, one a street hat, and the other a dress hat. Open to Fourth Year double, two single.

442.

Millinery.

Winter quarter.

students.

Home Economics 443. House Planning and Furnishing. Three periods a week, one double, two single. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The house and its construction, furnishings, decoand care. The study of house materials, colors, harmony in furnishings, the selection and arrangement of furniture, etc. Open to Fourth Year students.

rations,


Departments of Instruction

74

Home Economics 444. Advanced Clothing. Three periods a week for one quarter, two single and one double. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The aim of this course will be to round out and supplement with the student all supplementary courses in clothing, textiles, and design. Illustrative matter for clothing problems in teaching will be prepared. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Home Economics

445.

Menu-Making, and Marketing.

Three

periods a week, two single, one double. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The planning of menus for various occasions with definite allowances. The marketing is done by the students. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III. Alternating

with

Home Economics

Prerequisite

:

344.

Home Economics

Laboratory Fee:

Home Economics

Two 446.

dollars

132, 133

and a

and

231.

half.

Advanced Dressmaking. Three periods

a week, two double, one single. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Dresses made of soft materials, each student designing her dress and making her own pattern to suit the design. Students furnish their own materials.

Home Economics 451, 452 and 453. Home Making. Three periods a week,

General Problems in one double, two single. Credit, three hours each Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. quarter. The various problems of the home are considered. This course is for students who have had no work in Home Economics, but who desire a general knowledge of the scientific handling of home problems. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.


Industrial Arts

75

INDXJSTRIAL ARTS MISS MILLICAN

The purpose

of this department

two-fold first, to prepare students to teach handwork by the use of suitable subject matter, methods, and ideas of practical arts; second, to enable them to use this knowledge to devolop self-expression, to satisfy the constructive instinct in children and to arouse an appreciation of color, form and beauty. The books used are those suggested by the Board of Education in the Virginia State Course of Study. is

:

Industrial Arts 111, 112 and 113. Primary Handwork. Two periods a week, one double and one single. Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. course to prepare students to teach handwork in grades one to three. Color theory applied to simple forms, paper cutting, folding and weaving, clay modelling, sand table projects relating to history and geography, blackboard work, collecting illustrative material for special days, making of animal toys and furniture in wood or cardboard. Methods and plans carried along with the projects. First Year of Course I.

A

Fee

:

One

dollar a quarter.

Industrial Art 3 121, 122 and 123. Grammar Grade Arts. Two periods a week, one double and one single. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. The subject matter of handwork treated from the point of view of the grammar-grade teacher in its relation to other subjects such as history, geography and arithmetic; also from the standpoint of the materials obtainable in average school. Special stress laid

upon inexpensive and substitute materials. Study of art structure, design and color applied to clothing, homes and business. Object drawing and perspective, stencils, blackboard work, charts and calendars, illustrative material relating to stories and special days, study of industries that supply food, shelter, and clothing, clay and product maps. Types of printing and poster-making studied; also methods of enlarging irregular forms and making teachers' aids such as hectograph, etc. Some simple shop work and projects made from boxes, shelves, bird houses, simple playground apparatus and games planned. First Year of Course 11.

Fee

:

One

dollar a quarter.


Depaetments op Instruction

76

Industrial Arts 131, 132 and 133. High School IndustrialArts. Three periods a week, two double, and one single for three Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Practical problems for high school pupils in book-binding, poster-making, pottery, wood, mechanical drawing, lettering, advertising. Lectures, readings, and discussions. Visits to the plants of various industries. Elective in First Year of Course III. Also in Third and Fourth Years of any course, with one-third additional time.

Laboratory Fee

:

One

dollar.

Industrial Arts 231, 232 and 233. Three periods a week, two double, and one single. Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. continuation of Industrial Arts 131, 132 and 133, for students wishing to specialize in Industrial Arts. Shop work, designing, period furniture, drafting, and history of Industrial Arts, training required for industries, wage returns, hazards, etc. Elective in Second Year of Course III. Also in Third and Fourth Year of any course, with one-third additional time.

A

Fee:

One

dollar a quarter.

Industrial Arts 341, 342 and 343. Three periods a week, two double and one single. Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. Applied design, craft work, drafting (use of instruments). Period furniture, and special attention to practical projects for home, modelling, tied and dyed work, making rugs of home materials, also favors. Open to Third Year Students.

Fee

:

One

dollar a quarter.

Industrial Arts 441, 442 and 443. Three periods a week, two Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. double and one single. Credit, three hours each quarter. A continuation of above, with study and making of blueprints, wood finishes on walls, floors, exteriors. Care of tools, types of architecture and historical ornament, clay modelling. Design and color in homes, treatment of renewing old furniture, removing old finishes and putting on new. Contrast of good and poor design in furniture. Favor and table decorations. Open to Fourth Year students.

Fee

:

One

dollar a quarter.


Industrial Arts

77

Industrial Arts 331. The Teaching of Industrial Arts. Three periods a week, two double, one single. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. Planning courses of study for various types of schools. A survey of equipment materials, books, aids, and laboratory planning. Teachers' problems and subject matter. Open to any student who has had three terms of Industrial Arts.


Departments op Instruction

78

LATIN MISS RICE

The work

of this department is planned to prepare teachers Latin for the high schools of the State. of A major in Latin requires the following courses First Year, Latin 131, 132, 133 Second Year, Latin 231, 232, 233 Third Year, Latin 341, 342, 343 Fourth Year, any two courses open to Fourth Year students. The minor requirement is the work of the first two years of the major. :

;

;

;

Prereauisite to choosing a major or a minor in this departThree high school units in Latin. ment :

131. Roman History. Three hours a week. Fall quarCredit, three hours. Elective in First Year of Course III.

Latin ter.

Latin ter.

Lyric Poetry.

132.

Latin

133.

Latin

Winter quar-

Year

of Course III.

Elective in First

Credit, three hours.

Grammar and

Spring quarter. Course III.

Three hours a week.

Three hours a week. Elective in First Year of

Composition.

Credit, three hours.

Life and Literature of the Romans. Three hours Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Roman life as seen in Roman literature life and literature of the Romans as a factor in modern civilization brief history of the Latin language and its relation to English. Elective in Second Year of Course 231.

a week.

;

;

III.

Latin 232. Life and Literature of the Romans. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. A continuation of Latin 231. Elective in Second Year of Course III. Latin 233. Intensive Study of Caesar. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Personality and career of Caesar, significance of his conquests, his writings as history and as literature Roman military system geography of Gaul sen;

;

;

tence structure and word order drill in the building of a vocabulary; practice in sight-reading. ;

Latin 341. Intensive Study of Cicero. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Brief history of the last Credit, three hours. century of the republic personality and career of Cicero com;

;


Latin parison between Caesar and Cicero

man

79

typical structure of a Rooration; practice in sight-reading. Elective in Third Year ;

of Course III.

Latin 342. Intensive Study of Vergil. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Roman mythology and religion; the Augustine age; life of Vergil and the effect of environment upon his poetic genius and literary art; Roman epic poetry; study of the hexameter, essays on Vergil from standard works. Elective in Third Year of Course III. Latin 343. The Teaching of Latin. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The present high school organization and the Latin curriculum; sources of vocabulary Latin; first-year Latin in relation to the grade in begun and to the general aims and values of classical study; methods of presentation; proper emphasis upon geography, ancient life, and historical connections use of maps, pictures, and various classroom helps books for use of teachers and for reference purposes of pupils. for

first -year

which

it is

;

;

Latin 441. Pliny's ter.

Letters.

Three hours a week.

Pall quarin the time of

Credit, three hours. Study of Roman life Elective in Fourth Year of Course III.

Domitian and Trojan.

Latin 442.

Essays. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Elective in Fourth Year of Course III.

Latin 443.

Satire and Ars Poetica. Three hours a week. Credit, three hours. Elective in Fourth Year

Spring quarter. of Course III.

Roman Comedy. Three hours a week. Fall quarCredit, three hours. Five plays to be selected from Plautus Terence. Elective in Fourth Year of Course III.

Latin 451. ter.

and

Latin 452. quarter.

Reerum

Roman

Philosophy.

Three hours a week. Winter

Selections from Lucretius' Credit, three hours. Natura. Elective in Fourth Year of Course III.

De


;

Departments of Instruction

80

MATHEMATICS MISS LONDON, MISS TALIAFERRO, MISS MEREDITH

This department offers courses in arithmetic, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytical geometry, calculus, electives, a course in history of mathematics, method courses in teaching arithmetic in the elementary schools, and a method course in teaching mathematics in the secondary schools. All work in the department is given with a full appreciation of the need for vitalization in all school work, and the effort is made everywhere to link up the work with the demands of real life.

Students who choose mathematics as their major subject, are required to take the following courses First Year, Mathematics 131, 132 and 133 Second Year, Mathematics 231, 232 and 233 Third Year, Mathematics 330, 331 and 332 Fourth Year, Mathematics 441, 442 and 443. The minor requirement is the work of the first two years. The additional periods in Mathematics 133, 441 and 442, may be credited as electives. :

;

;

Prerequisite for choosing a major or minor in this departOne and one-half units of algebra and plane geometry.

ment

:

Mathematics 111, 112 and 113. Arithmetic for Primary Teachers. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, two hours each quarter. Arithmetic treated from the point of view of the primary teacher. The development of number concepts and systems discussed. Material available for classroom use listed with emphasis upon the importance of linking up number work with life experiences, and school-room activities. Emphasis upon the importance of arithmetic as a tool subject. The place of drill in arithmetic. tentative course of study for the first three grades outlined, and definite methods of classroom procedure suggested. Illustrations of the use of standard tests taken from the work of the Training School. Diagnostic tests and remedial work distributed throughout the year. Some attention given to the laws of thrift and to the making of personal and household budgets. Required in First Year of Course I.

A

Prerequisite Mathematics 111 or 112 precede Mathematics 113. :

Mathematics

121, 122

and

123.

;

preferably both must

Arithmetic for

Grammar

Grade Teachers. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, two hours each quarter. The subject matter of arithmetic treat-


Mathematics

81

ed from the point of view of the grammar grade teacher, with emphasis upon the arithmetic needed by the average citizen rather than the special worker, and upon the choice of subject matter from real life situations and in accordance with modern business customs. A tentative course of study, upper elementary grades outlined, and requirements of an ideal course discussed. Diagnostic tests and remedial w'ork distributed throughout the year. Some attention to the laws of thrift and to the making of personal and household budgets. Required in First Year of Course II.

Prerequisite Mathematics 121 or 122 precede Mathematics 123. :

;

preferably both must

Mathematics 131. College Algebra I. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. High school algebra discussed from the teacher's viewpoint, followed by the usual topics of college work oral and written reports from required reading. Elective in First or Second Year of Course III. No credit unless followed by Mathematics 132. ;

Mathematics

College Algebra II. Three hours a week. Credit, three hours. continuation of Mathematics 4. Elective in First or Second Year of Course III. Mathematics 133. Solid Geometry. Four hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, four hours. The usual propositions and original exercises with applications parallel review of plane geometry. Elective in First or Second Year of Course III.

Winter quarter.

132.

A

;

Mathematics 134. College Geometry. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. An extension of highschool plane geometry which includes some review of that subElective in First and ject from the professional standpoint. Second Years of Course III. Mathematics

231. Trigonometry. Three hours a week. Fall Credit, three hours. Students led to discover the fundamental principles, field work with improvised instruments to Elective in First or stress the practical nature of the subject. Second Year of Course III.

quarter.

Mathematics 232. Analytics. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Elective in Second or Third Year of Course III. No credit unless followed by Mathematics 233.


Departments of Instruction

82

Mathematics 233. Analytics. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. continuation of Mathematics 231. Elective in Second or Third Year of Course III.

A

Mathematics

330. History of Mathematics. Three hours a Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Elective in Third or Fourth Year of Course III.

week.

Mathematics 331 and Mathematics.

The Teaching of High-School Three hours a week. Winter and Spring quar332.

A

Credit, three hours each quarter. discussion of the aims in teaching the different branches of mathematics; a brief history of their development, an investigation of their applications in various lines, a study of the presentation of typical parts. Work given through the study of mathematical and educational books and journals, and observation of teaching. Eequired of all Third Year students who choose Mathematics as a major or ters.

minor.

Mathematics

441. Calculus. Four hours a week. Fall quarCredit, four hours. Principles and applications. Elective in Third or Fourth Year of Course III. No credit unless followed by Mathematics 432.

ter.

Mathematics 442. Calculus. quarter. Credit, four hours. 441. Elective in Third or Fourth

A

Mathematics

Four hours a week.

