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THE ROTUNDA VOL. LVII

LONGWOOD COLLEGE, FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

TUESDAY, JANUARY 26, 1982

Local Food Prices Drop By PUBLIC AFFAIRS The good news regarding local food prices continued this month. Following national and state trends, the local market basket dropped 1.08 per cent between November and December. An even more positive note for local food buyers is the comparison in yearly prices which shows a 2.3 per cent drop from December 1980. The table below gives data on the four areas of the state where

News Briefs

By BILL BRENT bread, pork chops, hot dogs, fryers, cheese, ice cream, eggs, WORLD France and the Soviet Union have agreed on a 25-year pact that bananas, carrots, lettuce, onions, will let France buy 282 cubic feet of natural gas a year. It is the first peaches, corn, tomatoes, agreement by a Western country with Russia since Polands martial shortening, and grape jelly. Prices were lower for flour, law was established. corn flakes, soda crackers, round All problems are solved according to Egyptian Foreign Minister steak, hamburger, bacon, tuna Kamal Hassan Ali in regards to Israels' withdrawal from the Sinai fish, milk, evaporated milk, Peninsula. Ali and Ariel Sharon, Israeli Defense Minister hope to frozen orange juice, apples, complete everything by April 25. oranges, cabbage, celery, U.S. Army Lt. Col. Charles Ray was gunned down in Paris last potatoes, peas, tomato soup, week. The Lebanese Armed Revolutionary Factions claim responcoffee, cola drinks, peanut sibility. No new leads and a stymied police force continue their search (Continued on Page 8) for U.S. Brig. General James Dozier, abducted by the Red Brigade one month ago. % CHANGE % CHANGE DEC.

market basket studies are conducted. Although local food prices fell again this month, the Farmville market basket, at $59.37, is still slightly higher than in the other three areas of the state where these surveys are conducted. In comparing local prices for November and December, 16 items were priced higher, 22 items were lower, and two items were the same as last month. Higher prices were found for

Farmville Richmond Northern Virginia Norfolk-Va. B«och-Portsmouth

NOV. 1981

DEC. 1981

11/81-12/81

1980

12/80-12/80

$60.45 57.74 58.71 58.12

$59.37 58.10 58.42 58.58

-1.08 + 0.6 -0.5 +0.6

$60.71 59.58 N.A. 59.16

-2.3 -2.5 N.A. -1.1

Lemish To Claim Post By BILL BRENT Donald I>emish, former Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement and Planning at East Carolina University is the new Vice President for Institutional Advancement at Ixmgwood College. Institutional Advancement has the responsibility to acquire private funds that benefit 12 academic programs for students. Lemish says "fund raising is an art" and his past shows he is a master of his craft. He studied Speech and Journalism at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, lemish chose BSU because of its baseball reputation but a football injury haltered all baseball for the talented athlete. At 13 he was invited to workout with the farm team of the Milwaukee Braves. He completed his BS in Education then MA in Journalism at BSU. In 1968 Lemish took his journalism talents to an Indiana high school where the weekly paper, under his direction won the "Pacemaker of the Year" award as the best paper in the nation. Returning to Ball State he became the Alumni Field Director and Alumni Editor. During the next nine years he became Associate Director of Alumni and Development, Executive Director of the Cardinal Varsity Club, Director of Development and Executive Vice President of the Ball State University Foundation. In this nine year period BSU earned five U.S. Steel Incentive Awards, Alumni donations tripled and total giving ballooned five fold. Lemish spent two years as Assistant Vice President for

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Development at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, where private gift support doubled after one year. Then he moved on to ECU to become the Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement and Planning. In his two years at ECU two additional incentive awards, alumni fund doubled and he wrote The Foundation Handbook published in July 1981. As Lemish ascended the upper echelons of adniinistration he

remains close to sports as he officiated Indiana high school sports, NAIA playoffs and Big 10 baseball. His radio play-by-play took him to the Major Leagues and friends Merv Rettermund, Brooks Robinson and Earl Weaver. Education, sports and Longwood are prominent in Lemish's life, he adds "the drive, the enthusiasm, the intensity of Jan Greenwood" is the major reason for his presence.

NATION All but the engine of Air Florida's Boeing 737 that smashed into the 14th Street bridge then into Washington, D.C.'s Potomac River has been recovered. Late last week the last body was removed from the frigid waters; two black boxes were retrieved, investigators hope they may provide a clue to the crash. Four pilots lost their lives last week as four Air Force Thunderbird jets slammed into the Nevada desert sands. It was the worst single accident in Thunderbird history. In California two single-engine planes collided in mid-air killing one pilot and injuring another. Inflation figures are down as GNP and unemployment rose....the trial of Wayne Williams continued with the prosecution introducing fiber evidence....freezing rain, frigid temperatures and blizzard snowfalls continue to plague the nation, the National Weather Service forecast for the next month calls for little relief.

Salters To Resign Dr. Leo C. Salters, Vice President for Student Affairs has turned in his resignation which

will be effective on June 30,1982. Salters, whose wife is currently working at Ohio University and moving to Tennessee for a post there, says he will seek work in Tennessee also. Salters says he needs to rejoin his wife and son He feels Ixwigwood offers opportunities to students and that "there is a lot going on (at Longwood) for students." No one has been hired for the position.

Inside Page 2 Hoke Currie interviews four I,ongwood male seniors and explores the changes of a former girls school.

Photo by Joe Johnson

Ice And Snow Cancels Classes Longwood students got last Tuesday and Wednesday off from classes. And many students used anything they could find — trays, Ironing boards, sleds, lnnertubes — to take advantage of the slick stuff. Some melting should clear conditions up as no precipitation has been forecast for this week.

Page 4 Collegiate Crosswords Puzzle returns. Page 5 t Joe Johnson and Jodi Kersey find out what it is like to be burned out of house and home. Page 6 and 7 Sports Editor Mike Lynch reports on the cagers wins over Johnson State and liberty Baptist.


