Bulletinoflongwo1962long

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cftoi/iqufood ALUMNAE NEWS

WRITERS ON CAMPUS 1962

MOONSHOOTER

CLASS NEWS

NOVEMBER, 1962


Contents

of Writers on

Campus

1

Dabney

Lancaster Library

4

LONGWOOD COLLEGE Alumnae

S.

Association Ciianging Patterns

Volume XLVIII

Number

of

Elizabeth

Mildred

Board

Shipplett

Jones

Dickinson

Davis

Ellington White Betty Ri'TH Stimpson Frances Ctriwrigljt Moore

College

in

the Higher Eciuca-

Women

A Word From

November, 1962 Editor Editorial

tion

3

6

Mr. Wygal

9

Commentary

10

J.

Assistant Typist

MEMBER AMERICAN ALUMNI COUNCIL

LONGWOOD COLLEGE

Reunion

12

President Speaks

13

Class

Your Alumnae

Our Alumnae Chapters

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION Execiilitf

The 1912

15

Board

Dr. Francis G. Lankford, Dr. Dabney S. Lancaster,

Longwood College

Jr., President, President Emeritus,

Chapter Officers

Named

16

Longwood College Institute of Southern Culture Lectures

17

The Alumnae Fund Appeal

18

Budget and Financial Report

18

President

Janie Potter Hanes, 321 In.stuute

Hill.

Lexington,

V.i.

First Vice- President

Evelyn Second

Tray/or

Macon,

1110 GriHin

St.,

Lynchburg. Va.

]'ice- President

Rosemary

£/,//«

Pritchard,

6()-i

E.

Cawson

St.,

Hopewell. Va.

1962

Honor

Ex-President

Minnie Lee Crumphr Burger, 10056 Hobby

Hill Rd.,

RithmonJ, Va.

Founder's

Roll

Day

Moonshooter

Ex-Secretary

19

23

— College

of Tomorrow

,

.

.

Inset

Virginia McLean Pharr, 5220 Gravelbrook Drive, Richmond, Va.

Wedding

-

Bells

25

Director,

DoRCJTHY Hudson. Route 1, Midlothian, Va. Margaret Motiley Adams, 1618 Greenleaf Lane. Charlottesville. Va. Dorothy Davis Holland, 2259 Sewell Lane, Roanoke, Va. Helen Warriner, Route 1. Amelia, Va.

We Chairman of Snack Bar Committee Virginia Ahemathy Courter, Box

26

Births

Take Pride

The

Chairman of Alumnae House Committee Elizabeth Aloiwi; Smith, 713 Second Ave., Farmville, Va.

28

In:

Worthy Johnson

9^, Amelia. Va.

Crafts

Truitts Retire

The Blue and White Cookbook Executive Secretary

Elizabeth

and Treasurer Route

Shipp/ett Jotsies.

2,

Farmville, Va.

Class

News

29

C/ass Representatives

Patsy Powell, 318 S. Main St., Suffolk, Va. Christine _/»/zf.i Ferguson. P. O. Box 322. West Point, Va. 1509, 309 W.Jackson Blvd.. Chicago Cecil Kidd, 6319 Three Chopt Rd.. Richmond 26, Va. Ann Kovacevich, 2200 S. Buchanan Street, Arlington. Va. Peggy Green, 303 Mistletoe Drive, Newport News, Va. Judy Smith, 11 Greeneland Blvd., Portsmouth, Va.

Rebecca Jones, Room

Special

Honor

Roll

51

6, III.

An Adventure In

Memoriam

in

Learning

52

Inside Back Cover


14J.tUet^ it H.

".

.

.

to

K^amMn^

hold a mirror up to our time would be enough to break the mirror

.

Curtis

.

."

Harnack

Hortense

Callisher

Stanley Kunitz David, Jenkins


CURTIS

HARNACK

Has

there been something

alarming

'

My first point is that here is .

.

large literary achievements.

an unwill-

to believe

readers

.

of the product

granted

a writer

to

.

.

"Why

granted.

.

.

.

What was

.

David Jenkins,

in the past is no longer shotdd I willingly suspend

..."...

It

would

my

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

But the chief

.

.

.

WAR AND PEACE

Tolstoy an type of book

Musil's

.

.

A

mark

novel

.

.

.

almost deliberately

so;

that

.

.

an unfinished

.

.

.

After the novelist has

.

presented his nightmare view of the world

what is there a mirror

Clearly, to hold

left

for him to do? our times would he .

.

we

read and will be reading for

Jean Pollard, speaking of Stanley Kunitz, a poet "I his reading of his own poetry

was most impressed with because he did

it

with so

much

A

.

.

feeling

and expression."

I first

man

obvious that he was a

met (Mr. Kunitz),

it

of great intelligence and

was

skill.

However, I found him rather aloof. But after talking with Mr. Kunitz and hearing him speak several times, I realized that he was not only intelligent and talented, but also had

Susan Molthrop

—"Curtis

Harnack's two-hour session

with us in class was, for me, one of the highlights of the

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

reality.

.

.

year."

Dr. Richard Meeker of the English Department

felt that

.

way from dying, that so?ne interesting new developments are taking place these days. cannot count on The 7nodern writer an agreed

— Sharon Coulter "When

the ability to perceive character."

forging their own chain of facts applicable It seems to me within terms of their works. that the novel as an art form is a long

reality

literature

come."

to

thing different from all of this I've been are busily engaged in few enclosing their fictional worlds, .

be in

.

tip to

break the mirror. But a number of today s writers are attempting some-

enough

.

making the

years to

is,

cidminating chord, no completion, no

.

— "It was wonderful to

is itself

rounded shapes.

recounting.

creative writing student

the

part of the intentions of the novel. The theme dictates the form, in the best modern manner; here the point partly that our modern world is characterized by no

today,

in

....

Robert

is

THE MAN WITHOUT QUALITIES

the truncation

is

.

were students. Here are some

beneficiaries

the company, even for a short while, with people engaged

community of agreement as to what people were like and what might be expected of life. Think for

A

creative

of the things they said:

great days of the novel {l9th and early 20th century) there was apparently much more

end of the

and

interested in literature

.

instance of a character like Pierre in modern novel frequently said to

Kunit?,

faculty.

.

.

.

Stanley

Other students heard them, of course, either in formal or informal gatherings, and so did members of the

ring of the intentions of fiction. Partly the times are at fault, and we are bewildered incredible as to the nature of reality. It seems could presume a writer that one man In the is reality. THIS to say .

Callisher,

writing.

be unfair to suggest

that readers alone are at fault for the blur-

.

Hortense

here at various times, visited the College

on campus

students

am

"I

all

during March and April primarily for the benefit of the

.

asks the modern reader.

belief.^"

too busy.

itself

Harnack,

Curtis

in the fiction-writer s product on the excellence

'old-fashioned storytellers. ingness on the part of

Tt was Longwood's good fortune to have on the campus both poets and novelists this spring a number of writers who have become loiown across the nation for their

^

happening to the novel in the last few decades? Readers complain that they can find few

.

Stanley

Kunitz "succeeded

in

our interest in

reviving

writing and reading poetry because he presented evidence that poets are the only sane, orderly people

we have

left in

.

But what

constitutes

for present-day writers is being fashioned in fictional-shapes that are new. .

the world."

And

another

member of

a luster not

commonly found

Hortense Callisher

would add in the

to

felt

world.

a.

novel under consideration for the

Book Award, and one of the outstanding

achievements of the year. such magazines as The

won wide

critical

that

any gathering

the wife of Curtis Harnack and the

is

author of False Entry, National

the same department

Callisher, a novelist,

Hortense

New

Her short

stories,

literary

appearing in

Yorker and Harpers Bazaar, have

acclaim.

Mr. Harnack's books include two novels. Work of an Hand and Love and Be Silent. Besides writing short stories and essays, he has also served as fiction editor of

Ancient

one of the editors of the yearly O. Henry During the 1961-62 academic year he was on the faculty of Sarah Lawrence College. He currently holds a Guggenheim Fellowship and is working on a book about Esquire

and

as

collection.

Mr. Kunitz "meets" a

class

Alumnae Magazine


his experiences in Iran as a Fulbright teacher in the city of

STANLEY KUNITZ

Tabriz, near the Russian border.

Green Ways

Mr. Harnack and his wife visited the College in March During that time they met informally with

for three days.

Eh Thorn,

students and were entertained by Beorc

Mr. Harnack attended

College literary society.

meeting of the creative writing story,

and talked about writing

about the writing of the

in general

and

difJicult short story

Let 7ne not say

How

student

criticized a

class,

the

two-hour

a

The

in particular

Let

thing students heard him say was that today in our frag-

mented society one of the

own

own

them. "But write about victim to

it

in

such a way that you don't

but with

many

members

faculty

recent trends in contemporary literature. lecture are

found

in

me

not say

it, let

me

How

one of the

In

fall

not say

me

not say

of

Parts

recipient,

gathering, delivered

two

the

On

the

and "Order and Disorder

rary Poetry"

He

also

me hut endure and like star.

me proclaim

it

— human

be

my

lot!

—

of green horse-bones

To

a large

the moon-breasted sibylline.

And

lift this

To blaze

it

garland, Danger, from her throat

in the foundries of the night.

and on poetic

in the Arts")

talked informally with creative writing students

forms and techniques.

not confess

I turn, in a wilderness of sweat.

Contempo-

lectures ("Trends in

let

this

visited

me

This ritual like feather

on

Let

he read his poems before

for three days,

leave untold

kiss:

it,

How from my pit

campus

me

self's pre-history

Let

present)

College early in April as a Danforth Lecturer.

let

it,

(a class

side panels.

Stanley Kunitz, a Pulitzer Prize

climh

in the leaflight of my green-celled world

The blind moidds

Mr. Harnack also lectured before another group in the novel

to

crystal

region.

part of the country." he urged

cliches."

its

of the

not reveal

This legend, while the nights snow emerald.

Let

"Write about your

trellis

me

heart begins

must be

writer's chief concerns

with the essential uniqueness of his or her

it, let

a god my

In the rose-green ynoon;

One

form.

like

found time to

talk to stu-

dents individually.

A graduate of Harvard at

University, Mr. Kunitz has taught

New York State Teachers New York City. At the at New York's celebrated

Bennington College; Potsdam,

College; and the

New

School, in

present time he teaches poetry

His works include which he was awarded a Pulitzer and Passport to the War. Poetry Center.

Selected Poems, 1928-58,

for

Prize, Intellectual Things

Among

many honors

his

are rhe Garrison

Poetry, the Oscar Blumenthal Prize, a

Medal

Guggenheim

for Fel-

lowship, and a Letters Grant from the National Institute

of Arts.

The

Stanley Kunitz

last writer

on campus was David Jenkins,

(N^w Yorker

story writer

Magazine') and poet

a short

who now

teaches at the College of William and Mary. Here for only

Mr. Jenkins attended the creative writing

a day,

listened to

of the

and

class,

criticised a short story written

and talked about Welsh

literature in

One of

has done considerable work.

by a

class,

member

which he

the things he

men-

tioned was the similarity in the treatment of children that find in such novels as Henry James' Turn of the Screw, Richard Hughes' High Wind in Jamaica, and the recent book

you

by WilUam Golding, Lord of the

The

Flies.

college hopes to continue the practice of inviting

writers to the

coming

campus, and

is

already

making plans

for the

year. Curtis Harnack and Hortense Callisher

*Ellington White Editor's Note: Mr. White,

November, 1962

a

member

of the

Longwood

English

staff, is

himself an audior of short stories and magazine

articles.


Longwood alumnae, who

returned to Farmville for the Library saw the High Street exterior view unchanged: the white columns at the entrance, the clock tower, and the red brick terrace Those of you who came with its early spring flowers. into the building saw a transformation: an interior change and enlargement which was the result of years of planning and the expenditure of approximately 5450,000.00.

Founders Day

last

March and passed

Some years ago it was apparent that the Library, which had been opened in 1939, had outgrown its quarters to the point where it was unable to function as elSciently The book shelves were jammed; the office as it should. and catalog room were overcrowded; the reading rooms often presented the appearance of a bus station on a Labor Day weekend; clearly, the time had come.

^a^ecf.

President Lankford secured the services of an experienced Mr. William Jesse, Librarian of the University of Tennessee, and after visits to the campus and an investigation of the existing quarters, meetings with the library stafit, the architects and members of the faculty and administrative staff, Mr. Jesse dtew up It was an a program for enlargement and renovation. imaginative and striking program for the guidance of the discarded the idea architects; in essence it of enlarged reading rooms and an enlarged bookstack and called instead for the elimination of a central bookstack. A three floor addition of approximately 25,000 square feet at the rear was suggested. These areas would contain new freeIn standing shelving and reading and study facilities. library-building consultant,

^a^Ci^Aten.

other words the library's book and periodical collections would be out in the open over the entire area with reading tables, private study carrels, and lounge furniture intermingled. Mr. Jesse's proposals were enthusiastically accepted, and funds for the work were included in the Thompson and legislative appropriation for the college. Payne, Architects, of Roanoke began work on the plans; and in January, 1961, the library staff, with the help of the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds and a hardworking crew, moved the entire contents of the library to the empty elementary school building a block away.

^c6^%an.cf

By Charles

E.

Butler, Librarian

Work on the building continued for more than a year. Walls were knocked down; stairways disappeared; windows were bricked up; old light fixtures disappeared; the dark crowded stack was dismantled tier by tier. Quarters in the elementary school were less than ideal, but the time, In February, 1962, in retrospect, passed quickly enough. the weary move back began, the labor lessened somewhat because we were moving back into a building that was beautiful, modern, spacious. As you enter the lobby from long, wide, uncluttered space.

f

\

chandeliers.

window Editor's Note:

On October 2, 1962 the College Library was officially dedicated and named. -^

iii])i^

r^5$<:: ^^'*-^.. h

.â‚Ź?

.

^iiM,,.

ljHhi

High

Street,

you

are in a

To the left is the main desk, twenty-one feet long but unobtrusive; the only other pieces of furniture are several small groupings of chairs, sofas, coffee tables, and some decorative plants. New recessed ceiling lights augment the five copper

The

was built in was renovated

Library

1939 and and enlarged

in 1962.

Draw

draperies of gold Saranspun

With

filter

the

high arched white ceiling, its walls of ivoty and fawn, its floor covering of beige and brown, the lobby is a serene and compelling introduction light.

its

to the entire library.

To the left and right are the former Reference and Reserve Rooms, somewhat less changed. New flush ceiling and sandalwood lights provide brilliant illumination, draw draperies, new flooring, and fresh paint have renovated these latge reading rooms completely. From

the center of the lobby one looks into the

new

Alumnae Magazine


main

area of the

floor.

Here have been re-located the card

the periodical indexes, Twelve ranges of book shelves, individual study carrels, and informal lounge The walls furniture occupy the remainder of the floor. are a soft green; the floors are gray with flecks of green; and the fifteen windows are curtained in a green shade catalog,

the reference collection,

and the pamphlet and picture

files.

Directly behind this addition is a new called celadon. mall where the young grass and new trees and shrubs are thriving.

The new

areas on the floor above and below are similar equipment and furnishing, with the former including

in

Also included are a microfilm reading room with five readmg machines, three seminar rooms, staff and student lounges, an exhibition room (the former Browsing Room), a listening room, and seven small rooms for group study use. The entire building is air-conditioned and humidity-controlled, and will seat about 450 readers. Shelving will permit the book collection to grow to 140.000 volumes. five private faculty studies.

The exterior views from the sides and rear give no inkling that the whole structure was not planned originThe brick of the new section is an ally as a single unit. excellent match with the old, and the details blending the two link them smoothly together. The "new" Longwood

Library

is

a beautiful

building,

and out, and should serve the College efficiently many, many years to come. But a library is not a building alone; it is chiefly books the recorded word, the recorded dream: man's struggle to achieve the height. inside for

wrote a poem to read to the Richmond Alumnae chapter 1962 meeting; in the poem I tried to imagine the lingering impressions of a young person who had used (and used well) a library such as ours.

I

at its

I

It

remember had

but they did not enclose: opened to the worlds of the past. the worlds I know, this one, that one, those

They were

And

that place as beautiful.

walls, yes,

walls that

.

.

.

That place was as beautiful as a dream: I could walk over its wide floors to anything: There I could hear Karenina's mufl^ed scream, I could walk with David Copperfield And a thousand explorers, I

could hear La Traviata sing.

That place had windows opening on all the world: Those books: there Da Vinci's beautiful women smiled: There Byron slouched: there Dylan Thomas drank himself to death:

There Marie Antoinette murmured something

softly to her

child:

There Lindbergh knew the Atlantic below him Was fanged and dangerous and wild.

I

in the dark

remember that place, I remember those books, those pagesthem were windows, they were passages of light

All of

To

all the tangled centuries and ages Pages to the ages of shadow and ages that were bright. And my own time it was there: All its strange pages that will be fingered by Time.

Charles

November, 1962

E.

Butler

Remodeling of shown in these

the

Library is views.

interior


-

'

CHANGING PATTERNS IN THE HIGHER

WOMEN

EDUCATION OF By Ruth Editor's

Note:

B.

Wilson

This speech was delivered

at

Founders Day.

To initiate any conversation today around the subject of education is like releasing the floodgates of Grand Coulee Dam! Every newspaper and magazine editor, every alert congressman and legislator, every man on the street who can write legibly enough to send a "letter to the editor," plus a sprinkling of educators, have been sounding off on their pet theories concerning our educational system from kindergarten through certain medical schools.

Ruth

Articles and letters and editorials and conversations center around that most popular of topics, "The Education of American Youth, Where Is It Lacking, and What Shall

We Do About It.'" Much

that

is

written or verbalized gives

Much

evidence of some deep, sincere thinking. written and said

unless

it

is

utter drivel

that

is

and serves no good purpose

provides the author with an emotional cathartic.

Now,

while a great deal is being said about the elementary and secondary levels of education, much expounding has been done on the subject of higher education and its after-effects. And the higher education of women, with which this audience, in particular, should be concerned, has

had

its full

share of attention.

As you know, the education of women, higher or

other-

wise, has been a lively topic for discussion ever since

Eve

educated herself at the Tree of Knowledge. In this country the serious business of higher education for women got off to a fair start when Oberlin Collegiate Institute opened its doors to women in 1837. This milestone was followed a few months later by the founding of Mount Holyoke Female Seminary. In 1839 the Farmville Female Seminary Association was incorporated, making the forerunner of Longwood College the fifth oldest educational institution for women that has been in continuous operation in the United States.

mid 1860's both Cornell and Michigan Universities had admitted women, and by 1890 a college education for women was established practice in many of our coedu-

By

the

cational institutions.

Many

ivoinens colleges

had been

founded by the close of the nineteenth century. However, from the beginning right down to the present there have been arguments for and against the value and/ or necessity of education for women. If I should ask you to place within the correct century the two statements I am about to read, my guess is that you would be way off:

The the

first is this:

"I have often thought of

most barbarous customs

it

as

one of

in the world, considering

us as a civilized and a Christian country, that we deny the advantages of learning to women. reproach the sex every day with folly and impertinence, while I am confident, had they the advantages of education equal to us, they would be guilty of less than ourselves.

We

"A woman well bred and well taught, furnished with the additional accomplishments of knowledge and behavior,

is

a creature without comparison; her society

is

the

Wilson

B.

Dean of Women and

Professor of Education

emblem of sublimer enjoyments;

her person

is

and her conversation heavenly; she is all softness and sweetness, peace, love, wit, and delight; she is every way suitable to the sublimest wish, and the man that has such a one to his portion has nothing to do but

angelic,

to rejoice in her, and be thankful."

The second

College Wasted on statement to a champion of women's rights in the early part of this century and the latter question to a bitter opponent in the nineteenth century, your guess might be understandable, but you would be very wrong. The first statement was made by Daniel Defoe in 1697; the latter is the title of an article written in 1962 by Margaret Mead! I use these examples merely to show how the tides of opinions have fluctuated over the years. They are still fluctuating.

Women?" 3

is

If

am happy

a

question:

"Is

you attributed the

first

Margaret Mead, noted anthroand mother answered her own question with an unqualified "no" and takes to task the present-day detractors of higher education for women for their fogbound minds enmeshed in a mire of Victorian tradition. I

to report that

pologist, author,

But, despite the pessimistic and antagonistic attitudes that have been in evidence throughout the years, higher

education for to be

women

is

changing for the

here to stay, and the patterns seem better.

One of the major changes is taking place in the curricula now available to women. Academic disciplines for women once consisted of the "lesser arts", those cultural activities that enabled the daughters of the wealthy to converse in at least two languages, to spatter Shakespearean quotable quotes throughout their conversations, and to know a small amount of history, provided it pointed up the favorable traditions of their part of the country.

As more women sought advanced learning, the men who made all the major decisions regarding woman's place in the affairs of men, decided that women might well become school marms, thus releasing men for work that was more important and that required the advanced knowledge that only men could acquire! Women were also permitted to take up nursing, although it wasn't until recently that at least some college education was deemed necessary for that. Gradually the pattern has changed so that today we find enrolled in every curriculum offered, including

women

Alumnae Magazine


One reason for this change is the increasing among educators and researchers that the mental

engineering.

awareness

women

capacities of just might be equal Nearly one hundred years ago President

to that of

men!

Eliot of Harvard

wrote:

"The world knows next

nothing about the mental Only after generations of civil freedom and social equality will it be possible to necessaty for an adequate discussion of obtain data women's natural tendencies, tastes, and capabilities. We at Harvard do not find it necessary to entertain a confident opinion upon the fitness or unfitness of to

capacities of the female sex.

women

for professional pursuits."

Today, nearly one hundred years pressed by President Eliot still linger who take a dim view of the female better?" you can do, we can do

later,

the doubts ex-

in the

minds of many "Anything

battle-cry,

Today research is continuing under the auspices of numerous foundations and committees to determme what differences, if any, do exist between the male and female To date, as far as I know, no intellectual disposition. adequate answer has been given, but by and large it seems that most people are now willing to admit that woman's intellectual capacity, under a given set of circumstances, is equal to that of man's.

What

women who

those girls and to those

and the

ability to

become educated

have the opportunity for a changing world.

The second change

that is scarcely off the ground, and and has been since 1932, is in the area oi top level training for ivomen which requires post graduate work leading to a doctorate. According to recent statistics, women were awarded 33 per cent of the Bachelor's degrees and 32 per cent of the Master's degrees, but only 10 per cent of the doctorates for the year 1959. in fact,

The

is

regressing,

latter

percentage

is

surprising

when you compare

it

In a recent study made by Dr. John B. Parnsh, professor of economics at the University of Illinois, we are told that "in 1910 forty women received doctorates, in the early twenties the annual number increased to 125, and then jumped to 400 per cent in the mid-thirties. The average per cent increase every five years was 60 per cent. This rate of growth was more rapid than increase in population and in doctorate training for men, which was a little under 50 per cent. Strangely, too, the growth was not limited to a few areas, like educational and social sciences, but cut across almost the entire range of the curriculum.""' to the preceding forty

odd

years.

However, we are now regressing percentage-wise. We was our best year for women in top-level

find rhat 1932

women

training, with

receiving 16.8 per cent of

all

doc-

was only 10. One reason for this is that the percentage of men going on for doctorates has increased from 50 per cent in the first torates awarded, but in 1959 the percentage

differences

there are between male and

female

performances are now thought to be caused, not by sex but by sex expectations. Historically woman has been thought of and treated as home-maker, wife, mother, and loving peacemaker. She is, but she is capable of so much more than has been expected oihei. differences

Higher education is essentially tailored to masculine requirements provider, shaper of world events, discoverer, explorer, scientist, astronaut! Only in the past three decades have a sizable number of women attempted, and been permitted, to break through into man's world of higher academic achievement.

But the pattern is changing, and the academic disciplines which women are being admitted on both the undergraduare and graduate levels are slowly but surely broadening. Today women are holding their own beside their male peers in the sciences; physical, biological, and social; in the professions; law, medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy; and in other selected disciplines such as engineering, architecture, veterinary medicine, and psychiatry. to

path has been long and at times strewn with insurbarricades, perhaps the fault is largely our own. For years the drop-outs among women in college have been far greater than that of men; fewer women by far even enroll in college nationally 20 per cent of the 18 to 24 year age group in i960, and by the end of the sophomore year between 30 and 40 per cent of these had withdrawn. Early marriages account for many drop-outs but so do lack of motivation and the mistaken idea of so many women that a complete college education is not essential if all they plan to be are "mere housewives and mothers." To rhem, marriage is a culminating goal of the first importance and seldom do they see on the horizon any future problems or anxieties; any need for the ability to become gainfully employed in later years; any relationship between a college education and the ability to be a good wife, mother, and intelligent member of the community. If the

mountable

In the face of current emphases upon more and better education and with the ever increasing opportunities for women in the academic world, you who work with high school girls and we who work with college women, have our hands full in providing the necessary motivation to

November, 1962

quarter of this century to 85 per cent at the present time, an increase nearly twice the growth rate for women.

This presents a disheartening picture since women have demonstrated competence relative to men in every academic area, with the exception of engineering.

According to the Parrish study, at one time or another since 1900, women have accounted for from one-fifth to one-fourth of all top-level degrees in astronomy, anatomy, bacteriology, biochemistry, botany, zoology, anthropology, English and literature, foreign languages, and mathematics. They have earned as high as one-third or more of all doctorates in physiology, fine and applied arts, education, home economics, library science, and psychology. Parrish sums it

up

this

Since

way:

women

have already demonstrated great capacity

what is the prospect for the future.' let the statistics of the last twenty-five years serve the future, women will likely play a very guide to as a in all the disciplines,

If

we

small role and a declining one in the nation's highest intellectual efforts.

But

used as a guide to the future, could play a very important role cerhigher than at present. ^

if their potential is

women

then

much

tainly

Perhaps

this pattern will

change slowly, but change

it

the needs of our expanding economy are to be met. Again, we who are educators must provide not only quality education but strong motivation, and those who are respon-

must

if

growth in economic, industrial, and development must make room at the top for the qualified job-seeker, whether male or female.

sible for the country's scientific

The

third pattern has to be with womanpoicer on the labor

market.

In 1957 the National

Manpower Council

published

of Womanpower. Since the Manpower Council consisted of sixteen men and two women, I think it is quite a study

significant that

Women

it

prefaced

its

findings with this statement:

constitute not only an essential but also a dis-

of our manpower resources. They (women) without their presence in the labor force we could neither produce and distribute the tinctive part

are essential because


"

goods nor provide the educational, health, and other social services which characterize American society. They constitute a distinctive manpower resource because the structure and the substance of the lives of most women are fundamentally determined by their functions as wives, mothers, and homemakers. I

think

we

are

aware of the fact that a revolution

all

and over,

paigns to attract more

What

in

women

seems that young

and conscious of the possibility of having not only an education in depth, quality, and range, but an education which will allow them, after they leave college, to have a career before marriage, with the intention of going on with a career after marriage and even after the children are all in school. It

those

women's

in

in

college

colleges,

today,

are

Current trends, therefore, seem to point to the following: 1.

Women

will

become

our nation's labor 2.

increasingly

necessary

to

force.

Many women lives

if

will or can work 40 years of their they remain single, and 25 if they are

Women who

terminate their college education to a family will go back to college, either on a full or part-time basis, in order to compete with college graduates for more economically

marry and have

rewarding jobs. 4.

Recent studies have revealed that women 40 years and older may be expected to achieve academically proportion to their previous attainment; therefore, many young women today may feel secure in the knowledge that they will be able to complete formal degree programs in the years of their in

middle maturity. 5.

For those who are preparing to be teachets, the need for the future is critical. Estimates indicate "that our public schools will need 200,000 new teachers each year to supply the more than one million teachers needed by 1968-69. At present sex tatios, this

means 150,000 new women

teachers

upon

older

women

it

Academic

to

meet the demand.

amounts to

disciplines

this:

for

women

have

broadened

to cover the entire range of curricula; top level training

women has been declining since 1932, if the perwomen earning doctorates is an indicator. Womanpower on the labor market is on a tremendous upsurge. Even the National Manpower Council has admitted that without women the nation's economy for

centage of

would probably

fold.

Opportunities for college women to continue an interrupted education and/or to get back into the labor market after their children are in school have never been better. For the sake of herself her family, her community, and her country, no college-bred woman today has the right to withdraw from life and do nothing but attend to the needs of her family, important as these are. She can and should use the education she has received to become an intelligent, functioning member of society, and if that society needs her talents, whether on the labor market or on a worth-while community project, it should have them.

have been talking about changing patterns in the women but the patterns will not be there to change unless the foundations are well laid. I

Longwood College

continues to have as one of its sound education, including professional preparation. The challenge of the immediate future IS to faculty, administration, student body, and alumnae, and has been well expressed by the Chairman of objectives, the provision of a

Commission on Goals

the

which

report, is

college graduates to

is

for

Higher Education

in

the

W. Darden, Jr. One excerpt from his "An Urgent Need for Excellence,"

South, Dr. Colgate

entitled,

as follows:

One

luxury which alumni of Southern colleges and universities will never be able to afford is complacency about higher education in the South. We cannot afford illiteracy. We cannot aflford second-rate education. We cannot aflford any substitute for excellence.

We

cannot afford to have tomorrow's alumni of our

schools look back to say, "If only they had taught .' me The thoughtful leadership of today's alumni in a regional drive for excellence is a starting place. With your support we shall not come to terms with less than the best in our system of higher education.'* .

per year. Meanwhile, the shortages that are already accumulating indicate that schools must draw heavily

women

higher education for

married and have children. 3.

and

I

In essence

out of every ten married women are now working, as are nearly two out of every five mothers whose children are of school age. With college graduates who obtain professional jobs after graduation in the 1950's, teaching ranked first among the occupational choices. particularly

service,

putting on recruiting cam-

have attempted to do here is to point our some of the important changes that are taking place today in the higher education of women.

Three

are in the labor force.

economics, social work, library

scientific fields are all

women's employment has occurred during this present century. Today 37 per cent of all women in the United States, eighteen years

Home

8.

.

keep the schools supplied with qualified teachers. 6.

More critical in some respects is demand for teachers at the college more women may find places in the

the

growing where

level,

future.

Esti-

mates indicate that over three thousand new women teachers will be needed each year from now until 1969 in institutions of higher learning."" Incidentally, this is one reason for the latest scholarship program being sponsored by the American Association of

Women. who have never

University

It

seeks

women,

taught

Iron Worker,

"A

History of

Longwood

College."

Projects."

1697.

Reprint,

1955.

-Defoe, Daniel,

"An

Essay

Upon

•^Mead, Margaret, "Is College Wasted on Magazine, January, 1962.

Women."

Kedhook

John B., "Top Level Training of Women in the United 19OO-I96O." Journal of the National Association of Women Deans

*Parrish, States,

and

Counselors.

35 years of age or

who will apply for a full year's scholarship to attend a given college or university to take courses that will prepare them fot college teaching. over,

TAf

Autumn,

in college,

'-Ibid.

°

National

sity Press,

Manpower

New

Council: Womanpower.

Columbia Univer-

York, 1957.

"Leopold, Alice K., "Today's Women College Graduates." and Guidance Journal, December, 1959.

The

Personnel 7.

Professional nursing, which is the second largest profession for women, will need 48,000 new nurses by 1970.

''Zapolean, Marguerite, "Woman's Work: Facts, Findings, and Apparent Trends." Journal of the National Association of Women Deans Counselors, October, I960.

and

Alumnae Magazine


A WORD FROM

WYGAL

MR.

Fred O. Wygal

Acting President

As

this

message

arriving in Pakistan,

is

being written, your president, Dr. Francis G. Lantcford,

where

lie will

remain for the next year. There, he

is

a leader

Jr.,

of

is

a dis-

tinguished group of American educators on an enterprise that will present the true image

of America to the people of

this ancient land.

Through

Ford Foundation, the educational leaders of Pakistan

this project,

supported by the

gain understanding and

will

experience in developing programs of education intended eventually to accomplish for their

people what public education has accomplished for the masses of people in America.

