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VTATE TEACHERS COLLEGE

--

FARMVILLE, VIRGINIA


/

.

l/O^ Q^ W^^ ^OOS£

me ofiee dood —cRASttes T/mooeHme Riii/um' fence/

1

LONG- EXPERIENCE HAS

TAUGHT CLYOE GORDON NEVER TO SHOW FEAR TO AN ANIMAL. HE STANDS HI3 GROUND... 5PEAIC.INSSOFTLY, INSISTEMTLY... WHILE

DIVERTING HER ATTENTION

WITH BROOM HANDLE

,

* TRUE, TOO, IN

CHOOSINO A cigarette! WITH SMOKER

AFTER SMOKER WHO TRIED AND

COMPAREO-CAMELS ARE THE "CHOICE OF experience"! B. J. Beniolds Tobacco Co., WlosU>n-S>Iem. N. C.

WAS

''^THAT

CLOSE, CHIEF,

Y^THANKS..?^

BUT you SURE HANDLED THINGS right!. ..HAVE

Let your

EXPERIENCE

)

tell

ycOMES IN HANDY

"T-Zone"

you why!

WHETHER YOU'RE HANDLING ANIMALS OR CHOOSING A cigarette! that's

why

I

SMOKE camels'

T for Taste . T for Throat .

.

.

ing

.

that's your provground for any

cigarette

See

General Curator and Oircetor

StatM Island Zoo

According to a Nationwide survey:

MORE DOCTORS SMOKE CAMELS THAN ANY OTHER CIGAREHE When

113,597 doaors were asked by three independent research orgam2ations to name the

cigarette

they

smoked,

more doctors named Camel than any other brand!


STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE PARMVILLE, VIRGINIA Vol.

XI

November,

1948

CONTENTS STORIES:

WE ARE TWENTY-ONE ME AN' THE ELEPHUNT

Janice Slavin

3

Maria Jackson

5

Joan Prichett Peggy Lloyd

10 8

Beverley Smethie

11

Ruth Eggleston

12 14 18

FEATURES: JOHN'S LETTER

MUSIC—STUFFED SHIRT STYLE LIFE AT

S.

T.

C

9

AND SO I LIVE SCHOOL DAZE FROM A FRESHMAN PSALM CIV POETRY:

TO YOU RATS LITTLE FOG GHOST IN NOVEMBER

Anne Langbein Barbara Andrews

2

SELECTED

7

7

REVIEWS:

RUNNING OF THE TIDE DONA BARBARA RACHEL AND THE STRANGER ONE TOUCH OF VENUS BETWEEN THE COLUMNS

Dalila Agostini Dalila Agostini Janice Slavin Janice Slavin Love Bentley and Katie Cobb

19 19

20 20 16

THE STAFF Anne Langbein

Editor

Managing Editor Business Manager

Mary

Short Story Editor

L.

Meredith

Polly Nasser

Essay Editor Poetry Editor

Book Reviews

Betty Jefferson Movie Reviews

Janice Slavin

Eula Ayres

Art Editor

Betty Spindler

Humor

Dalila Agostini

Staff Photographer

Martha Hatcher.

Business Assistants:

Barbara Andrews

Editors

circulation

Love Bentley, Katie Cobb Lee Robertson

Maude Savage

Manager

Mildred Evans, Patsey Gravley

Board Art Assistants:

Pat Paddison,

J.

Helen Arrington Turner, R- Edwards

Lou Shelor, Ruth Eggleston, Beverley Smethie, Maria of Contributors:

Lila Easley,

Jackson, Lois Callahan.


;

TO YOU RATS

now, that awful day,

'Tis over

When

reigning Sophs held you at bay.

With your noses and hair askew

How

you did scrape and bow and stew!

Yet praises rang throughout the

halls,

As you Rats stood with backs

How

to walls.

you shivered, feared and shook

When Sophs

gave you that ghastly look!

You counted boards You

really

But glory

be,

And you

;

you,

bunched

like

grapes

formed the strangest shapes.

"Tis over

now"

survived

We know

!

.

.

.

not how.

Good sports you were you showed your ;

You

did not even say,

The time

will

"Enough!"

come when you

The reigning Sophs

will be

of S. T. C.

The Editor

stuff..


!

)

We Are Twenty-One Janice Slavin,

HOR

twenty-one long years, we had waited for our privilege of voting in the 1948 presidential election. But at the time of the election, the political issues had so hopelessly confused our minds, we didn't know what to do. There were four principal

parties

And

!

of

course,

there

were four principal candidates one a Democrat, one s Dixiecrat, one a Republican, and one a so-called Progressive. Had such f;S that evei- happened before in the history of these United States? Of course, it had not! It looked as if Fate had framed us :

twenty-one-year-olders

Last summer, we read and read, and we

and listened to the radio speakers. the time came for the nominating conventions in Philadelphia, we stuck by the radio rapt. We just had to have our minds clarified. In normal times we would have needed to understand the platforms of only two major candidates. But now that was only 50 9^ of what twenty-one-yearolders needed to know. We talked Dewey; we talked Wallace; we talked Truman and Thurmond; and we talked Civil Rights, High Tariffs and States' Rights. But the more we talked, the greater our confusion listened

And when

became.

We

went

to our

professors, to our par-

ents and friends, and to our ministers for their points of view we even went to poli;

tical rallies.

And we

But even with

all

read more and more. that our confusion in-

creased.

By

we weren't even

this time,

jsure to

which party we should pledge our allegiance. Of course, the regular Democratic party was ours by inheritance a sort of

—

birthright.

But after

erners treasure

Rights? not just

above

all,

all

didn't

we South-

things

States'

Maybe we should be Dixiecrats, Democrats. Or maybe, we should

'50

Dewey had what

vote Republican. to clean

New

up

York.

it

took

That meant some-

It means that possibly Dewey was an able leader. But when Taft came out with the statement that the Republican campaign should be waged on the con-

thing to us. really

between governmental philosophies, that meant nothing to us. Governmental Philosophies! Even the term was bewildering to us twenty-one-year olders. (Perhaps at twenty-one, we were too young and flict

uninformed to catch

At

last we, the

on.)

twenty-one-year olders

here at S. T. C, began to wonder for whom the Shmoos would vote. Would these saintlike little Shmoos stick together and not split the Solid South? Or would they turn Dixiecrats? Or would they vote the straight Republican ticket? Maybe, we had lost out by not taking a stiff course in Shmoo-ology. We did read (in the comics) that a representative had been sent from Washington to Dogpatch to dig up some information about the candidates. Unfortunately, however, he hadn't returned by November 2. Perhaps, Hairless Joe and Lonesome Pole Cat gave him too much of their home-

brewed Kickapoo Joy Juice! But after all, we twenty-one-year olders were not the only "unsophisticates" who were puzzled. One day in October when two of us were walking down Main Street in Farmville, we passed two weather-beaten old farmers who had propped themselves against one of the town's big trash cans. They, too, were discussing the coming election.

