Gyre19686943long

Page 1

//,

DABNEY LANCASTER LIBRARY

LONGWOOD COLLEGE FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA 23901


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2010 with funding from

Lyrasis IVIembers

and Sloan Foundation

http://www.archive.org/details/gyre19686943long


DONG-DING— LONGWOOD SPRING Ding-dong

— Longwood spring

Paper, pencils, books, pens

Catcher

in

the

Rye

Write reports, cry and sing Four-letters words; Chi; Eight o'clock sleepyhead Breakfast stomach pain

Catch a

class,

grab a coat

Super-pilled migraine

Ding-dong

House

library bell

mom

call-down wild

Crack, crunch the

Snow,

slush, slip,

fallen leaves

and

—SMILE

Umbrellas' wild collage

Wet

boots, winter colds

(Gargle

salt,

paint your throat,

Sneeze, and blow your nose)

Ding-dong now here's the sun Exodus to the roof

Wild dreams Boys, beach,

of

summer

fun

and bathing

suits.

Edrie Bays

SPRING 1969

LONGWOOD

COLLEGE

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA

VOLUME

4,

NUMBER

1968-1969

3


STAFF

Editor

Joan Harrup

Assistant Editor

Sharon Dietz

Feature Editor

Louise Dougherty

Poetry Editor

Sharon Collins

staff

Essay Editor

**a^ Short Story Editor

**a" Art Editors

Pixie

Owen, Mary Palmore

Sharon Bourne

Mary Alice Carmody, C.

L.

Dunnavant

Fran Simpers

Catherine Leary, Lise Worthington Susan Davenport, Ginger

Werz

Literary Board

Chairmen ^"^•"'^

Linda Matthews,

Wanda

Rush

Joan Barnes, Mary Alice Carmody. Lynn demons, C. L. Dunnavant, Susan Dupriest, Kathy Godfrey, Betty Johnson, Valerie Jones, Jeannie Kay, Barbara Leahey, Catherine Leary, Glenna Lewis, Pixie Owen, Tricia

ington

Shaw, Margaret

Webb,

Lise

Worth-


Business

Manager

staff

Nancy

Harris

Mary

Alice

Carmody,

Janice Glllenwater,

Reporter to

ROTUNDA

Nancy

Circulation

Manager

Pam Wayne

staff

Harris

Bonnie Andrews, Edrie Bays, Betty Boylan,

Carol

Brotherfon,

Drewry,

Penny

Royce Irvin,

Eldrldge,

Karen

Knud-

Mary Lee McKeever, Owen, Emily Salle, Maureen Shan-

Margi

PIxIe

non,

Sara

Claytor,

Randl

Eberly,

Marcia Harris, Cindy sen,

Typists

demons,

Lynn

Wells

Lois

Lantz,

Gayle Yeates

Befty Boylan,

Head;

Linda Carter, Lois Wells Publicity

Salli

Akers,

Edrie

Penny

Eberly,

Heflin,

Janet

Bays,

Janice Lacy,

Peggy

Clowdls,

Glllenwater,

Linda

Lew,

Sharl Doris

Reames, Jenny Young Proofreaders

Sharon

Exchange Editor

Mary Young

Bourne,

Yeates, Jenny

Palmore,

Gayle

Pam Wayne Advisors:

Art

Miss Leitch

Business

Mrs. Taliaferro

Literary

Miss Etherldge


TABLE OF CONTENTS •kEve'i Delight

SECOND PLACE— PAINTING

Sedgwick

Lesiie

From the Editor

_

_

j

4

c H

5

T^rThe Shelter

SECOND PLACE— SHORT STORY ^Hester's Hair FIRST PLACE-PAINTING

:^A

Linda Fisher

6

Barbara Fuoua

S

Crystal Prism

SECOND PLACE— POETRY poem poem '^My Hometown Untitled,

^

Joyous,

_ _

SECOND PLACE-ESSAY ^Untitled, pen and

Go

le,

_

.__

10

Catherine Leary

I

I

._

_

Frances Bain Barbara Leahe

12

Gall Biount

13

linoleum block

HONORABLE MENTION— GRAPHICS A-The Farmer's Market FIRST PLACE-rSSAY

^Contentment,

felt-tip

Gv,'yn

_..._

pen and

The Guest, poem

_

_

;^Junle of Nazarene FIRST PLACE— SHORT

Muse

14

._

ink

PLACE— DRAWING

FIRST

STORY

Ruth Booker Virginia Robertson

15 _..

Catherine Leary

_

:^Sketch of Father from Memory, pen and

16

17

Ink

HONORABLE MENTION— DRAWING You,

I0

Sedgwick

ink

prose impression

Life,

9

ii„^^ Long Leslie

SECOND PLACE— DRAWING A-Stiil

Alers

_Salli

poem

_

_

Becky Ke'so Gwan Robinson

19 _

19

^Salt and Pepper Lady, aquatint

SECOND PLACE— GRAPHICS ^Mickie Crigler Was Here HONORABLE MENTION— SHORT STORY _...._

-^-

Where

is

Fixer,

20

Brenda Holly

21

Jenny Young Sharon Brown

24 25

God?

HONORABLE MENTION— POETRY The

Sandra Hltt

book review


ytShalmar, wood cut FIRST PLACE— GRAPHICS

Dillard

Vaughan

26

A-Win+er FIRST

PLACE— POETRY

Linda

Long

Pa+ti

Coogan

_

26

_

^Feather Rain

HONORABLE MENTION— POETRY Diamond

*The

Personality, essay

Bailey

27 27

Linda Long Jenny Young

28 28

Paula

Joker

HONORABLE MENTION— PAINTING Raindrop Watcher's Weekly, feature A-Surrealism

HONORABLE MENTION— ESSAY Grandmother, monologue

Louise Dougherty G'enna Lewis

_

_

,

29 30


FROM THE EDITOR prompt you magazine. their

to continue to write

Students often

works because they

tell

to the campus do not submit works are not good enough

and submit

me

feel the

they

that

or because they fear being "laughed at" by the small college such as ours feels

is

the Gyre's annual Spring Contest Issue.

of the staff,

I

would

late the winners Issue.

this

In

take

like to

and thank

addition,

a

all

this

those

special

who submitted work

thanks goes to

Fritsche, Dr. hlooker. Miss hluffman,

A again tic

few weeks ago, this

year a

First

Press Association.

