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ROTWNDA

SIXTY-SIXTH YEAR

Tuesday, October 2P, 1986

Number Six

Artists Of The Month Announced Deborah McClintock, of Hampden-Sydney, has been chosen Artist of the Month at I-ongwood College. Her winning work was a drawing titled "My Garden," which was done with a flair pen. She received a $50 cash award, and her work is on display in the Bedford Building at Longwood. Mrs. McClintock, a part-time student, is attending her first semester at Longwood. In fact, this is the first time she has gone to school since graduating from Mary Washington College in 1968. "I've been raising kids since

then," said Mrs. McClintock, the mother of four children. She has lived in the Farmville area since 1975. Second place in the Artist of the Month competition went to Kelley Coggsdale, of Suffolk, for her mixed media work, "The Silver Screen." The third-place finisher was Susan Hilton, of Richmond, for her pencil drawing, "The Illusion of Dream." The Artist of the Month competition is open to all students enrolled in art classes at Longwood. The winner is selected by the art faculty. Dr. Chock McCarter, head of Visual ft Performing Arts dept. (bottom row, 2nd from right), welcomes to matinee (bottom, from left) Joyce Sweet of Appomattox HS, Janet Westin of Mecklenburg Academy and Jim Weighand of Amelia HS, and (top row, from left), Carl Wood of Fluvanna HS, Dr. Dong Young and Jim Frizzell of Varina HS. More than 800 students from area high schools and other schools from as far away as the Richmond area attended a special matinee of Ah! Wilderness at Longwood College recently. The Oct. 10 performance in Jarman Auditorium was attended by students from Prince Edward County Elementary and Prince Edward High School,

Prince Edward Academy, Amelia County High School, Appomattox County High School, Varina High School in Henrico County, Fluvanna High School, and Mecklenburg Academy. Residents of Brookview Lodge in Farmville, Charter Oaks I in Charlotte Courthouse, and Charter Oaks II in Blackstone also attended. Some 816 students and others were in attendance.

The Longwood Players' production of Ah! Wilderness, Eugene O'Neill's only comedy, played Oct. 8-12. It was directed by Dr. Doug Young, professor of speech and theatre. Longwood has provided matinee performances of several of its plays for area high school students.

Business Innovation Center

Deborah McClintock and her winning work, "My Garden."

serve as a resource and By MADONNA ORTON Longwood College is educational outreach unit in announcing the Open House of its support of programs which newly created Business inspire economic development, Innovation Center on Tuesday, entrepeneurship, and human October 28, 1986. Two very resource development. Why would students want to get distinguished visiting guest speakers for today's ceremony involved in this? "To paraphrase are Governor Gerald L. Baliles something Jack Jacques (Dean and state senator Howard P. of the School of Business and Anderson. The Longwood Economics) once said," stated Business Innovation Center, Barrett Baker, Management Intern for the Innovation Center. located across from the "Southside Virginia is our home Cunningham dorms in the Hiner Building, is a unit of the School of and if we don't take care of it, Business and Economics who will? And even though I'm from Northern Virginia I don't reporting to the Dean. The basic purpose of the Center view the state in two separate parts, so whatever I do here is to strengthen the region's effects all of Virginia. If we can business and industrial competitiveness in domestic and make a difference here, maybe we can make a difference on a international markets. It will

larger scale — possibly even on an international level." lx)ngwood business students will especially benefit from the services that IJ3IC has to offer. The Center's director, Dr. Larry C. Minks, is very excited about the new program and says that his key interest in the center is to create a way for the college to connect higher education with economic development. So far, there are six students working under tarry Minks as interns: I-aura Cason, Barrett (Mick) Baker, Matt Church, Lynn Harmon, Kelley Noe, and Deborah Amos. However, the center hopes to expand its number of interns as things get busier.


Pag* 2

THE ROTUNDA

MY PAGE Gone- But Not Forgotten In what may have been the first of its kind in Longwood history, Lancer Gym was invaded last Saturday night to spark some sunshine in what turned out to be a dreary Octoberfest weekend. That invasion, of course, was the Bangles, and with the help of Paul Striffolino and the rest of the Student Union, the Rotunda got a chance to get back stage and talk with them for a while. And this is how it went: ROTUNDA: Let me ask the inevitable first so I can satisfy my curiosity. Why in the world did you agree to come to Longwood? BANGLES: Why not? (Laughing) I just had to say what you were expecting. (Serious) I don't know — it seems to me that places like this have the best crowds you could find anywhere. We seem to have our best luck in places where the people don't get exposed to big bands much and seem to be starving for something to come their way. When it finally happens, the fans really go out of their way to support it. ROTUNDA: The students were warned before going in to the show that there would be no drinking, no smoking and no dancing. Did that present any problems for you personally? BANGLES: No dancing!! Why not? ROTUNDA: I think it had something to do with messing up the gym floor. BANGLES: Actually, one of our road people came up to me in the middle of the set and said, "I know you really don't want to do this, but the police want you to ask the crowd to sit back down' and I just said, "right." There is no way I'm going to say anything like that to a crowd that's having a good time — there's no way. ROTUNDA: Have you ever had any problems with rowdy crowds? BANGLES: We've had a few shows in Europe that have gotten out of control and there have actually been moments when we've been frightened, security-wise. In fact, at one show the crowd rolled into one of the lighting trees and it came crashing down on the stage — killer trees, if you will (laughing). But for the most part, it really hasn't been a problem. ROTUNDA: Let me ask you this then. Would you ever come back? BANGLES: Oh yes! Definitely! ROTUNDA: Great — then we'll expect you this time next year.

gROTUJNDA Editor-in-Chief Barrett Baker Managing Editors

West Coast Correspondant

Cathy Gaughran Kim Setzer

Valentine Hertz

Business Manager John Steve Advertising Manager Danny Hughes Advertising Staff Rob Liessem Pete Whitman DeDe McWilliams Public Relations Manager Robert Turner

Foreign Correspondant Denise Rast Writing Staff Scott Loving Michael Kidd Susan Thompson Michelle Bailey Matt Peterman Jason Craft Michelle Hummer John Howard Tipton Mama Bunger Madonna Orton

Production Design

Advisor

Carole Metz

William C. Woods

BANGLES: We'll be there. We are trying to finish this leg of the tour first and then we'll take some time off. Actually, this is the fifth leg of the tour — we had two tours in Europe and one small Japanese tour — but yeah, we'd come back. ROTUNDA: It seems that your career has pretty much blossomed over night. Is there any truth to that? BANGLES: No, not really. Before the first album came out, we had released an E.P. During the year and a half between the release of the E. P. and the album we did some song writing, etc. I think success has been a respectable long time in coming. ROTUNDA: Do you feel that being an all female band has presented any extra barriers to that success? BANGLES: We have experienced working with certain people that have given us some problems, but we've never had to fire anyone over it — we just don't work with them again. For the most part I think people can accept us as a band, or at least they are learning to, and that's really all we're asking. I think that society is becoming open-minded enough so that it really isn't a problem. ROTUNDA: Is that the official story? BANGLES: (Laughing) Actually, we have this joke about how we do a press conference and tell the press exactly what they want to hear ... well, we formed the band because we thought it was a good gimmick. We figured, "hey, we'll get four chicks together — yeah, yeah that's it. That'll get 'em to come see us . . ." No, we're just kidding. Actually we really got together because we wanted to be the next Go Go's. (Rolling their eyes in unison.) Heaven help us! ROTUNDA: Actually I have to admit that I was surprised by some of your music. I didn't think you really got into as much of the rock oriented stuff. BANGLES: Right. A lot of people are si'rprised at that, and that's one thing that we eventually need to put down on an album. There are so many people who have heard of us now that have heard "If She Knew What She Wants", "Walk Like an Egyptian" and "Manic Monday" — and that's their knowledge of the Bangles. And that's only one facet. It is true that we do a lot of songs with that sweet kind of vocalizing and whatnot, but we also like to make a lot of noise, too! ROTUNDA: Moving away from that quickly, how did you all ever get together? BANGLES: I don't know. (Laughing) It was such a long time ago. ROTUNDA: How long? BANGLES: I guess about five years now — almost six. We basically formed because Debbie and I are sisters and that helped. We played together some in high school and eventually put an ad in the newspaper for a base player and a lead singer. That's about the extent of it. ROTUNDA: How did you come up with the Bangles for a name? BANGLES: We were originally the Bangs . . . (laughing) but that was kinda nasty and one syllable names are just not commercial enough, so we sold out and added another syllable. I think it sounds better like that anyway. ROTUNDA: How well do you get along when you're on tour? BANGLES: Considering that we have been pretty much forced to be together since January or February, we really don't have much choice. Like the kids from the same family — we've learned how to make each other laugh. And that's really the best kind of remedy for any kind of problem. ROTUNDA: So what's next? BANGLES: After we finish this tour, we're going home to L.A. to try and reacquaint ourselves with boyfriends, family, etc. We need to take some time off to write some songs for the next album that we'll start working on in late January. ROTUNDA: So you do write most of your own music? BANGLES: Oh, yes! (Continued on Page 4)


.\vv:".\

Scholarship For Education The Longwood College Foundation has announced establishment of the Louise Brightwell Watson Memorial Scholarship by W. A. Watson, Jr., of Farmville. Interest from the scholarship endowment of $25,000 will fund annual scholarships to students enrolled in Longwood's Teacher Education Honors College. Recipients will be chosen on the basis of financial need and academic merit. The amount of the scholarships may vary according to the recipient's need. One to five scholarships will be awarded each year. Preference will be given to student applicants from Prince Edward, Buckingham, Cumberland, Nottoway, and Charlotte Counties. Each scholarship recipient will be identified as a Louise Brightwell Watson Teacher Education Honors College Scholar. President Janet Greenwood said that Longwood "is deeply grateful to Mr. Watson for his most generous gift. This scholarship will be a lasting memorial to Mrs. Watson, who was a member of the class of 1920, and will help many deserving students achieve their goals." Mrs. Watson, a native of Prospect, taught in Hot Springs and in Prince Edward County before her marriage to W. A.

Watson, Jr. in 1924. The couple had two sons — W. A. Watson, III and James M. Watson, both of Farmville — seven grandchildren, and four greatgrandchildren. She was an active member of Farmville Methodist Church, particularly the missions circles, and a member of the DAR. With her husband, she helped organize the Farmville, Pamplin, and Cartersville chapters of the A.A.R.P. W. A. Watson, Jr. has been a business and civic leader in Farmville for more than 50 years. He opened his insurance agency here in 1926. He helped to organize the Farmville Area Development Corporation. He has been a Mason and a member of the Lions Club and the International Order of Oddfellows for 50-plus years. . A lifetime member of the Prince Edward County Democratic Committee and the only lifetime member of the 5th District Democratic Committee, Watson attended two National Democratic Conventions as a delegate from Virginia. He is one of two life deacons of Farmville Baptist Church. His activities there during more than 50 years of membership included serving as Sunday school superintendent and teacher, church treasurer, church trustee, and chairman of the deacon board.

Longwood Senior Awarded SBEA Scholarship Paula Wood Hauenstein, a Longwood College senior from Bracey, has received a $500 scholarship from the Southern Business Education Association. The award is one of five scholarships SBEA gives each year to outstanding business education students from the many states in the southern region. Mrs. Hauenstein has a nearperfect academic record (3.95 grade point average from a possible 4.0). She achieved this record while maintaining a home for her husband and two teenage children and driving a round trip of 160 miles each day to attend classes at Longwood. She will complete requirements for the B.S. degree in business education in December. She plans to teach business subjects, particularly accounting and data processing, on the high school level. Her student-teaching practicum was completed last spring. She taught for 10 weeks at

Nottoway Senior High School, under Mrs. Juanita Yates. "I had wanted to go to college for a long time," Mrs. Hauenstein said, "but there were family factors that prevented me from doing so." When her children were old enough that she "could feel comfortable leaving them" and her husband's business was established, she began taking classes at Southside Virginia Community College at Alberta. In January of 1964, she became a full-time student at Longwood, transferring some credits from SVCC. Single-minded dedication to her goal has kept Mrs. Hauenstein going. "This is where my heart is now," she said. "I've cut out many other things until my education is finished." But the most important factor in her success is "the support and cooperation of my family," Mrs. Hauenstein said. "When I graduate I should give them a gift."

THE ROTUNDA

•-.\.

Page 3

Afghanistan: Not A Soviet Vietnam

By MATT PETERMAN The world today looks at Afghanistan with little more than indifference. Many people are quick to falsely point out that Afghanistan is what the Vietnam war was to the United States. If this were true such indifference could be justified and the Soviets after great expense would realize that something is not working and discontinue the war. For the Soviet Union, continuing the war with what is left of the Afghan resistance, the Mujahideen, it makes great geopolitical sense to stay. The Soviets have immense possibilities of improving their strategic position in a part of the world which is far from stable. A close inspection of the situation should tell the West that support of governments fighting the Soviets there should be stepped up. First of all, the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan puts them about 300 miles away from a warm weather port in the Indian Ocean, which would leave them in position to disturb the

Persian Gulf oil shipping routes at their will. The mere 300 mile buffer zone to the Indian Ocean is in a part of Pakistan that could try to secede from that country in the near future. A secession would bring into existence a country that would be called Baluchistan and strangely enough it is the Soviet Union aiding the secessionist movement in every way. Unfortunately for the West, the present leader in Pakistan reminds them of Ferdinand Marcos and his type. He is Gen. Zia Ul-Hag and too much support to him makes the West nervous. This factor alone could not be good, for when a secessionist challenge is waged, his ability to quell it would be limited, thus giving the Soviet Union the gift of Baluchistan and all of the strings attached. Second of all, the Soviets cannot retreat from Afghanistan even if they wanted to. Besides being a blow to their near and Middle East agenda, a victorious mujahideen would quickly find

abundant aid from the United States, China, and many other nations with a stake. The Soviets could not tolerate a government hostile to theirs in Afghanistan, a primary reason for their invasion in 1979. The Soviets cannot even offer the Mujahideen a part in the puppet government for such a move would stir the already suppressed Soviet Moslem population. Finally, if one must look for an accurate comparison to the Afghan-Soviet conflict, he must only look back 50 years to the Spanish Civil War. Spain in 1936 was Hitler's testing ground for future wars, as new weapon developments were viciously used against the Spanish people. This is what the Soviets are doing in Afghanistan with new developments in chemical weapons and the devising of new tactics for their war machinery. Are the Soviets preparing to use these new tactics for a nonnuclear invasion of Western

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Page 4

THE ROTUNDA

Bangles

NOVEMBER 10 14

Preregistration begins.

26-28

Thanksgiving Holiday — Collage closed

ROTUNDA: I've always wondered how a person can spend ten months on the road, bouncing from town to town, and still be able to get up on stage and perform when the time comes. What do you do that keeps you in such good physical condition? BANGLES: Just performing itself — that's a lot of it. However, we have also been great supporters of Jane Fonda. Jane Fonda is our guru — she rules our lives. ROTUNDA: When do you ever have time for scheduled exercise? BANLGES: Somewhere between the midsts of things — before breakfast, after lunch, whatever — usually in the hotel room. We always try and make the time. ROTUNDA: I understand that you are putting together a new segment for MTV. When can we expect to see that? BANGLES: We will be taping it at the end of this month. It's going to be an hour long concert, but I'm not really sure when it will air. In fact, they did the audio taping right here at Longwood so they could get the timing down for various segments, etc. but the video portion will be shot in Pittsburg. ROTUNDA: Do you make it a practice to tape shows and critique them later? BANGLES: (Laughing) We try not to, no... "A concert like this is something that Longwood really needed," stated Longwood Alumni Sherry Massey shortly after the show. "The school has been doing a good job of building up their image as far as academics goes, but an event like this is something the students really needed — a boost in their morale." "I'll agree with that," added another Alumni, Mark Mitterer. "This is the most school spirit that I have ever seen at this school. I hope they plan to continue on in this tradition." Special thanks, again, go to Paul Striffolino and all the members of S-UN who made this concert run smoothly, and especially to Jay Fitzhugh who had the vision to make the whole thing possible. Hopefully this is the start and not the finish of a great new tradition for Longwood.

DECEMBER 1 5 9 10 11 16 19

Classes resume at 8 a.m. Preregistration ends. Classes end. Reading Day. Examinations begin. Examinations end. College closes at 12 noon.

JANUARY — FEBRUARY 1987 12

Professional semester begins; odvising and late registration.

13 19

Classes begin at 8 a.m.

26

Last day to drop a class without an automatic F.

23

Fall 1987 Class Schedule due.

Last day to add a class.

MARCH — APRIL 9 9

Mid-term estimates due in Registrar's Office at 12 noon. Spring Break begins.

16 6

Classes resume at 8 a.m. Preregistration begins.