Longwood

College

is

honored that

leader should be chosen to direct this important

its

mission.

Longwood

In orientmg myself to the responsibilities of acting president of

during the absence of Dr. Lankford, quality of the traditions that

am

I

College

profoundly impressed with the nature and

make Longwood an

institution of preeminence.

In the firm

handclasp, the steady look from friendly eyes, and the offers of encouragement and

wishes

I

abundant

receive spirit

from the Alumnae and friends of Longwood,

Longwood

has transmitted to each of you.

preserve and to carry forward these traditions so that

educational needs of this generation as effectively as

As

I

review the role of

Longwood

My

Longwood it

good

see evidence of the

I

challenge shall be to

will

continue to serve the

has for almost a century.

College as an educational institution and search

for the source of the spirit that creates and preserves

its

preeminence,

I

find very definitely

Alumnae Association is an integral force. Through the influence of this force, most new students, before arriving at Longwood, have had transmitted to them through alumnae acquaintances some of the cherished features of the institution's enduring qualities. Through local chapters of the Association, the spirit and feelings kindled during college days are nurtured and kept burning bright. Through the activities of your Association, both state-wide and local, you transmit ideas and engage in endeavors that nurture the continued material and spiritual growth of your Alma Mater. that the

In the

needed

immediate years ahead, your active support of Longwood College

as never before.

As you know, the primary purpose of this

teachers for the public schools of Virginia.

This distinct function of

will

be

to

produce

Longwood

College

institution

is

becoming more and more the Only as each of you loyal focus of attention of public-minded citizens of Virginia. alumnae of Longwood join hands in helping your Alma Mater develop the programs and and

certain other state-supported institutions

facilities for

are

November, 1962

the challenges that

our heritage today.

lie

ahead

of Virginia

shall

is

we continue

to preserve the traditions that


COLLEGE COMMENTARY September's new students, numbering 354, will increase the college enrollment to an estimated 1,200 students for the year of 1962-63.

The 196I-62 session opened with an enrollment of 1,162 undergraduates and 37 graduate students. The June graduating class totaled 187 and the August class, 43 students.

and Mrs. Betty Price Rex, head resident of South Faculty resignations include Dr. Richard Meeker, Mr. Hunter Ballew, Mr. Robert Merritt, Dr. Donald Wesley,' Mrs. Ray Moore, Jr., Mr. Clifford Smith. librarian,

Cunningham dormitory.

New

courses in the College curriculum include: in the

department courses have been added in enamels, jewelry and metal work; in the education, psychology, and philosophy department, three new courses in philosophy will be offered and, as a requirement in all teaching degrees, a course in educational measurement will be required. The English department has expanded the American literature course. More courses are being offered in European history and the history department is also expanding its offerings in the field of political science. The department of music is increasing its requirement of credit hours for graduation with a corresponding increase in credits being granted. This department also inaugurated two-week seminars in piano and church music during the summer school session. art

Of these 1,199 students, 519o received financial aid in the form of scholarships and loans during the 1961-62 Various gifts and bequests to the College by session. alumnae and friends enabled Longwood to strengthen its growing scholarship program. Gifts and bequests include Alumnae Association gifts; Miss Frances I. Goldman Library Fund; Oscar Smith Memorial Foundation scholarship; Lynchburg Coca-Cola Company unrestricted; Eureka Ashburn Oliver Scholarunrestricted; Slater Food ship Fund; Ben R. Johns, Jr.

Service

Management

— — unrestricted;

General Electric

— un-

Burlington Industries Foundation unrestricted; and Kappa Delta-Gamma Theta Scholarship Fund. restricted;

Longwood College continued its assistance to faculty members furthering their education by providing summer Miss Lora Bernard, assistant professor of study grants. home economics, is taking courses in home economics at Mrs. Anita B. Ernouf, asthe University of Tennessee. sistant professor of foreign languages, studied for six weeks Sorbonne in Paris. Mr. Alfred L. Patrick, insttuctor in business education, is beginning woik on the doctotate at Mr. David G. Vieria, inthe University of Tennessee. structor of history and social sciences, completed his dissertation for the doctor's degree at American University. Miss Patricia Reilly, assistant piofessor of music, is continuing work on the doctorate at Indiana University.

The new laundry building was put into use at the beginning of the fall term. It is located directly behind the old training school, which will be converted in the near future into classroom and office space. The physical education building is nearing completion and is to be opened duting the latter part of the fall term. Behind the library the planting of the mall has been completed. Plans are underway for a new dormitory to house 200 students.

at the

10

Mrs. Eleanor Weddle Bobbitt, assistant professor of physical and health education, has received the first state scholarship of Delta Kappa Gamma. Beginning this fall, she will use this scholarship to pursue her Ph.D. degree in physical education at the University of Maiyland.

New appointments to the faculty for 1962-63 include Dr. Richard William Barron, associate professor of political science; Mr. George P. Elliott, insttuctor in education; Miss Mary Anne Heintz, assistant ptofessor of health and physical education; Dr. Leta Jane Holman, assistant professor of biology; Mr. Ben William de los Reys, assistant professor of physics; Miss Barbara Bramlette Smith, instructor of physical and health education; Dt. William J. Sowder, associate professor of English; Dr. Rose Frances Spicola, assistant professor of education; Dr. Rosemary Sprague, associate professor of English; Mr. Wiley L. Umphlett, instructor in English; Mr. Dennis Earl Williams, instructor in mathematics; Senorita Maria Isabel Loeffler, part-time instructoi in foreign languages; and Mademoiselle Nicole Charron, part-time instructor in foreign languages. appointments include Mrs. Marion Barrett, head resident of Main Cunningham dormitory; Mrs. Katherine B. Pilley, head resident of Tabb dormitory; and Mrs. Betty Stoddard, assistant to the director of public relations. Staff

Retirements

include

Miss

Marion

Terry,

assistant

President Lankford is the co-author of Contemporary Algebra Book One, pubhshed recently to meet the changing needs of secondary school mathematics. He also served as president of the Association of Virginia Colleges.

Dr. John W. Molnar, professor of music and chairman of the department, was awatded a |300 gtant-in-aid from Colonial WiUiamsburg to continue his research during the summer on art music in Colonial Williamsburg. His article on "Choral Placement" was published in the Music Journal.

Miss Nancy V. Leitch, instructor in art, exhibited sculpweaving, and drawings at Randolph-Macon Woman's College and at the Art Club of Lynchburg. She slso exhibited weavings at the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh ture,

Exhibit at the Cainegie

Museum.

A group of eight ptints, the work of Miss Annie Lee Ross, associate professor of art, was placed on permanent "The prints exhibit at Regis College, Denver, Colorado. were purchased by a benefactress of the college and piesented to the college in her name and in Miss Ross' name. Miss Ross also exhibited a group of four prints at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Dr. Robert T. Brumfield, chairman of the depattment of is continuing his research entitled "Control Cell Division and Growth in Plant Root Meristems" at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this summer under a grant from the National Science Foundation. Two articles that Dr. natural sciences,

Brumfield had published were "Effects of Nucleic Acid Components on Root Growth and Geotropism" in Ameri-

Alumnae Magazine


"A Photographic Instrument for Determining Cellular Growth Rates in Roots of Small-Seeded Grasses" in the Association of Southeastern Biologists Bulletin. Dr. Brumfield is serving as vice-president of the Association of Southeastern Biologists.

can Journal of Botany (Abstract) and

An

of natural sciences, Dr. Carolyn continuing her research entitled "Cytological, Physiological and Genetic Studies of Certain Strains of Tetrahymena pyriformis" this summer at the University of Michigan under a grant provided by the Atomic Energy Commission. Dr. Wells had published "Evidence for Micronuclear Function during Vegetation Growth and Reproduction of the Ciliate, Tetrahymena pyriformis," "An Analysis of the and Nucleotides of Three Strains of Tetrahymena pyriformis," in American Zoologist, and with the aid of Lmdy Hatch, a Longwood senior, "Possible Breeding Systems for the Study of Recessive Mutations in Tetrahymena pyriformis" in the Association of Wells,

assistant professor is

DNA

RNA

Southeastern Biologists Bulletin.

Maurice Neveu, was awarded

professor of natural National Science Foundation grant to take part in their Research Participation Program for College Teachers. In addition to his summer research at the University of Virginia, he will be given another sum for the purchase of equipment for use in continuing his research here at Longwood. Dr. Neveu is co-author of "Deuterium Oxide Solvent Isotope Effects in the Nucleophilic Reactions of Phenyl Esters," published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. He has become an abstractor of English and French chemistry papers for

Dr.

sciences,

assistant

a

Dr. Richard K. Meeker, associate professor of English, edited the latest Institute of Southern Culture publication. The Dilemma of the Southern Writer.

An assistant professor of English, Mr. Ellington White, had published a short story, "The Penis of Flight," in the Best American Short Shories of 1961: an article, "The Sandpile at Whale Bay," in Sports Illustrated: and an article, "Robert Penn Warren," in South: Modern Southern Literature in its Cultural Setting.

The writings of assistant professor of English Carson Gibb included "Frost's Mending Wall" in the Explicator, "Interpreting Burlesque in Gulliver's Travels" in Virginia "The Best Authorities" in Huck Finn and His Critics. English Bulletin, and

During the past

year. Dr. Francis B. Simkins, professor

of history and social sciences and chairman of the department, worked on a paperback book, The Reconstruction of the South. He also prepared an essay on "Reconstruction" which is a chapter in an anthology to be published by G. P. Putnam and Sons. He is currently adding a chapter to his book, A History of the South. Dr. Marvin

W.

Schlegel, professor of history and social

sciences, served as editor of the second edition of J.

Wertenbaker's Norfolk: Historic Southern

Port.

Thomas He also

had book reviews in the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, the North Carolina Historical Review, and the Mississippi Valley Historical Review.

Chemical Abstracts. Dr. Charles Lane, professor of geography and geology, had published "Some Aspects About Maps and Map Reading" in the Geogram of the Virginia Geographical Society and "Some Natural and Cultural Observations in the Dismal Swamp of Virginia" in Memorandum Folio, Volume XIV, Southeastern Division, Association of

American Geographers. During the past year, he continued his research on "Virginia's Changing Landscape Patterns in the Twentieth Century." Dr. Lane is State Coordinator for the National Council for Geographical Education and editor of the Bulletin and Geogram of the Virginia Geographical Society.

Dr. R. C. Simonini, Jr., professor of English and chairof the department, is currently serving as a member of the Commission on the English Language of the National Council of Teachers of English, as well as a member of its College Section Committee and the Committee on Selection, Retention, and Advancement of the College Teacher of English. Dr. Simonini is also editor of the Virginia

man

English Bulletin.

Mr. Foster Gresham, associate professor of English, is Executive Secretary of the Virginia Association of Teachers of English.

The Virginia Journal of Education includes "Teaching the Military History of the Civil War in the Junior High School" by Dr. Donald A. Wesley, assistant professor of education and supervisor of student teaching. Mr. Alfred Patrick, instructor

in business education,

had

published "Develop More Than Speed in Typewriting" in the Balance Sheet and "The Experts say ..." in Business Education Forum.

Mrs. Emily K. Landrum, associate professor of physical and health education, is serving her fourth term as dance chairman for the State of Virginia at the request of the National Section on Dance of the American Association of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. Mrs. Landrum's opinion on "The Problem of Evaluation in Creative Dance" was recently included as one of two points of view in the

Journal of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation.

Eight members of the Longwood faculty were included 1962 edition of Who's Who in American Education. Among those listed in this twentieth edition are: Blanche Crisp Badger, Elizabeth Burger, Merle L. Landrum, Charles George Gordon Moss, Dorothy Badders Schlegel, Marvin Wilson Schlegel, Donald Arthur Wesley, and Ruth Bayford Wilson. in the

Associate professor of English Mary Nichols wrote a for the Virginia English Bulletin on Literary Heritage: A Macmillan Paperback Series.

Dissertations were completed by three members of the Mr. Sterling Adams, assistant professor of music, was awarded the Ph.D. degree by Indiana University in Ph.D. degree from the University of Virginia was June.

Dr. Dorothy Schlegel, associate professor of English, had a book review, "Erwin Wolff, Shaftesbury, unt seine Dedeutung fur die Englische Literatur des 18, Jhs," pub-

received by Mr.

book review

faculty.

A

lished in Anglia.

November, 1962

and

James Helms, associate professor of history In August Mr. Carson Gibb, assistant

social sciences.

professor of English, received the Ph.D. degree from the University of Pennsylvania.

11


KATHARINE COOK HUFFMAN WRITES OF

THE Do

1912

you remember that wonderful year

CLASS REUNION

— that wonderful

year that used to be?

Do you remember Longwood with one parlor, double beds with sagging springs, a classroom with an upright piano and a cabinet victrola which doubled as a music room, sorority meetings held in bedrooms, and last but not least the voluminous blue bloomers required for gym class? Remember? Yes, it was that wonderful, wonderful year of 1912. Despite the numerous lounges, the single beds, the grand pianos, the gym shorts, the sorority rooms, and all the other "plushness" found at Longwood today, 1912 was a wonderful year. It mmt have been, judging from the appearance and achievements of the 14 graduates who returned for the 50th reunion of the class.

You

will find a picture

of

this likely

looking group of

Amenta

Aiatthews CrabiU were either late arrivals or just couldn't stop reminiscing long enough to join us. The picture was taken at the Alumnae House following a delightful Coffee Hour. At that time Elizabeth Shipplett Jones, out Alumnae Secretary, presented each of us with a lovely Wedgewood plate picturing Longhope wood as a gift of the Alumnae Association. Susie and Amenta didn't miss out on this score! After the enjoyable get-together at the Coffee, we attended the Alumnae meeting in the auditorium. The rattley seats with the bfoken veneer that tore our dresses (our hose were spared because our skirts weie long) are no more. In the new auditorium the seats are upholstered with nothing less than foam rubber. oldsters.

Susie Holt and

We

12

In the auditorium there was a program of speeches, music, and reports. However, the highlight for the 1912 class members was the presentation of a cut-crystal bowl by Ruth Vf^ard Sadler to the Alumnae House. Hear Ye! Hear Ye! Members of the Class of 1912 and do ye likewise!

At luncheon (can you imagine

a

mid-day meal

at

"Farm-

ville State Normal School," which was the official school name in 1912, being called such?) we "girls" let our hair down and exchanged personal chit-chat.

Louise Poindexter produced a 1912 'Virginian. Each of us autogtaphed hei picture, some of which were identified a bit reluctantly. Such hesitancy is undetstandable! The hair-dos rival anything Jackie Kennedy's stylist has produced thus far!

Margaret "Woodward, aftet teaching a mere 11 years (doubtless the reason for her youthful appearance), conwotk in the Welfaie Department at Richmond.

rinues to

In sharp contrast (not in appearance) Susie PM/z^j Glenn, gtaduated befoie she was 18, retired in 1958 after 46 years in the teaching profession.

who

libiarian ar the Kenbtidge Public occasions articles regarding her "Stoty Hour for Children" have been featured in the Richmond Times Dispatch.

SaWie Jackson Stokes

Libtaty.

On

is

several

Mamie Auerbach

reaping the reward shared by many love and admiration of former students, four of whom are admirals in the U. S. Navy. dedicated

teachets

is

— the

Amelie Jo«« Garrison retired 11 years ago aftet teaching 38 years, 30 of which have been in Richmond Public Schools. She is now living very comfortably at the Hermitage Methodist

Home.

Table talk at the luncheon was not confined solely to mattets legarding "what you have done and how 7 have spent these 50 yeats." Anne Wilkinson Cox, Sallie /rff/^Jo;^ Stokes and Katherine Cook Hoffman had lettets ot messages from many classmates unable to attend the reunion. Mary Carrington Eggleston, Elizabeth Hart Kelly, Leta Chtistian, Thutzetta Thomas Ross, Eunice Watkins Wood sent us their regards and greetings. Lily Peicivall Rucker would have been ptesent had she not been tecoveting from

an automobile accident.

A

fitting finale to the festivities

the tea given at the

of Foundets

Day was

home of

President and Mts. Lankford The afternoon downpour may

honor of the Alumnae. have drenched some of the guests, but it failed to dampen their enthusiasm. It couldn't have been otherwise in the genial atmosphere created by a gracious host and hostess, delicious refreshments, and prevailing friendliness. For mosr of us it marked rhe end of a perfect day. in

CLASS OF 1912 Front row, from left: Mrs. Jean Boatwright Goodman, Lottsburg; Miss Mamie Auerbach, Richmond; Mrs. Katherine Cook Huffman, Salem; Miss Hattie E. Ashe, Perrin. Back row: Mrs. Ruth Ward Sadler, Norfolk; Mrs. Sallie Jackson Stokes, Kenbridge; Mrs. Sue Powell Peters, Elizabeth City, N. C; Mrs. Ann Wilkinson Cox, Newport News; Miss Margaret 'Woodward, Richmond; Mrs. Susie Phillippi Glenn, Roanoke; Miss Louise Poindexter, Portsmouth; and Mrs. Elizabeth Hawthorne Lueck, Round Hill.

In 1972 our class will have another reunion. Most of us will be well past our allorted time. So what? Let us hope we may be physically able as well as inclined to emulate the valiant little 89-year-young lady, Mrs. Louise Twelvetrees Hamlet, '92. No one enjoyed Founders Day mote than she, even though 70 yeats have elapsed since her graduation.

So Here's to 1972! May it also be a wonderful year, wonderful as that year that used to be. Remember? Yes, it was that wonderful, wonderful year of 1912.

as

Alumnae Magazine


YOUR ALUMNAE PRESIDENT SPEAKS

.

J ANIE Potter Ha-nes. President

.-•'

i''-'''

It seems such a short while ago that I had this opportunity of contacting you! Then, I thought that you should exercise your option to elect another to serve as your President for the year, for I realized that the demands of the office and the needs of the Association were for one who could devote mote time to our College than I could. I am of the same mind still but nevertheless shall cairy on as I can to serve and assist the Alumnae Association and Longwood. I have found the responsibilities of this office both challenging and rewarding, and I cannot urge too strongly that you give your sincere interest and hearty cooperation to the affairs of Longwood, present and future.

My remarks of a year ago more

privileged to observe

still greater conviction now that I have been the long hours which your Association staff

could well be repeated, but with

closely the very hard

work and

expends throughout every day of the year. As for the faculty and staff of Longwood College itself, I must state that only a truly dedicated group of those devoted to the education and training of youth could do what they are doing. While salary is no measure of recompense for these friends of Alumnae or molders of our students, I cannot stress too strongly the effort which should be exerted by each individual, as well as alumnae chapters, toward the economic recognition of laboi performed above and beyond the call of duty! And I also wish it understood that each one of us should continue and increase our support of our Alumnae Association with larger funds for all of its causes, some of which are barely existing just now. There is need for encouragement, a letter or a word, to that staff on how well they are carrying out their duties.

We could not fail to be thrilled

by an announcement of Dr. Lankford's

Longwood had selected nor could we fail to feel

at

Founders Day

in

March saying

classrooms were being refused admission and were feeling the despondency of rejection. We might recall our own youthful laxity in high school studies, which did not cost such a price in those past days, and imagine such careless repetition last year on the part of such a girl. I would ask each of you to use your influence, and advise your younger friends who are a year or so away from college not to risk such a rejection, be it from Longwood or some other college. Teachers, mothers, and especially those of you who are closer in age and social contacts, have a most setious responsibility in this sort of educational and psychological preparation of that,

even

for the

at that date,

coming

year;

sufficient top quality student applicants to

ihe disappointment in realizing that

fill its

many

girls

youth.

One of the ways we alumnae can assist both the college and the precoUege girl is to support the administration of Longwood, and other State schools, in the realization of planned additions and improvements to the plant: classrooms, dormitories, recreational and physical training facilities, as well as those intangible but vital needs which can best be met through the student union and facilities for the exercise of student government and extracurricular activities which train in social and economic organization. Funds

and our legislators and representatives should be well informed of the leading position holds in the responsible education and training of our Virginia girls as teachers and mothers of

are needed,

Longwood tomorrow.

We

shall

family well.

miss Dr. Lankford this year! As he goes about his duties in Pakistan, shall be happy when they return.

we wish him and

his

We

We welcome you,

Mr. Wygal, and we want you to be well assured of our complete and hearty cooperaand duties at Longwood. We may not be fully aware of what we may do to help you, but we are eager to do our part! Please advise us individually and otherwise as to the ways and means in which we may lend our active suppott. tion in your responsibilities

To you

alumnae, whether one year or four years at Longwood, I urge you to affiliate yourself with the Alumnae Chapter, take an active part in its woik, and attend its meetings. Plan now to attend Foundets Day, March 16. Your heart will warm with renewal of old ties!

nearest

November, 1962

J

3


Dr. Joanne Curnutt, assistant professor of music, presented recitals and lecture-recitals in various parts of the state using the recently purchased music department harpsichord.

Pictured at a tea of the Peninsula Chapter, standing, left to right, are: Sally Jester Ford, Patricia Altwegg Brown, and Gertrude Seated is the late Gertrude Lash Asher.

Leny Conn.

14

•v,^j,

f;'-j*^

Louise Twehetrees Hamlett '92 had the honor of being the graduate attending oldest

Founders Day.

Pictured at the Founders Day luncheon are (1. to r.) Thelma Croye Smith. Janie Potter Hanes, Nan Seuard Brown, and Rosemary Ehim Pritchard.

Granddaughter

Laurice

Hamlet

the fitst granddaughter Mrs. Jean Boaturight Goodman '12 at Founders Day

greets

Pictured above are the members of the Peninsula Chapter planning the annual Style Show and Card Party. In charge of the event are, seated left to right, Jean Cake Forbes, Sally Smith Petty, Peggy Hood Smith and Mildred Pleasant Rhodes.

Alumnae Magazine


^un.

We

extremely proud

are

of our Alumnae Chapters,

backbone of the Alumnae Association. The chapters vary in age, size, and distance from Longwood; but they share a common purpose to further the best interests of our college and foster a spirit of The social functions, business fellowship and service. meetings, and money-raising projects of the chapters all add to the life of the chapter members and keep them in close for they remain the

—

Mrs. Janie Potter Hanes, Lexington, the

Longwood Alumnae

luncheon

Robert

Association,

Lee

national president of pictured at a February

left, is

Hotel

with Mrs. Josephine Magnifico, a member of the Longwood faculty'; Mrs. Mary Sterrett Lipscomb, Lexington, president of the William Henry Ruflner Chapter of the Alumnae; and Mrs. Elizabeth S. Jones, secretary of the Alumnae Association. the

in

E.

touch with their Alma Mater.

The chapter presidents convene in early October with Alumnae Board members and form the Fall Council

the

meeting.

Togethet they plan projects of interest for the

year, gleaning novel ideas for their chapters.

for

them

to see the college

It is a

and hear of plans

for

pleasure

its

further

development.

At the business meeting of the Alumnae Association on Founders Day, the chapter presidents report on their year's

work.

Our Alumnae Association

of pep and leadership and, with a past filled with service, can look to the future with renewed vigor to work together for our Alma Mater and to strengthen our Alumnae Association. is

full

The following is a brief resume of the yearly reports ot The ones sending checks at Founders Day are listed on the Honor Roll. our chapters.

The members of the Baltimore Chapter decided to begin a fund to give a scholarship to a student from their Jane Richards Markuson serves as Longwood's representative on the Woman's Alumnae Club Council. area.

The

active Farmville Chapter entertained the Alumnae "Coffee Hour" during Founders Day at the Alumnae House. This is always a highlight for many returning alumnae. A tea was given in the fall, and in November the annual benefit bridge party was held. Their Mary White CoxScholarship was awarded to a deserving Prince Edward County student. A loan of $100 was given to a Longwood at the

student.

The William Henry Ruffner Chapter of Lexington and Rockbridge County had a well-attended luncheon at the Robeit E. Lee Hotel in February and heard a talk on the College by Mrs. Josephine Magnifico, a member of the Longwood Faculty, and a talk by Elizabeth S. Jones, alumnae secretary. The members also enjoyed colored slides of the college.

Norfolk-Portsmouth students home for the holidays, and students.

A

prospective

was held to

at

Longwood

aid in raising

for their $200 scholarship fund. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bittinger were honored guests at the spring luncheon in April. Also, from the faculty were Miss Virginia Bedford and Mrs. Janice Lemen as guests. Mr. Bittinger made the main address on the college. The luncheon was at the Norfolk Yacht and Country Club.

The Petersburg Chapter gave a tea at the Petersburg Country Club in the fall at which time 25 high school seniors were entertained by the large number of alumnae Dr. Joanne Curnutt presented a short program present. of music on the harpsichord. The chapter gives a scholarship to a deserving high school senior. The Peninsula Chapter voted

last

November

to

accumu-

fund of 32,500 to be invested with the Longwood College Foundation. The annual fall tea was given in the home of Mts. Ellis Conn to honor the new alumnae on the The spring card parry and fashion show was Peninsula. held in April and was the money-making project for the year. Dr. Richard Brooks, chairman of the department of education, physchology, and philosophy at Longwood, was guest speaker at the luncheon given in May at the late a

Warwick Hotel.

Our most nottherly chapter is the Philadelphia one bur made up of active and interested alumnae fiom a large Their Christmas Bazaar was held in November to area. raise

funds ro swell their Teacher's Service Organization

from which they receive dividends. In May Dr. Gordon Moss, dean of Longwood, was guest speaker at the annual luncheon.

The Raleigh Chapter had

May

at the

home

meeting in November, and a delightful tea in

their fall

a luncheon meeting in February,

of Thelma Croye Smith.

The Richmond Chapter cooperated with the Richmond Club in entertaining all new September

School.

for their first days at

November, 1962

Longwood, who were

all

money

The Lynchburg Chapter had several meetings last year. They awarded a scholarship to a senior at E. C. Glass High The Norfolk Chapter had seven luncheon meetings, two board meetings and luncheons, a Christmas tea for the

at

benefit card party

Curtis.

at a dessert party in the

students in students last

home of Mrs. Warren

Thirty-six girls attended, receiving a

good

send-off

Longwood.

Chapter members were hostesses and gave (Continued on page 16)

a tea for the

15


Chapter Officers The Alumnae

Named 1962-63

Office has been notified of the election of

—president,

Grace Kappas Bishop; vice president,

Penultima Johns Wiseman; secretary, Nell Pritchett Gordon; treasurer, Grace Jamerson Neely; historian, Agnes Stokes Richardson. Farmville

—president,

Eleanor

Weddle

Harris;

treasurer,

Greensboro

treasurer,

Lexington

Helen

dent, Bailey;

Lynchburg

president, Ann Galusha; vice president, Alice Raleigh Prood Morrisette; secretary, Roberta Skipwith Self; treasurer, Katherine Brewer Carter; historian, Nena Lockridge Sexton.

Richmond

— president,

Jean Ridenour Appich; vice presiFrances Lee Stoneburner; recording secretary, Tac Waters Mapp; corresponding secretary, Harriet Butterworth Miller; treasurer, Elizabeth Lacy Jones; membership chairman, Rosa Courter Smith.

Margaret Eley Brothers; secretary-

Roanoke

Sterrett

Lipscomb; vice

presi-

Floyd Hight; secretary, Ellen Mildred Goodman Thompson.

Veva Oakes Spain;

vice president,

Freeman; second vice president, Cleo Reynolds Coleman; secretary, Goldie King; treasurer, Elizabeth

Ballagh; scholarship chairman, Evelyn Traylor

—president,

Rocky Mount

Virginia Johnson; second vice president, Margaret Woodard Vanderberry; secretary, Gertrude Lytton Barnes; treasurer. Nan Brimmer.

president, Anne Lynch Millner; vice president, SA\y Jester Ford; second vice president, Peggy Hood Smith; secretary, Sylvia Roper Custer; treasurer, Mary Ellen Moore Piland.

Petersburg president, Henrietta Salsbury Fauber; president, Mildred Maddrey Butler; secretary,

Valley

alumnae attending the VEA Convention in November. A scholarship was awarded to a worthy high school senior who would enter Longwood in the fail. Elizabeth S. Jones, alumnae secretary, and Mr. Charles Butler, college librarian, were guests at the annual luncheon at the Hermitage Country Club in March. Mr. Butler told the members of the "new" library and recited one of his poems. Liz told of the alumnae work. The Richmond alumnae have been most helpful in rooming the students who are there for their practice teaching.

The Roanoke Chapter

entertained at a large tea in the

home of Dorothy

Davis Holland last fall and had as honored guests, the student teachers in Roanoke and new alumnae in the area. Dr. and Mrs. Lankford and Elizabeth S. Jones were there for the occasion. A fashion show and dinner was sponsored in the Miller and Rhoads Tea Room in March to raise money for the chapter scholarship fund. This was most successful. In May Mrs. Josephine Magnifico of the mathematics department of the College, and Elizabeth S. Jones, alumnae secretary, spoke at the annual luncheon at the Shenandoah Club. Miss Mary Nichols was present from the College. Colored slides of the College were shown to the group.

The Valley (Staunton) Chapter had a delightful buffet supper meeting in October in the home of Margaret Mish

(Staunton)

Jane

Myra

Ruth Hunt;

— president,

Bailey

secretary, St.

Caroline

Eason Roberts; secretary,

Catherine Bickle; Margaret Mish Timberlake.

—president,

president, Jackie

Mary

Clair Martin.

treasurer,

alumnae representative, vice

Cuddy;

Reese

Brooke Benton Dickerman;

Willson;

SufFolk-Nansemond

Dale Brothers Birdsong; secretary, Rebecca Mary Alston Rush;

Marshall;

Bradshaw; treasurer, reporter, Jean Parker Harrell. Riddick

Washington president, Elsie Story; vice president, Ann Blair Brown; secretary, Fran Harper Powell; treasurer, Eleanor Lester

Winchester

Umbau. Nancy

— president,

Harrell Butler; vice presi-

Betty Jean Snapp Fawcett; secretary, Dorothy Overcash; treasurer, Helen Kaknis Thomas.

vice

(Continued from page 15)

—president,

vice president,

dent,

Mary

OUR ALUMNAE CHAPTERS

secretary,

Temple.

Bennett Arrington; treasurer, Margaret

Macon.

Barbara Ames Hoy; vice

Kessler;

treasurer, Elizabeth

president,

16

—president, Helen Smith Crumpler; vice president,

Kathryn

Mary

Elsie

Peninsula

—president,

dent,

Winnie Hiner.

Lucille

treasurer,

NorFolk-Portsmouth

Thompson Burger; vice president, Bobbitt; secretary, Ola Brightwell

Winston Cobb Weaver.

— president,

Pennington;

Stables

president, Annie Salley; vice president, Philadelphia Irene Pugh Evans; secretary, Harriett Walker Dukes; treasurer, Alberta Collings Musgrave.

Elsie

—president,

Ruth

treasurer,

historian, Elizabeth Coghill Stevens.

Baltimore president, Grace Scales Evans; vice president, Barbara Assaid Mills; secretary, Neyra Hines Krieger; librarian, Alice Wiley Brown; prospective-student representative, Jane Richards Markuson.

Danville

Powell;

Bowles

the following chaptet officeis:

Dr. and Mrs. Lankford, Miss Winnie Hiner, S. Jones were guests from the College for In March the chapter entertained at tea in the home of Caroline Eason Roberts and had as guests students of Lee High School who had applied to Longwood for the

Timberlake.

and Elizabeth the evening.

fall.

The SufFolk Chapter had a White Elephant March to raise money for their projects. In May group attended the annual supper meeting the liigh school seniors

who

will attend

at

sale

in

a large

which time

Longwood

this

were honored guests. The speaker for the occasion was Dr. Elizabeth Burger of the Longwood faculty who told of the developments of the College and showed colored slides. Elizabeth S. Jones, alumnae secretary, spoke to the group on the alumnae work and told of Founders Day activities. fall

The Washington Chapter members enjoyed a luncheon Hotel in March. The annual tea was given in the home of Lucille Akers Harvey in May and members heard talks by Dr. Gordon Moss, dean of the College, and at the Willard

Elizabeth

S.