I

was notified

behalf

opportunity to congratu-

judges: Becky Bartholomew, Marilyn Bates,

for

it

is

It

and Miss Ross.

that the

Gyre received

staff

It

is

Gyre

is

will

begin submitting

able to compete so

successfully

I

that you, the student body,

cates that

we do have good

will

award indion campus, and that it will

recognize that

writers

this

a

who

a student

Is

interesting. bit"

not a very It

Is

often

of editing. it

J.

C. H.

articles.

The

receives, but

does enjoys reading the works and hopes that next

more of you

both pleasing and surprising that a

each year with magazines from such larger schools as Ohio State University and Northwestern University. hope

if

does not "laugh at" the material

Class rating from the Columbia Scholas-

small-college magazine such as the

In

girl

impossible to get a valid sampling

body. Even

possible to retain her work after a slight

Gyre

staff.

important that every

good grammarian when her Ideas are

year's

this

Mr. Eyster, Miss

Pyle,

Mr.

Otherwise,

of the Ideas of the student

On

is

she has something to contribute to the magazine submit

her works. This

it

fall


* SECOND PLACE— SHORT STORY

THE SHELTER had often read about people who were Innocent of cer-

I

crimes being sent to prison anyway, and

tain

But that was

them.

all

I

felt

until

I

1

felt

sorry for

My

joined their ranks.

crime was not that of murder or robbery, but that of having a

What made my father nuttier than most men was obsession about the bomb and fallout. As a result of this,

nutty father. his

we were

the only family

in

our town with a

fallout shelter.

when Dad started making plans, but when he had that stupid hole dug in the backyard, we knew that he was serious. The neighbors had a picnic laughing when the cinderblocks were brought in from the store downtown. The only people who were not bent double from laughing were the men who were building it. At least they seemed to be quite serious while they were working, but It

was

sort

always

I

felt

of

a

that

gag

I

half the price of

was

totally innocent.

more than prison. It

all

My

I

wanted prison

started

first

probably went

they

home from

evening when they went

paid

at

into

work.

hysterics

in

the ground.

did not want that fallout shelter any

I

a broken leg: however,

was the

I

still

ended up

in

fallout shelter.

that the Russians us to let

him and

had his

couldn't believe my ears. wanted know all the details where he had heard the news, how he knew that it was valid, etc.; but Dad would not let me find

family into our shelter. to

out anything.

I

I

Instead he hustled the family off to the shelter

our neighbor to take

was

shelter that

That began

my

in

life

in

downtown

family

his

to

the

the school basement.

Daddy

prison.

hurried us into the

we

closed and bolted the door, and

all sat down and began the long stare. After a few hours (that is, if they were hours; they seemed more like days or weeks). Dad tried the radio to find out how things were. But in all his hurry, he had

So we were trapped

forgotten the batteries.

in

silence with

absolutely no contact with the outside world.

was not

It

bad

really

week or

for the first

so,

except

for

the noise of the twins quarreling, but then, the twins always

got on

my

nerves after a few hours. During that time books that Dad had furnished and worked crossword puzzles in the papers. After that the days

anyway. The

The

played

twins

all

herself through the

games

if

it

living

week long make out

room

just

situation.

as

all

the

for

me

just fine.

always.

She remained

She straightened the Hole at home, and she played

She even made a game out of eating

games

did on several occasions.

his

whole

canned food we had stored

so sick of her stupid I

to the

whole ordeal.

were our

with the twins.

that horrible

a to

and fought accordingly,

Mother seemed oblivious as

seemed to be seemed

rest of the family

read

I

the

all

just

one Saturday afternoon when our neighbor

came flying in the backdoor screaming just bombed Washington and begged

told

shelter,

each

Father must have

our house for that hole

and

temporary

precious fallout manuals.

I

wanted

Dad

in

the shelter.

to scream,

I

got

and scream

spent

When

all of his time reading he wasn't reading, he was

making charts and trying to figure out safe for us to get out of the shelter

and

just

when it would be home.

return


On

we

several occasions

day

held conferences on what

it

between the

tunnel

was, what the condition of the atmosphere and earth was, and

dying,

but then

when we could

shelter

and

During these meetings

safely return.

was

I

evi-

shelter

and the outside door.

had been destroyed or whether any

and Mother and Dad talked

alive.

The day By noon After

that

was

I

Dad

remember most began

I

at

the

at

leaving several times, but

not if

it

safe

is

One

safe yet.

is

it

twins

Dad and he

me

or

not.

we

If

it

is

the family.

If

I

them.

talk to

have talked about

are not quite sure whether or

of us will

return then that person can

over to

have

to

go out and

okay on the outside

come back and

find out us

to

rest

of

for

get the

the person does not return, then those

who

are

in the shelter will remain in the shelter. Darling, you seem so impatient to get out, maybe you would like to go out and see if it is all right for us to bring the twins out. You seem so despondent, and we know how you hate being cooped up in here with the twins."

prayed before

I

though, ning

hold

door

my

readied

I

and

had had

breath

hastily.

if

will

leave and

just go outside but not to be noble With those thoughts my obsession to .

.

.

get out of the shelter got the better of me. position

of going

first.

daylight or whatever

it

All

1

1

accepted the

could think about was seeing

was again.

had second thoughts about the

while

in

the

That

what

I'm not sure

unusual

is

for

Somehow, remember plan-

that time. I

I

necessary,

if

expected

to

to find.

since

life

none

of the neighbors

opened

I

the door,

almost fainted. The sunlight

I

incredibly bright. Then

realized that

I

it

was summer-

time and our nextdoor neighbor was fixing the rubber swim-

ming pool I

for his children.

After

finally

I

got hold of myself,

walked over to our fence and looked around

"My, but me.

"We

had not seen

I

it is

good

so long. That

in

the pool

and ran over

all.

for playing that joke

being bombed, but you were

all

into the neigh-

was when Joe

to the fence.

Anne," he said as he hugged

to see you,

sure have missed you

and apologize tion

situation

at

just

and being ready,

any, sign of

He dropped

I

the door.

system to be revolted by the sight of charred

little,

saw me.

"All

opened

shelters.

When seemed

my

about are those precious twins of yours and yourselves.

thought.

were

be a freedom from

there would

got the courage to open the door.

I

to

close the

trees

I

that

I

least

was not myself

I

borhood

transparent can you be?"

to get out of this hole."

I

death at

you can

"How Well,

in

me, but then

left

think

even

for

of our neighbors

continued the trudge forward toward possible death,

I

the horrors of the Hole.

popping bubble gum.

for

called

"Anne, dear, your mother and

said,

any other day.

just as

end with everything and everybody.

at wit's

screamed

I

Mother looked

whispers most of the time.

thought of

returning without knowing whether everything

of

dently irrational because after awhile the meetings stopped, in

I

thought of the horror of returning to the

I

1

came over

to see

you

on you about Washington

gone. Did Paul take

his

vaca-

sooner than he had expected?"