11 24

Spring Weekend. Preregistration ends.

30

Classes end.

MAY 1 4 8 9 18 25 JUNE 5 15

Reading Day. Examinations begin. Examinations end; Professional semester ends. Commencement. Three Week Interim Courses begin. Memorial Day Holiday — College closed.

Three Week Interim ends. First Term Graduate and Undergraduate Summer School begins.

JULY 3

College closed.

10

First Term Graduate and Undergraduate Summer School ends.

13

Second Term Graduate and Undergratuate Summer School begins.

Got a story?

AUGUST 7

TELL THE ROTUNDA... BOX 1133

Summer 1987 Class Schedule due.

Second

Term

Undergraduate and Graduate

Summer

ends. Note: Please note the date changes in both Commencement and Summer School Sessions. These have been

KEEP FROM BETWEEN PARKED

PINOS DAILY SPECIALS TUE. WED.

— MONDAY CLOSED — SPAGHETTI LASAGNA

f V $3.95 $4.95

THURS. $1.00 OFF LARGE OR SICILIAN PIZZA $ .50 OFF MEDIUM PIZZA FRI. SAT. SUN

MEATBALL PARMIGIANA PIZZA STEAK BAKED ZITI

recently revised.

$2.25 $2.45 $3.95

CARS SENIORS!

(Dinners include salad and garlic bread)

ORDER CAPS

FREE DELIVERY TO LONGWOOD

AND GOWNS

(AFTER 5:00 PM)

WED., OCT. 29

CALL 3923135

IN THE BOOKSTORE!

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SUNDAY BRUNCH PLATTER FRESH FRUIT SCRAMBLED EGGS BACON

«;. GRITS BLACK-EYED PEAS BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

$3.95 (Offer available also on carry out basis.)

Farmville Shopping Center — 392-6825 OPEN EVERY DAY 11:30 AM - 2 PM; 5 PM

9 PM.


TRIM

FROM THE REGISTRAR'S OFFICE

LONGWOOD COLLEGE MASTER SCHEDULE OF CLASSES UNDERGRADUATE ADVISING AND REGISTRATION Advising begins - Mon., Nov. 3. Preregistration - Mon, Nov. 10 through Fri., Nov. 21, and Mon., Dec. 1 through Fri., Dec. 5. Hours - Mon.-Thurs., 1-6 p.m., and Fri., 1-5 p..m, Registrar's Office.* Late Registration - Mon., Jan. 12,9 a.m.-Noon and 1-3 p.m., Lower Dining Hall. Add/Drop - Tues., Jan. 13, 8:30 a.m.-Noon and 1-3 p.m., Lower Dining Hall; Wed., Jan. 14Mon., Jan. 26, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Registrar's Office. Last day to ADD a class or to register - Jan. 19. â&#x2122;ŚRegistrar's Office open from 10-11 a.m. for other business only during preregistration period (11/10-11/21 and 12/1-12/5). Special registration packets for non-degree and graduate students will be available in the Information Office, Registrar's Office, Office of Continuing Studies, or School of Education Office beginning Dec. 1. Students may register in person (Registrar's Office) beginning Dec. 8, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Mon.-Fri., through Jan. 19. (On Jan. 12 and 13, Registrar's Office will be closed from noon until 1 p.m.) Non -credit and off-campus courses are offered through the Office of Continuing Studies. Call (804) 392-9256 for the latest brochure. Spring semester classes begin Tues., Jan. 13, on a normal scneauie.

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BUILDING CODES Grainger-01 Hiner -17 Crafts House -19 Der-20 Jarman - 23 Jeffers-24 Lancaster Lib. - 25 Barlow - 30 S. Ruffner - 31 M.Ruffner-36 E. Ruffner - 37

' ',

! !

CODES FOR DAYS M - Monday T - Tuesday W - Wednesday

W. Ruffner - 38 Stevens - 39 Lankford-42 French - 43 McCorkle - 47 French Pool - 48 Bedford-56 Wygal - 57 Coyner- 58 Wynne - 59 Lancer Hall-64 Graham-66 R - Thursday F - Friday S - Saturday OR Sunday

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE CODES French - 27 Anthropology - 01 Geography - 29 Art-02 German-33 Biology - 07 Government - 35 Business -10 Health Ed.-37 Chemistry - 12 Computer Science -14 Health/Phys. Ed. - 38 Earth Science, Astronomy, History - 40 Home Economics - 42 Geology, Phys. Sci. - 18 Library Science - 46 Economics - 20 Mathematics - 48 Education - 22 Military Science - 50 English - 23

Music - 52 Philosophy - 54 Phys. Education - 56 Physics - 61 Psychology - 63 Recreation - 66 Religion - 68

Science - 70 Social Work - 74 Sociology - 76 Spanish - 78 Special Ed. - 79 Speech - 80 Theatre - 81

ADVISING COORDINATORS Anthropology - Hiner 207 - J. Jordan Art - Bedford 202 - H. Springer Arts & Sciences - Grainger 201 - J. Peale Biology - Barlow, Upper Level - D. Breil Business Administration - Hiner 114 - W. Jacques Business Education - Hiner 114 - W. Jacques Chemistry - Graham Building - P. Barber Earth Science - McCorkle 122 - J. Austin Elementary Education - Wynne Office - V. Williams English - Grainger 107 - G. Orth Government - W. Ruffner 322 - R. Couture History - W. Ruffner 322 - R. Couture Home Economics - Wynne 148 - M. Osborn Mathematics - Grainger 301 - M. Allen Modern Languages - Grainger 107 - G. Orth Music - Wygal Office - B. Montgomery Office Administration - Hiner 114 - W. Jacques Philosophy - Grainger 107 - G. Orth Physical Education - Lancer 106 - J. Johnson Physics - Grainger 216 - L. Fawcett Physics (Pre-Engineering) - Grainger 216 - L. Fawcett Pre-Dental Hygiene - McCorkle 122 - D. Merkle Pre-Medical Technology - McCorkle 122 - D. Merkle Pre-Nursing - McCorkle 122 - D. Merkle Pre-Occupational Therapy - McCorkle 122 - D. Merkle Pre-Physical Therapy - McCorkle 122 - D. Merkle Pre-Pharmacy - Graham Building - P. Barber Psychology - Wynne Office - E. Smith Social Work - W. Ruffner 221 - G. Stonikinis Sociology - Hiner 207 - L. Hlad Special Education - Wynne Office - V. Williams Speech Pathology - Jarman 004 - R. Woodbum Theatre - Jarman 001 - D. Young Therapeutic Recreation - Lancer 106 - J. Johnson Undeclared - Grainger 213 - F. McCombs

SPECIAL NOTES Registration Appointments: Registration appointments will be assigned for all students who are continuing undergraduates. Registration forms will be distriButed through academic advisors. Students who change majors after the forms are printed will need to pick up their forms from the former advisor before going to the new advisor. Delinquent Accounts: All library fines, parking fines, unpaid damage deposits, or other delinquent student accounts must be cleared before the student can preregister. This includes degree applications for those students who have accumulated 90 or more credits, including transfer credits. Academic Probation-Suspension: This policy provides for automatic (immediate) suspension for those students whose cumulative averages (at the end of any grading period) fall below certain required averages, which increase according to the total number

of hours attempted (including transfer work). The complete table of required averages may be found on Pages 32-33 of the 1986-87 Longwood College Catalog (available in the Admissions Office).

PREREGISTRATION PROCEDURES 1. No student should cut classes to preregister. The Registrar's Office will honor a student's registration appointment at any time during preregistration hours (on or after the printed appointment time) through the end of the preregistration period. 2. To be permitted to preregister, each student must bring the following documents to the Registrar's Office: (a) a pre-printed registration form signed by the academic advisor and showing sufficient alternate courses to allow the student to obtain a complete schedule; (b) a form giving permission to enroll in a closed course, signed by the advisor and appropriate department head, if applicable; (c) receipts showing payment of any charges for which registration stop codes have been imposed. 3. The advising process is an integral part of preregistration. Be sure to allow sufficient time to meet with your academic advisor and discuss your degree requirements, as well as any academic difficulties you might be having. If you are in academic difficulty, remember that the fastest way to improve your GPA is by repeating courses in which you need to pull up your grades; think of C as the break-even or equilibrium point. For every grade you have that is below C, you need a comparable one above C to balance it That is, for every D, you need a B in a course of the same or higher credit value; for every F, you need an A or two B's in courses of the same or higher credit value. 4. Each student is expected to complete the preregistration process in one transaction. Come prepared by planning alternative courses ahead of time. Daily Space Available supplements will be printed, and a terminal will be available in the Rotunda area. Use these to determine what courses or sections are likely to be closed, and make your plans accordingly. Students who must return for additional processing (overrides, additional courses, alternatives, etc.) may do so only on Fridays. 5. Preregistration hours are limited to 1 p.m. until 6 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and 1 p.m. until 5 p.m., Friday, for the preregistration period. This is necessary so that the office staff can continue routine office work and prepare enrollment reports to facilitate the process. 6. Alphabetical master lists of registration appointment times will be posted in convenient locations across campus. Be sure to check one of these to find your appointment time. 7. Undergraduate students who fail to preregister during the preregistration period must register on Monday, January 12, 1987, in the Lower Dining Hall. Schedule changes may not be made until drop-add begins on Tuesday, January 13,1987. Please do not hesitate to come to us if you have questions or problems.


SPRING 1987 CLASS SCHEDULE DEPT - SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS 03 101 01 01 INTRO ANTH 02 03 101 01 INTRO ANTH 03 101 03 01 INTRO ANTH INTRO ANTH ARCHEOLOGY 03 01 211 01 NA INDIANS 01 03 321 SUPRNAT 3LFS 01 03 443 01 01 COMMUNITY 01 492 01 03 INTERNSHIP

8! I85 8* 81

ANTHROPOLOGY TIME 0900-0950 1000-1050 1100-1150 1330-1420 1050-1205 1600-1715 0925-1040 14C0-1515

HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER

206 206 206 206 206 206 206 206

ARMSTRONG JORDAN JORDAN ARMSTRONG JORDAN JORDAN ARMSTRONG ARMSTRONG

KV JW JW KV JW JW KV KV

TBA

T3A -TBA

HINER

212

JORDAN

JW

> CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR NO NO NO HRS COURSE TITLE 03 01 CRAFTS 03 02 CRAFTS 03 03 CRAFTS 04 03 CRAFTS OS 03 CRAFTS 03 01 BASIC DESIGN 03 02 BASIC DESIGN 03 01 LIFE DRAWING 03 02 LIFE DRAWING 03 01 BASIC PHOTO 03 0? BASIC PHOTO 01 03 INTRO VIS AR 0? 03 INTRO VIS AR 03 03 INTRO VIS AR 03 CERAMICS I 03 CERAMICS I ft CERAMICS II STAIN GLASS 03 01 3-D DESIGN 03 01 GRP ART PR I 03 01 GRAP PROD II 01 03 PRNTMAKNG II 03 01 HIST REN 19C 50 04 HON ART HIST

§

ILLUSTRATION

01 01 01 01

ART ED K-4 ART ED 4-8 HIS AM F 19C ADV PAINTING PAPERMAlCING SPEC TOP ART CERAMICS STU

8! 81

JEWELRY II

01 01 01 01 01

ADV CASTING DRAW STUD I PHOTO STUDIO PAINT STUD I PAINT STU II PNT STUD III

8J 01

8?

03 03 03 03 03 03 03. 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03

8? 8!

DEPT - SCIENCES > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR HRS NO NO NO COURSE TITLE 04 BIO CONCEPTS 07 101 01 LAB 07 02 04 BIO CONCEPTS 101 LA3 07 810 CONCEPTS 101 04 03 LAB BIO CONCEPTS 07 101 04 04 LAB 07 BIO CONCEPTS 101 05 04 LA3 07 101 04 BIO CONCEPTS 06 LA3 07 07 04 BIO CONCEPTS 101 —'■ ■ i

*i

TIME

DAYS MF MF TR TR TR TR WF MW TR MW TR MW TR R WF TR TR WF WF TR WF MW MWF

m MW

WF TBA TR MW TR TR MW TR TR WF WF WF TR MW TR TR TR

1100 •1250 330 •1520 09C0 •1050 1400 •1550 16C0 ■1750 1400 •1550 1100 •1250 1330 ■1510 16C0 •1750 1330 •1520 10C0 •1150 1100 •1215 0925 •1040 900 •2230 330 •1520 4 QQ 1550 4uu -155 1550 C 39 CO •1050 300 •1450 6CU •1750 330 •1520 1C0 •1250 C jauu •0850 )800 •0350 300 •1350 530 •1720 100 •1250 3A ■TBA ( I9G0 ■1050 100 ■1 230 100 •1250 C )8C0 0915 1 530 ■1720 4 00 ■1550 C i900 ■1050 330 ■1520 100 •1250 100 •1250 ( I900 •1050 330 •1520 600 ■1750 6C0 •1750 1 600 •1750

|

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD 3EDF0RD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD 3EDF0RD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD BEDFORD

119 119 234 119 119 127 207 207 207 213 213 103 103 103 121 121 121 232 234 205 205 217 207 207 207 207 232 234 205 207 207 103 207 217 234 121 232 232 207 213 207 207 207

STAFF STAFF BALDRIDGE STAFF STAFF OLIVER OLIVER SPRINGER EDMONSON BISHOP BISHOP FLYNN FLYNN FLYNN EDMONSON EDMONSON EDMONSON BALDRIDGE BALDRIDGE OLIVER OLIVER BISHOP FLYNN FLYNN FLYNN MCCARTER BALDRIDGE BALDRIDGE SPRINGER SPRINGER SPRINGER FLYNN MCCARTER BISHOP BALDRIDGE EDMONSON BALDRIDGE BALDRIDGE SPRINGER BISHOP EDMONSON EDMONSON EDMONSON

GEN CHEM I LAB GEN CHEM I MS A A HL R 4

BL BL EL EL EL RW RW RW MS MS A A BL EL EL EL

SC

MS MS HL HL HL EL SC BL MS RW MS MS HL BL RW RW RW

TR w

TR W TR

TIME 1000- •1050 1400' •1540 10C0 •1050 1600' •1740 0925- •1040 1330 •1510 0925 •1040 1530 •1710 08C0' ■0915 1330 •1510 0300- •C915 1530 •1710 oaco •0915

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR BATTS JEFFERS 133 MCC ORKLE 121 BATTS JEF FERS 133 BATTS MCC ORKLE 121 BATTS LAN KFORD CON TINNELL TINNELL MCC ORKLE 121 TINNELL LAN KFORD CON MCC ORKLE 121 TINNELL JEF FERS 133 WELLS WELLS MCC ORKLE 121 JEF FERS 133 WELLS WELLS MCC ORKLE 121 FERS 133 WELLS

CR HRS 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03

GEN CHEM LA3 GEN CHEM LA3 GEN CHEM LA3 GEN CHEM LAB GEN CHEM LAB GEN CHEM PHYSICAL LAB ORG CHEM

12

101

01

04

12

101

02

04

II

12

102

01

04

II

12

102

02

04

II

12

102

03

04

II

12

102

04

04

II

12

102

05

II CHE

12 12

102 301

06 01

04 . 04 04

II

12

306

01

04

12

306

02

04

12

352

01

04

12 12

372 401

01 01

03 04

12 12

420 463

01 01

01 02

ORG CHEM II LAB INST METH II LA3 SP CRS CHEM ADV PHYS II LA3 SEMINAR I CHEM PROJECT LAB

DAYS MWF T TR MWF W TR TR TBA MW

as BS BS

as

WH WH WH WH OC OC OC OC

TR T TR MWF M MWF M MWF W MWF W TR R TR MWF T MWF MWF W TR R TR MWF W F T3A

DEPT - MATHEMATICS > CALL NUMB < DIS( CRSE SEC CR NO HRS DAYS NO COURSE TITLE NO INT COMP SYS INT COMP SYS INT COMP SYS INT COMP SYS BUS LANG II a*INTRO PROG b*INTRO PROG ADV FORTRAN DATA STRUCT

14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14

OP SYSTEMS 14 a* -Block 1: Jan. 14 b* -Block 2: Mar. 30

BIOLOGY DAYS MWF T MWF T TR M TR M

BUSINESS

DEPT - SCIENCES > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS DAYS

ART

DEPT - ART

PAINTING OIL JEWELRY METW ADV WOOD DES

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR

DAYS MWF MWF MWF MWF TR MW TR TR

DEPT - BUSINESS & ECONOMICS > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC COURSE TITLE NO NO NO ACCT THEORY 10 441 01 ACCT SEMINAR 10 449 01 FINANCL MNMT 10 450 01 ORG THEORY 10 461 01 SYS ANAL DSG 10 470 01 ADVERTISING 10 480 01 MKTG MANAGMT 10 482 01 ENTREPRENEUR 10 498 01 BUS POLICY 10 499 01