Jones, alumnae secretary.

The Winchester Chapter had a business meeting in October in the home of Nancy Harrell Butler and plans were made for the rummage sale to raise money for the General Fund. The sale was held in November and was very successful. The members enjoyed a luncheon at the Charcoal Hearth in May.

Alumnae Magazine


HIGHER EDUCATION OF THE SOUTHERN Theme women

"Southern

of the

1962

have not changed

fundamentally

Dr. Francis B. Simkins, professor of history and social sciences at Longwood College at the sprmg session of the Institute of Southern Culture.

Speaking on "Higher Education and the Nature of the Southern Woman," Dr. Simkins maintained that, although there were more distinguished women's colleges in the South than there were men's, after graduation from these colleges Southern women find more satisfying activities than those outlined for them in college.

"Domesticity remains the chief obligation of the Southern wife and daughter," Dr. Simkins said. A career, if pursued, for a Southern girl is "nothing more than a hopeful interlude before retiring to the vine and fig tree."

He pointed out that woman's suffrage was imposed on the South by Woodrow Wilson, "an expatriate." It was meekly received without opposition and has made little difference in the political activities of Southern women. Dr. Althea Hottel, former Dean of Women and lectuter sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, in her talk on "Quality Education for the Southern Woman," traced the history of quality education for women in the United States, pointing out how much more excellent education for women is than is education for men. She demonstrated that probably the college of highest education for women in the South is much better than that for men. The South tolerates more liberal education for its girls than for its boys. in

Dr.

Southern Culture Lectures

Institute of

since 1865 in spite of the quality of their education," said

Gladys Boone, professor of economics at Sweet on "The Twentieth Century

Briar College, in her lecture

WOMAN

Revolution

and

Higher

the

Education

for

Southern

Women," showed that the occupational opportunities of women have greatly increased in recent years, and that women have gone into many professions heretofore barred for them, such as nursing and teaching which have

become

monopolized by women. South a hundred years ago.

largely

true in the

This was not

"There is no such thing as 'the best kind of college'," Chancellor Otis A. Singletary, of the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, told those attending the summer Institute of Southern Culture at Longwood College. There were approximately 600 persons at the three summer lectures. "The quality of an educational institution is independent of the sex of its student body," Dr. Singletary declared in his talk on "Higher Education in the Traditional Woman's College." Mrs. Eudora Ramsey Richardson of Richmond spoke

at

morning session on "Coeducation and Co-Ordination versus the Traditional Woman's College," tracing the history of the education of women from ancient Greece the

"The movement for the higher education not well under way in America until the 1860's" because before that time studies were directed at enhancing "the charm and usefulness of the wife and to that of today.

of

women was

mother"

in the

South.

Dr. Fletcher M. Green, professor of history at the University of North Carolina, said academies, which were the beginning of secondary education for boys and girls, stimulated an interest in teacher training and were the forerunners of the normal schools. This taste of higher education brought about a demand for the same quality of education ofi^ered in the men's colleges and universities.

Southern Culture Lectures

Institute of

for 1961

Receive Favorable Review The

first

full-length

book review

in a scholarly journal

of The Dilemma of the Southern Writer, Institute of Southern Culture Lectures at Longwood College, 1961. appears in the April issue of the "Virginia Magazine of History and

Biography."

The Longwood

publication, edited by Dr. Richard K. is called a "valuable indeed excellent essays, on an important reviewer. Dr. Louis D. Rubin, Jr., of HoUins College, says, "It is high time that Longwood's Institute of Southern Culture received the recognition it deserves. There is no more meritorious and intellectual venture going on in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Alumnae of Longwood College who finance the Institute can be very proud of their college's initiative and imagination."

Meeker, associate professor of English,

book topic." The little

.

.

.

After favorable comments upon the lectures of the visiting scholars who participated in the 1961 Institute Dr. Willard Thorp, Dr. Robert D. Jacobs, Dr. Lawrence G. Nelson, and Dr. James B. Meriwether Dr. Rubin had high praise for the contributions of Dr. Richard Meeker

—

—

November, 1962

and Dr. Dorothy Schlegel, both of Longwood's English department. He terms Dr. Meeker's essay on "The Shadowy Stories of Ellen Glasgow" a "sensible, perceptive Perevaluation of Miss Glasgow's labors in this form haps a collected edition of Miss Glasgow's short stories is in order; I suspect Mr. Meeker has designs along that line, and I hope so." .

.

.

The reviewer

calls Mrs. Schlegel's essay on "Cabell and "one of the most interesting and clear-sighted this book No one is doing better work on

his Critics"

essays in

.

.

.

overlooked Virginia author than Mrs. Schlegel. If this essay is to be a part of a larger study, then I hope that There is an the full work will soon become available. urgent need for intelligent, imaginative criticism of Cabell's fiction, and Mrs. Schlegel's is all of that and more." this often

In looking over the five volumes published so far in the Rubin agrees with the editor, Dr. Meeker, who "very properly finds it hard to Institute of Southern Culture series. Dr.

boasting that we have the best volume of The Dile?ntna of the Southern Writer. resist

in the series"

17


.

.

WE CARE TO GIVE

only to give but to INCREASE our annual contributions. Our Alumnae Association remains constantly as the tie between you and your Alma Mater. May it always be so.

LONGWOOD

has given us, If we stop to think what realize what a wonderful heritage we have in our Alma Mater. We are proud of this heritage and of our feeling of joy and pride in our college as it is today. All of this leads us to the desire to see our Alma Mater continue to serve and educate our young people. This will be possible through our combined efforts and contributions. We can become a part of this service by giving FUND. annually to our needs our vigorous support, Our yours and mine, so that the Alumnae Association may continue to serve as the link between the college and alumnae, so that the Association may continue to contribute in every way to the well-being of our Alma Mater and

we

Let's

show how much we

you the Alumnae. Each one of us should be aware of the following services performed by our Alumnae Association: The ALUMNAE MAGAZINE is received and read 1. with much mterest by you. This magazine costs money to publish and requires hours of work to edit. 2.

ALUMNAE HOUSE

ours to feel at home Your contributions pay for in, to visit and enjoy. the running expenses of the HOUSE. Many college guests also enjoy the hospitality of the

The

is

F//n(/

3.

4.

ALUMNAE STAFF which

you in many ways is paid by your contributions. They work hours compiling the magazine, keeping up the changes of addresses, revising class lists, and mailing numerous data to you. The SCHOLARSHIPS and LOAN FUNDS and the President's Discretionary Fund, which are given

The

serves

through your contributions to the ALUMNAE FUND, are all deeply appreciated and should be perpetuated. The only way we can serve and add momentum to our Alumnae Association is for each one of us to give, and not

Association of REVENUE

(Estimate)

S 2,000.00

3,2;0.00

Total

$ 5,250.00

ANTICIPATED REVENUE Alumni Contribucions

S 8,000.00

Snack Bar

3,000.00 636.00

College Total

$11,636.00

ANTICIPATED EXPENDITURES Salaries Mrs. Jones Hostess Student Help

% 2,200.00

900.00 1,260.00 130.00

Social Security

Total

S 4,490.00

Alumnae House Magazine Publishing Fund Appeal Mailers

1,156.00 3,185.00 400.00

Office Expense

Travel

Founders Day Expenses Socials

—Junior, Senior,

Summer School

Board Expenses Miscellaneous Discretionary Fund Tabb Memorial Fund Cunningham Memorial Fund Morrison Memorial Fund

5.00 5.00 10.00

Contingency

745.00

Total

511,636.00

— Longwood

1961—June

30,

College

1962

Rent

64.60 1.00

Incidentals

80.00$

Electricity

Balance on hand, July 1, 1961 General Fund Institute of Southern Culture.

S 3,840.61 7,330.05

362.00 466.00 3,500.00 78.00 25.00 700.00

Registration Snack Bar Use of House

Endowment China Fund Refunds

610.00 80.00 50.00 250.00 50.00 75.00 25.00 500.00

Alumni Council

Alumnae

Treasurer's Report, July,

Hand

Chairman

BUDGET

1962-63 Balance on Savings

ALUMNAE

House.

— LET'S ALL GIVE.

Cordially yours,

ALUMNAE ALUMNAE FUND

to

care

$

343.56

Bulletin Printing

.'

Envelopes Postage Postage on returned Bulletins

.

.

.

$2,904.08 220.42 80.00 44.49 $3,248.99

20.41

Fund Appeal Second Fund Appeal Moonshooter for 1962 First

$16,322.07

EXPENDITURES Salaries Mrs. Jones Miss Jennings.

Miss Bugg Student Aid Extra Clerical Help. Social Security

Office Expense Telephone Printing and Supplies. Postage Repairs to Equipment. Freight

$2,191.62 900.00 840.00 845.12 143.25 123.16 $5,043.15

144.15 712.24 147.33 112.80 17.68 $1,134.20

Bulletin

Travel

Board and Committee Expense Summer School Teas.

Junior, Senior, and

Flowers

Founders Day Alumni Council (National Membership) Engraving Jarman Cup President's Discretionary Fund Institute of Southern Culture

Music Scholarships Endowment Fund Morrison Memorial Fund Cunningham Memorial Loan Fund Tabb Memorial Loan Fund Balance on Hand, June 30, 1962

...

283.16 416.41 500.00 4.35 67.90 25.14 18.90 309.65 80.00 26.80 500.00 1,000.00 200.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 $13,247.21 % 3,074.86

Alumnae House Upkeep Maid

Service

Laundry

160.00 37.96

$16,322.07

Alumnae Magazine


.

1962

HONOR ROLL

July

l.

1916-~June

1962

30,

This list was compiled from the contribution cards received at the Alumnae Office. Our association is self-supporting and your contributions maintain your Alumnae Office Staff and Alumnae House, publish the Alumnae Bulletin, and finance the Institute of Southern Culture, in addition to awarding music scholarships and contributing to the Cunningham and Tabb loan funds and the Morrison Memorial Library Shelf.

1888 I

Hortense Bottingheimer

Number Number Amount Amount

J(

1891

Maude

Frances Trevvett

1892 Trent Taliaferro Louise Twelvecrees Hamle Ella

of Alumnae

McGeorge Gwathmey McGeorge Burke Moore Rector Bettie Muriee Ray Virgmia Nelson Hinman Ella

Ellen Armistead Guerrant Susie Fulks Williams (also contributed in 1961) Nancy Nulton Larrick Sue Raney Short

Angle Powell Parker Mary Powers Kearney Alda Reynolds Smith Charlotte Snead Grimes Scotia Stark Haggerty Carrie Sutherlin

1905

Lucy Brooke Jennings

Maud Chernauk Yeaman

1896

Mary Day Parker

1897

Emma

Lecato Eichelberger

Mapp Winn

Georgie R. Gravely Katharine Grayson Reid Ellen Lee Wilson Betsey Lemon Davis Alice Paulette Creyke Fannie May Pierce Bertha Starritt Ursula Tuck Buckley Alice Ware Eubank Frances R. Wolfe

Annie H. Cunningham Linda Farley Wmgfield

1906

Miller

tCathleen Riley Gage Mary Roberts Pntchett

Louise Adams Armstrong Jennie Cluverius Russel Louise Cox Carper

1899 Martha Feacherston Matilda Jones Plumiey Annette Leache Gemmell Ruby Leigh Orgain

Carrie

Nellie

C

Preston

1900 Margaret

Good Moore

Julia Harris Bucterworth

Fannie Hunt Armistead Elizabeth Pierce Harris Annie Pollard Bealle

Mary Holt Rice

Maude

Foster Gill Elizabeth C. Pinner Edith Steigleder Robinson Frances White Mertins

1902

Finke

Claudme

L.

Kizer Frances Y. Smith Katherine Vaughan Farrar

Lucy H.

Wood

Lena Marshall Carter Paxton Anna Mary E. Peck Daisy Stephens

Virginia E. Stubblefield

Fraz

i

Julia Forbes

Thornton

Virginia Garrison William; Grace Graham Seville

Georgeanna Newby Page

ildsi

1904

Muse Bareford Antoinette Nidermaier Phipps Blanche Nidermaier Vermillion Mary Perkins Fletcher Florence Rawlings Lucy Robins Archer Frances Stoner Binns Lula Sutherlin Barksdale Virginia TinsIey Betty Campbell Wright Countess

1910 Florence Acree Conkling Armistead Lee Bessie Brooke Ritchie Cora Brooking Parker

Julia

Mary Brooking Savedge Bessie Coppedge Lucy Elcan Gilliam Emily Firrh Smith Estelle Hall Dalton Maggie Humphries Magee Hester Jones Alphin

Moorman Morgan

Willie

Hattie Robertson Jarratt

Maud

Rogers Rvnex Caroline Roper White Myrtle Steele Seay Elizabeth Taylor Clark

Marjorie

Thompson

S.

1911

Kathleen Baldwin MacDonald

Agnes Burger Williams

Cook Ramsay Grace Gibb Van Ness Lillian

Dunlap Harper

Isabel

Nelle Fitzpatrick Jordan Louise Ford Waller Mary Garnett Morris Eloise

Gassman Cook

Martha Goggin Woodson Elizabeth Haskins Perkinson

SeUna H. Hmdie Emily W. Johnson Tressie Jones Parker Effie B. Milligan

Reames Young Robinson Turner

Susie

Ruth Shepard Forbes Mary Shaw McCue Lucy Steptoe Sarah Stuart Groves

Watkms

Ada Smith Lillian

Shaffner

Watson Rose

Lucille Iva Wilkerson Etheredge Wilson Elsie

Emma

1912 Sue Adams Davis

Ann Bidgood Wood Mildred Blanton Button

Jean Boatrighi

Alice E. Carter Carrie Caruihers Johnson Mary Zulie Cutchins

Leta Christian

Katherine

Goodman

Cook Huffman

Lettie

Cox Laughan

Mildred Davis Phelps

Mary

Currell

Lilian

Delp Perkins

Burger Morgan Mary Lou Campbell Graha.

Mary

P.

Inez Clary McGeorge Marie Etheridge Bratten Blanche Gilbert

Blanche Gentry Douglas Evelyn Hamner Chess Hardbarger

Mary Gray Munroe Mary Clay Hiner

Kate Perry Ruth Kizer Trevey

Mayme

Dupuy L. Elliott

Hester Bass Spinner

Ada R. Bierbower Virgiha 1. Bugg

Mmme

Butlet Albright

Ola Channell Berryman

Chew Leslie Georgia Mae Creekmore

Sallie

Antoinette Davis Schaefer Irene Dunn Clarke Jennie Earnest Mayo Florence Garbee Margaret Garnett Trim

Gay Wilbourn Margaret Godbey Smith Elsie

Ruth Harding Covner Wanda Harkrader Darden Winnie V. Hiner

Nena Lockridge Sexton Alice Martin Horgan Putdum

Jennie Mattin

Gertrude Martin Welch Emily Minnigerode Clayton Annie Moss McClure Katherine Ragsdale Brent Celeste Richardson Blanton Ethel Rodes

Mary

Sterling Smith

Eileen Spaulding O'Brien Bessie Stuart Elsie

Mildred

Stull

Annie Tignor

Ann Woodroof

Hall

1914 Dorothy Batten Martha J. Bill Maria Bnstow Statke Bessie Bucher Pike Mary Dornin Stant Virginia Driver Beardsley Vallie Engleman Fitzpatrick Ethel Fox Hirst Carrie Galusha Mcllwaine

Ruth Gleaves Marie Jones Elcan Pearl

H. Jones

Meta Jordan Woods Lucy A, Moss Eleanor Parrort Hutcheson Evelyn Purcell Davis Josephine C. Sherrard Elizabeth Wall Ward

1915

Thorpe

Wall Bain

Mary Anderson Latham Hattie ÂŁ. Ashe Sallie Blankenship Adams

1909

Ethel Abbitt Burke Ora Alphin Turpin Frankie Preston Ambler Eva Anderson Grimes

Vera Tignor Sandidge Lottie Lee

Marshall Franklin

Ella

November, 1962

387.00

Wahon

Vedah Watson Dressier

C

,S

Lucy Phelps Irma Phillips Wallace

Lois

Ruth Clendening Gaver Elmer Crigler Holmes Mary Frayser McGehee

.

Jessie

Lockett

1903

.

.57,330.05

Lucv Rice English Lenora Ryland Dew Fannie B. Shorter

Clan

Holmes

.

Carrie Mason Norfleet Beryl Morris Flannagan

1908 Virginia Blanton Hanbuty

Rose Lee Dexter Mary T. Farthing Jessie V. Grace B.

M. Dungan

Holland Perkins Bess Howard Jenrette Florence L. Ingram Elizabeth Kizer Virginia Nunn Williams Mary Preston Clark Angela Tinsley Dillard Iva Vaughan Childrey Elizabeth Verser Hobson Pauline Brooks Willii Elsie

1907

1901

1,273

.

.

Muriee McPherson

Effie

Mary

Ida Greever

Anna Meats

.

Fund

1913

Bessie Carrie

1895

Mamie Ragsdale Turner Annie Robertson Paul Annie S. Summers Thomas Ross Ruth Watd Sadler Anne Wilkinson Cox Edith Willis Reed Lillian L. Wilson Margaret D. Woodward Thurzetta

contributed

contributed to Other Funds.

C

Florence Crump Popkins Pearle Cunningham Boyle Sarah Ferguson Thomas

who

9.753

contributed to General

Glenn

Louise Poindexter Susie Powell Peters

of Alumnae contacted

Martha Holman Rand Hurt Jemima Byrd King Eckies

Zillah

Susie Lee Phillippi

STATISTICS

Woods(

Louise Davis Thacker Susie M. Holt

Hawthorne Lucck Jackson Stokes Amelie Jones Garrison Amenta Matthews Crabill Pearl D. Matthews Elizabeth

Sallie

Ruth Phelps Suthetland

Lula Berger Terry Marv S. Berger Mildred Booker Dillard Dorothy Bratten Martha S. Christian Mary Elizaberh Codd Parker Evelyn Dinwiddie Bass

Martha

E.

Drumeller

Elizabeth Ewald Lively Eugenia Harris Catherine Hill Shepher J Carey Jeter Finley Louise Layne Shearer Eleanor Lester Umhau Christine MacKanWaike Pearl

Moore Cosby

Oast Marnetra Souder

Sallie Perkins

Anna Belle

Spitler Booron Towler Snead

1916

Thomas Cobb

Lelia Carter

Hazel

E.

19


Diploma 1921

Mae Cox

Wilson Myrtle Dunton Curtis Grace Freemaa Huffman Brenda Griffin Doggett Josephine Guy Yonce Louise Fletcher Annie Fulton Clark Louise Fulton Elizabeth Jarman Hardy Nancy E. Lewis Dixie McCabe Hairston Helene Nichols Mabel Lee Prince Nellie Rogers Cornett

Mary

Russell Piggott

Ruth Russell Westover Anne Tucker Bradshaw Martha Watson Hamilton EHzabeth

W. Young 1917

Annie L. Ayre Elsie Bagby Butt Janice Bland

Blankenship Woods Ruth Blanton Wood Kathleen Bondurant Wilson Bessie R. Burgess Blanche Burks Bertha Dolan Cox Lee Drumeller Vought

May

Lou

nelle '

Lucille

Freed

Geddy Crutcher

Dorothy Loving McElfresh Rose E. Meister Agnes Murphy Clara Pearson Durham Irene Pugh Evans Hattie Robertson Brinkley Ruby Sledd Jones

Dorothy Truitt Kate Wooldridge Watkins 1918 Josephine Barksdale Seay Ida Batten Dean Marion Beale Darden Jessie Brett

Kennedy

Aline Cole Engleby Viola Colonna

Cox Godwin Katherme Ellis Hunt

Leil

Alice Everett Worrell

Susan Ewell Hamilton Betty Gates Virgmia E. Gates

^^

ZO

Katherme Gilbert Elizabeth Harris Loving Rille Harris Josey

Sophie Harris Bryson

Nola Johnson Bell Mary Noel Hock Frances Treakle Whaley Marie Wilkins Taylor

Degree 1919 Laura A. Meredith Margaret Shannon Morton Janet Peek

Diploma 1919 Sally

Barlow Smith

Elouise Davis Stokley

Sue Brown Harrison

Selina Hindle

Alice

Elinor Rov Dameron Justine Gibson Patton

Ruth Jennings Adams Gladys Moses McAllister

Margaret Leonard Dillard Grace Moran

Alice Mottley Overton

Clara Norflect

Dora

Jett

Mabie

Frances Jordan Moore Frances MacKan Adams atherine McAllister Wayland Mildred Mirchell Holt Ruby Paulette Omohundro Helen Skillman Jernigan Margaret D. Travlor Dorothy Wells Greve

Mildred Dickinson Davis

Diploma 1922 Martha Bidgood Wood

Margaret Rogers Sanderson Rice Miriam Wood Cole

Degree 1920 Ethel

M.

Gildersleeve

Diploma 1920 Betty Bailey Barnes Elizabeth Blair Hackley

Blanche Brewer

McMahon

Louise Brightwell Watson

Gladvs Camper Moss Emily L. Clark Mary Vcrliner Crawley Elizabeth Venable Forbes Edith Estep Gtay Elfreth Friend Shelburne Frances

Gannaway Moon

Kathleen Gilliam Smith Katharine Krebs Kearsley Vivian Lane Hollowell

Winnie Lewis Minor Frances Lynn Baugher Aldona McCalmont Bradshaw

McCormick Mitchell Mary Muse Henry Eleanor

Belle Oliver Hart

Annie

C

SaUey

Frances Spindler

Annie Winslow Baxter

Degree 1921 Helen Draper Edith Harrell McCarthey

Katherme

Stallard

Washington

Lilian Via

Nunn

Fannie B. Shorter Ann Smith Greene Olive Smith Bowman Kate G. Trent Martina Alice Willis Lucille Wright Ebcrwine

Diploma 1926 Mildred Amory Heptinstall Cassie Baldwin Mary Anna Billups Mary Billups Hartman Claire Black

Marguerite Connor Wingfield Margaret Giles Sw-eeney

Sara

Nettie McNulty Oertly Sarah E. Moore

Helen Patton Denby Lucille Rash Rooke Mary Reid Anderson Virginia Ricks Edwards

Mary

S.

Simmons

Doris Thomas Page Trent Bird Sarah Belle Stubblefield Clotilda Waddell Hiden

Lorena Wilcox Leath Lilliam Williams Turpin

Gwendolyn Wright Kraemer Degree 1923 Mary Pomeroy Nichols Marjone Thompson Lois T. Williams

Diploma 1923 Charlotte Anderson Eaton Edna Blanton Smith Genevieve Bonnewell Altwegg Lucy Reid Brown Jones Pauline Chapman Ramsey Elizabeth Coleman Echols Susie V. Flovd

Turner Holland Chappell Pattie Jeter Timberlake Mary Sue Jollii? Leech

Lillian Griffin

Amy

Baldwin

Mary Alice Blanton Roberts Cobb Rakestraw Kathryn Landrum Smith Ester Love Roane Anna Scott Homan

Mary

Mann

Carrington

E.

Elizabeth Crute Goode Virginia Graves Krebs

Mary Markley Louise Pruden Apperson Louise Richardson Lacy Louise Rothrock Tragdon Maude Rountree Taylor Frances Sale Lyle Mildred Spindle Ellen H. Smith

Ola Thomas Adams Margatet Watkins Bridgeforth Orline W. White

Margaret Barham Wallace Helen Coston Sara Cross Squires Sara Doll Burgess Louise Gary Alkire Elizabeth Gordon Chenery

Anna Leigh Gwaltney Laine Stella Lotts

Magann

Degree 1928 Evelvn Dulaney Cassidy Nancy Holt Gladys Oliver Wenner

Diploma 1924

Katherine Wilkinson

Reid Crumpler Birdie Reynolds Winnie E. Sutherland Frances Moorman Walker

Julia

Degree 1925 Dorothy Askew Gayle Ruth L. Bartholomew

Stell

Marnetta Souder Frances Treakle Whaley

Updyke Cushwa

Virginia

Louise Bates Chase Louise Bland Morgan

Scott

Diploma 1928 Elenor Amory Boyerte Edrie Brinkley Clay Bertha Chappell Lane

Duggins Vaughan Mary Harward Smith Mary Blackwell Parker Vernelle

Pedigo Grant Kathleen Sanford Harrison Lucv Shelton Clipfel Louise Shoffner Putney Doris Steere Harwell

Audrey White Harris

Degree 1929 Bowers Meredith

Helen Miller Brown Lucile Walton

Mary

Watson St. Amant Jean West Shields

Nancy Denit Eastman Margaret Dunton Lillian Rhodes

Diploma 1925 Elizabeth Ballagh Mallie V. Barns Virginia Cowherd Adkins Blanche Craig Barbee Derilda Crowe White

Kathetine

Pitts

Goode

Mary Gose Pope Elva Guy Gwaltney Louise Hamilton Walker

E.

Alfreda Collings Begley

Sammy

A. Scott

Louise Vaughan Lafayette

Margaret Walton Gladys E. Wilkinson

Emma Woods Hollomon Ruth Yeatts Hall

Blanche Daughtrey Mabel Edwards Hines Lucile Franklin Richardson

Nannie Gilliam

Evelyn Traylor

Hancock

Macon

Nancy Watkins Diploma 1930 Judith Fenner Barnard Louise Hurt Fauber

Gladys O'Berry

Mary Susie

Price Wills Beville

Reames

Degree 1931 Mary Anderson Swope Frances Armentrout Irwin Eleanor Bower Townsend Eleanor Dashiell Graham Annie Davis Barber

Mildred

F.

DeHart

Elizabeth Dutton Lewis Mabel Gregory Craig Alice Harrison Dunlap

Halstead Thompson Olive T. Her Catherine Jones Hanger Mildred Maddrey Butler Catherine McAllister Wayland Margaret Nuttall Coaker Lillian

Diploma 1929 Clements Hanna Katherine Cooke Butler Mabel Cowand Smith Mildred Deans Shepherd Elizabeth Lacy Jones

Elsie

McComb

Dorothy Hughes Harris

Helen McHenry

Ruby Johnson Cooke Hattie Lythgoe Gwinn Alma Matthews Vaughan

Jennie R. Owen Hazel Poarch Batte Edith Richardson Grizzard

Elizabeth Moseley

Nellie Royal

Sue Roper Pace Virginia Spencer Riley Lola Taylor Branscome

Lillian Sturgis

Rhodes

Geneva Smith Alice

Doughty Wimbish Manning

Goodman

Georgia Putney

Mary K, Rucker Elizabeth Taylor Knight Elizabeth Temple Ida Trolan Allen

Lucy Lee Williams Susan Yancey Farnsworth

Diploma 1931 Vivian Conwav Crawley Elsie R. Hardy Josephine Hughes House Isabel Jones Pauline Lanford Sioner Stella

Mann Robinson

Frances Martin Vinson

Lena Mayton Milam

Degree 1932 Louise Clayton Mary L. Connalley Frances Crawford Lucille Floyd Hight Susie V. Floyd Fannie Haskins Withers

Ruth D. Hunt Charlotte Hutchins Roberts Catherine Marchant Freed

Nan Mears

Kirby

Agnes Meredith Lowry Cleo Quisenberry Kent Catherine Ritter Zeno Doris Robertson Adkisson

Martha von SchiUing Stuarr Nancy Shaner Strickler Easter Souders Elsie B. Story

Wooldridge

Jane Witt Kisler Cora B. Womeldorf

Diploma 1932

Phyllis

Eula B. Harris Mary Haskins Ferguson

Susie

Lucile Scaff^ Elizabeth Thornton

Kathryn Hargrave Rowell Laura Hurt Elmore

Degree 1924

Moore Spiggle Edna M, Wilkinson

Ham nerWoll

Diploma 1927 Leiia Bain Eraser

Mary Thurston Daughtry Nancv Watkins

Dorothy N. Diehl D. Matthews

NoeU

Lucille Graves

Sarah Dinwiddie

Degree 1927 Alene Alphin

Janie Potter Hanes Alice Rumbough Stacy Florence Savjlle Anderson Betty Shepard Hammond

Peatl Janie

Irving

Myra Reese Cuddy

Sue Puckett Lush

Clarrene Brite Bell Catherine Brooking Priddy

Mable Mays

Lily

E.

Degree 1922

Anna Penny

Ellen Robertson Fugate

Degree 1930 Armstrong

Elizabeth Bugg Hughes Harriet Coleman Tavlor

Vivian Evora Glazebrook Fiances Louise Murphy Willis

Anne

Mary

Reva Blankenbaker Holden Dons Cochran Klotz Gladvs Griffin Jeter Alice Johnson Eagles

Bettie Carter Bell Mattie Leigh Fretwell Whitlock

Degree 1926 Booker

Irene Anderson Turner Sally Barksdale Hargrett Mabel Boteler Kishpaugh

Alice Abernathy Smith

Lou Covington Rogers

Delma Conway

Bates

Virginia Huntsberry Shockey

Mary Martin Drinkard Emily McAllister Bell Frances Newman Esces

Mary Virginia Robinson Dorothy Weems Jones Degree 1933 Frances Armistead

Margaret Armstrong Ottley Cora Briggs Doughty Lois Virginia

Cox

Beulah Green Moore Ingram Turner Irene Leake Gottschalk Fay Martin Barrow Marguerite Massey Morton Clara Misrr Harriet Moomaw Leek Marjorie OTIaherty Davis Gay A. Richardson Lucille

Duvahl Ridgway Hull HUdegarde Ross Sarah Rowell Johnson Evelyn Shaw Bennett

Diploma 1933 Marv Alston Rush Elizabeth Feild Williamson Louise Hartness Russell

Alumnae Magazine


;Hu

Butle:

Beatrice Jones Lewis

Mildred Phillips Spencer Audrey Smith Topping

Dorothy Thomas Stover Anne Watkins Nell Weaver Cooper

Margaret Pittard Chewning Marian B. Pond Dorothy Price Wilkerson Charlotte Rice

Maty

Mundy

Moilie Walker Sanger

Elizabeth Burger Alice Disharoon Elliott Elmer W. Foster Frances Graham Saunders Mary Easley Hill Steger

Margaret Hunter Watson

Ruth N.

Jarratt

Alice McKay Gloria Mann

Washington Maynard

Neva Martin Hickman Mary Berkeley Nelson Margaret Otten Stuart Margaret Parker Pond Alice Rowell Whitley Edith S. Shanks Sarah

Annie Helen

Thomas Douglas L. L.

Via

Westmoteland

Beverley Wilkinson Powell Elizabeth W. Young

Diploma 1934 Edna Dawley Gibbs Margaret Eley Brothers Katherine Hoyle Chesta Hubbard Morrissette Elizabeth Renfro Martin Kathryn Woodson Baite

Degree 1935

Marguerite York

Diploma 1937 Katharine Coleman Barclay Brenda Doggett Garner Ida Drumheller

Edith Hammack Evelyn Hastings Palmore Nora Jones Heizer Nellwvn Latimer Lillian A. Minkei Norvell Montague Jones

Louise Coleman Hughes Christine Childrey Chiles Frances Elder Turner Louise Floyd Johnson

Lena Mac Gardner Sammons Ila Harper Rickman Jessica Jones Binns Ethel Leigh Joyner Belle Lovelace

Bonnie

Dunbar

McCoy

Frances McDaniel Cargill

Ann Mann Wilds Clmt.s Mae Mattox Maude Rhodes Cox Elizabeth Vassar Pickett

Katharine Walton Fontaine

Mary

Bailey

Diploma 1935 McDowell

Marjorie Bradshaw Powers Charligne Hall Chapman Vivian Hall Jones

Degree 1936 Helen Boswell Ames Margaret Clark Hanger Audrey Clements Lawrence Edith Coffey Evans Ruth Gleaves Berkeley Gregory Burch

Mapp

Mary Wells Miller Beverly Wilkinson Knighton Diploma 1936 Edna Harvey Dawson Copeland Johnson Dora Pair Tavlor

Butler

Elizabeth

Barlow

L.