In between chews on his

tobacco, one of

as fer as

I

kin

wad

of

them drawled, "Wal, now

.see,

thar's jes one

man

run-

and that's that thar man Truman!" "Truman, hell!", boomed the second

nin',

farmer.

"And

as far as

Henry Wallace,

(Continued on page 21


THE COLONNADE

i

7 wanted

to

see

that Elephunt!"


;

ME

AN' THE ELEPHUNT Maria Jackson, First

XT

wuz

Prise

Winner Short Story Contest

seventy-five years ago this very

afternoon.

I

wuz

lyin' right

here prop-

ped up against the maple tree 'bout half asleep an' feelin' kind of cool an' dirty. 0' course, that tree wuzn't near so big as it is now, but it sure made a good prop fo'* a tired little feller who'd spent the best part of his ten years whoopin' it up for his poor Ma. Well, anyway, I wuz lyin' right here all scrooched up behind the maple to keep from takin' a bath. Tildy was on the back porch hollerin' in her organ-grinder voice, "Ebbie! Ebbie! Ebenezer Jerome Prichett!" yur maw wants youunn!" when all of a sudden, I saw it for the first time. Right smack across the street from our house in the baseball field, they had put a new sign, an' even from where I was, I could tell it wuzn't no "C. C. C. sign for chest colds", neither. There wuz a great big pink thing in the middle with red hair, an' right along side of the pink thing was somethin' that looked like a cage, an' way corner wuz a wuz a just had to find out if it wUiZ, so I kept in the shadder of the maple till I had

down

in the

Well,

I

.

all the way down to the front hedge, an' then I just crawled through. Well, I guess ole Tildy was still grindin' out "Ebenezer Jerome Pritchett" as loud as ever, but I didn't hear a thing, not a blessed thing. Right underneath last years' fat lady an' last year's lion on the new circus poster wuz a real, sure enough, honest-to-goodness ELEPHUNT!! An' it wuz wearing a hat over one eye.

sneaked

Ma

didn't have no use a-tall for circuses, knew, though I hadn't ever asked her, that she wouldn't have any use a-tall for an'

I

ELEPHUNTS, Ma had a lot

even of

if

u,se

'52

they did wear a hat. for boys that wore

hats.

I

always

lost

never had a hat

I'd

had

mine myself, but then like that

ELEPHUNT

on.

It didn't look nothin' like the white bowlers that Ma liked an' that ole George Fisher wore. It wuz red with a green bill on the front, to keep the sun out most likely, an' it had a purple feather stuck on the side. I sure wanted to see the purple chicken that feather came out of, but more than that I TO SEE THAT ELEPHUNT!! I just had to see him. An' that meant I had to sugar up Ma.

WANTED

I

rible

knew pretty well that she'd be termad if I didn't come in for that bath;

I crawled along the hedge until I wuz out of sight of the house, an' then I cut loose around the block. Tildie was still wheezin' away on the back porch when I came chargin' UiP an' she hollered somethin' at me 'bout takin' a bath. I slammed the back screen door, like I always did, an' snitched three cookies off the kitchen table before I rememberd th ELEPHUNT an' his red hat. So I put two cookies back an' went lickety-split up the back stairs to the bath room. Ma wuz right outdone, but she worked off steam on my elbows. An' I told her how nice .she looked, an' how I wuz goin' to ?ive away Hermes because she didn't like him going' in her room. I loved He'^mes better'n any lizard I'd ever had so I wuz awful sorry to have to give him away. But all the time I could see the circus poster in my head, an' it gave me shivers even thinkin' about it. After I wuz so clean I itched, an' had put on the white shirt Ma used to make me wear for supper. Ma an' me went down to the lawn an' sat down on the hammock to wait for Pa to come home. But before he

so


THE COLONNADE got there, I showed her the circus poster. She sorta clo,sed up like. I knew she would, but I knew how to fix that. I sat an' looked an' looked at the sign with my face screwed up kinda sad, not poutin', becuz Ma didn't like poutin"

—just lookin'

sad. After awhile

Ma said she supposed I'd want to go with those dowdy Jensen twins. I didn't say nothin' a-tall. Then Ma said she supposed I didn't say I'd get sick as a houn' dog. nothin' a-tall. So, all of a sudden Ma looked at me sittin' there nice an' clean an' said kind of sad like, "I suppose you'll have all the dirt in the circus on your face tomor-

row

night."

hugged

Ma

couldn't sit

I

still

awful tight an' went

then; in to

,so

I

shake

bound

to get the best place in the circus to

see him. All

had

I

the tent where he close

up

to do

wuz

to him, an'

I

wuz crawl under somewhere

an' hide

could look at him all

I wuz thinkin' 'bout his t'''unk as I tiptoed around the corner of the lion's tent on my way to the biggest tent of all where

day.

I

knew he had

to be.

They

said he u-sed

that trunk for arms, an' for a mouth, an' for near 'bou,t everything. They said he wuz as big as a horse. They said Just then I stepped around the corner of the lion tent

smack into a grey muddy post. don't know why, but I wuz all of a sudden shakin' like crazy, an' I couldn't an' ran I

move

to save

my

life; so I

just looked up.

can that I used for a bank. After ?upper I put Hermes in a shoe box with a piece of lettuce an' took him over to Georgie Fisher's house. Hermes usually slept in the bottom bureau drawer by my bed, but it wuzn't so lonesome not to

There he was He was bigger'n a horse, bigger'n the maple tree; he wu,z near as big as our house, and I wuzn't just lookin' at him, I wuz standin' on his foot! I looked at him, an' he looked at me, an' he knew I didn't want to hurt him an' that I wuz

see his little oie green eyes jshinin' in the dark after I got in bed. I kept seein' the ELEPHUNT'S eyes twinkling off the pos-

just tryin' to

my

tin

when I went to sleep, the ELEwas tippin' his red hat to the fat lady with the red hair, an' they wuz dancin'

ter, an'

PHUNT

around an' around.

The next mornin' I woke up so early I could hear Tippie throwin' his papers on every porch on our street. I put on my everyday knickers an' slid down the bannister so as not to wake Ma. In the kitchen crackers in my I put a lot of peanu.t-butter pocket along with the quarter in nickles an' pennies that had come out of gutters and gone into the tin can. Then I scooted across every back lot in town so as to get to Caller's field before the circus got a-wake. The

wuz

tents

when

still

wuz

ground wuz cool on

my

everything

I

wuz

to (Start things.

shut an' cold

all

puffed that hardly any birds lookin'

in.

wuz so early singing, an' the

It

feet. It

was

like

waitin' for something else I

wooden lady would stand,

tiptoed by the

platform where the fat and peeked through a crack into the tent where the lion's cage wuz, to see if he wuz the still asleep. He wuz. But I had seen lion an' the fat lady an' gone on the merrygo-round about a hundred times before. I had never seen a ELEPHUNT; so I wuz

!

