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i89^ Published by the Students of the State Farmville, Virginia

Female Normal School


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BOARD OF EDIT0R5

MARY GARNETT JACKSON,

June,

'98,

ANNIE HAWES CUNNINGHAIVl, June

'98

Editor-in-Chief

Business

Manager

ASSOCIATE EDITORS NELLIE CUNNINGHAM PRESTON,

KATHLEEN MAUDE

RILEY,

'99

LELIA

AGNES SCOTT,

June,

'98

JULIA

WHIDBEE VAUGHAN,

June,

MARY WATKINS ROBERTS,

.

....

February,

MISSIE MEASE

'98,

June,

A'

J

'98

LUCY ELIZABETH WRIGHT,

GENEVIEVE BACON VENABLE,

LUCY THORNTON February,

'99

February,

February, .

'99,

'99 A'

J

February,

'98

February,

'99


BOARD OF EDITORS.


WILLIAM HENRY RUFFNER,

LL.

D.


Milliam

WILLIAM

Ibetir^ IRuffncr,

HENRY RUFFNER,

was born

LL.

D.,

Lexington, Virginia, in the His father was Dr. Henry year 1824. Ruffner, the founder of the Presbyterian church at Charleston, president of

in

West Virginia, and for many years the Washington College, now Washington

Lee University. He was a distinguished scholar, thinker, and writer, and was one of the most influential of the advocates of the gradual

and

abolition of slavery in Virginia.

The

subject of this sketch graduated at

Wash-

ington College in 1842, and afterward studied theology at Union Theological Seminary, HampdenSidney,

The

Virginia,

and

Princeton,

theological training, with

its

New

Jersey.

prominent psy-

chological feature, seems, in the light of subsequent

%%,

2).

events, to have been an enduring force in his

life.

At Washington College he excelled in physical sciences, and at Princeton his best essay writing was on Genesis and Geology. From 1849 to 185 1 he was chaplain of the University of Virginia, and from 1

85 1

to

1853

pastor

of

the

Seventh

While

terian Church, Philadelphia.

at

Presbythe latter

Wednesday evening on the Relations of Science and Scripture. Broken down in health, he was compelled to resign his charge in Philadelphia, and returning to Virginia, he resided on a farm, but gave a con-

place he delivered a course of lectures

stantly

increasing

amount

of

attention

to

field

geology.

In i860, in conjunction with Professor

Campbell

of

Washington

College

he

began

a

neological reconnaissance of Virginia, which was


pressing work allowed, for Large opportunities for this work, in connection with official duties, were opened up. when, in 1870. Virginia called upon him to guide and control her public education. continued,

as

other

several years.

The

constitutional provision for public schools

amid the saturyet the nalia of reconstruction was unpopular Legislature of 1870 gave it better effect than they knew by electing Dr. RufTner the first Superintenin the State,

originating as

it

did

;

dent of Public Instruction. The difficulties to be encountered would have paralyzed a less able or less resolute man. Two unhomogeneous races were to be provided for and public sentiment was against free schools. In their defence Dr. Ruffner wrote some of the ablest articles that have appeared in this country, seeking in this and every other available way to bring conviction to the minds of the people. Within thirty days after his election he had submitted to the Legislature an outline school system, which in a few weeks, he elaborated into a complete school law, which was passed substantially as he wrote it and has never been materially changed. L^pon its passage he organized the schools so promptly and efficiently that at the end of the year 1870-71

one hundred and

fifty

thousand

children were reported in attendance on them, and

up to this time the growth of the school S3'stem has been great. He retired from office in 1882. Hon. j. L. M. Curry has thus described his official work: " For whatever of success has crowned the system. Dr. Ruffner is entitled to the credit. His eleven reports are lucid discussions of

all

leading

subjects pertaining to the organization and

man-

and school systems. They are hardly surpassed in our educational literature, have often been quoted as authoritative, and were honored with a diploma from the Republic of Chili. RufTner will hereafter be ranked alongside of Mann, Sears, Wickersham, and other such educa-

agement

of schools

During

tors.

nearly

his

administration he apportioned

$5,000,000,

and administered $12,000,000

without bond or security, and yet no item in his accounts were ever objected to, not a cent was lost, bitterest opponent never intimated that was anything mysterious or dishonest in his administration. Every page of the public school liistory of Virginia is luminous with his triumphs." Industriously improving the opportunities incidentally arising from the official duties of this

and

his

there

period, the Superintendent of Public Instruction continued the geological examination of Virginia. It was then that Dr. RufTner formed his fine collection

of

N'irginia

minerals, and while traveling


over

State

the

lectures logical

he

frequently

delivered

popular

on the commercial mineralogy and geostructure of the locality in which he hap-

pened to

be, as well as that of the State at large.

When

he

once into the service of the Georgia Pacific Railway, and in connection with Professor Campbell, entered upon a physical survey of the country from Atlanta, Georgia, west to the Mississippi river. The report of this survey was and is much sought left

public

ofilice,

he passed

at

and

organization was

its

Sacrificing interests,

he

reluctantly

Under

his

left entirel)' in

and

inclinations

left

his hands.

large

personal beloved geologic work and

his

accepted the unsought responsibility.

his wise, upright

and

efificient

management The

the success of the school was phenomenal. prestige of his

an innovation,

manded

name gave it

it

the respect which, as

could not otherwise have com-

until again called

his sound educational philosophy shaped and gave tone to its professional instruction, and with quiet but steadfast courage he guarded it from dangers which might otherwise have overwhelmed it. In addition to psychology and didactics, he

to educational

taught here, as far as the limited time allowed,

From

the beginning of his administration he

botany, geology, and mineralogy, attracting to the

after.

Again we

find

him employed

in

making

geological examinations and reports, chiefly in the

Birmingham regions of Alabama, work in Virginia.

;

had pleaded

for the professional training of teachers,

weekly geology lectures large numbers of the

making the

State and county institutes very effec-

zens of the town.

and always, when possible, giving them digand force by his presence and teaching, he yet labored indefatigably, both before and after his retirement from office, for the establishment of a

citi-

tive,

In 1887 failing health required change of occu-

nity

and he turned his attention once more to field, working in Alabama, North Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia. In the autumn of 1887 he visited Washington Territory and reported on the projected route of a railroad three hundred miles long. It is probable that the

Normal

.School

in

Virginia.

In

1884 his views

were partly met by a legislative enactment, providing for what is now known as the State Female Normal School at Farmville. At the first meeting of the Board of Trustees Dr. Ruffner was elected by acclamation the first principal of this school.

pation,

the

geologic

country

and

at large will

know him best as a scientist, own State has much

in this respect, too, his

reason to be grateful

;

but

it

is

as an educator that


and the South must hold him most in honor and reverence. The next generation will hold him fully worth}' of the appellation already The Horace Mann frequently applied to him \'irginia

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

of the South." visit to

"'

In 1891 Dr. Ruffner

the State of

Washington on

made

a second

a geologic er-

rand, and since that time has

shorter literary

excursions.

He

has

made also

similar but

engaged

in

work, especially in writing the history of

Washington and Lee University.

He

the age of seventy-four, resting at his I.exing-ton.

is now at home near


DR.

JOHN

A.

CUNNINGHAM,

A.

M,,

LL.

D.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Shetcb of

2)r.

John H. Cunningbam, H.

undertaking to sketch the Hfe of a valued it is difificult to avoid one of two evils to allow our affections to carry us into seeming extravagance, or, for the sake of apparent partiality to fail to bring out fully all the virtues of one who, it may be is worthy of heartfelt admiration, and It is our sincere desire to set often of imitation. forth this man as he was to show to those who knew him not, how noble and generous and sympathetic a nature he possessed, how full of earnest purpose, of unselfish impulse, to bring back to those who knew him and have lost him the real presence of the man with all his stimulating words,

IN friend,

;

his ever helpful influence.

John A. Cunningham was born in Richmond, June 24, 1846. His father Dr. John A. Cunningham, who graduated at Harvard and completed his education in Europe, was for many years a prominent physician in Richmond, but retired from

active

life

in 1870,

%%,

m^,,

and spent

H).

his last years with his

at Elkwood, His mother, Miss Mary Johnston, was a first cousin of General Joseph E. Johnston, and was also a person of talent. The affection and intimacy existing between her and her youngest son was vmusual in kind and degree, and her memory was fondly cherished till the day of his death. To her he seems to have owed the emotional side of his nature, his buoyant and hopeful spirit, his tender and ready sympathy, as well as his faculty for government and clear insight into

brother, Mr. Richard A.

Cunningham,

Culpeper county.

character.

From

his father

he inherited his posi-

and open expressions of like and dislike, his high spirit, his keen sense of honor and his chivalrous abhorrence of injustice and oppression. tive

As in

a child he ^vas delicate

reading to his mother,

Being

a

woman

and spent much time

who was

almost blind.

of rare intellect, the little

boy was


introduced to books far beyond most children of his age, from which he gained

knowledge never

lost,

served as a private in the battery

commanded by Though a

Captain Willie K. Dance of Powhatan.

and which was afterwards made use of in his teaching. For the same reason, not being able to go to school very early, he accompanied his father on his professional rounds, gaining from him much knowledge of life both in its lower and higher sense, learning how the intellect and soul are dwarfed b)' physical weakness, having his attention directed to

mere boy, he was a brave soldier. He loved to tell of his war experiences, and said some of the most useful lessons of his life were learned through

the importance of the smallest things in nature,

complete his education. His high rank from the first, especially in mathematics and kindred subjects, and when he took his degree he was fully recognized as one of the master minds among his fellow students. Leaving the University in 1868, Mr, Cunningham was associated with General E. Kirb}' Smith,

and thus laying the foundation scientific bias of his

for the distinctly

mind.

Between the ages of twelve and fifteen, young Cunningham's education was continued in private schools in the country.

Part of the time under

Mr. Edward CunPowhatan county, about twelve miles from Richmond, and part in a large private school for boys, conducted by his cousin, tutors in the family of his uncle,

ningham,

at

;\Iacon,

Mr. Jaqueline Ambler,

in

In 1861, he entered

Fauquier county.

New London Academy,

Bedford county, which was then in charge of Mr. John H. Winston. Here he was a general favorite with both teachers and students, and was excelled in scholarship

by none.

enlisted in the Confederate

tions into

which he was thrown with

all

sorts

armv, where he

and

conditions of men.

When sity

the war closed he went to the Univer-

of Virginia to

work was

of

the Western Military Academy in New CasKentucky, in which he taught Latin and Greek, and afterward in the University of Nashville, where he occupied the chair of Latin. In 1872 this UniIt was versity conferred on him the degree A. M. first in tle,

at this

period that a great affliction befell him in

the threatened loss of his eyesight.

For seven

years he was unable to do any studying, except what

could be gained by listening to others read.

In 1863, at the age of seventeen, Mr. Cunning-

ham

the hardships he then endured and the close rela-

All

time he kept his place, performing his duties satisfactorily, and learning some of those lessons

this


which afterwards drew from him the expression so familiar to us all, "Young ladies, thank God for pain." in Nashville, November, 1874, he marMiss Florence Boyd of that place, who died after little more than a year of most happy married life, leaving a son, Frank, who is now at the Eastman Business College.

While

ried

Miss Martha Eggleston. a daughter of Mr. Stephen Eggleston, whose wife was Miss Martha Miller, of This marriage was the result of long Cumberland. and intimate friendship. Miss Eggleston's stepfather being Mr. Cunningham's favorite uncle, Those who Richard H. Cunningham, of Elkwood. were admitted into the inner circle of his domestic life, felt

that here the true

man was

children he was father, friend and playmate

changed into a training school for teachers, Mr. Cunningham came back to his native city, and in partnership with Mr. Joe Willis opened a drugstore. His career as a druggist was of short duration. In 1877 he was elected principal of Madison School, Richmond, and again took up the work of school-teaching, for which he was so eminently

thoughtful and considerate husband.