Helen Hawkins Shaffer Dorothv Lawrence Riggle Evelvn Pankev McCorkle

Nan Seward Brown

Elizabeth Parker Stokes

Elizabeth Shipplett Jones Florence Rose Smith Elise Turner Franklin

Lillian

Mary Harrison Vaughan

Dris(

Audrey White Harris Katherine D. White

Purdum Davies

Beverley Purkins Schaaf Frances Rosebro Garrett Lucv Steptoe Florence Thierrv Leake Harriette

Walker Dukes

Diploma 1942

Diploma 1938

Ay res Young blood Kathleen Brooks Craig Sarah Drinkard Wayne Mary Louise Stoutamirc

Doris Taylor

Ellis

Julia

Degree 1939 Dorothy Adkins Young Louise Anthony McCom Pattie Bounds Sellers Elizabeth L. Burke

Alma Butterworth Lewis Sarah Button Rex Virginia Carroll Worsley

Helen Coston Elsie

Dodd

Sindles

Dorothy Ford Hirschberg Florence E. Garbee Christine Garrett MacKenzie Lavelette Glenn Henry

Theresa Graff Jamison Katherine Hoyle

1943

Juha Ayres Youngblood May Harriett Straughan Brookie Benton Dickerman Juha Berry Smith Margaret Bowling Bowden Lucv Davis Gunn

Dew Beane Mane Dodl Link

Antoinette

Dearing Fauntleroy Johnston Lillv Bee Gray Zehmer Helen Hardv Wheat Bettv Harper Wvatt Lucille Johnston Baylis H.

Kunz

Frances Mallory Miller Elizabeth E. McCoy

Leona Moomaw Margaret Mish Timberlake Susie

Moore Cieszko

Nancy Hunter

Anne Rogers

Catherine Maynard Pierce

Rosalie Rogers Talbert Alice Rumbough Stacv Jane CabeU Sanfotd Hall Lois Steidtman Wilcox Joice Stoakes DuiTy

Margaret Motley Adams Catherine Pilcher Stanton Fannie Putney Boykin Marguerite Snell Trent Sarah Belle Stubbleheld Doris Thomas Virginia Tuck Burnett Carrie Yeatts Barbee

Diploma 1939

Maude McChesney Wine Mildred Perdue Spencer

Degree 1940 Frances Alvis Hulbert Lois Barbee Harker Evelyn Burtord Richeson Anita Carrington Tavlor Laura Nell Crawley Birkiand Judith Gathright Cooke Charligne Hall Chapman

Ann

Harris Loving Mildred Harry Dodge Katherine Horsley Booker Rosemary Howell Johnny Lybrook Mothersheai

Martha McCorkle Tavlor

Degree 1937 Mary Adams Cooper Mary Anderson Walker

Lorana T. Moomaw Jane Powell Johnson

Anna Maxey

Boelt

Elizabeth Scales

DeShazo

Marion Shelton Combs

Mary Simmons Goodrich Myra Smith Ferguson Olivia Stephenson Lennon Mattie B. Timberlakc

Grace Waring Putney

Degree 1941

Elsie Stossel

1944

AlphinDunlap

Dons Burks

Stanley Charlorte Corell Floyd Sara Wayne France Forsyth Gillum Scott Joscelyn Frances Hawthorne Browder

Katherine Johnson Hawthorne Lulie Jones Terry Frances Latane Tune Gloria Pollard Thompson Romelia Sayre Summerell

Titmus Dorothy Truitt Dteama Waid Johnson Mildred WiUson Jerolien

1945

Helen C. Cohbs Alice Feitig Kelley Nell Fleming Joyner Isabelle Fleshman Pillow

Goddin Hamilton Martha Higgins Walton Lelia Hollowav Davis Nell Hollowav Elwang Dororhy Hudson Edith Lovins Anderson Sara Moling MacKinnon Lillian

Alice Nichols Proter Alleyne Philhps Bryson

Ann Galusha Merwyn Gathright Rhodes

Lucille Barnett

Edith Sanford Kearns Mary Preston Sheffey

Anne Benton Wilder

Mary

Martha Hamlet Davis Katherine Irby Hubbard

Florence Boatwright Brooks Yates Carr Garnett

Elsie

Lois Jinkins Fields Virginia Leonard Campbell

Blanche Daughtrey

Faith

Sterrett

Hill

Yonce

Mildred Shiflett Toomer Forence Smith Carr Martha Warkins Mergler 1947 Virginia

Anderson

Beverly Boone Rachael Brugh

Justis

Kmeco

Margaret Ballard

Holmes

Constance Chiistian Marshall Betty Cock Elam Judith Connelly Coslett Elsie

Freeman

Louise Harrell Clark

Constance Hubbard Gills Ann Johnson Thomas Katharine Kcarsley Williams Heidi Lacy Tokarz Cabell Overbey Field

Nancy

Parrish

Haydon

Cornelia Smith Goddin Ann Taylor Burnam Nancy Whitehead Pattetson

Wilson

Violetta S.

194S Catharine Bickle Sue Davis Breeding Anna Derr Freed Frances Fears Williams Marian Hahn Sledd

Annie B. Hord

Nancv Hughes Robinson Elizabeth Jcffieys Hubard Katherine Rainey Wingo Mildted Shepherd Blakey Betty Snapp Fawcett Ruth Stephenson Eugenia Tollev Bourne Ellen

Ward

R. Tucker

Faircloth

Winn

N. Maiian Wittkamp

Stark

Ruth Wiley Rainey

Lois

Rosa

Nell Morrison Buck Jackie Parden Kilby Glenn Ann Patterson Marsh Alice Shackleford Mclntyre Lois Lloyd Sheppard Lewis Esther Shevick

Plyier

Virginia Price Waller Julia Raney Gillespie

Eunice Tanner Bailey

Virginia Baker Crawley Janice M. Bland Mary Alice Boggs Elizabeth Boylan Lufsey Emily Channel! Garrett Carrie M. Dungan Claire Eastman Nickels Elizabeth Venable Forbes

Degree 1942

Anne Avers

Edna Blanton Smith Dawley Capron Mary Katherine Dodson

Margaret Turpin Burke

Gumkowski

Margie Hewlett Moore Frances Lee Stonebutnet

Diploma 1941

Caroline Eason Roberts Caroline Ferguson Irons Buff Gunter Travers Jean Hall Bass

Claudine O'Brien Susie Robinson Turner

Tac Waters

Ruby Keeton

Alice Nelson

Elizabeth

Henrietta Salsbury Farbet Catherine Smoot Major Elizabeth Sutton Stettner Florence Tankard Rennar

Luverta Joyner

Virginia

Eugenia Harris

Huse Ware Dorothy McNamee Fore Agnes Murphy

Lucy Harvie Copeland Johnson

Martha Wheichel Plummer Sarah Whisnant Williams

Mary Klare Beck Johnson

Mabel Murden Johnson King Ruth Phelps Fisher

Florence Godwin Robbins Dorothy Holleman Caudle

Sarah Elizabeth West

Higginbothan

Degree 1938 Mary Dudlev Allen Westmore Geneva Blackwel! Camp

Susan Durrett Salter Juha A. Feagans Margaret Fleming Scott

Helen Truitt

Frances Gaskins Baker Isabelle Sprinkle Dotson

Laeta Barham Hirons Sarah Beck CrinkJey

Lady Boggs Walton

Rupp

White Dorothy Davis Holland Eula Doggett Drewery Shirley Cruser

Margaret Robinson Simkins Mary H. McCoy Catherine Phillips Coenan Frances Pritchett Lippincott Virginia Richards Dofflemyer Nellie Russell Shelton Dorothy A. Scott Juanita Smith Price

Sales Hairston

Elizabeth Smith Melvin Flora Belle Williams

Degree 1934

Louise Kendrick

Lipscomb

Thompson Burger Wade Tremblay

Eleanor

Weeks George

1949 Dalila Agostini Amend Virginia Bergman Phelps

Betty Brockwav

Low

Erla Brown Dunton Lelia R. Colonna

Bernice Harris Virginia Holliheld Meredith Mary Frances Hundley Abbitt

Helen Jackson Willis Kathryn L. Kesler Gladys Monk McAllister Helen Owins Scruggs Evelyn Patterson Venable

Ruth Radogna Heaps Violet Ritchie Morgan Ann Verser Hartman

1950 Jean Anderson Smith Mary Puckett Asher Kathryn Beale Barcalou Marjorie Boswick Michael Virginia Bowie Brooks Elizabeth Bragg Crafts

Katherine J. Buck Frances "Pankie" Collie Jarrett Sarah Corbin Bigby

Dorothy Doutt Minchew Virginia Diggs Lane Elizabeth Douglas Redd Dolores Duncan Smallwood Charlotte Flaugher Ferro Helen Hardin Luck Julia Hughes Reynolds Martha B. Hylton Iva Jones Seward Nancy Kibler Smith Patsy Kimbrough Pettus Dabney S. Lancaster (Honorary Member) Joan Moore Barrlett Patricia

Murray Wilson

Grace Oakes Burton Jean Oliver Hevwood Jean Pritchett Williams Jane Richards Markuson

Mary Edmonson McGhee

Mary Woodward

Mamie McDaniel Marie Moore Millner

Elizabeth Garretr Rountrey Louise Hall Zirkle Harriette Haskins Eubank

Ellen Bailey

Esther Slagle Fulghum Carol Bird Stoops Droessler

Ruth Hunter Myers

Marian

Irene Parker Craig

Mary

Viola Colonr Sue Cross

Annie M. Swann Juha Tuck

Louise Lewis Martin

November, 1962

L. Heard Jolliffe Light

Potts

1946

21


Wade Davis Margaret White Crooks

Helen M. Tanner

McKown

Mary Woodward

Anne Caldwell Cake Macy Cook Pegram R. E. Dunkum, Sr.

Blannie Tanner Bass

Harrietce

Betty Tyler

Ann W. Younger Harriet Burterworth Miller

Mary Crowder White

Betty Jones Klepser Charlotte Jones Greenbaum

Elsie

Julia

Else

Anne Motley Ryland Page Bonner

Rachael E. Peters Erma R. Poarch

Shirley

Wilma Spurlock Wallace Eleanor Weddle Bobbitt Peggy Wilson Sampson Nancy Wood Dowdy

Sallv

Hellen Hillman

Gaunt

Anne Conley Bromley Helen Crowgey Sheppard Davis Brown

Virginia C.

Carrie Brightwell

Cox

Hopkins

Karharine Tupper Genevieve Venable Holladay

1962

Mary Massenburg Hardy Emily Ward McLean

Kuyk

CHAPTERS Farmville Chapter Lexington Chapter Lynchburg Chapter Norfolk Chapter Richmond Chapter Roanoke Chapter Staunton Chapter Suffolk Chapter Washington Chapter Winchester Chapter

Simms

Jo Ann Sloop Simmers Barbara A. Staton Eunice Tanner Bailey Marie Thomas Anderson

Ashby Robinson

Margaret Barrett Knowles Gale Branch Gillespie Barbara Burnside Ridout

Contributions

Katherine Field Campbell

Gardner

Patsy Powell Carol Sandidge Charlotte Cofnelia Evelyn V. Skaisky

Memoriam

Anna Headlee Lambdin Mary Massenburg Hardy

Agnes Lowry Buck Mary Marsh Jacobsen Amy McFall Meyer Rebecca Parker

1957 Patricia

Harrell

B. Barlow

1961

Sandra Kilmon Phillips Nancy Knowles Saunders

Lenora Jones Mitchell Elizabeth Pancake Smith

Gladys M. Harvey Ann Keith Hundley Brame Betty Jennings Curran Caroline McDonald Reed

Rowe Tune

In

Gloria Gardner Buchanan Faye Garrett Lowton

Emma

Webb

Faculty

Mary

Adams

Doris Ayres McElfresh Sylvia Bivens Hall Frances Carrwright Moore Linda 1 Doles Dolores Dove Fanes Louise Duke

Wilson Lisanick

Virginia L. Hansel

Scott

E. Morris

Melissa Frances

Pruitt

Nancy Ann Andrews

Beatrice Jones Lewis

Goetz Vaughan Bunny Gibson Bowman Ann Gray Cook

Dickerson

M. Gates

1959 Jane T.

Dale Brothers Birdsong Bessie Burgess Carolyn Gray Abdalla Georgia Jackson Nancy Hartman Welker

Friea

Dancy

Lucille

Nancy

Drummond

Gwendolyn Whire

Gloria

Rose M. Johnson Beverly A. Kersey Cecil Kidd Nancy Martin Dickerson

Nancy H. George

Davis

Shelron

Blanche Craig Garbee

Jean

Ann Webb

Shirley Hauptman Mary Alice Henry

1956

Chapman Layne Maude Collins Shelton

Lillian

Ann Coleman

Jenrett

Charlorre Hall Padera

Mariam Wood Cole

Bessie

Julia

Barbara Brantlev Irene Bryanr Weston

Ellen

Anne Ward

1953 Bell

1961

Susan Gosnell Ball

Judirh Elliott Ware Mary Foster Rusr Elizaberh Brierlev Fulghum Shirley Grubb Hall

June Strother Shissias

Carolyn Watson Yeatts Betty West Buchert Joan Williams

Sadler Midgerr

M. Williams

Annie Young Duff

Carol Lash Pugh Jackie Sawyer Taplin

Jane Bailey Willson Dolly Baker Harrell Mary Campbell Higgins Nell Crocker Owen Betty Davis Edwards Becky Hines Bowling Phillis Isaacs Slayton Eloise Macon Smith Audrey Powell Pittard Phyllis Powell Swertfeger Anne Thaxton Daniel Dorothy Vaden Oglesby

Betty Borkey Banks Dorothy Boswick Greenman

Julia

Coakley

Jane Crute Sowards

Norma

Wente Bunch 1955

Christine Davis Grizzard Jean Dillard McCaffrey Mary Lee Folk Jocelyn Fraher Garber Jean Ridenour Appich Maria Jackson Hall Jacqueline Jardine Wall

L.

Maxine Crowder Crowder

Jean Smith Lindsey Virginia Sutherland Knott

1952

Ann

Joan

Ellen Porter Koolman Hattie W. Pugh

Jr.

Wnek

Grace Thompson Marshall Bobbie Wall Edwards

May

1958 Elizabeth Blanton Gilham

Holland Cox

Holland Terry

Elizabeth Wade Johnson Nannie LeSueur LeSueur Addie A. Richardson Norma Rourt Gore Clara Miles Shumadine Joanne Tench Estelle Walker Atkinson Helen B. Wente

Nancy Anderson Camp

Peggy Hood Smith Dorothy Hughes Harris Lucy Mann Pierce

Cynthia Mays Perrow

Julia

Jeanne Saunders Florence M. Soghoian

Gail Dixon Dickson L. Doll Sarah Drinkard Wayne Lee Drumeller Vought Katherine Gilbert Catherine Hamilton

Wanda

Peggy Hoover Newhall Geraldine Huckstep Spragins

Mary Flowers Vann Edna Harvey Dawson

Jacqueline Pond Joyce Pulley Bryant Frances B. Ralne

Jane Branch Botula Mary Jean Carlyle Overstreer Mary Fleming Carter Eckrote

Jean Cunningham Wilson Edith Duma Lindsey Betsy Gravely Emily Hastings Baxter Martha Hatchett Owens Eleanor Heath Hall

Elsie

Elva Fleming Warren Suzanne Garner Leggett Margaret Hudnall Miller Mary James Saavedra

1954

Altwegg Brown Dorothy Batten Kitchin Barbara Blackman Wynne Patricia

1951

Virginia Spencer

1960

Elizabeth Elhott Williams

Jacquelyn Wright Smiley

G. Perkins Corinne Rucker Lester H. Smallw-ood.

Wallace Sweeney Hardy Williams

Julia

THEY WERE THERE! LONGWOOD COLLEGE CHINA

The following alumnae have represented Longwood College at the

Produced by Wedgwood Colors

inaugurations of presidents of colleges

since July, I960:

— Mulberry or Blue — Rotunda

Mary Mahone Gtanais

— Lake Forest College

—Eastern Kentucky Jacqueline Eagle — Pace College Annie H. Alvis

Scene

Frances Hutcheson Pancake Plates, 10V4-inch size

each $2.50

Tea Cups and Saucers

each $2.50

After-Dinner Cups and Saucers

each $2.50

Salad Plates

each $1.50

Bread and Butter Plates

each $1.25

Ash Trays

each $1.25

Forrestine Whitaker Holt

— — —

State College

—Judson College

— Florida State University

Molly Harvey Childers Tulane University Mattie Lula Cooper Scarritt College Carol Stoops Droessler George Washington University

— Drew University — MaryviUe College Martha Saunders Appell — Baylor University Sarah Hyde Thomas Douglas — John's University Dorothy Wells Greve — Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art Sue Blair Barta — West Virginia University Ida Minis Lambeth — Southwestern University Olive Bradshaw Crummett — West Virginia Institute of Technology Louise McCorkle Laughhn — Point Park Junior College Virginia Barksdale Rotter

Elizabeth Seiber Robertson

St.

Proceeds from the sale of this china go to the Association of Alumnae.

Send

all

orders and

make

checks payable to

THE ASSOCIATION OF ALUM-

NAE, Longwood

College, Farmville, Virginia.

press or postage charges collect.

Ex-

Alumnae Magazine


SEVENTY-NINTH FOUNDERS DAY March

16,

1963

Dear Alumna, Longwood

is

happy

to

welcome

all Aliimnat:

back for Founders Day. The classes ending

in 3's

and

S's will

be celebrating

their reunions.

Due

to the

crowded space

in the college dormitories,

we

are requesting that

Founders Day please make their room reservations directly with the remain the same.

Do

We

come!

shall

Alumnae planning an overnight stay for Other plans for the week end

HOTEL WEYANOKH.

look for you.

TENTATIVE PROGRAM Friday,

March

15

M. and

3 to 6 P.

7 to 9 P.

8:00

Saturday,

March

P.

M.

Registration

M.

Spring Play

l6

M.

Registration

9:15 A.

M.

Coffee,

10:30 A.

M.

Alumnae-Student Program

11:30 A.

M.

Alumnae Business Meeting Luncheon

Open House

6:30 P.

M.

Dinner

8:00 P.

M.

Open House

last

name

in

Alumnae Chapter, Hostess

Jarman Auditorium

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Wygal

— College Dining Hall at

23

Alumnae House and Spring Play

RESERVATION FORM

1963 fill

Farmville

— College Dining Hall — President's Home,

M. M.

Please

Married,

Alumnae House,

P.

12:45 P.

unJ return

to the

Alumnae

Office hy

March

9.

Maiden,

first

Address

shall arrive for

— Rotunda

8:15 to 10:15 A.

4:00 to 5:00

I

— Rotunda

last

name

first

Class

Founders Day on. date

I

expect to attend the following: Coffee

,

Luncheon

,

Tea

,

Entertainment-

REGISTRATION FEE— $2.00 (Check may be enclosed with

The

A

charge for other meals

may be purchased

at

November, 1962

the

this

form or fee may be paid

Day Luncheon

cost of the Founders

is

made

Home

is

at

Registration Desk)

included in the Registration Fee.

at the following rates: breakfast, sixty cents; lunch, seventy-five cents; and dinner, ninety cents. OflSce or Registration Desk.

Meal

tickets


YOUR CANDIDATES Caroline Eason Roberts, Staunton, has recently completed a two-year term as president of the Valley

Caroline

is

Reverend Philip Roberts. into every phase of church

She enters very enthusiastically life

and gives much of her time,

too, to the various phases of civic

community.

Alumnae Chapter.

the wife of a leading Presbyterian minister,

She

is

a

and cultural

most gracious and

loyal

of the

life

Longwood

alumna.

Tucker Winn has been past ten years,

first

Senior Counselor.

Woodrow High

This

High School

at Fairfax

as a teacher fall

in Fairfax.

she will be a Counselor at

Tucker received her Master's

from George Washington University active

member of

the

for the

of chemistry and then as

in

She

June.

is

an

Washington Alumnae Chapter and

remains very interested in Longwood.

24

BE SURE

TO VOTE AND RETURN THE BALLOT BEFORE

MARCH

10,

1963

BALLOT PRESIDENT

(vote for one)

NOMINATING COMMITTEE

(vote for three)

Caroline Eason Roberts, '42

_Rosa Conner Smith,

DIRECTOR

'42,

Richmond Lynchburg

_Elsie

Freeman, '34 and

-Ann

Irving Potts, '29, Amelia

'47,

(vote for one)

Tucker Winn, '48

-Iris Siitphin

Wall,

'51,

Farmville

-Flora Belle Williams, '37, Pamplin

-Patricia

Wilmoth,

'58, Charlottesville

Alumnae Magazine


Andrew

Julie Jackson HoUyfield '61, Mrs.

Paul Kosko

TVeddiH^ SeitU Ruby A. Adams

WUliam H.

Mrs.

"40,

Sue Carolyn Agee '62, Mrs. Ewell Alexaader Morgan Nancye Gray Allen '60, Mrs. William Ed-

ward Laine,

McGhee Robbin Randolph Arthur Hartley Jordan,

Mrs. John

'60,

Satterfield III

Jerra Madeline Barksdale '64x, Mrs. Wise Patricia Anne Barrow '61, Mrs. Harold

Kent Puckett Harry Robert Welch Julia Winifred Beard '50, Mrs. Marble Elsie Jean Bass '62x,

Beckham

Randolph

'62,

Mrs.

Douglas Delano Billings

Ruby Leigh

Bell

'62,

Mrs. Russell Leroy

Watson, Jr. Patricia Dianne Blair '64x, Mrs. George Edward Ferguson, Jr. Jacqueline Sue Boggs '62, Mrs. Michael Kennon Worshara Carol Marlyn Boley '61, Mrs. Charles H. Rideout, Jr. Barbara Ann Bolster

Mrs.

'61,

Gordon Davidson Mary Elizabeth Bonner

Mrs.

'61,

Melvin

David

Crouch

Dabney

Bolick

Mrs.

'38,

Robert

Walter Deming Hunter Mary Blair Booth '61, Mrs. William Brooks Dorothy June Boswell '59, Mrs. Jerry W. Leach

Ann

Brierley '58, Mrs.

Thomas

Mrs.

Donald

Ray Fulghum Sarah

'56,

Jane Brisentine

Eugene Mick Joan Elizabeth Brooker

Dundan Belle

'59,

Mrs. William

McKay Brown

'63x, Mrs.

Benton Lee

Borden Vera Marie Bryant '52, Mrs. B. F. Williams Dorothy Lee Burnette '61, Mrs. Carlton Nicholas Elam, Jr. Laura Ann Butler 'dlyi, Mrs. Donald Pope

Whitley Harriett Feild Butterworth '61, Mrs. Wil-

liam Taylor Steele,

Audrey Ann Campbell

'60,

Mrs.

Bernie

Justice

Bobbie Lou Caples Patricia

Ann

Mrs. Stone Carr '61, Mrs. James Hunter '61,

Slaughter

Laura Elizabeth Carson Edward McClenny, Jr. Elizabeth Archer Cassida Frasier Williams, Jr.

'62,

'6l,

Mrs.

Mrs.

Robert

Thomas

Collier '6lx, Mrs. Robert Luther Wells Sarah Evelyn Corbin '35, '50, Mrs. Leon Bigby Barbara Kivit Chaffin '61, Mrs. James Ed-

win Bear, Barbara

Russler Christine Davis Jones '60, Mrs. George R.

Jean Dillard '62x, Mrs. Ray Winston

Lyda Gayle Jones '63x, Mrs. Smart Gordon

Mrs.

'62x,

Jr.

Mrs.

'59,

Ferguson,

III

Ann Copenhaver

'65x, Mrs. T.

Faye

Alice

'62x,

Driskill

Bobby

Mrs.

Cameron Hamilton Brenda Sue

Dod

'62,

Mostiler

Mos teller

November, 1962

Dodd

Sara Lee Jones ent. '61, Mrs. Alan

Bryant Mrs. Michaux Raine,

Mary Gwendolyn Keesee

Mrs. Gordon

'61,

Johnson

Nancy H. Donaldson '60, Mrs. Thomas N. Middlecamp Barbara Ann Dunnavant '62, Mrs. Emmett M. Hedgepeth, Jr. Edna Faye Edwards '57x, Mrs. John W.

Elizabeth "Betty" Burks Keith '59, Mrs. Carl Kermit Scarborough, Jr. Shirley Kemp '56, Mrs. Joseph Ray Barlow,

Stephens, Jr. Virginia Louise Ferguson '62, Mrs. Rich-

Henry Wood Bonnie Lou Keys

ards DeNyse Maxwell, III Mary Ruth Flowers '60, Mrs. Robert

Vann, III Jackie Foreman Sawyer

'58,

'62,

Mrs. Gardner

Fuqua

Elizabeth

Williams Dennis Brenda Louise Garren

Key

Clara Dell Mills Julia

Kidd

Marie King

Smith Joann Carol Kleinecke '6lx, Mrs. Wesley

Mrs.

'65x,

Jerry

Jr.

Dean '61, '61,

Donald

Mrs.

Mrs. Larry P.

Ball

Mrs. David Trayn-

Petty, jr.

Carolyn Elouise Gray '56, Mrs. Peter G. Abdalla Mary Hire Grayson '61, Mrs. T. W. Alvey, Jr.

Sylvia Josephine Guthrie '62. Mrs.

Melvin

Henry

Webb

Charlotte Tyler Haile '62, Hardwicke Fischkorn, Jr.

Ann Morgan Hardy

'61,

Mrs.

Charles

Ransom

Mrs.

Margaret Louise Harris '59, Mrs. Paul Barbery Sandra Anne Harrison '6lx, Mrs. R. L. Ihly Lois Elizabeth Louis

Hawkes

Rosemary Henry Thomas, Jr.

'62,

Newton Laing, Jr. Nancy Lewis Knight Dolese Klotz, Jr. Roberta Leigh Koons

'6lx, Mrs.

Mrs.

Donald

Raymond

C.

Carr Lindy Lee Landsdown

'61,

Wilson Marilyn Lincoln '65x, Mrs. David Jeddie Smith Patricia Anne Lowery '60, Mrs. Gerald

Kay Waters Shirley Jane Lucy '59, Mrs. Walter Leyland Susan Kirk McCarn '64x, Mrs. Billy James

Wall Dorothy Elizabeth McClenny Roy Gordon, Jr. Jeanine McKenzie Patricia

'62,

Kay McMiUen

Stone,

Lynn

'62,

Mrs. Harry Benjamin

III

Holland

Nathan, III Marilyn Lee Holt

'61,

'59,

Mrs.

Alexander

Mrs. D. H. Wright,

Jr.

'59,

Mrs.

Rob

Mrs. Lorie F. Allen '63x, Mrs. Seaton

Bloodworth Fulghum Linda Lee McPherson '60, Mrs. Linwood I. Sawyer Elma Frances Mackey '6lx, Mrs. Barry Lee Wells Mary Vinoria Malley '61, Mrs. J. H.

Dorothy Nash Marshall

Jo

Mrs. Kenneth

Gene Cox

Herman Winters Judy Ann Hogg

William

Douglas Reed

Laura AUene Lewis '62, Mrs. Leon E. Douglas, Jr. Nancy Jean Lightner '62x, Mrs. Elwood B. Dean, Jr. Anne Lee Lillaston '6lx, Mrs. Robert G.

Charlotte Fitts Cross

Mrs.

William

Mrs.

'59,

'61, Mrs.

Ensley Gray, Jr. Josephine McCraw Hillsman '59, Mrs. Leo '64x,

Charles

Mrs. Charles R.

Schilling

Ann Marie LaBonte Howard Futrell, Jr.

Frances Leiqh

Clarence Salyer

Mrs.

'60, '61,

Graham Herrington '60, Mrs. Mark King Wenzel Betty Lou HiUsman '62x, Mrs. Franklyn

Merle Holaday

E.

Mrs. Lawrence Ray

'62,

Arthur

Mrs.

'45,

Janie Elaine Glenn '59x, Mrs. John Melnort

ham

Linwood

Mrs.

'61,

Grace Page Landers

'61,

Joseph

F. Pattie,

Barger Adelaide Kirby '57x, Mrs. John Timothy

Wayne Swartz Jean McNutt Gates '61, Mrs. Robert Edwin Fowlkes Linda Haven Gilbert '62, Mrs. Matney Joscelyn Gillum '44, Mrs. David G. Scott,

Cherry Roth Gorham Herbert Pattington Susan Mayfield Gosnell

Mrs.

'60,

Mrs. John

'60,

Mrs. Charles Lacy

Brittain

Mary

Jr-

Katherine Martin

Jr.

W.

B. Taplin

Helen Sydney Fox

W.

Grace LaVerne Crowe '64x, Mrs. Billy Harrison Susan Lynn Crutchlow '62, Mrs. Robert C.

Jr.

Fears, Jr.

Louise

Rae LaVerne

Kathryn Ann Hubbard '61, Mrs. Edward Powell Susanne Lee Humphries '61x, Mrs. William George Rainnouard

Harry

Howard Snead,

Wooten Etheridge

III

WiUard

Mrs.

'62x,

Frances

Arnoldo

Day

Gilmore

Shirley

Nadine Alice Dazell Soto Montoya

Grace Ellen Grady

Pollard

Floyd Griffin, Jr. Lee Hoyle Wayne Jackson

Mrs. William

'62,

Hunt '63x, Mrs. Tuck Martha Diane Hunter '64x, Mrs. Ernest Penson Curry, Jr. Charlotte Sue Jett '58, Mrs. Daniel Terrill

Mrs. John Locke

'32,

Burke

Betti'

Ann Howell

Judith

Anne Eugenia David

III

Cornelia R. Banks '62, Mrs. John Harvie

Elizabeth

Culpepper '62, Mrs. Charles Palmer Alexander Gloria Jean Dancy '61, Mrs. Emmett C.

Virginia B.

Ellis

Jr.

Bonnie Ann Baker '64x, Mrs. Claude Benjamin Meinhard Mary Ann Bankhead '57x, Mrs. Robert F.

Edna

Mrs. Kenneth

'62,

Scott

Jr.

Jane Allgood '61, Mts. William Anderson Burnette Janet Lee Anderson '63x, Mrs. Leonard Douglas Hill, Jr. Neva Ruth Arnn '61, Mrs. Lawrence Dale Betty

Evelyn

Nancy Wilmina Cullip Alexander

Struhs, Jr.

Chaffin,

Elizabeth

Grow,

Jr.

Mann

'6lx, Mrs.

Donald A.

Wesley

Maragon

'55,

Mrs. Milton

'59,

Mrs.

I.

Alvin

Aron Constance Gayle Martin '65x, Mrs. Robert D. Withers, Jr. Judith Ann Mattin '60, Mrs. John R. Thatcher Joan Gwendolyn Melton '59, Mrs. Edward Bryce Baucom

25


Margaret Adeline Moore '59, Mrs. Roger M. Winibarger Mary Ellen Moore '59, Mrs. Kenneth Lockhart Piland Virginia Venable Moss '62, Mrs. Joel Calvin George Dorothy Ann Nelson '62, Mrs. Rothermel

McLean Duke,

Jr.

Faye Gates '6lx, Mrs. Charles Daniel Mullen, Jr. Carole Joyce Ogden '57x, Mrs. George A. Loretta

McGregor Noel Kathleen O'Leary '58, Mrs. Robert Leroy Kirby Lucy Carolyn Oliver '61, Mrs. Walter John

Anderson Lou Patterson

Paulita

Mrs. Paul Doug-

'60,

Wade

Marie Patterson Randolph Deane

'58x, Mrs. Russell

Phyllis

Linda Gayle Payne

Mrs. Kenneth C.

'6l,

Scarce

Ann

Patricia

Perkins

Winston Crenshaw, Rosa Kathleen Petree Spence

Mrs.

'55,

George

Jr.

'33,

Mrs. William L.

Caroline Battle Phillips '63x, Mrs. William Edward Bradley Ruth Geraldine Phipps '6l, Mrs. Charles

Webster Mrs. James H. Wood Virginia Cox Pohe '30, Mrs. E. H. Horner Ellett Judith Pollard '63x, Mrs. Walter

Linda Poff

Webb

'62,

Hawthorne,

Jr.