"So

this

was what happened,"

I

thought. "All the days

we


spenf

were

that hole

In

a

practical

result of a

and we

joke

could not find out any differently because of a stupid broken

Now

radio."

through shelter

me

to

I

really

was angry with my father

those days of torture,

all

would be cursed that

until

my

for putting

occurred

It

my

could pay

I

me

that idiotic fallout

dying day. Then

could even the score.

I

and

hie

father

made my life miserable. "I'll fix them," thought, "for making me their guinea pig." turned to Joe and said, "I am sorry we left without telling you or anyone, but Dad got his vacation moved up back

having

for

I

I

because York.

being transferred to the main office

he's

We

had

time to find an apartment.

more

"Oh, that

I

house going up for sale?"

no.

don't think the transfer

I

is

permanent."

my

then rushed Into the house and packed I

New

of our things."

"Is the

I

in

we could use part of our have just come home to get some

to leave hurriedly so

and made reservations father's car, since

at a

beach

resort.

he wouldn't be needing

I

my

savings

decided

to use

—

It

After

clothes.

went downtown to the bank, drew out part of

not for a while

anyway. Lying on the beach,

listening

about the twins and wonder

and playing games, or

If

if

to

the

they are

radio, still

I

often

think

blowing bubbles

they finally ran out of

gum and

games to play. And sometimes think of Mother and Dad and wonder if they are still cleaning and working charts. Sometimes feel guilty, just for a moment; but then remember how Father sent me to what he must have considered my doom. Oh, this gorgeous Florida sunshine! I

I

.

I

.

.

Linda Fisher


.

A CRYSTAL

* SECOND PLACE— POETRY

PRISM

Sail!

Quietly like

the sun's

when dawn

first

whisper

stretches out

across the waking earth All

warm and

.

.

.

glowing,

Friendship settles in the heart

.

.

.

becomes a treasure, shared Of autumn sunsets, laughter, dreamy first snow of winter, letters

.

.

.

feared with sorrow and

silver secrets,

red carnations

joy,

.

.

.

Giddy, gilded happiness, simple, solemn quietude of care

Comes streaming

A

like

spring sunlight

.

.

Friend

Paints rainbows with your tears.

Akers


JOYOUS Scratch the sky and claw Like rakes,

you crooked

Rip the gray

dome

twigs.

of winter wide.

Stretch against the bleak cirrus clouds

Smooth

Like skeletal fingers that reach for bread. I

know you,

the barren, the beaten.

The bare and twisted arms

And

I

hear you

in

of

as the silent sea at

sundown

Soft as a snow-white kitten,

Smiling a grin so bright

Gleaming

naked bark;

Happy

that howl,

with

happy

eyes,

as an innocent child.

That rackling, plaintive cry. For

\,

too, in this tundra seek

my

Love dwells hidden

spring.

in

deep abyss

quiet as a secret spring

below the sleeping town

A peaceful Of

niche

in

the screaming wails

Life.

Linda Long

Leslie

10

Sedgwick


• SECOND PLACE— ESSAY MY HOMETOWN

On ters

Saturday afternoons well-dressed ladies and their daugh-

are no longer to be seen shopping at the once

end

respectable

A

hometown

is

your youth with taking

thing,

the is

files

yours only for that time

its

its

activity.

For most people

Not

a

geographic

left.

hometown,

I

a transient

is

began

yours,

like

have been back

to look for

entity

to

one I

travels

can

It

on

still

his

is

as alien as

way

all

me

as his

the signs say

—and

is

not the

the fare

same

is

either.

up of

end

of

antiseptic

now.

all

to the

as

Drive-ln

by name and could

shop with

to

of

game

the

kids

no longer

where Tony the cook knew

recite their orders before they

new Shoney's where they

dictate their orders to awk-

intercoms which respond with

steel

static

to the

push

Shoney's doesn't reward the player who scored

touchdown with

Tony once

remember

did, but

if

all

the Bigger-Burgers he can eat

the hero

is

lucky the

machine might

to leave the slaw off his Slim Jim.

you happen

either.

to be around on a Sunday, you will notice American Legion baseball games are not the same The chief of police who coached the state champions

for so

many

interest of

Antiquities,

prefer

atmosphere

ever reached the counter. They now drive five miles further

the winning

War buildings line the "wrong" Sycamore Street, where in my time these same buildings had comfortably degenerated into the Corine Hotel and the Busy Bee Restaurant a honky-tonk haven for hoboes and numbers men. freshly reconstructed pre-CivIl

the

Rainbow

to the

instead of greet-

Virginia

in

shielded from the weather.

of a button.

to twenty cents

the suburban shopping

mall

them

I

in

daughters

their

more

formerly

signs

old stop; but the

Because of the

the Association for the Preservation

has a branch

and

which

store

the

I

maps

customary passenger, he simply requests that

deposit another nickel

Downtown

my

now

Each

where they pass unhindered by "walk" and "don't walk"

ward at

ladies

comfortable ease

swarm

any small town through which

driver no longer bears a familiar face ing

The

I

to the big cities.

board the downtown bus

their trade

mall.

Sycamore.

After the Friday night football

took the right road; but the faces and places deny the

and markers.

in

hometown

a

disappear the day

and

it,

lives

drew

and time.

real only in terms of people, places,

My

it

place for the greater part of their

memory.

of

which you merge

in

of

If

that the

years no longer occupies

Also you

his

familiar

in

the dugout.

as

much when that stocky kid in the dirty uniform it did when Bobby Taylor took a base.

as

will

find that

it

doesn't

position

mean

quite

steals third


If

you venture out to the edge of town where we used

ride horses

now. The

home

and

hill

ice skate,

that

you

was the best

and the pond

will

find that neither

to gallop

down

is

Is

to

possible

now

a select

was inaccessible without a tromp through the woods has now been filled in at the request of homeowners who found mosquitoes unbearably offensive.

A

sight;

new generation has

efforts to

that

my hometown, and

rebuilt

modernize and improve

me. Their hometown Preservation

of

tronic restaurants,

is

it,

in

their

it

from

they have stolen

the product of the Association for the

Virginia

shopping

Antiquities,

and green acres bulldozed

However, years from now when they markers to their hometown, they

will

follow

malls,

Into brick all

find that

the

It,

elec-

homes.

maps and

too, has dis-

appeared.

Catherine Leary

12


GONE

Did you see the old house they are tearing down across the street?