With a deep insig'ht into great principles which underlie subjects apparently superficial, he had the gift of engaging and holding the attention and fitted.

the interest of his pupils. tedious, but he could bring

common

daily

life

ject in familiar

subject so dry or

touch with their and experience present his sub-

and

in

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

attractive guise

play faculties which the to

No it

young

and

call

into

are prone to applv

games or diversions. In November, 1884, Mr. Cunningham married

mother-in-law a devoted son

;

To

visible.

In 1875, when the University of Nashville was bought by the trustees of the Peabody fund, and

;

his

to his

to his wife, a loving,

Cunningham was elected president Female Normal School, in Farmville, a vacancy occasioned by the resignation oi

In 1887 Mr. of the State

to

fill

This position he held until his death and here his best and most enduring work was done. Being a new enterprise, this has been little understood in conservative \'irginia, and the difficulties confronting any man at its head were great. It was still in its infancy, when Mr. Cunningham took Dr. Rufifner.

it

in charge, ofifering great

women

opportunities

to the

conducted by a brave, independent, active man, and original thinker, but, destined to failure, if carried on by the weak or the commonplace. Few men could have been better fitted for just this position than Mr. Cunningham, for, having been intimately connected with public of Virginia,

if


schools, he tically into

knew

their needs and entered enthusiasany enterprise that looked to their im-

own

pupils, and in 1896 Hampden-Sidney College conferred on him the degree of LL.D.

He was

intensely interested in educa-

tion, a great thinker,

an acute observer, and verv

in

far-seeing as to the

ultimate

ual who came in close contact with him, this was by no means all. To many, the material improvement he wrought around him would seem his greatest work, certainly enough for one man's lifetime. His business methods were so effective, and his conception and practice of economy so just and true

provement.

effects

of a

given

method of government or of training. These qualities combined with practical good sense and judgment, a heart as loving and sympathetic as a woman, a

manhood pure and

ability

unsullied, and an executive possessed by few, he brought with him to this

work, determined to make of

it,

not a

monument

to

himself, nor, indeed, the vehicle for the expression of his

own

opinions, but, in truth, a training-school

for teachers, otir State.

and through them this end he gave,

To

ordinary sense,

all

care, his trained

of himself

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

for the in

the

his time, his constant

and thoughtful mind.

thusiastic a leader could not

youth of

more than

fail

So en-

to infuse energy

Each year a larger number untrained women learned from him the true prin-

and stimulate hope. of

ciples of education, learned to discard

unrealities,

which simply dazzle, and methods that go on widening and deepening with the year, learned that woman is capable of doing the highest and best work in the field of instruction, and how to do it. His success as an educator and his varied knowledge did not pass unrecognized by others than his

Great as was his work in the class-room, and moral and intellectual stimulus to every individ-

that, with

comparatively small means he rebuilt old

new so rapidly that we learned summer when we left to find some in the fall, and we were never disap-

buildings and added to expect each

fresh surprise

pointed.

The Assembly

Hall, the Science Hall, and

the Practice School were entire

new

buildings added

during his administration. The main building has been enlarged and renewed, until not one brick of the original structure remains. We do not mean to say that we have actually more and better buildings than most schools, or, indeed, as handsome as any other State institution, but we believe that few men have expended small means so wisely. His last

work was

to pull

building, adding

much

down and to

comfort of the whole. A man so many-sided,

the

rebuild the

main and

attractiveness

who

could teach any


subject, direct buildings, superintend accounts, reg-

and yet enter heart and soul into the smallest detail of joy or sorrow in the life of each individual about him, must, necessarily, wear out before his time from simple exhaustion of vital force. When we returned in the fall of '97, it was under circumstances the most auspicious. The last building, upon which our friend had so set his heart was completed, the prospects for the school were good, and the session had begun with promises the most flattering. We knew not that we were under the shadow of a great cloud. The first announcement of Dr. Cunningham's illness caused no alarm, we thought it a slight attack like many he had had before. But in a few days it was only too apparent that all was over. It was like a total eclipse at high noon, suddenly darkness, deep and dismal, enveloped us. He had lived his life, giving to others the best that was ulate expenses,

in him, strengthening the weak, cheering the desponding, awakening the dull, giving out with every

more or less nervous force. On the ninth October his spirit returned to the God who gave it. On Tuesday, the twelfth, he was laid to rest in his own loved cemetery, Hollywood. Surely it is breath

of

true that the void one's departure

world

is

Some

there are

in

the it.

whose voices leave no echo, whose leave no trace. Others have a person-

footsteps ality so

makes

proportioned to the place one holds in

pervasive that they

are

always

with us,

influencing our thoughts, controlling our actions,

constraining us to exclaim, " There

To

this latter class

ject of

our sketch.

is

no death."

belongs unquestionably the sub It is

impossible, having

known

him, to forget him, impossible to efface the impression he, unconsciously,

with him.

"

He

do follow him."

rests

made upon

from

all

associated

his labors, but his

works


NORMAL SCHOOL


ROBERT FRAZER,

A.

M

,

LL.

D.


IRobeit jfraser, H.

FRAZER was born in Orange County, Va., fifty-eight years ago. Fonythree years have been spent in school seven-

ROBERT

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

teen as student and twenty-six as teacher.

age of

five,

he was put in school at

home and

%%,

riD.,

command

S).

passed in the famous campaign, 1861-62. '62, young Frazer received five

In the campaign of Avounds,

two

at

Kernstown,

in

March

At the

Sharpsburg, in September, and two

before

burg, in December.

reaching ten he was sent, with an older brother, to a boarding-school. In 1856 he entered the Brook-

;

one

at

at Fredericks-

land Academy, established that year by William

Permanentl)' disabled by one of these last, he returned to the University in the fall of '63, and begun the study of law, during the course of this

Dinwiddle, to prepare boys for the University of

session he

Virginia.

After three sessions here, he went to the

During his second session there the war between the States came on, and, in company with a number of fellow-students, he enlisted as private soldier in the Rockbridge Artillery, StoneUniversity.

wall Brigade.

A

ruder transition

have come into a boy's

life

the quiet routine of student privation, conflict

could hardly than this exchange of

work

for the ordeal of

and exposure through which

this

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

was offered a professorship

in the Mil-

itary Institute of Florida, at Tallahassee, but de-

clined

it.

of '64,

it

This offer being renewed in the autumn The surrender of our

was accepted.

armies led to the closing of the Institute, and Mr. Frazer returned to Virginia and opened a school for boys in his native county. In 1870, upon the organization of the present public school system of Virginia, he

County Superintendent

of

Orange.

was appointed At the end of


a year, having established thirty-odd schools in the county, \'.^ resigned this position to take cha' cc of

for the school that

the Fauquier Female Institute at Warrenton. Here,

most successful

he married Miss Florence Spilman. In 1882 the trustees of the Judson Institute at Marion, Alabama, asked Mr. Frazer to take the

in 1873,

presidency of that school. tute

was young and

proaching

number

its

The Warrenton

flourishing, the

semi-centennial

of years

it

;

Insti-

Judson was ap-

and, though, for a

had held dominant sway

in the

educational and social life of the Gulf States, it was It was embeginning to show signs of decadence. barrassed by debt and its patronage had so fallen off as to

awaken

serious solicitude for

its

future. It

was natural that under these circumstances the But the young teacher should deline the honor. ofifer was made again and again, until, finally, at the solicitation of friends, whose judgment was entitled to moie than ordinary weight, the Virginia school was left for that in the South. If a

movement may be estimated with

solely to altruistic considerations, this

one

may

be

by its results for whilst, with other things, invoked for Mr. Frazer the loss of health, it did

justified it

reference

;

which characterizes

some important

his

work

and During the five years of his administration the work of the school was recast with reference to extension and strength, the patronage, more than doubled, the debts were all paid and additions- were made to buildings and equipments amounting, altogether, to some forty

there as in

of his

respects, the best

life.

thousand dollars with several thousand dollars still

left

in the treasury.

Under

the strain

of

these

five

years Mr.

Frazer's health gave way, and by direction of phy-

he sought restoration in more active purSeven years ago he resumed school work, as president of the State Industrial Institute and ColThis lege for Women, at Columbia, Mississippi. position he resigned to take that which he now ocsicians, suits.

Normal School. war experience, and American Consul, Mr.

cupies in the \'irginia Female

With the exception

of his

several years spent in Italy as

Frazer's

life

has been devoted to the cause of educa-

and, except in the professorship in Florida, his past student work has all been in the relation of

tion

;

either principal or president.


Jacult^ of

ROBERT FRAZER,

President,

"ffnstvuction.

8

'98.

VIRGINIA KEYNOLDS,

ANNIE LOFTIN WALTON,

»

'87.

*LELIA JEFFERSON HARVIE,

^MARTHA WILLIS COULLING,

*SARAH PRITCHETT,

'87.

"

'92.

«MRS. SADIE

STONE,

ESTELLE SMITHIE,

12

92.

GAY PATTESON,

"

'93.

'96.

EDNA VIRGINIA MOFFETT,

'97.

History and Eyiglish.

mathematics.

»FANNIE TALBOT LITTLETON,

"

'93.

*AGNES MARGUERITE CARROLL, [Substitute] Chemistry.

Physics and Chemistry.

*Those

'94.

French and German.

Gf^rammar and Composition.

S.

HARDY,

Principal of Practice School.

Latiii.

MARY PREDERICA

'93.

Stenography and Type-writing.

Drawing and Form. Librarian.

RICE,

'93.

Assistant in Mathematics.

Physiology and Geography.

MINNIE VAUGHAN

'95.

Vocal Music and Physical Culttire.

Psychology ayid Hlsfort/ of Pedagogy.

so

marked

are grad aates of the Farmville

28

Normal

School.

'97.


FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION.


H)oine6tic

MRS. POETIA

L.

MORRISON,

SARAH P SPENCER, MRS. MAGGIE QUIGLEY MISS MR.

B.

DR.

PETER WINSTON,

M. COX,

Bepattment. Head

of

Hmne.

Assistant Housef:eeper. steu:ard.

AHemUmi Phyuc


DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT


PRACTICE

SCHOOL


J

Class of jfebruar^, '98.

Colors. Confederate Gray and Gold. /iOotto. Oh')-/-

(out;

a}jM

TTsait;.

Šfficers.

President, O.

WARREN.

Vice-President, M.

TURNER.

Secretary and Treasurer, R. CUTHERELL. Historian, G. B.

VENABEE.

Bland, Eily

Cox, Mary White

Mears, Belle

Baldwin, Laura

Cunningham, Annie Hawes

Oakey, Nellie

Vaden, Mary

Booth, Annie

Cutherell,

Spain, Cora

Venable, Genevieve Basan

Chisman, Marj' Whiting

Harri,s,

Ruby

Laura

Spiers Eunice,

Turner, Martha

A'

Warren, Odelle


CLASS OF FEBRUARY,


Ibtstor^ of tbc Class of Jebruav^, '98.

OURwhen we were was

September

first roll-call

i6th,

of the

assigned to

Normal School. There we were " The Little companies. Sisters,"

seven in number, with about thirty others, to the First B.

1st,

The next meeting of importance was February Then it was that our numbers were 1895.

slightly diminished, but almost as quickly re-en-

forced by those

— poor

proceed to the Second

girls

B

—who

did not wish to

at that time.

Meanwhile, the usual drill, dress parade, actual fighting and occasional guard duty the ranks being thinned and re-enforced successively until, after several promotions, we all ranked as SENIORS; grave, dignified and weighed down by a sense of our responsibilities, and our importance, as instructors

modes

Here we sadly missed our great General, who had helped and cheered us on our long, hard march to victory. in the

of life's warfare.