Jane Richmond Price '63x, Mrs. Louis French Paret, III Suzanne Prillaman '56, Mrs. Austin Clark

25

Ringgold Prout Miller

'49,

Mrs. Robert M.

Wilson

John Boiling Williams Barbara Lou Railey '61, Mrs. Marion Smith Daphne Altagracia R-Arango '59x, Mrs. Roman Julio de Rivera Dorothy Reaor '56, Mrs. Turmail Catherine G. Reid '6l, Mrs. Edward W. Jeannette Puckett '57, Mrs.

Wade,

III

Jane Braxton Richardson '59x, Mrs. Frank-

Mrs. Colin Blaydon Mrs. Frederick

'62,

Stanley

Mrs.

'60,

Carl

Boadwine Mrs. Dwight L.

May

Strohecker '44, Mrs. George

James Mcintosh Florence Sutherland '54, Mrs. William BaskerviUe Knott, Jr. Betty Lee Tucker '61, Mrs. William L. Bates Natalie Carol Tudor '59, Mrs. Kenneth S.

Virginia

Virginia Maude Van de Lindsey King Gardner

Dion Puckett Juliet C. A. Robinson '59, Mrs. Franklin Martha Ann Rose '64x, Mrs. Millard Dallas Magee,

Jr.

Ann Herring Ruckman

'60,

Mrs.

James

Selden Smith, Jr. Katherine Beckner Rule '65x, Mrs. O. Bryant,

Riet

'6l,

Mrs.

'62,

Mrs.

George Herbert McNeal, III Grey Wallace '59, Mrs. Frank Julia Sweeney NanQ' Earle Wallace '61, Mrs. Bryant Arabelle Waller '50, Mrs. Willard McFarland George Helen Janet Wainwright '61, Mrs. S. G. Kessler Alice Tae

Wamsley

Glassan Grace O'Neil Hillsman,

Ward

'60, '60,

Mrs. Joe

Hudson

Mrs. Marvin C.

W.

George

Mary Lee Warriner '62, Mrs. Marvin Scott Sylvia Yvonne Webb '60, Mrs. Joseph Taylor Stewart, Jr. Claudia Fleming Whipple '60, Mrs. David

Harold Osborne

Hannah Wilson White Kelly Moore

John

Mrs.

'61,

Harriet Hardy Williams '59, Mrs. Alfred

William Robinson, Jr. June Wilson '59,

Gordon

Mrs.

Shirley

Nancy John Newton Thomas, Jr. Sandra Wise '62, Mrs. M. G. Runion June Barclay Woodward '62, Mrs. Willard Leslie Smith Octavia Rebecca Wooldridge '6l, Mrs. John Samuel Waring, III Margaret Barlow Worthington '55, Mrs. Alfred Wallace Richardson Mary Mercer Wright '61, Mrs. W. Lawrence Poole

Wynn

'59,

Robert

Mrs.

J.

Grymes Rose Marie Yager '64x, Mrs. Robert William Hart

Ann Young

Mrs.

'62x,

Stanley

Tillman Winfield, "jr. Marianne Zimmerman '61, Mrs. Edward Franklin Knight,

Jr.

W.

'65x, Mrs. Clayton

Crigger

Emily Frances Shelton

'61,

Mrs. Jerry Al-

bert Good Betty Jo Shewey '62x, Mts. Marshall Ross

June

Skellie

'62,

Mrs. Percy Lee

Prickett

Emily Bruce Smith '62, Mrs. Charles Kenneth Kidwell Ruth Marie Smith '60, Mrs. Robert Lee Wells Vivian Delight Smith '60x, Mrs. Robert Eugene Schrepel Diana Snow '62, Mrs. Randolph Bluford Campbell Ann Beverly Spaulding '64x, Mrs. Henry Bernard Showalter, Jr. Suzanna Waring Spicer '63x, Mrs. Jennings

Simms

Gale Branch Gillispi

'53, a son, Stuart

Abbitt

Adams

Spangler

'57,

Connie Joy Judith Margaret Alexander a daughter Marjorie Frances Allgood a daughter Patricia

P.

a

daughter,

Herrmann Harrison

Altwegg Brown

'54,

a

'58, '58,

son,

Robert Iris

Jimmy

Frank Elizabeth

Cantrell

Owen

'58x,

a

son,

David Taylor

Mary Jean Carlyle Overstreet '54, ter, Mary Elizabeth Mary Fleming Carter Eckrote '54, ter, Mary Archer Joyce A. Cheatham Harvey '53, a Mary Elizabeth

a daugha daugh-

daughter,

May Clardy Rowe '44, a daughter, Melissa Robertson Clements Trimble '57, an adopted son, Edwin Baxter Carol Carson Angstadt '57, a son, Robert

Jenny Ellie

Catharine V. Connor Flatley '59, a daughter, Mary Susan Lois A. Crutchfield Smith '54, a daughter.

Amy Ames Jane Elizabeth Crute Sowards '58, a son,

Alan Griffen Elizabeth B. Culpepper Holland '59, twin sons, Mark Thomas and Gary Franklin L. Christine Davis Grizzard '52, a daughter Mary C. Davis Edwards '49, a son, Scott Jo Dearing Smith '60, a son, John Marshall,

Jr.

Arnn Meadows

'57, a son,

Jean C. Baber Wakefield Carole Lynn

'57,

a

Alan

son,

Curtis

Gail A. Dixon Dickson '54, a son, Scott

Hatton Dorothy A. Douglas Daughtrey Blakley Cox Elizabeth C. Elliott Williams

'55, a son, '57,

a son,

Robert Edward Frances B. Everett

Brown

'51, a son,

David

Webster Sandra A. Fitzgerald Tarter '59, a daughter Leddie Foster Mcintosh '49, a daughter, Elizabeth Irving F. Garlasco

Doris

Umberger

'54,

a

son,

Thomas Andrew Jane Hunt Ghiselin Lindley '50x, a daughter, Ann Sherwood Nancy Lou Gilbert Griffin

'54, a son,

David

Hunter

Jr.

Hardy McCray '57, a daughter, Tamara Leigh Jacqueline Lou Hamsberger Lewis '58, a daughter, Jennifer Lou Frances M. Harper Powell '51, a daughter, Laurie Anne Jacqueline Ann Harper Meador '59, a son, Raymond Maxwell Shirley

Diane Acree Sisson '57, a son, George Winton, III, and a daughter, Mary Carol Jackie

'57, a son,

Ruth D. Brisentine Middlebrooks '60x, a son, Donald Keith Nancy Lee Brubeck Simon '59, a son, Eric

Franklin,

^cnt^ M. Betty Abhitt Holland

Glass

John

Elizabeth Anna Graziani Vance '64x, a daughter, Elizabeth Anne Carrie E. Hale Dickerson '57, a son, Claude

Jr.

Diana McLean Ruxton

'46, a son,

Sidney Homer Beverly Jane Branch Botula '54, a daughter, Beverly Paige

Nancy Deaton Jones

Jr.

Tipton Wingfield '62x, Mrs.

Elizabeth

Lucy Braltey Del Cardayre

Carson

Jr.

Shirley Anne Ward '55, Mrs. Patteson, III

Jane

'59, a daughter,

Ann

Barnett Trapp '58, a son, Christopher Todd Mary Elizabeth Bennett Barksdale '54, a son, Bruce Bennett G. Hannah Bowles Watkins '58, a daughter, Nancy Louise

S.

Mary Gaynor Van Landingham

McKinley

Susan Hunter

Mary

Mildred Jean Stone '64x, Johnson, Jr. Frances

Betty Sue Barbee

'61,

Patrick Fields Betty Jane Stoots '53x, Mrs. A. B.

Elva

lin L. Britt

Sue Catherine Robertson '62, Mrs. Robert

Scott

Kay

Rustland,

Lowry

Patricia

Sprague

S.

Morris Donica, Jr. Barbara Ann Stephenson

Brown

Wilke Clara Lee Parker '6l, Mrs. Thomas E. Ripley Frances Elizabeth Parker '33x, Mrs. Copeland Epes Adams Jo Anne Parsons '61, Mrs. Andy Gene

las

Carol Janet

Joe Richard

'54, a daughter,

Peggy Ann Harris Ames '52, a son Dorothy Harrison Wells '60, a daughter, Elizabeth Lee, and a son. Charter, III Ann Hart Hamrick '58, a son Lucia Ellen Hart Gurley '58, a daughter, Elizabeth Lane Dolores L. Hoback Kanner '52, a son, Steven David Jeanne Lynch Hobbs Dorsey '55, a son,

Timothy Walker

Alumnae Magazine


.

Who What

Who

will

go

—and

to college

where?

will they find?

will teach

them?

Will they graduate?

What

Who

will college will

pay

have done for them?

—-and how?

COLLEGE of

ROW

TOM 'ILL

MY CHILDREN GET INTO COLLEGE?"

"Wi

The question haunts most

parents.

Here

is

wringing stage.

the answer:

Yes

.

The

.

If they graduate from high school or preparatory school with something better than a "scrape-by" record. //"they apply to the college or university that

them

for

meet the needs of your children and others of your children's generation. Their planning is well beyond the hand-

—aiming

their

sights

is

right

(and their application

forms) neither too high nor too low, but with an individu-

colleges

ality

Some

no region

mand

for higher education that

is

certain to exist in this

the likely cost of putting their

They know

in

in school

and precision made possible by sound guidance both and in their home. If America's colleges and universities can find the resources to carry out their plans to meet the huge de-

know

this cost, both in money and manpower, will be staggering. But most of them are already embarked upon finding the means of meeting it. Governments local, state, and federal are also deeply involved m educational planning and financing.

plans into effect.

parts of the country are far ahead of others. But is

without

its

planners and

its

doers in this

field.

Public

demand

—not only for expanded

facilities for

higher education, but for ever-better quality in higher

—today

more

more informed than

country for years to come.

education

The ifs surrounding your children and the college of tomorrow are matters of concern to everyone involved

ever before. With this growth of public sophistication

to parents, to children, to alumni and alumnae (whatever

parents that they themselves must take a leading role in

and to the nation's educators. But by no means being left to chance. The colleges know what they must do, if they are to

their parental status),

resolving

them

is

This special report er,

is in

the form

of a guide

is

about higher education,

insistent,

it is

guiding their children's

now clear to most intelligent

educational

careers

—and

making certain that the college of tomorrow ready, and good, for them. to parents.

But we suspect that every read'

parent or not, will find the story of higher education's future remarkably exciting.

will

in

be


Y/V/here

your children

will

go to college? AST FALL, more than one million students enrolled in the freshman classes of U.S. colleges and imiver—^ sities. They came from wealthy families, middle-

I

income famihes, poor families; from all races, here and abroad; from virtually every religious faith. Over the next ten years, the number of students will grow enormously. Aroimd 1964 the long-predicted "tidal wave" of young people, bom in the postwar era and steadily moving upward through the nation's school systems ever since, will engulf the college campuses. By 1970 now the population between the ages of 18 and 21 around 10.2 miUion will have grown to 14.6 milUon. College enrollment, now less than 4 million, will be at

and perhaps

least 6.4 million,

far

more.

the student bodies will also have

More than

half of the full-time students in the

coming from lower-middle and low income groups. With expanding scholarship, loan, and self-help programs, this trend wiQ

country's four-year colleges are already

continue strong. Non-white college students past decade have

compose about

more than doubled

in

—who in the

number and now

7 per cent of the total enrollment

continue to increase. (Non-whites formed

1 1

.4

will

per cent of

the U.S. population in the 1960 census.) The number of married students wiO grow. The average age of students will

continue

its

recent

other restriictions

of these and

Many ot{ier institutions, public and private, are expanding their enrollment capacities and will continue to

do so: and universities around 1,500,000

Priyate institutioiis: Currently, colleges

under independent auspices enroll students some 40 per cent of the U.S. college population. In the future, many privately supported institutions will grow, but slowly in comparison with pubUcly sup-

ported institutions. Thus the total number of students at private institutions will rise, but their percentage of the

become

smaller.

Public institutions: State and locally supported colleges

and

universities are

expanding their capacity

steadily. In

the years ahead they will carry by far the heaviest share of

America's growing student population. Despite their growth,

many

the strain of the burden.

of them are already feeling

Many

state institutions,

once

committed to accepting any resident with a high-school diploma, are now imposing entrance requirements upon appUcants. Others, required by law or long tradition not to turn away any high-school graduate who apphes, resort in desperation to a high flunk-out rate in the freshman year in order

rise.

The sheer force of this great wave of students is enough to take one's breath away. Against this force, what chance has American higher education to stand strong, to maintain standards, to

— or of a combination — they cannot grow.

geographic, location

total college population will

The character of changed.

they are keenly aware of it. But for reasons of finance, of faculty limitations, of space, of philosophy, of function, of

manageable

tc*

size.

whittle

down

their student bodies to

In other states, coordinated systems of

higher education are being devised to accommodate

improve quahty, to keep sight of the

individual student?

And,

as part of the gigantic population swell,

what

chances have your children?

TO BOTH QUESTIONS, there are some encouraging answers. At the same time, the intelligent parent will not ignore some danger signals.

FINDING

ROOM FOR EVERYBODY

NOT EVERY COLLEGE or University in the country is able to expand its student capacity. A number have concluded that, for one persuasive reason or another, they must maintain their present enrollments. They are not blind to the need of

American higher education,

in the aggregate,

to accommodate mp re students in the years ahead; indeed. COPYRIGHT

1962

BY EDITORIAL PROJHCTS FOR EDUCATION


students of differing aptitudes, high-school academic

and career

records,

goals.

Two-year colleges: Growing at a faster rate than any other segment of U.S. higher education is a group comprising both pubUc and independently supported institutions: the two-year, or "junior," colleges. Approximately

now

exist in the United States, and experts estimate an average of at least 20 per year will be established in the coming decade. More than 400 of the two-year institutions are community colleges, located within commuting distance of their students. These colleges provide three main services education for

600

that

:

students

who

will later transfer to four-year colleges

or

show they often do as well as those from high school to a four-year institu-

universities (studies

who go

directly

and sometimes better), terminal training for vocations (more and more important as jobs require higher technical skills), and adult education and community

tion,

ILLUSTRATIONS BY PEGGY SOUCHECK

cultural activities.

Evidence of their importance:

One out of

every four

students beginning higher education today does so in a

By

two-year college.

1975, the ratio

is

likely to

example, is

may transfer to the university. If past experience many will with notable academic success.

a guide,

be one in

two.

THUS 2,000

IT IS

Branch campuses: To meet local demands for educational institutions, some state universities have opened branches in population centers distant from their main

LIKELY that somewherein America's nearly

colleges

and

universities there will be

room

for your children.

How will you —and they— find it?

the "conmiunity college" concept. In Ohio, for example,

On the same day in late May of last year, 33,559 letters went out to young people who had applied for admission to the 1961 freshman class in one or more of the eight

proponents of community two-year colleges are currently

schools that compose the Ivy League.

arguing that locally controlled community institutions are

20,248 were rejection notices.

the best answer to the state's college-enrollment prob-

Not all of the 20,248 had been misguided in applying. Admissions officers testify that the quaUty of the 1961 applicants was higher than ever before, that the competition was therefore intense, and that many applicants who might have been welcomed in other years had to be

campuses. The trend

is

Ukely to continue.

however, the "branch campus" concept

On

occasion,

may conflict with

Ohio

and Miami University, which operate off-campus centers and whose leaders advocate the establishment of more, say that taxpayers get better value at lower cost from a university-run branch-campus system. Coordinated systems: To meet both present and future demands for higher education, a number of states are attempting to coordinate their existing colleges and universities and to lay long-range plans for developing lems. But

new

Ohio

State University,

ones.

Cahfomia, a leader

in

such

involving not only the three

ported institutions

and

University,

—the

efforts,

has a "master plan"

main types of publicly sup-

state university, state colleges,

locally sponsored two-year colleges. Private institu-

tions voluntarily take part in the master planning, also.

With at least 661,000 students expected in their colleges and universities by 1975, Califomians have worked out a plan under which every high-school graduate will be eligible to attend

a junior college; the top one-third will

admission to a state college; and the top one-eighth will be eligible to go directly from high school

be

eligible for

to the University of California.

dents

who prove

The plan

is flexible:

stu-

themselves in a junior college, for

turned away in

Of

these letters,

'61.

Even so, as in years past, a number of the appUcants had been the victims of bad advice from parents, teachers, and friends. Had they applied to other institutions, equally or better suited to their aptitudes and abihties, they would have been accepted gladly, avoiding the bitter disappointment, and the occasional tragedy, of

a turndown. The Ivy League experience can be, and

is,

repeated in

dozens of other colleges and universities every spring. Yet, while some institutions are rejecting more appUcations than they can accept, others (perhaps better quaUfied

to meet the rejected students' needs)

still

have openings in

freshman classes on registration day. Educators, both in the colleges and in the secondary schools, are aware of the problems in "marrying" the their

right students to the right colleges.

An

intensive effort

is

under way to relieve them. In the future, you may expect: Better guidance by high-school counselors, based on


improved testing methods and on improved understanding of individual colleges and their offerings. Better definitions, by individual colleges and univerof their philosophies of admission, their criteria for choosing students, their strengths in meeting the needs of

that a

to pursue

and

their

weakness in meeting the

it

institutions

who

is

within

takes the pains

intelligently.

Exploration—but probably,

sities,

certain types of student

happy match of children and

the reach of any parent (and student)

widespread adoption

in the near future,

—of a central clearing-house for

no col-

lege applications, with students stating their choices of

and colleges similarly Usting The "clearing-house" would thereupon match students and institutions according to colleges in preferential order

needs of others. Less parental pressure on their offspring to attend: the college or university that

mother or father attended; the

college or university that "everybody else's children" are

their choices of students.

their preferences.

Despite the likely growth of these practices, applying to

attending; the college or university that enjoys the greatest

may

well continue to be part-chaos, part-panic,

sports-page prestige, the greatest financial-page prestige,

college

or the greatest society-page prestige in town.

part-snobbishness for years to come. But with the aid of

More awareness

that children are different

from one

another, that colleges are different from one another, and

V/y hat

enUghtened parents and educators,

tomorrow, than

it is

it

will

be

less

so,

today.

they find

will

in college? —the onc your children —

COLLEGE OF TOMORROW

THE

when they get in is likely to differ from college you knew in your days as a student.

will find

the

The

students themselves will be different.

sions, recurrent

and

Curricula will be different. Extracurricular activities wdll be different, in respects,

The

from what they were

in

many

may be

be

different.

With one or two conspicuous exceptions, the changes be for the better. changes there will be. will

for the

threats, military-service obUgations,

young to want

At the moment, pace one's

different. will

war

talk of utter destruction of the race, the tendency

to

cram

their lives full

is

of living

with no unnecessary delays, please.

your day.

college year, as well as the college day,

Modes of study

Like most generalizations, these should be qualified. There will be students who are quite far from the average, and this is as it should be. But with international ten-

But for better or for worse,

THE NEW BREED OF STUDENTS

life

there

is little

likelihood that the urge to

quickly and seriously will soon pass. This

is

tempo the adult world has set for its young, and they will march doubletime to it. Economic backgrounds of students will continue to grow more diverse. In recent years, thanks to scholarships, student loans, and the spectacular growth of the

public

educational institutions, higher education has

WILL COME AS NEWS to no parents that their children are different from themselves. Academically, they are proving to be more serious than many of their predecessor generations. Too serious, some say. They enter college with an eye already set on the vocation they hope to pursue when they get out; college, to many, is simply the means to that end. Many students plan to marry as soon as they can afford to, and some even before they can afford to. They want families, homes, a fair amount of leisure, good jobs, security. They dream not of a far-distant future; today's students are impatient to translate their dreams into

become less and less the exclusive province of the sons and daughters of the well-to-do. The spread of scholarship and loan programs geared to family income levels will intensify this trend, not only in low-tuition pubUc colleges and universities but in high-tuition private institutions.

reality, soon.

growth

IT

Students from foreign countries will flock to the U.S. for college education, barring a totally deteriorated international situation. Last year 53,107 foreign students,

from

143 countries and political areas, were enrolled in 1,666

American increase

colleges

and

universities

—almost a 10 per cent

over the year before. Growing numbers of

African and Asian students accounted for the is

virtually certain to continue.

rise;

the

The presence of


such students on U.S. campuses 50 per cent of them are undergraduates—has already contributed to a greater international awareness on the part of American students.

The

influence

is

bound

to grow.

Foreign study by U.S. students the

is

increasing. In 1959-60,

most recent year reported, 15,306 were enrolled

in 63

of U.S. higher education

will be truly global. This nonWestern orientation, says one college president (who is seconded by many others) is "the new frontier in American higher education." For undergraduates, comparative studies in both the social sciences and the humanities are likely to be stressed. The hoped-for result: better under-

human

foreign countries, a 12 per cent increase in a period of 12

standing of the

months. Students traveUng abroad during summer vaca-

Mechanics of teaching will improve. "Teaching machines" will be used more and more, as educators assess their value and versatility (see Who will teach them? on

tions

add impressive numbers to

this total.

experience in

all cultures.

WHAT THEY'LL STUDY

the following pages). Closed-circuit television will carry a

STUDIES ARE in the course of change, and the changes will

lecturer's voice

affect

your children.

A

standards will reflect the

must be imparted

new toughness in academic great amount of knowledge that

tions to duphcate, in small space, the resources of distant

in the college years.

In the sciences, changes are particularly obvious. Every

Thomas

and closeup views of his demonstrations to hundreds of students simultaneously. TV and microfilm will grow in usefulness as hbrary tools, enabhng institu-

and

libraries

specialized

rare-book collections. Tape

Stelson of Carnegie Tech, 25 per

recordings will put music and drama, performed by

cent of the curriculum must be abandoned, due to

masters, on every campus. Computers, already becoming

decade, writes obsolescence.

J.

Robert Oppenheimer puts

way: nearly everything

"was not There

in

now known

it

another

almost commonplace, will be used for more and more

in science,

he says,

study and research purposes.

any book when most of us went

will

to school."

be differences in the social sciences and

humanities, as well. Language instruction,

now

getting

an example. The use of language laband other mechanical devices, is already popular and will spread. Schools once preoccupied almost entirely with science and technology

new emphasis,

is

oratories, with tape recordings

(e.g.,

have

colleges of engineering, leading medical schools)

now

integrated social

their curricula,

and humanistic

and the trend

will

studies into

spread to other institu-

availability

of resources

unheard-of in their

extensive programs of independent study.

embark on Under careful

faculty guidance, independent study will equip students

with research

ability,

problem-solving techniques, and

bibliographic savvy which should be of

them throughout graduates

still

immense value to

Many of yesterday's college know how to work creatively in un-

their lives.

don't

famihar intellectual territory: to pinpoint a problem, formulate inteUigent questions, use a library,

map

a re-

search project. There will be far fewer gaps of this sort in

tions.

International emphasis also will grow.

This

parents' day will enable undergraduates to

The

big push will

be related to nations and regions outside the Western World. For the first time on a large scale, the involvement

the training of tomorrow's students. stress on quality will be found at all instituImpending explosive growth of the coUege population has put the spotUght, for years, on handUng large numbers of students; this has worried educators who feared that quality might be lost in a national preoccupa-

Great new

tions.

tion with quantity. Big institutions, particularly those with

"growth

situations," are

now

putting emphasis on main-

—while

grams, opportunities sistence

and even raising them handhng high enrollments, too. Honors pro-

taining high academic standards

on

for

undergraduate research,

creditable scholastic achievement are

in-

symp-

tomatic of the concern for academic excellence. It's important to realize that this emphasis on quaUty will ties,

be found not only in four-year colleges and universibut in two-year institutions, also. "Each [type of

institution]

how it;

shall strive for excellence in its sphere," is

the California master plan for higher education puts

the

same idea

is

pervading higher education at

all levels

throughout the nation.

WHERE'S THE FUN? EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITY has been undergoing subtle changes at colleges and universities for years and is likely


to continue doing so. Student apathy toward tivities

political clubs, for

other activities

—the

be growing. There

light,

is less

is

lifetime.

one who feels nostalgic about it: 'That's the one event Mrs. Jones and I looked forward to each year.' "

ac-

lessening.

interest in spectator sports,

interest in participant sports that will

of a

some

— Toward the frothy — apathy appears to example

A QUEST FOR ETHICAL VALUES

more

be playable for most

EDUCATION, more and more educators are saying, "should be much more than the mere retention of subject matter."

Student newspapers, observes the dean of

students at a college on the Eastern seaboard,

Here are three indications of how the thoughts of many

no longer

rant about band uniforms, closing hours for fraternity parties,

and the need for bigger pep

rallies. Sororities

educators are running: "If [the student] enters college and pursues either an

are

disappearing from the campuses of women's colleges.

intellectual

"Fun

cash register," says a midwestern educator, "his educa-

festivals" are granted less time

students; at one big

the events of

midwestem

and importance by

a five-day wingding

quite

.

May Queen —are

now crammed

into one half-day. In spite of the wellpubUcized antics of a relatively few roof-raisers (e.g., student rioters at several summer resorts last Labor Day,

and

new

seriousness

is

.

.

campus

and mood

.

.

.

faculty

and administration are more

"The

resistant to

commitment

to the

make

congress wants to abolish the junior prom; the dean

to bet his

yy/ho THE QUALITY KNOW can look forward

is

of the teaching that your children

Will

know much

Yes.

to,

and you

will

tomorrow

as in the past,

is

secret,

.

by now, that college teaching has been

be better when your children go to college? At the moment, faculty salaries and fringe benefits rising. Since the rise started

rich in the process. Indeed,

areas such as business and government.

for

most other groups of

from an

on almost every campus the

rea/ income in every rank of the faculty is

teachers lagged far behind those paid elsewhere in jobs

cUmbed

wilUng

it

less

well as dollar incomes,

is

them?

on a plateau of crisis in the U.S. for some years. Much of the problem is traceable to money. Salaries paid to college requiring similarly high talents. While real incomes, as

what he

extremely disadvantageous level, however, no one is getting

the heart of

higher education.

England, "is that he

on."

life

(on the average) are

will

New

articulate to himself and to others

will teach

about the effectiveness of the education they

receive. Teaching,

the

man," says the

responsibility of the educated

a women's college in Pittsburgh. "The typical student

no

all,

use of one's learning in fruitful, creative, and noble ways."

provost of a state university in

It is

The odds are form of is no incom-

will progressively characterize the

This means, most of

these changes than the students are," jokes the president of

-

all.

society."

intention

the keynote of most student

activities.

"The

at

Says another observer: "I prophesy that a more serious

student revelers at Florida resorts during spring-vacation periods), a

little, if

that he will simply have exchanged one

barbarism for another Certainly there patibility between being well-informed and being stupid; such a condition makes the student a danger to himself

involving floats, honorary-fraternity initiations, faculty-

student baseball, and crowning of the

good

Teutonism, or the

intellectual

tion will have advanced very

university, for example,

May Week—formerly

smorgasbord,

than

it

still

considerably

once was. Nor have faculty salary

scales,

generally, caught up with the national scales in competitive

But the trend

is

encouraging. If

it

continues, the

—and the serious threat to posed — should be substantially

financial plight of teachers

Americans, the real incomes of college professors not still but dropped noticeably. The financial pinch became so bad, for some teachers,

education which

merely stood

diminished by 1970.

that despite obvious devotion to their careers and obvious

evidence, check the appropriations for higher education

preference for this profession above

made

leave for other jobs.

who

ordinarily

Many

would be

bright

all others, they had to young people, the sort

attracted to teaching careers,

took one look at the salary scales and decided to make their mark in another field.

Has

the situation improved?

None at

it

has

of this will happen automatically, of course. For

your

state legislature's

most recent

yours was like a number of recent legislatures,

session. If it

"econo-

mized" and professorial salaries suffered. The support which has enabled many colleges to correct the most glaring salary deficiencies must continue until the problem is fully

solved. After that,

it is

essential to

make

sure that


the quality of our colkge teaching

—a truly crucial element —

minds and attitudes of your children is not jeopardized again by a failure to pay its practitioners in fashioning the

adequately.

alumni groups ("When am I supposed to find the time to check my lecture notes?"), but they take heart from the high regard for their profession which such invitations from the conununity represent. Part-time consultant jobs are an attraction to good

ARE OTHER ANGLES to the questionof attracting THERE and retaining a good faculty besides money. The better the student body—the more challeng-^ members —the more attractive the ing, the more

faculty

job of teaching it. "Nothing is more certain to make teaching a dreadful task than the feeling that you are dealing with people who have no interest in what you are

opportunities

lively its

is

talking about," says an experienced professor at a small college in the Northwest.

"An

number of tested high on

appalling

lacked

still

I

subject matter,

The

is less

likely to leave for other fields.

toward teachers community, the more likely is a faculty to be strong. Professors may grumble among themselves about all the invitations they receive to speak to women's clubs and in a

both with additional income and with enormously useful to

base

their

classroom teachings

better the public-opinion climate

on

practical, current experience.

COLLEGES AND UNivERSmES must do more than BUThold on good and

have known

flair

many industries seeking new plant sites is. What faculty talent is nearby?) Such jobs provide teachers

to their present

the students

their College Boards, and and drive and persistence," says another professor. "I have concluded that much of the difference between them and the students who are 'alive' must be traceable to their homes, their fathers, their mothers. Parents who themselves take the trouble to be interesting and interested seem to send us children who are interesting and interested." The better the library and laboratory facilities, the more likely is a college to be able to recruit and keep a good faculty. Even small colleges, devoted strictly to undergraduate studies, are finding ways to provide their faculty members with opportunities to do independent reading and research. They find it pays in many ways: the faculty teaches better, is more alert to changes in the

were bright,

members. (Conversely, one of the principal check-

points for

those

many

teachers

who retire or resign. Over the

institutions

must add to

replace

next few years

their teaching staffs at a

prodigious rate, in order to handle the vastly larger

numbers of students who are already forming admissions

The

lines in the

office.

ability to

be a college teacher

be acquired overnight, or

in

is

not a

skill

a year or two.

that can

A

Ph.D.

degree takes at least four years to get, after one has earned his bachelor's degree. More often it takes six or seven years, and sometimes 10 to

15.

In every ten-year period since the turn of the century, as Bernard Berelson of

Columbia University has pointed

out, the production of doctorates in the U.S. has doubled;

But only about 60 per cent of Ph.D.'s today go into academic Ufe, compared with about 80 per cent at the turn of the century. And only 20 per cent wind up teaching undergraduates in liberal arts colleges. Holders of lower degrees, therefore, will occupy many teaching positions on tomorrow's college faculties. This

is

not necessarily bad.

A

teacher's ability

always defined by the number of degrees he

is

is

not

entitled to


write after his name. Indeed, said the graduate dean of one

great university several years ago,

is

it

high time that

men

very

on the quality of work they have done and

soft-

"universities have the courage ... to select

largely

pedal this matter of degrees."

TEACHING MACHINES HOLDING GREAT PROMISE

for the

improvement of

instruc-

tion at all levels of schooling, including college, are

programs of learning presented through mechanical

self-

teaching devices, popularly called "teaching machines."

The most widely used machine, invented by SUMMARY, Salaries for teachers will be better, larger numbers of able young people will be attracted into the field (but their preparation will take time), and fewer

IN

Frederick Skinner of Harvard,

is

Professor

a box-Uke device with

able people will be lured away. In expanding their faculties, universities will accept more holders of and master's degrees than they have been accustomed to, but this may force them to focus attention on abiUty rather than to rely as unquestioningly as in the past on the magic of a doctor's degree. Meanwhile, other developments provide grounds for cautious optimism about the effectiveness of the teaching your children will receive.

some colleges and bachelor's

THE TV SCREEN TELEVISION, not long ago found only in the lounges of

dormitories and student unions,

many campuses.

teaching tool on

now an

is

Its

accepted

use will grow.

"To

report on the use of television in teaching," says Arthur S.