!

remember him an' me standin' We stood there like that forever'n ever. there, me 'an the ELEPHUNT, an' looked at each other for a long time. It seemed couldlike fifteen years. That

ELEPHUNT

'a

moved

his foot just a little bit, an'

I

would'a disappeared into the ground, but he didn't. He blinked at me out of his teeny a blue eyes that Ma would'a said had wicked look about 'em, an' it seemed like he wuz thinkin' about all the othe'' boys like me who had looked at him for the first time, too. Then, before I could move, his big trunk curled around my waist, an' I was rockin" back an' forth through the air like a merry-go-rou,nd only .sideways, goin'

higher and higher an' not a speck afraid. I wuz so high I could see over the tops of the all the circus-stands an' down over ELEPHUNTS slippery-looking back. I could look down on the little red hat held on by elastic under one palm-leaf ear with that purple feather wavin' an' wavin'. A hundred birds wuz singin'; an' it seemed mine an' the ELEjust like my world PHUNT'S, until all of a sudden I felt the

hot grass under my feet, an' the world stopped swingin', he wuz gone. The ELEPHUNT had gone, but lyin' right at my feet wuz somethin' red with a green bill. A lit(Continued on page 21)


Fog Ghost

Little What

is

that tip toeing stealthily byV

Moving

so quickly

Catch glimpse of

it

it

here

Little fog ghost

seems

to fly

.

.

— 'tween shadow and light .

lost in the night.

is

Creeping and seeping and oozing around

Making not even a wisp

of sound,

Chilling as icicles, white as a cloud,

Quicker than thought and solem.n as shroud,

Here again, there again, gone from

Underneath

Now

it all,

roots, yet over trees tall,

by himself, and

now

Little fog ghost has

joining a crowd.

found his home cloud. Barbara Andrews,

In Soft, sweet,

and sad

'50

November

in its pathetic glory.

The pale November sunshine floods the Like a bright ending to a mournfuj story,

earth,

Or, in a minor tune, a chord of mirth.

Before the wet w^est wind forever drifting, The falling leaves fly o'er the garden walks;

The wet west wind the bare, gaunt branches And bowing to black mold the withered

lifting.

stalks.

The blackbird whistles to the lingering thrushes. The wren chirps welcome to the hardy tit. While the brave robin, 'neath the holly-brushes, Sees what of berried store

And

still

gleans for

it.

the heart, sad for vanished hopes, in turning

Back

to lost

.summers from the winter's

chill

Sees the rich promise through the weary yearning.

That heaven and spring

will each our trust fulfill.

Susan Kelly Phillips '•Thanksgiving"

Edited

by

Robert

Schauffler


Music-'Stuffed Shirt Style Peggy Lloyd,

XN

old Vienna, orchestras and musicians filled all the parks and miisic centers with the popular music of their time. Now we drop a nickel in the juke box and listen to the popular music of our

The themes of both types of music are basically the same, though expressed in a different manner. Almost every time we hear a boogy beat, we are listening to a base derived from Bach, and the popular time.

love songs, "Starry Night" and "Moon Love" have their roots in Tschaikovsky's work. Seeing you are a reasonably intelligent person, perhaps you've sometimes wondered why you haven't listened to and enjoyed Beethoven's or Wagner's music as mu,ch as Irving Berlin's. There are many Berlin songs that you never tire of hearing because of their catching melodies, rhythm, and harmony; moreover, if a new one is written, you want to hear it because you like his others so much. This would be true of Beethoven, too, if you listened to his music as much. Words cannot be found to describe the famous Fifth Symphony, and if you delve into other works of his, you'll

find each as lovely as the other, for each has haunting melodies that never leave you. Symphonic music is not as frightening

as

it

sound;S.

You,

may

hesitate to listen to

because it sounds rather "stuffed shirt". is it "stuffed shirt"? To start with, a conductor may be termed distinguished. But that does not mean that he is apart and

it

But

up on a cold marble pedestal. What it means is that he has won distinction by being a good conductor. Beethoven's music has been described as powerful, emotional,

and soul expressive. And

But that it is! does not put it on a level above our heads. Many things are powerful, emotional, and soul expressive. It is these qualities as well as others that make his music so enjoyable and so much to be admired. Suppose a program includes the "Conzertstuck" in F minor" by Carl Maria von Weber, and the "Dance" from "La Vida Breve", Manuel de Falla's opera. At first

'50

they may sound difficult, but t'ley can be understood. "Conzertstuck" simply mearts "Concert Piece", and "La Vida Breve" means "The Short Life". Such music is warm, friendly, and emotional. Too often art suffers from a "stuffed shirt" that .scares rather than invites people. Perhaps it's the announcer who confuses you if you're listening to the radio. What you hear is a ^smooth impersonal voice announcing something like this "Today we are to hear the orchestra under the distinguished conductor Eugene Ormandy. The program includes ..." And here he uses words he has practiced, such as "sforzando, and Schdanda, der Dudelsackpfeiffer." Obviously he has been advertising hair tonic and tooth powder all day, and this ijS his chance to prove that he can do better things. Maybe he can even win a diction prize. He never stumbles. "One Latin word, one Greek rema'-k, and one that's French" ... to quote Mr. Gilbert never stumps the announcer. Yet there is nothing easy going, :

human

casual, or

in his delivery.

It leaves

the listener awed, flabbergasted, or overwhelmed after his announcement. Why does he not say simply that what follows ijS

music that

is

really a master piece

—

clear,

Why

does he not announce music as such in simple terms that would help people to understand it? He wrongly assumes many times that the audience is familiar with all the musical facts. A word or two of introduction to a piece would take some of the stiffness out. effective,

perfect?

Even with these things cleared

may

still

up, you

say that you don't quite under-

stand the music and

its

message. Don't try

—

you can't just listen to the melody, the harmony, and the different instruments picking up the theme. Beethoven once ^said, "He who truly understands my music must thereby go free of all the misery which others bear about with them". Beethoven, too, wanted people to enjoy music even if

to, if

they did not

know

its

technique.


LIFE

AT

S. T.

C

RATS OF

'52

A. M. on October EIVE trudging through the

12 found

me

shadowy audi-

toriu,m to my first date with Miss Haze. Her very namae implied hard times ahead, and every minute I expected a dozen or more sophomores to pounce on me, and drag me blindfolded back to their private lairs, where they would force me to eat raw eggs and turtle eyes.

Nothing like that happened, because the long dreaded sophomores were all asleep. And Miss Hazel was no exception! She looked as happy as a pig in a mud ditch, but I'm afraid I had no qualms whatsoever about waking her, because I had already been up for two and one-half hours. When Continued on page 22

THE BURIAL OF NEBUCHADNEZZAR

ONE

of the saddest occurrences of Jun-

Building was the death of Nebuchadnezzar, the pet goldfish of third floo'''. On the day of this tragic event, tears flooded the dorm. Fu,neral services had to be arranged. Everyone was so upset that it was difficult to make preparations. A military funeral was decided upon, since the beloved Nebuchadnezzar had been in the services of the students for several months. The funeral procession formed at one o'clock and wended its way to the burial grounds of Junior Building. It was a beautiful day for ;such a sad occasion. Many mourners watched from the windows. The "funeral march" was rendered on an accorior

Continued on

page

21


;

John's Letter Joan Prichett,

'52

>^5^HE

the familiar box.

