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THE

SCHOOL

Y. W. C. A.

LOYALTY ? THE NORMAL SCHOOL WEEKLY.

VOL.

3.

No. 4.

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

OCT. 2*. 1922

GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP AND ATHLETICS

ALUMNAE NOTES

VISITORS

Miss Buford Addresses Student Body.

The alumnae section of the "Rotunda" begins to look like a page from a matrimonial bureau register. Among the < Ictober marriages are the following: Miss l.ilhan Paulett I'ugg to Dr. Herman IT fer of Winchester. Miss Pattie Buford to Mr. Edgar Arlington Engart, of Clifton Forge. Miss Bertha Gladys Dolan to Lev. Prank Cox. of Washington. \'a. Miss Phillipa Spencer to Mr. J. Parker Lambeth, of Richmond. Miss Mamie Rohr, at one time supervisor of the sixth grade in the Training School, now cond with the University of Virginia, recently visited friends in Farmville. Miss I.ula Walker, formerly head of the department of Home Economics, now teaching at V. P. I., was one of the judges at the Farmville

Miss Sarah Moore, who is teaching in Pulaski, was the guest of Miss Ethel Warthen last week end. Miss Helen Mason visited her sister Miss Min Mason during the week-end of (October 20-22. Miss Nancy Watkins, who is now teaching in South Boston, spent last week-end with her parents. Miss Anna Ruth Allen was the guest of Mis-, SpOttSWOOd Wittlbish during the weekend of October 20-22. Miss (Catherine rlardaway visited Miss Elizabeth Williams. Miss Virginia Wall, who is attending Hollins College, spent last week-end with her parents. Miss Emily Clarke, who is now teaching in \shlaud. was in town for the week-end of ( >ctoher _>< >-_>_>. Miss Man Pinch, who has a position this year in the Boydtpn High School, spent the week-end with her sister. Miss Margaret Pinch. Miss Sue Jones, who is teaching in Lynch burg, spent the last week-end in town. Mrs. Thornhill and baby, and Miss Gertrude Thornhill were guests of Miss Lily Thornhill during the past week-end.

Saturday evening, Oct. 21, at 6:30, Miss Buford, of tin' Physical Education Department. spoke to the student body on the subject of "Good Sportsmanship and Athletics." Mis Buford began her talk with the old quotation from Shakespeare " Ml the world's a stage "which she changed into " \11 the world is a game and you are players in that game.'' \ftcr a discussion of this statement, the speaker gave Henry Vandyke's four rules for good sportsmanship, the gisl of which are i 1 ) Always wish and try to win. hut not enough to make you unhappy if you loose; (2) Seek only to win fairly; (3) Seek pleasure whether you win or not; and (4) If you win. think more of your g 1 fortune than of your skill. Elaborating on these topie~. Miss Buford claimed tint one of the chief essentials of playing a good game is teamwork, and the next most important after that is fidelity to self. At the end of her address the speaker gave the student body the following don'ts to he observed when a gam being pla; ed : Don't make remarks about officials. I )on't criticize either team. I ton'l whine over losing. Don't boast over winning, or in other words. "Hear no evil; see no evil; speak no evil."

CLASS ELECTIONS The 1 Professional Class held a number o\ meetings last week for tin' purpose .if electing officers for the coming year. The very satis factory results of the elections were: Nancy Lyne- -President. Kli/alieth Pugg -Vice-President.

Virginia Beale -Secretary. ( Hive Smith Treasurer. Mabel Edwards—Chairman of Tea Room Committee. Miss Edna Norton Spear Honorary Member. \ committee of eight, with Mabel Edwards as chairman was appointed by the president to dec orate the Pair Parade float. The elass deeided to charge $1.50 for dues, and all members are urged to pay as promptly and as conveniently as possible. \t a recent meeting of the 4 Year High School Class, the following officers were elected: Louise Jones President. Margaret Crawlej Vice President. Evelyn Beckam Secretary. Louise Xnnn Treasurer. Miss Helen Draper Honorary Member.

STUDENT BUILDING FUND Since < ictober 16, the amoun* of $75 has been paid into the Student Building Fund.