When we

1894,

marshalled into the Chapel

reached this glorious position, how"

were only three of " The Little Sisters left, and the others were from dififerent companies of this great army of workers. Of course, the most vivid scenes in our career are those last spent around camp fires. Which of us will forget the ever, there

pleasures of the reception given us before leaving

?

Not one For a few short hours we forgot the morrow, which was to send each one of us out to fight her own life-battle. The morrow came and !

with

it

the leave-takings, each girl-soldier, wearing

the badge of her brigade and bearing with her her

passport into greater

fields.

Although we have been transferred from our Alma Mater to the broader work of our State, we still look forward to the time when, with our comrades, faithful to the cause, as our purple violet signifies, we shall " Trabble Back to Dixie " under our banner of Confederate Gray and Gold, and again be " Tenting on the Old Camp Ground."


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Sonas

of the Class of jfebruar^, '98.

[To tune of " Sweet Bunch of Daisies."]

Sweet purple violet?, flower of '98, Ever their memory brings back that dear date

When we

our school career.

as class-mates, closed

Having gathered

knowle.:lge from instructors dear.

She was young and bright and gay, And had always held her sway. This artless

maid.

little

But, oh, the times are changed,

For she

's

almost

This artless

now

deranged,

maid.^FiRST Chorus.

little

Chorus. Sweet purple violets we love so well, For of our errors, violets, won't tell. Like to their emblem, we '11 faithful be. To our Alma Mater, and the faculty. Sweet withered

Whose

violets, treasured

And

'11

to leave you, years

ne'er forget you,

we

her brain

This poor

little

this girl,

in a whirl.

is

maid.

Though no longer young and gold,

E

She's gone from

This poor

tinted petals mem'ries dear enfold

Now we 're going But we

more than

Hard work has done

little

to Senior

gay.

A,

maid.

may come between.

the sweet sixteen.

Second Chorus. [To tune of " Streets of Cairo."]

For she now has seen the streets of Farmville, In the Normal she has often strayed She has mastered English, math, and science.

you a song. won't be very long,

I will sing

And Of Of

it

;

a poor little maid.

the day

And

when

This brilliant

she struck here,

little

maid.

her memories won't be dear

0, this poor

little

maid.

FiKST Chorus. For she had never seen the streets of Farmville, In the Normal she had never strayed She had never tackled math or science. Poor little home-sick maid. ;

But she

's

And

Farmville bids adieu,

graduated now. Though she can not tell just how. This happy little maid.

She

to

will miss

This happy

it

just a few,

little

maid.

Second Chorus.


CLASS OF JUNE,


1F:)i6tov^

NCiTHIXG

of the Class of June, '98.

more fascinating than the achievement under difficulties, of obscure beginnings and triumphant endings of obstacles overcome and final triumphs. The most forbidding circumstances can not repress a longing for knowledge, a yearning for growth. The ninth of February, 1895, though stormy and wild romance

is

of

;

with raging snow, marked the recurrence of that

long established event in the Normal annals, the of another " E " Class. We were " green," of course, " evergreens," the biting snow even failed

incoming

afifect us, but we felt that the barriers are not yet erected which declare to aspiring talent, " Thus far

to

and no

In our

farther."

we had

new environment we

felt

Home-sickness came to us the methods employed by our instructors were a novelty we gazed upon the imposing professional class, whose giddj- height as strange as ever

in

:

;

our

life.

seemed unattainable

;

even

in

our study the lights

were impolitely turned off in the midst of a halfprepared lesson, while we were left to hurry in the dark and make ready to be in bed by the time Miss Sarah's " All in bed," and sweet " Goodnight " was heard at the door. We had our fits of " blues." but an occasional call from some kindly " old girl," induced us to forget these. And thus were the minds of many of us so effectuall}- engaged that we gave heed to naught but matters of the moment which oftentimes were perplexing, indeed. But the winter sped swiftly by, and soon June, with her roses heralded our home-going, not as " Envious E.'s," but " Delighted D.'s." Time has stolen on unobserved, and as I gaze through the vista of the intervening years, I see but a confused mass, a mist, a great clouded mist.

problems

in the first,

Zones, spherical triangles, second and third cjuadrants,


cosines tangents, midnight umbrellas, not used to

keep

moonshine, oh, no, but to keep the rays of candle-light from creeping through the transom. I recall a few instances in which our ever-watchful, but kind matron, reported at certain rooms in the " we sma' hours," and sent the occupants to bed with their promises to remain there. Thus we advanced, growing great in Latin verse, writing Spencerian stanzas and dramatizing, too. We all studied English. We developed a " composite critical consciousness " which enabled us to give in a moment's time an account of Goldsmith's ethical influence and the especial features of Hawthorne's romanticism. Carh'le might have envied us. If Franklin could have seen us generating electricity, or could Herschel have heard us discussing Jupiter's moons, they would have stared in astonishment at the great wisdom displayed by the class of June, '98. Then, off

too, there rises before hibition, in

me

which the whole

the of

memorable

art ex-

English History was

represented in different scenes, and the characters were so vividly portrayed that spectators wept on beholding them. Some of our number may yet aspire to the height of a Raphael. But June, '97, approached and closed the door with a click upon these scenes, and in September we stood gazing at a space through which the warriors of poetry and

march on in stately hosts that seem to have what comes next ? We are professionals and look down on the line of girls below us with a condescending interest in such of them as bring to mind the girls we were when first we entered here. The girls of those first days seem to be no part of us we remember them as something left behind upon the road of life, as somehistory

no end

— and

;

we have passed rather than actually been and almost think of them as some one else. But the present stands before us, school life

thing

not finished

when we reach

splints, blocks,

the professional.

globes and charts proclaim, "

who teachest another teachest thou As young aspirants we marched to

not thyself

we

" ?

the front and

exhibited our ability to train the tender shoot, but

is

The Thou

mind

to

usually resumed our seats feeling that

mind didn't shoot, but our courage did. Then the criticisms were read. " Miss J you came be-

the

,

your lesson was a spirt, and you left with a spirt." " Miss G never in the record of the methods class has such a complete failure been made." "MissD youmay take your seat; you 're off the track." But why recall these criticisms which were so kindly given that we might have " grit " and more " back-bone." Did it improve us ? I 'm glad to repl)' in the affirmative, but an fore the class with a spirt,

,


incident

which

is

will

connected with this class the result of be remembered by the class, regardless

of a record,

those tice

but

who may

I will

mention

it

for the benefit of

not understand. At times the Pracin the

School children could not be present

and certain members would have to act as children. Now, a few of our most intellectual girls have forgotten to put awa}^ childish ways, and

methods

class,

instead of

acting

as

dignified

rather as spoiled babes.

The

professionals, class

hopes

act

for

a

change before graduation day.

Few

histories there are in

which

all

is

sun-

shine and happiness, would that this could be so.

But who fail

of us in

looking back

in after years

would

to recall the painful bereavement which befell

That noble life which our class while Juniors ? by example, as well as by precept, and would have us be pure, upright and generous, has been sadlv missed. How well he performed his mission 'Though our beloved president has been on earth. led us

called

by the Master,

forever, in the lives of

deared himself.

It

and will he had en-

his influence lives,

many

to

whom

seems that the taking of

this

noble man, so dear to our class, has formed a link on high to draw us nearer each day of our lives, lo that great school above.


STATISTICS.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; CLASS OK JUNK, KNOWN Mattie Amos.

An

.

Inspiration.

Richie

Emma

Duckie

Bland.

Mary Boyd.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Anna

Daniel.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Fowlkes. Martha Featherston Ida Greever. Elizabeth

.

.

Hargra

Mary Jackson.

.

.

Katharine Morris. Katharine Moffett. Katherine Mclnto: Charlotte McKinney Louise Otley. .

.

Emma

Payne.

.

.

Elsie Pierce. Pattie Percivall. Bernice Pollard. .

.

.

.

.

Mary

.

.

Elizabeth Rice.

.

A

Kathleen Riley, Missie Mease.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Geitrude Thomson Alice Whitaker.

Brown.

Silver.

Grey.

Republican.

Blue.

Gold Bug. Silver Bug. Gold Bug. Gold Bug. Silver Bug.

Grey. Grey. Grey. Blue. Blue. Hazel. Grev. Grey.

.

.

Republican.

Bug. Can't Bug. Anno Domini. Bug. Lady Brown. Bug. Pat Blue. Bug. My Ciilleague. Blue. Bug. Puddin' Blue. Bug. Jack Blue. Bug. Johnny Hop. Blue. Bug. Katy-did Hazel. Gold Bug. A Dear Blue. Silver Bug. Scamp Grev. Sliver Bug. Popularity. Hazel. Silver Bug. "Sweet." .... Blue. Silver Bug. Rockaway Blue. Silver Bug. Absentee Blue. Silver Bug. Gray Squirrel. Hazel. Silver Bu^. Dictator Blue. Silver Bug. Rooster Grey. Silver Bug. Mary Liz Brown. Silver Bug. Old Maid Green Silver Bug. Pokahontas. Blue. Silver Bug. Procrastination. Brown. Silver Bug. Strawberry Blonde. Grev. Silver Bug. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Marie Rhodes. Roberts.

Modest Daisy. Broady Independence. Lulu Bird

.

Mamye

.

.

Monkey

Sue Boyd Coirie Broadwater Lilliim Cox. Louise Cralle. Lallie Darden.

FAVORITE BOOK

AS

Priscilla

.

.

Bessie Birdsall.

Florence Bmndis.

"98.

.

.

.

.

.

Silver Silver Silver Silver Silver Silver Silver Silver Silver

Peck's Bad Boy. Dick's Sweetheart.

Two

Kisses.

.

.

Geography. Geography. Drawing.

.

.

Bad Boy's Dairy. Fair

God

The

Violet. Elsie Dinsmore. .

.

Idleness.

.

Drawing.

.

Arithmetic. Arithmetic. English.

.

.

Barbara Dering.

.

Qneechv

Dissecting. 7th Grade.

Trilby."

James Wordsworth

SPARE TIME SPENT IN

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Singing. Tarr.

.

My

soul

imprefsion

is

Oh, John. Oh, pshaw.

Studying

Plague take Plague take Oh, dear.

Teacher Congressman.

it.

Ladv

.

.

Lady of

Preacher.

.

.

Hot tamale.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Don't

Army

.

.Jack

Matrimony.

.

Arithmetic Psychology.

.

My

Ah, John. Laws, child.

Laws, child.

.

" Dickens."

.

Lady Pokahontas, Arithmetic. But Yet a Woman Geography.

Don't ask me. That 's awful.

Any Old Thing.

Mv

.

.

Historv.

.

.

stars.

.

.

.

.

Judge

Keeping Seniors

quiet.

Dancing.

Objecting. Sleeping.

Lamenting. Studying coal. Listening to a bee.

Reforming. Cleaning up. Listening to a bell. Spooning. Writing letters. Borrowing books Drawing maps. Teasing. Chatting.

Growing white

Florist

Prima donna. Paderewski Helpmate.

.

Nursing the

II.

.

Practicing.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Looking

lillies.

sick.

cute.

Making candy.

Saw-bones. Saw-bones. Aborigi'jal

.

.

.

Singing.

Hoj'den

.

Mis.sionary. Trained nurse.

Compayre. Drawing.

.'. .

.

Teacher

Ben Hur Thelma Mother Goose. Molly Bawn.

Tarr.

.

Lawyer

Arithmetic. .

.

.

Prize winner.

Geography. Laws, child. Mathematics I'm a good child. Drawing. Geographv.

.

Lady's maid.

.

Studying. Having a thought. Dreaming of Bob.

Studying. .

Lawyer

.

Law, child. To be sure.

.

leisure.

Essay on Man. Well-dressed Woi Duchess Prince of India. .

.

Scientist

.

.

.

.

of leisure. Bootblack.

Beans. O, Peter. 0, no, my lady. .

.

Work Cramming.

it.

Beg pardon .Jay bird.