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THE ROTUNDA

Tuesday, January 26, 1982

In M em on am

Yes Virginia! There Are Men At Longwood Editors Note This is the first of a two part series by Long wood's Sports Information Direc tor. Hoke Currie Dallas Brad bury, Duke Rollins. Randy John son and Brian Cochran are all male seniors and speak candidly about the changes at a former all girls school. ByHOKECURRIE FARMVILLE. VA When

senior Dallas Bradbury of Chesterfield was a freshman he would get the following response when he told his friends and relatives he attended longwood College: "longwood, that's a girls' school isn't it?" Bradbury would smile and say, "Well, no. Longwood just became co-ed." Three years and hundreds more longwood male students later, he still gets the same question. "Now when they ask me I just look at them with a real cold look and say, 'Yeah',"explained the longwood senior. Despite the fact that Bradbury is just one of 688 male students' currently enrolled at longwood, people as close as 40 miles to the Farmville college still believe Longwood is an all-female institution of higher learning. Fact is, longwood became coeducational in 1976 when the college population was made up of 2,051 women and 181 men. The number of men has grown each year to the current figures of 1,738 women and 688 men, roughly 75 per cent female and 25 per cent male. As Bradbury and three other longwood senior men revealed in a recent interview, Longwood's all-female image is dying a slow death, agonizingly slow for the male students who want the college to be known for what it now is: an institution of higher learning for MEN and women. PIONEERS IN TRANSITION For Bradbury, a Clover Hill High School graduate, and fellowseniors Randy Johnson of Richmond, Brian Cochran of Alexandria and Duke Rollins of Portsmouth, the past 4 years have been ;i time of transition at I-ongwood and the 4 have been among the pioneers in this transition. longwood men are making their mark in student government, college traditions, athletics, academics and social life. As an example, Bradbury was Longwood's first male orientation chairman when school opened in the fall. The longwood men seem to have been fully integrated into college life, but it wasn't always so. Duke Rollins recalls that in his freshman year (1978) several female students let him know Jhat his presence was not welcome. GOT UP AND LEFT "Now they have accepted us," said Rollins, who was the college's first male class president as a freshman, "but I know some girls here that are

seniors now who refused to sit with me in the dining hall when I was a freshman. "They were intending to go to an all-girls school and sat down at the table with them. They said I'm sorry but I don't want to sit here and these girls got up and left because they would not sit with any males. "They were freshmen," Rollins explained. "I know these girls today and I talk with them about what happened. Of course, they've kind of gone with the flow and worked it out. "They say the thing they came here for was to have a girls' school with a guys' school (Hampden-Syeney) six miles down the road. That's exactly what they said. They wanted to come to an all-girls school and when they knew that the guys were coming here more and more, they kind of turned us all off." TIMES HAVE CHANGED "That was four years ago," Rollins continued. "Today, the thing that I like is when the freshman girls and guys come in, they're going to school together here like they did in high school. There's a lot more class identity and unity as freshmen at longwood." longwood's decision to go coed, which was announced in September, 1975, has fostered change with sociological implications. longwood men and women are dating, getting engaged and getting married. Prior to the arrival of male students in significant numbers, the affection of many Longwood women had been centered on the 700 or so males down the road at Hampden-Sydney. When Longwood went co-ed a natural rivalry sprang up between the males at longwood and Hampden-Sydney. Like the new kid on the block, the longwood men resented the fact that most of the local social activity took place at someone else's house, namely HampdenSydney. Richmond Senior Randy Johnson recalls what it was like is freshman year in 1978. "When I first came here (to Longwood) the big thing was Okay, the guys from HampdenSydney will be up on the corner.' A lot of the girls would go out to meet them," said Johnson. "Then half the campus would go1 to Hampden-Sydney for fraternity parties on the weekends. It was like a putdown to us. "A lot of people got motivated about the social situation that year. That's when several fraternities were formed. People started having parties here just to keep the female population at longwood." All four senior men (Bradbury, Rollins, Johnson and Cochran) agree that there was some animosity between the males at the two schools back then. But, they also agree that the animosity has lessened in recent

years.

"As a freshman I'll agree there was a certain amount of animosity," said Bradbury. We were the first male class of any size. We were here and we were out to prove that longwood did have males and that we were just as good as other males that went anywhere else. "So there was a little bit of tension created there because that (Hampden-Sydney) was the closest other school to us that we could prove ourselves. I think that tension has lessened some now. I have friends at HampdenSydney and we attend parties together at both schools." The Longwood seniors agree that the problems between the males at the two schools often involve freshmen. "When the freshman males come to Longwood, of course there's a grudge because they see the girls going to HampdenSydney," said Alexandria native Brian Cochran. "As for the upperclassmen, I think we basically get along." "You can go to a party at Hampden-Sydney and have a good time," he explained. "They know you're from Longwood and they're not going to say anything about it. I think they are starting to accept the fact that we (longwood men) are here. Our freshman year I know then didn't like it at all." FRATERNITIES LEAD THE WAY Borrowing an idea from their male counterparts down the road, Longwood men began to start fraternities of their own. Currently, there are five fraternities and 10 sororities at longwood and social life on campus has picked up. With the advent of fraternities and the increase in weekend social activity, Longwood's image as a "suitcase college" has also been fading away of late. Perhaps the biggest contributor to the suitcases remaining in the closet, however, has been the Student Union organization (SUN). According to Duke Rollins, who has been active in SUN, entertainment opportunities for students have really multiplied. "There are a lot more things going on now that help to keep students on campus," said Rollins. "We can see as far as the student union is concerned how much it has grown. longwood has broadened its scope as far as keeping people on campus, because they feel that if people come to the campus they should entertain them also as well as educate them. Maybe that's not the general cause, but people aren't going to always study on Friday and Saturday nights. "The student union budget has grown from around $20,000 to $36,000 since I've been here," he continued. "You can tell that the student union's idea is to keep people on campus and make us (Continued on Page 8)

Courtesy of Alpha Chi Rho

Marcus Shaw, 19, ended a life-long battle with Cystic Fybrosis on Thursday, December 17, 1981. He donated his remains to the University of Virginia Hospital where he died. A memorial service was held on Sunday, December 19 in Charlottesville. He was an only child and is survived by his parents of Charlottesville. Shaw was a member of Alpha Chi Rho fraternity.