Fair. Mr. and Mis. (',. |.. Miller, of Newport News, announce the engagement and approaching marriage of their daughter Helen to Mr. Jefferson Curl Phillips of I lampton. Another editorial from a second Richmond paper, pa\mg a beautiful tribute to the memory of Mis. Hula Young Morrison, has been handed to the Alumnae Editor. We are proud that she was once one of us, ;md feel that her life mav be an inspiration to others: A D< >CTOR ' >!•' BROKEN HOPES. Perhaps it was not until they read with a shock this morning the news of her sudden death that even those who knew her well reflected what a remarkable woman Eula Young Morrison really was. She had more than the normal suffering and hardship one hard stroke after another—hut she never lost her courage or her faith in mankind and she never turned despairingly inward eyes that forever were looking aboul for opportunities of service. A reporter, and a good one. for a number of years, --he had many curious adventures that disclosed her unique character. One morning during the war. about - A. M.. as she was coming home from the newspaper office where she worked, she was accosted by a man in uniform who insisted on escorting her. Mrs, Morrison protested in vain, and finally, seeing there was not a police officer in sight, tried another method. She began an honest, heart to heart talk with the WOUld-he Lovelace, who proved to he a lonesome boy; and before she had reached her home she hail him faith in teats. He left her. at her front door, with thanks and apologies pathetically mixed. When she became head of the new business department of the Federal Trust Company, Mrs. Morrison speedily launched several enterprises of marked originality. She made her office a center for the activities of women. She inaugurated die fust window displays a Richmond hank (Continued on page 3.]

OUT OF TOWN The following girls were out of school during the week-end of ( )coher 20-22: Misses Charlotte Anderson. Isahel Allen, (Catherine Brown, Prances Baskerville, Lucie Ried Blanton, Edna Y. Blanton, Kitty Carroll. \nne Calloway, Louise Clements. Edna Mav Christie. Elizabeth Chappell, Sallie A. Carter, Julia Cave. Edwina Carwile, Eliza Davis. Margaret Day, Margaret Daniel. Marie Deusch, Prances Elliott, Pord Eubank, Helen Pitch, Christine Poister. Thelma Fowekes, Archer Reams. Pannie Thomas. Helen Sutherland. Mary Porbes, Grace Goulding, Dais) Goodman, Lucille GOT lion. Margaret Glenn, Helen Glenn, Myrtle Ilar\ I;.. Mabel Holmes. Winifred llcaly, Lucille Harris, h'.ula Harris, N'ora \a\ Holmes, Elsie llailh. Prances Johns. Sophie (acobson, Bernice Johnson. Mary Johns. Catherine Kemp. Marv C. Knight. Gladys (Cackey, Mancj Lewis. Virginia Masten, Dona Mosely, Sue Parker. Olive Payne. Mildred Phillips, l.ovard Priddy. Annette Rose, Ruby Rose. Ethel Squire, Erna Shot well. Man Boyd Scott. Bettie Shepherd, Marionette Trice. Pauline Timherlake. Helen Trav lor, Lisle Tucker. Agnes Walker. Ruby Walton, Margaret Wight, and Aha Williams. Miss Margaret Mason attended the State Vol Unteer Council which was held at Lvnchhurg last week end. She returned Mondav. ' It to her 16. Misses Lennie Blankenship and Elsie Bell left school Thursday, ' October 19, for Richmond, where they will observe the teaching of writing. We regret to learn of the death of the father of Miss Florence Stubbs. Miss Stubbs is now with her family in Florence, South Carolina.


THE ROTUNDA, OCTOBER 28, 1922

THE ROTUNDA

nothing to benefit themselves and the rest of huMember Southern Inter-Collegiate Newspaper Ass'n manity. These men have either no goals at all, or goals so high that they can never hope to atDepartment Store tain them and they are dissatisfied as any one is Published weekly by the students of The State Normal who realizes that he is merely marking time on | "Karmville's Largest and Most Progressive School, Farmville, Va. V" . . ., , . ...,. . .. the pathway of life. ... -. , ,c .. c FMitered as second-class matter March 1, Wsl, at the Store** TI * ,, t office of Farmville. Virginia, under the Act of . Halfway between this easy going self-satisfacpost tion and the harsh self-condemnation there is a The Finest in Wearing Apparel. Millinery and March .?, 1879. happy middle ground. Every man ought surely Footwear to have the privilege of some self-satisfaction on Subscription $2.00 per year. his birthday when he thinks over what he lias 207-209-211 and 213 Main Street done in the past year. But to feel complete satROTUNDA STAFF FARMVILLE, VA. isfaction is pretty good evidence that what he Editor-in-Chief EUZABKTU MORING set out to do wasn't very much. Assistant Editor DOROTHY LANGSLOW "WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS"