(?)

Aboriginal

Silence.

O, Peter.

Cook.

Prima donna. Salvation Army. .

.

Psychology. 1st Grade. Arithmetic. Drawing. Music. Drawing. .

Dick's Sweetheart. Shakspeare. Life and Love. Princess Aline. Tom Brown atOxford. Bacon's Essays. In Ole Virginia. Princess Sonia

my

Nun Army

It.

1

O,

Spooning.

Hunting cats. Writing letters.

Work Cramming.

Cyclist.

.

.

Dentist.

.

.

Talking sense to boys. Gritting her teeth.


Class of jfebruar^ '99.

©fficers.

President,

Vice-President

Secretary and Treasurer, Class Historian

NELLY CUMMINGS PRESTON. LUCY ELIZABETH WRIGHT. BROWNIE TALIAFERRO. VAUGHAN, A' J. WHEDBEE JULIA


CLASS OF FEBRUARY

'99.


IfDistor^ of tbe

writing a liistory of the Class of February.

IN a

brief glance at the

The

work

of

Class of jfebruar^, '99.

'99,

former years

is

forming the basis of the Let them class entered the second year B grade. be asked of their work then, and they will most probably tell you that they learned that H2O was not explosive, and the H2S resembled " /\ttar of Roses " in odor, but further than this, they will only remember that school life as yet had not grown serious. February's pitching day, of '97, found ihtm all (?), of course, enrolled with the second year A.'s. With their promotions sad to relate was noticed a promotion also of their own opinions necessary.

girls

of themselves, until,

own

it is

really thought, that in their

estimation, to write poetrj' as

Poe

did, to pic-

ture nature as Irving did, were the easiest of class

lequirements.

Looking again

at

our same

girls the

next September, we see them deep in the mysteries

of

spectrum analysis

of the

new theory

of electricity,

revelling in the classics of old English

and becoming the model female This

present century.

them

and

as Junior B.'s,

last

and

debaters

Virgil, of the

feature characterized

as a class, the reader, per-

haps, has received the impression that they are

school

use

selves," but

right

who

"

very

can say,

—to

much stuck on themwho dares say without a

?

The is

— slang

epoch, however, of their school career

first

over with the completion of this work, and

will leave

it

to be guessed

what the next step

is

by an observant

for them.

front corridor of

Ye Normal

the lines of girls

file

class

the

rooms,

tall

is

stately

we

outsider,

..Standing in the

School and watching

from the assembly-hall on to He can easily see that

a stranger.

maidens,

who

follow in the foot-steps

of the Faculty, are the Seniors, the graduates of the


coming June

of '98, and, again, the white

brigade classes note the girls

who

apron

as the infant department, but

itself

What who and what

are

follow the Seniors.

their characteristics

?

In

fact,

are

they ? Surely they are what might be termed as " a motley array" or, to quote an expression of " The " debater in class " a truly heterogeneous

mass," for

all

and

sented,

is

ages, sizes, types are therein repreit

a

wonder

that our stranger, be-

sudden relaxation

of all nuiscles save those of

our

fated friend, while she, with dilated eyes and dishevelled locks, goes with a " do or die " expression

She does and dies not for after a little to the front. wrestling in spirit on her part, the pet of all Practice School teachers is heard to sa\- without aid "

two and two is four." Have vou discovered our profession yet ? Strange wondrous strange, but time will prove it.

cause of their striking appearance, demands their name ? " They are the Senior B.'s, or better known Puzzled, again he as the Junior Professionals.' "

Not the intriLet us pass into another class-room. cacies of mathematics puzzle now, but the analytical

asks, " Will )'OU

l)lue-eyed favorite with

"

i<V:

girls

tell

me

their peculiar vocation

Thou

are veritable professionals."

?

for

shalt

answer this for thyself, noble stranger follow them The mathematical class-room and thou shalt see. is the stage on which the drama is to be played. The presiding genius in the form of our Amelia member ;

cf the Faculty glances down the list of namc-s in her grade book as she sits in state, every figure is seen to tremble, faces pale as the instruments of torture in the shape of an abacus, splints and blocks are brought forth, and as the dear little innocents from the Practice School are brought like lambs to the

slaughter into the

room

"

And

the air a solemn broken by "Miss There is a the class." all

stillness holds," until the spell is

Thornton, take charge of

]>resentation of the parts of our

H.

S.

own

taken her stand in front of the class. begins, and forgetting that her pupil says in a tragic

way

"

vernacular.

A

College boys, has is

Isabelle, trust

Dreamily, she also her rival,

men and

they

be true to you." Without waiting to hear the analvsis, covered with confusion, she has resumed her seat, while the gentle spirit in charge here, re-

will

membering her

troubles likewise with Cupid and

Knglish, gives her an eight with

a zero

after

it

(which means a slip of paper with P on it at the enu The stranger can no longer restrain of the month). himself; but he was overheard to say to the teacher of the professionals, " Well, really learn to

teach

I

don't know, they

some day."

may


daily experiences, but

has remembered once, perhaps oftener, though very

Some various are the ones that could be given. of us already have acquired the air and bearing of

doubtful, to speak in lower tones than in those of her usual key of G, and the '' Shining Lights " of the

Only two instances of our

"' Brownie " is the pedagogue of old, of which girls the typical representative; others are climbing the

same stair-way, for Nell, Kate, and even the baby of the class, " Little Michie," are all learning to possess that charm of manner, that faculty of developing the ideas of the mind, so exemplified for us

Other effects of this by our own corps of teachers. Kate Terry term's work have been noticed also. is learning (?) that the books in the library are not for idle scanning of titles Miss Wilkey thinks life ;

too serious to amuse her classmates with her chromatic scale of giggling; Aliss Sara's " Rat " actually

physics class

have found that when, before the

august figure of the instructor in the science of geography, that they could not draw so simple a Lastly and best, a number of thing as the rainbow. our girls have found that although they thought they knew it all, that they had yet to learn where the sun rises, and, furthermore, that although there is a shadow of a chance that we may be numbered with the graduates of our school next February, yet we are now very far below the mark towards which

we

are struggling.

HiSTORIAX.


)

.

STATISTICS.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; CLASS OK FEBRUARY, KNOWN Anderson Carter Cliborne .

Lizzie Lily

.

Cunningham Douglass Greer Garnett

Hale. Hill

.

Hope Jones

.

.

.

.

.

"

.

.

Margaret.

.

.

Sallie.

.

.

.

.

Lelia.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Richardson

"

.

"Shining Light

.

Lola.

Taliaferro .

.

.

Brownie. Kate. .

.

.

.

Wootton Wright

Young Weisiger

.

.

'* .

.

.

Louise. " Lou."

.

Rose

.

"

++

.

.

Socrates.'

.

+

.

" Miss." " Dulie." Kate.

.

"

.

.... "Sub Rosa

+ Eighteen "

Eighteen "

"

+ +

(?)

.

.

.

....

Building air castles. Fringing ties

.

it.

Dancing mistress

Martin's Store

Drawing teacher

Amelia C. H.

Architect Seamstress English professor.

Farmville. Farmville. .

.

.

Candy maker

it.

"

.

.

"

"

" Oh, Lucy, you are goosey " " Who 's got to teach ? " " Oh my! " " Great day. " !

Admiring

" Jerusalem " " I know 'tis. " " For the land's

Drawing "

.

.

" Wherefore." " H-e-i-g-h-o! "

.

.

.

.

" Pusillanimous. " " Shoe strings. "

"Well!" " What I care? " " Do you want an annual ? (Without any. ) " Don't tell it. "

Actress the teachers

Raising a racket.

Spooning

!

.

Elocutiiig

"Consequently."

sake.

.

.

.

.

(?)

Quarreling Outlining Tarr. Studying Sight seeing Cycling Sleeping Peace-making.

.

.

.

Rushing about. Fixing her hair. Cycling Studying Looking for 51

hat.

(No

indications.)

Curdsville.

.

Primness.

.

Rocky Mount.

Patriotism.

Sandidges.

.

Good

Hampton.

Height.

New

.

Smooth hair. Burdened brain.

Store.

Pulaski Plain View .

.

Glendower.

.

Leader of Red Cross.

.

.

.

.

Her

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

ties.

Miller School, Farmville.

Winning ways

San Marino. Seven Mile Ford

Rats in her garret. Mountain walk.

Curiosity.

Politician Dancing mistress Torch bearer

Bedford Springs.

Inquisitiveness.

West Point. Morven.

Dignity.

Pedagogue

Mearsville. Orange C.

.

" Knows it all.'" Pronunciation.

.

.

H

Looking

Peddler Patent Medicine Mangohick.

.

looks.

Diminutive size( ?

.

.

Spinster

Walking

'

.

Gracefulness. Loyal to school duties Leader of fashion.

.

Wallaceton. Roanoke.

That walk. Her crowning glory. Innocent smiles.

.

.

arithmetic. Farmer's wife Schoolmarm Studying Fortune teller Dancing Reading about the war Electrician Temperance lecturer. Planning S(c)herer Sketching Teacher Laughing Writing poetry. Poet Professor of Mathematics Rhyming .

" What have you studied?

CHARACTERISTICS

POST-OFFICE

Working

Has none. ) " Don't know."

Trader

.

"

Studying Tarr.

Thinking Talking

(

"LouisianaLou

Verier Wilkie

.

" " Jemima. " " Isn't

!

"+ +

.

Thornton

Vaughan

.

.

.

1.

" Aristotle."

Tom."

"

I declare."

"Child!

.

.

Baby No.

.

?

Drawing

" Have mercy. " " You don't mean

2,

Scott

Terry

+

.

.

.

Baby No. Hattie.

.

.

.

Somers

"

.

.

Lougie.

did you say

" Gee whiz. "

" Kit." " Mauds." " Net." " Rube. Isabella.

.

.

"

.

.

.

What

" Let 's dance." " What 's your opinion? " John Brown. "

'

.

.

.

Preston

.

.

.

Powell

.

"

" I don't know. " " Let me see. "

.... Pemma "

.

.

Eighteen-|-

Sadie

.

Bead

.

.

Leache Leigh Merrick Michie Miller

....

Sallie. Ellen.

PROBABLE PROFESSION

FAVORITE PASTIME

FAVORITE EXPRESSION

AS

'99.

High

Smithville.

.

Lawyer

HudginsP.

O,

Missionary Lady of leisure. ... Professor of everything Desert traveler Minister's wife .... Novelist Debater

Roanoke. Farmville Lindsav.

collars.

Jewelry. " Late, late, so

late.''

Laziness. Philosopher.

Her Her

Farmville.

Toano.

wise.

Silence.

Music teacher

.

hair.

great size

Silcott Springs.

Rapidity (?)

Swansboro.

Her

.

.

(

?)

absentraindedness.


Class of June, '99.

ARMSTRONG, ELLEN CHERNAULT, HESSIE CROWNING, FLORENCE COLEMAN, ALICE COLEMAN, ETHEL DRIVER, FRANCES DAVIS, LOUISE

ELCAN, GRACE

FRANKE, FLORENCE

LOULA HASKINS, BENA

GILLS,

HATHAWAY, EFFIE HAWKINS, CELIA HENING, LILY JOHNS, MARTHx\ JONES, MATILDA LEWIS, DELL A MALONEY, JULIA MILLER,

MARTHA

MOFFET, MARY WILSON, MELITA


E here WELL, Junior B

we !

Bivb'8*e^e \Diew of tbc Junior B.

are now, classmates, in the

Who would

have thought when

we entered that we would ever reach the Many of highest class in the academic course ? called us started in the First B, which used to be in the the " E Class." When we were there and brag class, the First A, our teachers would about us and our dear president, Mr. Cunningham, " more sense than all of used to say that we had next

It is those stuck-up professionals put together." pleasant to recall such things, in view of our later

experiences.

were Just one short year ago how subdued we ^lany when we found ourselves in the Second B " new girls," and for some it was a first of us were With what experience of being away from home. pleasure do we remember the elegant preceptress in her as she came gracefully into the room, holding '

hand a little bag, out of which she took some cards How and told us to write our names on them. and careful we were to write them in the clearest memories prettiest hand possible With what loving !