Student Sings In Bethlehem By Cindy Corell If you ask Rebecca Nunez, a senior music education, performance and foreign language major how she spent her Christmas holidays, she'll ask how much time you have, because it promises a three hour story. Some of this story would be about how she sat on Jordan's Prince Ali's lap and serenaded him with "I Can't Help loving That Man." The prince was returning to Harvard in the same flight as Rebecca's return trip, and an airline stewardess invited Rebecca to come to the first class section and entertain his Highness. Rebecca was invited to be a soloist for a televised special, "Christmas from Bethlehem," in Manger Square, which was shown on the Christian Broadcasting Network. The brass section of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and two other soloists accompanied her as part of a crusade group under the direction of Rev. John Adkerson, staff evangelist of First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Rebecca was surprised when she learned that she would be a soloist. "I thought there would be a professional soloist and I would just sing in the choir, but it turned out I was a soloist...singing in front of 30,000 or 40,000 people. I wasn't scared during the performance, but afterwards I couldn't believe what I had done." After the Christmas Day concert at Manger Square, the group travelled to Cairo, Egypt to sing for top officials there, and then to Tel Aviv, Israel and Galilee for a concert at the Dead Sea. They rode burros from Judea to Petra — a three hour trip across the desert. While in the Holy I^nd, the group taped two additional shows to be shown any time on syndicated Christian networks. The many contrasts of this land impressed Rebecca a great deal. "I had always heard it was a land of contrasts, but it's unbelievable how true that is," she said. "Israel has always been described (to me) as the land of milk and honey,' and Egypt as the land of plagues,' and that's exactly how it appeared to me. Just as soon as you cross the border between Israel, which is so green and cultivated, and Egypt, which is all sand, you notice the difference immediately." She also notes that the customs are just as much of a contrast: "There are no women on the streets of Israel, except for female students going to school. In Cairo, though some of the women are more American than we are, and dripping with gold! But the majority you see are completely veiled, covered up, the typical stereotype." Some of the highlights of the trip included spending New Year's Eve in Vienna, Austria, and attending an opera there. She also attended a masked ball and a concert by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. The evening was, in Rebecca's words, "a musician's dream." But the most inspiring part of the trip was cruising across the Sea of Galilee. '.'The cruise was very inspirational," she said. "During a devotional about (the disciple) Peter, I sang "I Walked today Where Jesus Walked," and it was so inspiring to actually be there." Rebecca plans to repeat this holiday's events next year with another trip to the Holy I^and for a repeat performance. She will graduate from longwood this Spring. WIDJKEATHHJALI SWEAT SHIRTS, G III 95 NOW $10 SWEATERS, MG $14 95 NOW $12.00 SALE LASTS THRU FEB. 13

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Page 3

Attend:

"Morning's At Seven" "Morning's at Seven," an enduring comedy hit which captured three Tony awards in its 1980 revival on Broadway, will be presented on the stage of Longwood College's Jarman Auditorium on Wednesday, January 27, at 8 p.m. The production is part of Longwood's Series of the Performing Arts. Tickets may be obtained from the Student Union office in the tankford Building or may be reserved by calling. 3929346.

Written by Paul Osborn and McCann and Nelle Nugent, the originally produced on Broadway play ran for over a year in New in 1939, "Morning's at Seven" is a York with unanimous cheers warm and winning story about a from critics and roars of laughter lovable but daffy family and their from capacity audiences. Author Paul Osborn scored his slightly cuckoo feuds. first Broadway hit in 1930 with The cast includes four elderly "The Vinegar Tree" and then successful sisters, three husbands, a 40- wrote several year-old fiance who still has cold adaptations of best-selling feet regarding marriage, and an novels, including "Point of No intense wallflower who has been Return" and "The World of Suzie He also wrote trying to get to the altar for 12 Wong." screenplays for the hit movies years. Revived most recently by "South Pacific," "Sayonara," Broadway producers Elizabeth and "East of Eden."

rHE ROTUNDA

Tuesday, January 26, 1982

Cast Chosen For Once Upon A Mattress are in quite a panic for the prince By JOHNEL BROWN Late night practices are to be married so that they too can already underway for the cast be wed to avoid almost certain and crew of Longwood's social pressures. Jeff Thomas, a transfer production of Once Upon A Mattress. The play is a hilarious freshman from George Mason slapstick adaptation of Hans University, auditioned for the Christian Anderson's children's musical comedy by reading fairy tale, The Princess and the passages from the script, Pea. It's the story of a kingdom in learning simple dance steps and * state of unrest and just short of performing them with little turmoil because no marriages preparation, and finally singing are allowed in the kingdom until "My Country Tis of Thee." Jeff the Prince has been married. was cast as the Minstrel of the This seems simple enough a task, production. The Minstrel is a except that there's a somewhat major character who essentially overprotective queen played by tells the story in song. Jeff was Lisa Magill who decides it's her actively involved in high school motherly duty to test the drama in Reston, Va. Reston, worthiness of the candidates of being a small town, produced matrimony to the Princehood. some big time plays that Jeff There is a secondary starred in, including Godspell development which adds to the and One Flew Over The Cuckoo's urgency in the kingdom. Lady Nest. Jay Thompson, Marshall Barer Larkin, played by Joanne Mosca, has found that she is "with child" and Dean Fuller's Once Upon A and "without husband." She and Mattress is to be presented her accomplice in deeds of February 25 through 27 at 7:00 adultry Sir Harry, Sydney Long p.m. in Jarman Auditorium.