\^_jJ

John had probably written a beautiShe hurriedly slipped her glove from her trembling hand. Two turns to the left, one to the right, and with a faint click the door slowly opened. She sucked in her breath and cautiously peered in. No letter. The small opening revealed a dark and dusty box, but no letter. Miss Rhodes closed the box quietly, turned, and walked out of the building, down the flight of foot-worn steps. She walked slowly now, with an almost reverent air, up the vacant street. John really should have sent a letter today. Today was a special day, and he shouldn't have forgotten. Today was an

icy chill hung on the evening air as Miss Rhodes hastily made her way to the post office on lower Third Street. The click clack, click clack of her steady, undeviating stride shattered the qiiiesence

ful letter this time.

of the deserted street. Constantly, ever constantly, her gait continued.

There was little need to hurry, she knew but somehow the brisk, penetrating winter air together with the tingling sensation of hoping that in her small post office box lay a letter from John drove her onward with tense expectation. Always at this hour, winter and summer. Miss Rhodes made this same short journey to the post office for mail from John. It made no difference how long she continued this identical and habitual routine, her exuberance never ceased. John's letter would be so beautiful.

engagement. Yes, John had slipped that beautiful little ring on her finger and then had vanished in a haze of train smoke and steam. Of course, John would surely write to her tomorrow. She could forgive him this once. How very busy he must be these days! Yes, she would have to forgive anniversary

John was a first lieutenant in the army. Miss Rhodes had met him several years ago at a dinner party, three days before he had sailed for Europe to join his regiment. In the three brief ensuing days Miss Rhodes and the lieutenant had found divine con-

tentment

each other. Indeed, they had

in

him

left that

morning

down

a

warm few

building.

yard^s,

Around the

icy chill

hung on the evening

air

Rhodes lingeringly made her way back to her rooming house quarters. She walked over the same sidewalk, over the same cracks and breaks in the cement that she had walked over for the past thirty years. Always an identical pattern she made in her nightly walk for John's letter. For almost thirty years now, people had been setting their watches by her i-egular

Notrain roared and

as Miss

in early

vember. Just before his puffed away, he had taken a small gold engagement ring from his pocket and had slipped it shyly on her finger. "Wait for me, dearest. I'll write every night," he had said as the train thundered and chugged away, leaving the solitary figure of MisjS Rhodes on the deserted platform. The post office loomed tall and drab ahead of Miss Rhodes. She reached the steps and ascended them with an anxious pace. Through the brass rimmed doors she walked, into the stuffy, tobacco-laden air of the

their

this time.

The

fallen quite in love.

He had

of

thirty years ago today,

After thirty years to the day. Miss Rhodes still held a firm conviction that the next night she would certainly d'-aw from her mail box a letter from John, even though John had been reported killed in the service of his country some twentyschedule.

coimer,

then she was in front of

nine years ago.

10


— !

And So ^^/''^H, how very lucky you are," some

^^

woman

poor

three lamps, and the electric clock. I supP0;Se that saleslady does get tired of selling dresses all day in that harassing, hurried

with six children, a

fuming husband and three weeks of washing ahead of her, said to me the other day, as she admired my new green skirt

new

assing, hurried classes all

do know .1 little about what is going on, even if you do look .stupid most of the time. I don't imagine she would make any sales.

But the thing that takes the cake is as I was packing my suitcase and very

this

!

room there

freshly ironed blouses,

room but Mother. to to

so

Oh, sweet,

mother ... if you only do have a closet ... all myself, too, but besides shoes, hats, little

knew! Of course, to

coats,

kets,

new

I

and blouses, I also tennis rackets, extra blantowels, and a few million

dresses, skirts,

have to keep

.store,

sheets,

in

it

books, which are forever falling off the high shelves. Naturally, I can't look like a lady

returned to college as a Junior, "Oh, you're going to college? How nice! I know you will just have loads of fun at college; this lovely little red frock will be just the thing to go with that wonderful suntan." What does she think I do? Keep a suntan all year at school? I guess she doesn't know that the only sun I get is that which fights its way through a barrage of ivy. No doubt she thinks that in each .

into the

that your clothes will always look neat, and not as if they had just come through the wringer and never quite got to the ironing board."

I

.

my

who should walk

school,

!

a

:

carefully folding

"Now, darling," she said, "be sure hang everything up as soon as you, get

dress before

day and t^y to the professors the idea that you really

sell

Little does she know that I live in dungarees half the time and the rest of the time in skirts that drag the floor, and are ;S0 tight that I usually have "convulsions" of the spine when I try to sit down! And new hair-dos Since I've whacked my hair off to try to acquire the new look, there is only one way that I can possibly arrange it. That is the way it is cut looking like the rear view of a duck's tail That dear sweet housewife with the six children and the unintelligent looking husband doesn't realize how lucky she really is. Sometimes I wish I were stuck at home with a dozen kidjS and didn't have to worry about a thing except wljich one of the dozen would have the measles next.

And then the sales-lady in the who said to me while I was buying

but suppose she had to attend har-

store,

course — "Yes,

look of how lucky you are to be able to go to college and wear pretty clothes, and have new hair-dos."

the

Live

I

from Voguo, when

I put on a dress that has been squeezed between a tennis racket and a five pound volume of English Literature. I

have no doubt

in

my mind

the reader

me sarcastic and cynical. Now, me wrong. I like college, there is

will think

.

don't get

no place

like it on earth thank goodBut, in two more years I shall be forced out into the cruel old world to make a living for myself. Then I shall probably ache for my overstuffed closet and my mix.

ness!

is an ultra modern sunlamp She should see my room it contains one socket from which is connected a radio,

up light

11

fixture.

.

.


:

SCHOO We'd She

like to is

introduce today

the Class of '52

:

i

Fresl"

I.

Bag and baggage here is Sue The problem now is what to do The sign ^,ays go Matriculate But, "She's not hungry

—she just ate!"

II.

few day.s pass and now we see Her ;schedule has her up a tree

A

Five straight classes every day Ah, Eager Beaver, you must pay!

Verses B

Sketches b

12


—

DAZE

L tie girl 1,

she

who's here to stay. really you.

is

III.

Alas, alack, or eek a freak! With nose and ear a verdant streak. Our Freshman friend signs off in S's,

Bows and

scrapes and wears 51 tresses.

IV.

And

then to show her college part

—

That S. T. C. now owns her heart A Rat Cap crowns our Susie's dome. It makes her feel so much at home.

J.

sr-y"^^

Spindler

oan Prichett 13


From Dearest

Mom

a

Freshman

and Dad,

September 20

finally arrived at S. T. C.