Winter

continuation of Mathematics

Year

of Course III.

443. Elective in Mathematics. Three hours a week. Credit, three hours. This course is offered upon demand, and adapted to needs. Elective in Third or Fourth Year of

Course III.


Modern Languages

83

MODERN LANGUAGES MISS SMITHEY, MISS DRAPER

The work of the courses

in

Modern Languages

is

designed to

give students wishing to teach in the high schools of the State a mastery of the language studied, especially with respect to pronunciation, grammar, and oral expression.

Students selecting a modern language as a major are required to take eleven quarters.

Students selecting a modern language as a minor are required to take six quarters.

Students selecting a modern language as an elective are required to take not fewer than three quarters.

Prerequisite Three units of Latin and two units of the modern languages selected as a major, minor, or elective or two units of Latin and three units of modern languages. The department offers courses in French, Spanish, and Ger:

;

man.

French French

Grammar, Pronunciation, Composition.

Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Critical study of grammar pronunciation based on phonics reading of simple texts oral and written reproduction dictation. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III. French 131 taken as an elective must be followed by French 132 and French 133. 131.

;

;

;

;

French

132..

Grammar, Pronunciation, Composition.

Three

This hours a week. "Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. course is a continuation of the work of French 131. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III.

French

133.

French

231.

Three hours a week. Literatiire and Phonics. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Intensive and extensive reading of texts; study of phonics; dictation; oral and written reproduction. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III. Three Principles of Grammar and Phonics. hours a week. Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, three hours. Critical study of the underlying principles of the structure of


;

Departments of Instruction

84

the French language; intensive study of phonics. Elective in Second and Third Years of Course III. French 231 taken as an elective must be followed by French 232.

Three Principles of Grammar and Phonics. Credit, three Winter and Spring quarters. hours. The work of this quarter is a continuation of French 231. Emphasis is placed on the study of verbs. Elective in Second and Third Years of Course III.

French

232.

hours a week.

French

233. Methods and Composition. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The teaching of French principles of Modern Language teaching; methods of instrucComtion; organization and presentation of subject matter. position practice in oral and written use of the language application of principles of teaching, grammar, and phonics. Elective in Second and Third Years of Course III. ;

:

French 341. Literature. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. An outline study of French literature with special reference to the origin of the language and of the literature. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III. French 342. Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Reading of selected plays and letters of this period with special emphasis placed upon the work of Moliere. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III. French

343.

French

441.

Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. The clasSelected plays from sic writers of the Seventeenth Century. this period. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III. Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The Romantic Movement in French literature with special reference to the work of Victor Hugo. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of

Course

III.

French 442. Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Three Some hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. study of Rostand and his work. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III.


French

443.

Spring quarter.

Modern Languages

85

Contemporary Literature.

Three hours a week. aspects of French

Credit, three hours.

literature of the present century. ing of some lyrics. Elective in

Some

This course includes the read-

Third and Fourth

Years

of

Course III.

Spanish ^Spanish 131. Grammar, Pronunciation, Composition. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Critical study of grammar pronunciation based on phonics reading of simple texts; dictation, oral and written reproduction. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III. ;

;

Spanish 132. Grammar, Pronunciation, Composition. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. This course is a continuation of Spanish 131. Reading of simple texts; oral and written reproduction; dictation. Elective in First and Second Years of Course III. Spanish 133. Literature and Composition. Three hours a Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Reading of Span-

week.

ish texts suitable for second year high-school classes.

in First

and Second Years of Course

Elective

III.

^Spanish 231. Literature and Composition. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The reading of stories and plays of intermediate grade with reference to teaching in secondary schools. Elective in Second Year of Course III.

Spanish 232. Literature and Composition. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Selected readings in prose and poetry for classes in secondary schools oral and written composition; dictation. Elective in Second Year of ;

Course

III.

Spanish 233. Spring quarter.

Literature and Phonics. Three hours a v^eek. Credit, three hours. Outline course in Spanish literature as a basis for further study of some of the great Spanish writers. Elective in Second Year of Course III.

Spanish 341. Literature and Composition. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. This course is a continuation of Spanish 233. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course

III.

^Spanish 131, taken as an ^Spanish 231, taken as an

elective, elective,

must be followed by Spanish 132 and 133. must be followed by Spanish 232.


Departments of Instruction

86

Spanish 342. Literature and Composition. Three hours a Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. The reading of plays, stories, and lyrics of medium and advanced difficulty; oral and written reproduction dictation. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III. week.

;

Spanish 343. Literature and Composition. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. This course is a continuation of Spanish 342. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III. Spanish 441.

Literature and Composition. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Some study of the origin and development of Spanish literature. Elective in Third

and Fourth Years

of Course III.

Spanish 442.

Literature and Composition. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Study of Cervantes, Lope de Vega and Calderon. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III.

Spanish 443. Literature and Composition. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Study of Spanish writers of today. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III.

German Courses in German similar to those in French and Spanish will be given should there be sufficient demand for them.

—

NOTE A beginner's course in French and Spanish is given for the benefit of students in Course III, who wish a Modern. Language as an elective, and who have not had the necessary prerequisites for the regular work in this department. This class meets five times a week throughout the year. As an elective chosen by First and Second-year students it receives three hours' credit, chosen by Third and Fourth-year students it receives two-thirds credit. If full credit is desired, one-third more work must be done in the form ojE outside assignments.


Music

87

MUSIC MRS. KING, MISS

VAUGHN

The aim of this department is to emphasize the esthetic, intellectual and social values of music to broaden the conception of ;

the function of music in the public schools; to prepare grade teachers to teach music in their respective grades to thoroughly prepare supervisors and special teachers of music in elementary and high schools; and to bring all into an understanding and appreciation of the best music through intelligent and sympathetic listening to the world's greatest musical literature. ;

Students who choose a major in music are required to take the following: Music 111, 112, 213, 121, 222, 223, 341, 342, 351, 352, 353, 451, 452 and 453 Reading 341 and Choral Music 460 ;

Glee Club and Orchestra optional.

Prerequisite Two years of music study and ability to play simple accompaniments to songs. :

Music 111. Two hours a week for one quarter. Offered Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, one hour. The beginning of a three quarter course in Course I. Rote songs, voice training, ear training, sight singing, rhythm, and symbols of music. First Year of Course I.

Music 112. Two hours a week for one quarter. Offered Winand Spring quarters. Credit, one hour. A continuation of Music 111. Sight singing; observation songs; art songs; voice training; ear training. First Year of Course I.

ter

Music 213. Two hours a week for one quarter. Offered Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, one hour. Continuation of Music 111, and 112. Methods of teaching music in the first three grades. The child voice and how to develop it; song interpretation; outlines for grade work. Second Year of Course I.

Music 121. Two hours a week for one quarter. Offered every quarter. Credit, one hour. First quarter of a three-quarter course to prepare students to become familiar with song literature suitable for grammar grade children. Sight singing; part singing; music appreciation. First Year of Course II. Music 222. Two hours a week for one quarter. Offered Fall and Winter quarters. Credit, one hour. A continuation of


Departments of Instruction

88

Music

Subject matter includes sight-reading, applying principles embodied in Music 121. study of time, and time problems. Second Year of Course II. 121.

A

223. Two hours a week for one quarter. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, one hour. continuation of Music Methods of teaching music in the grammar 121, and 222. grades; problems of tone, time, and theory; two and three-part singing; classification of voices. Second Year of Course II.

Music

A

Music 341. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Materials and problems of the high school. Conducting. Suitable programs. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Music 342. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. Continuation of Music 341. High school methods, music material. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. 351. Elementary Harmony. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Scales, keys, intervals, major and minor. Tonal tendencies and their use in melody writing. Elective in Third and Fourth Years of Course III.

Music

352. Elementary Harmony. Three hours a week. Wincontinuation of Music 351. ter quarter. Credit, three hours. Chords, cadences, harmonization of melodies. Open to Fourth Year students.

Music

A

Music 353. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, Continuation of Music 351 and 352. Chords in three hours. Composing and minor. Dominant seventh chord modulation. harmonizing. Original work. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Music

451. Music Appreciation. Three hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. Beginning a three-term course in The media, quality of History and Appreciation of Music. vocal and instrumental music. National tendencies. Early Folk Music. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Three hours a week. WinContinuation of Music 451. ter quarter. Credit, three hours. Early Church music. Beginnings of Opera and Oratorio. Development of instruments and their influence. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Music 452. Music Appreciation.


Music

89

Music

453. Music Appreciation. Three hours a week. Spring Credit, three hours. Continuation of Music 452. The classical period its writers. Form the Sonata, the Symphony, The Romantic School. Modern Music. Open to the Suite. Third and Fourth Year students.

quarter.

;

Prerequisite

:

;

Music 451 and Music 452.

Music 460. Chorus. Twice a week. Offered every quarter. Credit, one hour each quarter. Students desiring to elect chorus will have a trial by the director of the department and upon selection will be admitted to the class. The aim of this class is to study the best classical and modern choruses and to be prepared to sing for college functions and to present one or two formal programs each year.

An

orchestra and glee club, selected by the director of music, receive weekly training and give public concerts.


Departments of Instruction

90

HEALTH ANP PHYSICAL EDUCATION MISS BARLOW, MISS GRAHAM, MISS ILER, MISS

THOMAS

This department, through instruction in hygienic living and the supervision of gymnastics, athletics, and play activities, aims to develop and maintain in the students bodily health, strength, and endurance, wholesome attitudes, desirable habits and skills, to the end that they may lead more efficient lives, and by placing emphasis on the theory and methods of physical education, to prepare students to teach physical training in the grades. In order to accomplish this two-fold purpose a physical examination is given every student upon entrance, and all are required to take some form of physical training throughout the four years. Athletics (under the supervision of an Athletic Association) forms an important part of the work. There are intercollegiate games in basket-ball, and inter-class contests in games and athletics, culminating in a Field Day program, and the awarding of a cup to the winning class and individual each year. Work in Physical Education is marked and credited as in any other subjects.

The object

of Courses 101, 102 and 103 is to give to the student a large amount of material to use in her teaching with principles of selection, and at the same time provide opportunity for wholesome physical exercise and the development of desirable personal qualities and attributes associated with group activities. Courses 214, 215, 224 and 225 are especially designed to meet the law requiring the teaching of physical education in the grades.

Third and Fourth Year students may elect any of the practice courses above second year for their required physical education. Students choosing Health and Physical Education as a minor must be physically fit and approved by the head of the Department. The following subjects are required of those who choose a minor in this department First Year, Biology 131, 132 and 133, Physical Education 231, 232 and 233; Second Year, Physical Education 345, 346 and 347. :

Physical Education 101, 102 and 103. First Year Practice. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. Practice in gymnastics, mimetic exercises, elementary folk dancing, games and general athletics. Talks on personal hygiene, health of the teacher, importance of good posture and


Physical Education

91

educational value of motor activities involved in physical education. Note book containing material suitable to teach in respective grades required.

Physical Education

106. Health Education. Three hours a week. Offered every quarter. Credit, three hours. This course follows the outline as prepared by the State Board of Health. It includes: (a) healthfulness of the child's environment; (b) physical defects and their control; (c) communicable diseases and their control; (d) organization for health; (e) care of the school plant; (f) health instruction. Required of all students in

the First or Second Year,

Physical Education 214 and 215. Teaching of Physical Training in the Lower Elementary Grades. Three hours a week Credit, first quarter, two hours second quarfor two quarters. Theory, methods, practice. Instruction in the ter, one hour. technique of teaching physical training material of varied sorts adapted to the interests and needs of children in the primary grades. Ways and means of organizing school, playground activities and Play Day programs. Practice teaching within the class. Required in Second Year of Course I. ;

;

Prerequisite

:

One

or

more practice courses in Physical Edu-

cation.

Physical Education 224 and 225. Physical Education in the Upper Elementary Grades and Junior High School. Same as 214 and 215, the work being adapted to the needs and interests of the upper grades, elementary and high school. Required in Second Year of Courses II and III. Physical Education 236.

Playground

.Activities.

Three

hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, one hour. Practice in games, stunts,, and athletics adaptf^d to the average playground.

Required in Second Year of Course

III.

Physical Education 231 and 232. Anatomy, General and Applied. Three hours a week for two quarters. Fall and Win-

A

ter quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. study of the structure of the human body and a mechanical analysis of gymnastic and athletic movements. Open to First and Second Year students.

Physical Education a week.

233.

Spring quarter.

Applied Physiology. Credit, three hours.

Three hours

The

effect of


Departments of Instruction

92

exercise

upon growth,

nutrition, epithelium, bones

and

joints,

exercise in relation to respiration, sleep, fatigue, mental processes, and recreation. Open to First and Second Year stu-

muscle

;

dents.