156 156 156 156 202 204 ?05

01 • 02 03 04 01 01 01

03

81 03

03 02 03

°1 81 §3! 01 03 311

01 Mar. 27 Apr. 29

W TR TR TR MWF MWF MWF MWF TR TR

DEPT - SCIENCES > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR NO HRS DAYS COURSE TITLE NO NO PHYS SCI LAB PHYS SCI LAB PHYS SCI LAB PHYS SCI

01

04

102

02

04

MWF W MWF

18

102

03

04

MWF

1

102

04

04

MWF

II

18

II

18

II II

102

TIME

1000-1050 19C0-2130 O3C0-0915 1330-1420 1600-1830 1400-1515 0925-1040 TBA -TBA 1500-1615

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER

106 106 109 105 109 105 105 108 102

HARBOUR ROY MCWEE LUTHAR AAGAARD BROOKS BROOKS MINKS MINKS

CK GM WE H L NB NB LC

LC

CHEMISTRY TIME 0915 1540 0915 1740 0950 1510 0950 1530 710 1000 -1 050 1330- 510 1000- 050 1530- 710 0925- 040 14C0- 1540 0925- 040 1600- 1740 1200" 1250 1400- 1700 1100- 1150 1500- 1300 11C0- 1150 1500- 1300 0925- 1040 1330- 1600 1040' 1150 1100- 1150

0300 1400 0800 1oOO 09C0 1330 0900

im If SI 1330- 1430 TBA • TBA

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW 3ARL0W BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW BARLOW MCCORKLE BARLOW MCCORKLE GRAHAM BARLOW BARLOW GRAHAM GRAHAM GRAHAM GRAHAM GRAHAM

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA T3A TBA TBA TBA TBA T3A TBA TBA TBA TBA 123 TBA 123 RF TBA TBA RF RF RF

HARDY HARDY HARDY HARDY PETTY PETTY PETTY PETTY KLEIN KLEIN KLEIN KLEIN HARDY HARDY HARDY HARDY MAXWELL MAXWELL MAXWELL MAXWELL MAXWELL MAXWELL KLEIN KLEIN PETTY

JA JA JA JA JT

BARBER

PG

RF

BARBER

PGG PG P6

RF

BARBER BARBER BARBER

«

JT

U LC LC JA JA JA JA MH MH MH MH MH MH LC LC JT

COMPUTER SCIENCE

TIME 19C0-2130 03C0r0915 1050-1205 1525-1640 1200-1250 1100-1150 1100-1150 1000-1050 1525-1640 1400-1515

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER

307 303 303 310 307 310 310 303 307 309

AAGAARD A RE HART AREHART CREWS AREHART MAY MAY WEBBER WEBBER WEBBER

L JE JE R JE RD RD RP RP RP

EARTH SCIENCE TIME 0900-0950

1330-1510

09CC-0950 1530-1710 0900-0950 1000-1140 0900-0950

BUILDINGi ROOM INSTRUCTOR AUSTIN BEDFORD 103 AUSTIN GRAHAM RR AUSTIN 103 BEDFORD AUSTIN GRAHAM RR AUSTIN BEDFORD 103 AUSTIN GRAHAM RR AUSTIN BEDFORD 103

JM

JR JH JM JM JM


ULII

WVS • mi 1

LAS GEN BOTANY

LAB

6EN BOTANY

LA9 GEN ZOOLOGY LAB GEN ZOOLOGY LAB GEN ZOOLOGY LAB GEN ZOOLOGY

LAB

ANIMAL MORPH

LAB LAB

ANIMAL MORPH ANAT & PHYSI ANAT & PHYSI LAB ANAT & PHYSI

LAB ANAT & PHYSI LAS PLT ECOLOGY LAB

HICRO3I0L0GY

LA3

EVOLUTION BIOL OCEAN

LA3 LAB

GENETICS SPEC PROJECT SPEC PROJECT SPEC PROJECT BIO SEM I BIO SEM II

U 1

1 >J c

u c

u«»

07 07

102 102

03 04

04 04

07

103

01

04

07 07

103 103

02 03

04 04

07 07

103 202 202 207 207 207 207

04 01 02 01 02

04 04 04 04 04

03 04

04 04

302 309 310 316 324

01 01 01 01

04 04 03 04

01

462 463 464 490 491

01 01 01 01 01

04 02 03 04 01 01

07 07 07 07 07 07 07 07 07 07 07 07 07 07 07

nnr

M TR T TR T TR U TR W MWF M MWF M TR TR TR TR MWF U MWF W MWF R MWF R MWF W TR TR TR MWF M MWF M TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

DEPT - BUSINESS & ECONOMICS > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS DAYS ELEM TYPW AMER BUS SYS INTER TPWR INTER SHORT LAB BUS MACHINES ACCT I ACCT I ACCT I ACCT I ACCT II ACCT II ACCT II ACCT II ACCT II PERS FINANCE PERS FINANCE COBOL II LEGAL ENVRNT LEGAL ENVRNT BUS COMM BUS COMM BUS COMM AOV TYPW AOV SHORT LAB

INTER ACCT

MNGRL ACCT MNGRL ACCT TAX ACCT II BUS FINANCE BUS FINANCE PRIN MGMT PRIN MGMT OPER MGMT OPER MGMT ORG BEHAVIOR HUM RES MGMT MGMT INF SYS MGMT INF SYS MGMT INF SYS PRIN MKTG PRIN MKTG SALES MNGMT INTRNTL MKTG BUS & SOCIET BUS & SOCIET TCH BUS SKIL AOV ACCT

U 7 uu

1530 -1710 0925 14C0 0925 •1040 1600 •1740 1050 -12C5 1330 -1510 1050 -1205 1530 -1710 11C0 -1150 1330 -1510 11 CO -1150 1530 -1710 0300 -0915 1400 •1540 0300 -0915 1540 -1720 09C0 ■0950 1330 -1510 09C0 ■0950 15^0 •1710 09C0 1400 09C0- •0950 16C0 •1740 1100 •1150 1530- ■1800 1400 •1515 1525- •1705 0925 •1040 09C01330 1200- ■1250 1900- ■2040 TBA ■ •TBA

■ \m

:?H8

m

TBA TBA TBA TBA

n A K z. «

BARLOW JEFFERS BARLOW JEFFERS BARLOW JEFFERS MCCORKLE JEFFERS MCCORKLE JEFFERS MCCORKLE JEFFERS MCCORKLE MCCORKLE MCCORKLE MCCORKLE MCCORKLE JEFFERS MCCORKLE JEFFERS MCCORKLE JEFFERS MCCORKLE JEFFERS

D n C i t-

CRT 133 CRT 133 CRT 133 117 133 117 133 117 133 117 117 117 117 117 133 115 133 115

\}\

133

MCCORKLE 115

BARLOW BARLOW

MCCORKLE

MCCORKLE MCCORKLE MCCORKLE MCCORKLE W RUFF MCCORKLE

TBA •TBA •TBA •TBA

CRT CRT 123 123 117 117 115 228 117 TBA TBA TBA TBA T8A

BREIL SCOTT SCOTT SCOTT SCOTT BREIL BREIL BREIL BREIL HEINEMANN HEINEMANN HEINEMANN HEINEMANN BREIL BREIL BREIL BREIL MERKLE MERKLE MERKLE MERKLE MERKLE MERKLE MERKLE

MERKLE

BREIL BREIL TINNELL TINNELL MERKLE BATTS BATTS HEINEMANN HEINEMANN STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF

DA MW MW MW MW SJ SJ SJ SJ 3L RL RL RL SJ SJ SJ SJ DA DA DA DA DA DA DA DA DA DA WH WH DA BS RL RL

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR

1000- 1050 1400- 1515 0900- ■0950 1100- 1150 1050- 1205 12C0- •1315 1400- ■1515 1525- •1640 0925- ■1040 1050- •1205 1050' •1205 14C0- ■1515 12Q0- •131 12C0- ■125 1330- •1420 10C0- ■1050 1100- •1150 1200- 1250 1525- 1640 19C0 2130 850 o§QQ 09C0 950 1000- 1050 0900- 0950 11C0- 11 50 1050- 1205 1330- 1445 0300- 0915 0925- 1040 1525- 1640 0300- 0915 1040 0850 10C0- 1050 0925- 1 040 1050- 1205

HINER JEFFERS HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER GRAINGER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER

FIELDS O'NEAL FIELDS HAMLETT HAMLETT FIELDS CARR CARR GILFI LLAN GILFI LLAN HARBO UR HARBO UR GILFI LLAN ROY ROY CARR

HINER

HAMLE TT

1330- 1445

HINER

:8

8Ic8: 18S8-

11 QQQ80009CQ110010501 1 CO08C0190008000900-

1050 1050

o|!8 C950 1 1 50 1205 1 1 50

0915 21 30 0850 0950

HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER

CARR

AREHA RT DICKE RSON DICKE RSON HAMLE TT HAMLE TT

HAMLE TT FIELD S HAMLE TT

101 102

HARBO UR KLAYT ON KLAYT ON ROY O'NEA L O'NEA L TERZI N TERZI N LUTHA 1 LUTHA R

MINKS

LUTHA CROSS CROSS CROSS BROOK BROOK TERZI TERZI BRUCE BRUCE FIELD S GILFI LLAN

LAB ASTRONOMY LAB PHYS GEOLOGY LA3 PHYS GEOLOGY LAB HIST GEOLOGY LAB CARTOGRAPHY

1a

OF JE OF FN FN OF JE JE S

s

CK CK S GM GM JE JE JE J J FN FN FN OF FN

FN

CK D D GM JE JE MA MA H H LC H JS JS JS NB N3 MA MA R R OF S

cv 1

ui

w

13

201

02

04

13

210

01

04

18

210

02

04

18

211

01

04

13

358

01

03

IK

W TR W MWF T MWF T MWF M W

uy<:3- 1 w*o

1330092515301200140012C016C0100013301900-

DEPT - BUSINESS J ECONOMICS > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS DAYS BASIC ECON PRINC MACRO PRINC MICRO PRINC MICRO PRINC MICRO PRINC MICRO MANAGERIAL MANAGERIAL PUBLIC ECMCS

20 20 20 20 20

210 211 212 212 212

01 01 01 02 03

03 03 03 03 03

20

212

04

03

20 20 20

31 2

312 313

01 02 01

03 03 03

MWF MWF MWF MWF MWF TR TR TR TR

1510 1040 1710 1250 1540 1250 1740 1050 1510 2130

TIME 1330-1420 1000-1050 0900-0950 1100-1150 1200-1250 1050-1205 0925-1040 1400-1515 1050-1205

EDUCATION Z PSYCHOLOGY > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS DAYS

ARTS PSY PSY CHILD PSY ADOL PSY ADOL PSY ADOL PSY PRE-S C CHILD DEVEL READ EA N-4 DIR EA 4-8 DIR EA SEC DIR EA ELE DIR EA SEC DIR READ FOUND DIAG READ PRIN K-4 PRIN K-4 PRIN 4-8 PRIN SEC ED MEAS MOD MEAS MOD PHIL MOD PHIL MOD MEDIA MOD MEDIA MOD MEDIA MOD MEDIA MOD MULTI CUL MOD MULTI CUL MOD MULTI CUL MOD SEMIN AR MOD HUMAN DEV READ CONTENT CURR DEV EL CURR DEV SEC INTR TO GUID PRIN OF INST PRACT COUNS SCH L AW SC FI NANCE OR SU P READ RESEA IN EDU INST SUP

225

01

03 02 02 02 02 01 01 01 01 02 02 02 01 03 03 03 03

MWF MWF MWF M TR MWF TR W TR TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TR TR TR T TR MF MF MF MF MF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWR T M T T

03

T

03 03 03 03 03 03 03

M T8A TR W TR M M

03

8i3 03 85 03 118 02 8 1 03 250

22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22

II

22 22 22 22 22 22 22

250 305 325 400 401 402 403 404

03 01 01 01 01 01 01 01

429

81 8: 8?12 03; 01

454 455 480 480 432 432 484 434 434 434 486 486 486 438 521 530 542 543 545 571 615 620 625 645 661 671

01 01 02 01 02 01 02 03 04 01 02 03 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01

81

03 03

fa

10 10 05 05

DEPT - ENG/PHIL/FOR. LANG. > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR HRS DAYS COURSE TITLE NO NO NO ENG SKIL DEV COM COND WRT EXPOS WRIT EXPOS WRIT EXPOS WRIT EXPOS WRIT EXPOS WRIT

23 23 23 23 23 23 23

051 061 100 100 100 100 100

01 01 01 02 03 04 05

03 03 03 03 03 03 03

MWF MWF TR

TR

MWF MWF TR

W

KUI- t-

GRAINGER W RUFF GRAINGER JEFFERS MCCORKLE JEFFERS MCCORKLE W RUFF MCCORKLE GRAHAM

t UKLfc Y

309 321 309 133 115 133 115 323 115 LR

CURLEY CURLEY CURLEY FERGUSON FERGUSON FERGUSON FERGUSON FERGUSON FERGUSON RUBLEY

JW JW JW JW LM LM LM LM LM LM EA

ECONOMICS

DEPT -

LANG

BUSINESS TIME

A^iK'jnuni

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER

B10 B10 B10 B10 B10 B10 87 B7 37

SHAW MARTIN MARTIN SHAW SHAW MARTIN MARTIN MARTIN SHAW

SO JD JD SO SO JD JD JD SO

EDUCATION TIME 0900-0950

-Am 1188 1300 ■2030

0925 -1040 1000 ■1050 1050 ■1205 1530 ■1710 0925 ■1040 TBA •TBA TBA ■T3A TBA •TBA TBA •TBA TBA •TBA 0925-1040 0925-1040 105 ■1205 13C ■2030 1300 •1915 11 CO •1215 0900 0950 1000 ■1050 0900 09 50 1000 ■1050 0300 •0850 0900 •0950 10C0 ■1050 1100 •1150 1300 •1500 13C0 •1500 1300 ■1500 1515 ■1659 1800 ■2030 18C0 ■2030 1800 •2030 1300 ■2030

I?

18C0 •2030

1800 TBA 1800 1800 1800 13CC 1300

■2030 •TBA ■2030 ■2030 •2030 •2030 •2030

BUILDING

ROOM INSTRUCTOR

WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE

All 129 All 123 122

WOODBURN OSBORN WEATHERLY SMITH WEATHERLY

122 129 116 All T3A TBA TBA TBA TBA SEM 121 121 123

WEATHERLY RICE OSBORN WOODBURN GIBBONS GIBBONS GIBBONS GIBBONS GIBBONS GIBBONS BANTON BANTON WOODBURN

122 207 123 123 AI AI 101 101 101 101 122 122 122 AI 122 129 121

ELLIOTT SIZEMORE SIMMONS SIMMONS KOVACS KOVACS VICK VICK VICK VICK ELLIOTT ELLIOTT ELLIOTT GIBBONS BANTON WOODBURN ELLIOTT

WYNNE

207

APPERSON

J

WYNNE

All TBA

BANTON WEATHERLY

WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE

123 122 121 207 202

KOVACS ANDERSON WOODBURN BARTOS VICK

RL MG L J MJ RB NJ

WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE

121

ELLIOTT

MJ MW MG CS MG MG LB MW MJ RD RD RD RD RD RD RL RL MJ GP RB BW BW L L NJ NJ NJ NJ GP GP GP RD RL MJ GP GP

ENGLISH TIME 1330-1420 1330-1420 0300-0915

1525-1640

1430-1520 10C0-1050 0925-1040

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR DOUGLAS GRAINGER 210 DOUGLAS GRAINGER 210 STAFF GRAINGER 211 STAFF GRAINGER 103 DOUGLAS GRAINGER 210 STAFF GRAINGER 212 SEDGWICK GRAINGER 206

OW OW OW E


ENGLISH

DEPT - ENG/PHIL/FOR. LANG. > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC COURSE TITLE NO NO NO EXPOS WRIT LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP AND COMP AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LI COMP I ANO Lit AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP LIT AND COMP HON LIT-COMP INTR JOURNAL WRIT FICTION TECH WRIT CHILD LIT CHILD LIT YOUNG ADULTS TRA MOD GRAM TRA MOD GRAM BRIT LIT I BRIT LIT II BRIT LIT III BRIT LIT III BRIT LIT IV AM 1820-65 AM 1865-1920 AM 1865-1920 AM 192Q-PRES AM 1920-PRES THE NOVEL SHORT STORY SHAKESPEARE HON REG LIT CREAT WRIT SHAKESPEARE YEATS-JOYCE VICT LIT