It's

once so tough and

kind of sad. Those walls

now leaving nothing but a collection of plaster and one big empty room. The stairway that led people up and down their lives is gone, too. wonder about the number of feet large, medium, and small which have

sturdy are shattered

I

used those

stairs

and

all

the reasons why.

There must have been children I'll

in

the house at

some

time.

bet they sat on the porch telling ghost stories on hot sum-

mer

nights.

You can hardly tell know it was.

once a porch, but

I

must have been a nursery

muddy

that the If

area

was

there were children, there

with a cradle.

Where

is

the floor

on which the cradle rocked, and on which the mother's feet tiptoed softly?

broken glass probably means that there were

All that

of

windows

in

fresh

plaster.

air. .

.

to let in

The

air

the sun, keep out the rain, is

all

so

dusty now,

though

lots

and bring

all

.

Barbara Leahey

that


— *

FIRST

PLACE— ESSAY

THE FARMER'S MARKET A

degeneration

spread

has

over the

market.

which once housed businesses are sham hotels.

merchants have

One

American scene is burgeoned during the days of horse and buggy and which held its own as a place of trade after the emergence of the automobile, it has become, in the days of cash and carry, a used and useless commodity. tfie

of the

disappearing aspects of

An

Farmer's Market.

the

City

Market

is

the

official

the square of health-regulated,

city

Commerce-approved

stalls

stores

and

title

inspected.

applied

to

Chamber

of

The

people

buy and lessly

to sell.

The

most

indoors.

with the latest gossip

green,

from Hollywood, and Batman comic books offer the newest

at

night their blinking

Most

of those

in

the

who come today wander aim-

change

remarkable

with round,

over the square, and

time

is

In

the

sights

and the

sounds and the smells of the place. The market has moved

duce and wares, magazine racks and newsstands display the

Restaurants

one

through the square or stand idly on a corner.

sidewalk style.

Caped Crusader.

At

too.

and quibbled over the price of the same pound of butter or same quart of honey or the same pork chops. People once came to the marketplace to bargain and to haggle, to

nowadays. An oldtimer wouldn't recognize the square. Where homemade stands once displayed the farmer's pro-

adventure of the

changed,

the

which very few people

Modern Screen teems

have

market square, the classes mixed. They stood side by side

visit

latest headlines:

of the

the area; the ghosts of once-prosperous

businesses hang over the City Rescue Mission and secondhand "bargain stores."

tfie

institution wfiich

The Farmer's Market has changed. Changed in atmosphere, changed in sight and sound and smell. Even the name is different

left

Buildings

Most

Very few products are displayed It

ears

bunches

of

corn. of

blueberries and

red and green

neon signs announce the City Diner or Market Lunch.

Small

deep-purple

waxy yellow abundance. Depending upon

have taken

cherries.

the

old

way

to see truckbeds filled

ripe cantaloupes, or coarse

veined

strawberries,

was once possible

brown sacks

cartons

grapes,

held

of light

freckled

button-sized

Flowers were also

in

the time of the year, a shopper

could find the purple and yellow faces of pansles or dazzling

14


golden jonquils brittle

and

that

if

or,

in

the autunnn,

you touched them

stiff,

their

brown

cattails

—

so

stems would collapse

elongated heads would shatter into thousands of

their

infinitesimal seeds.

Today, though they

will

and they

and

it

is

still

buy some

possible to

probably be sold from a

shelf

of these items,

or over a counter;

be packaged. In the "new" market, cellophane have taken the touching and smelling

will

plastic containers

out of shopping.

The smell to

inhale

of the

the

market

aroma

of

is

gone.

fresh-baked

Passers-by once stopped

bread, the stinging

mellow odors of cheese, the nose-curling smell of odors,

like

or

but the

the touching, have been taken from the market.

The "smelly" products have stalls

fish;

either

been removed from the

or hermetically sealed or frozen or dried.

The marketplace has changed,

in

a surprisingly short time,

from an area of feverish movement to an area of

The mood, the sellers

quality,

—everything

Is

the

temper

different.

of

the

little

activity.

buyers and the

The old Farmer's Market has

evolved Into the "modern" City Market and

is

on

its

way

to

oblivion.

Gwyn Muse

15


THE GUEST

That paradox loneliness, That

we be

Encounter with one's

Most

Her

self

becomes

right

No

The conversation topic be. Play a stranger's game, Exchange bare, bright

alone?

sporting never cease.

Interrogation,

interfering social;

Grasp more

me

But leave she

least alone,

escape no

From her

acknowledgement

— she deem her

demand. outlet.

persistent plan;

illusion,

the same;

And

should

I

want

to leave.

Ungracious Hostess-

Suppose

To

play a

I

trip the

And And

turn

around

shout:

She simply

My

Violate hostile hospitality?

trick.

Find she won't be

shadow's pose,

—catch her

Nor

black.

Voiceless voices pervade her pretty party.

"No!" slips

rid.

run, nor resisted.

And And

beneath

fastened, nailed

fist,

so

I

must dress

in

costly charm.

ask her leave to stay.

Slyly whispers her "regrets,"

And

slips

through

silent

space;

Virginia Robertson

16


— •

PLACE— SHORT STORY

FIRST

OF NAZARENE

JUNIE

Catherine Leary

Livy, in light uh the goin' ons

Aprils, 1969

be

to

Well, after you

down Dear A'nt

at Joe's

know

been

ifs

things here

news worth lately

a spell since

been pretty quiet and there

's

troublin' the

though

that's

got

mailman all

me

you heard from with.

ain't

last,

but

been much

Some's come up here

uh Nazarene County

good

I

one time 'bout years ago, when he was all

for a

just

pa

his

an ideal son

—even

but he kept to

all;

down

at

Nazarene Church

in

youngun'

his

age. You said

if

how he

to

no good

— and

mons out

17

talkin'

likely as

not,

in

Got

and

riddles,

girls.

so's

it

you was

if

you'd get a question back

that

all

time

'roun'

church

he was,

like

two back Junie took to preachin' on

o'

preach the

A'nt

notice uh the

an answer.

won't preachin'

you was any kinda judge

come

him anything,

average young

the

'bout his strange ways.

he was always

like

Spendin'

the time answerin' out and sayin' such strange things

uh character, that boy'd never

started wonderin'

month

your Sunday

of the Savior,

more time than church, and never took much

Folks

to ask

I

school class

was

like

deal, spent

'roun'

for

astir.

tell

Seemed

station.

fellas

seemed

You 'member young Junie Taylor Joe and Marian's boy know you recollect him 'cause can recall hearin' you

well

fillin'

he was a right big help to

so's

Marian out with the chores and

helpin'

you shown yourself

Livy,

himself a

I

lately,

here for Columbia, young Junie

left

Got

sprouted on up.

here

woman.

a pretty wise

in

in

the fields

Good

neither

world

peace,

no,

Book

Junie was an'

was

the church though; he

just

and down by the like folks 'roun'

preachin' all

here

'bout

grades uh

his

givin'

river. 's

his

He

hie ser-

won't

been raised on

lovin'

stuff

here a

own.

folks

niggers,

here

an'

'bouts


— used

ain'f

to

got

It

He even

hearin'.

powers

'vangelical

just like

started

Junie was drawin' a pretty

so's

had a bus load come

Birmingham

Well,

fair size

crowd.