I

third floor Main,

I

around

five oclock.

After locating

my

room, which

is

on

began unpacking.

—

My roommate is darling "Chick" Bailey from Lynchburg. She is rathe^ tall, with blonde hair and blue eyes. She has three brothers, all of whom are older than she! While waiting for Chick seem nice.

to arrive,

I

tried to meet

some

of the girls on the hall; they

When

Chick finally arrived at ten thirty P. M., I was ready to go home ... I was so But time passed quickly as she and I became acquainted. We talked about everything. Oh, yes! She knows loads of people that I know. Soon Mrs. McCoy, the night matron, knocked on our door and told us, "Lights out." We realized then that we were very tired and sleepy, and so we crawled into bed. Sleeping soundly, we pas.,sed our first night lonely.

at S. T. C.

Love,

Jan

Mom

September 27 and Daddy. wish you could see our room now. We have our curtains up and have made our "little home" as comfortable as possible. I've gotten into the habit of staying in it all the time. Somehow I hate to mix with the other gi^ls. They seem so alien or something, not at all like my friends at home. Dear

I

I

miss you dreadfully and have thought several times of giving up college and comThe atmo^sphere of S. T. C. is not at all as congenial as I had imagined it would homesickness! suppose you could sum up my feelings in one word

ing home. be.

I

.

Please write to

me

immediately.

I

feel

.

.

the need of your moral support. Your loving daughter

Dear Folks,

October 5

College is just wonderful. I couldn't begin to tell you all the perfectly perfect aspects about it. The girls are friendly and entertaining; the professors are understanding, and the spirit of S. T. C. is unsurpassable. I have been very busy rushing from one thing to another, but I have had time to appreciate college and its advantages. The other night "Bobbie" had a big party in her room. We ate and ate, talked and talked. Then we turned out the lights and began to tell ghost stories. Connie, who was telling a killer-diller yelled, "Look! There at the door". We screamed and then guess what? Mrs. McCoy opened the Were we surprised!! She lectured to us, but not one call down did she give. door .

.

.

Please send me an old clown costume as I'll need it for the Circus, a production put on each year, in which each class takes part. We've been practicing every night at ten. and have been having a perfectly grand time.

Three

girls just

came

in to

chew the rag;

so

I'll

close

now.

Love,

Your gal 14


FROM A FRESHMAN Hello

ag-ain,

October 13

Oh! I'm about dead! I'm awfully glad that awful "Rat Day" is over. The Sophomores just about killed us. We crawled out of bed at the early hour of four, and began the tedious task of tying our hair in fifty-one pieces. It seemed like a thousand. In an hour we finished. As we tugged on blue jeans and pinned skirts on up-side down, I moved in horror. It would soon be six o'clock A. M., and the blessed sophs were waiting. Chick and I proceeded to dab green on our noses and ears, tie bands over our eyebrows, on which was painted "praise '51". Just as we slipped our name signs over our heads and crammed our feet into pujnps, the clock hands evily pointed to Six! Oh, horrors. It had begun. From six 'til six, we hit the floor, praised '51, and did some of the most incredible things you ever heard of. Well, it's over now, and J have met quite a few upper classmen.

Your very

Hi

tired

baby

folks,

October 23

What a glorious week end!! Eddie came up for the C/rcMs and saw me a funny clown. Can't make much time that way! Circus was a huge sucess and the clases really showed their talent.

Eddie has asked me to come

Randolph-Macon next week end for their big football rig-ht away. Oh, Mom, Eddie's such a dream! Friday, I met Chick's brother. Bill, who is twenty-one. He has asked me to come to V. P. I. for their dances on the twentieth of November. Do let me go. Gosh, Mom, I'm so glad I'm at college. The girls are so nice ... so difl:'erent from those at home. I feel like I'm at last growing up. Do you think so? As always your "big" girl g'ame. Please send

me my

to

permission

Hello again, November 1 Boy, what a week! Tests, tests, and more tests. And the questions those professors can't ask! Have only heard from one, my history a C plus. Oh, well, just as long as I keep passing. I've decided that it's really ha rder to make grades here than in high school. Those A's then seem like pleasant dream s of the past. As I have a big chemistry test tomorrow, I had better just say "goodnight" and start studying. .

P. S.

—Thanks for both permissions and

I'll

x

.

.

Love me? Jan be dignified lady, when

X

X

I

go to VPI,

I

promise.

X

Mom

and Dad, November 12 Please send me some money immediately. I'm broke. You know how it is! Tests are over, and I passed them all. Heard from Eddie again, asking me up on the twentieth. What am I going to tell him? I don't want him to know that I'm dating Bill that week end. Gee, why do I get onto these messes? Chick

out playing tennis. She's a real athlete. this. About $12.00 will do it. in need, is

Must run and mail Just

me

Jan 15


Between th Love

of being a flea is that you children are going to the dogs

The tragedy

know your

Boy: "Mama, what was the name

Little

of the last station the train stopped at?"

Mother: "Don't bother me. Don't you see I'm reading? ask?"

Boy: "Because

Little

I

don't know.

Why

little

do you

brudder got

off there." It's hard to explain why girls who are scared of a mouse will go riding with a wolf.

X

X

X

An

X

boys est Bill, our good friend from H.-S. C, was driving down Main Street looking for a likely pick-up. Spying a girl on the corner, he stopped the car and told her that he would gladly take her home. Without a word she climbed into the car, and sat down on the front seat. Bill coming to a stoplight

said, "Is that light red or

ly

suh,

yo shore

mistah,"

could

tell

him who was the great-

in history.

an-

other. 'St.

Patrick" shouted

a

bright

little

fellow.

The priest turned to him and said. "The sixpence is yours; but why did you say St. Patrick?"

green? I'm slightis,

man

"Columbus," answered one boy. "George Washington," answered

"Right down in my heart I knew Moses, but business is business."

color blind."

"Yes,

Irish priest offered sixpence to the

who

jshe

it

was

replied.

XXX "Tell m.e,

farmer whose clock had run down was sending his boy to town to get the cor-

A

sir,

who

is

the real boss at

your home*!"' "Well,

rect time:

my

wife bosses the children, and

the children boss the dog and cat, but I can say anythirig I want to the sweet peas."

"But, Pa, I can't bring the correct time. I have no watch." "What do you want a watch for? If you can't remember, write it down on a piece of paper."

Mo "I've been driving a car for five years and never had a wreck." Shmo: "I've been driving a w^-eck for five years and never had a car." :

I'm wearing

memory

of

my

my

eyelids at half-mast in

lost sleep.

16

Benti


olumns She floor

is

He:

(awkward dancer)

:

There was a man on the Pullman who tell people's occupations by their looks. One was a lawyer, one a doctor then

"This dance

could

certainly slippery." "It isn't the dance floor.

I

had

my

;

he

pointed to a tired, insignificant little man huddled in one corner of a seat and said, "He's a teacher." The little man jerked u,p and said, "Oh, no, not thr.t! I've been sick."

shoes shined."