(Left to right): Stars in "Morning's at Seven": Fiona Hale (Aaronetta Gibbsi, Frances Peter (Cora Swanson), and Stan Kahn (Theodore Swanson).

Violin-Piano Duo Perform Here By CINDY CORELL The internationally known violin, piano duo of Kees Kooper and Mary Louise Boehm performed in Wygal Auditorium last Wednesday night as part of the Visiting Artist Recital Series presented by the Department of Music. The husband and wife team have many prizes and awards to their credit and a reputation of high standing all over North and South America and Europe. Mary Louise Boehm has studied piano in the United States, France and Germany with several well-known teachers such as Robert Casadesus and Luisa Stojowska. Her sister, Mrs. Pauline Boehm Haga is a faculty

member of Longwood's Department of Music. Kees Kooper was born in Holland and was one of his country's foremost violinists and a prize-winner in the International Queen Elizabeth Violin Contest before emigrating to the United States. The program Wednesday night included works by such composers as Arcangelo Corelli, George Enesco, Charles Ives, and Johannes Brahms. Piano and violin conversed like old friends, sometimes rejoicing, interrupting one another, sometimes alternating voice. The audience was held magnetized (Continued on Page 8)

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THE ROTUNDA

Tuesday, January 26, 1982

Your Turn President To Hold Forum

a ao

To: Faculty, Staff, and Students; An Open Forum is scheduled for Friday, January 29, 1982, from 3:30-5:00 p.m. in Bedford Auditorium. A report will be given at that forum on suggested organizational structure for the College beginning July 1, 1982. There will be included a discussion of the possibility of the position of a Dean of Students and

a Dean of the Faculty. This forum will not include a discussion o the possible organizations structures at the level incorporating the academic departments. I encourage all who are interested and who are able to attend and participate in the f rum ° Janet Greenwood President, Longwood College

Motorist Aided Dear Editor, The Rotunda.: I would like to extend my sincerest appreciation to the students who assisted me on Thursday, January 14 when my car was hit beside South Cunningham Dormitory. Your concern for my safety, your disengaging of the cars, and your help in the snow storm meant much to me. I failed to thank you

at the scene of the accident or to even get your names. Special thanks to the young lady who made several phone calls for me and to the Campus Police. How fortunate we are to have such responsible and caring students at Longwood! Thanks so much. Nancy Anderson Department of Speech and Dramatic Arts

Dear Joanie NOTE: Dear Joanie will be ap- car keys back and let my pearing weekly in the Columns husband think I'm not forgetful and Comments section. Thanks to and let my boy friend love me by Joanie all our problems are 'giving him the answers or should I not give my boy friend the solved.

Dear Joanie, Me and my boy friend have been having an affair behind my husbands back for the last three semesters. He is a professor here at Longwood and my boy friend is taking one of his classes. But that's no problem, the problem is my boy friend wants me to get the answers on his next test for him. I told him that was unethical and I wouldn't think of doing such a thing. Well, he got mad and stole my car keys (which are also my husband's professor's keys) and won't give them back. What makes matters worse is my husband (the professor) thinks I'm really air-headed and forgetful and he doesn't treat me with any respect. Should I get the

THE ROTUNDA Established 1920

Editor-in-Chief Mark Segal \SM KDITOR Jot Johnson FEATURE KDITOR .... Jodl A. Kerery SPORTS KDITOR Mike Lynch PHOTOGRAPHY KDITOR .. Man Nusi NKW8 KDITOR BUI Brrol ADVKKTISINO MANAGER Richard Brandt Bl SIN ESS MANAGKR... Barry Driver STAKE i.... Cindy (or. II. Joharl Brown. Kay Schmidt. Ronnie Brown

Member of the VIMCA Published weekly during the College rear with the exception oi Holidays and eaaminationt periodi by the ttudentt of Longwood College, Farmville, Virginia Printed by The Farmville Herald Opinions expressed are those of the weekly Editorial Board and its columnists, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the student body or the administration Letters to the Editor are welcomed. They must be typed, signed and submitted to the Editor bv the Friday preceding publication date All letters •rt subiect to editing

I had a dream the other night: Longwood had a journalism department with 15 instructors and packs of typewriting students, bleeding with self-expression and the "hear me" germ staining onion skin paper, while hopes of "print-me" permeated every hope and desire of each student. I could hear this incessant roar of typewriter keys ticking away the entire time. Tickaticka-tick. Four girls were having a mud wrestling contest and the winner was to have a Dear - Somebody column. Something worth fighting for. In another corner an array of quick witted eccentrics were trading colloquial sports terms on the worth of Ralph Sampson's turn around jumper, his devastating dunk and San Fran's chances at a Super Bowl victory. Ticka-ticka-tick. Then I was in the middle of downtown New York City, and out on the sidewalk there was a door, just a! door and a frame — like the one in "the Road Runner" cartoon — and I am sitting behind the door in a desk. There is a line two blocks long and everyone is waiting his turn to come through that door and ask if his story can be printed. "It's great, magnificent," some young student of journalism pleas and tries to assure, "I uncovered a Soviet spy plot to kill Alexander Haig — it's all in the print — and the spy is tied up in my room three blocks away at Columbia U." He wanted this story in the Rotunda. Jesus. Maybe we could get some sort of collegiate Pulitzer, who knows. These kinds of stories have real substance — substance, no, forget it — this is Woodward and Bernstein — maybe a movie. Tickaticka-tick. And then Dr. Greenwood is at the door and suddenly the scene changes and she is showing me the new teletype she purchased for the newspaper's use. And the whole time hordes of papers are being slid under my door and begging to be printed. If there is not news some students are creating it by building million dollar homes in The Greens and then burning them down so they can i write a story about it. It doesn't stop. The news, the : stories, the offers, the ticka-ticka-tick. Please print . . . story . . . 14th Street Bridge . . . I newsworthy. Suddenly I am sitting up in my bed in a cold sweat. I j think of all the stories, the juice, the added pages, and I the coveted Pulitzer prize. And I look out the window i and see Longwood and I am quickly reminded of the hard work in store for the diligent Rotunda staff. I lay back in my bed and draw a deep breath and hear the ' sleet hitting the window — ticka-ticka-tick.