DAYS

1515 0915 1205 1040 1205 515 640 0925 1040 1050 ■1205 10C0 ■1050 06C0 -0850 •1420 ■1520 0800 •0850 0900 ■0950 0900 ■0950 10C0 ■1050 120U •1250 0300 :0915 0925 ■1040 1330 •1420 1525 ■1640 1525 ■1640 1400 ■1515 1600 •1715 1200 •1250 1330 •1420 1630 •1745 09C0 ■0950 1000 •1050 1100 •1150 •1515 •1745 19C0 •2130 09C0 •0950 1100 •1150 •1150 •1250 1100" •1150

0800 1050 0925 1050

uss :1

fcH

Ui8

m

1188 900- •0950 925' •1040 809C0 ■0950

1330 ■1420 1100 ■1150 1000' •1050 1100' •1150 0925 •1040 12C0- •1250 1050 ■1205 1525 •1640 1600' •1715 1400' ■1525 1900 •2130 1630' •1745 1400' •1515 19C0 •2130 1900 ■2130

DEPT - ENG/PHIL/FOR. LANG. > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR HRS DAYS COURSE TITLE NO NO NO BASIC I LAB BASIC I LAB BASIC II LAB BASIC II LAB READ & COMP CONVERSATION CIV i CULT ADV GRAMMAR

27

100

01

04

27

100

Q2

04

27

110

01

04

27

110

02

04

200 210

01 01

401

TIME 0900 09 5'J 1400' 1515 1050 1205

8:

8] 8:

MWF TBA MWF TBA MWF TBA MWF TBA MWF TR MWF T

BUILDING GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER LANCASTR LANCASTR GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER

ROOM 206 210 102 102 101 101 103 103

181 210 210 210 212 211 211 018 018 101 101 210 212 212 212 211 212 212 212 212 101 211 211 211 108 103 101 101 B3 B3 018 211 101 103 211 210 103 103 102 210 101 101 211 210 101 108 108 101 108 108 206

INSTRUCTOR STAFF SEDGW ICK CHALL ENDER CHALL ENDER ORD ORD LUND LUND STINS ON STINS ON TINNE LL TINNE LL MAY STAFF WOODS WOODS HEVEN ER HEVEN ER O'GRA DY 0' GRA DY STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF MAY WOODS CLARK DOUGL AS ORD ORD HEVEN ER TINNE LL TINNE LL STINS ON MAY LUND STINS ON LUND CHALL ENDER FRANK O'GRA DY CHALL ENDER O'GRA DY WOODS DOUGL AS MAY STUAR T CLARK MAY STUAR T SPRAG UE

E C C PA PA MC MC MC MC CC CC SH WC

wc F F B B

SH WC

sc ow PA PA

F cc

CC MC SH MC MC MC C WL B C B WC ow SH DC BC SH DC R

FRENCH TIME 1100-1150 TBA -T3A 12C0-1250 TBA -TBA 1330-1420 TBA -T3A 12C0-1250 TBA -TBA 1100-1150 1525-1640 0900-0950

190C-2130

BUILDING GRA INGER GRA INGER GRA INGER GRA INGER GRA INGER GRA INGER GRA INGER GRA INGER GRA INGER GRA INGER GRA INGER GRA INGER

ROOM INSTRUCTOR 019 019 102 102 019 019 103 103

?1 11 02 212 013

STAFF STAFF KELLY KELLY TUCKER TUCKER TUCKER TUCKER KELLY STAFF KELLY KELLY

J9 JB

JS JB JB

DEPT - HOME ECONOMICS > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC COURSE TITLE NO NO NO DIR STUDY-CD 42 405 04 DIR STU-C4T 42 425 01 DIR STU-C4T 42 425 U2 DIR STU-C&T 42 425 DIR STU-CiT 42 425 0 INT IN CLO 42 428 01 CAREER ED. 42 451 01 SEMINAR 42 491 01

°l

HOME ECONOMICS CR HRS 04 01 02 03 04 03 U3 02

DAYS TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA W MW

DEPT - LIBRARY SCIENCE > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS DAYS COLLSCTN DEV 46 301 01 03 TR LIB REF MAT 46 302 01 03 TR

DEPT - MATHEMATICS > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC COURSE TITLE NO NO NO 111 01 COM INTR MAT 48 112 PROB SOL MAT 43 01 STAT DEC MAK 113 01 48 114 CONS MAT HI 48 01 123 01 3AS CONC MAT 4§ 124 BAS CONC MAT 43 01 124 48 3AS CONC MAT 02 124 48 03 BAS CONC MAT 43 124 04 6AS CONC MAT 48 ALG & TR IG 161 01 43 162 01 ALG & TR IG 43 02 ALG $ TR IG 162 48 162 03 ALG & TR IG 04 ALG & TR IG 48 162 DIFF INT CAL 48 261 01 DIFF

INT CAL

48

APP STAT APP STAT APP STAT TEA ELEM K-4 TEA ELEM K-4 SUR MOD GEOM LIN ALGEBRA CALC ULUS III HI S CH METH DIFF EQUAT INT MAT STAT

43 48 45 48 48 48 48 48 48 48 48

262 271 271 336 343 361 451 460 472

CR HRS DAYS 03 TR 03 TR MWF 03 MW 03 MWF 03 MWF 03 TR 03 03 TR TR 03 03 TR MWF 03 MWF 03 TR 03 03 -TR 05 /TR

81 03

fyl WF 'TR jlWF IWF MWF TR TR TR MWF TR MWF

03 03 03

W MWF MWF

05

01 02 3 1 02 01 01 01 01 01 01

03 03 03 03 03

<«i

DEPT - MILITARY SCIENCE > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR HRS DAYS COURSE TITLE NO NO NO INTRO TO MIL INTRO TO MIL MIL HI STORY MIL HI STORY MIL HI STORY FIRST AID FIRST AID LEADER SHIP LEADER SHIP LEADER SHIP ADV MS II LAB ADV MS II LAB ADV MS IV LAB

202 202 302

01 02 01 02 03 01 02 01 02 03 01

02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02 02

50

302

02

02

50

304

01

02

50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50

101 101

181 102 201 201

202

ELEM OF GEOG ELEM OF GEOG ci III

nc

ec f\n

29 29

201 201

01 02

03 03

TR TR

GEOGRAPHY TIME 0300-0915 1400-1515

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR HINER HINER

*m

MW MI MI MI MI MI MI

LIBRARY SCIENCE THE 0925-1040 1050-1205

MW TR MW MW TR MW T MW MW TR TR W TR W TBA

w

TIME 0925 14C0 0300 1600 10C 08C 08C0 1050 1400 1400 1000 1100 0925 1400 0825 0900 0825 09C0 1000 1100 0925 0925 1050 1330 1050 09C0 1900 12C0 1100

■1040 •1515 ■0350 •1715 •1050 •0350 •0915 •1205 •1515 •1515 •1050 •1150 ■1040 •1515 •0915

•0950 •0915 ■0950 •1050 ■1150 •1040 •1040 ■1205 ■1420 ■1205 ■0950 •2130 -1250 •1150

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR LANCASTR B27 LANCASTR B27

HOWE STWODAH

PA MI

> CALL NUM8 < DISC CRSE SEC CR NO NO NO HRS DAYS COURSE TITLE BASIC MUSIC THEORY SS &.DICT

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER

307 304 3UJ 310 307 310 307 307 307 510 310 507

310 303 310

310

304 304 308 308 303 309 309 308 310 307 309 308 304

ALLEN WU GUSSETT SOMERS AREHART ALLEN GUSSETT GUSSETT NOONE LAW WU GUSSETT WU MAY LAW LAW ALLEN ALLEN NOONE NOONE NOONE NOONE NOONE MAY MAY WEBBER NOONE LAW WU

ML RS JC P JE ML JC JC ET KK RS JC KS RD KK KK ML ML ET ET

51

JA RD RD RP JA KK RS

MILITARY SCIENCE TIME 1430- 1520 0925- 1015 1050 1520 1525- 1615 0900- 0950 1900- 2100 10C0- 1050 1200- 1250 1400- 1450 1050- 1205 1545- 1710 1525- 1640 1545- 1710 T8A - T3A 1545- 1710

\m

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF

360 360 363 363 363 360 360 360 360 360 360 360 360 360 360 360

CAMPB ELL SWEAR ENGEN FOX FOX FOX FOX FOX CAMPB ELL CAMPB ELL CAMPB ELL SWEAR ENGEN SWEAR ENGEN SWEAR ENGEN SWEAR ENGEN NALLY NALLY

CPT E CPT CPT CPT CPT CPT CPT CPT CPT E E E E MAJ MAJ

MUSIC

DEPT - MUSIC DEPT - SCIENCES > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR HRS DAYS COURSE TITLE NO NO NO

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR OSBORN WYNNE 148 COYNER 202 FOWLKES FOWLKES COYNER 202 COYNER 202 FOWLKES COYNER 202 FOWLKES COYNER 202 FOWLKES COYNER STAFF 202 COYNER 202 FOWLKES

MATHEMATICS

01

ill 8 323

TIME TBA -T3A TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA 0700-0930 1330-1420

TIME 1330-1420 0925-1040 r -Q2-09;

BUILDING ROOM

WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WJ

106 105 15

INSTRUCTOR

MONTGOMERY MOHR MOHR 1G8ERT

WB RW RW


DEPT ~ ENG/PHIL/FOR. LANG. > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR HRS OAYS COURSE TITLE NO NO NO MWF 33 100 01 04 BASIC I T8A LAB MWF 04 33 110 01 BASIC II T8A LAB 200 01 03 TR READ I COUP 33 TR 33 342 SURVEY TR LIT GENRE 33 412

81 8i

DEPT - HISTORY/GOVERNMENT > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR HRS DAYS COURSE TITLE NO NO NO TR 01 03 US GOV FED 35 215 MWF 02 03 US GOV FED 215 35 MWF 216 US GOV ST 35 230 TR AD CRIM JUS 35 TR 330 50 03 HON 6RT TRIA 35 MWF 03 35 335 01 COM POLITICS MWF 342 01 AM POL TMT 35 MWF 343 AM FOR POL 35 MWF 01 03 CONS RTS LIB 35 355 TR POL LEAD 390 01 US CNST HIST 455 01 TR

81

u

81 8!

DEPT - HEALTH/PED/RECREATION > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS DAYS 37 MWF HEALTH EDU 100 01 01 HEALTH EDU 37 MWF 100 02 01 HEALTH EDU 1 MWF HEALTH EDU MWF HEALTH EDU 37 MWF 100 05 01 HEALTH EDU 37 100 06 01 TR HEALTH EDU 37 100 07 TR DRUG/AL C/TOB 37 01 211 MW HUMAN S EX 37 212 01 TR 02 37 EMER & F AID 260 01 03 TR DRIVER ED 37 M 301 01 03 SEL HEA TOP 37 345 01 03 TR rETHOD/ MATER 37 365 01 03 TR •Physical Education majors only

8

TIME 1000-1050 TBA -TBA 08C0-0850 TBA -TBA 1050-1205 14C0-1515 0925-1040

TIME 0800-0915 1100-1150 09C0-0950 1050-1205 14C0-1515 1000-1050 09C0-0950 1100-1150 1200-1250 0925-1040 1050-1205

TIME 0900- 0950 10C0- 1050

h

1050- 1205 1400- 1515 16C0- 1715 1830- 1945 1400" 1515 1900- 2130 1050- ■12 05 0800- •0915

83 03 03 03

n

03 03 03 03 03

8? 03

03 C3 o3 03 03 03 03 03

TR MWF MWF MWF MWF TR TR MWF TR MWF MWF MWF MWF MWF MWF MWF MWF TR TR TR TR TR MW MWF TR TR TR

DEPT - HOME ECONOMICS > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS DAYS TR NUTRITION 42 235 01 03 FASH MERCHAN 42 MWF 321 01 03 TCMG VOC HE 42 MW DIR STUDY-CD 42 TBA 405 T8A DIR STUDY-CD 42 02 405 02 DIR STUDY-CD 42 405 TBA 03 03

81 8?

GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER G°AING£R GRAINGER GRAINGER

018 018 01 9 019 019 018 018

STAFF STAFF ORTH ORTH REYNOLDS REYNOLDS ORTH

GC GC J J GC

BUILDING RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF GRAINGER W RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF

ROOM INSTRUCTOR 323 323 323 323 206 324 324 326 323 325 325

HARBOUR CALIHAN HELMS CALIHAN PEALE CALIHAN HARBOUR HARBOUR CALIHAN HARBOUR HELMS

WR DS JM DS JS DS WR WR DS WR JM

HEALTH EDUCATION

1188: UIjj 1430- 1520

03 03 03 03

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR

GOVERNMENT

188 U 8 ,

DEPT - HISTORY/GOVERNMENT > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS DAYS

VA HIS US CNS TUD ST

GERMAN

BUILDING LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER

ROOM INSTRUCTOR 207 SOFALVI 207 SOFALVI 207 HUFFMAN 207 HUFFMAN 207 HUFFMAN 207 HUFFMAN 207 SOFALVI KANNAS 207 207 SOFALVI BINGHAM 208 STAFF 203 208 KANSAS 203 SOFALVI

AJ

AJ AH AH AH AH AJ L AJ S L AJ

HISTORY TIME

0800- 0915 0900- 0950 1000" 1050 1150 152Q 151* 1640 090C- 0950 0800- 0915

1188:

i??:

8188: 8118 0900- 0950 10001000110012001330105014Q010501400 0300

1050 1050 1150 1250 342 120 1515 1205 1515 915 415 1150 1525- 1640 1050- 1205 0925- 1040

mi :?

BUILDING ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF GRAINGER W RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF

ACKERMAN MILLAR CROWL MILLAR CROWL MILLAR CROWL HALL HALL ACKERMAN HELMS SNELLER COUTURE HELMS ACKERMAN SNELLER COUTURE SNELLER ACKERMAN COUTURE PEALE SNELLER CROWL HALL COUTURE HELMS MILLAR

325 325 325 325 323 323 323 326 326 321 321 326 321 321 326 321 321 326 206 321 323 324 326 325 326

KE GJ JW GJ JW GJ JW LM LM KE JM MP RT JM KE MP RT MP KE RT JS MP JW LM RT JM GJ

HOME ECONOMIC TIME 0925-1040 12C0-1250 1630-1745 TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR COYNER COYNER COYNER WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE

202 202 202 148 148 143

STAFF FOWLKES STAFF OSBORN 0S30RN OSBORN

MI MW MW MW

DICTI ON ORGAN SECON LA B ORGAN SECON LA 3 ORGAN CONC LA B ORGAN CONC LA 3 HARPS I SECON LA 3 HARPS I SECON LA 3 PERC SECON PERC SECON PIANO SECON LA 3 PIANO SECON LA 3 PIANO CONC LA B PIANO CONC PIANO CONC LA 3 PIANO CONC GROUP PIANO GROUP PIANO BRASS SECON PERCU S CONC VOICE CLASS VOICE CLASS VOICE SECON LA 3 VOICE SECON 3 VOICE ELECT LA 3 VOICE SECON LA 3 VOICE SECON LA 3 VOICE SECON LA 3 VOICE CONC LA 3 VOICE CONC LA 3 VOICE CONC LA B VOICE CONC LA 3 VOICE CONC LA 3 VOICE CONC LA 3 BRASS CONC LA 3 BRASS CONC BRASS CONC LA 3 BRASS CONC PERC CL WINDS SEC F WINDS SEC F WINDS CONC C LA 3 WINDS CONC F JAZZ ENSEMB BRASS ENSEMB WINDS ENSEMB

52 52

140 153

01 01

02 01

52

154

01

01

52

01

02

52

155 156

01

02

52

157

01

01

52

158

01

01

52 52 52

161 162 164

01 01 01

01 01 01

52

164

02

01

52

165

01

02

52 52

165 166

02 01

02 02

52 52 52 52 52

II52

166 169 170 178 180 181 182 133

02 01 01 01 01

81 01

02 02 02 01 02 01 01 01

52

183

02

01

52 52

133 134

03

01

01

01

52 52

134 184

02 03

01 01

52

135

01

02

52

185

02

02

52

185

03

02

52

186

01

02

52

136

02

02

52

136

03

02

52

137

01

02

52 52

187 138

02 01

02 02

52 52 52 52 52

133 139 193 194 196

02 01 03 03 01

02

81 01

52 52 52 52

196 203 203 203

03 01 02 03

02 01 01 01

02

MW T TBA T TBA T TBA T TBA TBA T3A TBA T3A TBA TBA R TBA TR TBA R TBA R R TBA R TR TR TBA R R W T TBA T TBA TBA TBA T TBA T TBA TBA TBA T TBA T TBA TBA TBA T T3A T TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TR F F TBA TBA TBA MW TR TR