"I

wish you boys wouldn't

call

me Big

Bill."

"Why?" "These college names stick studying to be a doctor!"

X

X

X

and

I'm

"Say Galloway, I'm in an awful jam, and need $5.00 right away. I haven't the least idea where I can get it." "Glad to hear it. I was afraid for a minute that you might have the idea you could get it from me."

X

He: "I'm burning with love for you." She: "Oh, stop making a fuel of yourself."

X Miss Waters

X

X

X

"What's the shape of the

:

Nancy?" Nancy: Round." Miss Waters "And how do you know

earth, of

Have you heard the hare raising story two rabbits?

:

it's

Miss Wheeler: "For this job,

I

round?"

Nancy (shifting uneasily in her seat) "Oh, Miss Waters, excuse me, please, wasn't thinking. It'jS square, of course."

want a

:

I

responsible girl."

X

Freshman "That's me, everything that has gone wrong since I've been here, I've been responsible for it." :

x

X

x

"See this stick-pin? Well, it once belonged to a millionaire." "And who is the millionaii'e?"

"Woohvorth." X

Barbara "Don't you know what happens to little girls who tell fibs?" Emily: "No, what?" Barbara "They don't go to heaven." Emily: "Where do they go? S. T. C?" :

X

X

X

Wife: "Here comes company and we're not through dinner." Scotchm.an "Quick, grab a toothpick."

:

:

17


SALM CIV Ruth Egcleston,

"Miss Betty! Miss Betty!" IS it, Lillie Bell?" "Psalm CIV (pronounced Sam Civ but spelled just as his mother found it in the Bible, Psalm CIV) "he 'bout to fling a fit." "I'll be right down."

it. Miss Nancy, she kin fin' it, en 'twarn't be long before she be a-coming home from college and a-comin,g down

cayn't find

"What

out 'bout ole Psalm CIV." sure enough, one day during the Thanksgiving holidays, Nancy picked up a couple of apples and walked down to

heah to

fin'

And

As she started out of the house, she looked up, and there was the new moon. Yes, she thought, Psalm CIV always flings a fit when a new moon comes up. Having arrived too late to be of any help with his phenobarbital tablets. Miss Betty returned to "The House", and left

Psalm CIV's house ting on. As soon as face lighted up.

what

"Jes'

to see how he was getPsalm CIV saw her, his

needs.

I

An

keep the doctor away." After munching on

For a short time he lay writhing and foaming at the mouth. When he did recover, he declared Ruby Pearl had tricked him and that

Psalm CIV

'49

to his colored friends.

u,p.

"En getttin'

the

ap-

—dese

he jes'

apples.

Nancy, is your boy friends a kinda bald-headed? Efen he is, MiSjS

rub his baldness wit a

jes'

of

"Miss Nancy, you'se different," "You don't bring no advice, you

bring de remedy

ground glass was oozing out of his chest. Nobody could convince him that it was not. Several of his colored friends examined his chest, and they too, declared glass was oozing out of it. Finally Psalm CIV went to the District Attorney and offered to pay him to put the law on Ruby Pearl and make her break the spell she had put on him. He had already tried the big conjure doctors, but they had not been able to break

one

few moments. Psalm CIV looked

ples for a said,

apple a day to

little

bear grease.

Dat'll stop baldness ebey time.

warns you conyou de moonlight, 'cause if you

Miss Nancy,

"But,

I

cernin' one thing 'bout yo'self: Don't

never sleep in

do, you'll go loony

—clean,

plumb, spank,

loony I tells yo'. "En, MiSjS Nancy, I tells you a little secret. I eats fish very of'n 'cause day's good brain food you'll have to eat a lot of fish, too, 30 you ken make dem high grades

the spell.

By sneaking up and sprinkling ashes Ruby Pearl could put him

;

ai;ound his door,

under her .=pell whenever she pleased. But he was able to fortify himself against the witches by painting the frames of the doors and windows of his house a bright blue. One day his friend, Lizzie, brought him some anti-trick medicine she had concocted out of bitter herbs, yellow honey, and snails she'd gathered ujiderneath the lavender and rosemary bushes. But Psalm CIV took just one dose. Even Lizzie couldn't persuade him

at dat college of yourn."

to take a second one.

And

"Dat stuff ain't no fittin' fit cure," he would say. "I know what it takes, but I

light night, I gonna ketch you a (Continued on page 20>

At

Psalm CIV chuckled in his selfway and kept on. Really Miss

this

satisfied

Nancy, couldn't get a chance to put in a word Psalm CIV was too busy giving remedies for this and that. After all, she was ;

getting a big kick out of

"Efen you want good

it.

luck. Miss

Nancy",

he continued, "jes carry a buckeye wid you, and good luck is bound to come your way.

18

sho'

nuft",

Miss Nancy, some moongraveyard


u ave

Head

YOU

Dalila Agostini,

Ihese

?

'49

THE RUNNING OF THE TIDE

DONA BARBARA''

^^HE

BARBARA has been proclaimed OONA the South American novel

setting of

"The Running of The

\^J

Tide" is Salem, Massachusetts, at the time when it was the wealthiest port in the world, because of its flourishing trade with Russia, the West Indies, India,

best

we find the ,story the Inman family. Three of them were sea captains. The eldest was a veteran who had commanded a ship at nineteen. and China. In of

this novel

four sons

the

of

a $100,000

After this fateful event, the three captains put all their efforts into making up these losses. cargo.

full

This picture of Salem is seen through the eyes of Peter, the youngest Inman brother who is too fragile for the sea, and whose interests are more intellectual than anything else. The novel contains another plot, that of the two old Salem families, the Inmans and the Mompassons, and their fateful fascina-

Dash

who

is

in

love with

Polly

Mom-

the victim of a father-daughter relationship. She is like a puppet in her father's hands, and yet she is helpless in

pesson

faithful

full of intrigue as well as

and colorful descriptions of the

old Salem.

It will

keep the reader inter-

ested throughout.

*"The Running of the Tide"—by Esther Fo'-bes,

Hampton

its

is

Dash'jS arm.s. is

all

beauty

and

the theme throughout

Dona Barbara is worth reading for its dramatic happenings and for the picture the author gives of the Venezuelan plains. *Dona Barbara by Romulo Gallegos, translated by Robert Malloy, J. Cape and H. Smith (1931), N. Y.

is

The novel

a struggle between civilization

;

in this novel is a

of activity.

tions.

charm.

with

is

The name. Dona Barbara, means barbarism. She was a beautiful woman, who had been wronged by a gang of smugglers. Her bitter experience with them turns her into a woman with no respect for morality. So low has she sunk that ,she is ready to "destroy" the chastity and honor of all men. She acquires wealth through dishonest dealings she continues to bend men to her will until Santos Luzardo, the man from the city with the blood of a plainsman, invades her surroundings. Santos defies Dona Barbara's authority, and for the first time she knows the meaning of respect towards a man. There is a second plot in which Dona Barbara's illegitimate child is involved. Both mother and daughter fall in love with the same man. But, at the end of the novel, innocence and pu.rity win over low passions.

conditions very difficult. The Inmans lost three of their best ships one of them, com-

wealthy and magnificent one, a Salem

and

prairie

There

the novel.

warfare between England and France had made the American shipping

The Salem described

Its

barbarism, which

The

manded by Dash, was carrying

of all

strength lies in the portrayal of its natural setting, and in the por. trayal of the violence of the human passions. The author pictures the Venezuelan times.