Physical Education 341, 342 and 343. Advanced General Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. Practice in all forms of physical training activity. Includes Danish gymnastics, mimetic drills, gymnastic marching, calisthenics; practice in writing drills and teaching class. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. Practice.

Prerequisite:

Physical

Education 101, 102 and 103, or

equivalent.

Three Corrective Gymnastics. Fall quarter. Credit, three hours. The technique Deals with and physiological effects of remedial exercises. faults of posture, weak and flat feet and other abnormal conditions coming under the observation of teachers, with a study of corrective exercises to meet individual needs. Practical work under supervision. Open to Second, Third and Fourth Year students who have had a college course in anatomy and phys-

Physical Education 345.

hours a week.

iology.

Physical Education 346. Personal Hygiene. Three hours a week. Winter quarter. Credit, three hours. General review of the care of the body, with emphasis placed upon methods of teaching hygiene in the grades. Open to Second, Third and Fourth Year students.

Physical Education 347. Playground Bwpervision and Leadership in Extra Curricular Activities. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Theory and practice in organization and management of playground activities. Aims and purpose of the playground as a social center considered. Training in leadership in school and community recreational clubs and extra curricular activities. Open to Second, Third and Fourth Year students. Physical Education

441. Clogging and Athletic Dancing. Two hours a week. Fall quarter. Credit, one hour. Special practice in clogs, jigs and gymnastic dancing. Sandals or leather-soled gymnasium shoes required. Open to Second, Third

and Fourth Year students.


Physical Education

93

Physical Education 442 and 443. Natural Dancing. Two hours a week. Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, one hour Practice in natural rhythms, music interpretadances, and their adaptation to festival work. to Second, Third and Fourth Year students.

each quarter. tion,

esthetic

Open

Physical Education 445 and 446. Folk Dancing (Intermediand advanced). Two hours a week. Winter and ate Spring quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. Practice in folk and national dancing suitable for upper grades, high school and college. Open to Second, Third and Fourth Year students.

Physical Education 451, 452 and 453. Coaching of Athletics. hours a week. Fall, Winter and Spring quarters. Credit, one hour each quarter. Practice and study of technique in athletic games. Fall quarter, hockey, soccer and tennis Winter quarter, basketball, and volley ball; Spring quarter, baseball, field and track events. Includes discussion of organization and management of athletic leagues, interscholastic and intrascholastic contests and field days. Open to Third and Fourth Year students.

Two

;

note

—a

regular gymnasium suit, consisting of medium full black bloomers, black all-white middy blouse and three-quarter cut white sneakers is required for all practice courses. These may be purchased in FarmviUe.

tie,


Departments of Instruction

94

READING AND DRAMATICS MISS

WHEELER

The aim of the reading department is to equip the student with the power of keen analysis and the ability to extract thought from the printed page. The pupil is led to a further realization of the meaning and beauty of literature by training in adequate vocal expression of the best literature.

Reading 211. Fundation Course in Beading. Three hours a week for one quarter. Offered every quarter. Credit, two hours.

Aims

to give the student distinct articulation, correct

tion,

freedom and ease in speaking before a group, and power Second Year of Course I.

pronuncia-

in critical analysis.

Reading 121 and 222. Beading for Grammar Grade Teachers. Three hours a week for two quarters. Reading 121 given in First Year. Credit, three hours. Reading 222 given in Second Year. Credit, two hours. A continuous course for two quarters especially adapted to the needs of grammar grade teachers. Training in silent and oral reading, and study made of the problems involved in the teaching of reading. Emphasis in first quarter placed upon the problems of teaching reading in the second- quarter upon the individual needs of the student. Prac;

given in silent and oral reading, in the use of the voice, in speaking before a group. Required in Course II.

tice

and

Literary Interpretation and Voice Training. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. Aims similar to those in Reading 211, with added emphasis upon voice training, public speaking, and the oral interpretation of the types of literature suitable for the high school. Elective in the First and Second Years of Course III.

Reading

131.

Three hours a week.

Reading 341. Plays and Festivals. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three hours. A study of the various types of dramatic entertainment suitable for school presentation, plays, festivals, and pageants. Opportunity is afforded for the study and application of the principles of producing, costuming, stage mechanics and make-up. Open to the Second, Third, and Fourth Year Students. May be taken by students choosing English as a major, required of students choosing Music as a major.


Reading and Dramatics

95

Reading 441, 442 and 443. History and Development of EngDrama. Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit, three hours each quarter. A study and survey of the development of drama, particularly in England and America. Fall quarter (Reading 441), brief study of primitive and folk drama of various countries. Greek and Rom.an drama as bearing upon development in England. More careful study of beginnings Winter quarter (Reading 442), Elizaof drama in England. bethan drama. Shakespeare's predecessors and contemporaries lish

carefully studied, briefer notice being given to Shakespeare. Parallel reading, class study, and criticism of plays. Spring quarter (Reading 443), Modern English and American drama. Modern trend of drama as to subject and technique contrasted with earlier forms. Study of significant modern dramatists and of contemporary dramatic criticism. Open to Third and Fourth Year students. May count toward a major or minor in English, in Course III.

A

dramatic club chosen from the student body by the process of "trying out," gives opportunity for developing special dramatic talent Two or more standard plays are presented each year.


LIST

OF STUDENTS

Name

County or City

Address

Abbey, Lila Euth, 1 Adams, Alyee Page, 3 Adams, Laura Janie, 1

Asheville, N.

C

112 Arlington St. Port Richmond Alton 9 Pecan Place 608 Buffalo St.

King William

Aderholt, Pauline, 1

Agee, Edith Mae, 1 Agee, Eula Gray, 1 Ailstock, Elizabeth Perriton, 1 Allen, Elizabeth, 3 Allen, Frances Irene, 2 Allgood, Elsie Elizabeth, 2 Allison, Virginia C, 1

.

.

.

Halifax City Point Farmville Lee Portsmouth Charlottesville

Brunswick Mecklenburg

Jonesville 92, R. 2

Box

1309 Wertland St. Valentines

Boydton

Fairfax

Fairfax

Ames, Kargaret Jacob, 1 Ames, Mary Virginia, 4 Amory, Caroline E., 1 Amory, Lienor Archer, 1

Northampton Accomac York

Anderson, Annette E., 2 Anthony, Martha Alice, 1 Anthony, Nannie Sue, 1 Archer, Mary Page, 2

Buckingham

Augusta

Armfield, Elizabeth G., 3

Fairfax

Armistead, Mae B., 1 Armstrong, Anne Irving, 1 Armstrong, Lucy R., 1 Armstrong, Mary Moff ett, 4 Arthur, Ruby, Eskay, 1 Asher, Edith S., 4 Atkinson, Althea B., 2 Atwater, Elizabeth D., 2

Mathews

Waterloo Front Royal Campbell Evington King William West Point Roanoke .... 803 Windsor Ave., Va. Hts. Prince George Prince George, R. 1

Atwood, Edna Frances, 2 Austin, Ora Pauline, 1

Princess Anne Botetourt

Babb, Ellen Edwards, Bailey, Edith Dean, 1

Southampton

3

Bailey, Ethel V., 1 Bailey, Gladys Mae, 2 Bailey, Marguerite E., 1 Bailey, Mary Hyatt, 1 Bain, Lelia Darby, 2 Baker, Agnes B., 2

Baker, Grace McDowell, 1 Baker, Mary Elizabeth, 1 Baldwin, Dorothy G., 1 Ball, Elizabeth Hope, 1 Ballard, Margaret

S.,

Banks, Mary Nash, 3 Banks, Myrtle L., 1 Baptist,

Maude

G.,

2

2

Norfolk Patrick Patrick

Farmville Culpeper

Franktown Belle Haven 313

Messick 35th Street

Ore Bank Stella Stella

"Waynesboro Fairfax

Motorun 108 First Ave.

Warren

Surry Surry Surry Lee

Lee Dinwiddle Tavares, Fla

Southampton

Wythe South Roanoke Portsmouth Charlottesville

Norfolk

Albemarle

Princess Anne Fincastle

Ivor Wakefield Wakefield Wakefield Jonesville Jonesville

Dinwiddle Alfred St. Capron

Max Meadows 621 Carolina Ave. 221 Washington St. 1201 West Main St. 237 E. 42d Street

Winton, N. C. Ivy Depot


Students

97

Name

County or City

Barden, Lucille P., 1

Powhatan

Barham, Margaret H., 2

Norfolk

Barker, Dorothy Mary, 1 Barker, Florine E., 1 Barlow, Mary Annis, 1 Barnes, Myron, 2 Barrett, Hazel Lavinia, 2

Pittsylvania Pittsylvania Isle of Wight

Barrett, Thelma F., 1 Baskervill, Alice Merle, 2 Baskervill, Mary Mann, 1 Bass, Leola Mayo, 1 Batte, Gertrude M., 2 Batten, Irene Thelma, 1 Batts, Susie May, 1 Baxter, Charlotte B., 2 Beale, Doris Inez, 2 Beavans, Elizabeth, 1 Beazley, Bertha DeS., 3 Beazley, G. Louise, 2 Beckham, Evelyn P., 4 Bell, Frances Elizabeth, 1 Bell, Lois Elizabeth, 2

May, 1 Diana Celeste,

1

Prince Prince

Bovell, Lillian F., 1

Anna Lee, Bowen, Mary OUie,

Gargatha Franklin

Newsoma Worsham Worsham 902 Court St. Jarratt

Sussex Princess Anne Wilson, N. C Petersburg

Back Bay 909 Broad St. 519 Washington St. Courtland Enfield, N. C. 211 Venable St. 211 Venable St. 505 High St.

Southampton Farmville Farmville Farmville

Lunenburg Lynchburg

Victoria

317 Yeardley St. Princess Anne

Anne Nansemond

Norfolk Bedford

Bowde'n,

Smithfield, E. 3

Lynchburg

M. Eleanor, 4

1 1

Bedford Eichmond. 811 Eoanoke St. Forest Hill Disputanta Prince George Portsmouth 509 London St. Amelia Amelia Tobaccoville Powhatan Palmer Springs Mecklenberg Ford Dinwiddle Amelia Amelia Bridge St. Farmville George St. St. FarmviUe 311 Pamplin Prince Edward Lynchburg 105 Brierwood Ave. Orange ... Orange Weldon, N. C. Vontay Hanover .

^

Princess Anne Philadelphia, Pa.

Middlesex Tazewell

Eichmond

Lucille, 1

Eockbridge Eockbridge

Gladys Lucile, 4 Bradshaw, Mabel C, 1

Buckhorn 146 College Ave. 308 Clay St.

Miary Elizabeth, 2 Virginia B., 4

Mabel Virginia, 1 Virginia Winn, 2 Mary Elizabeth, 1

16th St.

Einggold Einggold

Edward Edward

Danville

Nellia Euth, 2

W.

Accomac Southampton Southampton

Jessie, 2

Catherine D., 2 Binf ord, Henrietta, 2 Blackman, Charlotte E., 1 Blanton, Elizabeth E., 1 Blanton, Josie T., 2 Bobbitt, Sue Smith, 2 Boiaseau, Dorothy D., 1 Bollinger, Lucille Edith, 2 Bondurant, M. Louise, 4 Booker, Harriett E., 3 Booker, Mary Elizabeth, 4 Booth, Frances Major, 1 Booton, Florence P., 1 Bounds, Elizabeth Lee, 1 Bourne, Pauline G., 2 Boush, Virginia Lee, 1,

Bowers, Bowers, Bowyer, Bowyer, Boxley, Boykin, Bracey,

211

Princess

Bell, Louise

Bennett, Bennett, Bennett, Bennett, Bentley,

Address

Sunny Side

Carrollton,

Mo

Orange Greensville

Mecklenberg Prince

Edward

.

.

.

Oceania 4226 Baltimore Ave. Saluda Tazewell 3401 Hawthorne Ave. 303 N. Folger St. Lexington, E. 6 Lexington, E. 6

Orange Emporia Bracey Bice


Students

98

Name

County or City

Bradshaw, Nannie Mae, 2 Brame, Kathleen M., 2 Bramm, Hazel Mae, 2 Branch, Catherine T., 1 Branch, Ruby M., 1 Brantley, Dorothy L., 2 Brauer, Doris Amelia, 2

Prince

Bray, Catherine B. Brett,

Southampton.

3

....'.."'!'.