DAVIDSON'S

BOARD OF EDITORS: News

SOCIAL NEWS

First National Bank

ANNE MEREDITH

]S^=======J& a£S Literary Exchange Alumnae

On T,r,av evenin,, October 17, a. al,o,,t rix

FARMVILLE, VA.

P.UUNK TIMBERLAKE o clock, there CAROLYN MORROW What did it Miss BROWNIE TAUAFERRO was giving a

MANAGERS: Busineti Manager CHRISTINE ARMSTRONG Assistant Business Manager GENKVIKVI; BONNEWEU. Circulation Manager FLORENCE MILLER Assistant Circulation Manager MARY MAUPIN Assistant l ireulation Manager CAROLYN PAYNE Advertising Manager KATHERINE KEM,

was great excitement in the halls. all mean? The Mu Omega Club Every Convenience Offered Women Depositors Pierrot-Pierrette party at the home rs MISSES DAVIDSON °f ^' > Elliott Booker on .St. George Street. The Ladies' Specialty Shop Each member, dressed as Pierrot, escorted a new girl, dressed as Pierrette. Suits, Coats, Dresses, Blouses, Dry Goods and The entire lower floor of the Hooker home was Notions attractivelv decorated in black and white, the , - ., < , »■«, _ . . __ _i . FARMVILLE, VA. colors of the club. The color scheme was also earned out in the lighting, which formed the Creek letters Mu Omega. An evening is not Complete without dancing. I he Drug Store with the Personal Touch so "Everybody Stepped." John Paul Jones was Carrying an Up-to-date Line of played and figures were led by Cabell Gilmer Toilette Necessities and Stationery and Helen Pitch. Attractive favors were disFARMVILLE, VA. tributed after which a two course buffet supper was served. The Mu Omega Club entertained at a very attractive Hollowe'en dance on Friday evening. Leaders of Fashion < Htober 20. at the home of Dr. \Y. K Anderson IN on Buffalo Street. The spacious residence, Ladies' Tailored Suits and Millinery which is admirably adapted for such a social FARMVILLE, VA. event, had been further beautified by artistic and harmonious Hallowe'en decoration-. Caylv colored evening dresses lent beauty and charm to the occasion. Music was furnished throughout Portraits: All Sizes and Styles the evening by a negro orchestra. Attractive fa School Work a Specialty vors were given the guests and delicious refreshments were served. Every one regretted very Amateur Work Finished much to hear the strains of "Home Sweet FOR GOOD ENTERTAINMENT "onie. _

Grays Drug Store

R. W. Garnett & Co.

HOW HIGH ARE YOUR IDEALS? Every once in a while you read an item like this in the newspaper: "This is the fifty-sixth birthday of the Hon. John Jones. Many letters and telegrams of congratulation were received. but no special celebration was held. Mr. Jones spent the day in his office as usual." Such a paragraph always excites my curios ilv. I wonder what went on in the brain of the

Honorable John Jones whUe he was alone in his private office "as usual." For if von could know exactly whal a man thinks about'himself on his birthday, you would have a pretty good idea as to just about how big a man he is. \ man's birthday is a time when by natural instinct he thinks about himself. ( hie more year he has bad the privilege of living upon this earth and what is the result? [s the world a better place because of Ills living here? Is he a better man because of another year in which be could improve? Mas the past year been a profitable one. has he accomplished what he set out to do? This depends upon what his goal was, how high he bad set bis ideals. Some men are BO shallow that they will spend the greater part of each birthday in checking over their accounts and congratulating themselves upon their increase in worldly wealth. These men have reached their goal and are satisfied; but do they ever recall the words of thai great poet, Robert Browning, " \ man's reach ihould exceed hi- grasp, or what's a heaven for?" Other men come up to each successive birthday With a sense of dissat isfaction, a feeling that their years are stealing away from them and thev are doing nothing,