Even

this

bull

Got

he was spreadin'.

some uppety

foreign nigger

who

so's

'bout

just

such a

good

all

I

got to say, A'nt Livy,

smart one to spot

a

while back.

little

sorry

for ole

Christian place

know

didn't

guess that's

you certainly was

think

1

all

trouble

this

everyone here kinda

feels

know he meant well, but decent folks jus' can't be 'spected to sit by and let some maniac go on threatenin' the security of a peace loving.

decent people couldn't walk down the main street uh town without meeting

I

'ceptin'

a

from Selma, and another clear from

in

hear

just to

had

he

claimin'

them TV healers and crackpots.

like

Junie. They

Nazarene.

place or else some crazy cripple out huntin' for Junie to

his

heal him.

Junie was gettin'a

and things was an'

lovin'

communism

pretty like

come

week

just

might blow up.

Potter,

it

Billie

from 'roun'

Jo

he was,

to the point

late

good

this

kinda

as not

their

duty.

Well,

where things looked

like

Your Nephew,

just

Luke

they

he's sheriff now, Kyle an'

all

the

fellas

jus'

to see

what oughta be done.

I

you know what the outcome of that was they found

afternoon

wonder

nigger

no wonder the town

Deacon Simpkins,

telephone pole up atop Calvin's I

do

talkin'

court house got together for a kind of a

at the

committee meeting,

little

reckon

ain't

So Raph Johnson,

Butler,

Him

unsettled.

leaders would eventually have to last

preachin'

lotta folks all afire with his fool

gettin'

if

ole

Junie hangin'

A

Hill.

jus'

he sensed what was comin' on 'cause

end.

I

heard Stoney Goodson and some of the other boys that stuck right close to Junie talkin' this evenin' 'bout

been 'em

actin' last

when he came

night.

in

to eat

supper

how strange he'd

things on his

mind he wanted

I

hope

come up

early this evenin'

and thunderin' to

goodness

it

like lets

here,

the world

up

'fore

and

right

eatin'

to get thought out.

18

now

was comIn' tomorrow.

and an awful

lotta

gonna be mighty disappointed If they don't get their new spring outfits 'roun' church In the mornin'.

at the diner with

Stoney said soon as they was done

big storm llghtnin'

always a big day 'roun'

Junle'd headed out tow'rd the orchard alone, said he had

some

S.

P.

from the

its

to an

Easter's folks

to

's

wear


YOU

I

remember

YOU

the

with the white

YOU

It

YOU

time

saw

i

YOU feet

then, but oh-so distant just

close

andi

ago

not so very long

when

sun's blinding rays

YOUR

circling

we became always

wasn't long

no

foam

were close

but soon just

first

were standing against the

YOU

and

I

ran

ago

down

the

beach

the sandpipers were always running

down

to the sea

Intent

on

their

and back

the tiny creatures would just to

sing

watch

and

talk

19

loved

to the sea

peep out from

us

—dance and

we were young

YOU

—down

and back

everyday business

walk

then

me—

I

loved

YOU

their holes


hot

summer days melted

Into cool

windy nights

days passed and weeks became months but

YOU

and

i

took no notice whatsoever

became shorter and cooler became longer and became one long goodbye we would always stay close

the long hot days

and the

our hellos

YOU i

said

just listened

winter i

waited so

but there

i

is

I

cried

silently

o n g

with spring not far behind

so long to say hello again

no second spring, no second summer

grown cold

remember

YOU YOU YOU YOU

and

came and passed

for love

colder

short cool nights

with winter

YOU — against the

with the white

foam

and the sandpipers

and

the heat of the

sun's blinding rays

circling

—YOU

YOUR

feet

and the

tiny creatures

summer

and always— just— YOU.

Owen

Robinson

20


• HONORABLE MENTION— SHORT STORY

that of the

WAS

MICKIE CRIGLER

up

HERE

little

sandpipers on the beach. They would creep

to the ocean,

and with each wave's

way.

unmerciful

After

became exhausted and The pier was deserted.

It

object along the shoreline.

played

in its

long, jutting

gray afternoon

would

sky.

think that

it

stood out as the only

A

feeling

solitude

body which rested against

Looking at

was a

of

and then, a big its

jellyfish

if

some sound besides

rustled as

if

they hoped

that of the lonely sea

and

gulls;

Fish,

empty space, were

lying

to

its

Now

overhead made

gulls flying

tiny

was

that of

waves

hitting

the

hollow

At

intervals

passage

each receding wave; and

washed upon the shore again.

see, this string of

begun

their

Little

then,

of time like

grains of sand joined within

seconds,

they

This endless cycle paralleled

Some the

glassy, stone eyes

about three or four

peered

feet apart.

In

into

one

marine morgue.

devouring process, and they drifted from one It

was

their orgy.

remains of human activity also cluttered the beach

near the of

whose

As far as one could decadence continued. Hundreds of flies had

spot, an eel joined this

tasty object to another.

to illustrate the

the ticking of a universal clock. with

September leaves

was much debris.

systematically against the shoreline. as

late

one might

of the less pleasant sounds

sound reverberated,

was erased, nature took on a dreary ap-

hint of sunlight

pearance. The

Also, from far away,

silhouettes against the afternoon sunset.

One

rest.

had grown an even darker gray; and as soon as the

sky

to supply

a rather

creatures

however, the competition was too great. Along the shoreline

with a seemingly white four-leaf clover

back drifted near. The

last

ran to a dryer spot to

little

separating

drawn

wonder if its planks ever ended. Barnacles were clinging long wooden poles, against which small waves splashed. on

dis-

the

in

horizontally,

line

the waters from the heavens.

was

the dirty,

from a certain angle, one

it

The

man-made

minutes,

several

would run

splash, they

back ashore. The water was teasing them

fiercely

wooded

sand

area.

where

it

Part of the rim

had

of a

can jutted out

been wind-buried.