133C- 1420 1525- 1640 TBA - TBA 1525- 1640 T3A - TBA 1525- 1640 T3A - TBA 1525- 1640 T3A - TBA T3A - TBA T3A - TBA TBA - TBA T3A - TBA TBA - TBA TBA - TBA 1525- 1640 TBA - TBA 1050- 1205 T3A - TBA 1525- 1640 TBA - TBA 1525- 1640 1525- 1640 TBA - TBA 1525- 1640 14C0- 1515 1400- 1515 T3A - •T3A 1525- 1640 14C0- 1515 1430- 1545 1525- 1640 T3A - TBA 1525- 1640 T3A - TBA 1525- 1640 TBA - TBA 1525- 1640 T3A - TBA 1525- 1640 TB A - T3A 1525- 1640 T3A - TBA 1525- 1640 T3A - TBA 1525- 1640 TBA - TBA 1525- 1640 TBA - TBA 1525- 1640 T3A - TBA 1525- 1640 TBA - TBA 1525- 1640 T3A - TBA TBA - TBA T3A - TBA TBA - TBA T3A - TBA TBA • TBA T3A - TBA TBA - T3A T3A - T8A TBA • TBA TBA - TBA TBA - TBA TBA - TBA 1600- 1730 1400- ■1515 1650- 1705

WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL

106 230 230 230 230 223 223 230 228 223 228 TBA 104 204 219 227 227 204 219 204 204 219 204 107 107 225 T3A 233 233 2Q4 14

;§•

204 224 204 221 204 224 204 224 204 221 204 224 204 224 204 221 204 224 225 TBA 105 225 TBA 105 TBA 232 232 217 TBA 217 106 106 104

104 WYGAL MW 1600- ■1715 206 01 52 01 CHO IR 104 WYGAL MWF 01 1100- •1150 2 33 01 52 CAM ERATAS 104 WYGAL 208 02 01 TR 1650- •1805 52 LAN CER EDIT 104 WYGAL T •21 30 210 52 BAN D 105 WYGAL •1205 02 TR 216 52 ORY THE 105 WYGAL MW 10C0- ■1050 01 52 218 01 SS & DICT WYGAL 105 MWF 03 1330- •1420 232 01 52 MUS IC HIST 227 WYGAL 03 MWF 0900- •C950 236 01 52 MUS IC & ARTS 106 WYGAL •1150 MWF 11C0237 03 01 Z FOLK RK 52 JAZ 106 WYGAL 1200- ■1250 237 03 MWF 52 2 JAZ Z FOLK RK WYGAL 230 01 T 1525- •1640 52 253 1 ORG AN SECON 230 WYGAL 254 T 1525- ■1640 01 52 ORG AN SECON WYGAL 223 T 1525- ■1640 255 01 52 ORG AN CONC TBA WYGAL TBA ToA - ■TBA LAB T3A WYGAL •1640 T 1525256 01 02 AN CONC 52 ORG 223 WYGAL TBA T3A • ■TBA 257 52 01 01 HAR PSI SECON 230 WYGAL TBA TBA - •TBA 258 01 52 01 HAR PSI SECON 230 WYGAL TBA TBA ■ •TBA LAB 204 WYGAL R 1525- •1640 52 263 01 01 PIA NO SECON 219 WYGAL TBA - •TBA TBA LA3 204 WYGAL 01 R 1525- •1640 02 52 263 PIA NO SECON 204 WYGAL 01 R 1525- ■1 640 264 01 52 PIA NO SECON 219 T3A - ■JBA WYGAL T3A LAB 204 WYGAL 1 525■1640 R 264 02 01 52 NO SECON PIA 204 WYGAL 1525R -1640 01 02 265 52 PIA NO CONC 219 WYGAL TBA TBA ■ •TBA LAB gen. educ. requirements 1 - Beginning piano for non-majors; counts as 2 - Beginning voice for non-majors; counts as gen. educ. requirements 3 - All ensembles count toward general educat ion requirements 4 - Counts toward general education requirements

81 °1

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WILLIAMS HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HARPER HARPER MYERS MYERS BLASCH BLASCH MYERS MYERS BLASCH MYERS MYERS BLASCH BLASCH BLASCH MOHR HARPER WILLIAMS WILLIAMS LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMP3ELL CAMPBELL LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL MOHR MOHR TOWNSEND MOHR MOHR TOWNSEND HARPER WERRELL WERRELL HARBAUM HARBAUM WERRELL MOHR MOHR HARBAUM

TA PS PS PS PS PS PS PS PS PS PS PS PS L L

PACE EGBE RT EGBE RT MOHR HESS ELINK WILL IAMS HARB AUM BLAS CH MONT GOMERY MONT GCMERY HESS ELINK HESS ELINK HESS ELINK HESS ELINK HESS ELINK HESS ELINK HESS ELINK HESS ELINK MYER S MYER S BLAS CH MYER S MYER s 3LAS CH MYER s MYER s

RC LE LE RW PS TA DG RB WB W3 PS PS PS PS PS PS PS PS FE FE RB FE FE RB FE FE

tt RB R3 FE FE R3 FE FE RB RB R3 RW L TA TA PO PD TA TA PO PO PD PD TA TA PO PO PD PD TA TA PO PO PD PD TA TA PO PO RW RW D RW RW D L P P DG DG P RW RW DG


> CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR HRS NO NO NO COURSE TITLE 02 OZ 265 PIANO CONC 52 LAB 266 01 02 52 PIANO CONC LAB 02 52 266 02 PIANO CONC LAB 02 269 01 52 1 GROUP PIANO 02 270 01 52 1 GROUP PIANO 02 230 01 52 PERC CONC 231 01 01 52 2 VOICE CLASS 232 01 01 2V0ICE CLASS 283 01 01 VOICE SECON LAB 01 02 283 VOICE SECON 52 LA3 01 03 52 233 VOICE SECON LAB 234 01 01 52 VOICE SECON LAB 234 02 01 52 VOICE SECON LAB 234 03 01 52 VOICE SECON LAB 285 01 02 52 VOICE CONC LAB 02 52 285 02 VOICE CONC LAB 02 235 03 52 VOICE CONC LAB 286 01 02 52 VOICE CONC LAB 286 02 02 52 VOICE CONC LAB 02 236 03 52 VOICE CONC LAB 287 01 02 52 BRASS CONC 287 02 02 52 BRASS CONC 238 01 02 52 BRASS CONC 02 283 02 52 BRASS 294 01 52 WINDS SECON 02 296 52 WINOS CONC C LA3 296 03 52 WIND CONC F 300 01 52 INSTRUM SURV 316 01 AOV CHR COND 317 01 ADV INST CON 03 340 01 52 MUS IN CLRM LAB 340 02 03 MUS IN CLRM 52 LAB 341 52 01 03 CLRM MUS^MAT 343 01 03 52 MUS UP ELEM 52 353 01 ORGAN SECON 354 01 52 ORGAN SECON 355 52 01 ORGAN CONC 356 01 52 02 ORGAN CONC LAB 357 01 52 HARPSI ELECT 358 52 01 HARPSI ELECT 01 01 52 363 PIANO SECON LAS 363 02 52 PIANO SECON 364 01 52 PIANO SECON LAB 364 02 01 52 PIANO SECON LAB 365 52 01 02 PIANO CONC LAB 52 365 02 02 PIANO CONC LAB 01 02 366 PIANO CONC 52 LAB 366 02 02 PIANO CONC 52 369 01 02 1 GROUP PIANO 52 370 01 02 52 iGROUP PIANO 01 373 01 52 BRASS SECON 01 52 331 01 2V0ICE CLASS LAB 52 01 382 01 2V0ICE CLASS LAB 01 01 VOICE SECON 52 383 LAB 383 52 02 01 VOICE SECON LAB 01 52 383 03 VOICE SECON LAB 384 01 01 52 VOICE SECON LAB 384 01 VOICE SECON 52 02 LAB 384 03 01 52 VOICE ELECT LAB 385 01 02 52 VOICE CONC LAB ■»

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81 81

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11 81

81

DEPT - HEALTH/PED/RECREATION > CALL NUM3 < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS

MUCIC

OEPT - MUSIC DAYS R TBA R TBA R TBA TR TR TBA W U T TBA T TBA TBA T3A T TBA T TBA TBA TBA T TBA T TBA T3A TBA T TBA T TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TSA TBA T8A T9A TBA F TR TR TR MWF TBA MUF TBA MUF MUF T T T T TBA TBA TBA R TBA R R TSA R TBA R TBA R TBA R TBA R TR TR TBA U TBA U TBA T TBA T TBA TBA TBA T TBA T TBA TBA TBA T TBA

TIME 1525-1640 T3A -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 T3A -TBA 1400-1515 1400-1515 TBA -TBA 1430-1545 1430-1545 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 T3A -T3A 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 T3A -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 T3A -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA 1400-1515 0925-1040 0925-1040 0800-0350 TBA -TBA 0900-0950 TBA -TBA 1000-1050 10C0-105Q 1525-1640 1525-1640 1525-1640 1525-1640 TBA -TBA T3A -T3A TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 1525-1640 TBA -T3A 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -T3A 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 1400-1515 1400-1515 TBA -TBA 1430-1520 TBA -T3A 1430-1520 TBA -TeA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -TBA 1525-1640 TBA -T3A 1525-1640 TBA -TBA

BUILDING UYGAL UYGAL WYGAL UYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL WYGAL WYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL WYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL WYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL UYGAL WYGAL UYGAL UYGAL UYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL

ROOM 204 227 204 219 204 227 107 107 104 233 233 204 224 204 221 204 224 204 224 204 221 204 224 204 224 204 221 204 204 224 204 221 204 224 225 105 225 105 223 223 T3A 232 TBA 233 233 107 107 107 107 106 106 TBA TBA 230 230 230 230 230 204 219 204 204 219 204 227 204 219 204 227 204 219 204 107 107 225 204 221 204 221 204 224 204 221 204 224 204 224 204 221 204 224 204 224

INSTRUCTOR BLASCH BLASCH MYERS MYERS BLASCH BLASCH BLASCH BLASCH HARPER WILLIAMS WILLIAMS LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL MOHR TOWNSEND MOHR TOWNSEND HARBAUM HAR9AUM HARBAUM WERRELL HARBAUM EG3ERT EGBERT MYERS MYERS MYERS MYERS MONTGOMERY MONTGOMERY HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK MYERS MYERS BLASCH MYERS • MYERS BLASCH BLASCH MYERS MYERS BLASCH BLASCH MYERS MYERS BLASCH BLASCH BLASCH MOHR WILLIAMS WILLIAMS WILLIAMS WILLIAMS LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL LUST LUST

RB RB FE FE RB RB RB RB L TA TA PD PD TA TA PO PO PD PD TA TA PO PO PD PD TA TA PO PO PD PD TA TA PO PO RW D RW D DG DG DG P DG LE LE F6 FE FE FE WB WB PS PS PS PS PS PS PS FE FE RB FE FE RB R3 FE FE RB RB FE FE RB R3 RB RW TA TA TA TA PD PD TA TA PO PO PD PD TA TA PO PO PD PD

AER03 IC FIT GYMNA STICS I TENNI S I TENNI TENNI bTENNI TENNI TENNI 3 #T£NNI S BOWL I NG I 30WLI NG I BOWLI NG I BOWLI NG I BOWLI NG I BOWLI NG I bGOLF I GOLF I NON WIMRS NON WIMRS BEG WIMMING ADV IFE SAV IFE SAV ADV bfSOCCE R I

56 56 56 56 56

56 56 5o 56 56 56

110 110 111 112 112 115

07 01 02 03 04 05 06 01 02 01 02 01 01 02 01

WGHT TRNG WGHT TRNG UGHT TRNG WGHT TRNG WGHT TRNG WRESTLING a#BASKET3ALL

56 56 56 6 §56 56 56

11 11 11

01 02 03

faRIDlN I f aR IDIN I f RID IN 1 fbRIDlN I fbRIDIN I f R ID IN G-HUNT f R ID IN G-HUNT bCAMP SKILLS bCAMP SKILLS ARCH- 3ADM YOGA YOGA AER03 IC DANC BALLE T I JAZZ I MOD D ANCE I MOD D ANCE I ADV M OD DANC

56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56

101 103 104 104 104

01 01 01 02 03

01 01 01 01 01

8* 81 184 104 06 104 107 107 107 107 107 107

18!

01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01

81 01 01 01 02

PHYSICAL EDUCATION DAYS TR TR MUF MUF MUF MUF TR TR TR MUF MUF TR TR TR TR TR TR MUF MUF TR TR

°? A* 01 /MUF

\TR MUF MUF MUF TR TR JR /MUF \TR MU MU T MU MU TR TR MUF MU TR MUF TR TR MU MW MWF TR

122

01

01 01 01 01 01 01 01

56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56

123 123 123 123

01 02 03 04

01 01 01 01

bSOFTBALL TENNIS II BOWLING II BOWLING II GOLF II at V0LLEY3LL II INT SWIMMING WAT SAF INST INT SYNC SUM ADV SCUBA fa RIDING II fa RIDING II RIDING II RIDING II fbRIDING II f RIDE II-HUNT fRIDE II-HUNT MOD DANCE II ADV DANCE II

56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56

135 204 207 207 208 209 211 212 213 214 223 223 223

232

01

02

a# TRCK FLD II b# SOFTBALL II 3AS ATH TRNG PRACT ATH TR FOUND OF SPT MOTOR LEARNG LIFEGUARDING ADV SYN SWIM ADV DANC III

56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56 56

234 235 270 272 275 235 312 313 332

01 01

01 01

TEAC SEC SCH CHOREOGRAPHY PRACT IN AT ELE* SCH PED SEM ELEM PE PHYS OF EXER

56 56 56 56 56 56

361 366 372 330 332 387

01 01 01 01 01 01

MWF 03 TBA 03 TBA 01 03 MWF 03 MWF 03 fMWF

PHYS OF EXER

56

337

02

ELEM SCH HPE ADV DANCE IV

56 56

390 432

01 01

03 fMWF \R TR 03 02 M

ORG AND ADM

56

462

01

03

ll 11

ifj

123 124 124 125 126 126 127 129 130 131 131 132

ill 231

8S 01

81 81 07 01 01 02 01 01 01 01 02 01

01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 02

01 01 01 02 01 01 01 01 01 01 01 02 03 04 05

01 01 01 01 01 01 01 02 01 01 01 01 01 01 01

8? 01

81 8* 01 01 81

01 01 01 01 01

01 03

Vz 01 02

{?" MWF MWF MWF MWF TR MWF TR MW MW TBA MW MU T MU MU TR TR TR

<?" MWF MWF MWF TBA MWF MWF MWF MW

Qu

IT

{?TR

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR

TIME 3

08C0-0 15 1400-1515 09C0-0950 10C0-1050 1100-1150 1200-133Q 1050-1203 14C0-1515 0925-1040 1000-1C50 0900-0950 0925-1040 1050-1205 1400-1515 1525-1640 0300-1043 1050-1205 0900-0950 1QC0-1050 0925-1040 1050-1205 1400-1515

18§8:183? 0300-0350 0900-0950 1000-1050 0925-1040 1050-1205 0925-1040 1000-1050 1050-1205 1245-1515 1530-1800 1400-1630 1245-1515 1530-1800 1050-1205 1400-1515 1200-1330 1430-1715 0925-1040 0900-0950 1400-1515 0925-1040 1200-1315 1330-1415 1100-1150 0925-1040 1530-1700 1530-1700 1330-1515 1430-1520 1000-1050 1100-1150 0800-1040 1200-1330 0800-0850 1530-1645 1900-2015 T3A -T3A 1245-1515 1530-1300 1400-1630 1245-1515 1530-1300 1050-1-205 1400-1515 1050-1205 1530-1700 1530-1700 1200-1330 1200-1330 1330-1420 TbA -TBA 11C0-1150 0800-0350 1330-1420 19C0-2015 1530-1700 1530-1700 1330-1420 T3A -TBA T3A -T3A 1330-1420 1100-1150 0900-0950 1525-1640 0900-0950 1525-1640 08C0-0915 1530-1700 1530-1700 0925-1040

LANCER LANCER ILER ILER ILER ILER ILER ILER ILER LANKFORD LANKFORD LANKFORD LANKFORD LANKFORD LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER FRENCH LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER

224 223 908 308 303

131 908 903 119 119 119 119 119 119

HI 143

143 143 143 143 224 224 313 313 313 313 313 TBA 224 224 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 208 208 223 307 307 223 307 307 307 307 307 1. A N C E R LANCER 307 LANCER 223 ILER 308 LANKFORD 119 LANKFORD 119 LANCER 223 224 LANCER LANCER 143 LANCER 143 LANCER 143 LANCER 143 LANCER 100 LANCER 100 LANCER 100 LANCER 100 LANCER 100 LANCER 100 LANCER 100 LANCER 307 307 LANCER 307 LANCER 224 LANCER 223 LANCER LANCER 203 222 LANCER LANCER 208 LANCER 203 LANCER 143 LANCER 143 307 LANCER 307 LANCER 208 LANCER LANCER 307 222 LANCER T3A T3A LANCER 208 LANCER LANCER LANCER 208 207 LANCER 307 LANCER 307 LANCER 207 LANCER

iol

NELSON BUDD HARRIS HARRISS HARRISS HARRIS HARRISS HARRISS DUNCAN O'NEIL O'NEIL FINNIE FINNIE HUFFMAN HUFFMAN SMITH SMITH JOHNSON JOHNSON LUTHER CALLAWAY MERLING LUHTANEN LUHTANEN POSIPANKO NEAL NEAL BOLDING BOLDING NELSON DUNCAN DUNCAN ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS KOESLER KOESLER HARRISS ANDREWS ANDREWS BUDD TIPTON TIPTON NEAL NEAL TIPTON TIPTON COUGHLIN HARRISS O'NEIL O'NEIL SMITH CALLAWAY LUTHER BINGHAM BINGHAM BINGHAM ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS ANDREWS NEAL TIPTON TIPTON CALLAWAY COUGHLIN CARLTON CARLTON HARRIS NEAL BINGHAM 8INGHAM TIPTON TIPTON O'NEIL NEAL CARLTON ANDREWS ANDREWS GRAHAM GRAHAM GRAHAM GRAHAM ANDREWS TIPTON TIPTON HARRIS

SC RL BL PW PU BL PU PU SG SM SM SE SE AH AH B3 BB JR JR CC CR J P P RJ EL EL C3 CB SC SG SG NA NA NA NA NA NA NA RA RA PU NA NA RL TA TA ND ND TA TA LE PU SM SM BB CR CC S S S NA NA NA NA NA NA NA ND TA TA CR LE UG UG BL ND S

s

TA TA SM ND UG NA NA GP GP GP GP NA TA TA BL


VOICE CONC LAI VOICE CONC LAB VOICE CONC LAS VOICE CONC LAB VOICE CONC LAB WIND CONC C WIND CONC F FLUTE ENS JAZZ ENS BRASS ENS WIND ENS CHOIR CAMERATAS LANCER EDIT BAND PIANO LIT VOCAL PED ORGAN SECON ORGAN SECON ORGAN CONC LAB ORGAN CONC PIANO SECON LAB PIANO SECON LA3 PIANO SECON LAB PIANO SECON LAB PIANO CONC LAB PIANO CONC LAB PIANO CONC LAB PIANO CONC LAB PIANO CONC LA3 GROUP PIANO GROUP PIANO VOICE CONC LAB VOICE CONC LAB VOICE CONC LA3 VOICE CONC LAB VOICE CONC LAB BRASS CONC BRASS CONC LAB BRASS CONC WIND CONC C LAB WIND CONC F PIANO CONC PIANO CONC VOICE CONC LAB VOICE CONC

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

1 1

LAB

1 2 3 4

-

52

335

02

02

52 52

335

03

02

386

01

02

52

336

02

02

52

386

03

02

52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52

8! R 01 03

52 52 52

396 396 402 403 403 403 406 408 403 410 435 437 453 454 455

01 01

01 01 01 01 01 01 01 02 02 01 01 02

52 52

456 463

01 01

02 01

52

463

02

01

52 52

464

01

01

464

02

01

52 52 52 52 52 52 52 52

465

01

02

465

02

02

466

01

02

466

02

02

466

03

03

469 470 435

01

8?

01 02 02

52

485

02

02

52

486

01

02

52

436

02

02

52

486

03

03

437 488

°1 01

81

52 52

488 496

02 01

02 02

52 52 52 52 52

496 565 565 585

03 01 03 01

02

535

02

I! 52

01 02 03 01 01 02 01

8; 01

8i 02

._ 02

T TBA TBA TBA

T TBA T TBA TBA TBA TBA F F MW TR TR MW MWF TR T MW TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA R TBA R TBA R TBA R TBA R TBA R TBA R TBA R TBA R TBA TR TR T TBA T TBA T TBA T TBA

T

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA F TBA R T TBA T TBA

1525 •1640 •TBA •1640 •TBA •1640 •TBA •1640

WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL

TBA • -TBA 1524- -1640 TBA • -T3A TBA -T3A TBA -TBA T3A -TBA 16C0 -1730 14C0- -1515 1650 -1705 -1715 -1150 1650 -1305 19C0 -2130 1420 -1520 TBA • -TBA TBA ■ -TBA TBA • -TBA TBA • -TBA TBA • -T3A TBA • -TBA 1525- -1640 TBA ■ -J3A 1525- -1640 TBA • -TBA 1 525- -1640 T3A ■ -TBA 1525- -1640 TBA • -TBA 1525- -'1640 TBA ■ -TBA 1525- -1640 TBA ■ -TBA 1 525- -1640 T3A - -TBA 1525- -1640 T3A • -TBA 1525- -1640 TBA • -TBA 1400- -1515 1400- -1515 1 525- -1640 TdA ■ -TBA 1525- -1640 T3A • -T3A 1525- -1643 T3A -TBA 1525 -1640 TBA -TBA 1525 -1640 TBA -T3A TBA -T3A TBA -TBA TBA -T3A TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -TBA TBA -T3A 1525 -1640 1525 -1640 . TBA -TBA 1525 -1640 TBA -T3A

WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL WYGAL

TBA 1525 TBA 1525 TBA • 1525

W8:

204 221 204 224 204 224 204 221 204 224 223 232 232 106 106 104 104 104 104

WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS CAMPBELL CAMPBELL HAR3AUM WERRELL WERRELL MOHR MOHR HAR3AUM PACE EGBERT EGBERT

104 227 221 230 230 228 TBA T3A 204 219 204 227 204 219 204 227 204 219 204 227 204 219 204 227 204 219 107 107 204 224 204 221 204 224 204 221 204 224 225 TBA TBA 105 223 TBA 232 T3A 227 204 224 204 221

MOHR BLASCH WILLIAMS HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK HESSELINK MYERS MYERS BLASCH BLASCH MYERS MYERS BLASCH BLASCH MYERS MYERS 3LASCH BLASCH MYERS MYERS BLASCH BLASCH MYERS MYERS BLASCH BLASCH LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS LUST LUST MOHR MOHR MOHR TOWNSEND HARBAUM HARBAUM WERRELL MYERS BLASCH LUST LUST WILLIAMS WILLIAMS

TA TA PO PO PD PD TA TA PO PO DG P P RW RW DG RC LE LE RW R3 TA PS PS PS PS PS FE FE R5 R3 FE FE R3 R3 FE FE RB RB FE FE R3 R3 FE FE RB RB PD PD TA TA PD PD TA TA PD PO RW RW RW D DG DG P FE R3 PD PD TA TA

Beginning piano for non-majors; counts as gen. educ. requirements Beginning voice for non-majors; counts as gen. educ. requirements All ensembles count toward general education requirements Counts toward general education requirements

a b # f

EVAL HPc FIT PRACT I

56 56

463 490

01 01

FIT PROJECT

56

499

01

«

INTRO PHIL INTRO PHIL INTRO PHIL INTRO ETHICS KANT 4 19 C HON GRT TRIA AESTHETICS PHIL OF SCI SEMINAR

54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54 54

200 200 200 201 213 330 350 365 430

01 02 03 01 01 50 01 01 01

03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03

TR TR MWF MWF MWF TR MWF MWF M

1050-1205 1400-1515 0300-0350 11C0-1150 09C0-0950 1400-1515 100C-1050 11C0-1150 1900-2130

LANCER LANCER LANCER LANCER

203 312 223 312

HODGES GRAHAM GRAHAM GRAHAM

cv

GP GP GP

DEPT - SCIENCES > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC NO NO NO COURSE TITLE 101 01 61 GEN PHYSICS LAB 101 GEN PHYSICS 61 02 LAB 61 102 01 GEN PHYSICS LAB 61 102 GEN PHYSICS 02 LAB 326 01 61 LIGHT LAB 332 01 61 ELEC & MAG 352 61 01 MECHANICS LAB

PHYSICS CR HRS DAYS 04 04 04 04 04 04 04

MWF W MWF W TR M TR M MWF W MTWR TR R

DEPT - EDUCATION 4 PSYCHOLOGY > CALL NUM3 < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS DAYS GEN PSY SOC GEN PSY SOC GEN PSY SOC GEN PSY SOC GEN PSY BIO GEN PSY BIO GEN PSY BIO QUAN MET PSY PSY ADJUST A3N0R PSY A3N0R PSY INDUS PSY EXPER PSY LAB EXPER PSY LA3 PSYCH TEST PHYSIO PSY

iie m

MY

PER THEORY

63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63 63

131 131 131 131 132 132 132 134 353 356 356 359 362

01 02 01 02 03 01 01 01 02 01 01

03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03

63

362

02

03

420 423

01

tt

01

03 03

a63 Ml 523

il

81 85 01

03

DEPT - HEALTH/PED/RECREATION > CALL NUM3 < DISC CRSE SEC CR NO NO NO HRS COURSE TITLE 111 03 01 INT LEIS SER 66 206 01 01 MANL COMNCTN 66 237 01 03 OUT ADV PROG 66 03 66 301 01 REC MENT IMP 66 303 REC PHYS DIS 305 HELP SKILLS 66 01 TR MED SET 66 LEADERSHIP 66 01 66 01 490 16 ##SR INTERN 02 66 490 16 f#SR INTERN

8! 8 81

MWF MWF TR TR MWF MW TR TR M MWF TR TR MW M MW W TR TR MW TBA T

TIME 1000133010001530092513300925153010001330080009251400-

1050 1510 1050 1710 1040 1510 1040 1710 1050

im

1040 1450

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR BEDFORD BARLOW BEDFORD BARLOW W RUFF GRAHAM W RUFF GRAHAM MCCORKLE HINER MCCORKLE MCCORKLE BARLOW

103 CRT 103 CRT 323 LR 323 LR 123 B3 121 123 CRT

MESHEJIAN MESHEJIAN MESHEJIAN MESHEJIAN FAWCETT FAWCETT FAWCETT FAWCETT FAWCETT FAWCETT KIESS MESHEJIAN MESHEJIAN

WK WK WK WK LR LR LR LR LR LR EM WK WK

PSYCHOLOGY TIME

09C0 11C0 0925 1050 1330 16C0 0925 08C0 18C0 1000 1525 1400 0900 1330 10C0 1330 1400 1525

•0950 •1150 •1040 -1 205 •1420 ■1715 •1040 -0915 •2030 ■1050 •1640 •1515 •0°50 •1520 •1050 ■1520 •1515 •1640 ■1715 TBA 1800 •2030

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE

122 AUD 207 122 129 129 129 121 AUD 202 121 129 121 111 129 111 122 122 207 TBA 121

APPERSON APPERSON STEIN STEIN STAFF SMITH WACKER SMITH WACKER STEIN APPERSON WACKER SMITH SMITH SMITH SMITH APPERSON WACKER WACKER SMITH STEIN

J J D8 DB ED PG ED PG DB J PG ED ED ED ED J PG PG ED DB

RECREATION DAYS MWF M TR MWF TR MW MWF TR TBA TBA

TIME 1100-1150 19C0-2130 1400-1515 1000-1050 0925-1040 1430-1545

1318:1*58 TBA -TBA T3A -TBA

3UILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR KOESLER 203 LANCER 207 STAFF LANCER KOESLER 203 LANCER VALE LANCER 208 MERLING LANCER 203 LANCER 203 VALE VALE KOESLER LANCER 114 MERLING LANCER LANCER 127 VALE

;as

RA RA WH J WH WH RA J WH

## -Therapeutic Recreation Majors only

PHILOSOPHY TIME

1000-1050 0300-0350 1200-1250 14C0-1515

-1st block: Jan. 13 - Mar. 3 -2nd block: Mar. 4 - Apr. 30 -Physical Education Majors only -Fee Required

m

DEPT - ENG/PHIL/FOR. LANG. > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NO NO NO HRS DAYS

03 MWF 03 /MWF LMWF 03 TR

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER

206 019 206 206 103 206 ?G6 102 108

JAMES JAMES PEALE PEALE J AMES PEALE PEALE J AMES JAMES

DN DN JS JS ON JS JS ON DN

DEPT - SCIENCES > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC NO NO NO COURSE TITLE 362 01 70 SCI ELE TEA LAB 362 02 70 SCI ELE TEA LAB

SCIENCE CR HRS DAYS F 03 MW 03 F MW

TIME 0800-0850 0300-0950

1888=M8

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR WELLMAN SEM HINER SEM WELLMAN HINER SEM WELLMAN HINER WELLMAN SEM HINER

RT RT RT RT


SOCIAL WORK > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR NO NO NO HRS DAYS COURSE TITLE

SOCIAL WORK

DEPT -

SOC yEL SW SOC WEL sw H3SE II HUM SEX ADJ HUM SEX ADJ MINORIT Y ZXP JR I M LAB JR INT MEANS JR FIEL D JR FIEL D JR INT SEM SENIOR FIELD SENIOR FIELD S E U 10 R FIELD SR INT SEM SR INT SEM SR INT SEM S- ADMI M LAW 1 S w WOMEN I N ORG TOPICAL SEM

74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74

102 102 231 309 309 313 335 336 339 339 340 400 400 400 401 401 401 404 407 410 490

01 02

8! 02 01 01 01

n

01 01 0? 03 01 02 03 01 01 01 01

03 03 03 03 03 03 01

03

05 05 01 12 12 12 02 02 02 01 01 02 03

MWF TR TR M T TR TBA TBA TBA TBA T3A TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA W TBA

TIME 09C0 -0950 0925 ■1040 1050 ■1205 1330 ■2100 1330 -2100 0925 ■1040 TBA ■TBA T3A ■TBA TBA •TBA TBA ■TBA T3A •TBA TBA ■TBA TBA •TBA TBA ■TBA TBA •TBA TBA ■TBA T3A •TBA TBA •TBA TBA ■ •TBA 1520 •1700 TBA •TBA

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR RUFF RUFF RUFF RJFF RUFF RUFF RUFF RUFF

223 228 227 227 227 227 228 228 TBA T3A TBA TBA TBA T3A TBA TBA T3A TBA TBA GRAINGER 227 TBA

SIMPS ON-JOH NSON SIMPS ON-JOH NSON ALLEN -BLEDS OE ALLEN -3LEDS OE ALLEN -BLEDS OE GC STONI KINIS SIMPS ON-JOH NSON SIMPS ON-JOH NSON SIMPS ON-JOH NSON STONI KINIS GC SIMPS ON-JOH NSON ALLEN -BLEDS OE SIMPS ON-JOH NSON STONI KINIS GC ALLEN -BLEDS OE SIMPS ON-JOH NSON GC STONI KINIS ALLEN -BLEDS OE STONI KINIS GC TAYLO R K STONI KINIS GC

DEPT - SPEECH/DRAMATIC ARTS > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC COURSE TITLE NO NO NO VOIC E DICT SO 100 01 FUND AMENTALS 80 101 01 FUND AMENTALS 80 101 02 FUND AMENTALS 80 101 03 FUND AMENTALS 80 101 04 FUND AMENTALS 30 101 05 FUND AMENTALS 30 101 06 FUND AMENTALS 80 101 07 PRAC SP THER 80 300 01 SPEE CH PATH 30 304 01 FORE NSICS 80 01 312

DEPT - SPEECH/DRAMATIC ARTS > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC COURSE TITLE NO NO NO INT RO T HEATR 81 101 01 INT RO T HEATR 31 INT RO T HEATR INT RO T HEATR 04 31 101 INT RO T HEATR 31 101 05 PLA Y PR ODUCT 81 112 01 PLA Y PR ODUCT 31 112 02 PLA Y PR ODUCT 81 112 03 PLA Y PR ODJCT 31 112 04 ADV ACT ING 81 201 01 PLA Y PR ODUCT 31 212 01 PLA Y PR ODUCT 81 212 PLA Y PR ODUCT 81 212 PLA Y PR ODUCT 81 04 212 STG CRAF T II 81 221 01

SPEECH CR HRS 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 03 02

°2 03

INTRO SOC JNTRO SOC

SOCIOLOGY TIME 0900" ■0950

3UILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR 209 PIPPERT MINER )9 PIPPERT HINER

0925- •1040 1050 •1205 1330' ■1420 0925 ■1040 1050' •1205 1400- •1515 10C0 ■1Q5Q 0925 •1040 1330 ■1420 1400 ■1515 TBA • •TBA

H IN E P HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER HINER

m :WI8

INTRO SOC INTRO SOC INTRO SOC CON SO C PR03 SUPRNA T BLFS MARR F AM SOC RS RCH SOCIAL STRAT CRIMIN 0L3GY SOC TH EORY COMMUN ITY INTERN SHIP

T9A

i8!