OGDEN STUDIO

fndav fwnijf. October 20. the lea "" - f«ooned m the traditional black and yel-

1<

()n ]U

'ow

of

ful

dinncr

AND FIRST-CLASS SHOWS Go to THE EAC0 THEATRE

Hallowe'en, was the scene of a delightFarmville's New $50,000 Play House l,;ir,v !*» ,,v ,,lr Ztta 'au Club, cre m the (1,ni h ht hosts walkt 1 aml for DR. L. D. WHITAKER. Manager " R K '' " tu,u s wm 1 ' ' t"'' X,UT mi,l( ' ''"- ,l"' l,art>' was chaperoned at the Good Things to Eat Just Across the Street n,(,vil s ,,v Mr amI " Mrs. Allen Stokes. AT

THE S. N. S. GLEE CLUB presents a 11 igh Class Vaudeville under the direction of Christine K. Munoz Auditorium. Nov. 3rd, at 8:30 i irehestra Sspagnole, Favorite Songs of Bygone Days. Si Perkins on Broadway. The Dumbbells and other attractive offerings. Tickets 50c. All seats reserved. (>n sale at Garland and Mclntosh Drug Store. S. N. S. Girls. 35c

D. W. GILLIAM'S MAKE YOUR HEADQUARTERS AT

WADE'S Fountain Drinks. Confectioneries, Canned Goods, Olives, Pickles, School Supplies FARMVILLE, VA.

THE COMMITTEE OF 39 ON PUBLIC SCHOOL METHODS AT YOUK SKKVU'l

Nave you any close relatives? Gosh, yes. My uncle's the closest town. Georgia Cracker.

man in

Material covering all subject* In the course of study. I >!■[>;. rt TiKiitK on project method, motivation, the socialized recitation programs for special days. Write for Information to R. O. WICKHAM, Organlxer for Va.. Hampton. Va.

\


THK ROTUNDA, OCTOBER 28, 1922 ALUMNAE NOTES

PLANTERS' BANK OF FARMVILLE

[Continued from page 1.)

FARMVILLE, VA. STATE. CITY AND COUNTY DEPOSITORY Capital Stock $ 50.000.00 Surplus 100.000.00 "The Old Reliable Bank"

"THE TOY SHOP" First Dramatic Presentation of the Year. Saturday evening at 8 o'clock, Misses Edna Spear, Jeanette Edwards and Mary Haynea presented in the Normal School auditorium the kindergarten children of the Training School, assisted by young ladies of upper grades, high school, and Normal School in the "Toy Shop," written by MUs Spear. The scene was laid in a toy shop. The three chief characters were the toy maker, the child and the fairy. ()ther than these, there were all sorts and kinds of toys such as dolls of all descriptions, teddy hears, jumping jacks, elephants, tin soldiers, and finally Punch and Judy, and the nice dog. Toby. The dolls were on their very l>est behavior and performed all kinds of tricks for the entertainment of the audience. Even the elephants, big and clumsy, executed a dance.

ever put on—most excellent window displays they were. .She organized what she termed a "private employment agency," which was very dear to her heart. In reality it was more a hospital for hroken hopes than an employment agency. She found the strangest people in the strangest places and set to work in the strangest fashion to fit them where they belonged. Probably there was nothing in Richmond quite like this work. Her only explanation of it was that she was interested in people. Now and again she would make a discovery of some man whom she regarded as an unrecognized power for good. Quite often she was satisfied that people who passed by with a hare nod possessed real ability. Forthwith she hecame their hooster—and was insistent that her friends he also. What a company it would he if all those she helped and cheered were gathered to do honor to her memory and to her ideals!

SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER

Monogram Stationery $5.00 PER CABINET FARMVILLE HERALD FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP In front of Post Office

ROANOKE CLUB A very enthusiastic meeting of Roanoke girls was hdd Monday. A club was organized with twenty members and the following officers:

President Elsie Bell. Vice-President Mary Spe'ggle. Secretary Caroline I'avne. Treasurer Lois Cosby. Miss Ada l'.ierbower was elected sjxmsor of the club. The colors chosen were maroon and white, and the motto, "Acorns to oaks, watch

Roanoke." MARRIED A wedding <>t interest to many people in Farmville and through the State was solemnized in John's Memorial Church Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, when Miss Lillian Paulett Bugg became the bride of Dr. Herman I. Pifer, of Winchester, Va. Because of recent sorrow in both families, only the relatives of the bride and groom were present. The beloved minister of the church, Rev. Frederick Diebl. was the officiating clergyman. Lohengrin's wedding march was sweetly played by Mrs. Frank S. Blanton as the wedding party entered the church. The bride, entering with her father, Mr. Charles Puller Bugg, was becomingly dressed in an imported gown of white crepe Renee. heavily headed with irredescent beads. Her veil of tulle was catlghl with a wreath of orange Moi soins. She carried a shower bouquet of roses and lilies of the valley. Her only ornament being a string of pearls, the gift of the groom. Miss Virgillia Pugg, beautifully gowned in pink canton and carrying an arm bouquet of Orphelia roses, was her sister's maid of honor. Dr. Piter's best man was Dr. II. D. Roving, of St. Luke's Hospital, Richmond, Va. Mr. W. C. Duvall, brother-in-law of the bride, was master of ceremonies. Mrs. Piter's going away gown was of dark brown canton crepe, with cape, hat and gloves to match. Dr. and Mrs. Pifer left by automobile for an extended northern trip and will be at home after October 15th, in Winchester, Va.

College Stationers and Printers FINE STATIONERY AND ENGRAVING ' SCHOOL SEAL STATIONERY

All Work Guaranteed LADIES' SHOE SHINE PARLORS

NORMAL SCHOOL JEWELRY

FRATERNITY STATIONERY

Watches, Clocks, Diamonds, Rings, Class and Sorority Rings

?CllltidOI& AGENCY

MARTIN-The Jeweler

LEATHER GOODS Si:Xl> US YOUR INQUIRIES

MONTAGUE REALTY GO,

SURBER ARUNDAIECOMPANY

Real Estate and Insurance

INCODPODATED

PUBLISHERS PRIYTEKS STATIONERS CHARLOTTESVILLE--VIRGINIA PRINTERS OF THE ROTUNDA

CONTINENTAL HOTEL AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN

HOT AND COLD WATER Rooms with or without bath J. O. HARDAWAY, Proprietor

MRS. A. P. MONTAGUE, Business Manager

503 Krise Bldg.

Lynchburg, Va.

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FOR WOMEN FARMVILLE, VA. J. L. JARMAN, President For Catalogue address THE REGISTRAR, State Normal School for Women, Farmville, Virginia.

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

THE ELECTRIC SHOP A. E. WILLIS-FLORIST

WU1 Fix Your Shoes While You Wait

FARMVILLE, VA.

Best Workmanship and Leather Used

Cut Flowers for Every Occasion

People's National Bank High Class Jewelry and Watch Repairing at LYNN'S JEWELRY STORE on Third Street

FARMVILLE, VA. 4% Interest on Deposits Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent

MILLINERY We Are Knockers

All the latest and up-to-date styles always on hand

Every Day We Are on the Job—We

HATS FOR SCHOOL GIRLS A SPECIALTY

KNOCK SPOTS

Mrs. W. H. Crenshaw

Phone 249

W. E. ENGLAND Merchant Tailor

QUALITY MILLINERY Rear Chappell Co.'s Store

Main Street


i

THE ROTUNDA, OCTOBER 28, 1922 candidates for the class officers and the Student Government Council; then the candidates made their campaign speeches. The general election was held on October 3, Hammermill Bond Social Stationery 1922. The elections were conducted under practically the same laws that govern our state elecSchool Supplies—S. X. S. 1'cnnants—Banners tions. Sealed ballot boxes were used and two judges of elections were on duty all day to see Pillow Cases that everything went off smoothly, that none but GOOD THINGS TO EAT AND DRINK duly registered students of the Normal School voted, and that each voted the hallo: of the class of which she was a member, and the general BUREAU I •!•■ INFORMATION