Dear to be or Not to be, Think through your problem thoroughly and do the thing which is best suited to your personality. Also check your biorythms and horoscope, ask your mother what to do and send five dollars in care of Joanie, Box 1133, Longwood College, Virginia, for my authorized book entitled "Dealing with Fashion and Cosmetic Problems Facing Young Adolescent Girls in 80's".

collegiate crossword 2

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Answers Page 8

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THE ROTUNDA

Tuesday, January 26, 1982

Blaze Destroys Home— Kindles New Hopes Note: Thackston's Home for the Aged was completely destroyed in a fire which began at 2:00 a.m. on January llth. The sixteen residents of the Home were safely evacuated. Local fire departments (Farmville, HampdenSydney, Prospect, and Darlington Heights) were unable to stop the firq because of low temperatures^ (below zero) which froze the metal nozzles. There was no insurance on the home. By JOEJOHNSON Where the house had been, there was a solid chimney jutting up from the mudded ashes. The snow which had fallen the Wednesday before the fire, outlined its absence. Four trailers face this bare spot in an unsymmetrical semi circle. One of the trailers, an old green and white aluminum, sits directly behind the chimney and charred spot. Mrs. Thackston, known to close friends as Gaygie, is a short woman of 68. She wears thick glasses, which, if seen at the right angle reflect the trailer's interior. You would expect to see the ashes, which lay outside her trailer, reflected in those glasses in the form of desolate hopelessness, or of contentment, in merely surviving the blaze. The fire which had started early Monday morning in the kitchen ceiling wiring and blazed up, billowing smoke. "I walked across the living room floor over the kitchen, it was hot and I saw the smoke coming off the floor and a flame started lunging up from the kitchen below." She tells the story as facutally as possible arguing over the fine points of time and sequence with her daughter, Dolly. But her hands tell a different story. They fondle papers and light up

cigarettes with anticipatory vigor. "L.L., my step-son was there, during the fire, bless his soul, he and I, and I swear it was just like we rehearsed it, got all the residents out safely. The first thing I did when I saw that flame was call 911, — the fire department, you know...that was an exciting time, Love. After that I walked to the end of the hall and said 'ladies there's a fire, do not dress, get a blanket or shoes if possible, and walk out the front door.' She pauses for a second and as if remembering an essential fact that she has left unsaid and points to a calendar hanging on the wall next to her. January the eleventh is squared off in a dark red outline. She flicks her cigarette. "Only a couple got their shoes...but they never saw or felt any smoke", she says it defensively like an overprotective mother. "While I was getting the ladies out, L.L. tried to grap some important things. Poor old Mary lancer walked out of the door and froze like a statue. L.L. just swooped her up and carried her on. All sixteen of them got out and no one was hurt." She stops talking as if to end her interview, turning her head towards the window she see's the lone chimney and takes a drag off her cigarette. But she does not want to stop talking, no more than she would stop working or building or living. "This place started as a nursing home in about 1949, but we changed it to a rest home in 1962 because the regulations were too tight. We grow all our own food out here in the garden...we can, and freeze all the vegetables and raise all the cattle for beef and hogs for pork ourselves. We used to have a pastuerizing machine out here but the

regulations, I was talking about put,ah end. to that." She sifts back to the past, in her chair by the kitchen table and her hands are still now, she speaks quietly and the only sound is the coffee pot slowly reheating with the barely perceptable sound of steam hissing. "My husband died in the first day of July in 1966 and that was a hard winter" (You can almost hear her insert the 'also' after

one of the three currently living in the trailer is walking into the kitchen gripping either end of a wooden table. The lady is slightly flushed from exertion, but seems pleased with herself just the same. "That's Hestor Edson, her braces and shoes were burned in the fire, so she uses the table as a wajker. We improvise a lot around here. I worked out an irrigation system using that old tank out there",

"... over there for God sakes." was). That winter was the worst I can imagine and Dolly kept begging me to come with her to Roanoke, but I couldn't leave my family...I wouldn't part with these old folks for love or money. So, I took the bull by the horns that time, I renovated the old farmhouse — put in aluminum siding, insulation, central heating, added a sun room and carpeting upstairs and downstairs, made it really nice." 1 She stops, aware of a thumping from behind her. An elderly lady,

Photo by Joe Johnson

she points to a rusted tank held up by a trolley, leaning against an . enormous maple. A useless | looking item, but obviously not. "We hooked up some pipes to it and now we get enough water to keep the garden growing during the dry months. We also have a generator that we use when the electricity goes out." There is a naked light bulb overhead which burns with the same potent light as the silver haired old lady. Her eyes are no longer in the past and she sits up

straight in her chair. She is not concerned with things so much as people and emphasizes the point with her hand jabbing the air like an exclamation mark. She points to a quiet, tall man somewhere in his 60's who has been busying himself helping prepare supper. "Sometimes things people think are useless just aren't if they're used in the right way. Take James for instance, they called him an idiot and his brother Otis an imbecile up in this institution in Lynchburg." She pauses for a minute letting the words sink in, James does not turn around, he continues with his work in silence. "James works marvelously with animals and he's smart as a tack, he just needed something to show some affection for — you don't get any of that in those institutions. This is my family." You can hear the determination in her voice, her eyes are bright and she grips the phone telling me to get a picture of her 'over there for God sakes'. The picture is taken and she brings the papers she has started fondling again, towards her. "These are my plans for the new rest home, look here, it'll liave room enough for nineteen residents and all on one floor. That fire was on Monday and on Tuesday two contractors were down here making designs and plans. Construction will begin as soon as the ground is soft." Dolly interrupts her with caution "we still have to get that loan Gaygie". We'll get it..they think I'm going to die..but I'll fool them". A rebuilding fund has been established and contributions can be sent to coordinator of contributions, Harry Binkley, Box 152, Farmville, Va.