Cellophane

wrappers that had become soggy with moisture clung sand; and,

in

one

spot, a pile of

wood was covered by

to the

ashes.

Several long wire objects which were obviously former closet


were scattered

fixtures

wooded

Despite

about.

these

the

objects,

with

area seemed a separate entity from the Immediate

The only intruder was west, his small figure

was advancing towards the

a navy blue parka,

he pressed

chest so as to

ward

off the

his

Occasionally, he would wind

eyes.

in

He

avoiding them.

It

and out

in

to

Getting

shiftless

atmosphere

well with the

for a

boy

of his age,

scribe his actions as mechanical,

were doing them

One

he walked very slowly.

for him.

as

some

if

His head was lowered, and

were focused on the dark sand resting underneath toenails. Although he watched his feet as they dug soft earth

beneath,

his

stare

Then Mickie walked up within

inches of

surveyed the to seize the

felt

its

fins.

fish

boy

caressed the

it,

was without

to

a

dead

he stopped.

for several

as he

fish in his

reached

A

minutes.

as

down

the dry

tail

fin

caking

long

ness

fascination

He He

seemed, now, never

as his

yet

lonely,

his

satisfied,

it

seemed

as

he proceeded

undecided and

own. Just as each sand particle settled again

on the

made

trek

Mickie dug

just

and kicked

plopped down,

lift

his it

others.

foot

Soon,

down

eel's

as lifeless as before,

in

the

real

Mickie scooped up sand and began

body, patting

the sand stick together.

burled the eel

into

out of his way.

it

hard so that the moist-

Digging a narrow hole, he

same way he had buried the

fish.

His

pilgrimage began once again.

He

came

picked up some speed, and began winding

he

of the string of

dead

seemed

was careful not

to step

slowly,

for the inanimate form. it

eyes

into the

he

fish

ball of his right foot as

activity in the limp form.

meaning.

and

fish

Squatting

hands and rolled

He touched

real

his

into the hole.

on the sand. The outside force had not generated any

force

his

began

sand's direction

lifted

The elongated body

might de-

invisible

the soft sand.

in

After a few silent moments, he began to

the sand direcly under the eel,

His coloring was rather drab; and,

two, small, dark discs.

hand. The

an eel obstructed the way.

eyes had a very hollow appearance with a similarity to

his

rough mouth. Then

fish's

a hole

on the beach, down the narrow foot went to

of the

His face reflected grayness and doom, and

deserted beach.

his

sand with the

along. The

the slightest matter. in

dug

and lowered him down

Mickie

up,

the beach.

kick the

did not want to interrupt nature even

Mickle Crigler blended

the fish's cold and glassy

have been.

down

his

dead

of the

fish

little

aside and

fish

spot with the back of

His tan

got into

into

covered the hole back up with the sand and smoothed the

in

his

pants were wet to the knees, and he was barefooted.

khaki

His auburn hair tousled, and he squinted when

fish,

Clad

pier.

folded arms against

afternoon breeze.

late

took the

From the

boy.

sixteen-year-old

a

stared

His forefinger outlined the

Mickie put the

shoreline.

He

thinness.

Its

eyes.

he

Mickie

over and over.

He

made

a

fish

and squatted on 22

his

had done

earlier.

and out Again he

in

on any of the small corpses, but then

movement too

quickly and stepped heavily on washed ashore. He stopped abruptly knees. He saw an oozing from the vic-

the side of a fish newly

and was surprised

as he


tim's

threw in

Mickie grabbed the rotting

Feeling nausea,

out to sea with

it

the water only a

the wet sand, his face.

wept

hie

rested

all

his

might; however, the

softly.

sticky.

in

He

brought

They had the

to fear

its

contamination.

straight

his fingers.

He had

He wiped

As soon

He

wooded rustling

area.

the

of

of flies

He

sat

down, he rose and walked

heard the

A

leaves.

down on

Mickie sat

its

had

quickly as he

its

gulls;

and

decaying log was

wondered how

He grabbed

a stick

on the sand near the buzzing

head as

if

to

he erased

name

in

his forefinger. it

the

spot,

got to the end, and sat down.

flew away,

still

reproach the intruder.

He drew

a

and he Inscribed below

it

size.

Next, it

stared a long while. Then

and he arranged them

he took the smallest

in

centered

order according to

in his left hand and done to each successive last and largest shell, he

he had gotten to the it

body while

his attention

shell

out to the sea. This was

When

boy was always

the creature's

of

stood up on the pier and threw

out

in

the direction of the

sunset. It

huge number "6." Then wrote

his shells

shell.

However, by

He

upon threw

remained.

walked

After placing the

by. The

jellyfish drifting

He

flies

He

on the board beside him, he looked down into the green

breathing.

Many

Getting out

number.

body by such a hideous nearby and slammed it down

activity.

two

few of the boards had parts of them missing.

water and noticed a

Its

shells.

Mickie climbed up on the pier.

by the contracting

quickly with the side of his hand.

same

finally

shells

now, Mickie didn't care since he was lying across the log on his stomach and was very Intent on drawing something in the

sand with

six in

shells,

first

to look at the

and stooped over and

the shells

fascinated

in

He wanted

down

stood the water was too deep. Then he

picked up exactly

He

nearby.

Mickie threw sand on those, and they struggled, then flew his

it

came near

carefully, since a

The bug was on

but a few of the braver and more gluttonous

up near

where

the water

further

he surveyed the

pier,

death,

could tolerate the desecration of industry.

insect.

the bug, even

reached the

of the water, he

With these

to the

he heard the lying

When

in.

looked to the sandy beach and saw several

end. Within a few feet of him, scores

were devouring a huge beach

back, and Mickie

also,

as he

next pole, but

no

the smelling hands, and he ran them through his hair.

As

He waded

poles with their barnacles attached.

moist eyes with

his

boy got up and walked

the

disturbed,

to the water.

had reached his knees, he began walking the beach. The pier was his goal.

hands up to

his

rather

down

level

smell of rotting fish.

between

the creases in

and

plopped

fish

The smell no longer offended him.

didn't care.

fish

Mickie sat down on

few feet offshore.

They were

Some sand need

Seeming

mouth. The substance was gray and green and very

slimy.

was getting much darkner now.

crimson shades were

In

the

sky,

Lavender and pink and

and they were

swiftly

dis-

appearing into the blackening abyss. The breeze had gotten

his

much

the words

"was here."

heavier,

and Mickie now zipped up

his

parka.