DeWitt Norview Blackstone

Amherst

Norfolk Culpeper

Portsmouth Southampton

Newport News Eoanoke Nottoway Mecklenburg Mecklenburg

Grif ton, N. C. Biscoe

Nandua 210 Sixth St., Wasena 244 Virginia Ave. 922 Brandon Ave. Hazel Eiver 324 Fifth St. Boykins 3100 West Ave. 913 Park St., S.W.

Crewe PhUlis

Hampton

1123

Norfolk

Amherst Beford Lynchburg South Norfolk of Suffolk

Isle

Wight

Princess Ann Pleasant

Eoad View

519 North St. 112 Fredonia Ave. 2 Stewart St.

Windsor Dinwiddle 1023 Ann St. Warm Springs

Bath

Plymouth, N. C.

Cahoon, Evelyn, 2 Caldwell, Lillian Glenn, 1

Appomattox

Appomattox

Calloway, Georgie E., 3 Campbell, Grace Taylor, 2

Concord, N.

Canada, Mary Ellen, 1 Carmine, Florence L., 2

Farmville Norfolk

Carrington, Catherine E,, Carrington, Mary E., 4

W.

121 Wellons St.

Dinwiddle Portsmouth

1

Phillis St. Edenton, N. C.

W. Queen

Newhall, W. Va. Chalk Level

Pittsylvania

1

Butterworth, Marie, 2 Buxton, Emily Virginia, Byrd, S. Permele, 1

216

1

Burgess, Anna Council, 1 Burks, Eloise Mildred, 1 Burks, Virginia Mosby, 2 Burnett, Phyllis C, 1 Burton, Margaret Myrtle, 2

Bune Mae, 1 Euth Dorothea,

Prospect

.Norfolk

Roanoke Salem

2

Bunch, Carolyn Juanita, Bundy, Margaret N., 1 Burch, Clara Stone, 1

Butler, Butler,

Edward

King and Queen Accomac

Broughton, Aileen, 1 Brown, Earline Isabel, 2 Brown, Edna Elzada, 3 Brown, Martha Eegina, 1 Browning, Mary Louise, 1 Brownley, Mary M., 1 Bryant, Eleanor Belle, 2 Bryant, Margaret Anne, 2 Bryant, Mary Elizabeth, 1 Bryant, Nora Edna, 1 Bugg, Dicia DeJarnette, 1 Bugg, Grace Watson, 1 V.,

Ivor

.Nottoway Amherst

Brooks, Doris Mae, 1 Brooks, Julia Grace, 2

Kathryn

Toano MadisonviUe

Big Island Bedford 21/2 Holly Ave. South Norfolk Newsoms Southampton Newport News .... 2706 Jefferson Ave. 220 Johnson St. Bristol, Va Macclesfield, N. C.

Bridgers, Mary Elizabeth, 3 Brightwell, Frances C, 3 ...... Prince Brinkley, Edrie Hope, l-;jj|:^vf;^;jf^;, .Din^

Bully,

504 Penn. Ave.

Charlotte

Brewer, Lorah, Helen, 2 Brewer, Nannie Louise, 4

Brisbois, Vashti T., 1 Britton, Alice H., 2 Brodie, Bessie T., 3

Kice

Kenbridge

Lunenburg Bristol, Tenn James City

1

Martha Elma,

Address

Edward

Salem

1

Eoanoke Nelson

C

99 Georgia Ave. Oreston 510 Grove St. 23 Orleans Circle 633 Day Ave., S.W. Nelson


Students

Name Carroll,

99

County or City

Anne

Address Middleburg, N. C. Halifax

B.,

1 Carter, Alice Boiling, 4 Carter, Annie Beulah, 1 Carter, Annie Page, 1 Carter, Oara E., 1 Carter, Dabney, 2 Carter, Hazel, 2

Halifax

1607 "Watts Ave., Rugby (North Carolina) Danville, R. 5

Roanoke

Carter, Helen Catherine, 2 Carter, Leola H., 1 Carter, Lorice, 2 Carter, Margaret Ellen, 2 Carter, Mar jorie Helen, 2 Carter, Mary Minor, 2 Carter, Sallie Emmie, 2 Carver, Elizabeth E., 1 Casey, Elizabeth T., 2 Cash, Elizabeth, 1 Cawthorn, Nellie Maye, 1 Chambers, Dreama E., 4

Chambers, Grace R., 4 Chambers, Nellie W., 3 Chandler, Elizabeth M., 2 Chapin, Anne W., 2 Chapin, Martha Rebecca, 4 Chappell, Bertha McCoy, 1 Chappell, Eloise, 3 Cheatham, Stella L, 1 Cherry, Gertrude E., 1 Chitwood, Mae Belle, 2 Clark, Lelia, 1 Clarkson, Marguerite E., 1

Claud, Robbie Ximena, 3 Claud, Ruth Lee, 2 Cleaton, Florence E., 2 Clements, Lucy V., 1 Clements, Mary V., 3 Cobb, Anne Missouri, 1 Cobb, Margaret Forbes, 4 Cocke, Edith Rolf e, 2 Cocks, Alice Elizabeth, 2 Cocks, Mary Rebecca, 2 Codd, Majorie V., 2 Coffman, Emma Mildred, 1 Cogbill, Virginia Courtney, 1 Coggin, Cleo Belle, 1 Coggia, Doris V., 2 Cohoon, Anna C, 2 Cole, Alice Williams, 1

Petersburg Campbell

114 Shore St.

Nottoway Lynchburg

Burkeville

Leesville

911 Wise St.

Campbell Alleghany Alleghany

Leesville

Blue Spring Run Blue Spring Run Lynchburg 911 Wise St. Prince Edward .... Darlington Heights 100

Charlottesville

James City

W. High

St,

Williamsburg 419 Second St.

Farmville

Appomattox

Appomattox

Alleghany Dinwiddle Dinwiddie Mecklenburg

Covington Dinwiddle

Newport News Newport News Hertford, N. C

Edward Edward

Prince Prince

Wise Franklin Charlotte

Era Buffalo Junction .

.

.

.

.

.

5510 Huntington Ave. 5510 Huntington Ave. 36 Road St. Meherrin Green Bay

Norton Rocky Mount Drakes Branch

Bath Southampton Southampton Mecklenburg

Millboro Drewryville Drewryville

LaCrosse

Purdy Manquin

Greensville

King William Southampton Norfolk Fluvanna Prince Prince

Edward Edward

Portsmouth Shenandoah .... Mecklenburg of of Suffolk

Isle Isle

Wight Wight

Halifax

1230

W.

Franklin 27th St.

Columbia Prospect Prospect

324 Hatton St.

Edinburg Boydton Windsor Windsor 223 Clay St.

Vernon Hill

Newport News

Cole, Billie Marion, 1 Cole, Nancy Calhoun, 3 Coleman, Bettie, 1

Coleman, Laura Evelyn, Collier, Edith Grade, 1 Collier, Elizabeth Reba,

Newsoms

Southampton

EmUy

216 34th St. Washington, D. C. ... E. Florence Court Chase City Mecklenburg 1

Amherst Surry

1

Amherst Dendron Garysburg, N. C.


Students

100

Name

County or City Norfolk Norfolk Norfolk Portsmouth

Collings, Alberta Z., 2 Collings, Alfreda L., 2 Colodne, Jeanette E., 2 Conner, Nellie V., 1

Copeland, Edith H., 2 Copeland, Vesta Minerva, 1 Oornwell, Edith Vincent, 4 Costan, Helen Arthur, 2 Costen, Helen Louise, 3 Cousins, Margaret West, 2 Cox, Daisy, 2 Cox, Virginia Lee, 1 Craft, Louise, 2 Cralle, Florence Willis, 1 Cralle, Mildred Lee, 1

Nansemond

Holland Eethune, S. C.

Winchester

125 W. Peyton St. 1301 Floyd Ave. Buell Prince George

Lynchburg Norfolk Prince George Sussex Sussex University Farmville Prince Edward Farmville Norfolk

Crawley, Jane Madison, 4 Cromwell, Carroll, 2 Cross, Sara Lee, 2 Suffolk Crowder, Ida Ellen, Sp Eiehmond Crowder, Ida Mary, 1 Crowder, Yates Minnie, 1 ....... Dinwiddle Crowell, Lucy Theresa, 1 Concord, N. Crute, Elizabeth Marshall, 4 Farmville Curry, Lillie Louisa, 3 Lancaster Dashiell, Katharine Nash, 4 Dashiell, Nancy Bell, 2 Daughtrey, Elsie Lee, 2

Portsmouth

Davidson, Helen I., 3 Davidson, Mrs. Lucy P., Sp Davis, Alice Carmine, 1 Davis, Frances Brown, 1

Norfolk Farmville Norfolk Mecklenburg

Davis, Julia S., 1 Davis, Katherine P., 3 Davis, Lucy Alice, 4 Davis, Lula Mae, 1 Dawson, Grace, 2 Dean, Alice Levinia, 2 Debman, Jessie Leo, 1 Dedmon, Louise, 1

Danville

Deffenbaugh, Anne E., Denit, Nancy, 1 DeShazo, Lelia 0., 2

Address 533 Shirley Ave. 532 Shirley Ave. 735 Graydon Park 143 Florida Ave.

Isle of Isle of

C

Homeville Stony Creek

Eugby Eoad 505 Appomattox St. Prospect 318 Eandolph St. 712 Eedgate Ave. 207 S. Broad St. 3015 Garland Ave.

Woodsdale, N. C. Dinwiddie 71 Franklin Ave. 209 High St. Merry Point 207 London

Wight Wight

St.

Smithfield Carrsville

1521 Lovett Ave.

Beech

St.

613 Baldwin Place Clarksville

158

Mecklenburg Middlesex Southampton

Main St. Union Level Eegent S.

Branchville

Appomattox

Pamplin

2613 Granby Ave. Suffolk 196 Cedar St. Mecklenburg Chase City Petersburg 132 Monroe St. Salem 161 Craig Ave. Dinwiddie Sutherland Charlottesville .... 305 E. Jefferson St.

Norfolk

1

Dickinson, M., Cornelia, 4 Diggs, Alice L., 2 Diuguid, Annie Louise, 2 Dixon, Frances Sudye, 2 Dodson, Elizabeth, 1 Doll, Sara Elizabeth, 2 Doyle, Mattie Leigh, 1 Draper, Margaret B., 3

Drew, Ann Clinton, 1 Drewry, Mildred Mae, 2 Driskill, Eebeeca Lee, 2

Mathews Lynchburg Halifax

Accomae

Susan 53 Federal St.

Vernon Hill Wachapreague Hickory, N.

C.

Dinwiddie

McKenney

Eichmond

3000 Kensington Ave. Wakefield

Sussex

Southampton Charlotte

,

.

.

Ivor

Hosmer


Students

101

Name

County or City

Dryden, Charlotte L., 1 Dudley, Ann Traywock, 1 Duke, Louise E., 2 Dulaney, Evelyn V., 3 Duncan, Mary Eeese, 2 Dunn, Harriette E., 3 Dunnavant, Mary Ellis, 1 Dunton, Margaret Ann, 2

York

Jeffs

Ga

Columbus, Isle of

Halifax Halifax Campbell

Vernon Hill Gladys

Pittsylvania

South Norfolk Dinwiddle Dinwiddle Norfolk Norfolk Essex

A., 1 Delia Eice, 1

Edwards, Edwards, Flora Frances, 2 Edwards, Mary Ida., 1 Edwards, Mavis E., 1 Eggleston, Kathleen L., 2

Sycamore 48 Stewart St.

MeKenney MeKenney Craddock Craddock Dunnsville

Cambria Eidgeway Quinby

Campbell

Brookneal Chuckatuek

Nansemond Prince Edward Elizabeth City

Eice

Hampton, E.

Orange Savannah,

2

Bland

Erdman, Marguerite

Ga

327 E. 50th St.

Middlesex

Aleoma Claremont LawrencevUle

Surry Brunswick Brunswick

E., 2

Newport News Norfolk Portsmouth

Newport News Halifax

1

3

Lahore

Buckingham

Virginia McOue, 3 Ellison, Julia M., 4 Elmore, Elizabeth H., 1 Elmore, Mar jorie C, 2 English, Alice Maude, 3 Ellis,

Clifton Forge Appomattox ....Lynchburg Appomattox

Lawrenceville

Eocky Gap

Wake 334 52d Street Fentress 403 Webster Ave. 1129 23d St. South Boston 625 Brussels St.

Evergreen 1475 Eivermont Ave.

Evergreen 303 North St.