The old saydreaded lesson ing about first impressions has proven true in this our ignocase, for we will never forget how kindly

do we

recall that first

!

And what of the rance and stupidity were treated. chem'stry, which was all so new to us ? Shall we ever cries of forget our wonderful experiments, and the â&#x20AC;˘

Fire

!

Fire

" !

when

a

lamp or two would be

overturned by the big sleeves of our aprons ? Such pleasures were not to last long, however, we learned for soon we were in the Second A. Here or not to use slang, not to make paragraphs of two three lines, and akvays to

in interesting papers.

Who

Ijy

does not

feel

hand overcome

a flood of tender

the and joyful recollections when she hears or sees


name, " Green's Short History of the English People ?" And who does not remember the problems in Gage? ]\[any of us, I am sure, walked up the stairs an extra time or two the day we were told to find the number of pounds of work we did in one day. Ah, those were happy times but they too, have passed and now we are Junior B.'s. There never was a Jimior B Class like ours. If you doubt it, just look at one of our number ready There she sits with sparkling eyes for a debate. !

watting for the audience to assemble.

When

she

rises to speak,

she stands with head thrown back,

hands swinging

in every direction, turns her

back to

her listeners, and, addressing a chart on the wall, Now and then pours forth a torrent of eloquence. a smile crosses her face, as though she thought, "Ah, for am not I am sure our side will be victorious,

/

on

it ?

when she

"

A

rather blank look crosses her face

finds that the other side wins,

as she realizes

it

may be friend, who

Later, she

with a

and as soon

she makes a dash for

the door.

seen walking about the grounds tells

her she debated beautifully,

Well, we ought to have won. may fail (as yet) to outdo Cicero or Demosthenes; we may translate " Heimat Herd," "the cricket herd," and " Halt das Maul," " hold the mule " we may reject accepted theories and declare that the sun moves around the earth we may not be at all clear about right isosceles triangles we may do, and have done, all these things but still we are known, and justly, too, as the " Brilliant Junior B.'s " and this time next year, girls, won't it be fine to be

and that her

side

;

;

;

Senior Professionals

!

HiSTORrAN.


Class of S^ebruar^, '00.

ASHMORE, LENORA, A' BOLAND, SAI.I,IE CARDWEI^Iv,

JUDKINS,

J

MARY

KINSEY, JEAN

CHILTON, JULIA CHILTON, LAURA CLARK, MARY

COTTON, EDNA CULPEPPER, ELIZABETH GOODE, MADGE GOODWIN, JOSEPHINE

HENDERSON, MARTHA HOLLAND, KELLOGG JONES,

MARTHA

KABLER, SUSAN

HELEN

LAW, ANNIE MALLORY, FANNIE NEAL, MARY OSBORNE, ALVERDA PINNER, ELIZABETH

ROWE, LENA SLOAN, MAY SPARKS, MARY, K J TYLER, JULIA, A' J

WATKINS, ELIZABETH


flDistor^ of the

As

the school 3-ear the

month

is

nearhig

of roses,

is

its

close,

almost here,

Class of jfebruar^, '00.

and June,

many

are

the hearts that beat happily over the expectation of the

members

summer

of the

vacation, but, especially the

Second B

Only those who

Class.

have travelled the long road know the many heart palpitations experienced during this time. The But ours is a happy-go-lucky old class. world doesn't know our troubles. It doesn't know we rack our brains in the midnight hours over science and song. Song ? Yes ours is the poets' Did you know it ? Poets are made in these class. days of advanced civilization, they are no longer born. We have Miss Silver-Tongue. She kissed Her phrases are as the Blarney Stone years as^o. sweet as the June gardens and as flower}', too. Then She excels Mr. W'entwe have ]Miss Know-All. worth in geometry, can work physics problems, easily overcome Caesar, master Horace and \ irgil, and write poetrv, too. If you want to know anything, go to her. She can tell you at least she thinks she can, and that amounts to the same thing.

We

—we

all

We

also have the honor of having among Get-There-Too-Late. \\'eak-minded ? )h, no she knows enough, but finds difSculty in articulating. But then there is ^liss Quick-Tongue who catches her idea and says it for her verv kind it 's just the same thing, you know until rest.

us

Miss

V

;

— —

June.

Taken

;

also have ^liss Put-Olif.

She can write can as for that matter but she is one of the birds who can sing Oh, you know the poetry

in

all

all,

ours

a striking-looking class

is

distingue as the French would sav. are so unique of her

an is

own.

Oh

!

I

I)

among

we

fear

it

we

good-bye

long

—and,

will

have

to leave you.

and we

ourselves in our next, and

and she dares is growing

as the time

—we ask you not to

to think of us often

we have

us, too, but this

a delicate subject with the writer

not dwell upon to say

members

forgot to mention that

artist (mirabile dictu

short,

Its

each has a pronounced characteristic

;

'11

tell

now

We

hate

forget us, but

you more about

— good-bve. W.


Class of June, '00.

BALDWIN, HELEN BALDWIN, ELIZABETH BATTEN, MARGARET

FLORENCE CARPER, ELIZABETH

BIRD,

CARTER, EFFIE CHEATHAM, LILLIAN

MARY VENABLE CRAFFORD, HELEN

COX,

DEBAUN, MARIA

MARY

ELIOTT,

FLOURNOY, MARTHA GAMBLE, ANITA GRAVELY, BETTY

HAM, NANNETTE

A'

J

HARRIS, ESSIE HARRIS, JULIA

HARRISON, BERTHA HENDERSON, ELIZABETH

HOLMAN, MARTHA HOOPER, EMMA HUGHES, MARY

JACOBS,

MARY STUART

JACKSON, JENNIE JONES, CAMPBELL KEISTER, LILLIAN

LEATH, MARTHA LESTER, LULA

MUNDY, NELLIE OWEN, HALLIE OWEN, PORTIA POLLARD, ANNIE REAMS, MYRTLE ROYALL, NANNIE SCHLEGEL, KATE SCOTT, LUCIA SMITH, FRANCES SPENCER, SALLIE TABB, SADIE TEMPLE, ESSIE

TURNER, SARAH K WADE, MARY WILLS,

J

KATHARINE

WILLIAMS, JEAN


1bi8tor^ of the Class of June, '00,

ago some one asked me if the Second B meant second best, or second

SE\'ERAL days " baddest."

could not

say

it

I,

out of respect for

meant the

latter;

but

my

class,

when

I

thought of the number that passed on English last month, my conscience would not allow me to say This brilliant class, when it was the second best. given a sentence by their English professor to diagram, plunged so deep into the mysterious waves of

syntax that only thirteen, out of forty-eight, rose and landed on the shore of pass-

to the surface,

mark. heard

chemists, the Second B.'s excel, but

it

school

I

have

explained by the fact that no other class in In the laboratory studying the subject.

is

exceedingly prudent and scream only when But they are violently opan explosion. posed to letting their stools remain in one place, ar-e

there

to the discomfort of the class in the

room

below.

have been very uneasy for some time about some of our class, myself, included. The shape and size of angles with lines, points, triangles, and figures of all kinds are mingled in our heads in such a way that I am afraid they will afifect our brains as well as our grades. I think it is not quite safe for me to say anyI

the minds of

thing concerning this class in music, but I will just mention that their music teacher always has a severe headache after giving them a lesson and they have sung fifteen pages this term. The Second B's have been drawing flowers this spring, which w'ere so natural, that observers wished ;

As

they

much

is

to pluck I

them from

class will

the page.

from present appearances, that this graduate with honors, and be the pride

think,

of the school.


Class of dfebruar^, 'Ot

ALLEN, LOUISE AMOS, MARY ARMISTEAD, JENNIE ARVIN, ETHEL BALTIMORE, VIRGINIA BAUGH, BIRDIE BIDGOOD, SADIE CHAPPELL, LOTTA CONDREY, BLANCHE CONDUFF, LENA COX, COURTNAY EDWARDS, ADDIE FITTS,

AGNES

GAINES,

ALMA

HOLMAN, JULIA HOLMAN, MARTHA HUNT, FANNY JORDAN, MARTHA KAYTON, MINNIE LITTLEPAGE, LAVINIA MOSS, CONNIE PRICE,

KATHARINE

SCOTT, SUSIE SMITH, LOUISE

SWANN, ANNIE STAPLES, LOTTIE STOKES, SALLIE

TAYLOR, MARTHA

GAINES, LILLIAN

GARROW, GEORGIA GAY, MAUD GRAY, BESSIE HAY, IRENE

HENLEY, IDA

HENSHAW, GRACE

TRADER, PEACHIE

WALKER, MARY WATSON, ELIZABETH WEBB, BOOTHE WILKERSON, MARY WILLIAMS, ROSA


1F3i8tor^ of the

1KNOW

that everybody will be

deeply

ested in the history of our class, as

mostly unsophisticated new

girls,

it

Class of Jebruar^,

inter-

contains

who make

As a member of remarkable blunders. this unfortunate band, I feel that I haven't the right to expose their ignorance, so shall only tell of a few instances in which some have displa3'ed remarkably vivid imaginations and unusual power in inventing

\\'hen such a thing as this occurs, though.

know

Our language classes are the most interesting and become extremely amusing when such an ex" I'un dragon et I'autre mosquipression as this taire " is rendered thus, "The one a dragon, the

other a mosquito." rendition

is

— thinks,

preferable to

all

however, that such a others.

I

one must give us the credit of having very brilliant girls among- our number. that every

rather

expressions.

'01.

Ibistore Gla8s=1Room.

Miss ]\I "When the had taken their " enemies prisoners, with what were they w'hipped ? Miss "With stripes and lizards (scorpions)." When another girl, using a very original comparison in speaking of the vowels and consonants, told the legislators that consonants were the backbone of the word, we almost despaired. But the thing that gives us most hope is that " the beauty of our class is unsurpassed." At least, one would suppose so, to see the way in which all the Faculty smile on her the drawing teacher, especially.

:

:


Class of June,

ANDERTON, ELIZABETH BOISSEAU, EVELYN BRITTINGHAM, LENA CHITWOOD, JAVIE CURTIS,

NANCY

FOSTER, IDA FOSTER, MAUD GRAVELY, SALLIE HILLMAN, SALLIE IRVINE, ELIZA JOHNSON, IDA JONES, ISABEL KING, DICEY KING, LULA

'01.

KITCHEN, VIRGINIA KYLE, LILA LESTER, LOULA LEWIS, ADELE OSBORNE, ESSIE PERRY, ALICE PULLER, LULA PURCELL, MARGARET

SAUNDERSON, MARY SMITH, CALLIE WHITFIELD, ELMA WILLEROY, MARY-GROVE

WYNNE, EFFIE


Ibistor^ of the Class of June, '01.

\

V/HEN we entered YY Some of us are

the

First

teachers,

B

Class,

we

and we came

thought we should have a very easy time, merelv to review the work we had been over many times before, but, alas, for us We who had thought ourselves capable of teaching, found that our own ideas needed to be taught to shoot, and since then we have been trying, trying, trying; sometimes hitting the mark, oftener missing it, and, consequently, getting " sat upon," but up we get, and try again, and we at least deserve some credit for our It would not perseverance, if not our success. greatly interest the reader to have our personal appearance described. All he need do, is to imagine a number of all sizes, with hair of all shades, and eyes of all colors known in the human body, and he !

would not need ther.

Our

to stretch his imagination

class

is

any

the smallest in school in

fur-

num-

what we lack

it is to be hoped our work, and we have never yet failed to get one hundred per cent, on our lessons, unless they failed to be perfect, and that ought never to be, as our brains are abnormally

bers, but

in quantity,

we make up

in the quality of

large (even

if

we

don't look like

it).