Adams, past

president of the

American Council on

Education, "is hke trying to catch a galloping horse."

For teaching closeup work

in dentistry, surgery,

laboratory sciences, closed-circuit

TV

is

unexcelled.

and

The

number of students who can gaze into a patient's gaping mouth while a teacher demonstrates how to fill a cavity is limited; when their place is taken by a TV camera and the students cluster around

—^and see more, too.

TV screens,

scores can watch

Television, at large schools, has the additional virtue of

extending the effectiveness of a single teacher. Instead of giving the same lecture (replete with the same jokes) three

times to students fessor can

now

filling

give

it

the campus's largest hall, a pro-

once

—and

be seen in as

many

auditoriums and classrooms as are needed to accommodate

all

registrants in his course.

Both the professor and

the jokes are fresher, as a result.

How effective show

is

TV? Some

that students taught

as well in

carefully controlled studies

from the fluorescent screen do

some types of course

sitting in the teacher's presence,

{e.g., lectures)

as those

and sometimes

better.

But TV standardizes instruction to a degree that is not always desirable. And, reports Henry H. Cassirer of

UNESCO, who

has analyzed television teaching in the

U.S., Canada, Great Britain, France, Italy, Russia,

and

Japan, students do not want to lose contact with their teachers.

They want to be able to ask questions as instrucMr. Cassirer found effective, on the other

tion progresses.

hand, the combination of a central TV lecturer with classroom instructors who prepare students for the lecture

and then

discuss

it

with them afterward.

three windows in its top. When the student turns a crank, an item of information, along with a question about it, appears in the lefthand window (A). The student writes his answer to the question on a paper strip exposed in another window (B). The student turns the crank again and the correct answer appears at window A. Simultaneously, this action moves the student's answer

under a transparent shield covering window C, so that the student can see, but not change, what he has written. If the answer is correct, the student turns another crank, causing the tape to be notched; the machine wiU by-pass this item when the student goes through the series of questions again. Questions are arranged so that each item builds on previous information the machine has given. Such self-teaching devices have these advantages: Each student can proceed at his ovra pace, whereas classroom lectures must be paced to the "average" student ^too fast for some, too slow for others. "With a machine," comments a University of Rochester psychologist, "the brighter student could go ahead at a very fast pace." The machine makes examinations and testing a rewarding and learning experience, rather than a punishment. If his answer is correct, the student is rewarded with that knowledge instantly; this reinforces his memory of the right information. If the answer is incorrect, the machine provides the correct answer immediately. In large and indiclasses, no teacher can provide such frequent vidual rewards and immediate corrections. The machine smooths the ups and downs in the learn-


ing process by removing

some

external sources of anxie-

learning which has previously been

unknown. "Where

danger of standardized instruction," Gardner, president of the Carnegie CorporaYork, in a report to then-President Eisen-

ties,

television holds the

teacher can check back over his machine tapes and find

tion of

the exact point at which the student began to go wrong.

hower, "the self-teaching device can individualize instruction in ways not now possible and the student is always an active participant." Teachmg machines are being tested, and used, on a number of college campuses and seem certain to figure prominently in the teaching of your

such as fear of falling behind. If a student is having difficulty with a subject, the

Correction of the difficulty can be

not gropingly as

made with

precision,

usually necessary in machineless

is

classes.

Not only do

the machines give promise of accelerating

the learning process; they introduce an individuahty to

said

John W.

New

—

children.

Will they graduate? AN ADMINISTRATOR at a university in the South SAID not long ago (he was the director of admissions, no

nizing their children's strengths and limitations; by creat-

and he spoke not entirely in jest): "I'm happy I went to college back when I did, instead of now. Today, the admissions office probably wouldn't let me in. If they did, I doubt that I'd last more than a

read, to study, to develop curiosity, to accept

the motivation for serious study," say persons

semester or two."

studied the attrition problem. This aspect of students'

less,

is a problem, nowadays. Staying can be even more difficult. Here are some of the principal reasons why many

Getting into college

there,

once

students

in,

fail

failure:

—not

always coimected with a lack of aptitude or potential scholastic ability

—many students

fail

to

make

the grade.

ideas.

failure to finish college

is

attracting attention

who have from edu-

cators and administrators both in colleges and in secondary schools.

future outlook: Extensive research For one reason or another

new

Poor motivation: Students drop out of college "not only because they lack ability but because they do not have

to finish:

Academic

Low

ing an atmosphere in which children will be encouraged to

is

under way to

determine whether motivation can be measured. The

"Personal Values Inventory," developed by scholars at Colgate University,

is

one promising yardstick, providing

entrance requirements, permitting students to enter

information about a student's long-range persistence,

college without sufficient aptitude or previous preparation,

personal self-control, and deliberateness (as opposed to

Many colleges and universities are participating

also play a big part. In schools where only a high-school

rashness).

diploma

in the study, in

is

required for admission, drop-outs and failures

two years average (nationally) between 60 and 70 per cent. Normally selective admissions procedures usually cut this rate down to between 20 and 40 per cent. Where admissions are based on keen competition, the during the

first

attrition rate is 10 per cent or less.

and teaching the techniques of note-taking, efand Ubrary use. Such measures vdR

fective studying,

inevitably better the chances of students

when they reach

and counseling programs should help, byiguiding less-able students away from institutions where they'll be beyond their depth and into institutions better suited to their abiUties and needs. Growing popular

college. Better testing

acceptance of the two-year college concept will also help, as will the adoption of increasingly selective admissions

procedures by four-year colleges and universities. Parents can help by encouraging activities designed to find the right

academic spot for

their children;

by recog-

Thus

far,

an

effort to establish the efficacy

of the

report the Colgate researchers, "the tests

have successfully differentiated between over- and underachievers in every college included in the sample."

own attitudes toward scholasachievement and by encouraging their children to

Parents can help by their tic

FUTURE outlook: High schools are tightening their academic standards, insisting upon greater efiTort by students,

tests.


develop independence from adults. "This, coupled with

from his image relating to persistence and other may have much to do with his orientatraits and values tion toward academic success," the Colgate investigators the reflected image that a person acquires

parents

—an

say.

Money: Most parents think they know the cost of sending a child to college. But, a recent survey shows, relatively

few of them actually do. The average parent, the

survey disclosed, underestimates college costs by roughly

40 per cent. In such a situation, parental savings for coland, unless the lege purposes often run out quickly

student can

fill

the gap with scholarship aid, a loan, or

earnings from part-time employment, he drops out.

A surprisingly high proportion of dropouts are children of middle-income, not

FUTURE outlook: financial

low-income, families. If parents would inform themselves

about current college costs

fully

—and

selves periodically, since prices tend to tial

reinform them-

—a substan-

go up

part of this problem could be solved in the future by

realistic

family savings programs.

Other probabihties: growing federal and state (as well as private) scholarship programs; growing private

and governmental loan programs. Jobs: Some students, anxious to strike out on their own, are lured from college by jobs requiring little skill but offering attractive starting salaries.

may have

Many

such students

hesitated about going to college in the

first

and drop out at the first opportunity. FUTURE outlook: The lure of jobs will always tempt some students, but awareness of the value of completing college for lifelong financial gain, if for no other reason place

is

increasing.

ing living quarters for married undergraduate students.

Emotional problems:

Some

students find themselves

Some even have

day-care facihties for students' young

unable to adjust to college hfe and drop out as a result

children. Attitudes

Often such problems begin when a student chooses a col-

will

lege that's

"wrong" for him.

or too httle freedom;

its

It

pace

may accord him too much may be too swift for him,

resulting in frustration, or too slow, resulting in it

may be "too

and customs

in their

"peer groups"

continue to influence young people on the question

of marrying early; others,

it's

in

some groups,

it's

frowned upon;

in

the thing to do.

boredom;

social" or "not social enough."

FUTURE outlook: With expanding and more skillful guidance counseling and psychological testing, more students can expect to be steered to the "right" college

environment. This won't entirely eliminate the emotional-

maladjustment problem, but it should ease it substantially. Marriage: Many students marry while still in college

A number do go on (sometimes wives withdraw from college to earn money to pay their husbands' educational expenses). Others have children before graduating and must drop but fully expect to continue their education.

out of college in order to support their family.

future outlook: The trend toward early marriage shows no signs of abating. Large numbers of parents openly or tacitly encourage children to go steady and to marry at an early age. More and more colleges are provid-

Colleges and universities

are deeply interested in

finding solutions to the attrition problem in

all its

Today, at many institutions, enrollment resembles a pyramid: the freshman class, at the bottom, aspects.

sophomore class is smaller, the junior class still and the senior class a mere fraction of the freshman group. Such pyramids are wasteful, expensive, inefficient. They represent hundreds, sometimes thousands, of personal tragedies: young people who didn't make it. The goal of the colleges is to change the pyramid into a is

big; the

smaller,

straight-sided figure, with as

many

people graduating as

enter the freshman class. In the coUege of tomorrow, the sides will not yet

—as

have attained the perfect vertical, but

a result of improved placement, admissions, and acai

demic practices they do now.

—they should slope considerably

less

than


YY hat will college have done for them? IFcollege graduates, they will not end their formal educa-

As a result, for able students the distinction between undergraduate and graduate work will become

On they'll

blurred and meaningless. Instead of arbitrary insistence

go to graduate school, to a professional school, or to an advanced technological institution. There are good reasons for their continuing: In four years, nowadays, one can only begin to scratch

upon learning in two-year or four-year units, there will be more attention paid to the length of time a student requires and desires to immerse himself in the specialty

YOUR CHILDREN

tion

are like about 33 per cent of today's

when they get their

bachelor's degrees.

body of knowledge

the surface of the teach, or to hold

down a

in his specialty.

appeal.

To A ND EVEN with

high-ranking job in industry or

government, graduate study

is

that interests him.

becoming more and more

f-\

tion

-^

-^

is

graduate or professional study, educa-

not hkely to end for your children.

and necessary. Automation, in addition to ehminating jobs in unskilled categories, will have an increasingly strong effect on persons holding jobs in middle management and middle

more accurately, "continuing education" expect that within a decade the number of students under their wing will exceed the number of undergraduates in American

technology. Competition for survival will be intense.

colleges

useful

Many

students will decide that one

advantageously

is

to take as

way of competing

much formal

education be-

yond the baccalaureate as they can get. One way in which women can compete with

men

for high-level positions

is

successfully

to be equipped with

a

graduate degree when they enter the job market. Students heading for school-teaching careers will increasingly be urged to concentrate in their

on substantive

studies

undergraduate years and to take methodology

courses in a postgraduate schooling period.

be true in

many

other

The same

will

Shortages are developing in some professions, medicine. Intensive efforts will be

made

to

e.g.,

woo more top

undergraduates into professional schools, and opportunities in

short-supplied professions will

become

increasingly

attractive.

"Skills," predicts a Presidential committee,

"may

be-

come obsolete in our fast-moving industrial society. Sound education provides a basis for adjustment to constant and

abrupt change

The moral

—a base on which new

will

skills

may be built."

not be lost on tomorrow's students.

In addition to having such practical motives, tomor-

row's students will be influenced by a growing tendency to expose

them

to graduate-level

work while they

are

still

undergraduates. Independent study will give them a taste

of the intellectual satisfaction to be derived from learning

on their own. Graduate-style seminars, with their stimulating give-and-take of fact and opinion, will exert a strong

and universities. "Continuing education," says Paul A. McGhee, dean of New York University's Division of General Education (where annually some 17,000 persons enroll in around 1,200 non-credit courses) "is primarily the education of

The more education you have, the more you are likely to want. Since more and more people will go to college, it follows that more and more people

the already educated."

will seek

knowledge throughout

their Uves.

We are, say adult-education leaders, departing from the live. In this day of automaand urbanization, a new concept is emerging: "time," not "work," is the paramount factor in people's lives. Leisure takes on a new meaning: along with golf, boating.

old notion that one works to tion

fields.

Administrators in the field of adult education

or,


—

and partying,

it

now

includes study.

gardening for studying is

less

and

And he who forsakes

less likely to

be regarded

as the neighborhood oddball.

Certain to vanish are the last vestiges of the stigma that

has long attached to "night school." Although the concept of night school as a place for educating only the literate

has changed,

many who have

either for credit or for fun

have

felt

and

il-

studied at night

far,

American colleges and

such places as Rio de Janeiro, Dakar, Melbourne, or Toronto."

They'll have an awareness of unanswered questions, an extent that their parents probably did not have. Principles that once were regarded (and taught) as into

controvertible fact are

now regarded

(and taught) as sub-

technologies. Says one observer:

"My student generation,

looked at the world, didn't know it was 'loaded'. Today's student has no such ignorance." if it

universities

—have not led the

continuing education for their

in

of long-held ideas in today's explosive sciences and

intellectual stimulation

obsolescent and soon will be obsolete.

Thus

abroad

Beirut, Leopoldville, Sydney,

ject to constant alteration, thanks to the frequent toppling

out of step, somehow. But such views are

notable exceptions

his career

—with

way in providing alumni. Most alumni have

been forced to rely on local boards of education and other civic and social groups to provide lectures, classes, discussion groups. These have been inadequate,

and

institutions

of higher education can be expected to assume unprecedented roles in the continuing-education

They'll possess a broad-based hberal education, but

many of them are likely to specialize more narrowly than did their elders. "It is a rare bird today who knows all about contemporary physics and all about in their jobs

modern mathematics,"

said

one of the world's most dis"and if he exists, I

tinguished scientists not long ago,

field.

Alumni and alumnae are certain to demand that they take such leadership. Wrote Clarence B. Randall in The New York Times Magazine: "At institution after institution there has come into being an organized and articulate that group of devoted graduates who earnestly beheve the college still has much to offer them." When colleges and universities respond on a large scale to the growing demand for continuing education, the variety of courses is hkely to be enormous. Already, in institutions where continuing education is an accepted role, the range is from space technology to existentiaUsm .

to funeral direction.

(When

.

.

the University of California

offered non-credit courses in the first-named subject to

engineers and physicists, the combined enrollment reached 4,643.)

"From

the world of astronauts, to the highest of

ivory towers, to six feet under,"

is

how one wag

has

described the phenomenon.

haven't found him. Because of the rapid growth of science

OTHER LIKELY FEATURES of your children, after SOME they are graduated from tomorrow's colleges: They'll have considerably

cation than did the average person

more political sophistiwho marched up to get

a diploma in their parents' day. Political parties active student groups

material

beamed

now have

on many campuses and pubUsh

specifically at undergraduates. Student-

it

has become impossible for one

part of

it;

therefore,

we have

man to master any large

the necessity of specializa-

tion."

Your daughters

are likely to be impatient with the

prospect of devoting their lives solely to unskilled labor as

more of tomorrow's women when they receive their diplomas, but more of them will keep up their contacts housewives.

Not only

will

graduates embark upon careers

government organizations are developing sophisticated procedures. Nonpartisan as well as partisan groups, operating on a national scale, are fanning student interest in

with vocational interests even during their period of childrearing. And even before the children are grown, more of

current political affairs.

them

They'll have an international orientation that their parents lacked

when they

left

many of

the campuses.

will return to the

employees or as highly

working

force, either as

paid

skilled volunteers.

The

a recent government report predicts that "25 years from

UPON THEIR OWN OUTLOOK, parents of tomorrow's graduates will find some of the prospects good, some of them deplorable. In essence, however, the likely trends of tomorrow are only continuations of trends that are clearly established today, and

now, one college graduate in four

moving inexorably.

presence of

more

foreign students in their classes, the

emphasis on courses deaUng with global affairs, the front pages of their daily newspapers will all contribute to this change. They will find their international outlook useful: will find at least part

of

DEPENDING


\/\/ho WILL

YOU BE ABLE

will

pay

to afford 3 College education

your children? The tuition? The travel expense? The room rent? The board? for

In addition: Will you be able to pay considerably more than

on the

written

The if

as

is

you

From city, state,

and

WHO

—or somebody—must pay,

But, in the last analysis, individual persons are the source

received.

and

universities get their

taxes paid to governments at

federal.

PAYS?

all levels:

you

colleges

is

Governments now appropriate an

as the education

where HERE money:

total income that the colleges and universities will require in 1970 to handle this enrollment will be on the order of $9 billion compared with the $5.6 biUion that they received and spent in 1959-60.

VIRTUALLY EVERY SOURCE of funds, of coursc howevcr it is labeled boils down to you. Some of the money, you pay directly: tuition, fees, gifts to the colleges and universities that you support. Other funds pass, in a sense, through channels your church, the several levels of government to which you pay taxes, the business corporations with which you deal or in which you own stock.

that

your children are to go to college and get an education

good

academic year 1969-70. The

is

price-tags for these items?

stark truth

— and how?

estimated $2.9 billion in support of higher education

By 1970 government support

have grown

of them

all.

From private gifts and grants. These now provide nearly By 1970 they must provide about $2,019 billion. Here is where this money is Ukely to come

you wished to reduce your support of higher is presumably the case with most enlightened parents and with most college alumni and alumnae), if you wished to increase it, you could do that, also with your vote and your check-

from:

book. As

every year.

will

$1 billion annually.

Alumni Non-alumni Individuals Business corporations Foundations Religious denominations Total voluntary support, 1970.

.

These estimates, made by the independent Council for

on

the "best

available" estimates of the expected growth in enroll-

America's colleges and universities: from sUghtly

*To whose

about 6.4 million

in the

research staff the editors are indebted for most of the

financial projections cited in this section of their report. statisticians,

CFAE

using and comparing three methods of projection, built

their estimates

on

available hard figures

assumptions about the future.

es-

THE MONEY YOU'LL NEED SINCE IT REQUIRES long-range planning and long-range

voluntary saving, for most families the most

difficult

and

carefully reasoned

part

of financing their children's education is paying the direct costs: tuition, fees, room, board, travel expenses.

These costs vary widely from institution to

Financial Aid to Education*, are based

this year to

it is

substantially increase both your direct

for them.

now provide around By 1970 endowment will produce

pected to be around $585 miUion.

in

you

$2,019,000,000

earnings. These

From other sources. Miscellaneous income now provides around $410 million annually. By 1970 the figure is ex-

than 4 million

sential that

clearly evident in the figures above,

and your indirect support of higher education between now and 1970, if tomorrow's colleges and universities are to give your children the education that you would wish

per cent of all funds).

less

is

$ 505,000,000(25%) 505,000,000 (25%) 505,000,000 (25%) 262,000,000 (13%) 242,000,000 (12%)

$210 million a year. around $333 million a year. From tuition and fees. These now provide around $1.2 billion (about 21 per cent of college and university funds). By 1970 they must produce about $2.1 bilUon (about 23.5

ment

if

education, you could do so. Conversely (as

to roughly $4 billion.

From endowment

Hence,

At government-subsidized

colleges

and

institution.

universities, for


may

example, tuition fees for state residents existent or quite low.

At community

be non-

colleges, located

many families, a scramble many sources of funds. for

—a

piecing-together of

within commuting distance of their students' homes, room and board expenses may consist only of what parents are already paying for housing and food. At independent (non-governmental) colleges and universities, the costs may be considerably higher. In 1960-61, here is what the average male student

Is such scrambUng necessary? The question can be answered only on a family-by-family basis. But these

spent at the average institution of higher education, in-

what these costs will be. The only solution: Keep posted, by checking coHege costs periodically. What was true of

cluding junior colleges, in each of the two categories (public

and

Private Institutions

Institutions

$ 676

$179 383 187 $749

Tuition

Board

Room Total

404 216 $1,296

These, of course, are "hard-core" costs only, representing only part of the expense.

The average annual

is around $1,550. This conby the Survey Research Center at the University of Michigan for the U.S. Office of Education, does not include such items as clothing. And, as we have attempted to stress by italicizing the word "average" wherever it appears, the bill can be considerably higher, as well as somewhat lower. At a private college

for an unmarried student

servative figure, provided

for

women

(which

is

Many money

to

do seem

likely to get relatively little

money

from other sources and must therefore depend heavily upon tuition income) the hard-core costs alone may now run as high as $2,600 per year. Every parent must remember that costs will inevitably rise, not fall, in the years ahead. In 1970, according to

pay most of the costs of sending their children But most parents seriously underestimate

to college.

report, as nearly current as they are)

true of college costs today.

If they

knew what

families'

resources. Hard-core costs alone equal, at public institu-

about 13 per cent of the average American family's

annual income; at private institutions, about 23 per cent of average annual income.

How do famihes afford it? How can you afford it? Here is how the typical family pays the current average of$l,550 per year:

$950 130 360 110

Parents contribute Scholarships defray The student earns Other sources yield

Nearly half of aU parents begin saving money for their children's college education well before their children are

ready to enroll. Fourteen per cent report that they borrow

on

to help meet college costs.

extra work, to earn

of

when

and what

their children are

leges

and other scholarship sources are seriously confact, indicated by several studies, that

cerned about the

at least 100,000 of the country's high-school graduates

each year are unable to attend college, primarily for financial

reasons.)

Upper-middle-income famihes are

those most seriously affected by the sudden

zation that they have failed to save

enough

reali-

for their

Loan programs make sense. Since going to college sometimes costs as much as buying a house (which most

IT?

SUCH SUMS represent a healthy part of most

money

less true

need, largely determined by level of family income. (Col-

children's education.

bill

not necessarily

likely to enroll, many parents could save enough money. They would start saving earlier and more persistently. They would gear their family budgets to the need. They would revise their savings programs from time to time, as they obtained new information about cost changes. Many parents count on scholarships to pay their children's way. For upper-middle-income famihes, this reUance can be disastrous. By far the greatest number of scholarships are now awarded on the basis of financial

$11,684.

tions,

is

be even

college costs really were,

they are likely to be in the years

among

AFFORD

It will

college costs tomorrow.

one estimate, the cost of four years at the average state university will be $5,800; at the average private college,

HOW TO

valid:

parents think they are putting aside enough

college costs yesterday (and even of the figures in this

private); Public

bill

generalizations

Some

27 per cent take

more money. One

in five

mothers

does additional work in order to help out. Financing the education of one's children

is

obviously.

families finance through long-term borrowing), long-term


Using the current and the 1970 figures that were cited probably have to carry, on the average, about 2 per cent more of the share of total educational costs than it now carries. Governmental support, although increasing by about a billion dollars, will actually carry about 7 per cent less of the total cost than it now does. Endowment income's share will remain about the same as at present. Revenues in the category of "other sources" can be expected to dechne by about .8 per cent, in terms of their share of the total load. Private gifts and grants from alumni, non-alumni individuals, businesses and unions, philanthropic foundations, and religious denominations must carry about 6 per cent more of the earlier, tuition will

total cost in 1970, if higher education

Alumnae and alumni, ties

must look

of such

repayment of college strikes

many

costs,

by students or

and universian estimated 25 per cent ($505 milhon)

gifts: please note.

CAN COLLEGES BE MORE

people as highly logical.

Loans can be obtained from government and from private bankers. Just last spring, the most ambitious private loan program yet developed was put into operation: United Student Aid Funds, Inc., is the backer, with headquarters at 420 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, N.Y. It is raising sufficient capital to underwrite a reserve fund to endorse $500 milhon worth of long-term, lowinterest bank loans to students. Affihated state committees, established by citizen groups, will act as the direct contact agencies for students.

In the 1957-58 academic year, loans for educational

purposes totaled only $1 15 milhon. Last year they totaled

an estimated $430 million. By comparison, scholarships from all sources last year amounted to only $160 milhon.

THE COST TOO

EFFICIENT?

INDUSTRIAL COST ACCOUNTANTS and, not infrequently, other business men sometimes tear their hair over the

"inefficiencies" they see in higher education. Physical facilities

—classrooms, for example—are

for three

months

in

summertime. Teachers "work"

actually stand in the front of their classes

i.e.,

and research, without which a teacher would soon become a purveyor of dangerously outdated misinformation, don't show on formal teaching schedules and are thus sometimes overlooked by persons making a judgment in terms of business efficiency.) Some courses are given for only a handful of students. (What a waste of space and personnel, some cost analysts say.) to preparation

A

few of these "inefficiencies" are capable of being The use of physical facilities is

curbed, at least partially.

college education.

of night lectures and lab courses.

receive between three

must

and four additional dollars for

every one dollar that they collect from students, in order to provide their services.

At public

being increased at some institutions through the provision

the average: the states typically spend

is

greater than

more than $700

for every student enrolled.

Even the gross cost of higher education

is

low,

when

tional product spent for higher education

The

president of the Rochester (N.Y.)

Commerce observed not long ago: "The heart of the matter is simply

is

only 1.3 per

'inefficient'

is

.

.

national product, than they have been spending in the

gation as anyone else to use

what sources?

can spend

it,

they must get

it.

From

.

To

a great

an accurate reflection of [American business and

industry] have to understand that

on a

this:

often referred to as the

really but

true essential nature

cation which

past. Before they

is

Chamber of

'unbusinesshke' phase of a liberal arts

or

college's operation its

which

government statistics. To put salaries and physical plant on a sound footing, colleges must spend more money, in relation to the gross

cent, according to

schools and

avail themselves of even these economies.

extent, the very thing

put in perspective. In terms of America's total production of goods and services, the proportion of the gross na-

Summer

year-round schedules are raising the rate of plant utihzation. But not all schools are so situated that they can

institutions, the ratio

of non-tuition money to tuition money

—for only

a fraction of industry's 40-hour week. (The hours devoted

fflGH?

the national average, colleges and universities

in use for only

part of the 24-hour day, and sometimes they stand idle

HIGH AS THEY SEEM, tuition rates are bargains, in this sense: They do not begin to pay the cost of providing a

On

not to founder.

is

colleges

their parents,

I

IS

for

whom

to

is

much

of liberal edu-

urgently worth saving cannot be justified

dollars-and-cents basis."

much of an obUmoney wisely, you just can't railroad. Your children would be

In short, although educators have as

run a college cheated,

if

like a

anybody

tried.


In sum: WHEN

YOUR CHILDREN go

to College,

what

will

college be like? Their college will, in short, be

ready for them. Its teaching staff will be compeand complete. Its courses will be good and, as you would wish them to be, demanding of the best talents that your children possess. Its physical facilities will surpass those you knew in your college years. The opportunities it will offer your children will be limitless. tent

If.

That is the important word. Between now and 1970 (a date that the editors arbitrarily selected for most of their projections, although the date for your children may come sooner or it may come later), much must be done to build the strength of America's colleges and universities. For, between now and 1970, they will be carrying an increasingly heavy load in behalf of the nation.

—considerably more than

will need more money now available to them and much of it from you.

They

is

"The College of Tomorrow" Washington

JAMES

6,

E.

The

below,

and

as

always,

the

understanding by

own alumni and alumnae) of the

subtleties, the sensitive-

freedom and responsibility without which the mechanism of higher education cannot ness, the fine balances of

function.

They will need, if they are to be of highest service to your children, the best aid which you are capable of giving as a parent: the preparation of your children to value things of the mind, to know the joy of meeting and overcoming obstacles, and to develop their own personal independence.

Your children are members of the most promising American generation. (Every new generation, properly, is so regarded.) To help them reaUze their promise is a job to which the colleges and universities are dedicated. It is their supreme function. It is the job to which you, as parent, are also dedicated. It is your supreme function. With your efforts and the efforts of the college of tomorrow, your children's future can be brilliant. If.

report on this and the preceding 15 pages

schools, colleges,

need,

will

is

the product of a cooperative endeavor in which scores of

universities are taking part.

It

who form editorial projects for education,

was prepared under the

direction of the group listed

a non-profit organization associated with the Ameri-

can Alumni Council. Copyright © 1962 by Editorial Projects for Education, Inc., 1707 N Street, N.W., D.C. All rights reserved; no part of this supplement may be reproduced without express permission of the editors. Printed in U.S.A.

DENTON BEAL

ARMSTRONG

The University of Notre Dame RANDOLPH L. FORT

Emory

WALDO

they will need to obtain

They

thoughtful portions of the citizenry (particularly their

University

C. M. JOHNSTON Yale University

DAVID

A.

BURR

DANIEL

S.

ENDSLEY

Carnegie Institute of Technology The University of Oklahoma Stanford University O. GILLESPIE L. FRANKLIN HEALD CHARLES M. HELMKEN Swarthmore College The University of New Hampshire American Alumni Council

MARALYN

JEAN D. LINEHAN JOHN W. PATON ROBERT L. PAYTON FRANCES PROVENCE American Alumni Council Wesleyan University Washington University Baylor University ROBERT M. RHODES STANLEY SAPLIN VERNE A. STADTMAN FRANK J. TATE The University of Pennsylvania New York University The University of California The Ohio State University CHARLES E. WIDMAYER REBA WILCOXON RONALD A. WOLK ELIZABETH BOND WOOD Dartmouth College The University of Arkansas The Johns Hopkins University Sweet Briar College CHESLEY WORTHINGTON CORBIN GWALTNEY Brown University Executive Editor


.

Peggy Hood Smith garet

daughter, Mar-

'54, a

Mary Shepherd Anne Hough Miller '55x, a son, Bobby Herbert '55 and Nancy Hughes Goodman Hulrey Fulton Stephanie Leigh

'57,

Christie

Kenneth Carter hnboden

'55,

'60x,

a

Don Richard, Ann Mae ]eter

a

Hudson Roberta Koons

Collins '59,

'57,

a son,

'58.

a

a

son,

daughter,

Hampton

Schilling '61, twin daugh-

Karen and Sharon Clair Kreienbaum Hannan '54, a daughter, Kara Angela Ruth Lacy Smith '52, a son, Jeffrey Owen Jack ent. '57 and Eleanor Latming Jeffers '61, a son Patsy Lindsey Ware '50, a daughter, Charlene Lindsey

McRee Hodges

'51,

a son,

John

Fergus '55, a daughter, Janice

Osbourne Mullins Stephanie Lane Cabel Overbey Goodman Shirley

Jean

Stokes Overbey

Mann Mater

Todd

son,

a daughter.

Donna

Kay

Miller

Hendrick

'55x,

'59x, a

a

son,

Thomas James

Joan Coakley,

'58,

being briefed on operation ot

November, 1962

Steven

Ruth

'55, a daughter, '50,

Howard

'52,

Mary Redman Palmer Chinnis ter, Cynthia Mildred Parker Chandler

a daughter,

'51, a

daugh-

'54, a son, Carl-

Betty Jean Per singer Breed love '55, a daughter, Linda Jean Phyllis Poivell Swertfeger '55, a daughter,

'57,

a

son,

Joyce Quick Preble '55, a daughter, Kerry Kathleen Eric Lloyd Robinson '54, a son, Joseph Kirkbridge

Marjorie Anne Schular McKinney '59x, a daughter

.i

(iF,

computer

L.,

Jr.

Daisy Jane Spain Garner 57, a son, Gary Nelson, Jr. Karen Spencer Westbrook '55, a son, William Spencer Virginia Spencer Wnek '51, a son, John Betty Jeanne Spruhan Waff '58, a son. Will'iam Thomas, Jr. F. Stanley Lebo '55, a daughter,

Carolyn

Nancy Lynn Demetra Steger Butler Demetra Brinkley

'54,

a

daughter,

Smith

'59,

a

daughter,

E.

Stoltz

Sharon Lynne Martha Stringfield

Newman

ter, Susan Warren Anne Thaxton Daniel

progr.ini

'55,

'48, a

daugh-

son.

Martin

a

Minter

Anne Thomas Denny '57, a son, Michael Sally Louise Thomas Wallace '61, a son, John G. Marilyn Thompson Green Alan

Mark

'54, a son,

Vandal Thompson Holman Nathan George, Jr.