Mifflin, N. Y., 1948.

19


Mo vie Re views Janice Slavin,

RACHEL AND THE STRANGER—

ONE TOUCH OF VENUS—

(f^ACHEL AND THE STRANGER, an ^1^^ RKO Radio production, is a charming

ONE TOUCH OF VENUS Robert

Love

panions of the pioneer are described in this simple, leisurely tale set on a small farm in the Northwest Territory which was to

become Ohio. Marriage

in those days was as mu,ch a matter of necessity as a romance. After Big Davey (William Holden) lost his wife,

is

Walker

simple jservant until Jim Fairways (Robert Mitchum), the "woodsy" hunter, wakes them to her true worth.

table, sings several

as Conway's cynical secretary. Don't miss One Touch of Venus.

Mitchum, Loretta Young, Holden, and Gary Gray do splendid acting. Mitchum, as the

fre,sh,

in his gul-

Man

(to little boy fishing): "Is that good?" Boy: "T don't think so, but the fish do." X X X X

bait

guitar.

Rachel and the Stranger furnishes grand evening of entertainment.

a

African Hunter: "While wandering near I spotted a leopard." Young Thing: "Don't be silly: they grow that way."

Janice Slavin, '50

a native viUage, is

It's

funny, and original. Janice Slavin, '50

Dark Stranger," "Just Like

Me," "Foolish Pride", and several other gay folk songs to the accompaniment of a

two

Ava Gardner, apart from looking delecnumbers. Dick Haymes joins in effectively and Eve Arden scores

pastoral and quiet way this screen play by Waldo Salt, from a story by Howard Fast, contains many bits of wry humor.

is

!

her.

its

Life

Ava Gardner. comedy

down-to-earth human being. Far from being enchanted. Bob who turns in the most comical performance of his career is worried about losing his window trimming job ind his best girl, Alga San Juan. Venus, who is literally a dish for the gods, find that these are trifling obstacles for a

girl as a

Love

and

the theme of this piquant

The trouble starts when Bob sets the stage for the unveiling of the statue which his department store boss, Tom Conway, has purchased. On an impulse. Bob kis,ses she hops off her Venus lo and behold pedestal, behaving not like a goddess, but

he and Davey (Gary Gray), his son, were alone on the farm. Since there were chores to be done and a boy to be cared for, Big Davey was determined to get a new wife. There is gentle humor as he goes to town, buys, and marries a bond-woman, Rachel (Loretta Young). The movie traces with delicate grace the awkward months on the farm when both father and son treat the

let sings "Tall,

an Univer-

with mUisical trimmings. It is not the usual boy-meets-girl affair, however, for the little lady happens to be Venus, Goddess of Love. Since Bob is just an ordinary mortal, he couldn't possibly escape the clutches of such a captivating creature.

accustomed sorrow that were the daily com-

hunter with a captivating frog

is

sal-International production starring

romance of the frontier during the time of stockaded villages and Indian atThe life of simple plea,sure and tacks.

In

'50

one fool thing after another; fool things after each other.

20


—

ME (Continued from page

AN'

THE ELEPHANT An' now they've put up another sign across the street just like last year, an' the year before that, an' every year for sev-

6)

purple feather wuz wavin' an' wavin' en the side an' a broken elastic string wuz trailin' on the grass. All of a sudden, I tie

red hat, a long

little

worm

different.

decided to go

time

ELEPHUNT

slid across the

wuz saying, "I know you got my hat in your bottom drawer, you ole sinner!" There's Annie hollerin' at me from the back porch to come in an' wash up for dinner. She wouldn't like it if she knew I wuz goin' to take a walk down by Caller's old field. You see, Annie don't have no use

fishin'.

It jsure is funny how things come back an old man. Reckon that excitement when the circus ELEPHUNT comes to town is

just a part of every little shaver's growin' up a part that he has to hide when he gets as old as I am, but he never, never forgets

—

or loses

little

But that never changes! He just blinks out of his blue eyes that some people will always think have a wicked look an' sort of winks from the poster like he

to

it

pictures are always a girls get purtier every

an' the lion seems to look a little less scary.

grass. I

The The

enty-five.

wanted to leave the circus before the people came to stare an' the tents woke up while the circus wuz still mine an' his. There wuz no place I could go, I didn't guess, but as I stooped down to pick up the

atall for circuses or

ELEPHUNTS

or red

hats.

it.

WE ARE TWENTY-ONE (Continued from page 3)

Who

justice to all races and classes; we wanted good business, but we didn't want inflation. How could we get them all? There seemed to be no powerful leader for any one of the four parties. The whole thing was too much for us. Some of us became irritable; some

he is a Communist! He can't win nothing nohow. The only thing he kin do is to promote the egg business. He's had nuff eggs on his noggin by now to make him a regular egg nog." With that he guf-fawed his approval of his own wit and continued: "All us SouthB'^ners knowed what stand us real Southerners was gonna take over that Civil Rights question afore we took it." What were we twenty-one-year-olders to do! November 2 was close at hand, and we weren't as cock sure as were these two old farmers. We didn't want the Democratic party to split. But we wanted States' Rights And we wanted an able leader who could handle wisely both national and international affairs. Moreover, we wanted

Bah!

cares

if

apathetic.

But, Pshaw!

We

wonder now why we

twenty-one-year-olders at S. T. C. allowed ourselves to get so "het" up. We couldn't even vote; that is, not many of us could. We hadn't even paid our poll taxes! But, truly

we were

as

much

interested and as

bewildered as those

And

so now,

who

much

really had.

we twenty-one-year-olders

C, whether we voted or not, say: "Good luck to you, Mr. President! You and your platform have certainly caused us at S. T.

!

great concern!"

NEBUCHADNEZZAR (Continued from page

wailed in uncontrollable grief. Many piople remained to see the flowers and tombstone placed on the grave. The pall consisted of beautiful yellow and orange marigolds. "Here lies Nebuchadnezzar, gone but not forgotten", was the inscription that was placed on the tombstone.

9)

were the several other "numbers". The "numbers" were inte'^rupted by the

dion, as

frequent wails of the bereaved. The pallbearers bore the beautiful sky-blue coffin containing the deceased to the grave. A twenty-one gun salute was given, and the flag was at half mast. The preacher gave the "ashes to ashes" rite^s. As the coffin was lowered into the grave, the mourners

We, the students, of S. T. C. offer our sympathy to the bereaved of third

.sincere

floor,

21

Junior Building.