Portsmouth

Farrier, Grace, 1

Clifton Forge

Feagans, Miriam C, 1 Felts, Bernice E., 1 Fenwick, Helen L., 1 Ferguson, Margaret E., 3 Ferguson, Mattie H., 1 Ferree, Anne Woollen, 2 Ferrell, Connie V., 2

Campbell Southampton Albemarle

Mary Elizabeth, 1 Fisher, Lillian G., 1 Fisher, V. Ethel, 1 Fitchett, Marion C, 3

Eoanoke Southampton Eichmond Northampton

Terrell,

Johnsontown

Montgomery Henry Accomac

Eichelberger, Elizabeth, 1 Elder, Nancie Marie, 2 Ely, Edith Elizabeth, 1 Ellington, Mary Ellen, 1 Elliott, M. Virginia, 1 Ellis, Agnes Louise, 1

Eskridge, Doris E., 1 Etheridge, Grace E., 2 Etheridge, Pearl E., 2 Eubank, Annabelle, 1 Evans, Elisabeth B., 4 Evans, Enza Oneda, 1 Evans, Ida Belle, 1 Evans, Minerva Elizabeth, Evans, Myrtle Mae, 1 Everett, Louise C, 2

Carrsville

Northampton

Edmunds, Mary

Elmo Place

617 Va. Ave., Va. Heights Nathalie

Eason, Euth Keller, 1 Edmunds, Betty A., 4

Anna Mae,

St.

Wight

Eoanoke

Early, Evelyn Park, 1

Ellis,

Address

Bristol

412 Alleghany St. Lynchburg, E. 3 Sebrell

Howardsville 509

Nottoway Danville

Halifax

Edmond

St.

Blackstone

482

W. Main

St.

Paces 109 Oxford St. Adams Grove 3133-A Elwood Ave.

Townsend


Students

102

Name Fitzgerald, Annie Ward, 2 Fitzpatrick, Mabel P., 2 Fleet, Mary Louisa, 2 Fogg, Doris Luey, 2 Forbes, Louise H., 4 Ford, Louise G., 4

Forehand, Ethel Mae, 3 Foster, Harriett L., 4 Foster, Louise D., 2

County or City Nottoway

Address Crews Arrington

Nelson

King and Queen

Biscoe

Esses Howertons Eoanoke. 505 Camille Ave., Walnut Hill Wise Norton South Norfolk 2 Ohio St. Staunton 118 Madison Place Norfolk 940 Westover Ave. .

Wight

Carrsville

Charlottesville

Locust Grove

Fowler, Eunice Eandolph, 1 Fowler, Margaret W., 2 Fowlkes, Ellen M., 1

Isle of

Lunenburg

Kenbridge

Frame, Mary Ellen, 1 Frances, Martha Deaton, Franklin, Katharine L.,

Chesterfield

Hallsboro

1 1

Eraser, Lois Gertrude, 2 Fraughnaugh, Gladys H., 2 French, Katherine E., 2 Fritts, Virginia C, 2 Fulgham, Virginia E., 1

Emily Powers, 1 Garner, Alice Winifred, Garnett, Elizabeth S., 1 Garrett, Louise Davis, 1 Gale,

Garrett, Garriss, Garriss,

Boykins 2021 Grove Ave. Blackstone Sparta

Caroline

Sunny Side White Post

Cumberland Clarke Isle of Wight Isle of

CarroUton

Wight

Smithfield

Weldon, N.

1

Thelma K., 2

Mary Bernice, Mary Leigh,

Southampton Eichmond Nottoway

3

2

Edith Violet, 1 Esther Lily, 1 Louise Walthall, 2 Madeline Hart, 4 Gates, Sallye Euth, 1 Gary, Gary, Gary, Gary,

Gayle, Nancy B., 1 George, Grace Alma, 2 Giddens, Gladys lola, 3 Giles, Kathleen Ethel, 2 Gillespie, Ollie M., 4 Gilliam, E. Daphne, 4 Glass, Louise Eosa, 2 Glazier, Frances Hazel, 2 Glenn, Nellie Byrd, 2 Glover, Mary E., 2 Goad, Claire EUen, 3 Goetz, Freia A., 3 Goode, Beatrice A., 1 Goodman, Mildred, 1 Goodman, Victoria C, 2 Goodrich, Lillie E., 1 Goodrich, Euth Harrison, 2

Goodwin, Majorie E., 1 Gordon, Elizabeth L., 2 Graham, Margaret, 2 Grainger, Fannie Moses, 2

Buckingham Powhatan Prince Edward Southampton Isle of Wight Lunenburg Lunenburg Lunenburg Lunenburg Cumberland

C.

Farmville, E. F. D.

Tamworth Eice

Boykins Zuni Kenbridge Kenbridge Kenbridge Kenbridge Farmville, E. 5

Mecklenburg Union Level Portsmouth 211 Owen St. Norfolk 241 W. 31st St. Clifton Forge ...... 305 Alleghany St. Tazewell Prince Edward Halifax Culpeper

Tazewell ....

Farmville, E. F. D.

Halifax Culpeper

Cumberland Manteo

Cumberland Buckingham Carroll

Hillsville

Prince Edward Franklin

Keysville

Eockbridge Portsmouth Surry Surry Portsmouth

Henry Timber Eidge 408 Washington St. Wakefield, E.

University

Norfolk Prince Edward ....

2,

Box

15

Waverly 1613 Barron St.

Eugby Eoad 2901 Colonial Ave. Farmville, E. F. D.


Students

Name

County or City Eoanoke Eoanoke Southampton Wise

Graves, M. Lucile, 1 Graves, Virginia K., 4 Gray, Juanita K., 1 Greear, Mary Elizabeth, 1 Greenberg, Sadie, 2 Griggs, Mignonne, 2 Grimes, Marion H., 2 Grossclose, Mabel, 4 Gurley, Virginia M., 1 Guthrie, Florence A., 1 Gwaltney, Anna Leigh, 4

Norfolk

Eoanoke Norfolk Bland Suffolk

Cumberland Isle of Wight Isle of Wight

Gwaltney, Anna Wren, 2 Gwaltney, Victoria B., 1

Hahn, Virginia Hailey, Thelma

Isle of

Albemarle

Crewe North Garden

Powhatan

Clayville

Nottoway

Harper, Janice M., 1

Nottoway Nansemond

Hatchett, M. Frances, 1 Hawkes, Mildred E., 1 Hayes, Mabel E., 1 Hedley, Elva Maude, 4 Henderlite, Martha E., 2

Hendricks,

Mary W.,

1

Wingina Wingina

528 Bart St. 2222 Floyd Ave. Prince Edward .... Farmville, E. F. D.

Petersburg

T., 2

Toano 1517 Eoanoke St., S.W. 612 Woods Ave., S.W. Norfolk, E. 4

Eichmond

Hardy, Gwendolyn C, 2 Hardy, Mary Wilson, 1 Hargrave, Elizabeth G., 2 Hargrave, Kathryn S., 2

Hatch, Katherine L., 2 Hatch, Margaret D., 2

Windsor

Portsmouth ....

Highland

1

Windsor Smithfield

Buckingham Buckingham

Hansel, Margaret H., 2

J.,

533 Washington Park 215 Wellington Ave., S. 725 Westover Ave. Ceres 210 Central Ave. Sunny Side

221 Fudge St.

Norfolk

Hanes, Mary G., 1 Buckingham Hanes, S. Virginia, 1 Buckingham Hanger, L. Cornelia, 2 Amherst Hanmer, Frances M., 2 Charlotte Hanrahan, Annie Virginia, 2 .... Portsmouth

Harward, Mary Haskins, Emily

Boykina Paul

St.

Wight

James City Eoanoke Eoanoke

E., 2 Hairston, Elizabeth F., 1

Harrell, Mary Emma, 2 Harrell, Eosalind H., 4 Harris, Carolea, 2 Harris, Louise P., 1 Harris, Mabel M., 2 Hart, Helen D., 2

Address 618 Maiden Lane 618 Maiden Lane

Covington

Nell, 1

Haley, Anna Louise, 1 Hall, Bettie Lee, 1 Hall, Frances Anderson, 1 Hall, Pocahontas Scott, 1 Halpin, Irene Marie, 2 Hamilton, Mary Elizabeth, 1 Hamlett, Hannah L., 2 Hammock, Ella Walton, 4 Hamner, Eoberta Alice, 1 Hancock, E. Pauline, 2

103

Dillwyn Dillwyn

Amherst Keysville .

,

202 Webster Ave.

Monterey 435 S. Sycamore St.

Lunenburg

Wattsboro

Petersburg Surry

410 High St. Surry

South Norfolk Norfolk Nelson

Eoanoke Suffolk

Norfolk Dinwiddle Sussex Mecklenburg Petersburg Dinwiddle Norfolk South Norfolk Farmville Halifax

Crewe Whaleyville 53 Poindexter St. 825 Eedgate Ave.

Âť

.

.

.

.

Faber 728

Day

Ave., S.W.

138 Brewer Ave. 1046 35th St.

McKenney Wakefield South Hill 815 Shepard St. Wilson 121 Hardy Ave. 12 Holly St. 517 Appomattox St.

Alton


Students

104

Name Hendricks, Sudie L., 2 Hendrickson, Helen B., 1 Herbert, Nina M., 2 Higgins, Annie Curtis, 1 Hill, Carolyn M., 1 Hill, Madeline, 2 B^ill, Pansy, 3 Hill,

Reba

V., 1

Hilton, Edna Mae, 2 Hilton, Lois, 1 Hilton, Lucille R., 2 Hines, Mazie Lee, 2 Hitchcock, Alice Louise, 2 Hobgood, Inez, 1 Hodges, Mary Elizabeth, 2 Hodges, Sarah Margaret, 2

Hogan, Eleanor G., 1 Hoge, Mildred, 2 HoUaday, Ann Morton,

County or City Halifax Norfolk ^-.i- Suffolk

.Lynchburg Southampton Culpeper Culpeper Halifax Norfolk Norfolk Botetourt Sussex Dinwiddle

Halifax

Roanoke Loudoun

Farmville Holladay, Mrs. Genevieve, B.V. Sp, Farmville HoUaday, Genevieve V., 3 Farmville Holland, Eula Deans, 1 Nansemond Holland, Frances W., 2 Isle of Wight Holland, Mabel V., 1 Suffolk Holland, Mildred May, 1 Surry Hollowell, Elizabeth N., 1 Surry Holmes, Margaret G., 2 2

Holt, Blanche H., 1 Holt, Nancy B., 3

Hood, Eveljm W.,

1

Hopkins, Elizabeth, 4 Horner, Virginia M., 2 House, Nellie C, 2 Hoy, Katherine Alice, 1 Huband, Gladys J., 2

Hubbard, Margaret A., 2 Hudson, Dorothy, 2 Hudson, Flora Mabel, 2 Hudson, Frances A., 2 Huffman, Rebecca ZoU, 2 Hughson, Aylwin, 4 Humphries, Elva Gray, 1 Hunt, Emma Mebane, 2 Hurt, Annie Elizabeth, 1 Hurt, Clara Mamie, 1 Hurt, Laura Logan, 2 Hutt, Elizabeth Lee, 3 Huyett, Margaret R., 1

Anna Wood, 1 M. Jacqueline, 4 Irvine, Lucy J., 2

Inge, Irby,

Irving, Ann Archer, 2 Irving, Paula A., 1

Address Alton 741 Maltby Ave. 338 Cedar Street. 103 Vermont Ave. Boykins Mitchells Mitchells Virgilina Portsmouth, E. 2 205 East 41st St. Fincastle

Wakefield Dinwiddle Oxford, N. C. New Bern, N. C. Lennig 617 Maiden Lane

Round

Hill

510 Beach St. 510 Beach St. 510 Beach St.

Holland

Windsor Broad St.

309 S. Wakefield, R. 2 Hertford, N. C. Claremont Brookneal Campbell Sussex Wakefield Roanoke, 506 Carter Road, Raleigh Court Norfolk 901 Camp Ave. Lynchburg 907 Floyd St. 204 Sussex St. Lynchburg Charlotte Chesterfield

Farmville

Powhatan Lunenburg Pittsylvania

Roanoke Middlesex

Roanoke Salem Charlotte

Lunenburg

Charlotte C. H. Chester 107 Third St.

Moseley Kenbridge Whitmell Berwind, W. Va. 519 Greenwood Road Deltaville

Watts Ave. 120 Union St. Drakes Branch Kenbridge Florence, S. C.

Charlotteville

Prince George

Lunenburg Alleghany Amelia Farmville

703 E. Jefferson St.

Disputanta Blackstone

Low Moor Amelia

C.

H.

