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Digitized by the Internet Archive in

2010 with funding from

Lyrasis IVIembers

and Sloan Foundation

http://www.archive.org/details/colonnade196465282long


COLONNADE

LONGWOOD COLLEGE FARMVILLE. VIRGINIA

WINTER

1964-65

VOLUME

XXVIII

NO.

2


STAFF ÂŤi

EDITOR

DONNA WEATHERLY

Poetry Editor: Freda Richards

Short Story Editor: Essay Editor:

Kaye Catron

Rebecca Evans

Carol Mann,

Literary Board:

Margaret Robinson, Jo Ann Held, Pat Gillette, Betty Hodnett, Norma Davis, Carole Dawson, Joan Emerson, Patricia Reames, Joan Faulkner, Linda New, Frances Wynne, Sue Fuller Art Editor: Angel Stephenson Art Board: Carol Moyer, Leeny Lou Steiner, Phyllis Boykin,

Charlotte Staton Business

Manager: Jean Lundie

Business Board:

Ann

Cordle,

Brenda Conner,

Merle Hawkins,

Joyce Stanley

Head Stajf:

Typist:

Ginny Starkey

Sharron Bannon,

Trudy Fowler, Sharon Ripley Circulation Staff:

Helen Weeks,

Phyllis Boykin, Patricia Thrift, Sharon Ripley, Sandra Rhodes, Nancy Spain, Vicki Jester, Susan Besley, Beverly Jenkins Board of Advisors: Mrs. Mildred Davis, Dr. Rosemary Sprague, Mr. George Chavatel, Mrs. Ruth Taliaferro


CONTENTS Open Letter From The Editor

.

Contemporary Education , Poem

On

4

.

.

.

Freda Richards

.

5

ILLUSTRATION

Betsy Page Taylor

.

.

.

5

ILLUSTRATION

Betsy Page Taylor

.

.

.

6

Donna Weatherly

.

.

.

the mist.

One Act

Play

Place For Transients, Prose Impression

Edward A I bee: An

Existential

.

.

.

Freda Richards

.

Barbara Melton

.

7 8

....

10

Interpretation, Essay

ILLUSTRATION The

Agitator,

Forget,

Angel Stephenson

14

.

15

Maria Grant

ILLUSTRATION

Phyllis Boykin

Poem

Freda Richards

ILLUSTRATION The

.

Gayle Ray

Poem

Poem

Divestment,

.

.... ....

Carol Moyer

Exhibition, Short Story

....

Amanda

RuÂŁE

ILLUSTRATION

Carol

Moyer

ILLUSTRATION

Carol

Moyer

Lines Composed While Lying on One's

Freda Richards

.

....

....

.

16

.

16 17

.

18

.

18

.

21

.

24

.

26

.

26

.

27

Back Viewing Sunbeams, Poem

ILLUSTRATION

Charlotte Staton

Making The Swing Go, Informal Essay

Betty Hodnett

.

ILLUSTRATION And There Was Adam, Conformity,

Fable

.

.

.

Poem

Charlotte Staton

.

.

.

.

28

Donna Weatherly

.

.

.

.

30

.

32

Lynette Sykes

Printed by The Dietz Press, Inc. 109 East Gary Street Richmond 19, Virginia [

3

]

.... ....

....


Education An Open This

Awareness

Is

From The

Letter

Editor:

letter comprises the

concerning "education

concluding portion to the two-part letter

awareness."

is

The

first letter

series

introduced the scope of

education through awareness, and this one will develop the responsibilities

incumbent on education through awareness.

The

words education and awareness was

interchangeability of the

lished in the first letter

A

for education.

;

thus the

word awareness may

phrase which appeared in the

first

letter

can perhaps be

construed as the key to the idea of the responsibility of awareness sive

development of the mind."

quality of awareness

—

"progres-

This phrase should give indication of the

which manifests

Through awareness we

vidual.

estab-

hereafter be substituted

itself in

the development of the indi-

own

are led beyond the limitations of our

narrow grasp; we learn how to expose ourselves to life. From this challenging, we come to understand and accept both ourselves and others.

Once an

The answer

individual attains a sense of awareness, in part

is

what

found in the word "seeking."

responsibility ensues ?

Awareness involves the

constant search to understand and evaluate every situation and every idea to

which

we

are exposed.

in light of

new

Certainly

discoveries,

it is difficult

to re-evaluate established ideas

but the responsibility of awareness demands

this

of the individual.

The

second of these responsibilities

Awareness demands involvement

is

best expressed by the

in life,

and involvement

about ourselves and others to seek to understand.

Much

is

word

"caring."

caring enough

has been written

few years about the idea of involvement; for this reason many readers ignore it as no longer of any timely concern for themselves. What has in the past

failed to capture their attention is the fact that the essence of

involvement

is

simply caring to search for understanding, for awareness.

Do we ideas,

care enough to allow ourselves to become aware of the world of

actions,

small worlds ?

and people existing beyond the limiting confines of our own

Have we

ever felt the need to seek and to care about anything

outside ourselves?

D. L.

W.

Regretfully, the Colonnade has yet to announce that

Class

Honor Rating from

secutive year,

1963-64.

it

had received a

First

the Associated Collegiate Press for the second con-

Belated congratulations to last year's staff for an

excellent series of magazines.

[4]


—

7

On Contemporary Education Kick the old sow, Struggling belly,

Swollen and

Hurry,

/

alive,

pig.

Give us your brood. But hurry.

'A

Now,

don't wait.

Come

out

Grow, shoat. Voodoo medicine man. Rainmaker.

—Freda Richards [5

]



the mist donna weatherly

a play in one act by

first

two elderly men, decidedly stooped wrapped in shrouds, eyes bandaged. man: "i love dawn strolls."

second man: first

on the horizon,

Utopia, clouds of mist are rising as the sun appears

scene:

"yes (pause)

—

over, approach out of the mists

does clear the

it

.

.

spirit."

.

man: "do you leave today?" man: (silence)

second first:

"i said

second:

—

today the day you said you were leaving?"

^is

"uh? so sorry

.

.

feeling something first:

"not clearly long ago

.

.

.

.