Gliding Through The Golden Arches By JOEJOHNSON He stalks McDonalds at 1:30 on Saturday night, his eyes blurry from the two six packs of Budweiser he's downed in the last few hours. He drifts aimlessly through the parking lot looking for familiar headlights or the glimpse of fleeting taillights. He pulls a Marlboro out of his pack and shifts down to first, reviving his engines. He lights up and inhales casting glances first left then right and spots a cruising bear in his rear view mirror. He is the American Redneck. John is his name, because his father's name was John and so was his father's, but he is not a third, he is not that pretentious. His roots are found in coal mines and factories in pulp wood and construction. His life is Built on grimy faces and steel pailed lunches, chubby ladies that make switches for NASA, sixteen hours a day, and swear with the ease of Macenroe. John is his name because his father liked his name and so gave his son what he liked. , What his father likes is hunting in jacked up GMC's resting on fat mud gripping tires, with wooden gun racks screwed into the rear window. He likes tramping the woods and drinking Wild Turkey and loading Renungton 12 gauges

in case he spots the flurry wisp of a white tail. He likes telling stories to his buddies at work about when he was young, when he was John's age. He tells of running moonshine on the Hampden Sydney backroads in his '56 Chevy. He tells and remembers the red bubble twirling in his rear view window and remembers slamming into fourth as his Chevy grips a graveled curve diagonally. He sees the trees and bushes of the thick Virginia foliage flow by as he hits the straight way and hears Susie May Backawith scream from her position next to him, her knees framing chin. He takes another swallow from the glass milk jug held precarriously between his thighs and feels the burning river explode his stomach. He remembers earlier that night in the back seat with Susie. Susie, who reminded him iof Tammy Wynette with her bleached white hair done in long bouffante which a friend from Eda Dayes College of Beauty had done while they watched rollerskating on NBC. He remembers stumbling against her in the Red Byron and smelling the Tigris perfume and watching her breasts juggle around in her tight pink sweater as she turned and swore at him in

a sassy accent to keep his cotton starch faced children in the Her trailer which they had driven pickin hands off her ass, which duster which sheinformedhim had to, him following her, as they had shook like bagged jelly in the just come down off the blocks in (Continued on Page 8) summertime. He remembered the backyard behind her trailer. her wink after that and how she slipped up against him and slipped her hand in his back pants pockets feeling for his wallet and how the clumped mascara hung on each eyelash as she pulled him onto the dance floor. He remembered going out to the parking lot and seeing her two

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The Gyre, Longwood's Literary and Art Magazine has just published its first edition for the fall semesters. Copies are available in the English Department and Art Department offices. The Gyre is currently accepting publication for the spring semester. The deadline for submissions of literature, poetry and prose is March 9, art material deadline is March 16, 1982. The Gyre staff wishes to express its gratitude to all those who contributed literature, art material, time and interest in the fall issue. We also encourage all I^ngwood students to submit material to The Gyre, Box 1135.

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Page 6

THE ROTUNDA

Tuesday, January 26, 1982

SPORTS B-Ball Crushes Johnson St.,Burns Flames

Mike McCroey Goes For The Layup

Player of the Week Senior guard Mike McCroey i Arnold, MD) scored 20 points while hitting nine of 10 shots from the floor in Longwood's 99-60 win over Johnson State Thursday night and for his efforts the 6-0 eager has been named Longwood College Player of the Week. Player of the Week is chosen by the longwood Sports Information Office

Sparked by McCroey's play, 1/ongwood has won 10 of its last 11 games for a 10-3 overall record. The senior's shooting has been phenomenal over the past week. After hitting 9-10 against Johnson State, he came back Saturday night to hit 10 of 13 shots and score 22 points in an 87-61 triumph over Liberty Baptist. McCroey's recent point production and deadeye shooting have pushed his scoring average to 16.8, tops on the lancer team, and his field goal percentage to 67 per cent. The Ixmgwood guard will be ranked among the top shooters in Division II this week. "Mike has been shooting the ball super recently," said assistant coach Mo Schoepfer. "He's getting a lot layups off the break, but he's also been connecting from outside when he gets the openings." McCroey has been a key factor in Longwood ranking among the national leaders in scoring 189.f*

By MIKE LYNCH To put things mildly, the Longwood Men's Basketball team has been stomping all over a lot of opponents lately. They have won 10 of their last 11 games by an average of 22 points and have averaged 92 points per game through that stretch. The only loss in that stretch was against Florida Memorial under decrepit conditions with questionable scoring and timing. Coach Cal Luther bluntly termed the game "a farce." It was the last game on a trip south on which the Lancers won every game. But since the last game was the loss to Florida Memorial, the Lancers came home looking to get right back on the winning track against the Johnson State Indians. No problem! The Indians looked more like a bunch of gas station attendants than a basketball team. Their tallest player was just 6'2" and they only had nine players on their team. Consequently, Longwood annihilated them 99-60 while Johnson State was helpless on the defensive end and threw more bricks than a demolition crew on offense. LC Guards, Mike McCroey and Joe Remar led the team in scoring (20 and 14 points respectively), while Jerome Kersey grabbed 12 rebounds to lead in that category. Actually, those stats could have been much higher, considering the fact that those players only participated in about half of the contest. The only real challenge that JS could offer was with 15 minutes left in the first half when two consecutive layups by Curtis Carter brought the Indians to within just two points at 10-8.