1001 High St.


Students

105

Name

County or City

Jackson, Sallie King, 4 Jacobson, Bernice P., 1 Jacobson, Fannye E., 2 Jacobson, Minnie, 1 Jamerson, Grace E., 2 Jarman, Gertrude K., 2

Portsmouth Portsmouth Portsmouth Portsmouth

Jarman, P. Elizabeth, 4

Appomattox

Crozet Crozet

Princess

Susan

Anne

Jefferies, Georgie T., 1

Chesterfield.

Nottoway

Johnson, Helen S., 1 Johnson, Mabel J., 1 Johnson, Margaret A., 1 Johnson, Minnie Louise, 1 Johnson, Ruby B., 2 Johnston, Jeanette T., 2 Johnston, Margaret C, 2

Tazewell

Beulah A., 3 Dorothy L., 2 Effie Brown, 2 Emily E., 4 Evelyn T., 2 Fannie Ida, 1 Grace Viola, 3 Hazel Alise, 2 Helen Humston, Jenilee Anna, 1

1

Halifax Norfolk

Republican Grove Portsmouth, B. 2, Box 339 Northumberland Rehoboth Church

Nansemond

Suffolk, E. 4

Tazewell

North Emporia Concord Wharf

Greensville

Northampton Norfolk

Portsmouth, R. 3

Southampton

Ivor

Emporia 1012 Washington St.

Greensville

Portsmouth

Morrison

Augusta Clifton Forge Staunton

Churchville

813 Rose Ave. 810 Alleghany Ave.

Briuiswick

Gasburg Amelia C. H.

Amelia Northumberland

Edwardsville

News Ferry

Halifax

Northumberland Northumberland 1

E., 1

Lidie Branch, 1 Reba Virginia, 1 Jordan, Margaret U., 2 Jordan, A'^irginia T., 4 Jordan, Edith Lyle, 1 Joyner, Ethel Leigh, 2

Keister, Virginia R., 1 Kesler, Kathryn L., 1

King, Mildred G., 1 Knott, Evelyn F., 2

LaBoyteaux, Ethel Scott, 4 Lamphier, Edith Virginia, 2 Landis, Mildred T., 1 Landon, Mary Catherine, 2 Lane, Audrine Marie, 2 Lane, Helen, 2

Virginia Beach Midlothian Burkeville

Warwick

Juliet A., 3

Kathryn

Pamplin

Albemarle Albemarle

Jenkins, Frances E., 2 Jennings, M. Lillian, 3 Jernigan, Bettie Sue, 4 Jett, Alice C, 4 Johnson, Anona Gibson, 1

Anna Ham, 2 Anna Victoria,

1509 Maple Ave. 634 South St. 634 South St. 617 Sixth St.

Mathews

Jarvis, Alice Miller, 2 Jarvis, Beulah V., 1

Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones, Jones,

Address

Charlottesville ....

Nansemond Augusta Danville

Buckingham Portsmouth Suffolk Greensville

Edwardsville

Wicomico Church 106

W.

Jefferson St. Franklin, R. 3 Churchville 870 Main St. Andersonville 107 Maryland Ave. 216 Pearl St.

Emporia

Southampton

Winton, N. C. Courtland

Roanoke 702 Virginia Ave., Va. Hts. Roanoke, 626 Belleville Rd., Raleigh Court 421 Main St. Ahoskie, N. C Oxford, N. C. .

.

.

Richmond Norfolk Winchester

Lynchburg Tazewell South Norfolk

Richmond 907 Hanover Ave. 425 W. Leicester St. 1320 Ruffner Place Bluefield

26 Chesapeake Ave.


Students

106

Name

County or City

Lang, Lola Frances, 2 Lange, Mary Jane, 1 Lankf ord, Willie Mae, Layne, Beulah M., 1

Accomac Augusta

Mary

Churchville

Purdy

Greensville

1

Bedford Patrick

Leach, Etheljm. Carr, 1 Leavell,

Address Temperanceville

Salem

Elizabeth, 2

Accomac Eichmond

LeCato, Bettie Anne, 3 Leonard, Margaret J., 1 Lewis, Amy Frances, 1 Lewis, Frances Elizabeth, 1 Lewis, Mattie H., 1 Liebman, Eebakah, 2 Lif sey, Margaret Grace, 3 Ligon, Hilda Lucile, 2 Lindauer, Gertrude V., 1 Lipscomb, Ella Mabel, 1 Lipscomb, Temple Belle, 1 Litchfield, Ethel Mae, 1

Farmville Princess Anne

Lobban, Mary Catherine, 2 Logan, Lucile, M., 2 Lohr, Mildred T., 4 Long, Nellie Marie, 1

Augusta Newport News Madison Portsmouth

342 South St. Stuart 140 Elm Street Painter 3414 Noble Ave.

Norfolk. .1106 Bedford Ave., Larchmont

Salem Norfolk Greensville

Appomattox Portsmouth Portsmouth

Enfield, N. C. 450 E. Main St. 421 Ealeigh Ave.

Emporia Pamplin 646 Mt. Vernon Ave. 117 Broad St. Farmville Princess Anne Waynesboro, Box 419 231 52d St. Orange, E. 1 308 Maryland Ave. Troutville

Letts, Stella F., 2

Botetourt

Love, Euth Iva, 2

Lunenburg

Meherrin Gresham, S. C.

Covington Petersburg

132 Court St. 1731 Brandon Ave.

Minnie E., 1 Lowman, Edith W., 1 Lucas, Margaret W., 2 Luck, Mildred J., 1 Lyne, Josephine Sizer, 2 Lovell,

McCarn, Euth F., 1 McClenny, M. Aileen,

Hanover Orange Lexington, N. C

Appomattox

3

Ashland Orange 519

S.

Main

St.

Pamplin

Winston-Salem, N. C 515 Clover St. McCorkle, Sara, 1 Eoanoke 511 Allison Ave., S.W. McCormick, Louise Steele, 3 Norfolk 432 35th St. McCoy, Annie Marion, 2 Montgomery McCoy, Euby Elizabeth, 2 McCoy Portsmouth 934 HoUaday St. McGavock, Emily G., 1 Orange Mcintosh, Annie Griswold, 2 .... Orange Mclntyre, Cornelia M., 2 Mclntyre, Florence H., 2

McKann, Maude, 1 McKenney, Evelyn

T., 2

Macdonald, Isabel Marie, 2 Mackasey, Margaret E., 2 Maddux, Carolyn B., 3 Maddux, Eosa Lee, 2

Maddux, Thelma

Madison, Peggy, 2

Malbon, Mary Frances, Malbon, Mary Lee, 2

Mann,

Juliet L., 2

Manson, Lora Ashby, 2

Middlesex Samos Lancaster White Stone Norfolk, 1001 Hulview Ave., Ocean View Petersburg 1211 W. Washington St. Nottoway Blackstone

Lunenburg Albemarle

L., 1

Mahan, Nettie C, 1 Mahoney, M. Elizabeth,

Bennettsville, S. C. Bennettsville, S. C.

.*

Farmville Farmville 1

Southampton

1

Norfolk Portsmouth Lunenburg Eoanoke

Kenbridge Charlottesville, E. F. D. 526 S. Main St.

100 High St. Ivor 414 York St. 524 Queen St.

Kenbridge 31 Eiverland

Eoad


Students

Name

County or City

Mapp, Annie Lucille, Mapp, Courtney, 2

Marsteller,

Lucy

E., 2

Martin, Charline J., 2 Martin, Elizabeth Lee, 2 Martin, L. Paye, 1 Mason, Prances Lee, 1 Mason, Elsie Blanche, 2 Massey, Banna Price, 1 Matthews, E. Jeannette, 2 Maynard, Annie Laurie, 1

Maynard, Lucile, Mayo, Gretchen,

1

2

Meador, Gladys Lee, 1 Melvin, Elma Coneley, 2 Meredith, Caroline Pegram, 2 Michael, Alice B., 2 Michaux, Elsie Ingram,

1

Middleton, Julia C, 2 Milam, Elsie Frances, 1 Milam, Irma, 1 Miles, Ethel Mae, 2

Moore, E. Virginia, 3 Moore, Ella Louise, 3 Moore, Evelyn P., 1 Moore, G. Virginia, 1 Moore, Martha Ellen, 2 Morgan, Frances E., 3 .

.

...

.

Morris, Jeannette, 1 Morris, Mildred E. L., 2 Morris, Ocie Princess, 1 Morrisette, Emilie H., 2 Morriss, Ava Virginia, 1 Morriss, Mary Louise, 1 Morton, Lavalette E., 2 Moseley, Genevieve, 1 Moseley, Mary Emma, 2 Moses, Betty B., 1 Mottley, Bessie May, 4 Mottley, Laura H., 1 Mount joy, Daisy Lee, 1 Murdoch, Penelope H., 2 Murray, Ethel E., 1

Jenkins Bridge 1112 Second St., S.W. Madisonville Halifax 1850 Airline Ave. Halifax Farmville, E. P. D.

Halifax .Portsmouth Halifax Prince

Edward

Lunenburg

Victoria

Lancaster Virginia Beach Patrick Nelson

Morattico Virginia Ave. Stuart

Paber CuUen

Charlotte

Mecklenburg Lynchburg Prince

Clarksville

1006 Turnpike

Edward

Jeffress

730 Webster Ave. Wakefield 413 Glasgow St.

Norton 313 Madison St. Oxford, N. C. Lawrenceville

Brunswick

Powhatan

Buckingham Portsmouth

York Salem Eichmond Nottoway Norfolk

Waynesboro Charlotte

Norfolk

St.

Hampden-Sidney

Mecklenburg Portsmouth Surry Portsmouth Wise Eocky Mount, N. C

Norfolk Louisa

V., 2 Minor, Lillian P., 4

Exmore Wachapreague

Charlotte

Charlotte Pittsylvania Pittsylvania

Emelyn

Address

Northampton Accomac Accomac Eoanoke

1

Mariner, Beatrice M., 1 Markley, Mary, 4 Marshall, AUie, 2 Marshall, Elizabeth B., 1 Marshall, Henrietta Leah, 1 Marshall, Louise C, 1 Marshall, May Chiswell, 1 Marshall, Ormand M., 2 Marshall, Virginia, 2

Mills,

107

Michaux Brookneal Sutherlin

Mt. Airy 733 W. Liberty St. Mineral Oxford, N. C. Dillwyn 104 S. Elm Ave. Poquoson 243 Broad St. 2711 Fifth Ave. Crewe, Box 50 508 Graydon Park 505 Chestnut Ave. Madisonville 229 E. Indian Eiver Eoad

Prince Edward Prince Edward Farm\ille

Farmville, E. 3 Farmville, E. 3 610 Oak St.

Buckingham

Nuckols

Brunswick

Ebony

Lynelibuig

Lynchburg Amelia C. H. Amelia C. H.

Amelia Amelia

Wight Nottoway Eichmond

Isle of

Smithfield

24

W.

Blackstone Marshall St.


Students

108

Name Murray, Nellie Clay, 1 Murrell, Blanche H., 1 Myers, Dorothy A., 2 Myers, Helen Dorothy, 1 Myers, Louise Margaret, Myers, Ruth Peck, 1

Danville

Lynchburg

King and Queen 1

West Point 510 Beech St, Ahoskie, N. C 209 E. Church St. Farmville 402 Buffalo St. Gate City Scott Williamsburg .... 244 S. Boundary St. Farmville 533 S. Main St. Farmville 531 S. Main St. Farmville 600 Main St. Farmville 600 Main St. 424 N. Main St. Suffolk Winston-Salem, N. C. ... 904 Davie Ave.

.... Farmville

Nightengale, Freda A., 1 Noel, Lilian, 2 Noel, Mary Josephine, 1 1

Norfleet, Clara J., 1 Norman, Lucile, 1

Halifax Kinston, N. C.

1

Oettinger, Mary T., 1 Old, Annie Celeste, 1 Orgain, Maria W., 4 Orgain, Parke Leigh, 2 Overby, Blanche, 1 Overby, Lucy Haile, 4

Owen, Katharine McD., Owen, Ruth Esther, 1 Owens, Mrs. Zelpha, 1 Page, Nellie Edith, 2 Palmer, Ann Ware, 1 Palmer, Dorothy Lee,

Dinwiddle

Pittsylvania

Augusta Suffolk

Parker, Greenhow, 3 Parker, Mary Blackwell, 1 Parker, Mary Sue, 2 Parker, Virginia M., 2 Pair, Martha Blunt, 1 Parson, Annie Byrdie, 1 Patterson, Fannie Kathryn, 2 Patton, Rachael Eve, 2 Payne, Elizabeth M., 1 Peck, Mary Grigsby, 1 Peek, Mildred Olivia, 1 Pedigo, Phyllis Payne, 1 Peele, Sallie Prudence, 1 Pendleton, Byrdie Page, 2 Perdue, Lena E., 1 Perry, Edna Lavinia, 1 Perry, Mary Louise, 1 Peters, Josephine Willis, 3

Middlesex

Nottoway Southampton Isle of Wight Nansemond Newport News Amherst Sussex ...