HUBARD'S

WORLD CITIZENS

It is an essential part of our education that ballot. we think together nationally and internationally, Absolutely no lobbying was allowed within that we develop all sides of our lives to be the regulation distance of the polls. The voting bebest world citizens. We must seek opportunities gan at 10:30 and lasted until sundown. tn broaden our viewpoints and to be in contact The ballot boxes were opened and the votes with all people. Just such an opportunity is of- counted bv the Student Government Council. fered us in our Christian Association which is a national and international one. Through the relationship of our Association with the national Association, the World Student Christian Federation, by our magazines, World Fellowship Committee and our undergraduate representative, wc have within our reach world-wide views. Last week. Lois Williams, our l". R. and a member of the National .Student Council, took us with her to a meeting of this Council in Atlanta. Georgia by a must helpful and broadening talk. We tell our part in the making of a perfect whole and came out o! ourselves to think ahout such internationally vital problems as -tudentindustrial CO-operation and racial understanding. \e\t week, we shall IK' brought even more closely in contact with the student-industrial cooperation movement. We shall hear talks by people who have studied the movement, by a real industrial girl who has studied the student's ..; ;;;: .;;..! by our own representative who experienced the industrial girl's lite and problems this summer. Through just such contacts, we have a wonderful opportunity to really become members one of another over the whole world. and to give of self, time and money that we may speed the coming of Cod's Kingdom here on earth. < »n < October 17 there was a called meeting of the Cabinet with the Advisory Board of the Y. W. C. A. tor a discussion and adoption of the budget. The first regular business meeting of the Association was held Wednesday, I October 18. At this meeting the $2,000 budget for 1922 was adopted by the Association members. Friday, < October 20, the Ministerial Band and ladies of Hampton-Sidney entertained the Student Volunteer Band, Mission Band officers and the Y. W. C. \. Cabinet of S. X. S. The evenin-,' was a most delightful and enjoyable one for all.

S. I. N. A.

GARLAND & MclNTOSH DRUGGISTS

Suppose You Have a Fire Tonight?

The REXALL Store

Garland, Martin & Blanton

Agents for liastman Kodaks We invite you to visit our new fountain

INSUR0RS INSURANCE THAT INSURES

FARMVILLE,

FARMVILLE, VA.

R. B. CRALLE & CO. HOME OF THE PAMOUS

Queen Quality Footwear VAN RAALTE SILK HOSIERY MAIN STREET

FARMVILLE, VA.

VIOLIN, PIANO, "VOICE Banjo,

Guitar,

Mandolin, Cornet

GOLDMAN'S CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC

VIRGINIA

BALDWIN'S NORMAL GIRLS HEADQUARTERS FOR Classy Millinery, Suits, Dresses, Shoes, Goods, Notions, Etc.

Dry

WHITE DRUG COMPANY Established 1868

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM GOLDMAN Pupils prepared for orchestra, concert and church The Confidence of the Community work 11 alf a Century

for Over

Duvall Motor Co.-Automobiles

Finest Toilette Requisites, Drugs and Stationery

Trucks, Tractors and Farm Machinery

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

CORNER THIRD AND NORTH STREETS FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

WE TAKE PRIDE

SHANNON'S Soda Shop and Bakery MAIN STREET AT HIGH Delicious drinks and the most satisfying dainties to cat. WC specialize in catering to Normal School Students.

W. J. H1LLSMAN

Burrells Kash Grocery

VIRGINIA CAFE PHONK 227 FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

BARROW GOAL CO. QUALITY

Whole-ale and Retail Distributor of

LADIES'READY-TO-WEAR Roanoke College now ha- a thoroughh modern radio installation. Concerts may lie received GENERAL MERCHANDISE even night and heard all over the large room in which the set i- installed. At present transmit- Drv Goods. Notions and Pumishingl, ting i- accomplished with a one kilowatt s|>ark Supplies set. Distances of 1300 mile- have been attained. Before the year i^ up it i- expected that a radio COME TO telephone transmitting set will he added to the presenl equipment. Regular nominations and elections have been 'OR carried out by the -indent- at K'adford State Normal. Firsl the classes met and nominated GOOD THINGS TO EAT

In preparing and serving the most elaborate banquets at tin- most reasonable price. Banquets for school organizations our specialty.

SERVICE

PHONES 166 and 148

School

FARMVILLE CREAMERY, INC. MANUFACTURERS OF

Ice Cream and Butter PHONE 55


Rotunda vol 3, no 4 oct 28, 1922