After a time-out LC went into a half-court trap defense in order to gain a good margin. Using this formation Mike McCroey stole the ball on the next JS possession, eventually hitting from 10 feet to start the turnaround. The next time down the court JS threw a brick and the lancers got off a fast break that resulted in Randy Johnson perfectly dishing the ball off to Jerome Kersey, who promptly rammed in one of his patented one-hand fat flying death-defying slam-dunks that brought the Lancer Hall crowd to its feet and near the brink of insanity. A slam-dunk like that does nasty things to your opponents' egoes and JS was no exception. By 10 minutes left in the half, the lancers had gone ahead 31-12 and had no trouble keeping control for the remainder of the game. For the rest of the game IxHigwood played everybody they had while Johnson State never made a substitution until well into the second half. To no one's surprise the I oncers wound up winning 99-60 to up their record to 9-3. On Saturday night, Liberty Baptist at least brought in a real basketball team although still not the caliber of Ix)ngwood. By steadily outplaying the Flames I^ongwood came out with a convincing 87-61 victory, relying on a running game and solid defense. The Flames' main threat was guard, Greg McCauley who scored 22 points, many of which came from perimeter jumpers but he was the only Flame to score double figures compared to four players from longwood, including Mike McCroey who tied McCauley for high points honors

at 22. In the first half Liberty Baptist only made seven field goals (even Johnson State made 12) consisting of four McCauley bombs and three layups by assorted players. Credit a tough I-ongwood defense for this. The formations were regularly changing as the pace of the game demanded it and the resulting 25 first half points by Liberty Baptist, which is almost unheard of considering the pace of the game, attested to the I-ancers affectiveness on defense. On offense, Joe Remar and Mike McCroey took advantage of fast breaks and set plays to put in 11 and 9 points respectively while Ron Orr took much of the heat off of a heavily covered Jerome Kersey by putting in jumpers from the side of the key for 10 of his 11 first half points. Add a couple of more of those crunching slams by Kersey and the damage is done in the form of 41 first-half points by Ixmgwood to take a 16point lead into the locker room. The second half opened up rather sloppily after a few points were scored. For a while, there were many steals but few points resulted for either team, longwood got it back together though and kept the margin to 13 or more for the first 10 minutes of the half. Then, for the next five minutes McCroey and Remar ran circles around the tired Flames, stealing, driving and giving assists to spur a doubling of the lead. 70-46 with 6:34 left. After that, the game was just played out to an 87-61 Ixmgwood victory over what really was a tougher team than what the score showed them to be.

LIBERTY BAPTIST/ LONGWOOD

JOHNSON STATE/LONGWOOD »»*«■- -

MIKE McCROEY

JOHNSON STATE DELUCCO ... SWEENEY , .. CARTER VENTURO COBB UNDERHILL McSOLEY . . . BLACKMORE WENDAL....

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8

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22

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0

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5

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0

2

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3

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ppg.) and field goal percentage (.559). A graduate of Old Mill High School, Mike transferred to Longwood from Alleghany Community College in Cumberland, MD. He once handed out 18 assists in a game at Cumberland. He was an AllCounty, All-City, All-State and All-Region performer in high school. I^ast season he had a I-ongwood record 89 steals while scoring 10.9 ppg. The son of Mrs. Angela McCroey, Mike had a 3.06 academic average last semester. He's a Business major.

LONGWOOD

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2

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12


Page 7

THE ROTUNDA

Tuesday, January 26, 1982

SPORTS Darryl Case Named

Lady Lancers Host Richmond

Div. II Ail-American logwood sophomore Darryl Case, of Cincinnati, Ohio has been named to the 1981 National Soccer Coaches Association of American-McDonald's AllAmerica Division II Soccer Team, it was announced Saturday at the NSCAA convention in Chicago. Case, who was one of 22 players named to the squad, was chosen on the second team as a defender. He was the only Virginia hooter chosen on the Division II team. Said Kamali of Virginia Commonwealth was named to the third team All-America in Division I and Pekka Kaartinen of Averett made second team AllAmerica in Division III. The first Ix>ngwood studentathlete to be named All-America in soccer, Case had already been picked for All-Conference, AllState and All-South honors, after

leading Ixmgwood to an 11-4-3 record, best in school history, this past fall. The I^ancers ended up ranked fourth in the Mid-Atlantic Region in Division II and were considered for the NCAA Division II Playoffs. Case scored three goals and > had three assists while playing back for Longwood, but it was his defensive paly which won him the respect of fans and opponents and ultimately, the honor of AilAmerican plaudits. "Darryl had a tremendous season for us," said Longwood DARRYL CASE soccer coach Rich Posipanko. "He has great quickness and he starter for three years, he had 22 , uses it to make the big plays from goals and six assists as a senior one end of the field to the other." and was captain of the team. A Business Administration Case, who transferred to Longwood last year, after major who pulled a 3.07 GPA first playing for the University of semester, Darryl is the son of Mr. Cincinnati, had a sparkling prep and Mrs. William L. Case, of career at Madeira High School. A Cincinnati.

i

By KAY SCHMIDT Longwood's lady cagers have a busy schedule this week with three games on tap. Tuesday Longwood travels to William & Mary in a VAIAW Division II

conference game. Earlier this season Ixmgwood was edged by the Lady Indians 52-48, despite holding a half time lead. Thursday night the Lady Lancers host Richmond in

V

Grapplers Fifth In W&L Tourney The Ix>ngwood Crapplers, who placed fifth in the Washington and I^e Tournament, travel to Richmond Tuesday, host Lynchburg Wednesday and round off the week at the Campbell (NO Tournament. Freshman Mike Hackett, who paced the I oncers by winning the 118 pound class, became the second Longwood wrestler to win ;i weight class title. Hackett was undefeated (3-0) in the tournament and now boasts a 10-5 record. He posted a 24-3 rout over Washington and I.ee, a pin over Pfeiffer iNC), and a come from behind win < 11-10) over Catawba (NC). The Catawba wrestler was seeded number one for the tournament. Catawba, who eventually won the tournament, recorded 61.5 points. Pfeiffer took a close second with 60.75, Elon was third with 59.25, Washington and I>ee placed fourth with 51.25, Longwood captured fifth with 45.5 and Davidson and HampdenSydney placed sixth and seventh with 29.75 and 19 points respectively. Although the lancer Grapplers placed in the bottom half of the field, the squad compiled some impressive statistics. For starters, the wrestlers won 15 of