South Boston, R. 3 206 S. Independence St.

Dinwiddle

Accomac

1

.

Wellville Meredithville

Bedford

2

.

Nottoway Brunswick Pittsylvania Pittsylvania

Paris, Willie Alice, 1

Phillips, Alma E., 1 Phillips, Pauline E., 1

Fincastle Fincastle

Botetourt Botetourt

1

Nickels, Sarah, 2

Oakes, M. Elizabeth,

208 Mt. Vernon Ave. 921 Taylor St. 315 W. Main St. 2306 Memorial Ave.

Lynchburg

Nance, Margaret E., 2 Newman, Frances Virginia, Newsome, Janie Estelle, 1 Newton, Mary Elizabeth, 1

NoUey, Edith Wayland, NoUey, Ella Harris, 1

Address

County or City Danville

Bedford Savannah, Ga

Chatham Chatham Longwood Ave. Chatham Bloxom Waynesboro 231 Clay Street Saluda

Crewe Franklin Smithfield

Holland 315 51st Street

New Glasgow Jarratt

Bedford 110 East 35th St.

Horsey Norfolk 812 W. 34th St. Roanoke, 519 Lincoln Ave., Lee-Hy Court 224 Lexington Ave. Covington Lewiston, N. C.

Accomac

Wythe Chesterfield

Richmond Newport News York

Wytheviile

Matoaca Edenton, N. C. Tyner, N. C. 1319 N. 20th Street 536 29th Street Poquoson


Students

Name Phillips, Euby Myrtle, 1 Pierce, Virginia Pocahontas, 1 Pillow, Dorris Evelyn, 2 Piper, Lnlie Hobgood, 1 Pitt, Lucile Helen, 2 Pittman, S. Groveen, 1 Pollard, Annie Crowder, 1 Poole, Etta Snead, 1

Poole, Laurie Louise, 2 Poore, Mar jorie Emma, 2 Potts, Mary Virginia, 4 Potts, Nannie Eldridge, 2 Powell, Estelle Neomie, 2 Powell, Margaret Estelle, 2 Presson, A, Virginia, 2 Price, Ruby Pearl, 4 Province, Lucretia Mae, 2 Pruden, Louise T., 4

Putney, Elia Blanche, 3 Raine, Virginia Elizabeth, 2 Ralph, Mary Virginia, 3 Ramey, Janie, 1 Ramsey, Mary Virginia, 1

Ramsey, Ruby May, 2 Rawls, Carrie Elizabeth, 2 Rawls, Mary Elizabeth, 2 Rawls, Nannie Blowe, 2 Read, Mary McClung, 2 Reames, Rebecca, 2 Reeves, Grace Allen, 2

County or City Nelson .

.

.

Buckingham Roanoke

109 Address Wintergreen Arvonia 348 Ninth Ave., S.W. Oxford, N. C. Pinetops, N. C.

Luray Sunny Side

Page Amelia Halifax Susses Charlotte

Farmville

Buffalo Junction Stony Creek Keysville 501 Buffalo St.

Lunenburg

Dundas

Norfolk .... 206 W. Princess Anne Eoad Portsmouth G32 Webster Ave. Sussex Wakefield

Cumberland

Farmville, R. 5

Doyne

St.

W. Queen

St.

520 Main

St.

219 Broad

St.

Farmville

Edenton, N. C Farmville Danville

Accomac Scott

Bedford Bedford

Nansemond Nottoway Nottoway Bedford Dinwiddle Roanoke

118

Keller Gate City

East Main East Main

St. St.

Franklin, R. 3 Burkeville Burkeville

Evington

Ford 306 Otterview Ave.

Renna Caldwell, 2 .... Nottoway Crewe Reynolds, Mary Louise, 2 Northumberland Coan Rhodes, Katharine E., 2 Cumberland Cartersville Lynchburg .... Ill Westover Boulevard Rhodes, Lillian L., 2 Charlottesville Rhodes, Pauline Audrey, 1 Monticello Road Rice, Virginia F., 1 Portsmouth 3 Davis Apt. Richardson, Gertrude P., 1 Roanoke 103 Riverland Road Richardson, Louise M., 4 Farmville 806 High Street Riddle, Bessie Meade, 4 Norfolk D Raleigh Square Rigby, Mary Nuth, 1 Montgomery Cambria Ripberger, E. Annette, 1 Lunenburg Kenbridge Ripberger, Nellie Charles, 2 Lunenburg Kenbridge Riss, Helen Elizabeth, 2 Norfolk 308 W. 14th St. Roberts, Carolyn P., 1 Amelia Amelia C. H. Roberts, Mary Fay, 2 Wise Wise Roberts, Unity DeLacey, 1 Hickory, N. C 1700 Ninth Ave. Robinson, Elizabeth, 1 Wythe Mas Meadows Roche, Catherine Alice, 1 Hampton 167 Linden Ave. Rodes, Ethel Bibb, 3 Nelson Bryant Rodgers, Nettie Mae, 1 Prince George Petersburg, R. 2 Rodisky, Blanche, 2 1254 Brambleton Ave. Norfolk Rogers, Hettie Mlae, 1 Surry Wakefield Rogers, Katherine Cecelia, 1 ....Lynchburg 1301 Harrison St. Rogers, Mary Virginia, 1 Surry Wakefield Reinicker,


Students

110

Name

County or City

^

Grace Mildred, 1 Eose, Lucy Elizabeth, 1 Eoss, Daisy Belle, 1 Eothrock, M. Louise, 4 Eowe, Margaret Elizabeth, 1 Boyal, Mary Christian, 3 Eoyal, Eachel Louise, 1 Eucker, Elizabeth, 4 Eucker, Frances Elendor, 4 Eucker, Virginia M., 2 Eudasill, Elvira S., 1 Euss, Leona Evelyn, 1 Eux, Dorothy Goode, 1

Isle of

llopc,

Eyan, Eva, 1 Eyland, Alice Hubbard,

Newport News Tazewell Tazewell

Bedford Bedford Bedford Eoanoke Tazewell

Norfolk Lexington Norfolk Brunswick

Gladys Mae Belle, 2 Samford, Susie M., 1 Sanford, Kathleen Lyle, 1

Sussex Savage, Christine Cross, 1 Nansemond Savedge, Mary Adams, 4 Sussex Savedge, Eebecca Gaynell, 1 .... Sussex Sawyer, Elizabeth M., 1 Norfolk Prince Edward Schultz, Emilie Louise, 1 Scott, Elizabeth Madison, 3 Powhatan Tazewell Scott, Sammy Alan, 2

Brunswick

Sebrell, Sue Dunn, 2 Sebrell, Virginia Payne, 3

Ljaichburg Elizabeth City

Mary Catherine, 2 Mary Gwendolyn, 1

Wythe Portsmouth Farmville Farmville

.

2129 18th St., N.W. South HUl 608

New York Ave. 41 Jefferson St. 711 Park Ave. Alberta Jarratt Whaleyville Littleton

Wakefield 932 Harrington Ave. Green Bay Vinita Tazewell Lawrenceville 227 Cleveland Ave.

Hampton Kent 's Store Dendron Wytheville 215 Maryland Ave.

Appomattox Appomattox

Norfolk .

.

Finneywood Hertford, N. C. 2584 Ruffin Way

Wise

Wise

Pulaski

Pulaski

Roanoke Norfolk

1

Whaleyville

Lunenburg

.

...

Wythe Southampton

408 Woods Ave., S.W. 1133 Graydon Ave. Wytheville Boykins

Chatham

Pittsylvania Prince Edward

Prospect

Tabb

York Mecklenburg .... Southampton

Clarksville

Franklin

Wake

Eoanoke

St. St.

Bracey

Nansemond

Sylvia, 2

Sizemore, Eva May, 1 Skinner, Virginia Rebecca, 1 Sledd, Gladys Hobson, 4 Sloan, Alpha Price, 1

.

Mecklenburg

Ruth Myrtle, 1 Shepard, Mary Frances, 1 Shepheard, Gertrude Butt, 2 Sheppard, Mrs. Mecca Vicars, 4 Sheppard, Roda Neel, 1 Shoffner, Louise Agatha, 1

Simpson, Lena Carleton, 1 Simpson, Lucille Marian, 1 Sinclair, Carolyn L., 1

Nottoway C.

.... Surry

Shelton,

Lucille, 1

1302 Orange Ave., N.W. Tazewell

Fluvanna

Seward, Louise Elizabeth, 1 Sexton, Elizabeth G., 2 Shackelford, Thelma Euth, 2 Shannon, Colleen, 1 Shannon, Mrs. Hylda T., 2 Shaw, Lelia Rebecca, 2 Shelton, Lucy Eebecca, 1

Simmons,

Moneta Moneta Moneta

Nottoway Washington, D. Mecklenburg

1

Simmerman, Mary Crockett,

Stony Creek 265 Gray Street Mt. Airy, N. C. 829 27th St. Tazewell Tazewell

Danville

Sale,

Siegel,

Carrsville

Dinwiddie

Salasky, Ruth, 2 Sale, Frances, 4

Selden, Selden,

Address

Wight

Forest, N. C. 603 Richelieu Ave., S.


Students

Name Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith, Smith,

County or City Brunswick Alice Dorothy, 3 Dinwiddle Alice Elizabeth, 1 Eichmond .... ALma Elsie, 2 Catherine Gertrude, 1 .... Nansemond Ellen Harriet, 4 Farmville Covington Ellen Hudgins, 1 Din-wdddie Evelyn Carter, 1 Eichmond .... Florence Eose, 1 Newport News Frances Berkeley, 2 Cumberland Frances Carter, 1 Frances Marion,

Laura May,

Lelia Olivia, 1

Lorna Doone, 2

Mae

Ernestine, 2

.

Mattie Eogers, 2 Mildred Percy, 1

Sara Belle, 2

Snider, Virginia Ellen, 2

Snow, Annie Laurie, 1 Solt, Edyth Amelia, 2 Somers, Katherine, Sp

Holland 519 S. Main St. 206 Lexington St. Petersburg, E. 4 101

W. Overbrook Eoad 329 50th Street

Cumberland Branchville

Bird 's Nest Biscoe

615 Washington St. Eoanoke Eapids, N. C. 227 Hinton St.

Nottoway Burkeville Petersburg, 214 Suffolk Ave., Colonial Hts Farmville 315 Appomattox St. Mecklenburg Chase City Norfolk Fentress Culpeper Brandy Norfolk Tazewell Lancaster

1016 Brandon Ave. West Grahtun White Stone Fairfield,

Petersburg

Northumberland Eockingham .

.

.

.

Lancaster Lancaster Nelson

Eemo Harrisonburg Millenbeck Millenbeck Lovingston Henderson, N. C. Chester

Chesterfield

Amherst Eoanoke .

.

Middlesex Alexandria

Accomac

Ky.

129 Marshall St.

Wythe

1

Stubbs, Mrs. Christine Smith, 1 Ann Carrington, 1

Talley, Jettie M., 2 Taliey, Lillie Inez, 2

4

Southampton Franklin Winston-Salem, N.C., 530 Brooktown Ave. Pulaski Pulaski, Box 370 Halifax Clover Hopewell 3 Burnside St.

1

Sturgis, Helen Belle, 2 Sutton, Frances Gertrude, 1 Sykes, Eloise, 2 Sykes, Mary Elizabeth, 1

E

W. Overbrook Eoad

.

Petersbui-g

Virginia Belle, 1

Stump,

.

Halifax Petersburg

Odelle Virginia, 1

Margaret Mae,

Petersburg,

101

Dillwyn Prince Edward Farmville Portsmouth 2517 Bayview Boulevard Martinsville 214 Gravely St.

Margaret Inez, 2

Spain, Virginia Lee, 2 Spencer, Carrie Flournoy, 4 Spencer, Garland, 1 Spiers, Sara, 4 Spindle, Alice Mildred, 4 Spital, Helen, 2 Spracher, Clara May, 2 Squires, Dorothy Lucille, 4 Stallard, Pauline, 2 Steere, Doris Bruce, 1 Stegeman, Florence, 3 Stephenson, Georgiana E., 4 Stevens, Frances Catherine, 1 Stevens, Gladys Eudd, 1 Stevens, Nellie Louise, 1 Stewart, Mildred, 2 Stiff, Margaret Elizabeth, 3 Stone, Willie Irene, 1 Story, Elsie Dabney, 1

Address Danieltown

Southampton Northampton King and Queen Buckingham

3

1

Smitherman, Elizabeth,

Stott,

111

Wyt,heville

Sweet Briar 905 Third Ave., N.W. Saluda 922 Cameron St. .