.

this is important,

second

:

just

.

"i just can't

was

i

.

about

(breaks in) "about

first:

.

.

.

.

.

.

i

.

.

was

just

,

,

,

that happened

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

(stops)

what? concentrate a little more ... a think ..."

try to

seem ...

.

(interest)

feeling something

."

.

.

now."

.

do you remember it?"

"really?

second:

didn't hear you

i

.

.

(emphatic)

.

.

past feeling,

.

to break

.

.

the barrier,

.

wall

like a titron

it's

before me." first:

"i

knew

man who had

a

.

.

.

feelings

.

.

once

.

.

.

.

i'm not sure.

.

.

."

(voice trails off)

second: first:

"uh-huh.

.

.

.

create."

"we

are

.

.

exist

second: first:

.

we

.

really

.

life

.

.

.

"can you

.

anymore.

know

i

can (long pause) leave."

(vacant)

to

i

me

do .

.

.

something

feel i

feel a

.

.

.

i

can remem-

we

breakthrough,

are

.

world ... a world we helped

.

.

.

men

.

.

.

.

.

don't you see?

.

.

(voice trails off)

.

"we

.

(credulous)

live in a

world dedicated

.

.

.

to

.

.

.

to

.

.

."

(disconcerted)

can't ... say it." .

.

to

we have ... all thought ... all knowledge ... we know problems do not itself ... we know are perfect

everything?"

(not hearing him)

"i

before

.

.

living in a perfect

are.

"to what?"

second: first:

.

.

(raised voice)

the secrets of

"we

think

.?"

we

"yes.

.

perfected all science

first:

.

coming back

it's

.

Utopians

second:

.

.

wait a minute, yes

"wait,

ber

first:

have to

maybe you should."

"uh.

second:

i

.

.

think

.

.

.

(puzzled)

it?"

(continued on next page) [

7 ]


(continued from page 7)

the mist

second:

"a

.

.

but

yes.

.

.

.

.

the thought

.

.

causes ... a

.

new

sensation."

(distracted)

"what?"

first:

second:

(long pause) "pain."

what "human."

first:

"pain?

second

:

first:

"oh. (pause)

second:

second:

second:

that your

.

.

.

thought.?"

(vague)

not really."

.

mass immeshed

visualize a solid

"try.

in titron."

disassociation."

—complete

"no

.

commitment."

association,

.

.

first:

"commitment?" (vague)

second

:

first:

"i don't

second

:

first:

"oh."

second:

.

.

(anguished)

"i see.

first:

second:

was

"you don't understand, do you?"

"no

first:

(troubled)

... pain?"

only the result."

"no.

"oh."

first:

is

"being alive." .

.

"i didn't

.

understand.

.

.

."

(pained)

expect you ... to understand."

(straightens his back up) "i

must leave now.

(removes shroud, casts

approaching."

it

the time

is

.

.

.

rapidly

aside)

what are you doing?" (anxious) second: "leaving." (turns face away from other man) before you leave, what is our world dedicated to?" "wait first: (removes bandage from his eyes and turns into the second: "Blindness." first:

"what

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

mist and disappears)

PLACE FOR TRANSIENTS By Freda She floor

sits in

Richards

—bored and

the bus station

and watches a

sympathy for the

solitary ash light

woman who

tired.

She

How

flicks

her ashes on the

momentary The man across from her

on her hand.

cleans the floors.)

has white spots on his green argyles.

!

(She

feels

\

typical, she thinks, of people in j

a bus station.

The man had

looked like a fairly decent type, but then he

turned out to have spots on his socks.

Gazing around

1

!

at the people there, she

is

both revolted and

filled

with j

[

8

]

I


PLACE FOR TRANSIENTS (The pity she feels is brought on by the beer she had consumed before She hates bus she came in hopes of dulling the horror of the bus station.) while, and she stations. She can even get to hate the people in them after a pity.

The

has been there for almost an hour.

from the information booth

voice

She wishes she could

names a place that she has heard of but never visited. pay her money

and get on the bus and ride there, forgetting all responsibility.

Dreams.

A

short boy gallops by

—

of a sudden the

all

room

spins

and her eyes

start

water from the smoke of too many cigarettes. Her stomach is reeling and lurching in protest. So to help matters she walks over to buy a candy bar.

to

As huge

she

sits

woman

there, the

with tremendous

a thin inverted V.

The two

curls of hair piled girls

with her are

same

Two men

station.)

woman.

the

also

wear

the girls.

Two

They

other.

with

benches over

look as

if

their

slacks.

The

girls

woman

stays

and

serviceman across the room

definitely too-long hair

She says hello and

calls

sit

—

and have

slightly drunk,

rush off to have their pictures taken in a booth, while the

(A

in

on her forehead, her eyebrows

They

hair rolled and covered with sleazy scarves.

listens to a transistor radio.

walks

trio she has ever seen

most fantastic

come

is

tuned to the

and approach

in

them by name. Then, they

leave with

a young couple, happily intent upon each

they are on a honeymoon

—what a shame

to have to

spend even one minute of a honeymoon in a bus station, she thinks.

A

colored musician strolls

natural beat.

His hair

is

in,

his knees

and ankles bending

long, his pants tight,

which she assumes houses a

He

guitar.

sidewise glance at the brown-skinned girl

and he

continues

who

in a sort of

carries a large case

on by

her,

with a

The brownThey seem,

next to her.

sits

skinned girl looks up, and smiles fleetingly at him as he passes.

she muses, to have a friendship which has been born into them, even though she doesn't think they have ever met. She reflects for a it

is

that spontaneous affection springs

moment

of

how seldom

up between people today;

the prime

thought seems to be "don't get involved."

An

interesting philosophical discussion before this trip

depression which weighs on her head like a stone as she

the people in the station.

could claim her feels,

as

seat,

".

.

.

Claim your

seats.

.

.