THE COLONNADE RATS OF (Continued from page 9)

terrifying

the

Miss Haze

propped herself up

in bed.

had finally She turned out

minute I had to get up from my "square meal" and stand in the aisle right before all those people and sing for Mi^ss Taylor, or perform on the balcony for the benefit of Table No. 56.

to be just a sleepy blonde with a frog in her

(Who wouldn't have a frog in her throat at five o'clock in the morning!) I had expected her to make me jump head first, clothes-and-all under a cold shower, or do one hundred push-ups. But she did nothing more alarming than to send me off two minutes later to sing to Nellie ... I mean "Miss Hart." Singing to her was rather tame, too. To tell the truth, I .scared her almost to death. She was so shocked at seeing a tall, skinny, green - and-white nightmare standing bethroat.

I recovered from that, but tho,se "airraids" really got me way down! And I do

mean way down all

!

flatten at the

When two hundred same

time,

it

Rats

was

like

sardines in a can; so I don't hold it against the girl next to me for throwing her suitcase on me. I'm positive though that my right leg v/ill never be the same again. However, I have no X-ray pictures to prove it! Those little periods of being flat on the floor helped a little, for every minute of

fore her at that hour in the morning, and croaking "That's My Desire" that she didn't recover in time to torture me. Or else she was too sleepy to think up any inquisitional

rest counts

when

a girl has to get up at

three-thirty A. M. to paint her ears green.

But, golly, in spite of the fact that

stunts.

open, they were never really ferocious. For one of them. I composed a letter to Gus for another, I composed one to Kamal, and for ;

another, I started a crazy epistle made of newspaper words pasted with coral nail polish on a sheet of typing paper. This I addressed to Miss Anderson's friend. But still

I'm sure the receivers were much more pained than the writer, for I had rather enjoyed it all. To me there was nothing especially exciting about doing those things. Oh, Boy! It was But at mealtime .

.

I

had risen at three-thirty that morning and in spite of the fact that I had big blackand-blue bruises on both knees, I had fun. And now I know Miss Agnew and Miss Critzer and so many others, who might have just stayed names as far as I was concerned. Believe it or not, I can even call them by their names now. And so you see. Rat Day for me wasn't just a Big Bad Day when the sophom.ores were supreme. Really, it was the day when I felt that I had really and truly been taken in as a part of S. T. C. and its traditions. Maria Jackson, Class of '52

the day wore on, the sophomores got But even with both eyes spirited.

As more

'52

really like being a prima donna on "Rquestfully Yours," or something. Every other

.

PSALM CIV ness. Dat's true. Miss

(Continued from page 18) rabbit,

and

I'se

gonna make you

out'n his left hind foot.

You

jes'

a

a little corn likker

charm

tells

I

I

gets

even a

triejS

slight

stomach-sickness here at home.

carry dat

rabbit foot wid you and you'll have luck wid all dem beau-lovers of yourn.

"En, Miss Nancy, Miss Betty

Nancy!

when

"En, Miss Nancy, if you ever gets to hiccoughing real bad, jes press your finger on your upper lip. It'll sho stop dem hiccoughs ebry time.

me

you're gonna cross de water to Europe. Is

dat so?"

know anything about skunk smell is sho' mighty good to keep ofin colds and de flu. It sho is. Miss Nancy." And still Miss Nancy had not gotten "I

Nancy nodded her head and Psalm CIV's eyes became larger and larger. "Well, ef'n you'll drink a little champagne dat's a kind of wine dey use at weddings you wan' 'sperience no seasick-

—

don't rightly

science, but

—

22


PSALM CIV a chance to even inquire about his health.

"En, Miss Nancy Miss Nancy."

— Hey,

whar

is

Lovely Orchids and a variety of corsages are waiting for you at

yo',

To his amazement when he looked up, he saw Miss Nancy had started up the path toward "The House". He had been too engrossed with his own talk to hear her when she had said, "Good-bye, Psalm CIV. Be sure to keep your horseshoe over your

CHAS.

E.

BURG

FLORIST

COLLINS FLORIST

door."

Everything Fresh In Flowers

Phone 181 Day Jones (to desk clerk)

"Give

:

Phone 4 Night

me some

stationery, please."

Desk Clerk: "Are you a guest?" Jones: "Heck, no! I'm paying ten

dol-

lars a day."

Martin the Jeweler Will Appreciate Your Business

"Put all that stuff back at once," the irate householder ordered.

"Be all

of

pleaded the burglar. "Not Half belongs to the people next

fair, sir,"

it.

door."

FARMVILLE CREAMERY INC. My

Manufacturers of Dairy Products

love has flew

Him did I dirt Me didn't know Him were a flirt. To those Let

I

MILK a health food BUTTER best spread for bread ICE CREAM not only a food

in love

but a desert that

forbid

is

good, cheap and healthy

PHONE

55

That they be dood Like I've been did. Darn he! I hate him. I wish him were died.

Him

told

But darn

I

him loved him lied.

I,

he,

=6^1

Love Love

Love is sad. Love is mad. Love's a sorrow; Love's a curse. But not to be in Love is worse. is

silly;

is

futile;

SVff-V^

AAia,

—for— Quality Quantity

Variety and Price

took an hour to put out a fire in the room and four hours to put the firemen out! It

acrtress' dressing

23


THE COLONNADE

QUESTIONS A A

of red where tragedy lies, cheerful thing when it's something of Ty's. field

The shamrock and the blarney stone Have helped to make its power known. Ten Ten

to the sixth say they satisfy. to the zero will echo their cry.

ANSWERS WILL APPEAR IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF YOUR MAGAZINE

RULES FOR CHESTERFIELD HUMOR MAGAZINE CONTEST 1.

2.

Identify the 3 subjects in back cover ad. All clues are in ad. Submit answers on Chesterfield wrapper or reasonable facsimile to this publication ofSce.

ten correct answers win one carton of Chesterfield Cigarettes each.

3. First

Enter as many as you

like, but one Chesterfield wrapper or must accompany each entry. Contest closes midjiight, one week after this issue's publication date. Nev/ contest next issue. 6. Answers and names of v/inners will appear in the next issue. y.'AlI answers become the property of Chesterfield. 8. Decision of judges will be final.

4.

facsimile

5.

WATCH FOR THE WINNERS IN; NEXT ISSUE

24


Our Reputation

Is

At the Dorothy May Phone

Compliments of

.

.

FARMVILLE MOTOR 00.-395 Long Trips

.

COLLEGE SHOP "We

Call

Special Rates For

71

Farmville

TAXI SERVICE

Your Guarantee

JOAN BEAUTY SALON

-

:

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Virginia

DAVIDSON'S

Appreciate Your Patronage"

"The House

of Quality'

Farmville's Largest and Best

SOUTHSIDE DRUG STORE

Dept. Store

Farmville, Virginia

Coke coming

FARMVILLE COCA-COLA BOTTLING WORKS,

INC.


SEE

CHESTERFIELD