Pungoteague Hertford, N. C.

Albemarle

Scottsville Harrellsville, N. C.

Mecklenburg Buffalo Junction Mecklenburg .... Buffalo Lithia Springs


Students

112

Name

County or City Address Mecklenburg .... Buffalo Lithia Springs Cumberland Cartersville Dinwiddle Ford

Talley, Nellie, 1

Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor, Taylor,

Alice Burgess, 2 Belle Elizabeth, 1 Frances Pannill, 2 Helen Elizabeth, 2

Mamie C, 1 Mary Frances,

Eichmond Lynchburg

Ford Orphanage 732 Holbrook Ave.

Amherst, E.

410

2

.

.

.

1

.

.

.

Mary Elizabeth, 2 Mary Evelyn, 2

Eoanoke

Altavista

North Emporia 164 College Ave.

Sago ....

Madison

Powhatan

.

Ballsvllle Clarksville Wilson, N. C.

.Lynchburg

3634 Fort Ave. 662 Jefferson St. 1706 Berkeley Ave.

Danville

Petersburg

King William Norfolk

Lynchburg Mecklenburg Brunswick Northampton Eichmond Nottoway Nottoway

Truitt, S. Elizabeth, 4 Tuck, Lucille Evelyn, 1 Tucker, Dorris Evelyn, 2

Mary

Alexander, 3 Tumin, Bessie Gertrude, 1 Tune, Lelia Margaret, 2 Tune, Lena Victoria, 2

2703 Eoanoke Ave.

1611 Ashland Ave. Eoanoke, E. 2, Box 127 Lewisburg, N. C.

Mecklenburg .

St.

Burk 's Garden

Newport News Madison

Tickle, Lillian Madeline, 2 Timberlake, Lucy Clifton, 1 Timberlake, Sarah E., 2 Tisdale, Lola Lee, 1 Tomlinson, Lucile, 2 .

W. Main

Franklin

Norfolk

1

Box 90

South Hill Ivy

Greensville ... Danville

1

3,

Madison Heights Dayton

Covington Mecklenburg Albemarle Tazewell Campbell

Thurston,

Tompkins, Margaret Louise, Townes, Lito Kathleen, 1 Townes, Eosa S., 1 Townsend, Dorothy A., 1 Traf ton. Alma, 1 Traylor, Evelyn Eussell, 1 Trimm, Marguerite Anne, 2 Trotter, Agnes Baugh, 2

.... Presbyterian

Amherst Amherst Eockingham

1

Thornton, Elizabeth Dudley,

Tucker,

2914 Chamberlayne Ave.

Danville

1

Terry Edna Catherine, 3 Thomas, Helen Hoover, 4 Thomas, Marjorie W., 3 Thomas, Ola Elizabeth, 4 Thompson, Annabelle, 1 Thompson, Evelyn Byrd, 1 Thompson, Lucy Eoberta, 1 Thompson, Virginia Louise, Thompson, Willie Catherine, Thrift,

Stuart ....

Dinwiddle 1

Matilda Crews,

Eosa Marie, 2 Euth Virginia,

Patrick

728

Manquin

W.

Princess Anne Eoad 1110 Griffin St.

South Hill Lawrenceville Birds Nest 2000 Fairfax Ave.

Crewe Blackstone

Norfolk .... 367 W. Princess Anne Eoad Vernon Hill Halifax Vernon Hill Halifax Crewe Nottoway 128 Benefield Ave. Danville Wirtz Franklin

Tunstall, Lucy Ida, 1 Turbiville, Alice Atwell, 2 Turner, Elsie Meador, 1 Turner, Nina Maea, 2

Isle of

Updike, Virginia EsteUe, 3

Campbell

LeesviUe

Vaden, Mary Jane, 1 Vaughan, Louise Morton, 2

Charlotte

Campbell

Keysville Altavista

Vincent, Mary William, 1 Vincent, Monroe, 2 Vincent, Virginia Caroline, 4 Volk, Frances Lee, 3

Wight

Greensville

Eichmond .

.

.

.

Greensville

Warwick

Colosse

Emporia Ave Emporia

123 Grove

Menchville


t

Students

Name

113

County or City Lunenburg

Waddill, Margaret, 1 "Wade, Mary Elizabeth, 2

Norfolk Norfolk Parmville

Margaret E., 4 Walmsley, Frances, 3 "Wallace,

"Walshe, Violet Gertrude, 2 Walton, Margaret, 2 "Ware, Edwina Nella, 1 "Warriner, Eloise Brent, 2 Warriner, Margaret Louise, 3

Watkins, Agnes Venable, 4 "Watkins, Dorothy, 3 "Watkins, Dorothy Theresa, 2 "Watkins, Gay Dee, 2 "Watkins, Sue Gertrude, 2 "Watts, Carolyn Mercer, 1 Watts, Catherine A., 2 Watts, Mildred "Whiting, 2 "Webb, Nellie Perkins, 1 Webber, Susie Belle, 1 Wells, Ida Parrish, 2 West, Evelyn Wells, 1 West, Lilla Florence, 2

Westbrook, Marjorie Beeks, 2 Weston, Elizabeth Irma, 3 "Whipple, Virginia Norris, 1 "V\Tiite, Audrey Elizabeth, 1 White, Carrie Lee, 1 White, Frances Forrest, 2

Eoanoke Danville

Amherst Farmville .

.

.

.

Richmond Farmville Charlotte

Richmond

Hampton Norfolk Dinwiddle

Roanoke Mecklenburg Lynchburg Sussex

Portsmouth Lee .... Bedford Roanoke

Anne

White, Gladys Myrtle, 1

White, M. Pauline, 1 "White, Orline Wilson, 4 White, Sallie Irma, 2

Kate Carter, M. Arnold, 1

Campbell Bristol

Norfolk

Roanoke Dinwiddle 2

Whitehurst, Nellie Male, 2 Whitlock, Louise Dyer, 1

Whitmore, Emily Sue, 4 Whitworth, Marian S ., 1 Whyte, Ida Venable, 2 "Whyte, Kitty Friend, 1 Wiley, Alice Mount, 3 Wiley, Mary Alice, 1 Wilkerson, Bettie, 3 Wilkerson, Mary Ela, 1 Wilkerson, Mary Winfrey, 2 Wilkersen, Sarah E., 2 Wilkinson, Gladys E., 2 Wilkinson, Katherine H., 2 Wilkinson, Linda E., 1 Wilkinson, Mary Jane, 2 Willcox, Barbara B., 1 Willcox, Helen Warner, 2 Williams, Arlene Lee, 1

Sandidges 610 Buffalo St. 2224 Grove Ave. 710 High St. 1021 Holladay St. Blackstone 32 "Woodstock Apts. Roanoke Ave. 240 Newport News Ave. 1619 St. Denis Ave. Petersburg, R. 1 Grove Park, R. 3

Boydton 1114 Wise St. Homeville 1037 ''A" Street Jonesville

Bedford 601 Marshall Ave.

Mobjack Wakefield

N. C. Brookneal 224 Johnson St. Enfield,

"White, Lillian Elizabeth, 1 "White, Mabel Virginia, 1 White, M. Elizabeth, 2

"Whitehead, "Whitehurst,

634 Michigan Ave. Norfolk, R. 3, Box 61 409 Beech St. 312 Woods Ave. 1116 E. Main St.

Keysville

Portsmouth Nottoway Lynchburg

Princess Sussex

Address Victoria

Amherst Amherst

Norfolk, R. 1 601 Marshall Ave., S.W.

Harpers Home Amherst Amherst

Norfolk .... 718 W. Princess Anne Road Hickory Norfolk Milton, N. C. Blackstone Dinwiddle

Smyth Norfolk Norfolk

Smyth Pittsylvania Farmville Prince Edward Prince Edward Prince Edward

Petersburg Dinwiddle Charles City

Dinwiddie Petersburg Petersburg Prince Edward

Marion 736 Redgate Ave. 736 Redgate Ave. Saltville

Dry Fork Serpell Heights

Prospect Prospect Farmville 842 Shepherd St. Dinwiddie Holdcrof

McKenney 1659 Berkeley Ave. 1659 Berkeley Ave.

Green Bay


Students

114

Name Williams, Williams, Williams, Williams, Williams, Williams, Williams, Wiliams, Williams,

County or City Halifax Campbell

Elizabeth, J., 4

Elizabeth L., 1

Frances

Mkry

1

Portsmouth Campbell

Sallie Helen, 1

Sara Ewell, 2

Thelma Roberts,

Ada

2

Ocean View Roanoke

Wilson, Frances Anne, 1 Wilson, Julia Elizabeth, 2 Wilson, Mabel Fay, 1 Wilson, Mary Walker, 1 Wimbish, Alice C, 2 Winer, Sylvia, 1 Winston, M. Elizabeth, 1 Wise, Ellen Rebecca, 1 Wise, Katharine T,, 2 Wisecarver, Evelyn, 2 Wiseley, Mary Jane, 4

Augusta Cumberland Campbell

Roanoke Pittsylvania Pittsylvania Pittsylvania Danville 1

.... Nelson

Hanover

1

1

Main

St.

Keysville Jetersville

1607 Rivermont Ave.

Lot

Middlesex Norfolk

Norfolk Campbell Campbell

Townsend Washington St. Waynesboro

82

Amelia Lynchburg

Fayetteville, N.

S.

Farmville Brookneal Hickory

Princess Anne Oxford, N. C Charlotte

C

707 Park Ave. Hinsdale Ave. Buell

Rustburg Concord Depot 505 Arden Road Long Island Long Island Long Island 310 Gray Street

Lovingston

Ashland

Wight Wight Lynchburg

Benns Church Benns Church 409 Walnut St.

Prince George

Petersburg, R. 2

Isle of Isle of

F., 1

408

Winchester

Yeoman, Elizabeth B., 2 Yeoman, Lucy Marie, 1 Young, Florine Rae, 2 Dorothy

Ruark 1015 Paxton St. Roseland Nathalie 702 West 31st St, Skipwith 1006 Clay St.

Lynchburg Northampton

Isla Tazewell, 1

Hanna Elizabeth, Zollinger, Mary C, 1

625 Linden Ave. Brookneal 206 Mt. Vernon Ave. 921 Camp Ave, 721 Colonial Ave. 1234 W. Washington St. 120 Ocean Ave. 716 Maiden Lane

Nelson Halifax Norfolk Mecklenburg

V/orsham, Ruth Louise, 1 Wrenn, Myrtle May, 1 Wright, Evelyn Margaret, Wright, Gertrude, 1

Yoimgblood, Mary Rose,

Sutherlin Keysville

Danville

Woodhouse, Dorothy C, 1 Woodhouse, Frances, 3 Woods, Emma lona, 2 Woodson, Elizabeth G., 3 Woodson, Kathleen, 1 Woodson, Viola Gray, 3 Worsham, Dorothy E., 1

Zilles,

Third Ave., R. 3

Middlesex

Womack, Katharine B., 2 Wood, Bernice, Lorine, 1 Wood, Hazel Lee, 2 Wood, Inez, 1 Wood, Katherine Mary, 1 Wood, Mary Rose, 1 Wood, Phyllis, 3 Wood, Sarah Willis, 2

Ziegler,

Danville

Norfolk Norfolk Petersburg

T., 2

Willis, Frances Virginia, 2 Willis, G. Elizabeth, 1 Wilshin, lone Elizbeth, 2

Worsham,

Clover

Brookneal

Danville Pittsylvania Charlotte

O., 1 E., 2

M. Virginia,

Address

Philadelphia, Peim., 4226 Baltimore Ave. Wellville Dinwiddle Chase City Mecklenburg

NOTE: Numbers following names of students indicate Class, as: 1, First Year (Freshman) 2, Second Year (Sophomore) ; 3, Third Year (Junior) 4, Fourth Year (Senior) Sp., Special Student, ;

;

;


Students

115

RECAPITULATION Total in College Department

1,004

Campus Training School High School Department

284

Grades

94

378

378

John Eandolph Training School (Rural)

High School Department

154

Grades

55

209 Prospect Training School

209

(Rural)

High School

200 68

Grades

268

268

Rice Training School (Rural)

High School Grades

119 47 166

Students in Simimer Quarter, 1926 Total for Session 1926-1927 Total number of Graduates

166 432 2,457 3,679


Stateteachcol192728stat  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you