15 205

HLAD PERKINS

205 209 206 209 205 205 209 205 206 211

PERKINS PIPPERT ARMSTRONG PIPPERT PERKINS PERKINS HLAD HLAD ARMSTRONG HLAD

JM JM LG KL KL JM KV JM KL KL LG LG KV LG

CR HRS 03 03 03 01 01 01 01 03 01 01

8! 81 04

LAB

PLA Y PR ODUCT PLA Y PR ODUCT PLA Y PR ODUCT PLA Y PR ODUCT LIG HT D ESIGN DRA LIT 20C PLA YWRI TING PLA Y PR ODUCT PLA Y PR ODUCT PLA Y PR ODUCT PLA Y PR ODUCT *bSCE NE S TUOY *bIMP ROV THEAT

81 81 81 31 81 81 81 81 81 81 81

312 312 312 312 323 369 400 412 412 412 412 495 595

01 02 03 4 1 01 01 01 02 03 04 01 01

8

MWF MWF MWF TR TR TR TR M TBA MWF TR

TIME 1000-1050 0900-0950 1000-1050 0925-1040 0925-1040 1050-1205 14C0-1515 19CC-2130 TBA -T3A 1100-1150 03C0-0915

BUILDING ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN J ARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN

W00D3URN HAGA HAGA HAGA W00D3URN W00D3URN LOCKWOOD YOUNG WOODBURN W00D3URN HAGA

026 007 007 STU 007 007 00 7 026 T3A 007 005

JARMAN JARMAN

01 01 01 01 03 03 03 01 01

81 02 01

DAYS MWF MWF TR TR TR MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MWF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MW T3A MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF TR MWF W MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF MTWRF TR MW

TIME 11C0-1150

MIS: i«8 1050- 1205 1400- 1515 T3A - T3A TBA - TBA TBA - TBA TBA - TBA 10CC-'1050 TBA - T3A TBA - T3A T3A - T3A TBA - T3A 1330- 1420 T8A - TBA T3A - T3A TBA - TBA TBA - TBA TBA - T3A 1400- 1515 0900- 095Q 1430- 1600 TBA - TBA TBA ■ T3A TBA ■ T3A TBA ■ TBA 1525- 1700 1430" 1600

BUILDING ROOM INSTRUCTOR

JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN ARMAN ARMAN ARMAN ARMAN ARMAN ARMAN ARMAN ARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN J ARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN JARMAN

026 026 026 026 026 STG STG STG STG STU STG STG STG STG STG STG STG STG STG STG STG 026 007 STG STG STG STG STU STU

STAFF LOCKWOOD YOUNG EVANS YOUNG STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF EVANS EVANS STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF EVANS LOCKWOOD YOUNG STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF ARMITAGE ARMITAGE

*b -Block 2: Mar. 15 - Apr. 20 DEPT - ENG/PHIL/FOR. LANG. > CALL NUM9 < COURSE

TITLE

BASIC I LAB BASIC I LAB BASIC II LAB BASIC II LA3 READ & COMP CONVERSATION CIV I CULT SURVEY SPA AMER AUT

DISC NO

SPANISH

CRSE NO

SEC NO

CR HRS

75

100

01

04

78

100

02

04

78

110

01

04

73

110

02

04

73 78 78 78 78

200 210 330 342 442

01 01 01 01 01

03 03 03 03 03

DAYS MWF TBA MWF TBA MWF TBA MWF TBA TR MWF MWF TR TBA

DEPT - EDUCATION & PSYCHOLOGY > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NC NO NO HRS DAYS ED CHILD LD CHILD BEH MANG FIELD EX FIELD EX DIAG L-D CURR ED CURR LD

E-D L-D

79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79

290 292 310 320 327 380 402 404

01 01 01 01 01 01

03 03 03 03 03 03

8]

81

MWF TR MWF MW MW MWF MWF T

TIME 1000-1050 TBA -TBA 0900-0950 TBA -TBA 0800-0850 T3A -TBA 0900-0950 TBA -TBA 0925-1040 1200-1250 1100-1150 0925-1040 T3A -TBA

BUILDING

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER GRAINGER

019 019 102 102 102 102 019 019 102 019 212 019 TBA

SILVEIRA SILVEIRA STAFF STAFF BROOKS BROOKS BROOKS BROOKS BROOKS BROOKS SILVEIRA SILVEIRA SILVEIRA

SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS - SPRING 1917 MC MC FB rd FB FB FB FB MC MC MC

SPECIAL EDUCATION TIME 1000-1050 1050-1205 1000-1050 16C0-1715 1600-1715 1100-1150

IHWSiS

BUILDING

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE WYNNE

121 123 202 T3A TBA 121

WILLIAMS OVERTON OVERTON RICE OVERTON OVERTON WILLIAMS TAIBI

251

VG TL TL LB TL TL VG D

RJ NA NA NA RJ RJ P DM RJ RJ NA

THEATER

81 8?

DEPT - SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY > CALL NUMB < DISC CRSE SEC CR COURSE TITLE NC NO NO HRS DAYS

DAYS

Examinations for the Spring Semester 1987 are scheduled at times determined by the regular class meeting time. For example, the examination for the classes normally meeting at 2 p.m. Tuesday and/or Thursday will be held 7-10 p.m. Tuesday. May 5 in the regular class meeting location. Night classes will take their examination from 7-10 on the regularly scheduled night during examination week. Students having three examinations on one day may take one of the examinations during a scheduled makeup period. The instructor works out the arrangements with the student. FRIDAY. MAY 1

READING DAY

EXAM DAY/DATE

9-12

2-5

7-10

SATURDAY. MAY 2

ENGLISH 051, 100, 101

M/W/F 8:00

M/W/F 10:00

MONDAY. MAY 4

M/W/F 1:30

T/R 10:50

T/R 4:00/4:50/5:30

TUESDAY, MAY 5

T/R 9:25

M/W/F 2:30

T/R 2:00

WEDNESDAY, MAY 6

T/R 8:00

M/W/F 9:00

M/W/F 3:30/4:00/5:00

THURSDAY, MAY 7

M/W/F 11:00

T/R 3:25

MAKEUP

FRIDAY. MAY 8

M/W/F 12:00

MAKEUP

P DM AM DM

AM AM

AM P DM


CAMPUS NOTES Ren aissance Dinner

financial aids should send a stamped, self-addressed business-sized envelope to The Scholarship Bank, 4626 N. Grand, Covina, CA. 91724.

The 1986 Renaissance Christmas Dinner at Longwood College will be held on Saturday and Sunday, December 6 and 7. A tradition at Longwood for 11 years, the Renaissance Dinner offers singing, dancing, and feasting (prime rib of beef) patterned after Advent Season celebration in Tudor England. The entertainers are members of Longwood's Camerata Singers, under the direction of Dr. Louard Egbert who portrays the "Lord of Misrule." The evening begins at 6:30 with an opening ceremony in longwood's Rotunda, followed by the dinner and entertainment in the Blackwell Dining Hall. Reservations for the Renaissance Dinner are now being accepted by Longwood's Public Affairs Office, located on the second floor of East Ruffner. The cost of the dinner is $17.95 per person. For more information, call 3929371.

Need Aid? College students in need of financial aid for this academic year were urged to investigaste private foundation sources by Steve Danz, Director of The Scholarship Band. According to the director, there are over 500 million in private financial aid sources that oft-times go unused. This imbalance is due to the fact that college students until now have not had a reliable method of finding out about the numerous private aid sources. The Scholarship Bank has computerized this information and will send each applicant a personalized print-out of private aid sources that appear just right for each applicant. College students can find funds based on major, occupational goals, geographic preferences and approximately 30 other criteria. Financial need is not stressed as heavily in private aid as in government funding. Numerous new grants exist this year for business, liberal arts, health care, law, and humanities. Students are also urged to investigate well-paying corporate internships as part of their over-all financial package. Students interested in supplementing their current

I

How 'Bout Givin9 Me A Ring? The U.S. Post Office in Farmville has found a class ring that was discovered loose in the mail. Partial description is as follows: Women's size 6-6Vi, Gillham High School, Class of '86. A more complete description will be required in order to claim the ring. Please notify the Post Office in Farmville for details or to claim the ring.

China Awaits You

Applicants will need to submit application-recommendation forms as well as the following materials: A letter from the applicant including a statement of approximately 800 words about his-her background and the relationship of the proposed study to career interests. An official copy of the applicant's transcripts (including 1986 fall semester grades). A letter from a teacher of Chinese language certifying the language capability of the applicant who wishes to take courses other than beginning language courses. For a complete informationapplication packet, contact: Taiwan Scholarship Program AASCU Office of International Programs One Dupont Circle, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036 202-857-1835

Not Just Tobacco

Are you creative and looking The American Association of for marketing experience? Enter the Philip Morris MarketingState Colleges and Universities Communications Competition. is pleased to announce the 1987-88 For the 18th consecutive year, competition of the AASCUTaiwan Scholarship Program. Philip Morris Companies Inc. Applications are welcome invites students currently in accredited from undergraduates at AASCU enrolled universities or junior colleges to member institutions to study in research any of its non-tobacco Taiwan during the 1987-88 products-operations and submit a academic year. The AASCUTaiwan Scholarships, made marketing-communications possible by the Ministry of proposal that could succeed in Education in Taiwan, are offered today's competitive business world. to those students wishing to To enter, student committees begin Chinese language study in must prepare projects under the Taiwan, as well as those wishing to improve their Chinese supervision of a faculty member language capabilities and or a recognized campus knowledge of Chinese culture. professional society. Committee Applicants must demonstrate a size should be three or more serious desire to study Chinese students at the undergraduate language and should be capable level and two or more students at of living independently in the graduate level. Student ideas must relate to the non-tobacco another culture. The 15 available scholarships products or operations of Philip will provide tuition, Morris, which include General miscellaneous fees, and a Foods Corporation, Miller monthly stipend of Brewing Company, Lindeman approximately $175 (U.S. Wines, and Mission Viejo Realty currency) from September, 1987 Group. Winning teams in both the through August, 1988. graduate and undergraduate Transportation to and from Taiwan is the responsibility of the categories will receive first place student. Students having the awards of $2,000, second place required language proficiency awards of $1,000, and third place may take courses of their choice awards of $500. Representatives at appropriate universities in from the winning teams will be Taiwan. Beginning and invited, with their faculty intermediate students will study advisors, to be guests of Philip at the Mandarin Training Center Morris in New York City, where at Taiwan Normal University in they will present their projects to Taipei, and, depending on the judges and Philip Morris proficiency, may' enroll in executives. Projects can focus on nonlanguage courses.

marketing, advertising, public relations, cultural affairs, economics, etc. For example, student teams may wish to develop a new advertising campaign for Lowenbrau beer or one of the specified General Foods products, design a new import-export plan for Lindeman Wines, prepare a corporate image program for Philip Morris, arrange a series of public relations community events for Mission Viejo, market a new product within the product lines of present Philip Morris companies, or focus on a related issue of interest to the team. Participation in the competition offers students valuable business experience while they are still in school. The written proposals, layouts, storyboards, videotapes or cassettes that they produce will be excellent portfolio entries and will illustrate their talents and motivation to prospective employers. Ronelle Siegel of the Parsons School of Design, first place undergraduate winner of the 17th annual competition, commented: "As an aspiring creative director in an advertising agency, I have never delved so deeply into the marketing aspect of a product before and, therefore, found it to be a tremendously rewarding experience." Entries, due on January 9,1967, are judged by a distinguished panel of communications experts: Mary Wells Lawrence, Chairman, Wells, Rich, Greene; Frank L. Mingo, President, Mingo-Jones Advertising Incorporated; William Ruder, President, William Ruder Incorporated; John W. Rosenblum, Dean, Colgate Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Virginia; Richard R. West, Dean, Graduate School of Business Administration, New York University; John A. Murphy, President and Chief Operating Officer, Philip Morris Companies Inc.; William I. Campbell, Executive Vice President of Marketing, Philip Morris USA; Stanley S. Scott, Vice President and Director of Corporate Affairs, Philip Morris Companies Inc. and James Tappan.Group Vice President, General Foods Corporation. Students interested in entering the 18th Annual Philip Morris Marketing-Communications Competition should write to Susan Mannion, Competition Coordinator, Philip Morris Companies Inc., P.O. Box 7722, Woodside, NY, 11377, or call (212) 880-3525.

Help keep America looking good*

THE ROTUNDA

Page 5

Raquetball, Anyone? By LISA WEAVER In September of last year, the architectural and engineering firm was selected to begin blueprints for the reconstruction of French gym for raquetball courts. The final design will be approved by the state next month. Construction, however, will not begin until April. The reason for this delay is because the state must approve every step Longwood makes in its plans for the courts. But nevertheless, the courts should be available for use August 15, 1987. The total cost of the four raquetball courts is $428,477. This money was taken from a reserve fund that is built up every year from a portion of student's comprehensive fees and room and board. There is not a direct fee to the students. However, Mr. Rick Hurley says that he feels that raquets and balls will be available for use by the students, at no extra cost. The equipment will probably have to be signed in and out like basketballs, baseball bats and gloves, etc. But at this point, equipment is pretty much ahead of the game since the courts are not open yet. There will be four separate courts enclosed with glass. There will be two viewing areas, one on the upper level of the gym and one on the lower. There will be no handicapped access to the upper level, but the lower level will be so that handicapped students may also engage in viewing this sport. In addition to the courts and viewing areas, the locker rooms in French gym are being renovated, and they are scheduled to be finished by January of 1987.

B*V Woodsy Owl for Clean Water

Give a hoot. Don't pollute. Forest Service, U.S.D.A.


Pog«6

THE ROTUNDA

Get Dizzy

ROTC: Staying Active

Jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and his band will apear in concert on Saturday, November 1, at 8 p.m. in Longwood College's Jarman Auditorium. A musical legend for almost half a century, Gillespie's unique trumpet style helped define modem jazz. He earned his nickname years ago for his "effervescent hi jinks" on stage and off. But his fame is based on his love of music and his ability to create "jazz that cooks." The jazz concert is the second program in this year's Series of the Performing Arts at Longwood. General admission to the concert is $7.00. For senior citizens (over 62), young people up to 18, and Longwood employees and their families, the ticket price is $6.50. Longwood students will be admitted free with college I.D. Tickets will be available at the box office in Jarman lobby prior to the performance.

Henry IV The Longwood Players and The Speech and Theatre Program of the Department of Visual and Performing Arts will be presenting their second production of the year, Luigi Pirandello's Henry IV, from November 19 through November 22. Performances will begin at 8 p.m. Pirandello, one of the most significant playwrights of the twentieth-century, tells the tale of a madman, a man who has strayed from reality and believes he is the German King, Henry IV. Friends and foes of this "alleged Henry IV" Masquerade as counsellors, monks, queens, and guards to fulfill his fantasy. The consequences of this "charade" are sometimes amusing, sometimes tragic. The mystical Henry TV is played by Walter Alford. Opposite him is the marchioness Matilda Spina, played by Laura Boyett. Her daughter, Frida, is played by Sandra Clayton. Frida s fiance', Carlo Di Nolli is played by Doug Shamblen. Tito Belcredi, the present lover of the marchioness is played by Ed Phaup. The pompous doctor is played by Glen Gilmer. The four make-believe privy counsellors are played by Scott Koenigsburg, Dale Clark, John Boatwright, and David Miller. A manservant is played by Glenn Banton, and a guard is played by James West. The drama is being directed by Dr. Patton Lockwood.