'6lx,

a

son,

Laura Mae Trent Roberts '54, a son, Jeffrey Brain '50, a son, Arolein Troxler Harding Richard Barron

Tuggle Miller Lawson

Patricia

Anne

Jeanette Puckett Williams '57, a daughter,

Catherine Morey Nancy Redd Quarles Moore John Kevin

Marion Seymour Spence '54, a daughter Patricia Anne Simpson Kelsey '57x, a daughter, Karen Lou Ruby Jane Smith Tindall '50, a daughter, Claudia Lynne Thelma Smith Brandon '50x, a son, James

Lillie

a son

ton Conway, 111 Marian D. Parrish Finch '54, a son, William Donald Barbara Peach Auby '57, twins. Melody Gayle and Michael Gregory Audrey Pettit Mesmer '52x, a daughter, Elizabeth Byrne Peggy Aileene Peery Yost '51, a son, John Robert

Stephanie a daughter,

Nannie Mildred Matthews Stanley daughter, Patricia Lynne Katherine

'59, a son,

son,

Mary Eleanor

Elaine

Edna Lucille Mann Pierce '54, Nancy Gowen Carole Manley Lynn '59, a Manley '57,

a

Lois Ogburn Elsam '59. a daughter, Collier

ters,

Macon Smith

'52,

son,

Jr.

Catherine Lynne Jane Kell Newbill

Anne Oakley Kellam

Barbara Odoiii Wright '59, a son, Curtis Frank

Slayton '55x, a son, David

Andrew Mary Anne Jennings Crafton

Eloise

Margaret Anne Newton Weston

son,

Howard Robert

Elizabeth

C. Moseley Akers '52, a daughter Kitty Naugle Evans '57, a daughter, Connie Nancy Nelson Diggs '55, a daughter. Nancy Ellen

Wilson

Drake

Eleanor

daughter,

a

Mary Dawson Hundley Hyatt

Isaacs

Anne

David

son

'57, a

Blackstock '54, a son, Gregory

Alan

Barbara

Phyllis

Ann Moore

Hood

Doris Rea Honie Gwaltney '54, a daughter,

'52, a son,

Thomas

Margaret Whittle Atkinson '49x, a son, Robert Boiling Charlotte Williams Martin '51. a daughter, Susan EIna Ann Wilson Mayo, ent. '55, a daughter,

Ann

Burgess

Martha Wilson Black David

'54,

Kathleen Yates Schneider

a

'57,

son,

James

a daughter.

Kathy

sponsored by

GE

Found.ttion in Schenectady, N.

Y


We Take

Pride

In:

WORTHY JOHNSON CRAFTS The alumnae and

administration of any college would do well to cherish the memory of those faculty members who, though retired or resigned, have made inspiring contributions in their services to the institution which employed them. Moreover, it is a compliment to the college when such persons have retained through years of absence their love for the school and their respect for the faculty. Such a happy state of mutual admiration seems to exist

between Longwood and Mrs. Earl Crafts, of Lima, Ohio. Mrs. Crafts, who visited the campus in March I96I, has the distinction of having taught the first college-level home economics course in Virginia. On her visit she derived keen satisfaction in discovering that, since 1907 when she offered this course as an elective, a whole economics department, with many majors, three full-time teachers, well equipped classrooms, and a new home management house has evolved as an important part of the college academic program. But Mrs. Crafts has not confined her admiration to the advancement in her own academic field, nor to the college alone. Desiring to give honor to a co-worker and personal friend whose contributions to the cultural development of the school she regards as particularly worthy of note, she has recently established the Mary Clay Hiner scholar-

The income from

ship fund.

this

S5,000 fund will assist

many a deserving girl while a student at our college. The Alumnae Bulletin would like to express its appreciation to Mrs. Crafts for her gift and for the well-deserved

honor

it

whom we

bestows upon our beloved "Miss Mary Clay", are fortunate to have with us, since her home is

in Farmville.

with Mrs. Crafts, we would like Born in Athens, Georgia, her Licentiate of Instruction at the State Normal School of Athens in 1902, later pursuing her studies at Teachers College, New York. Her tenure at Farmville then the State Normal School was from 19071911. Her reason for leaving was a desire to travel, and travel she did South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, with cruises on the Mediterranean, Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. Her husband, Dr. Earl Crafts, also a world traveler, For those

to

make

less familiar

this brief introduction.

she received

and lecturer. Mrs. Crafts' present interests extend to church and community work, where her activities include flower arrangements and lectures. She has held every office in the local garden club of her city and has been president of the Federation of the Ohio State Garden Clubs. is

a psychiatrist

THE TRUITTS RETIRE Helen and Dorothy Truitt retired in June, 1962. after a total of 95 years of teaching in the schools of Virginia. They have both received their grateful communities' citations for the lasting contribution they have made to the life of the cities of Suffolk and Norfolk. Helen, elementary supervisor in the Suffolk Schools for the last 23 years, has been honored by parents, teachers, and administrators with teas, dinners, receptions, and handsome gifts. Dorothy, a principal in the Norfolk Schools for 31 years, has been similarly

honored.

The naming of

the

new school "The

Dorothy Truitt Junior High School" is the signal tribute the school board has paid her. Traveling is a hobby the sisters share. Both have visited 47 of the 50 states as well as Canada and Mexico. After retirement they plan to see the other three states and more of the world.

Home

to both sisters

is

214 Cedar Street

in Suffolk.

There

cook and pursues her hobby of trading recipes. With more time, Helen plans to become a better cook and to continue solving crossword puzzles.

Dorothy

is

chief

THE BLUE AND WHITE COOKBOOK One of

most important decisions made at the Fall Council meetings, October 5 and 6, was to launch a new alumnae project under consideration since October a year ago; to sponsor the publication of a cookbook compiled by Ruth Gleaves. The attractively prepared volume, to be known as the Blue and White Cookbook, is already in the hands of the printer and will soon be available to Alumnae chapters and individuals who wish to order one by mail. the

Special opportunity will be given at Founders Day for the examination and purchase of these books. Miss Ruth Gleaves, Longwood alumna, former chairman of the Home Economics Department, and for many years Dean of Women at our college, now makes her home in WytheviUe, Virginia. The many students and friends who have known Ruth over the years, recalling many of her delectable dishes, can testify regarding her culinary talents. The following is Miss Gleaves' own e.\planation of how she came to compile her recipes for publication, as explained in her 'Toreword": "The idea of writing a cookbook never entered my mind until some of my close friends began to urge me to compile the extensive list of tested receipts that I have collected from my family and friends over a period of years. Many of these receipts are a result of a long practical experience, as well as a real 'love for cooking' sparked with 'food curi-

Hence,

osity'.

as well as

I

bring you

some of

some of the old and memorable

the new."

"These receipts are representative of places in which I have been privileged either to visit or to live. Therefore, the list has grown from what was once a private family collection to one accumulated from sections of Virginia,

North Carolina,

House

Florida, Louisiana, California. International

New

York, Canada, Mexico, and various countries of Europe. Experience and travel have convinced me that 'good booking is good^cooking' regardless of where in

one goes."

"Food naturally has a way of bringing people together. Since today's world is more or less one big community, cannot food make its continued contribution toward improving relationships among peoples and their countries.' With so many foods now available, food preparations should be a never-ending challenge. is

a

May

cook

at heart,

and a good cook

'The real homemaker is an artist at heart.'

and these receipts inspire homemakers to and to make their just and worthy contribution to the welfare of their families and thereby to the this idea

become

true artists

world."

"May

beginning lead our Longwood Alumnae toward a more complete Blue and White

this small

Association Cookbook."

Alumnae Magazine


:

^Ca^

^euA^

1893 Wicker

enjoying her attractive log house built in English many trees. with wide lawn and sf>'Ie a Many of her former students visit her there at Black Mountain, N. C. Isabelle (Belle)

is

still

1894 The members

of Florine

Hunt

Fowler's

Reading Club in Ridgewood, N.

J.

are

presenting six volumes of poetry to the College Library as a memorial to her. At 88 Sarah Feyguson Thomas is active in her church, music club, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, Golden Age Club, and the Washington County Historical Society.

Linda Farley Winfield resides in GlenCalif. Linda was a classmate of Her husband was a Methodist minister. dale,

Mary White Cox.

1897 Larrick now lives in Winchester. She was vice-principal of Allegany County High School, Cumberland, Md.

Nancy Milton

from

1903-09. She married Herbert D. Larrick, lawyer and banker. They had one daughter. Dr. Nanq' Larrick Crosby, educator, editor, and writer. One of her books is

"A

Guide

Parents'

to

Children's Read-

For Zillah Mapp Winn April, 1962, brought the happy culmination of two cataract operations. She says she has never known "color to be so brilliant nor friends and family so dear and thoughtful." Between the two successful operations three of her four "darling daughters took her to Florida." She says, "What fun we had!" Emma LsCato Eichelberger writes "What a long road to travel back over 1962-1897! Sixty-five years! Today finds me an old lady of 84 years, mother of three, grandmother of two, and great-

grandmother of two.

While

ceeding

still

true,

is

can

1

all the prehear Mr. Cun-

ningham's voice, 'Young ladies, workshop,' and see Miss Walton

this

is

1899 Annette Leache Gemmell lives with her daughter at Sweet Briar College; and, although a semi-invalid, is able to go for drives and walks. She is well and happy and able to keep busy. Nelly Preston has retired from most activities. However, in the past year she has been grateful for the warm reception of a book she had published. Paths of Glory.

Ruby Leigh Orgain was made a member of the Dinwiddle PTA with

life

the

merit of being the first president of that chapter. She has enjoyed a wonderful response to the poem of her S2nd birthday.

Not with

a heavy heart did I out into this ever-cruel world of ours To face the future. Nor did I grumble or gripe at each setback found on the rugged road of life Nor did I hang my head with pity for myself when things looked dim: But with my faith in God and man did I

abdomens!' to go back at

its

"How

name

me

to

State then!

are left treasured Normal School!

those

dear the pages

memory Book!

We

turn

its

pages and look since gone!

Despite the years Has kept them bright and

And

We Of

clear.

we

1898 Belle Alears Miller is thankful for her wonderful health which enables her to do so much. She enjoys substitute teaching in the first and second grades and devotes a great deal of time to church work at St.

John's Episcopal Church in

November, 1962

Hamp-

jets

jet. She writes, "I now had been introduced years ago.

My, what distances we could have covered!" Martha Goggin Woodson keeps house and enjoys a small garden. She is now a great-grandmother of three, spending the winters in Florida with friends or in Virginia with her family. Mary Clark Clairborne lives in an apartment which she calls her "Retreat" as it gives her more freedom for contact with her own friends and for her church activities. Since her four children live nearby, she can keep in close touch with them. Mary also has six grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

Ruth Clendening Gaver

says the hardteaching spirit is still alive in her, she is coaching a 9th grade smdent and is enjoying it very much. Carrie Pendleton Greer lives with a daughter in Decatur, III., since the death of her husband. Rev. T. S. Greer. She has four children and seven "grands". The Church of Nazarene adds much to her activities as she is Sunday School teacher and a member of the Missionary Society. to-kill

for

Acting President and Secretary:

Mary Lou Campbell (Mrs. J. M. Graham)

'04

185 Ridge St. Wythevifle, Va.

The same

Class as

last

To

One, Jessie invisible."

seek

and gain

A

Acting Secretary:

'03

Mary Preston (Mrs. Roland Clark) il?36

W. Main

Street

Salem, Virginia Mary E. Peck writes that Ad years of her life have been spent teaching 10 years in public schools of Botetourt and Henrico, and 36 in her Alma Mater at Farmville. In 1949 she retired and now lives in a four-room cottage near her family. She has traveled twice outside the USA once on a Caribbean cruise and once on a

trip.

She

of 1904 is year except

occasionally

teaches

her church Bible class. Pearl Whiteman Knox teaches a Sunday School class, is a member of her church choir and has not missed a Sunday from church for seven years. Her one big accomplishment has been raising a family of six daughters and seeing all of them graduate from college! Grace B. Holmes is teaching biology and chemistry at St. Agnes School in Alexandria. She spent her vacation in the

South Pacific, visiting Tahiti, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, Tasmania, and several

just

for

about the being one

Dey, has joined the "choir

Bessie Carter leaving her the

place that is my own the sands of time.

Among

Canadian

look, hear the sound laughter, and of tears!" as

wish

year older!

At faces long Fond memory

Washington by

to

Depart

wonder how many

with Farmville

This was In

I

a

she was then standing erect in the hall, and hear her say in a clear, carrying voice, 'Young ladies, elevate your chests, and subdue your

Old

clude some historical research on Burke's Garden, writing a sketch of her home congregation (Lutheran Church) for the Synodical Archives, and raising flowers. Kathleen Riley Gage has lived a "Normal, quiet life, thank heaven!" They live in the home she and her husband built 53 years ago in Falls Church.

Go

ing."

days

ton. She and her niece live together. Ida Greever has lived in Burke's Garden with her sister since retirement in 1942. She does some substitute work in the local high school and her other activities in-

of the Hawaiian Islands in 1961. This past summer she planned to visit Seattle and Alaska. Her chief hobby is taking 35mm pictures of all the intetesting places she has visited. Lena Marshall Carter stays busy keeping house, teaching a Sunday School class of senior ladies, and occasionally helping with the church music. Mary Frayser McGehee writes that her hobbies are bridge, flowers, travel and old friends. She has enjoyed a number of ocean cruises and has recently had an exciting experience, traveling from Canada

Taylor last

a btother, family.

lost

of her

Mary Lou Campbell Graham spent the summer with her son in California. Some of the "girls" are in Rest Homes, but most of them are in their own homes just looking forward to Founders Day 1964. The time passes quickly with home duties, TV, radio, books and visiting friends. I did not hear from many of the girls. saw Jessie Finke at a U.D.C. meeting Salem in May. I had a nice visit with Carrie Martin Pedigo in the fall, also a chat with Jemima Hurt and Nellie Smithey in Roanoke. I never did hear whether Mary Herbert Peake's house at Va. Beach was damaged. I did hear from Mary Clay Hiner who won second place in the non-

I

in

fiction division in the

annual creative writ-

ing contest sponsored by the Virginia DiAmerican Association of University Women. Also, I heard from Mary Powers Kearney, Inez Clary McGeorge and a few others. Hear through Jessie Finke of Blanche Gilbert and Blanche Johnston through Mary Powers Mitchell, and Kearney and Mary Clay Hiner of Charlotte Snead Grimes and Scotia Stark Haggerty. It's a great fellowship, this class of naughty-fours! vision,

29


Vice President and Acting

'06

Marj' Preston Clark

1936

W. Main

Merle Abbitt Kirk, RFD 4, Box 442, when a student at old SNS, vowed she would never marry a farmer, live in the country, or own a dog! She has done all three, also raised three boys, two of her own and a cousin. Her older son is a lumberman; the second is an orthopedic surgeon; and the cousin is a lawyer. They are all married and live near home with Suffolk,

their ten children.

Adams Armstrong, 1419 Avon-

dale Ave., Richmond 27, married a Presbyterian minister, who is now retired. She has a daughter, Mrs. E. S. Robertson, who, with her four children, lives near her. Ella Brooke Bickers, .310 W. Asher St., Culpeper, whose husband was in the consu-

now who is

Gertrude

30

retired. They have one married and lives in

Burton

Schussler,

Box

374, Jackson, Ala., has five children, all married, 16 grandchildren and one great-grandson. Carrie M. Dungan, 906 Irving St., Farmville, is retired and lives with another retired teacher. She finds life very pleasant in surroundings that bring back memories of early days. She spoke of the beautiful

new

library at

Longwood.

Elizabeth B. Kizer, 226 Norfolk Ave., Lynchburg, retired in 1953 just short of 50 years of teaching day school, night school, summer and winter, and Sunday School thrown in for good measure. Her sister, Claudine, and she have the upper apartment in their old home, and their sister, Ruth, and her husband, Joseph D. Trency, occupy the lower one. The three sisters all taught school in Lynchburg. Hattie Kelly Thomas, 1305 Obispo Ave., Coral Gables, Fla., was widowed a year ago last March.

Virginia St.,

Nunn

'VX'illiams,

1704

Tulsa, Okla., taught one year in

ton, then

went

to

Oklahoma

the is

Senior Center in Richoperated by the Junior

League.

College.

lar service, is

on assignments from ManShe belongs to and enjoys the

of

mond, which

St.

Salem, Virginia

was very pleased with the interest shown by our classmates, and I hope each one will get a copy of the News. I was married to Roland H. Clark in 1915, and did not teach after that. We had three Only one is now living and daughters. she is a physician. Dr. Esther C. Brown, who has four children, two boys and two girls. Esther's family lives with me in my childhood home. My husband died three years ago. Esther's husband, Raymond K. Brown, is alumni director at Roanoke

daughter, Culpeper.

Inc.

activities

I

Louise

mostly

time,

power,

Secretary:

E.

13th

Hamp-

to teach.

She

used "Playmate Primer" written by Miss Haliburton, a director in the Training School at SNS. She continued teaching until 1926. She now lives alone, having lost her son and husband. Upon retirement she took up clubwork but her real hobby is traveling and she has visited all fifty states. Elizabeth Verser Hobson, 309 S. Main St., Farmville, who lost her husband last year, lives with her brother in the old Verser home. She taught two years in Richmond and eighteen years in Farmville. She has been active in church and civic affairs. She was organist for her church for 47 years. Her daughter, Jane, now Mrs.

Margaret Parish Thomas, Mechanicsville, had the misfortune to fall four years ago and broke her leg in two places and has been on crutches ever since. She keeps up her church work with the help of the telephone. Her daughter and four children live near her. Her oldest grandson will enter VPI next fall. Her granddaughter, Margaret Thomas Mayo, attended Founders Day this year. She lives in Garner, N. C, and has two little girls. Elise Holland Perkins, Huntington, W. Va., writes that she still has fond memories of Dr. Jarman and her classmates. Bess Howard Jenrette, Conway, S. C, has been a widow since 1960. She raised two stepchildren, a boy and a girl. There are four grandchildren. Bettie 'W. Jones, Va. Mennonite Home, Harrisonburg, because of her eye trouble, did not finish her course at Longwood, but later studied at Madison College and the University of Va. Teaching has been her life work. She became principal of Water-

man

School in Harrisonburg in 1920 and it grow from eight teachers to 20 teachers and 500 pupils. Although retired, Bettie does substitute teaching and drives

saw

her

car.

Goodrich, wood.

She has a great niece, Rebecca in her sophomore year at Long-

Steptoe Campbell Wood, King William, has had a busy life on the farm where she has spent her life. Her daughter, Lucie Wood, is an anthropologist, having received her Ph.D. at Columbia University,

and is now working on a project in Egypt. Angela Tinsley DiUard, 413B 4000 Cathedral Ave., N. W., Washington 16, D. C, has two sons and five grandsons. Tyree Dillard, Jr., is an attorney in Berryville and Douglas is in the textile business in Winston-Salem. N. C. She sailed for Europe May 31 for her 26th crossing to be gone for six months or more. Mary Harris Warren, 406 Capital Apts., Raleigh, N. C, and her husband have lived in Raleigh 24 years where her activities have been in church work and a volunteer

worker in

Wake Memorial

Hospital.

Fla., for lunch with Grace BeviUe. Grace and Geraldine had wonderful reunion as it was the first time they had seen each other since graduating together in June 1908. Geraldine says that she is so well she is almost ashamed and that the days are not long enough to do all the things she wants to do. She cannot imagine how Heaven could be nicer than our earth! Grace Graham Beville and her husband live in South Daytona, Fla. In I960 they motored through the southwest into Mexico through California and returned by way of Salt Lake City, Cheyenne, and Chicago. Bernice Howard Garrett and her husband live in Wytheville but spend their winters in the South. They have two married daughters, one in San Francisco and one in Richmond. Their granddaughter, age 17, plans to attend William and Mary and major in Languages. The grandson is 13. Bernice takes an active patt in the DAR, the UDC, and church and enjoys

Daytona,

Graham

a

playing bridge.

Mary Katherine Knott Olgers and

lives

f\Q

Georgeanna Newby (Mrs. Georgeanna Newby Page) 1809 20th St., N. W. Washington 9, D. C. want to thank all of you for your I prompt response. It was wonderful hearing from you and we missed those who did ^

^irN ^

I

telle,

Rosa Caldwell

Mann

and her husband Mich. Their daughter, Gloria (degree STC), and husband live in Glen Ellyn, 111. George Mann, Jr., and live

in

Detroit,

J. Lanier, lives in Lafayette, Ind. Elizabeth has two fine grandsons.

family live in Bluefield. Rosa continues to be active in many civic clubs and genealogi-

M. Jackson, 7-D-2 Prestwould Apt., Richmond, was retired from a secretarial

cal

position with one of the State Departments in 1958, and since has been working part

old

societies.

Wirt Davidson Cox lives alone in the home in Woodlawn. Life goes on much the same for her from year to year

a

widow

health and

way

to live.

Georgeanna Neti by Page is a widow and continues to live in Washington, D. C. Since her retirement as a foreign trade analyst with the U. S. Department of Commerce, she has been active in church work and in volunteer work for retarded children. She has also visited French North Africa, Europe, and the Caribbean coun-

Grace Beale Moncure, who lives in Baltimore, Md., finds that the present keeps her

ville.

ill

Ellie C. Nelson retired from Public Health nursin.g in South Carolina in September, She lives 1955. in Yellow Springs, Ohio, and while she has no "allencompassing hobby," she finds retirement

tries.

busy that she has little time for the past, except now and then a pleasant, grateful memory of seven happy years at Farm-

in

confined to her bed for several years. Emily Lewelling Hogge wrote that June, 1908, seemed only a few yesterdays away. She and her husband still live on the farm near Hampton. They are fortunate to have their two children married and four grandchildren nearby. Mollie Aiat/zy Myers continues to live in Arlington and proudly announced the arrival of a granddaughter, Ann Elizabeth, on February 10, 1962.

not write. Many expressed their desire to return for our Class reunion on Founders Day, March 16, 1963.

so

is

with her daughter, Ernestine, in

Richmond. She has been

a delightful

Acting Secretary:

William Lelia

but her zest for living continues. She taught in her home school but is retiring in 1962. Geraldine Fitzgerald Hagan enjoys retirement and not having to live by the clock. From November to May she lives out of her bags as she gravitates from her home in Christiansburg to Danville and to Rock Hill, S. C. to visit her daughter, then on to Florida for the colder months. Then the first of April she starts the "trek" back. One day last winter she drove to South for several years

Mildred T. Price has been hospital

D. C,

ill

and

in

a

for several years. Her sister, Esshe lived in Washington, sees her regularly.

with

whom

Edith Rogers, who now lives in Herndon, taught school in Portland, Ore., for five and used it as a base for traveling. She went overseas with the Red Cross in

years

World War

I,

remrned home and

started

farming. She was also the first female county supervisor in Virginia. Maggie A. Taylor Caldwell is a widow and lives in her father's old home in Lynchburg. She has a married son and daughter and four granddaughters. Her daughter and family live in "Waco, Texas, where she teaches math at Baylor University. Her husband is the head of Baylor

Alumnae Magazine


Little Theatre and the three daughters, who follow their father's profession, are quite

on the

talented

stage.

Mildred and her husband celegolden wedding anniversary

ference.

brated last

their

year.

May Louise Tucker is still living on She Rivermont Avenue in Lynchburg. bought the house in 193S and made four apartments, living in one and renting the

brated her golden wedding anniversary last year and writes of a very interesting trip

other three.

York,

Mattie Bou/es Black is living in Pamplin where her husband served as pastor of Elm Baptist Church for 12 years before his death in 1961. Her one daughter was graduated from Longwood and teaches Engin

lish

the

Appomattox High

School.

Clara Burros Eraser's husband died in March, 1962. She has her home in Orange

but spends several months of each year with her children, all of whom are married. Her son is a dentist in Washington, D. C; one daughter is the wife of a professor at VPI; one is teaching at Averett College in Danville; and one is living nearby in Orange, and another in Rich-

Blanche Nidermaier Vermillion also

she and Toni

made

last

summer

to

cele-

New

New Jersey and Pennsylvania, visiting relatives, among them Jessie's daughter

and five sons. Zula Cutchins fell in her home last February and broke her thigh near the hip. After four weeks in the hospital and persevering with a walker at home, she has taken up her usual activities at home, Sunday school and church. Minnie Blanton Button has just completed 23 years as representative of the Equitable Life Insurance Company in the Farmville area. She is continuing work on a retired basis.

We fifth

are all looking fotward to our fiftyreunion in 1964 and have high of again winning the attendance Will you meet us there?

class

mond.

hopes

Julia Forbes Thornton lives in Dunn, C. and makes a business of handling the estate left by her late husband. Her hobbies are belonging ro genealogical soTravels have taken cieties and traveling.

cup.

her to Europe. England, Canada, and many of America. She has three married children and seven grandchildren, ages 2 to 14, all of

whom

live in

North Carolina.

1910 Coppedge attended the D.A.R. convention at the Chamberlin Hotel at Old Point Comfort, and there met Mary Alston Rush ('33) and Lillian Woodson Coleman CIO). Bessie hadn't seen Lillian since Bessie

graduation in June 1910.

1911

Minnie Blanton (Mrs. H. E. Button) SOI High Street Farmville, Va.

Members of the class of January 1909 responded wholeheartedly to the call for news for the ALUNrNAE BULLETIN. Bessie Anderson Sharpe has moved to the Richmond Home For Ladies, 2620 Stuart Avenue. She writes, "It is delightful here and I have found many congenial people among

for

cil

this

Kathleen Balduin MacDonald and her husband were honored on their golden wedding anniversary, November 15, with a dinner party in Farmville given by their

son of Durham, N. C.

1912

community'

Minnie and Thelma

service.

Martha,

live at their old

See the special article on page

12.

Acting Secretary: Ada R. Bierbower

'13

404 A. High

home

Farmville,

Street

Virginia

in Farmville.

Happy 'Wilder is much better after a heart attack suffered several years ago and is now enjoying her years of retirement at her home in South Boston. Since her retirement as secretary at St. Christopher's School in Richmond and the death of her sister with whom she lived, Isabelle Harrison is making her home with her niece and nephew in Richmond. Her own flower garden is her hobby.

Ora Alphin Turpin writes that her church work, the Adult Bible Class, Woman's Club, Home Demonstration Club, an old-fashioned country store, and home-

Lucy Robins Archer is still very active in church and community work and finds "life after the party" most interesting. Antoinette Nidermaier Phipps has re-

Charleston, W. Va., where she tutors nonreaders and the slow to learn. She and her husband spent Christmas 1961 in California visiting Disneyland and Marineland. Nena Lnckridge Sexton is active in the Asbury Bible Class of her church and the Raleigh Alumnae Chapter. She said, "I am the 'Mama' to the alumnae and look after the 'girls'." The past two summers Eileen Spaulding O'Brien and her husband have had ex-

tired after 35 years of service as anesthetist in Dickerson County' Hospital. She was

honored by the Presbyterian Church in Clintwood for serving 25 years as Sunday School teacher in various departments. She is a member and past president of Clintwood Woman's Club. recently

Mildred Davis Phelps is verj' aaive work of the Methodist Church. She

the

in is

member of the Board of Trustees of Ferrum Junior College, President of Lyncha

burg District Hermitage Guild, District Direaor of Woman's Division, Crusade for Higher Education in the Virginia Con-

November, 1962

the Mediterranean.

Fair.

Jennie Martitj. Purdum has been arranging flowers and little landscaping scenes for Dr. Theodore F. Adams' TV Program, The Pastor's Study, for the past seven years. She has also helped with the regular flower arranging for the church since she moved to Richmond in 1946. Elsie

Stull

is

retired

after

working

maker

activities are the interests that

make

and most enjoyable. Kerah Cede Proctor operates Ginnie's Shop, an antique and hobby center in her

life

full

Fredericksburg.

Annie Warren Jones

citing tours

for

Store

Washington, D. C.

She is an aaive member of the Bethesda, Md., First Baptist Church, having served on the Board of Deaconesses for many years. She is an avid baseball fan, attending the games possible and following them at other times via radio or television. Bessie Stuart is living in Farmville since she resigned as Housemother at the Martha Jefferson Hospital Nurses' Home in Char-

when

lottesville.

Iva W'ilkerson Etheridge writes that she now has six grandchildren, four girls and rwo boys. Living nearby, they keep her well entertained.

the guests."

Martha Blanton retired last July after 48 years as Librarian and Manager of the Farmville Public Library. She received resolutions of appreciation from the Library Board and the Farmville Town Coun-

to

stop in Paris, they flew to Holland, England, and Germany for sightseeing in those countries. Ann says, "We both love to travel and are trying to see as much of the world as we can before old 'Father Time' puts us down in our rocking chairs!" Jennie Earnest Mayo stopped teaching after four years when she married a VMI Professor of Mathematics. Her husband is retired, and they live in Lexington, Ida Evelyn Gray retired in 1961 after 50 years of service as a registered nurse. In June she went to Seattle to the World's

for eight years in

President and Acting Secretary:

'09

trip

From there they took a cruise to Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. Then, after a brief

Woodward and Lothrop Department

N.

parts

on a previous

Starritt

is

living in

through Europe. This summer

Margaret Shaw Royall had a book pub-

ANDREW

lished in 1958. entitled

JOHN-

SON—PRESIDENTIAL SCAPEGOAT. Florence Boston Decker and her husband

have bought a farm in King William and go down there every chance they have. three grandchildren love to come there also. Florence has been workcaming hard this spring on the "V paign for a new building. Eva Anderson Grimes is the chapter chairman of the School Committee of the

Their

down

WCA

Colonel William Allen Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, and an active member of Christ Episcopal Church. One of her two grandsons lives with her and her husband, making a whole new life for them. Gertrude Martin Welch had a grandson to graduate from high school this past June. Her husband and daughter recently drove to Cleveland, Ohio, to see her son. Mattie Oidd Showalter died suddenly in December, 1961. The entire community witnessed a great loss in her death. Mattie quietly added to her reputation as an untiring worker in such causes as the American Red Cross, the YWCA, the Florence Crittenton Home, a "pink lady" at Lynchburg General Hospital, and the Rivermont Presbyterian Church. There are seven members of our class living in Farmville: Ada Bierbower, Thelma Blanton Rockwell, Virgilia I. Bugg, Ruth Harding Coyner, Winnie Hiner, Bessie Price Rex and Bessie Sruart. They are hoping to greet each one of our class at Founders Day on March 16 to celebrate our BIG REUNION. Do come!

1915

they toured the Orient and South Seas.

Ann W'oodroof

husband retired last December as chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank in Kansas City. Last summer they had a wonderful trip to where they visited a Spanish couple they had met Hall's

Between graduation from SNS in Farmville and retirement from teaching in '61, Martha Troughton Riley served on elementary, high school, and college faculties in Virginia and Pennsylvania. Martha is ac-

y\


church, County Historical SoClub, and Garden Club in her home community of Clarion, Penn. Martha and her husband, also a retired professor, continue to enjoy their summer excursions in this country and tive

ciety,

in her

DAR, Woman's

abroad.

1916 Although Virginia hee Coleman

refers '61 as

to her work before retirement in "underachievements," she taught approximately a thousand Virginia and Kentucky school children in the primary grades. Retirement for Virginia and her husband brought leisure for a long-planned tour of England and Ireland. They have just recently returned to their home in 'Warrenton where Virginia is "growing flowers."

1918 Carrie Oiren Manning and her husband live in Tampa, Fla., about nine months of the year, spending the rest of the time in the mountains. She has two sons, John, an of attorney, and Edward, rector St. George's Episcopal Church in Riviera

Beach, Fla.

had a

little

visit

more of you had

We

with you.

all

I

only wish

written.

appreciated

Gwendolyn Wright

Kraemer's invitation to our Founders reunion;

don't

I

know how many

Day

attended.

Gwendolyn

lost her husband, Karl, in 1950, and she has returned to Norfolk. Her daughter, Emily Sue, is married and works in 'Washington, D. C. Nancy Crisman Quarles writes that there is a "fairly active alumnae chapter in Winget together once or twice a chester. year and have teas for high school seniors

We

and rummage sales to raise money." She is proud of her year-old grandson. Marie Ricks Edwards is secretary to an executive in Franklin.

who went

to V.P.I.,

is

Her son, John, Jr., married and lives in

Richmond with his wife and two children. Mary Reid Anderson taught in Portsmouth for 21 years. She and Fred celebrated their 32nd wedding anniversary in June. He is retired and they have many

Sharon and Donna Wigginton, grandchildren of Virginia Shaver Lane, Diploma '19.