."

sits in this

sits

there dissecting

How

she wishes she

or even actually be sure she had a place to claim.

do many people her

age, that she

is

station for transients

and waits and waits. [

9

]

She

being perpetually ousted from

everywhere, that she has nowhere really solid to stay. she

had prompted her

How

appropriately


Edward

An

Albee:

Existential Interpretation

By Barbara Melton With is

to

new problems

each generation

are born, and the task of a philosophy

provide a body of thoughts and ideas that can serve

which man can build

The

his life.

latest generation is existentialism,

almost

philosophy that has come to shape this

and

existential ideas

major American and European writers

all

foundation on

as a

permeate the works of

who

have written since

World War 11. The writer who has done the most to promote the popularity of existentialism is Jean-Paul Sartre, but there have been others whose works are profoundly influenced by existential thought. Among these writers is Edward Albee. Although he five plays

—

has produced a relatively small

amount

work

strains of existentialism are revealed in each of his plays.

Existentialism as

name

its

implies, concerns itself

with existence, and

it

mean

to

attempts to answer man's most fundamental question: what does exist.

of

As a

philosophy,

it

number

contains ideas about a

it

of themes:

1) exist-

ence before essence, 2) alienation of an individual from society, 3) despair caused by the anguish of alienation, 4) a realization of nothingness, 5) the absurdity of

life,

and 6) the absolute freedom of the individual.^

These are some

of the themes that are characteristic of Albee's plays,

This perspective

his heroes are basically existential heroes.

is

and

especially ap-

The American Dream j Who's Afraid of Virginia The Death of Bessie Smithj and The Zoo Story. In Albee's The American Dream, the problem involved is that of the fundamental question ^what does it mean to exist. As far as the individual

plicable to four of his plays:

W.oolff,

—

characters are concerned,

their

existence has

no meaning whatsoever.

In

Sartre's rejection statement of the Nobel Prize for Literature, he said that in order for existence to

of

some

The

sort.^

have any meaning, one must make a total commitment

character of

being lacks any commitment. things for her family. that there

Mommy

is

no

total

and Daddy

The

Grandma

one example of someone whose

is

She draws meaning for her

reader can

tell

life

by doing

little

by her attitude towards her family

commitment on her part

to the family.

for financial support, but she

She depends on

draws no pleasure or mean-

ing for her existence from them.

Daddy typical

is

as

uncommitted

as

Grandma

example of the hen-pecked husband.

is.

Throughout the play he

In no

his existential free will.

His actions are products

looks to her before every

word he

is

a

way does he ever exercise of Mommy's desires. He

utters in a gesture to obtain her approval.

According to existentialism, individual free will

[10]

is

the most difficult thing to


EDWARD

AN EXISTENTIAL INTERPRETATION

ALBEE:

maintain because

it

automatically implies alienation from one's society, and

the forces of society are working against the person

Daddy

is

Freedom, or the

Eliot

may have had

on

his free will.

Mommy.

in

is

concerned, she

is

mind when he wrote

"I have measured out

my

life

is

mostly determined

not one of Daddy's virtues.

"The Love Song

in

you know."* themselves.

She belongs to

Mrs. Barker

is

my

fingers in so

of J. Alfred

many

womens' clubs that are

five

S.

Mrs. Barker

with coffee spoons."^

"I've got

she describes herself:

T.

the type of individual

is

one of Albee's best examples of the uncommitted modern woman.

own words

is

acts

exist for one's freedom,

This, unfortunately,

Mrs. Barker

far as

Prufrock." is

one to

ability for

by one's courage.

As

who

eager to relinquish his freedom in favor of the authority of

In her

little pies,

directionless in

She

going in every direction and no direction.

not involved in any total commitment; therefore, in terms of existentialism,

her existence

meaningless.

is

Who's Afraid

of Virginia

Woolff

deals

with the problem of the

illusions

modern world and the alienation one knows when these illusions are shattered. In an article in The English Journal, John Killinger wrote: "Man becomes aware of the insane character one creates to sustain

of daily living

that he

is

an

and

:

his existence in the

in the instant that he

is

divested of his illusions he realizes

In Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolff the

alien in the world. "^

Martha and George, who can make no

principal characters involved are

tempt to communicate with each other except through characters are aware of a deep sense of alienation effort to

overcome

this,

whom

is

other,

and

in

an

they hope to attain some level of communi-

cation between their spiritual beings.

"With

from each

at-

of these

thy try to create a correlative for their inner selves,

a mythological son through

greatest illusion

Both

illusions.

However,

gone, their communication

away

also gone.

is

Martha and George

a virtuous display of cruelty,

secrets, stripping illusions

this fails

because

As

their

slash at each other's

In the

like layers of skin."*^

when

Killenger says

final

moments

of the play Albee reveals the anguish of the characters when George asks

Martha, "Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf ?" herself

and answers, "I

The Death before essence.

.

of Bessie

.

.

am

.

.

.

George

Smith concerns the

Martha, .

.

I

.

.

.

at this point accepts

am.

."^ .

.

existential concept of existence

Sartre explained existence before essence

when he wrote

that

grows up in the world, and defines himself afterAlbee creates a situation that coincides perfectly with the existential idea of the absurdity of life. The setting is a great white hospital wherein a white nurse and white intern are arguing about a ridiculous an individual

ward.^

first exists,

Within the

play,

(continued on next page)

[11]


EDWARD

ALBEE:

AN EXISTENTIAL INTERPRETATION \

(continued from page 11)

subject while without, a

Negro woman

is

The argument man wants to emergency treatment. The nurse

bleeding to death.

between the nurse and the intern involves the fact that a Negro get Bessie Smith into the white hospital for

j

'

|

!

and intern are concerned with the essence of Bessie Smith rather than her existence as an individual. of her cover-symbol as a

That is, they discriminate against her on the basis Negro rather than her existence as a human being.

human

Prejudices such as these lead only to a waste of

and contribute

life

I

i

Albee indicates by having Bessie Smith die a

to the absurdity of existence, as

needless death.

—

With The Zoo Story Albee creates his greatest existential hero The play unfolds in the tradition of absurdist drama. Peter, who is reading a book on a Sunday afternoon,

is

Jerry.

quietly

who

strangely interrupted by Jerry,

[

screams that he has just been to the zoo.

literally

nothing but a

is

series of personal, senseless,

Their whole conversation

and disconnected

At

questions.

j

j

every point Jerry attempts to fling accusations at Peter and imply things about

him that are not

true.