24 of the matches and lost only one by a pin and two in the overtime period. Ixmgwood also placed five other wrestlers in the top four positions of their respective weight class. Freshman Charles Campbell took second in the 150 weight class and is 7-5 in overall play. Freshmen Steve Albeck, a 142 pounder now 8-6, and Dana Dunlap, a 167 pounder now 8-5, won third place as did junior Joe Bass, a 177 pounder now 6-2. Sophomore David Dodd took fourth in the 158 pound class and presently has a 5-2-1 record. Dodd and Bass suffered injuries in the tournament, but coach Steve Nelson is optimistic that his ailing grapplers will be geared up for a busy week of action. "We're bruised and battered, but 1 think that we will be prepared for next week's matches." David I who suffered a possible broken nose and injured shoulder) is still questionable, but he should be ready." Although several wrestlers had outstanding outings, the grapplers still were not satisfied with the fifth place finish. "The kids were disappointed that they didn't finish higher and with a few breaks we could have

Robin Powell (in earlier action) set a school record of eight assists against VCU. another conference contest. Longwood fell to the Lady Spiders 84-53 in their first meeting this season. In their final game of the week, longwood is on the road again Saturday to meet Division I James Madison. I,ast week the I^ady Lancers fell twice, losing to Hampton Institute 66-48 and Delaware State 60-58. The Radford game scheduled last week was postponed due to snow. Ixmgwood was ahead of Hampton 30-28 at

MIKE HACKETT been in the top four," said the coach. "I thought we wrestled real well and now the team is looking for a winning season." The grapplers will have plenty of chances this week to extend their 4-2 team record.

Coming Sports Events At Lancer Hall

0

the half. Freshman Florence Holmes scored 26 points in the two games, including 14 points and 16 rebounds against Hampton (154). Senior Robin Hungate led against Hampton with 15 points, shooting 5-5 from the line. Cindy Eckel scored 15 points and Robin Powell 13 at Delaware State. Longwood now stands 4-8 overall and 2-6 in conference play.

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I Pages

Tuesday, January 26, 1982

THE ROTUNDA

Food Prices (Continued from Page 1) butter, margarine, and sugar. Frozen haddock and frozen green beans were priced the same as last month. The difference between the high and low basket was $15.92. If the shopper purchased only the highest priced items found, the cost of the basket would be $67.26. For the shopper who bought only the lowest priced items, the basket would cost $51.34. The obvious conclusion is that it pays to be knowledgeable and to shop around. In January, in addition to the regular market basket, the "Trivia Basket" survey will be taken. The Trivia Basket includes items that most consumers buy in addition to food, and this survey is taken quarterly. As more quarterly data is available, comparisons between quarters can be more realistic and enlightening. The market basket and trivia basket studies are projects of the Economic Seminar class of longwood College and are under the direction of Dr. Anthony B. Cristo. The studies are financially supported by the Longwood College Foundation.

Golden Arches (Continued from Page 5) weaved into the rutted dirt driveway and she had dragged the two children into the trailer telling them she had important money business, as he watched the gray pink flamingo statues flicker in his headlights. Susie May, whose husband Tobert was doing 5-10 for man-slaughter, a barroom screw-up she had told him. He told his buddies about being in the back seat with Susie May and taking a 70 mph left on route 642 and how he nearly flipped his Chevy and would have if it wouldn't have been for his craigers and how he cut off his lights and drove nearly two miles by moonlight still doing 70 mph and how Susie clinched her eyes and fetaled and screamed the whole way. He liked telling stories and laughing with his work buddies, and so does John. John spots the cruising bear in his rear view morror and takes a deep drag off the cigarette, he lets it hang in his mouth, he likes the smoke to burn his eyes. He revv.s the engine and puts it in second, the sound is good — the bubble burns bright.

Yes Virginia (Continued from Page 2) more of a unified group." Male input has played a big part in the student union growth. The current SUN chairman is Jerry Richman of Toms Brook. Va. He's the first male student union chairman. There can be no question that the arrival of men had a tremendous impact on social life at Ix>ngwood, but what about other areas? Academics, student government, athletics? In part two of this series we'll take a look at these areas and examine what motivated the first males to attend Ixmgwood and how they feel about their college choice new.

CLASSIFIEDS $ BUY $ SELL $ The Rotunda Will Be Printing Classified Ads Or Personals. All ads are to be turned in the Friday before publication. They are to be typed and prepaid. Cost is 15« a word. Send to THE ROTUNDA, Box 1133, Longwood College, Farmville, Va. 23901.

Moran President Of Campus Republicans Thomas Moran, 21, of Chesapeake, was elected President of the Longwood Campus Republicans at a meeting of that organization on Thursday, January 22, 1982. He had served as interim president from August of 1981 until election. Ari Kelakaris, Class of '85, was elected vice president and Mary Cawthorn, '83, was elected secretary.

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INFORMATION ON

ALASKAN AND OVERSEAS EMPLOYMENT EXCELLENT INCOME POTENTIAL CALL 312-741-9780 EXT: 3127

BRIDALS-FORMALS-TUXEDOS Richmond at 3120 W Cory St. * Gayton Crossing Petersburg at Walnut Mall • Norfolk at Best Square Hampton/Newport News at Newmarket North Mall and Tappahannock

"like no other Bridal Store in Virginia/

j

Rotunda vol 61, no 13 jan 26, 1982  
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