Besides

we

study every night until the lights go out, and study so hard after that

we

we

get up at the early hour of 7:15,

got in the habit of

coming down

late to

and our matron had to inform us that the dining-room door would be closed at 7 130, and now We don't it takes all our time to fix our neckties. even have time to talk to young men, which is very hard on us, who in days past have made a specialty of that business. All, all the memories of the past and hopes of the future, must be put aside for lessons we thought we knew all about five years ago. Taken as a whole, and individuallv, we consider

breakfast,


To illusour class second to none in the school. trate our brightness one of our number said, in the geography class, that Virginia was named for the Virgin Mary, and that Annapolis got its name If any of our own from being the land of apples. pupils should give us so brilliant an answer, we should feel uneasy lest his precocity bring him to :

an early grave. lights,

when

in the

One

of our

particularly

bright

English class gave this striking

and unusual sentence,

"

talked in his sleep."

We

The

large,

handsome man

hope no one

will

con-

clude, after hearing these examples, that these are

the only prodigies in the class. legion.

Their name

is


/?

A

N

U

f?

T

H

C

y

A

'

I?

O

U

J

/V

A


John

K Cunningbaiti, I$45ÂŤ1W.


Zbc

IFlormal IRecorb. 36oar£) of

NELLY PRESTON,

EMtors.

Editor-in-Chief,

JULIA VAUGHAN,

JULIA TYLER,

Assistant Editors.

BROWNIE TALIAFERRO, KATHLEEN

RILEY, Business Manager.


SCIENCE HALL.


Xove, a

THE

following information of incalculable value

to

all

has been obtained at great cost from

Margaret It should be carefully engraved on the Hayesland. memorv or pickled and put away in the cellar for use during the coming summer. Arms will be worn around the waist, fitting well-known

the

neatlv.

The

effect

is

authority, Mrs.

particularly pleasing in the

dark.

Kisses will be

The

worn on

face should not be

the lips, as usual.

worn

at all,

but should

appear without any evidence of care. Blushes will range from pink to red. Sheep's eyes will be worn in

Hugs

will

of sleighing.

all

colors.

be popular during the continuance In warmer weather the mere hand-

size of a girl's

the sighs of the ardent wooer's heart, as usual.

Engagement tne giver

away

bank account

will regulate

is

rings should be

worn only when

present. Otherwise they might frighten

a better chance.

Brides will be given away by their fathers, as They should be well as other declasse relatives.

however, not to give themselves away. will be shorter than last season, but with fewer ruffles (of the temper). Both will Smiles will be both liquid and solid. careful,

Honeymoons

often be frigid.

Breach

of

promise

suits will

be cut out of whole

cloth.

Divorce

suits

should be tried before thev

arc-

decided upon. ^A'ooers should press their suits

occasion.

clasp should be worn.

The

la fIDobe.

upon

a fitting


(B^mnastfcs anb Htbletics.


President,

SALLIE PRITCHETT.

Secretary and Treasurer,

MAUD

JONES.

flDembers.

Edna Moffett. Laura Chilton.

Margaret Batten. Helen Jones.

Mattie Henderson.

Julia Chilton.

Grace Elcan. Gertrude Thomson.

Lucy Wright.

Bessie Carper.

Elizabeth Watkins.

Bessie Henderson.

Julia Harris.

Isabelle Merrick. Julia Tyler,

A" J.

Katherine Moffet.


TENNIS CLUB.


>!#

'

^&>SL^i^

X

::~JU

Bicycle Club.

Šfficers.

GERTRUDE THOMPSON MAMIE FOWLKES MARGARET BOTTEN

.

.

.

.

.

President

Vice-President

Sec'y and Treasurer

flDcmber6. Lucy E. Wright. Lucy D. Thornton. Margaret Botten. Sara Turner. Ida Henley. Mattie Henderson.

Fannie Smith. Katherine MofFet. Lotta Chappell.

Lola Somers. Bessie Anderton.

Bessie Birdsoll.

Mamie Fowlkes.


BICYCLE CLUB.


^£^^^~' JIUE^^E^SS^^:;^,.i"^iih^:>'''

German

Club.

KITTY HOPE, MATILDA JONES,

President. Vice-President.

.

JULIA VAUGHAN,

A"

Secretary AND Treasurer.

J

fIDembers.

EVELYN BOISSEAU.

MADGE GOODE.

SUE BOYD.

EMMA

MARY

LOTTIE CHAPPELL.

JULIA HARRIS. EFFIE HATHAWAY.

MATILDA JONES. JEAN KINSEY. ADELE LEWIS. JULIA MALLONEY.

FLORA CHOWNING. MAMIE FOWLKES.

MATTIE HENDERSON KITTY HOPE.

NELLIE PRESTON.

BOYD.

GREER,

A' J.

ELSIE PIERCE.

LUCIA SCOTT. ESSIE TEMPLE.

LUCY THORNTON. JUTA VAUGHAN. MELITA WILSON.


HB""

.^HIS^^H HHI^MR ^fl^^^^^^^H^^^^^S ^Hil .^^^^^^^bM^^^RIHH^HH^^^^^^H ^BKeXTf'

:i

L^^BH|^^^^

Mx^^ifB^B^^^MJSff^?

J

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^f 9 J^^^^^v^^^Hk

'

-^

if^ii

^^H ^^^J^ .^^^P^^^^^^vJI^^^jH

^rJ K^^^lkiM4^H^'^^^^'-'--^'^^^^^BI ^I^^^^^C^

^HB-

-

'.

jB^W^^^^^B

N*L«^

s ^^^^^^^^^^B ^^pS^;-^^^HH

B-^B9B9R9K9RefHffllB^aSHHliHIHHHBi^H GERMAN CLUB.

'-'--

11

JJ^K"

^^^^^^^1 ,'


'

Ube

ni>^8tic Xlbvee.

EstabliBbcO jfebruars I3tb, IS97.

Colors

:

Meeting held

Black,

3,

13,

Red and Yellow. 23 of every month.

Great High Jingeree of the Needle

R. C. ScoTT.

Appointed Prophetess to Mystic Three

R. C. Williams.

Most Exalted Keeper

N.

of Records

' '

Remember

the third

'

j-ear.

C.

Preston.


Hlpba dbapter Organized in

this,

of Ikappa Belta Sorority. Normal School

the State

October

of Farmville, Virginia,

23, 1S97.

Motto — " Aegbroylc Othrum Tryne." Colors

— Olive Green and Silver Gray.

fIDembers.

LENORA ASHMORE.

(

Now

JULIA

at R.

M.

W.

C.

)

GARDNER TYLER. MARY SOMERVILLE SPARKS.

EMMA EUNICE McDowell spiers. JULIA

(ClassFeb.

GREER.

'9S.)

WHEDBEE VAUGHAN. KATHLEEN MAUDE RILEY. NANNETTE HAM. SARAH TURNER. 82


ALPHA CHAPTER OF KAPPA DELTA SORORITY


Colors

:

Violet Purple and

Motto

;

fharo;

"o.yj!

Moss Green. Ki/vazipj.

flDembers.

LELIA AGNES SCOTT. SAELIE JACKSON MICHIE.

MARGARET LEE BATTEN. MARTHA TRENT FEATHERSTON.

ELIZABETH EGERTON WATKINS. MYRIE LOUISE DAVIS.

ISABEL NOYES MERRICK.

LUCY ELIZABETH WRIGHT.

lbonorar\5 nocmbers.

GARRETT

G.

GOOCH.

ROBERT

L.

MILLER.

H. W. COLE.


Xlbe Sea*8ibe Club.

Colors

:

Sea-green and Lobster red.

"Sink or swim, live or die." Motto Hope for the Wright. Our Guide Provisions; Ham, "Pig," "Bats" and Gambohng. Favorite Amusement :

:

Crawfish.

;

KITTY HOPE ELIZABETH WATKINS

Captain, First Mate,

Second Mate,

MARGARET BATTEN

Pilot,

JULIA TYLER

Cook,

.

ANITA GAMBLE

.

fIDcmbers.

ETHEL COLEMAN. CAMMIE JONES. JULIA TYLER A" J GERTRUDE THOMSON.

ALICE COLEMAN. HELEN CRAFFORD.

MARGARET BATTEN

("Bat")

RUBY LEIGH. ANITA GAMBLE. SARAH TURNER

IDA HENLEY. ("Pig'

NANNETTE HAM KITTY HOPE.

A'

)

J

K

J

ELIZABETH WATKINS. LUCY WRIGHT. ELLEN RICHARDSON.


Pass

W

Sclecte nnjoonsbiners of

13'

Word

:

(Dead

Colors

Secret).

速l^ 2)onunton.

:

Stone Blue and Iron Gray.

(From Ihemouiilaius near which we

Flower Corn Flower and Apple Blossoms Motto Fest und Treu.

live).

:

Favorite Drink The Thing. Chief Imbiber, (of knowledge Mary Sparks. :

:

Chief Distiller

(of wit)

:

Elsie Pierce.

Keeper of the Secret

)

:

Helen Jones.

fIDoonsbiners. Sallie Jaybird Michie. Nelly Coming Preston.

Matilda Mooer Jones. Helen Moping Jones. Elsie

Rockaway

Pierce.

Emma 'Tater Greer,

A"

-/.

Julia Would-be Vaughan, A' J. Mary Summergirl Sparks, A J.

Central Parke Whitehead. Emma Carbuncle Payne. K.iTHARiNE Spotter Moffet. Mary Stewed-up Moffet. Ellen Bag o' Bones Armstrong.


Organized

—September 15th,

Whereabouts —Unknown. — White Duck and Turke3' Red. Motto —Eat, Drink and be Merry. Favorite Dish — Olives.

Expenses

1897.

—Unlimited.

Colors

HDcmbcrs. Gertrude Thomson, Honorable Minister of Exchequer. Lottie McKinney, Chief Cook and Bottle Washer. Pattie Featherston, Assistant Cook and Bottle Washer. Kathleen Riley, A J, High Lord Extractor of Corks. .

.

Mary Roberts Elsie Pierce,

Emma

.

.

Pa^-ne,

Katherine MoiTet,

The Divider of

Mar}' Jackson,

The Peacemaker. The Embalmer of the Dead. The Fowler. Waiter. Spoils.

1bonorar\> nDenibers. Parke Whitehead,

Legal Adviser.


EFFIE HATHAWAY.

President, Vice-President, Secretary,

Treasurer, Chef,

FLORENCE CHOWNING. LENA MIDDLETON. LENA BRITTINGHAM.

.

ELSIE PIERCE. flDentbers.

EFFIE HATHAWAY.

ELSIE PIERCE.

FLORENCE CHOWNING. LENA BRITTINGHAM. 1bonorar\) flDeinbers.

EMMA Note:

This was drawn hv

il-self.

PAYNE.

ADELE LEWIS.

LENA MIDDLETON.


ffcrmcO 1S9S of GaDcts from Stonewall Jacftson llnstitutc, HbinciCion, Ua.

Stonewall Brioabe. Colors

:

Graj- and Brass.

IRoIl. In Faculty,

GENERAL WALTON.

Subor&inate Šfficers.

MAJOR WHITEHEAD.

We

're

not so many,

And we But we

will

we

're

not so large

are only three,

never condescend

To things of low degree. So we 're officers every one of Hurrah

for Liberty

!

us.

CAPTAIN PRESTON.