In existential terms, Jerry has come to realize the absurdity of

He

is

totally disgusted

my

beyond his

with

his

beaverboard wall

is

environment and everything in occupied by a colored queen

door open ... he has a Japanese kimono ...

brows, wear his kimono larger living

.

.

.

there's a

on the third

.

two

the

.

.

all

my

front rooms on

Puerto Rican family in one of them

floor, in

the front.

muffled, but very determined

.

.

.

I

know

.

is

the landlady

is

a

i

always keeps

pluck his eye-

floor are a little .

.

there's a lady

because she cries

all

the time,

ugly mean, stupid,

fat,

unwashed, misanthropic, cheap, drunken bag of garbage.

world.

"The room

it:

who

he does

his

.

."^ . j

Jerry

is

living in an atmosphere of squalor

and moral decadence.

The

!

other tenants are in complete despair with the hopelessness of their condition. It is this

awareness of hopelessness

or, as Sartre

would

say, nothingness, that

throws Jerry into despair and causes him to act as he does. of the absurdity of his existence

Make

you trying to do?

Once an alienated

from

his world.

that the landlady

to

owns:

person has to have some

this.

He

"It's just that

have to make a start somewhere.

way

Bring order

"What

are

|

,

?"^°

become aware of nothingness, he becomes

Jerry feels that he

overcome

His realization

revealed in his one question:

sense out of things?

existential hero has

makes two attempts

is

if

is

an

first tries

alien in his house

of dealing with

12

i

you can't deal with people, you

WITH ANIMALS! [

and

with the ferocious dog

Don't you

SOMETHING."^^

see:

A

Conse-

] I


EDWARD

ALBEE:

AN EXISTENTIAL INTERPRETATION

makes niimerous attempts to become friends with the dog that tear Jerry to pieces. The two come to some sort of understanding

quently, he

wants

to

they stare into each other's faces, and momentarily Jerry has overcome

when

his alienation.

The

title

The Zoo

of the play,

Story, has implications in terms of exis-

to the zoo to find out more about the

with people

way

animals exist with each other, and

It probably wasn't a fair test,

too.

by bars from everyone

else.

."^^

.

.

what with everyone separated

People are really

what

animal

causes Jerry's anguish and in a cage,

why

A

own

self

— they are

realization of this

he went to the zoo.

perhaps he saw the image of his

own being. Camus believed

animals

like

forever separated by invisible bars within their being. is

"I went

Jerry explains his reason for going to the zoo:

tential alienation.

Looking

at

an

a prisoner within

the cage of his

Albert

Man

this absurdity.

awareness of life in spite

it.

that life

must accept

Then he must

is

totally absurd, yet

one must

this absurdity only in that

defy

fight against

he maintains an

by "loving existence and clinging to

it

of it."^^

This rebellion against the absurdity of

life is

why

Jerry deliberately pro-

vokes Peter into a fight over the park bench.

Seemingly for no reason, Jerry

demands to have the whole bench for

and

at Jerry that he cannot

himself,

in

doing

Jerry creates

this

Peter finally becomes angry enough to scream back

another absurd situation.

have the bench, but in the middle of

his

screaming

"POLICE! POLICE! I feel

he suddenly becomes aware of the ridiculousness of the situation: I

warn

you,

ridiculous

to myself; I

ment

I'll

...

I

have you arrested. don't care

want you

Can you

your honor?

Another

said not.

I

want

bench

this

Jerry comes back with a superb state-

IT!"^*

of the absurdity of the situation:

Is this

I

makes any sense or

if it

OFF

POLICE!

"Are these the things men

think of anything

fight for?

more absurd ?"^°

basic precept of existentialism concerns the individual

and

his free

"man must accept individual responsibility for his own be."^^ coming ... a man is the sum total of the acts that make up his life. Right up to the final moment of the play, Jerry remains a product of his

will.

That

is,

.

individual free will. existential death.

of

madmen)

there

is

His

Camus wrote

implies that one has

no profound reason for

Undoubtedly

act

final

this

awareness

is

one of

but even this

suicide,

.

is

an

that a voluntary death (except in the case

come to

realize that all

is

ridiculous and that

living.^^ is

what motivates Jerry

to provoke an argu-

(continued on page 33)

[13]



The Agitator Living in wonder

Torn by

circles,

far flung thoughts,

Pushed long beyond strength,

Knowing

He

of strange meanings.

moves.

In a shadow world of people, Seeking ever the

infinite,

Stirring others to think.

Grading dimensions of work. Feels out,

Looks beyond, Is cursed,

Misunderstood

And why?

—Gayle Ray

[15

J


Forget I

wish I could stop caring

Whether your

love

is

mine

or not. I

wish

I

could stop hoping

That some day mine would yours.

Then

I

could forget

all

the

memories stored, inside,

Forget the

way you

are,

Forget your eyes looking in mine, and your

and your hand on mine.

voice,

I

wish

I

could throw

away

All remembrances of the past. I

wish

I

could cry

And catch the tears, then Throw them aside with all that

is

you of

my

thoughts.

Then

I

could forget you.

Forget that

we

Forget that

my

ever met. heart once

was

free.

Forget

all

the years gone

by.

But

I

cannot forget, and I

cry.

—Maria Grant [16]

be


Divestment No

longer can I be alone,

(grey and black slanting rooftops.) I

need you to be whole. (straight planks,

Hewn

of pine and oak.

Green and mossy banks, Stagnant,

murky

Choking with

Water

liquid,

parasites,

flowers.

Rotting timbers, grown over with fungus,

Muddy and rust. Obscured by wild weeds. White blossoms Dropping

Dank

petals

on the

water.)

窶認reda Richards

[17]


THE EXHIBITION By Amanda Ruff town long before I found occasion one morning I went there to get her recommendation of a dentist. Mrs. Stewart was very friendly. She had called on me when I first moved into the neighborhood and had invited me to come over to see I

had not been living

to call

on

my

her anytime

my

visit

stay

I

felt

coffee

coffee

lives.