Shawn Washington during repelling exercises last October loth

Written by Cathy Gaughran as reported by Billy Howard The ROTC Program has been keeping busy lately with projects such as their canoe trip on Sept. 24 and repelling ("descent off a vertical surface through the use of ropes") exercises on Oct. 10. Oktoberfest displays went way beyond a booth. They included helicopter flights, National Guard display, riggers (parachute) display, colorguard, and repelling exercises off Bedford. Some future happenings with the program are Field Land Exercises (FLX) on Oct. 31 and Nov 1, which include land navigation, M16 assembly and reassembly, movement techniques, and physical training (P.T.), and an information table in the New Smoker on Nov. 4 and 5. ROTC will also be hosting a

QL

Honor System Discussed An Honor Code forum was held at 3 p.m. in the Gold Room last Friday. There were about thirty people attending. Janet Greenwood and the Honor Board led a panel. Many were students, faculty and administrators who had attended the Honors Conference in Richmond. There were others there from all aspects of Longwood's life who came to express their views and share input. Many issues about the honor system were discussed in the forum. This included the apathy, enforcement, sanctions, and effectiveness dealing with the Honor Code. One of the issues discussed was the need for an investigative committee to investigate the validity of the cases. Currently, the only member with prior knowledge of the case is Mike Clemments, Honor Board chairman. He has no vote in any of the cases. There is some hope for this investigative commitee. This commitee would consist of four people and the Honor Board chairman. It has taken a while to devise it because of Longwood's apathy. Because of the conference, the apathy has alleviated some. The committee

OCPP The Office of Career Planning and Placement provides a variety of services to assist students with their career-life planning. These services include the following: — Provide career information — Individual counseling and group seminars to assist students with career decisions — Provide job search strategy workshops (resume writing, interviewing skills, etc.) — Offer experiential learning extern program, Project ASSET — Coordinate Challenge liberal Arts Career Fair and the Minority Student Career Fair — Arrange for on-campus recruiting — Maintain a Career Resource

party with Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity on Nov. 7 in the ABC Room in Lankford. What are some of the advantages students enjoy as a result of being a part of ROTC? ROTC members are challenged by the program, enjoy simply being involved with something constructive, and have an opportunity to enhance their leadership skills and patriotism. ROTC opens doors to scholarship money during college, and to a good paying job with the military after college. There is no service obligation attached to taking an ROTC class. For more information about the ROTC Program, please stop by 3rd floor, East Ruffner, or Europe or any unfavorable call 392-9259. bordering countries? The answer remains to be seen, but Hitler did. At the present level of indifference over the outrages committed to Afghanistan by the Soviet Union, it remains to be seen what future conquests the Soviets will attempt. Afghanistan should not be viewed as an isolated case, but as a warning

UI UNITED STATES SAVINGS BONDS

would meet at least once a week, be responsible for confidentiality, investigate cases and there is an obligation of 2-3 hours per week. Elections will be held at the end of November for the two unfilled positions on the Board. The Honor Board meets one night a week to discuss cases. A student needs a 2.0 GPA and at least be a sophomore to be eligible. There is a harsher attendance policy for members. A member cannot miss more than 25 percent of the meetings. If a member is negligent three times unexcused, a letter is put in his or her folder that says that he or she is not in good standing. One of the most pertinent questions asked was about the validity of the reporting of cases. Jeff Martin, a member of the Board replied, "I deal with facts, not with rumors." The next forum will be held on the testing of drugs when a person applies for a job. Many companies do this without a person's prior knowledge. The Rotunda encourages students to participate in elections, running and voting, and to also participate in forums. This is your chance to voice your opinions.

Center — Announce job vacancies (permanent-summer) — Prepare statistical placement reports — Maintain credentials files on seniors and mail to prospective employers All these services and others are designed to enhance the employ ability of our students and give them a competitive edge in the job market. To request a special program, students, faculty, clubs and organizations need only contact OCPP at ext. 254. OCPP activities and programs are regularly announced in the Campus Bulletin.

Afghanistan Continued... against the abilities of the Soviet conventional forces. The Soviets are in Afghanistan for as long as it takes to completely control it, be it this year, or 10 years and must not be viewed as a Soviet Vietnam. Such references draw false conclusions and discount the seriousness of the Soviet invasion into a region that is about as stable as bullets in a fire.


THE ROTUNDA

Take It From Me, Kid... By WES SMITH Chicago Tribune The strains of "Pomp and Circumstance" will soon fade away. The rental company will quickly repossess your cap and gown. And your graduation gift money will hardly cover the security deposit on a studio apartment beside the elevated tracks. Congratulations, graduates. Welcome to the Real World, you poor lost souls. There ain't no spring break in the Real World friends. Christmas vacation starts the night of Dec. 24 and ends shortly after the wrapping paper comes off. You may get a week of relief each year from the Real World, if you are lucky. It is a painful course that you are about to take; the lessons come unannounced. Your next final is Final. To aid you upon your entry into the Real World, a few of those who have gone before you have compiled some sage advice. Heed the following words well. Paste them to your refrigerator, or your forehead. Write them on your wrists. They will do you much more good than all those French adverbs. And take some consolation in this: The Spanish-American War hardly ever comes up in Real World conversations. In the real world: — Insurance premiums do not work like stock premiums. You pay them. They don't pay you. — They aren't kidding when they say, "Wash whites separately." — The rate of interest is what kills you, not the down payment. — Never answer an advertisement seeking a "liberal roommate." You probably are not that liberal.

— Having a drink with the boys every night after work is a bad idea. Notice that the boss doesn't do it. That's why (s) he's the boss and they are the boys. — Nobody cares anymore that you drank a six-pack last night without throwing up. — Your new neighbors are not likely to share your enthusiasm for the Violent Femmes at full volume at 1 a.m. — Cars need not only gasoline, but oil, antifreeze, brake and transmission fluid and about onethird of your annual wage. —Instead of buying a new stereo for your city car, skip a step. Buy a window sticker that says, "It's already stolen." —Parallel parking is a survival sport. — Never play racquetball with an old guy who has played handball for 40 years. He will destroy your youth. —Buy an alarm clock that works. — Grocery coupons are not socially unacceptable. — Harvey wallbangers might be a poor selection for a business lunch. — Never date a woman whose father calls her "Princess." Chances are, she believes it. — Never date a man who still goes shopping with his mother. — "Heat included" does not mean "Heat guaranteed." Life insurance is for married men; otherwise, your chief beneficiary is the life insurance company. — Toothpaste will cover up holes in plaster, but only small holes. — Eat good meals. Greasy burgers take their toll. — Buy good stuff. It lasts longer.

*■

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To The Editor

— If you don't like your job, quit. Otherwise, shut up. — Soon people your own age will be having children and buying garbage disposals. Learn to fake an interest in both. — If you get invited to the wedding, send a gift. Otherwise, don't expect a crowd when your turn comes. — There is no such thing as a self-cleaning oven — Be nice to the little people. You are still one of them. — Your feet will continue to grow. Be willing to go up a shoe size. — Shower curtains are replaceable. — You are going to need silverware. — Never assume that the telephone company is working in your best interest. — Never date someone you work with. Especially the boss.

To the Editor: Like most other students on this campus, one day I want to get married and have children. But now, I wonder. I went home for Fall Break, and, of course, the first thing that I do is turn on the news. You know, to catch up on Richmond. I get so far behind in the booming metropolis of Farmville. Well, Richmond is up to its 65th homicide. I think we are third somewhere behind New York and Chicago. I wasn't too stunned at the murder of this nineteen-year-old. Yes, I have taken an apathetic attitude toward the slayings. I guess I will until it is somebody I know. The next news item was about a Petersburg pastor who had been brought up on sex charges. This | is what shocked me. Clyde I Johnson, 51, is a city councilman and the pastor of two Baptist churches. He had been indicted I on 39 felony moral charges.

Twenty-nine were for aggravated sexual battery by use of force, threat, or intimidation, four counts of statuatory rape, four counts of having sexual intercourse with a fourteen-yearold girl, one count of forcible rape, and one count of attempted rape. This man is definitely SICK. Who can you trust your children with if you can't trust them with the pastor of your own church. This person is suppose to represent God, goodness and morality. Hopefully, when I have children, there will be more background research into individuals such as teachers, clergymen, policemen, etc. I don't know, last week a Richmond pastor was accused of sodomizing an eleven-year-old girl.

PLAY DOMINO'S PIZZA'S

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CALL 392-9461 One Call Does It All!

POM 7


Pago 8

THE ROTUNDA

Sports Wrap Up Field Hockey By Kirk Barnes After dropping a tough 2-1 decision to visiting La Salle Saturday morning, Longwood's field hockey team will be on the road for its final two regular season games this week. The Lady Lancers will be facing VCU Monday at 3:30 and Mary Washington Wednesday at 3:00. Saturday's loss, which came in overtime, dropped the Longwood record to 9-6. The defeat was a disappointing one for the team and the coach, denying coach Sue Finnie a chance to pick up her 100th career win at home. Liz Annet and Carla Voorhees were named the offensive players of the game while Margie Kemen captured the defensive honors. La Salle's Ann Richards scored the first goal of the game at the 12:50 mark of the second half. Liz Annet, on an assist from Laura Goetz, tied the game at the 15:40 mark. After a scoreless first overtime La Salle scored the winning goal on a long shot with only 28 seconds left in the second overtime. "The ball took a bad bounce on the winning goal," explained Finnie. The game was close in all phases. La Salle out-shot Longwood 26-22 and had 12 saves to LC's 10. "We played well. It was one of our better games. We knew it would be close," the Longwood mentor stated. The game had rivalry potential. La Salle's coach, Donna Partin, used to be an assistant to coach Finnie at Widener University. Finnie was happy with the team's effort.

Luther Inducted Longwood basketball coach Cal Luther was one of five people inducted into the Murray State University Athletic Hall of Fame Thursday night at the college's Hall of Fame Banquet. Luther, who has compiled a 7040 mark at Longwood in five seasons, was the coach who built the foundation upon which Murray State's modern'day basketball tradition rests. He is the only coach to have led the

basketball Racers to the NCAA Tournament, and three of his teams were ranked in the top twenty. In his 16 seasons as MSU head basketball coach, Luther piled up 241 wins, the second highest total in Murray history. He guided his teams to one outright Ohio Valley Conference title and shared two others. His squads also finished as the league runner-up or champion seven of 10 seasons, 1964 to 1974. He receivced OVC Coach of the year honors in 1964,1969 and 1971, which were the seasons Murray advanced to the NCAA playoffs. During his coaching tenure, 17 of his players earned All-QhioValley Conference honors a total of 28 times. Three players received OVC Player of the year honors four times. Luther's popularity with Murray State fans was enhanced by a 27-game winning streak in Racer Arena, from November 27, 1968 to February 21, 1970. That success string, which still stands, helped establish Racer Arena as one of the toughest home courts in the OVC. Luther's 808 homecourt winning percentage is second only to the undefeated one-year record of current Racer head coach Steve Newton. Thanks to his shrewd eye for talent and his ability to teach the game of basketball, three of Luther's recruits advanced to a career in professional basketball. Among them was Dick Cunningham, who also is a member of the 1986 Hall of Fame induction class. Accepting the additional responsibilities of MSU athletic director in 1967, Luther helped keep the Racers strong in the OVC, winning the coveted AllSports Trophy in 1973 and finishing in the top three in AllSports competition in eight of Luther's 11 years as athletic director. During that span, MSU claimed nine conference championships in various sports. Luther became Longwood coach in 1981 and has led the Lancers to four winning seasons in five years. His teams have finished second in the MasonDixon Conference regular season race two of the past three years.

Volleyball By Rick Rivera Longwood's lady volleyball team split a pair of matches Friday with two very tough Bridgewater squads which placed second and third in the

Cindy Smith Tournament October 11. Longwood improved its record to 11-17. The next match will be Thursday night when the Lady Lancers host Mary Washington and Liberty. The first match will begin at 6:00. Longwood dropped three straight in a best three out of five by a 15-10, 154, 154 count to Bridgewater I. Although Longwood served at an 87 percent clip it lacked consistency in other aspects of the game. One spiker who proved to be very consistent was Kris Meyer. On the night, she accumulated eight stuff blocks and six stuff assist blocks. Meyer hit at a 70 percent kill-to-hit ratio and as coach Linda Elliott stated "held the offense together." Joanna Marquez chipped in with a pair of ace serves. In the second match Longwood was pitted against a second Bridgewater squad which placed third in the Cindy Smith Tourney. Bridgewater took Longwood the distance but feU 15-9,11-15,15-13. Elliott said it felt good to win because Longwood lost to the same team in the tournament. The Lady Lancers showed some character in a come-from-behind match clinching third game. Those showing off their talents were Linda Swe who replaced the injured Staci Dillon and Stephanie Coukos. Swe did a fantastic job setting. Over the course of the year Elliott feels she has improved tremendously. Coukos again hit at a consistent pace as she has done all year long.

Playing for Longwood were: Tina Barrett 80-7541-236, Marcia Melone 78-82-77-237, Gretchen Pugh 7943-82-244, Ashley Warren 8544-78-247 and Leigh Russell 8682-87-255. In winding up its most successful fall ever, Longwood grabbed two tournament titles and a third place finish. Coach Barbara Smith's squad had a record 33-14 based on four tournament appearances. The Lady Lancers' highest team round of the fall was a 326 in the Duke Invitational. Top individual scores were turned in by Barrett and Melone. Barrett, a two-time AilAmerican, had a stroke average of 77.9 for the fall. Her 77-75-77-229 was the lowest 54-hole score for Longwood. Melone was close behind with a 78.8 stroke average. All her 54-hole scores were in the 230's in a strong display of consistency. Pugh (82.4), Warren (82.5) and Russell (82.8) were also consistent scores for the most part. Junior Tammy Lohren averaged 81.5 for six rounds, but was knocked out of action by an injury.

Soccer

In Wednesday's win over VMI Kremen had a goal and an assist, Scott Gittman two goals and soph Kenny Lim two goals. Kremen has 3 goals and 9 assists for the season. One more assist will tie the record for assists in a season (10) which was set by Gus Leal in 1982 and tied by John Kennen in 1985. Gittman has totaled 7 goals and 3 assists.

Gymnastics

Longwood's gymnastics team, prepping for a regular season which begins in early December, will put on an exhibition Wednesday night in Lancer Hall, starting at 8 p.m. The performance is open to the public at no charge. Coach Ruth Budd will have perhaps her most experienced team ever in 1980-87 with nine veteran performers on hand. Led by co-captains Tammy Zeller, a junior, and Debbe Malin, a senior, the Lancers are looking for an outstanding season. Longwood is scheduled to have a home intersquad meet November 19 and opens the season December 6 at Radford with William & Mary.

After splitting games with VMI and District of Columbia last Wednesday and Saturday, Longwood's soccer team will take a 9-4-1 record into a pair of road contests on tap in this week's action. The Lancers visit rival Hampden-Sydney for a 3:00 game Wednesday afternoon and travel to Newport News for a 2:00 showdown with nationally Longwood finished with a ranked Christopher-Newport respectable showing in the 11th Saturday. Both the Lancers and Lady Tar Heel Invitational Captains are hopeful of winning Tournament Sunday in Chapel the VISA Eastern Division crown Hill, NC, shooting a 322-322-318- and reaching the state playoffs. Longwood handled VMI with 962 for 13th place out of 16 teams. In the process, the Lady Lancers ease Wednesday, winning by a 6-1 finished the fall season with their count, but was upset by District lowest team stroke average in of Columbia 3-2 Saturday history â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a 318.8. afternoon in the rain. The At UNC's Finley Golf Course Lancers had 24 shots to eight for Friday through Sunday, UDC, but failed to convert Longwood played in a field which enough opportunities. Late in the featured the best Division I game Longwood failed to hit a women's golf teams on the east penalty kick, which might have coast. Miami (FL) shot a 301-300- brought on overtime. "We played well," said Lancer 298-899 to edge rival Florida (303coach Rich Posipanko. "We 305-294-302) for the title. Also competing were: Furman knocked it all around the field. 303-303-301-907, Georgia 303-308- We just didn't finish. We missed 307-918, Texas 310-308-303-921, too many shots." Senior Mark Kremen had a Duke 317-304-306-927, South Carolina 300-322-305-927. goal and an assist and Tim Ford Kentucky 311-307-315-933, also scored in Saturday's defeat. Minnesota 314-314-307-935, North Ford's goal put LC up 2-1 in the Carolina 319-309-317-945, Auburn second half before UDC scored 328-322-303-953, Wake Forest 308- twice to take the win. Posipanko, whose team has 332-314-954, Longwood 322-322-318962, Penn State 324-315-327-986, been ranked 13th in Division II William & Mary 332-334-332-998 the last two weeks, said the loss and James Madison 339-354-329- to UDC would knock the Lancers 1022. out of the rankings.

Golf

Player of the Week Freshman Kris Meyer had eight stuff blocks and six stuff assist blocks in a pair of Longwood volleyball matches Friday, and for her performance, Meyer has been named Longwood College Player of the Week for the period October 1926. Player of the Week is chosen by the Longwood sports information office. "Kris has been our most consistent performer all season and Friday night was no exception," said coach Linda Elliott. "She held our offense together." Meyer was credited with a 70 per cent (9-14) kill to hit ratio as the Lady Lancers fell to Bridgewater I and defeated Bridgewater II in a pair of matches in Lancer Hall. It was just two weks ago that Meyer was named to the All-Cindy Smith Invitational Tournament team. An art major who aspires to be a photo journalist, Meyer was an All-League and team MVP performer at Downers Grove High School. She was also a cocaptain in basketball. A member of the National Honor Society in high school, Meyer received an academic scholarship to attend Longwood. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Meyer who resides in Roanoke, Virginia.


Rotunda vol 66, no 6 oct 28, 1986