Zbc !5ouno Momen'8

5INCE

May

been going on organized work in our school, for the glory of our Lord, and the good of our girls. Its influence and its scope of work have gradually increased. At first it consisted mainly of 1896, there has

this great

of bi-weekly, formal it

has under

its

meetings

in

our chapel.

weekly prayer-meeting, and eighteen Biljle It has also classes of about seven girls each. started a library, and connected with it a readingroom of its own, in which are to be found many of the religious periodicals and association pamphlets. Through its every member, as well as its commitit is

exerting a marked influence over the stu-

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

dents old and new, and it is a good work that goes on, the meetings fuller the prayer-meetings more

whole-souled gatherings, and the members themselves,

show ever increasing

Among

especial line of study, there are

sonal Workers.

interest.

the Bible classes, each of which has

its

It is their

two

classes of Per-

object to prepare them-

selves for personal Christian

work among

their fel-

low-students, by a series of Bible studies, relating, principally, to Christ as a Personal

Now

control not only these meetings, but

also the

tees,

Christian Hssociation.

to

Worker.

The custom of the Association has always been give some form of social to the incoming new

girls.

Unfortunately, the Association was unable

They made the best of them this year. wavs for Association members to meet the new girls and should most assuredly be continued. The Association officers were elected in Janto give

new committees appointed It and put to work, and the classes re-organized. is our hope and plan to send one or more representatives to Asheville this vear, to the convention, and we are looking forward with much interest to the work they will be able to suggest, and aid in, for the narv, to serve a year; the

coming

vear.


of

©fficers

the K.

M,

C.

H. LUCY WRIGHT. GRACE ELCAN. NELLY PRESTON.

President,

Vice-President

Secretary Treasurer,

LELIA SCOTT.

Xcabers of tbe Bible Classes. Mary

Grace Elcan.

EuzABETH Wiekie.

Louise Otley. Jean Kinsey. Sadie Douglass. Lallie Darden.

Martha

Lucy Thornton. Ellen Richardson. Alice Whitaker.

Boyd.

Ellen Cunningham.

Anna Daniel. Delia Scott.

Mary Sparks. Lily Carter, Personal Worker's Classes.

Gertrude Thompson.

Judkins.

Committees. Finance Delia Scott, Ducia Scott, F. Brandis. Bible Study Miss Rice, G. Elcan, M. Boj'd, E. Armstrong. Membership Miss Dittleton, H. Crafford, R. Deigh. :

:

:

Religious Meeting Mrs. Morrison, M. Jones, D. Cox. J. Vaughan, Miss Harvie. Missionary Meetings Miss CouUing, M. Goode, K. Mclnto.sh, M. Roberts. :

:

92


:

H

Xovel^ Xass.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

and some are foolish women, mean. JMiss Trechvay was wise. She sat looking into the grate, where a bright fire glowed, though it was late in the spring, wdiile on

re wise I

the

hearth

lay

a

pile

l)urning and filling the

of

letters,

room with

She had odor of smoke. been trying to write a note to a colsge man, a friend of hers, and des-

the

pairing of success, had set the

numerous sheets

of

represented her failures.

fire

to

paper that

Now

she

hovered over them with something very like satisfaction in her face. Among the cleverest things that people do is sometimes to destroy the letters they write. Just at this time, however, the necessity for writing seemed urgent, since Miss Tredwav

was obliged

handsome

to return a

pin,

which could

not be sent through the mail without a note. had all come about in this way

The haze

It

on wood and field was very who looked out of her window

that rested

beautiful, but the girl

wished for clearer sunshine. gloves, then sat

down

to

read,

She drew on her though her eyes

Let a young woman with a glowing face weigh a mirror against a book, and The green and yelthere is no doubt of the result. low lights outside in the May foliage streamed into the room, wavering and trembling, as the breeze Sounds from the town below disturbed the trees. There blended with sulidued household noises. was motion everywhere, though this was lazy \'irginia, where we eat the lotus half the year, and for the indigestion, therefrom, complain of Life and motion everywhere, tut most remainder. turned often away.


?

now and then towards its image in the corner. \Mien the door opened and a servant came in to say, " He 's waiting," the book fell softly to the floor and I\fiss Tredway looked out once more at the of

all in

the figure swaying

reflected

haze.

\\'ith

a long springing step, she crossed

the room, Imt paused at the head of the stairway

and peeped over at the yotmg man in the doorway. Hearing the rustle of her dress, he glanced up, and both laughed. The servant laughed behind her apron. It is easy to laugh when one is Did you ? Were vou ever

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A

them

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

number

of other

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

.

young people waited

for

and all walked off toThe servant was still laughing behind her

at the foot of the hill,

gether.

apron when she climbed to the top of the fence to catch the last glimpse of the party, as they turned into the Hampden-Sidney road. This thoroughfare was in good condition, which means that all the holes in it had bottoms so firm that vehicles bounced A mile out of them with gratifying promptness. or more out of town the pedestrians turned to the into a lane bordered by rich clover fields, and shaded for long stretches by overhanging boughs. The small party of two behind the others talked in left

They lingered near a snatches of many things. patch of eglantine for a while, then walked on past


a dignified

country residence, by numerous cabins

As they turned towards home, Miss Trcdway caught a handful of blossoms that dared her from a bank, and fastened them to her dress, accepting for the purpose the stout pin offered by the young man at her side. They were in front, and the rest of the party not in sight. So far as they were concerned, the world consisted of a dogwood hedge and a tobacco-field they were the only inhabitants, and Their actheir occupation was to gather flowers. ;

quaintance had beg'un in December, six months be-

and had progressed naturally and inevitably. For some time, he had been conscious that when she came into a room, her presence put him into new relations with all else. Now, she was near, and, as he believed, full}' aware that he had forgotten everything except herself. At first, he talked about blooming idiots, meaning seminary students, about the profession he intended to enter, and about the western sky. She had agreed or disagreed with fore,

animation, until he turned the talk into

dififerent

For an hour she scarcely spoke, but she smiled, whereupon he declared that the haze was dispelled from the hillsides. When they stopped at the oak gate near her home, nothing definite had been said, yet both felt channels.

had been an event and not merely

that the afternoon

a division of time.

and farm-houses.

The next morning she

noticed

that

the pin

which still confined the flowers to her dress, was heavy and handsome, so she put it away carefully, though without any well-defined thought of returning it to the owner. But when a week passed without the usual exchange of notes, the pin began to gain in importance and interest, and soon became Finally, the most valued thing in her possession. her days were spent in alternations of feeling. First, she would be angry with him, then disappointed with herself for not being certain that he had written to her. At the end of a month she reasoned: I

nuist return the pin.

How

shall

I

write

?

If I


!

sav nothing,

it

look like a rebuke.

will

I

must not I do

Mr.

Allen.

offend his fine sense of propriet)', even though

not understand his present the note looks

tactics.

I

'11

see

how

Thursday. Dear Mr.

by

me

M.\RV Tredway. There

fear.

I

's

an undertone of resentment in that, Your sinit and sign myself

rewrite

'11

cere friend.'

'

"

Dear

Will.

For three weeks I 've been wondering what to do with the pin you lent me the day we took a walk together. Not knowing what to do, I have done

Horrors

!

that

sincere friend

which

'

nothing.

seems to be and visits

have

it

"

note

Mr.

My Dear Mr. Allen.

opinion of me.

That

Mary "

To what

Three notes.

Tr.

depths of punning have I fallen All equally out of the question."

serious matter, after till

I

see you.

all,

we

'

will

never do.

I

T.

Indeed the whole

return bv to-day's mail the pin you lent

weeks ago.

several "

Mr.

'

so

Yours,

absurd."

is

weeks

Yours,

it

Allen. I

For two or three weeks I have been intending I fear you have a poor send your pin.

keep

M.

his notes

now."

It isn't a

shall

I

stopped."

to

Sincerely yours,

Worse and worse."

"

think '

a reminder of the point at ' I

it

Yours.

sooner.

"

for

this mail.

Mary.

hope vou have not needed the pin of yours Pardon me for not returning it which I send.

"

your beautiful scarf pin was You should have I send it the day I saw you last.

fault that

Allen,

I

I

your

It is

not returned to you promptly.

asked

:

That '

is

is

perfect.

me

Sincerely yours,

No â&#x20AC;&#x201D; abrupt, and

the 'several

another objection."

Allen.

The

pin that you will receive by to-day's mail The fact that ought to have been sent long ago.


we have

house must be

visitors in the

my

for not attending to the matter sooner.

been

in a whirl of

ate anything of the kind. " That will let him

this Cjuiet

And

On

is

town can origin-

Your friend, know that I am

pendent upon him for society. it

have

excitement and gayety. thougli

you may not believe that

ever, the drift of

excuse I

On

not de-

reflection,

how-

too plain."

so the notes lay smoking- under the grate. the following

late leaving the

house

Sunday Miss Tredway was for

church

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so

late that the

other

members

and the

streets

had gone long before, were deserted. She fastened her

of the family

hat as carefully as

if

she cared

who

should see her

and went down the hill v^'ith a face as serene as if her heart had been at ease. As she turned a shaded corner, she suddenly found herself shaking hands with Will Allen. He flushed warmly and was about to pass on when he caught an expression in

it.

that passed .swiftly over her face. "

Why

didn't

you answer

my

letter

?

"

he said.


Xibvar^ IRulcs. I.

Never

stop

talking

till

the librarian has

II.

III.

Avoid payingXever return

all

a

book

till

sent

isters for

IX".

Educational journals are never allowed to

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

remain in order by Juniors. V. Never leave the library the

windows \'l.

don't use

the door

when

consulting the Century Dictionary,

more than

mav

talk aloud in the

On cold days, don't camp on the regmore than three consecutive periods.

ten volumes at a time.

When

studying for a debate, hunt up

the references for the opposite side and hide till

lay

are open.

When

but teachers

\ III.

fines.

reference

for. I\'.

None

\''II.

library.

rapped six times.

all

them

after the debate.

X.

When

a class of thirty are referred to

two

books, get out one of the books and ask your room-

mate to get out the

other.


The Second A Literature is Miss Mary Frederica

which

Class, the teacher of

Stone, will hereafter

rank in the school as a dramatic club. their first

bow

pleasing masque, " Pandora."

Assembly

the

They made

before the public this year, in the It

was presented

in

composed

of

Hall, before an audience

the school-girls. Faculty and domestic department, all

of

whom

were highly entertained.

be Furies, wise men, cast,

" evils "

but a careful selection of

resulted in

its

There had

and beauties

members

successful representation

of the class !

We

hope

that the Dramatic Club will be as long-lived as first

appearance

in public

was

to

in the

successful.

Eds.

its


Sibe XTalks

Mith Bo^s.

BY UNCLE JACK.

UNCLE JACK

DAVIE. — Yes, especially

if

think the best time to send a

I

Normal

little

her seat

I

flowers

girl

is

far

is

dinner time,

She likes

from the door.

to have the servant walk the entire length of the dining-room with the girls wondering where she is going, and then have them transfer their attention and gaze to her, and wonder who sent the flowers, and make a hundred speculations on the subject.

Hessie C. Some little girls, when some little boys don't come to see them, and do come to see some other little girls, like to take it out on the little boys. So Hessie, I shouldn't (if I were you) leave

anj'

of

nu'

in.stance, in the hall little

girl.

I

property,

personal

when

I

hats

for

went

to see the other

.see

inanimate things

don't like to

mutilated and suffering.

Harry exactly

the

Silly

Clod.

circumstances

I

in

don't

which

understand you were

placed,

my

boy, but as nearly as

they are in this wise.

ment, or rather

I

You went

can understand, to

an entertain-

should say, a party, to which some little girls come down, but

I

their

mamma

some

of the ^•ery little girls .she told to staj' up-

.stairs,

and

let

parth- because they were

parti}'

young and

because the}' were very

little

bashful,

and didn't

behave in company. And when those overcame their bashfulness and came partly down the stair-case to peep at the party you went out and just told them how things were going on. I think I have it right, haven't I ? If this is the case my bo}', your act, instead of being blameworthy, was praiseworthy. Always, my boy, be kindly and see that the neglected and bashful and retiring little ones are entertained as

know how little

to

girls parth'

far as their

shyness permits.


c^^

A^^ ^-^-^U^t^ 7>/^_^,^ ^-7,

/

.^^-.::.St^

e,-^.