We

was not

delicious,

talked of

and

many

had discussed

surprised

activities

I

her.

found

things,

She was a bridge player, and

found that these two

We

I

when the mission of When she insisted that I

Therefore,

and conversation with

was hot and

conversationalist.

our

the need of company.

had been accomplished,

and have

The

in

neighbor next door.

my

neighbor to be an easy

comparing the similar

facets of

I a private art collector; but

we

gave us the same self-satisfaction and happiness.

my hometown

and were beginning to talk of

hometown, when we heard the postman

outside.

[18]

this,

her


THE EXHIBITION Telling

me

that she

Mrs. Stewart excused sipping

my

letter

from her

Nebraska, I sat,

An

odd

face while she read a formal-looking engraved invi-

She appeared to be both excited and anxious

tation.

sister in

go to the door and bring dn the mail.

second cup of coffee while she opened and read her mail.

came over her

expression

as she looked at

it

with

Finally she finished going through the mail and turned back to

absorption.

me.

was expecting a

herself to

"Did you hear from your sister?" I asked. "No", she murmured absently. Then she handed the engraved

me

to me, telling

to read

it.

"You

read:

I

invitation

are cordially invited to attend

an exhibition of paintings by Miss Patricia Forrester at the Forrester Estate

on Willow Drive^

at

two

o'clock in the afternoon on Tuesday, the twentieth

of October, nineteen hundred and sixty-four." I sat,

comment or

looked at her, waiting for some further

turned to

me and

"From

explanation.

She

After several moments she slowly

deep in thought, looking into space.

began her story.

was brought home from the hospital as a baby until the day I got married, I lived on Willow Drive about a mile from the Forrester Estate. The huge white house with the stately pillars on Willow Drive has always fascinated me. Not that I have ever seen it up close, of course. The house sits away from the road I don't know exactly how far but it's close enough for anyone to see that it's a magnificent house. Even when I was a the time I

little girl, I

had longed to walk up that long, straight driveway, covered with

white pebbles and bordered with dark green boxwoods, and knock loudly on

But

the door with the big brass knocker. this to

me, and so

I

my

mother had always forbidden

had only paused at the entrance of the driveway to gaze

longingly at the big house.

On

those occasions as a girl, I had often seen the

gardener neatly trimming the boxwoods.

The

Forresters had always been

extremely wealthy, and everyone had always marveled at their well-kept "I attended high school with Patricia Forrester.

estate.

She had gone to a private

school until the ninth grade, but her parents finally allowed her to attend public schools after she had begged and pleaded with

She often told us in high school

eighth grade.

how

them

all

during the

she had watched us other

kids passing by her driveway in the old yellow school bus in the aftersoons

and had heard us singing and laughing to be a part of the fun

"I liked Patricia, but I didn't

could

was

tell

noisily

know

her very well.

she wanted to be one of us, but

different

and how she had always longed

we knew.

sort of aloof.

somehow

None

of us did.

she never did

She didn't have any brothers or

fit in.

sisters,

We She

so she

(continued on next page)

[19]


THE EXHIBITION never

(continued from page 19)

completely at ease around other kids.

felt

make

tried so hard to please us, to

All through high school she

But for some reason she

us proud of her.

was never able to become one of us. "When we were seniors, Patricia started dating Bill Hutchins. That Patricia had never dated anyone else as far surprised all of us tremendously. But she ^well, he just wasn't her type. as we knew. And Bill Hutchins

—

quickly

fell in

"We

love with him, or so she thought.

why

was dating Patricia. It was the was awfully good-looking, but reputation. He was a real Don Juan. He very good he didn't have a was known for dating girls to get what he wanted and then leaving them He had never dated a girl more than five or six times. stranded suddenly. never could figure out

Bill

lure of the Forrester money, I suppose.

Bill

—

was different he didn't stop dating her after five or six dates. "Patricia and Bill had been dating for about six months when I heard I stopped Patricia in the hall that they were thinking of getting married. one day and asked her about this. She seemed a little surprised that I knew, She told me that but she was very happy as she told me that it was true. her parents didn't completely approve of Bill and that they wouldn't want

But

Patricia

Therefore, she had not told them.

her to marry him.

planned to elope following graduation and asked

She confided that they not to

tell

anyone.

She

so happily in love with Bill that I could not help feeling happy for her.

was

At

me

last she

had found a place where she

"Since

Mr. and Mrs.

felt accepted.

Forrester never had too

much

to

do with the

rest

of the community, they never heard the rumors that Patricia and Bill were

going to be married.

and

Bill eloped.

And

When

so,

on the Saturday following graduation, Patricia

the Forresters did find out, they were very upset and

Determined that they weren't going

they tried to get the marriage annulled. to be torn apart, Patricia

and

Bill rented an

apartment over on the other side

of town.

we

"After they moved,

We

were

And

all

besides,

busy with our

own

goals

them

we drove

for several years.

and ambitions and our own

we'd never gotten to know Patricia very well.

about her except when

"Then

didn't hear anything of

We

families.

soon forgot

past the Forrester Estate.

we heard that Mr. and Mrs. They had been to Paris to buy a

suddenly, about four years later,

Forrester had been killed in a plane crash. painting

—

And on

the

I've forgotten

way

what

it

was now, but

I believe it

was by Rembrandt.

back, their plane had crashed, killing all thirty-nine passengers

aboard and the four crew members.

We thought of visiting Patricia to console [20]


THE EXHIBITION her in what must have been a period of great sorrow for her, but she and had moved again, and none of us knew where they were living. "The big house continued to stand as proud and majestic as it always

In the mornings the gardener could

still

did.

be seen trimming the boxwoods along

Everything looked as

the pebbly driveway.

Bill

it

always had

Was no one living in the big house. "Then one day, having lunch with some of

my

—but

friends,

I

knew

I

heard that

there

were coming back to live in the big house. We were all very excited. We wondered how five years of marriage had changed Patricia and how it had changed Bill. We were sure that both of them must have Patricia and Bill

had to change quite a

bit to

make

their

marriage a success.

We

could hardly

wait to see them.

"Soon

after that

see Bill at all.