He was

growing very uncomfortable. The cool wetness of the 23

air


made

his

pants legs cling to him.

the air with his dangling feet. his loafers.

The

made

No

it.

He made

had

ripples

sign of

their activity

just

life

small circles

* HONORABLE MENTION— POETRY

in

wished he now had brought

They were warm, but they were

gulls

water

He

also new.

about disappeared from the

Shame. sky.

The

where the heavy breeze impressed upon was

stirring

and had gone

now.

Even the

to find shelter.

flies

WHERE

had quit

would be seen no more on the beach. Mickie felt that he was an almighty looking down on an earth after a destroying force had hit. He did not enjoy that feeling. He decided to

Where

go home.

Flowered

When

he reached the shore, he walked more

he had before, and soon

He grew him. live,

his

GOD?

IS

Pretty soon they

swiftly

is

God? I

down sharp

Looking

than

Vanity

navy parka became indiscernible.

is

their

six

months

in

the church.

I

hunted

in

my

Books jump out at me, people

to

would return again the next day.

"Music"

shatters

Nothing

is

god

Singing the

As

Brenda Holly

In

I

his

I

hunted

found

in

in

the valley, in

the fields.

the song of the sparrow

heart out on a sun-spangled morning;

dew-drenched bluegrass, cool beneath my

follow a rainbow.

the face of a friend

Is it

me,

call

routs prayer.

the mountains, under trees,

Something

In

and

room.

here. I

On

proud.

noses at youth.

god.

smaller and smaller, and the black sky enveloped

Mickie Crigler, a leukemia victim with

hunted

ladies, hat-conscious, sinfully

Something

—

is It

I

feet

found

love?

God?

Jenny Young

24


The Fixer by Bernard Malamud; and Giroux,

Farrar, Straus,

and

lies

New

With

One ade

Bernard Malamud's The Fixer.

Pulit7er Prize

It

Award

and the National Book

Fixer

is

completely

web

1967 and has

in

A

MGM.

fifty

personal freedom which

may

one

is

Suffering

as he

knows and

in

not what one

likely to get. This

idea

is

is

Yakov

Bok, the fixer,

Bok

is

a

is

God. He educated, who becomes in

is

a

symbol

of suffering

and

is

ment, but

who does

must

self-

and

time.

He

Bok goes to Kiev during a turbulent period of anti-Semitism in Tsarist

Russia

in

the

first

decade

of the 20th century.

He

justice.

needed

The Russian

He was like

—

man

a

Bok unwit-

criminality.

denied

state

starved, poisoned, de-

an animal during two

was

state

be

his

a

in

the begin-

imprisonment did he begin to realize

trying to do.

He became

a hero to the

Bok went to Kiev with no political commit-

experience

commitment.

in

prison taught him that

He would

not

confess

itself

life

to

a

lie

Jews and cause even more hatred and persecution. Bok saw no future, but he was determined to go to trial and confirm his innocence. He believed that "where there's no fight for it, there is no freedom."

which

injustice.

a victim of history

after harsh

Jewish people.

an innocent man, the victim of ignorance, prejudice,

and inhumanity. More important, he his

a freethinker

Only

what the

basic to the major theme and

Jew and

the state

Bok did not understand what was happening

looking for but what

an ordinary man, poor and

all

the Tsar's adversary.

graded, humiliated, and chained

character of The Fixer.

not believe

for the troubles of the cor-

years of imprisonment.

showing that

mankind. Malamud does not idealize

all

is

became

him the most elemental

ning. suffering.

Jews were blamed One man was

up as an example of Jewish

to hold

from

result

Although he associates suffering with the Jew,

the fate of

is

whole society was against him simply because he was a

tingly

he has gone beyond any sectarian prejudice suffering

Bok stepped into history and the consequent

rupt state of Russia.

Malamud, being a Jew, presents Judaism it.

refute,

therefore, the

ignorance, prejudice, and injustice.

understands

make him

attempts to

of events surrounding the persecution of Russian Jews.

years ago. The story provides

an intense emotional and intellectual experience, clearly detailing the threats to

it

Jew. The Czar believed that men were best unified by hate;

book about a man who transcends

a powerful

the anti-semitic Russia of

of the state as

a Jewish identity that he could neither fully claim nor

of the past dec-

was awarded the

been released as a motion picture by

recently

The

most widely acclaimed books

of the

is

charges

false

confess to the crime.

York; 1966.

would

incriminate

the

fought a heroic struggle, and

his will

not to be destroyed

by the tyranny, hate, and prejudice of a corrupt

state

brought

is

him

charged with the murder of a Christian boy and is sent to prison to await trial. There he is humiliated and degraded by

finally to trial.

Sharon Brown 25


•

PLACE— POETRY

FIRST

WINTER Winter,

who

And draped

has stolen

skillfully

o'er the land

some cold delight, How swift the fall of Autumn in one night Beneath thy chill and northswept hand. A myriad of thy flakes compound to might And bury umber Autumn deep. O Winter, such magic in thy lullaby must be To blanket beauty in this bedded white we see. That Spring some compelling antidote must keep To warm thy grasp and set us free. Winter, so

And 'Til

in

its

figure

come

in

thou upon the harvest scene,

thy blast our cheeks

time,

And we

in

first

white, wears thin the

with

welcome glow,

memory

thy frozen face soon bid to go.

Linda Long

green.


* HONORABLE MENTION— POETRY DIAMOND PERSONALITY FEATHER RAIN Everyone knows what a diamond

deep silence befell the waking world, The thickly-falling snowflakes muffled sound, Pale stains of smoke arose from chimneys, curled And spelled a message to all around. The peering faces

of children

beam

Their shrieks and laughter soon shall

And

will

clear,

fun

is

The feathering

rain

is

Will

men perceive

It

And

is

in

a flawed one. The flaws

deceptive surface, the inner

this

of Icy reserve,

cut

in

hard person cannot

Any

is

fires

hard

gleam

and the cool sparks are given

Often these remarks are directed with

cutting sarcasm at the

when

all

feel

too sensitive humans nearby. This

pain from similar remarks directed

such attempt to hurt or change him

will

fall.

diamond, he can be destroyed only by an expert who knows how to apply force at exactly the right point a flaw. Like a

pillow fun.

—

so to clean up they send out the sun.

Patti

a

add

can be

it

an unemotional person whose personality

Through

off as witty remarks.

her beauty or see her light?

tire of

the

in

blue-white

impervious to marring and molding, but

is

cold.

at him.

By now, the angels

to

up through layers

land, but

the hardest

glitter

There

robes of dazzling white.