/ ^^—

Z^^C^

fp 'i^

'


Cupi& Smiling, Across the clover-field one day, I chanced to see a

Her

maiden

stray,

They sat them down beneath a tree, As happy as two souls could be

lover followed soon, to say

Sweet

thine'S as

is

a lover's way.

;

And many

things were said, I fear, That Cupid was not meant to hear; But Cupid stayed and never feared, For he had led them there.

vsp

Cupi& "Disconeolate. When

next I chanced to pass that way,

Poor Cupid's plans had gone astray, And things which lovers should not Darkened the sun on that sweet day.

say,

Alas, alack, behind the tree,

Cupid, as scared as he could be.

Trembled and dropped his bow through fear Of what he now was forced to hear And cringed and trembled, wept and feared, For he had led them there. ;


1Rb\)iiics.

This

is

the lady that

Enjoj's dissecting a cat, I

think

She

'd

if

Each day from

only she were able

A

put us on the 'secting table.

off

a great high

sun-bonnet comes

down

hill,

to school,

To cheer us on our tedious way, And in the practice- school to rule.

/I

This

is

the teacher of history.

With note-book

in

hand

as

you

will see,

Now Who

here 's

's

the teacher, (profess 'nal math.)

proud of the pedigree

.she

Reading of pages neatly ruled.

Last year to college she did go.

All she learned at Vassar-school.

And

hath,

there I 'm told she caught a beau.


This dear

With

ladj- large

and

fair,

the whitest of white hair,

Doses the

Upon

girls,

whatever their

This

ills,

lady dark and small,

little

Is the greatest of

large assafoetida pills.

them

all

For, to boss the girls she

And oh

!

the teacher of singing

With her she

A

Friend

And

thus

!

it

A

And

to

;

able

's

keep them from the

table.

!

always bringing

is

Friend

will

!

!

be until

A

Friend

!

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the end.

^^^^^-iru^^/

See the drawing teacher stand,

There

And

Who

forgetting

work on hand,

Into the library she will go

Crying out, "

Girls, don't talk

so.'

a lady named Rice, exceedingly nice

is is

;

But with Virgil and Csesar 'T is hard to please her.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

In the facult)' there

Who

teaches

's

Enghsh

And

in her classes

How

very retiring

a Stone,

Here the mighty Seniors

all alone,

Practice-school books

you can see girls

can

They

be.

try to

make

That before them

all

thej'

T

is

Who And

writes as pretty as pretty can be,

They

I

are the ones

who

are neat.

who always

beat.

'11

"

the baby of the faculty,

those of her pupils

hand

;

should kneel.

Little Nell.

^>..JSU_

/\y^X

'

This

in

others feel

'

Tf/

stand,

now

The

write on

As

'

Ignorance " she said, is my bent," '

writing

other maiden tossed her head " Sure 3'ou are competent."

M.

:

S. J.


Ubrouoh the Xookino

Emma

Payne and "

Kitty Hope.

Lallie Darden Be bold;, 1«; Ijolde and everywhere Be Bolde." Newell Hughes. " Scared out of her seven

Elsie Pierce.

amorous and fond and Like Pliilip and Mary on a

Ptill

The

"

billing, sliilling."

stone that

rolHng can

is

Who

"

says in verse what others

say in prose."

— Smith.

"

Above any Greek

or

Roman

— "I never knew so young body SalHe head." with so old — Imparadised Tyler. Sarah Turner and a

Julia

Margaret Batten.

"

as out of the fashion."

Irene

— Hay.

"

Faith, thou

hast

As good be out

Sue Boyd.

Anna

some in

of the

world

"

The

wilt lere. Is to restreine,

"

of

nations

!

She coude songes make

Daniel.

vertue, sone, if thou and kepen wel thy tonge."

firste

Fain would

"

fall."

crotchets in thv head now."

Xiolje

mal-

" !

Isabelle Merrick.

"

one another's arms."

art the ^lars of

and well endite."

a

;\fichie.

Greer.

"

there she stands

name."

Emma

— — Thou Margaret Hale. content." — The Sadie Douglass.

senses."

"

— Mary Jacobs.

in

'

gather no moss."

Fanny

(3la88-

"

High

I

climb, yet fear I to

erected thought seated

the heart of courtesy." Lillian Co.x.

lower."

"

Let

me

take you a button-hole


— ——

Bertha Harrison. death."

Peachy Trader.

——

"

I

would

Brownie

a dry

die

fain

A

"

dumb

kind of excellent

" ilee]< and

make

— Trader.

us lose the

Our doubts are traitors, and good we oft might win, by fearing

to attempt."

Nelly iMundy.

She hath never

"

Ida Greever.

"

A

Katherine

Daniel come to judgment

Alberta Osborne.

"

The

fair,

the chaste, an

Emma

soul."

Mattie Amos. best 's

none

Lelia

like pretty Sally."

If to her share some female error

Louise Otley.

A

''

them

all."

mighty hunter, and her

prey was man." Mattie Henderson. '

Lucv

O

— Wright.

Rupert of debate."

!

"

"

"

The

"

A

star of the

harmless,

And

uncon-

necessary

the vile squeaking of

Elliott.

life."

Daisy Read.

"

"

Men

My

"

The worm

"

I

The

am

still

few words are the

of

life

of conscience

is

one dem'd horrid

sure care's an

enemy

to

trick of singularity."

Eunice Spiers. "

hed hed delicious bed That heaven upon earth to the weary head !

Scott.

Mayme

fall,

Lool^ on her face, and you will forget

"

grind."

Ellen Richardson. ''

men."

the girls Ihat are so smart,

all

is

fife."

Bland.

begnaw thy

Sallie Spencer.

There

secret of success

!

the wr3--necked

— Moffet.

unexpressive she."

Of

The

pure and holy, the 'blessed three.' "

Kat."

" !

Corrie Broadwater.

"

"

lowlj',

among

Florence Brandis. quered will."

the

fed of

dainties that are Ijred in a book."

Yea, a Daniel

(Ihief

"'

Pat Featherston.

discourse."

Kate

Taliaferro.

constancy to ptirpose."

Frank, haughty, rash

A

Within the

!

"

limits of

becoming mirth,

I never spent an hour's talk withal."

!

— the

merrier girl

Rubv Cnthcrell. — satisfied."

"

He

is

well paid that

is

well


Elizabeth Wilkey.

satisfied with himself is

others as

little

A man who is always well

tranquil

seldom so with others, and

below."

"

pleased with him."

—" Cutting — an Lucy Thornton.

Nellie Preston.

" It is

Vena

irresistible conflict

to

Mary Sparks. " They might as well attempt to lock up the winds, or chain the fury of the waves of

beauty

Rhea

Scott.

"

She moves

looks a queen."

Lena Rowe and Lula long and short

— Lester.

Maynie Fowlkes.

"

"

This

Nature was here so

True dignity

"

Solomon

in all his glory

"

As prone

to mischief, as able

goodness heightens

"

How

"

"

'

Weisiger.

T

is

the last rose of

summer,

Left blooming alone.'' is

the

Annie Hawes Cunningham.

is

hers

to

make

"

The

daintiest

the end most sweet."

lav-

her store that she bestowed until she had no

more."

one of these."

!

Mary Rosa

and she

last,

"

like

Bernice Pollard.

of it."

— Elizabeth Watkins.

ish of

a god<less

Littlepage.

Jean Kinsey. perform it."

between opposing and enduring forces."

the ocean,"

virtue has raised above the things

mind

was not arrayed

like a scythe."

whose

Conclusion. " Be kind to our remains and, Oh, defend, Against your judgment your departed friends."


,_JSAju4i_»>~


OLLEGE PRINTING AND ENGRAVING.

/Lyi^

L J= ¥E

Fancy Dress Goods, Notions of Every Description, Boots, Shoes,

We

have every

up College ments,

facility

Invitations,

Society

forgetting

Announce-

Programs,

and Visiting Cards

in

the

printing

of

School

and

Misses'

Caps.

Shoes Made

Ladies'

and

to Order.

etc.,

very

latest styles.

The

Hats,

»wiy

mmk

Cata-

logues has been our specialty for several years,

and we would be

8 ra

pleased to have inquiries for esti-

mates and specimens.

'^IMB^

MilDI. Dealers

in

Staple and Fancy Gro-

ceries, Provisions, Mill

WHITTET & SHEPPERSON,

and Oats. Flour.

Publishers and Engravers,

RICHMOND, VA.

FMi^DLO

Agents

Feed, Corn

for

Ballard's


;

Sg'Sg^glg^ig'SSWSSWSSiS^S^S'^elg^fSigliS

for Artistic iUork €,M

BARROW.

H. E.

on

DEALER t)

i %

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA. Old

Pictures Copied in

Carbon

g

Style and Size.

Ice,

Beef, Pork,

Mutton, Lamb, Shoat

and Sausage.

Pictures a Specialty.

Pictures in this Bool<

ri!

Any

Fresh Meats and

JN

Made by Hunt.

m^

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GO TO

.

.

.

JACKSON'S

\

DOYNE,

UNDERTAKER

and

Furniture Dealer 3

FOR CONFECTIONERIES, STATIONERY,

T

\i

SCHOOL SUPPLIES,

ALL

C

S

OF THE LATEST DRINKS CAN BE HAD

/

R

AT MY FOUNTAIN.

\

\

Main Street,

-

-

CIGARS, ETC.

FARMVILLE, VA.

\

Wall Paper,

Window

Shades,

Pianos and Organs, School Furniture, Mattresses,

FARMVILLE,

Upholstering and

VA.

Repairing.


.

Founded by

State

Female

.

teachers for tion

Normal School

tlie

the Legislature to educate

public schools.

Free

tui-

provided by the State for tioo hundred

young women.

among

Scholarships apportioned

the counties

and

cities.

Liberal courses in LangJiage, Litera-

and

Art.

Profes-

Graded Practice School

in ivhich

ture, History, Sciences

sional course for teachers,

A

students receive a year s training before

going out

to teach.

Next session

begins September tiventy-

first.

Farmville, Virginia.

Catalogues sent on application.


"

'

Irade

ark" appear:

umber

of '9S School

Rollins Institute, Hollius, Va. Hollins Institute, Hol'ins, Va. Hollins Institute, Hollins, Va. Washington & Lee University, Lexington, V^. Washington & Lee University, Lexington. Va. Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Va. Virginia Polj-technic Institute, Blacksburg, Va

Hampden-Sidney

College, Hanipden-Sidney,

''

Virginia College, Roanoke, Va. Virginia College, Roanoke, Va. . . . . St. Albans. Radford, Va. . . St. Albans, Radford, Va. Mississippi A. M. College. Agricultural College, Mis Shorter College. Rome, Ga. Southwest Virginia Institute, Bristol, Tenu, State Female Normal School, Farmville. Va

'

aud College Annuals and Catalogues,

The Spinster" Catalogue

'

Semi-Annual"

'TheCaly.N:" Catalogue '

The Bomb"

"The Bugle" 'The Kaleidoscope" 'Virginia College Auni Catalogue '

The Promus" Catalogue

&

.

Roanoke

College, Salem. Va.

'The Reveille" 'The Iris" Sense and Nonsense Normal Light 'Roentgen Rays" '

Our facilities for handling thi^ All of the above publications speak for themselves. the country. We have in our establishment facilities for the expeditious handling of si preparations for your next year's Annual, correspond with us. We feel sure we can ass

The

m

'

'

;lass of

work

is

not rivaled

h publications. When you t you in making a success of

it,

Stone Printing and Manufacturing Company, 110-112-114

NORTH JEFFERSON STREET,

ROANOKE,

VA.


3.J19'


I


1898 Normal Light  
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