We

we saw

Patricia

moving

into the big house, but

left her,

didn't

decided to pay her a visit the next week, but then

heard that Bill had not come back with Patricia.

had

we

The rumors had

and that they were in the process of getting a divorce.

information set us back a

bit,

and

we

decided not to

visit

it

we

that he

This new

her after

all,

for

(continued on next page)


THE EXHIBITION we were

afraid

we

(continued from page 21)

wouldn't know what to say to her under the embarrassing

circumstances.

"Soon, however,

my

in the

months following her return

on

call

when

me

But

all

were turned away

Finally I stopped trying to see her. to see

any of

"Still I

each time

It

call before

they went to the

same manner by the

in the

butler.

seemed evident that she didn't want

us.

was very much

heard that the divorce was

and

interested in the mystery concerning Patricia

but the big house remained impenetrable to everyone.

Bill,

And

over.

politely that Patricia did not feel like receiving

and many of them did not even bother to

too,

come

to

Eventually others found their curiosity urging them on

callers that day.

big house.

So,

her on the

I called

visit her,

if it

the butler answered, telling

em-

I talked to her.

Drive, I tried several times to

Each time before I planned to would be convenient for me

her.

phone to ask any

Willow

to

my

overwhelmed

curiosity to see Patricia again

barrassment at perhaps not knowing w'hat to say

final.

No

A

year later

I

one was ever seen going into or coming

from the big house. The only sign of life about the estate was the gardener trimming the boxwoods along the driveway. The house was as it had ever been big, majestic, proud. But within the house Patricia lived secluded, Patricia and Bill eloped ten years ago, and none of us have like a hermit.

—

seen

them snce then."

Mrs. Stewart stopped talking and looked over, but I also

so enthralled

knew

was

at

me.

knew her

I

that the real ending of the story in

yet to occur.

I

could not

which

let that story

I

was

story

had become

be told to

me

without the ending.

"Mrs. Stewart," art collector. to

attend

Do

I

suddenly

said,

"As

I told

you

earlier,

I'm a private

you think you could manage to get an invitation for

the exhibition with you?

me

I'm very interested in seeing Miss

Forrester's paintings."

"I don't think Patricia would mind.

My neighbor said

as she

went

Why

to the phone.

don't

the butler allowed her to speak to Miss Forrster. receiver, she said.

turned back to

"She seemed very glad

welcome

to bring

me and nodded to

know

that I

we

find out right

She placed the

When

call

she put

time

down

the

her head in assent.

"Yes," she

was coming, and she

said I

lay between the arrival of the invitation

exhibition, I often thought of the story of Patricia Forrester. it

now?"

this

was

any friend with me."

During the week that

if

and

could be possible that

Mr. and Mrs.

[22]

I

and the

wondered

Forrester had protected their


THE EXHIBITION much

daughter so

finally able to

that they had destroyed her

break through to

—

so

much

was unable

reality, she

that,

when

she

regardless of Bill Hutchin's past reputation, I felt rather sorry for

was

And

to exist there?

him

for trying to help Patricia learn to live in reality, after she had been failed

by her parents, must have been a great

The day

and

my

neighbor and

I left for

was exactly two

When we turned into the driveway of the Forrester my neighbor had described it. The estate had up very well. When we reached the door of the big house o'clock, and I could see that my companion had become

The

butler received us, took our wraps, and led us into a big

Willow Drive

together.

Estate, I found

to be just as

it

obviously been kept it

task.

of the exhibition finally arrived

very excited.

room which was

living

But

it

exquisitely furnished in the finest Chippendale style.

wasn't the furniture that so completely captured

walls were adorned with

two

One was

paintings.

my

attention.

The

a portrait of Frederic

Chopin, done by the great French painter Eugene Delacroix, a contemporary

The

was the only landscape ever painted by Jacques Louis David, "View of the Luxembourg Gardens", painted from his cell window while David was imprisoned for some months in the Luxembourg Palace after In my studies of art history these two paintings had the fall of Robespierre.

of Chopin's.

always interested but

other

me

immensely.

had often seen reproductions of them,

I

would have the opportunity

I

had never thought that

I

had been studying the two paintings and was then wondering what other

I

treasures this magnificent house might hold

when

I

to see the originals.

realized that our arrival

was being announced to Miss Forrester, who had just joined us. Miss Forrester was a small^ rather attractive woman with deeply expressive eyes. These eyes seemed to be pleading silently for her acceptance. She was very quiet and obviously ill at ease in a crowd although she appeared to be trying very hard to

mates

fulfill

who were

her duties as a hostess.

By

2 :30 the twenty former

class-

present had been served punch and were conversing in the

During a lull in the conversation Miss Forrester spoke to the butler, and we were led into a small gallery lined with paintings. While the other guests walked around the gallery, looking at the paintings, I lingered in the doorway and watched their reactions. They were going through a

living room.

routine sort of admiration of the paintings as they looked at each one, but

seemed to

me

that they didn't understand them.

stood by, pleased and smiling happily.

them proud

knew

of her;

and

it

However, Miss Forrester

She had wanted so much to make

this time, as she listened to their

words

of praise, I

she felt that she had succeeded. (continued on page

[23]

25')



THE EXHIBITION When

the throngs around the paintings had spread out some, I walked

into the gallery

me.

The

(continued from page 23)

and began to study each of the paintings.

What

saw amazed

I

composition of each of the paintings was executed in perfect detail

;

the lines were sharp and clear in the extremely realistic paintings which

showed perfect balance. The colors and subject matter, however, were gloomy and depressing. In each of the paintings was portrayed a woman destroyed by forces over which she had had no control.

Then

I

to leave.

turned and saw at

"Have you

my

side

Mrs. Stewart, who seemed

seen all of the paintings?" she asked.

one was with Miss Forrester at the moment, and so

we

We

to be ready

saw that no

took the opportunity

to thank her for allowing us to see her paintings.

As we turned out of the driveway and left the big house behind, Mrs. Stewart said, "I wonder why in the world she chose such gloomy subjects!" I made no reply, but thought of the woman whose life those paintings depicted. Still, I

thought, her paintings were really good.

The

subject matter

was

indeed grisly and bizarre, but the composition was excellent and the paintings

were deeply meaningful to the of Toulouse-Lautrec

many

— and

woman who had

then, Gaugin.

great artists there have been

who

have lived

[25]

Then

painted them.