The beauty of nature arrays the

is

hard. Yet

shattered and so destroyed completely.

a curtain, in

fire,

It

stones,

precious,

snow; they do not care.

shrouds the earth

is

dead white brilliance. As the diamond itself will cut all lesser semi-precious, or common, but cannot be

and color

turn.

the air

in

it

the

and

And

like.

cuts into the eye, the

life

the busy grown-ups' minds annoy;

To them, no

depths flash points of Icy

frigid

perfect stone, red and green

with joy, split

is

substance on earth and looks as cold as

A

Coogan

Paula Bailey

27


RAINDROP WATCHER'S WEEKLY

If

has been brought to the attenion of the

drop Watcher's Club tressingly

long

time.

on several

shining

that there has

Longwood

been no

Rain-

rain for a dis-

Granted, we have kept the sun from but

occasions,

average cellar-water

the

down to one foot, 2'/4 inches now, and people are demanding to know what is happening. Water rats are belevel

is

coming scarce; ducks are taking

What

them.

of water?

It

in is

at

river

We

least

five

still

more, instead

can hardly blame

duck would swim

self-respecting

Fortunately the frogs are

age family having them

to the

back yard.

of staying in their owner's

in

two inches

numerous, the aver-

full-grown

frogs

serenading

the evenings.

rumored

that

the

Raindrop Watchers

town twenty weeping willows

NOT

soluely

TRUE!! Such

week-long droughts between

to

line

trees rains.

give

will

the streets. This

cannot

be

[However,

Is

beautiful

the

abwith

we have con-

sidered giving rain wear to several of the needy families the area.

Our

They won't die

readers

Swimming

Pool

about time.

basement? dentally, in

28

one out

of four

weeks

is

in

dry.

the Sunnyside

town.

left

It's

needs swimming pools when you've got

way you don't even pay

may have the Have you noticed all

Farmville

Virginia.

if

may be interested to knov/ that Company has closed up and

Who This

off

for filling

it.

lowest average water the rain barrels?

a

Incibill


• HONORABLE MENTION— ESSAY The Longwood Canoe Club

Is

sponsoring

canoe

a

along the general vicinity of the Appomattox River day. will

It is

not

hoped

that the water will

way. During

last

scopes" that

may be

of

and

veiltails

in

with

who

mildew problems

specialists,

and Welfare

is

hope many

of

you

will

this

a disjointed foot sitting

is

among

trees

in

a forest.

reproduced a hundred times on a

with an umbrella

walls.

It's

an

and

lit-

elephant slowly walking across a field of fingers. Surrealism

folks.

defined as a French movement

Is

In

art

erature that tries to express the subconscious through fantastic

that

or Incongruous imagery.

sending

will

take advantage of

man

piece of canvas, or a crowd of people staring out at you,

"tele-

found, so please check your yards,

you have written

a

separated from each other by soundproofed

back yard had escaped.

be on hand for counseling Friday and Saturday from 9:00 to 12:00 and 2:00 to 5:00.

two mildew

We

It's

week's flood, one Watcher discovered, much

the Department of Health, Education,

this

Surrealism

be low enough so canoeists

has requested the return of any stray

So many

Sun-

this

bunnping their heads on low bridges along the

risk

to his horror, that the goldfish in his

He

SURREALISM

trip

shows hidden thoughts of the

binations

of

everyday objects.

significance

oppor-

Surrealism

Is

Realism

becomes

life

Is

faces.

Surrealism

streets with

no

real

whole

new

a gigantic,

imagi-

a blade of grass.

an art form which presents

Realism is

is

alleys

life

as

it

may Is

or

Surrealism, on the other hand,

it.

as the artist imagines

or duplications.

Jenny Young

a

not realism, as close as the two words

as artists consciously see

presents

by weird com-

on

take

The ordinary foot becomes

nary citadel and a finger

sound.

artist

Objects that have

our everyday world

in

Interpretation.

tunity.

simpler terms, surrealistic art or

In

literature

it

alleys,

made

with monstrous additions

busy

streets,

of giants'

hard-worked

mouths, deserted

one tremendous eye overlooking them.

Realistic

faces have photographic accuracy of detail; surrealistic faces

are blank and show time not

in

wrinkles,

but by a

mummy's

mask. Louise Dougherty

29


—

.

GRANDMOTHER

to

Grandmother doesn't come to see me anymore. She used come every day. Sometimes she would bring me flowers,

and once a

little

Wednesday.

I

china lamb.

miss her!

Why

But the clock

come?

Gosh,

seems

it

wish she would

"Grandmother!"

Wednesday when

she didn't

come

rained.

it

I

don't

like

.

"GRANDMOTHER!

it

Wednesday.

you'll

rains,

not

if

—

Thursday morning the

rain

stopped.

A

mean, now you're

rainbow came

Grandmother

"But

didn't.

it's I

so

do

You've

I've it's

come!

Grand-

1

good

wish

really here, with

to

I'm so glad

even better than before. me, not

Isn't

it?

have you here!

Momma

and Uncle

Billy

wouldn't cry so."

I

early

and once

Glenna Lewis

late.

30

I

and Oh, Grand-

just visiting,

I

Grandmother always stays a long time on Friday. Once she spent the whole day here, but then she came early. She always comes early on Fridays, on her way to town. She visits awhile on her way back, too. So she's here twice, once

do

Grandmother!

Oh,

missed you every day!

never have to go away again!

never,

mother,

Not Thursday morning or Thursday afternoon (and she never comes at night). don't mind Fridays really. In fact. So now it's Friday. guess Friday is just about my most favorite day of all. but

2:00.

forever since she's been here.

like

Where were you? you're back. And

it

It's

.

Grandmother doesn't come. Rain never kept her away before. She would just pull on her galoshes and but she didn't come get her umbrella and come, rain and all

when

just struck.

yet.

"Grandmother!"

But she hasn't been here since

doesn't she

abbey

the

in

mother hasn't come


PATRONS

Baldwin's, Farmville, Virginia

Shop Cedar Brook Restaurant, Rice Road College Shoppe Carter's Flower

Collins Florist

Crute's Esther

May

Farnnviile

Village

Shop

Herald

Farmville Manufacturing Co., Shopping Center

Grant's Shopping Center

Gray's Rexall Knit Korner

Leggett's

Longwood Jeweler,

Farmville, Virginia

Martin The Jeweler

Moore's Distributing Co.

Newman's Owen-Sanford, Shopping Center Sherwin-Williams Co. Smitfy Bectric Co.

Stackpole Components Co., State Theater

31

P.

O. Box

M