And, suddenly,

I

I

thought

wondered how

at variance

with

society.


Lines Composed While Lying on One's

Back Viewing Sunbeams


Making The Swing Go By

The

Betty Hodnett

experience of teaching another person something comes to

whether we become professional teachers or

Even

not.

be seen teaching each other things occasionally with the educator.

If

you stand near a

all of

us

preschoolers can

little

skill of

a professional

swings in a playground area on a summer

set of

day, you will eventually witness at least one small teacher explaining to a

making the swing

smaller student the finer points of

swing and herself in another,

situate her pupil in one

first

The

go.

When

admonishing him to watch her and do what she does.

more than a

at imitating her result in nothing

teacher will the while

all

the pupil's efforts

jiggling of the seemingly

immobile swing, she will carefully explain the steps to be taken as she demon-

A whimpering,

strates them.

"Yes, you can;

"I can't do that," will be met with a reassuring,

just takes practice,"

it

If this

is

the small teacher might even offer a ride on her

not enough encouragement,

new

tricycle as a

reward for

few more minutes of trying. When the exhausted pupil is finally encouraged to success, however mediocre, both pupil and teacher go running to

just a

mommy

to tell her all about

it.

In instances such

methods of teaching are employed If so

much

how much more

from teaching an

entire

room

full of students

ship with one single pupil, but there

take

its place.

from twenty as a

And

little

child teaching her little

pleasure should a professional teacher gain

Here, of course, there

finds interesting?

world over, the

daily.

pleasure can be gained by a

brother to swing,

as this the

here, the joy of

is

is

something that she knows and

not the closeness of the relation-

the diversity of

accomplishment

is

many

personalities to

multiplied by anywhere

Everything points towards teaching

to thirty-five smiling faces.

who

rewarding experience, but do those

are preparing to experience

it

really consider it so?

That

the student teacher

be afraid or worried ing situation

many

is

who

is

going out to meet her

hardly logical.

how

to use them.

She knows

witnessed both good teaching and bad.

what

to do, but

should

times before, but she has also been educated in the methods,

techniques, psychology, and philosophy of teaching.

materials and

first class

She has not only experienced a teachShe knows where to find

principles of discipline

In short, she ought to

comments made by most student

teachers-to-be

know

show

and has exactly

that they

are not confident of this knowledge.

The

question of

why

this

is

so naturally arises here.

What

undermines

(continued on page 29)

[27]


^^

\ll

'

'

/

-

''

vC^&Jf^^K^t^

':a^m'M<'

-t'<^^

..:^j5tv^-<

'.^^'^


MAKING THE SWING GO

(continued from page 27)

the confidence of a prospective teacher as she gradually approaches the final

her knowledge?

test of

in

The

answers are probably as numerous

as the prospec-

but there are some things that would more than likely figure

tive teachers,

them all. Looking over the preparations a prospective teacher must undergo

profession gives a

clue to this problem.

first

The

child

little

who

for her

teaches her

small brother to swing, seems instinctively to do the right things to get him

After

to learn.

all,

she

knows her

little

brother's personality

and tempera-

ment. Through the experience of having him grow up with her, she has learned how to handle him. She knows his abilities and recognizes herself She is confident that she can teach him as more advanced and experienced. teacher has a somewhat different preparation. She to swing. The professional has been in course after course that has emphasized her lack of knowledge

which she has chosen. Studies of pupil individuality, classroom problems, and curriculum development give her information that she did not in the field

know

While

existed.

actually preparing her to teach, they give her a feeling

of inadequacy because she realizes that professional teaching

anybody can all of

many

that is

a

All of a sudden she wonders

do.

stufiF

when

how

she

she stands before a real class.

growing panic which culminates in a

is

is

not something

going to remember

The

result of this for

stoic determination to survive

the experience.

A

second clue to the problem

lies in

the size of classes.

The

thought of

facing approximately twenty-five people in a formal situation has a bad enough efiect

on most of us

many

across to that

courses

in itself

how to get a point many beginning speech

without the added worry of Unfortunately, too

individuals.

emphasize personal appearance,

characteristic

mannerisms, strange

Whether make the already shy person more concentrate on what he is saying a problem

pronunciations, and voice quality instead of content presentation. this

is

a good idea or not,

self-conscious

and

it

does serve to

able to

less

—

professional teachers cannot afford to have.

experience to prove to selves

and

dispell this

Unlike the

little

many

It

takes an actual classroom

teachers that they can completely forget them-

worry.

preschooler

who had

deal with, the professional teacher

only one well-known individual to

must cope with a room

full of strangers.

Convincing herself that she can learn their individual personalities their names, presents another

many

problem for

many

as well as

a prospective teacher.

How

times the words, "I just can't keep names and faces together," are ex-

claimed on a college campus by those

who

are being repeatedly admonished to (continued on next page)

[29]


MAKING THE SWING GO name

learn every student by

tion lies a third clue to the

(contimied from page 29)

as soon as possible,

if

worrying done by many

In

not sooner.

who

this situa-

are preparing to teach,

especially in the field of secondary education.

Can

there be a purpose for this situation, or

Who

another question.

lies in

just an inevitable evil

Perhaps the best answer, and certainly the most

a hazard of the profession? reassuring one,

is it

is

better prepared to teach the

self-confidence necessary for learning to take place than

taught

it

someone who has

to herself?

And

There

Was Adam

By Donna Weatherly

One bright spring morning it happened. Somebody got mad at somebody. Maybe an officer misread his signals. No one could explain its beginning, but it

did happen.

In

less

Cairo,

Panama City

than ten minutes, Earth was consumed in flaming

Moscow, Washington, Tokoyo, Beruit, everything went up and down filtered two and a half

London,

nuclear destruction.

Paris,

billion years of fallout.

No

one could say

how much

two survivors found one or

time elapsed.

two^ more.

Men

Months.

Years.

Gradually

one group found another and began to send out signals of any and

how much world

Reports came back.

they had

Western and

centrally located to somebody's

bomb

or

began to peek outside their

shelters to look for fellow survivors of the nuclear destruction.

to find out

One

all

types

left.

eastern

Europe unrecognizable.

sights.

Anyway,

it

was gone.

It

was

The

United States was completely annilated Russia along with her. Islands were blown into non-existence. Portions of Australia sank beneath the sea the ;

rest uninhabited.

It took a

themselves together. of

Most

long time, but these survivors gradually gathered of

them were from

South America and coastal Africa.

tiny unnoticed islands, parts

Certain scientific

[30]

men

collected their


AND THERE WAS ADAM and determined the

respective brains,

The

location they chose

Honduras

manage

to

up

set sail for the islands.

Not everyone

arrived.

Those who

complete the trip settled on the main island to await the

On

would gather

Day

in

an appointed place

their governing bodies, elect leaders, or whatever.

Somehow rumors

of Council. to set

of three small islands off the coast of

in the Carribbean Sea.

Small boats did

humanity to begin anew.

safest place for

was a chain

this

day

all

the people

Somebody said the scientists who had been so instrumental in locating survivors wanted the government to be under the rule of a scientific oligarchy. Others, it was rumored, were fascists or communists. Some were got started.

even alleged anarchists.

community broke out into fights. No guns or weapons of any mechanical sort were acquired because the people were too frightened to allow them on the island. But as always, man's genius at inventing destruction for his fellowmen induced clever means of sabotaging, lynching, midnight murdering, and otherwise eliminating undesirable elements among their number.

The

tiny

In the end, the three islands housed three camps: the Leftists, the Right-

and the Mediators.

ists,

The

Leftist faction, according to the Rightists,

composed of murderous radicals; and the Rightist Leftists,

—

point

was composed

the Mediators

of

murderous

radicals.

Both, however, agreed on one

were two-faced, therefore a common enemy.

Tension

between islands mounted rapidly, and within a few days a raging ensued.

By

No

battle

the time the sun had set on that day, no one remained alive save

for one small boy

At

was

faction, according to the

who had

scaled a tall tree to escape the combatants.

dusk, he descended from his perch and began searching for survivors.

one had known

religious leaders

who

he was or where he had been found.

One

of the

had said he just walked up to him one day shortly after he

had landed on the

among them and

island.

waited.

The boy had The boy was

never spoken.

He

young, yet fairly

had only stood

tall

and strong-

limbed, with a mass of golden curls.

The boy spoke.

stopped suddenly in the wreckage and listened.

"This

is

Mankind,"

said the Father.

Son.

[31]

"Yes,

I

His Father

know," answered the


Conformity What lies in my past Is my future. What I amj I always shall Dumb, blind, and stupid^

be.

This, then this will I stay.

For what I am now, I

shall forever be.

I look on the world with scorn Spineless

worms

Conforming

Sit there

they be!

to others' desires.

Losing the will Sit there

and and

to be free.

rot in your pleasuresstay a fool

Stand not for your rights as free Sit there

and

like the rest be.

Cast not your look of scorn.

Pass not your judgment on me,

I ask not for pity or praise, I

am what

I always shall

be.

I shall stand upright though oft wrong

And

scream to the wind

"Leewe me free!" For what I am now, I

shall forever be.

—Lynette Sykes [32]


EDWARD

ALBEE:

AN EXISTENTIAL INTERPRETATION (coiitinued

ment with falls

And

Peter.

gesture as master of his

in his final

on Peter's knife to an existentially

Edward

feel alienated

his

many other contemporary heroes. They are all aware of

from the world and despair

to exist as products of their

own

own

fate,

Jerry

justifiable death.

Albee, like

themes through

from page 13)

free will

writers, reveals existential

the absurdity of life: they

in their condition; they

attempt

and they rebel against the utter

;

nothingness that they come to realize.

Footnotes

2.

Gordon E. Bigelow, "A Primer of Existentialism," College English, XXIII (December, 1961), pp. 172-177. Jean-Paul Sartre, "News of the Week in Review," The Neiv York Times, October

3.

25, 1964, p. T. S. Eliot,

1.

1.

5.

"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," The Norton Anthology of English Literature, (ed.) M. H. Abrams (New York, 1962), II, p. 1469. Edward Albee, The American Dream (New York, 1961), p. 40. John Killinger, "Existentialism and Human Freedom," The English Journal, L

6.

Killinger, p. 310.

7.

Edward Albee, fFho's Afraid of Virginia JFoolf (New York, 1963), p. 242. Jean-Paul Sartre, "Existentialism is a Humanism," Existentialism From Dostoevsky to Sartre, (ed.) Walter Arnold Kauffman (New York, 1956), p. 269. Edward Albee, The Zoo Story (New York, 1959), pp. 32-33.

4.

(May, 1961),

8.

9.

10.

11.

12. 13. 14.

15. 16. 17.

p. 310.

Albee, p. 34. Albee, p. 49. Albee, p. 42. Killinger, p. 310. Albee, The Zoo Story, p. 55.

Albee, p. 56. Bigelow, p. 177. Albert Camus, The

Myth

of Sisyphus

(New

York, 1955),

p.

17.

Bibliography 1.

2.

The American Dream. New York: Coward-McCann, Inc., The Death of Bessie Smith. New York: Coward-McCann,

Albee, Edward. Albee, Edward.

1961. Inc.,

1959. 3.

4.

5.

6.

Albee, Edward. The Zoo Story. New York: Coward-McCann, Inc., 1959. Bigelow, Gordon E. "A Primer of Existentialism." College English. XXIII (December, 1961), pp. 172-178. Camus Albert. The Myth of Sisyphus. New York: Randon House, 1955. Eliot, T. S. "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Edited by M. H. Abrams. New York: W. W. Norton &

Company, 7.

Inc.,

1962.

Killinger, John.

"Existentialism and

Human

Freedom."

The English

Journal,

L

(May, 1961), pp. 308-315. 8.

9.

Sartre, Jean -Paul. "Existentialism is a Humanism." Existentialism From Dostoevsky to Sartre. Edited by Walter A. Kauffman. New York: Meridian Books,

1956. Sartre, Jean-Paul. 26, 1964, p.

"News

of the

Week

in

1.

[33]

Review."

AVw

York Times.

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