Diploma 1920 Eleanor McCormick Mitchell is presently serving as Director of District VII, Virginia DAR, and president of the Roanoke Read and Review Book Club. She has membership in six other civic clubs and continues her interest in the Alumnae Chapter.

Diploma 1921 Burdett Bagley has retired from teaching in East Orange, N. J. and lives at her old home in Kenbridge.

Diploma 1922

Gwendolyn 'Wright (Mrs. Karl Kraemer), 800 Gates Avenue, C-6,

President; E.

Norfolk, Virginia. Acting Secretary: Carolyn Cogbill, Principal, Stonewall Jackson School, Petersburg, Virginia. I confess I was appalled at the idea of writing to so many of you; however, our school secretary ran off the letters and I addressed them. I had so much fun reading your replies that I forgot what a chore was. it I'm sure some of you, on hearing from me after 40 years, did as I did and got out The Virginian, 1922. As I read your letter, I looked up your picture, compared it with the one you sent, and felt I had

that

her

husband,

George, is connecred with the and Southern Bank in Atlanta, Ga. Their hobby is growing roses, and they are looking forward to retirement and more roses! Ruth Webb is teaching at D. M. Bramn

Citizens

School in Petersburg.

Martha Bidgood Wood has been director of the Portsmouth Child Care Center for the past 16 years. Her daughter, BiUie Marie, graduated from Longwood. Martha was very proud of the "modern college" she found when she returned to her old S. N. S. in March, 1962. extend deepest sympathy to Mr. R. C. Haltom, Charleston, S. C, who writes that his wife, Evelyn Speight Haltom, died in June, 1958, from an accident in their

We

home. Letters

Smith their

to

Daisy

Storey and Elizabeth back. If you know the Alumnae Office should have the Alumnae

Jarratt came addresses, let

wonderful trips together. Nell Gill has been supervising teacher and is now principal of the Laboratory School, Berea College, Ky. Omara Daniel is principal of Akers Elementary School in

Magazine,

Roanoke Rapids, N. C; she has many interests, including Alpha Delta Kappa, Garden Club, and the Woman's Club.

together if only in a magazine"; so keep in touch, and we'll look forward to our 50th Anniversary in 1972.

Bess Badgett Helmondollar has been teaching kindergarten in Westheld, N. J., since 1945. She is now attending the University of Florida on sabbatical leave. Her son, Reese, Jr., is 24. Lucile Stone Reigel and her husband have each been teaching for 27 years. She received her degree at Radford this past summer. Her two daughters taught school before their marriage. Ruth Fiiqjia McGee, whose husband died in 1960 after a long illness, is teaching in

32

refinishing antique furniture. Elizabeth Finch Vest writes

Roanoke. Copelia Dixon Snead teaches in Henrico Counry. After the death of her first husband, she earned her B.S. degree at Appalachian College, Boone, N. C. and went She remarried and back into teaching. came to Virginia where she belongs to the Richmond Alumnae Chapter, First Baptist Church, Britton's Hill Garden Club, and Alpha Delta Kappa. Mary H. Bassett is Librarian of Lynchburg College. She writes: "My most exciting experience has been an exchange position in Edinburgh, Scotland, 1960-61. Miss Eleanor Wilson, Librarian of Moray House College of Edinburgh, came to Lynchburg College while I was acting as Librarian in her position." Hope Dretvry Fuqua is active in community affairs. She is president of the WSCS at Surry Methodist Church and recording secretary of the Woman's Club. She and Lorena M'ilcox Leath are members Eastern Star chapter. Hope her husband and older son in recent

know;

they

too.

As Julia Clarke Kimberley writes from Hampton, "It is commendable to get us

Degree 1925 Susie

Watson

St.

Amant

left

Va.

in

1930 and attended the Baptist Seminary New Orleans, receiving the Degree of

in

Bachelor of Religious Education. Then she taught English two years in the Gonzales School, married a lawyer there, and

High

down to rear a family. One of the surprises of her life was becoming a piano For about 12 years she has been

settled

teacher.

teaching elementary piano work, keeping a class of 18. Her church aaivities include teaching a Sunday School class and a Training Union class, and serving as president of Ascension Association Missionary Union. Susie can say with Browning: Grow old along with me.

The

best

is

yet to be.

of the same lost

Her younger boy. Bill, is a senior the University of Richmond School of Business Administration; her only grandchild is two-year-old Jeanine. From Greensboro, N. C. Leta Couk Moring sent a clipping showing the outfit which won the local Vogue Pattern Contest in the Woman's Club in which she is very active. Leta's six children are college graduates.

years. at

Lillian Williams Turpin is busy in the Wytheville Presbyterian Church and home activities. She was State Officer in the Va. DAR for six years. Her daughter, a graduate of Converse College, is married

and has four children.

Lillian's

hobby

is

Sue St. Amant, school teacher, daughter of Susie Watson St. Amant, Degree

Martha

Class 1925.

Degree 1927 Louise Pruden Apperson was honored upon her retirement by the PTA of Riverside Elementary School for her three decades of service to the teaching profession. She stated that, "Every pupil's personality has been fascination in its many facets." Retirement has brought no lull to her many interesting and varied activities. She enjoys experimenting with new recipes, sewing, participating in her

Alumnae Magazine


circles, painting china, and playing She also enjoys entertaining her bridge. friends and grandchildren. Louise Rothrock Trogdon writes that she

church

has a daughter, Carolyn, 19, who is a graduate of Stroyes School of Finance in Washington, D. C. and who is employed by the Bureau of Census. Her son, Joe, Jr., 18, is working part time and studying commercial art. Louise lost her husband in March, 1961. Bessie Meade RiJdle Tynes' husband. Brig. Gen. A. L. Tynes, MC, has been named to command the vast Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D. C.

Drploma 1927

garden club and church work take up her extra hours. I enjoy my work with the 7th gtades Calcott School, using Dr. Simkin's fine "Virginia History." Our son, 27, gradu-

at

ated "from V.P.I, and is American Oil Company

In May, 1962,

sentative.

awarded each

of

the

Rucker-Rosenstock

lives

Diploma 1929

in

is manager Department

Store.

Degree 1928 Juliet Jones

has returned to her

home

in Churchville from a special assignment with the in Nigeria, Africa. Juliet

UN

began work

at the

UN

in

1959

after hav-

ing completed some 25 years with the US Federal Government. She thinks her next assignment will be in South America. Liz Woodson is a supervisor in Testing and Guidance with the State Department of Education. Elizabeth Hutt Martin teaches four years of Latin at Patrick Henry High School in Hanover County. She says that it is not an easy job but a fascinating one. Elizabeth asks that you send news to her so that she can pass it on to others. Her address is: Mrs. Elizabeth H. Martin, 314

N. Center

Street,

Ashland, Va.

Diploma 1928 President:

Etta

Stubbs),

Box

Marshall (Mrs. J. W. White Salmon, 402,

Washington.

Elsie

Bayside, Virginia.

was

grand to hear from Kathleen Sa>iford Harrison of Jarratt. She is particularly interested in our Alma Mater since her daughter, Doris Kathleen, is a It

really

sophomore (at this writing). It is always good to hear of our daughters attending Longwood. Her son. Tommy, works for the Division of Motor Vehicles in Richmond. Aubrey, another son, attends Jairatt

High

School. Kathleen teaches second grade, this being her 25th year. She loves it more each year. Reba Collier Holland of Franklin has a 15-year-old daughter. Reba substimtes occasionally in the Franklin schools and also enjoys her church and Sunday School

work. Elva Humphries. Parrott of Exmore writes that her daughter graduated from Duke University in 1961 as a history major. Barbara, her younger daughter, is a junior in high school and hopes to attend Duke. Mary Wiley Reeves is happily engaged in her Sunday School and is finishing her two-year term as president of her District III Home Demonstration Club. Margaret Cousins Matteson of Oxford,

He a fine son, Howard, 23. teaches at the Univ. of S. C. while working on his Ph.D. degree. Margaret is employed by the Oxford Industries, Inc. as N. C, has

secretary

to

the

personnel manager.

November, 1962

Her

(Mrs.

Clements Pallister

R.

C.

Road, Norfolk Melanie Barnes, age

18, Virginia.

Northcross Ellis operated North Cross School (kindergarten through third grade) in Salem, as Headmistress and first grade teacher for 17 years. In September, 1961, the school merged with Roanoke Cirj' schools and is now known as North Cross Country Day School (kindergarten through seventh grade). Her position is Headmaster is Head' of lower school. Emerson Johnson, former assistant princia graduate and Academy Norfolk pal of In September of of Hampden-Sydney. kindergarten have will 1962 the school through high school. The faculty is composed of Longwood graduates: Garnett Hodges Spickard, Dottie Deacon Stevens, Betsy Wilkinson Darden, Emily Haskins Mosely, Janice Pinkard Hitt, Mary Kelly Billy is a Ross, and Charlotte Oakey. widow now, having lost her husband in 1954. She lives in the old family home in which she was born. EUiston was named for her husband's father. writes: Powell Tounsend Florence "Bestelle, out daughter, and husband, Don Hill, presented us with a wonderful grandson 'last August 13th. His name is Jon (Jonathon Adonerin, Jr.). Don will receive his B.D. from Southeastern Baptist Billy

Lillian Stiirgis

2,

granddaughter of

Doughty, Diploma

'29.

Elizabeth Ruth, born to her daughter and husband, the Rev. and Mrs. J. Gary Campbell, Sulphur Springs, Tex., on January 16, 1961. Miss Sharon L. Glaize became a part of the family when she married Francis Joseph Duckwall, a rising senior at Medical College in Richmond. A new sanctuary and Fellowship Hall are the pride and joy of Highland Presbyterian Church, WinMemorial

grandchild,

where Beth's husband is pastor. Martha Lanier Hinton, is Chief Proba-

chester,

tion Officer of the Juvenile Court in Peters-

burg. She has a niece, Taney Pegram, is attending Longwood.

who

first

Margaret Rutherford Yancey keeps busy with home and gardening chores in addition to helping her husband two days a week in his office. She belongs to the Woman's Club and is active in the Methodist Church. Lillian Sturgis Doughty began her teaching career again when her son was six years old and her daughter thtee years old. Her son was killed in a tragic automobile accident one month before his graduation from high school. Her daughter is married and Lil has a lovely granddaughter, Melanie Barnes, age two. Lil spent eight weeks at

I

Longwood

Seminary,

Acting Secretary: Elenor Amory (Mrs. Sidney Boyette), 2711 Hermitage Road,

completed two

year.

Hanna), 6924 Mackasey Parker Petersburg where her husband

I

repre-

a field

as

years as president of the Norfolk Chapter of the Longwood Alumnae Association. Our main project is a $200 scholarship for a Longwood student from our area to be

President:

Margaret

employed by the

Wake

Forest,

N.

C.

on May

18th. Roy is running for the House of Representatives from Dillon County. The

Primary is June 9th, so you see how spend my time!" Katherine Trent West received her B.A. from Lynchburg College in 1959 and is now teaching fourth grade at Altavista Elementary School. She was initiated into Delta Kappa Gamma this year. She has two daughters, Anne, who is graduating this June from William and Mary, and

Nancy,

who

will

enter

Sep-

in

college

tember. Jennie Owen taught school in Virginia for 22 years, then took the Civil Service Examination and for the past 24 years worked in the Post Office in Emporia. She was retired March 31, 1962. Louise Barlow Gibson lived in Columbia, S. C, ten years and has been in Charlotte the past two years.

Her husband

Regional Sales Manager for Nationwide Insurance Company in Charlotte Region. They have one son. Price, who graduated is

from "The Citadel", Charleston,

S.

C.

Mary Fielding Taliaferro Steck and her husband, "Mike", built a home in 1958 near Winchester. The site is an old apple orchard on a ridge with a lovely view of the mountains, especially beautiful when the orchards are in bloom. Their grandchildren, Corey Fielding Collins (3 yrs.) and Ellen Marshall Collins (18 mos.), are main interests. Beth Anderson Duckwall

their

has

a

first

the

summer

of '61.

Fannie Smith Murphy is still teaching She received her 25-year servfirst grade. ice pin Christmas 1961. She has rwo boys,

24 and 26 years old. The older is married, has two little girls, and lives in Newport News. The younger one is in service at Fort Eustis. Fannie's husband is a line foreman with the Cit>' Electric Department in Danville.

vacation the summer of 1961 husband, Charles, and daughter, Lynne and I stopped in Richmond years), (11 and had a chat with Mildred Deans Shep-

While on

my

herd. Her daughter, Susan, at Stratford Junior College,

a sophomore was President

of the Smdent Body during 1961-1962 Her older son. Bob, is in the session. service and received his appointment to Judge Advocate General Division of the Army. As 1st Lieutenant he went to His son, schooling. for Charlottesville Robbie, born October 1961, made Mildred arandmother. a

Degree 1930 Sarah Dinwiddle teaches the children of Florida tourists in a private school and finds the work very interesting.


son, Charles III, now almost 24, is a shop teacher in junior high school in Bloom-

Degree 1931 Acting Secretary: Mildred Maddrey (Mrs. H. Morris Butler), 1585 Montpelier St., Petersburg, Va. Eleanor Dash/ell Graham and her hus-

for this issue of the

in

Mildred Maddrey Butler, have been in Petersburg for nearly 14 years where my husband is assistant manager with the Metropolitan Life Ins. Co. Our son.

her teaches Sunday School along with regular activities. Her two sons lead busy too. She lives near Arlington and along with helping in her husband's insurance office several days a week does work in her church, PTA, and several women's groups. Add to these activities a couple of T'V College Credit courses and you wonder how Liz finds time to study Japanese flower-arranging, too. Ruth Glenn Carson's husband, a 'VPI graduate, is district agent with the exlives

They live at of 'VPL Both of Ruth's sons atand one is doing graduate work there now. Ruth is quite proud of She has kept her three grandchildren. tension

service

Appomattox.

tended

'VPI,

at Longwood because she has had five nieces to attend Longwood. Florence Moore Crothers is living in Rising Sun, Md., where she helped to establish the town library 20 years ago. She

up with events

says,

"My

life is

perhaps no different from

Our

gathering the news.

Omara

Daniel, '31.

million other women, but you know My husband has his own inI enjoy it. surance business and, being his own boss, fifty

are able to travel whenever we please, something we both enjoy." Her only child, an IS-year-old boy, graduated from Peddle, a N. J. prep school, this year. Florence stopped teaching 20 years ago, but continues substitute work. would like to I emphasize Florence's statement, "I wish everyone would write something about

we

herself."

Annie Deiiit Darst leads a busy life as a Methodist minister's wife with a "very energetic junioi high daughter." She says, "Harriet, our pride and joy, keeps us busy She is enthralled by the and young. thought of growing up and going to 'Mama's College.' There's just one stipulation at present regarding school there must be horseback riding. Was there such a thing in the 30's?" Florence Gregory Trent's 15-year-old daughter. Lina, has been Jr. Champion in Baton Twirling in 'Va. for three years. Florence writes, "My work outside my home consists of working with my Sunday School, leader of missionary circle, secretary of chapter and assistant to Lina who has been teaching baton twirling for

—

DAR

five years.

We

go

to .

many National .

.

volved in activities in Gloucester. In addition to church work, tutoring Latin and English, and substitute teaching, she is vice chairman of Gloucester Count;' Board of Public Welfare, member of SCA state advisory committee from Tidewater region, active in Woman's Club, PTA, King's Daughters and Sons. Besides, she has taken some graduate courses. "If I have any spare time, I do genealogical research as a hobby." All of rhis and a 12-year-old daughter! Elizabeth's 89-year-oId aunt, Louise Gayle Bland, is an 1894 graduate of

Butler, '31.

at 'VPI.

Church.

Baton Twirling contests "These contests have taken us into over 35 states in the US. We enjoy them very much." She and her husband have a number of horses which calls for more travel to horse shows. Elizabeth Dutton Lewis is really in-

Maddrey

sophomore

a

is

Thanks to all of you who sent news. Very special thanks go to Liz Anderson Swope who really did the hard work of

over

Betty Lynne Barker, grandchild of Mildred

Tommy,

daughter, Janet, is at Fort Sill, Okla., where her husband, Capt. B. L. Barker, is assigned temporarily. Our grandchild, four-year-old Betty Lynne, is really a honey! I do some substitute teaching and am taking work for credit at RPI. I am at present organist of St. Mark's Merhodist

ALUMNAE News. We

plays first flute in the school band, takes dancing, teaches ballroom dancing, has had the lead in two Dramatics Club plays and

Hampton. I,

living

also

wish more people had responded. Liz has an 18-year-old daughter, Betty, who plans to enter Mary Baldwin College for the fall term, 1962; and with two teen-age boys you can imagine what a busy life Liz is leading. She says, "I probably still have more teen-age children than anyone in the Liz's daughter late date." at this class

and married last year. Her John Antrim, attends in GreeneviUe, Tenn.

son,

Catherine Jones Hanger's daughter graduated from Longwood this year. Her son is a high school student at their home

had many happy moments, such as spending New Year's Eve at a gala party in Madrid, sightseeing in Italy, and enjoying the fascination of Paris." Eleanor and her husband live at 512 N. McKean Street, Butler, Pa. Liz Anderson Swope wrote numerous letters to classmates to collect the news

Grahams

the

J.,

18-year-old

Tusculum College

band visited Algeria in January. By permission of the French Government they were allowed to spend 24 hours in the forbidden territory of Oran, Algeria, where they visited the widow of an old friend. The following is quoted from the newspaper story about their trip: "Although their day in Oran was the most frightening experience of rheir 17-day holiday trip,

N.

field,

Longwood.

Elizabeth Antrim Niemann has been teaching in a boys' private school for more than six years in Maplewood, N. J. Liz's husband died on Feb. 3, 1960. Her elder

Copelia Dixon Snead,

'31.

Diploma 1931 Lena Mayton Milam and her husband have

just

moved

mond and Eastern

like

Star

into a

new home

very much.

it

and

home

in Rich-

Church and

duties

keep

her

busy.

Degree 1932

Nancy Shaner (Mrs. M. P. Secretary; Strickler), 17 Cavalier Place, 'Virginia Beach, Virginia. The gals of '32 are improving with Thank you for your news of the age. things you and yours have been doing. Frances Crawford wrote a long letter After teaching eight years, she in '61. went to William and Mary and studied Library Science. Here she met Lucy Fitzgerald, who embarked on the same training. Since 1941, she has been librarian at Lee High School in Staunton. Her work in the field of education, in church, and at home with her sister, make her life full and rich. Lucy, who is librarian at Crewe High School, has changed little with the years. She and I were enrolled in the same

workshop last summer ar William and Mary, Hazel Halloway Thompson was tak-

Alumnae Magazine


ing a class in the same building, and I saw her on several occasions. Lucie Anne Lane Bowles wrote of her

musically

talented

daughter,

Joan,

Why

not write before next

Nancy Shaner

to:

Cavalier Place Virginia Beach, Virginia

who

flute in the school band, and is an accomplished pianist; and about her husband, an oil distributor. Her work as a substitute teacher, in the PTA, and as choir direnor in her church in Powhatan, make her life full and interesting. Easter Souders Wooldridge and Doris Robertson Adkisson were disappointed that they were the only ones back for our thirtieth reunion on Founders Day. Easter

May

Strickler

n

plays

enjoys her fine arts work in the Lynchburg Woman's Club. She and her husband, Ed, who retired from the Navy in 1954, are very proud of their daughter. Holly Kay, who enters Converse College in September as a music major, and son. Bill, who is completing his freshman year at Harvard where he is a National Merit Scholar. Doris saw Nan Mears Kirby at the 1961 Averett College May Day. Nan and family live in Providence, R. L Doris and William have two daughters, Jane in high school, and Mary in the seventh grade. Doris is now serving on the VPI Advisory Agriculmral Committee for the State of Virginia. Bertie Price Henderson and her husband operate an apple and peach farm at Bridge-

town and have just moved into their new home. They have two children. Potter, Jr., age 17, and Hannah Price, 13. Ruth Reynolds Stimpson lives near Farmville and is head of the Mathematics Department at Cumberland High School. She has a daughter, who is finishing her first year at Longwood, and a son, who is finishing the sixth grade. Her husband is the agent for the American Oil Company in Farmville.

Prior to Founders Day, I had a card from Catherine Marchant Freed, saying it would be impossible to make our reunion; she was up to her ears in club work. She sees Nancy St. Clair Traynham, and Evelyn Stephenson Watkins quite often at home in Waynesboro. From Norfolk comes word from Annie Virginia Williams Laylor. She says she has much trouble with her name, which is

Laylor not Taylor. Virginia lives only a block from Jane Royall Phlegar ('33) and sometimes sees Bessie Lynch Diven. Her daughter is a junior at Mary Washington College.

New Orleans Margaret sends best wishes to the Class of '32. I quote from her card, "After S.T.C. I graduated from Lewis-Gale Hospital School of Nursing, Roanoke, and was on staff there and at Norfolk General in Norfolk for several years." In 1947 she moved to New Orleans, "America's most interesting city," and since then has been on the supervisory staff of the USPHS Hospital. She is married to William Sears and has two married step-sons and two grandchildren. All the

Addleman

way from Sears

summer, while on a trip to New my husband and I stopped in Coatesville, Penn., and had a wonderful visit with Jane Witt Kisler and her family. Those at home were husband, Harold, Kathy, a Junior in college, and the two Last

England,

youngest sons. She has her graduate from high school in June. John is is still in the Air Force, and Ronnie married and living in Florida. fourth

to

There are many of you from whom we have had no word; we would love to hear.

November, 1962

Degree 1933 Katherine Langhorne PanniU has been included in the latest edition of "Who's Who of American Women" for her achievements in the Arts. Katherine is teacher and supervisor of art in Winchester city schools where she is associated with the staging of the Apple Blossom Festival Pageant every year.

Diploma 1934

Woodard Margaret Secretary: Acting 1114 Cam(Mrs. C. F. Vanderberry bridge Crescent, Norfolk 8, Virginia. )

Can you

realize that in

two more years

will

our way to fame, fortune, etc.? Let's all start planning now to meet in the spring of '64. It might have been nearly thirty years ago, but from the things we are doing we surely don't show our age. Elva Connelly Rose graduated cum laude from High Point College in 1950, then went on to the University of N. C. and earned her master's degree. She worked with retarded children and in 1957 was awarded a silver cup from High Point College as the most outstanding alumna. Elva is presently teaching third grade in Children's Home in Winston-Salem. Elva's daughter, Sandra, is moving to Madrid, Spain in July and her other daughter will graduate from High Point College and plans to work with NASA in Houston, Texas. Edna Dawley Gibbs is very busy these days with her new enterprise, "The Sunnybrook Day School," on Virginia Beach Her husband, Howard, was the Blvd. power behind the throne. He, being a contractor, took the initiative in getting September 1961. for a building ready Aside from administrative duties and teaching Edna is active in Business and Pro fessional Women's Club, her Sunday School Class, and last but not least her two children. Joan, now 16 years, and Allan, 11

years.

Addie Lee Jarman Gibbs stays busy keeping house and working in their general merchandise store. She is assistant adult Sunday School teacher at her church. Sue, her daughter, is ten. Cassie Dickerson Hamlett has

been

a

Her

husband, Purcell, is a member of the Charlotte County School Board. They have four children. The oldest, Preston, has been in the Army for 2 years. Freida graduated from Longwood and is now teaching, Laurice is a junior at Longwood and Carroll is a junior in high school. Cassie has certainly been true to Longwood sending two girls for fifteen years.

Kitty

person

I

duties.

there.

Doris Button O'Bannon is teaching first grade in Culpeper. She lost her husband in '57 so returned to Longwood and earned her degree. Her son attends Culpeper High

Woodson Batte is about the busiest know with her civic and patriotic She and husband, Duroc, are in

Alexandria. Kitty is an active member of the D.A.R.'s and Colonial Dames XVll century. She is treasurer of Visiting Nurses

and

understand they do a terrific job She teaches in a private school.

I

there, too.

Dot Eley Holden has moved to Richmond. She is secretary to the Reverend W. Priestley Conyets, III, at Union Theological Seminary. Her daughter. Verna, is a sophomore at Longwood and son,

Tom

III,

is

a

junior

at

Collegiate

Boys'

School. Dot says she sees many of the old Longwood girls. Chesta Hubbard Morrissette teaches third grade in Burkeville. Her husband is with the Norfolk and Western.

They have two

boys one a sophomore at V.P.I, and the other in the tenth grade at Crewe. Mary Virginia Johnson Turner is the only one I know in our class who had a wedding in the family. Her daughter, Carol, was married in January and is now living in Cincinnati, Ohio. Their son. Perry, is quite a sports fan. Mary Virginia

works for the Welfare Department in Suffolk. She also enjoys garden club and church work what little time is left she and her husband spend in boating or

traveling.

Had a note from Virginia Riddick Rawls (Red) and she said she's simply enjoying happiness, and work and I guess

health,

that goes for me too. I'm teaching in a private school at the Naval Base. Peggy, our daughter, will be a junior at Longwood and our son, Ben, is in the third grade. He is quite a live wire and as

Claude,

Mary

4-H Club Leader

Lynchburg College.

,

have been thirr>' years since we said "farewell" and each of us started on it

Helen's daughter is a first year student at Averett Junior College. Hilda Brumfield Tomkins returned to Longwood and received her degree in 1959 and is teaching first giade at Brookneal School. She has a son attending Lynchburg College and a daughter who is a junior in high school. Elizabeth Renfro Martin and husband, Ralph, are in Pulaski and enjoying life. Their oldest daughter graduated from Converse in 1960 and is head of the Music Department in a girls' school in Davenport, la. Their youngest daughter will enter SuUins in September. Katherine Malone Donald and Harvey are living in Temperanceville. She is a seventh grade teacher in Atlantic Elementary School. Son, Wayne, is a freshman at

my

husband,

says,

"We

can't

grow

old 'cause he doesn't give us a chance." take an active part in my gatden club.

I

It

was wonderful hearing from you and I hope this tidbit of news will interest all of you.

Degree 1936

Agnes Crockett Davis' son was chosen as the FFA Star Farmer of Virginia for 1962. This is the highest honor a Future Farmer can receive from a State Association.

Diploma 1936

School.

Helen Conquest Johnston and her husband with another couple have a drug store on Eastern Shore. Believe it or not, Helen has suddenly taken up golf. I have an idea it was either play golf or be left behind since both Helen's husband and daughter enjoy the game. Incidentally,

Acting

Secretary:

Moody

E.

Valla

Stallings),

Nimmo

902

E.

(Mrs.

Riverview

Drive, Suffolk, Virginia. Marian Hansbrough Halt is living in Dunedin, Fla. She has one daughter, Manette, who is eleven. Marian spends her time keeping house and trying to get out

35


Her husband, Glenn,

is

an

Esso

dealer.

Just recently she was a "chorus girl" in the Junior Woman's Club Follies. Lucille says the chorus was the hit of the show because they ended by doing the twist and added that the twisting made her feel like a 16-year-old!

O. W. Draine, Jr.), Mt. Elba Farm, Walkerton, Virginia. Elizabeth Burke, Caroline Gwathmey Jones and I live near each other and manage to get together occasionally and thump around with the memories of school and cla.ssmates.

As you know, Elizabeth Burke

goes

A.A.U.W. Ruth Phelps

—

Fisher writes that after receiving her B.D. degree she went to Edinburgh where she did two years of post graduate study in theology at New College, the Universirj' of Edinburgh. While making a tour of Europe in the summer of 1960 Ruth and her son attended the Passion Play. Also, Ruth and her son made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land April, 1961.

Hansbrough Hait,

Diploma 1938

'36.

Margaret old

of doing outside work, community or otherwise! "Life is wonderful and I'm still enjoying it fully," writes Lucille Davis Byrd. In the First Presbyterian Church she is a Sunday School teacher and Bible Moderator in the circle. She is active in the Order of the Eastern Star and Woman's Club.

Dowdy

Locklair's son, 14-year-

Danny, received the God and Country

Scout Award in February. This was the first time this award has been presented in the Farmville area and it is one of the highest honors in scouting.

Degree 1939 Acting Secretary;

Eloise

prin-

Richmond.

Virginia Price Waller writes that this is her thirteenth year as Supervisor of the Henderson City Schools, Henderson, N. C. She is also a member of Delta Kappa Gamma, and president of the Henderson Branch

Manette Haic, age H, daughter of Marion

is

cipal of the lower school at Collegiate in She lives in Richmond but

Degree 1938

Williams

(Mrs.

home

to

St.

Stephens

week end. Elizabeth planned Holy Land last summer but

Church each a trip to the illness

in the

family postponed the trip for awhile. Caroline Giiathmey Jones stays busy with Woman's Club, PTA and church work keeping up with daughter, Bette, age 12, and Alfred, age 10. Eloise Williams Draine says there's never a dull moment living on a farm as there is always a new pet to care for and enjoy. Anne Walker, at 10, got her pony. Carolyn, age S, enjoys him too. Both girls have learned to ride, but Mama only tries a ride in the pony cart with little Wendell, age 5. Thelma Hotipse Foster's biggest news is she put on a cap and gown to graduate again this past June, as she received her master's degree from Woman's College, University' of North Carolina. Her husband and 10-year-old daughter were very proud. Willis Weiler wrote from Caroline Phoenix, Ariz, that husband, Fred, is State Director for Bureau of Land Management. Hunter, at 16, will be on the football team next year. Susan, 13, helps Mama and Marion loves the Boy Scouts.

36

Elsie Turner Franklin, '38x,

and family.

Alumnae Magazine


longs to see some Virginians occasionally.

Miriam Ficklen Howell brought us up on the Howell activities. Cary graduated from high school in June and planned to enter Longwood in September. She

Does anyone know any Longwood

to date

girls

down

that-a-way? She is teaching a slimcourse and tr}'ing to get her own weight over 100 pounds. Can you imagine? nasties

was a Page at the National Continental Congress of the D.A.R. in Washington last April and had a wonderful time and enjoyed meeting Betr>' Moss Keller who was chairman of the Pages. Harden received his Life rank in Scouts at a Court of Honor. He planned a canoe trip with the Scouts in Canada this summer. Jim, who is a judge, had been active in Scouts for many this year took over a troop and years, but

And

with everyone I know (especially me) trying to get our weight back down! A high school group of campfire girls (along with her own 3 boys) keep her on her toes too that must be the secret! Sara Keesee Hiltzheimer has been a TV She is another of our French teacher. alumnae with a V.P.I, son. Sara's husband, Silver Beaver Fitz, received the coveted

became a Scoutmaster. Miriam is regent of D.A.R. chapter and teaches Home Economics in high school. Elizabeth Button Rosenberger, 2-year

Scout Award recently. Anyone who knows Scouting knows the faithful years of service that have to be given to receive this award. Congratulations! Sara is a flower arrange-

diploma 1923, received her degree in 1939. She is retiring from teaching this year be-

ment

cause of Betty

PhiUp,

ill

Moss Keller has

3 teen-age boys, 16, Alfred, 14, and Charles, 12. interest in local C.A.R.

Jr.,

Her boys share her

of which she is a senior national officer. Louise Jones Wells has two girls, Elizabeth Lee, 18, and Linda, 141/2. Last summer she won a trip to N.Y.C. Elizabeth Prince Barnes married a peanut buyer, has three children, Nancy, 14, Anita Page is 10, and Dallas, age 6. She enjoys working in P.T.A., Woman's Club and Baptist Church and this past year has enjoyed part-time teaching. Anne Kelly Bowman is teaching in a in Staunton. elementary school large Youngest boy. Bill, is in 6th grade. Dick, is graduating from Wilson Memorial June and was entering St. Christopher's

at 16,

in

Anne is this fall for postgraduate work. to the University' of Virginia for three weeks of summer school and then to Ohio State with her husband where he will attend a national convention and

going

school for cooperatives.

David Terry Cave is still enjoying Navy Husband, Bill, is a senior dental officer aboard the U.S.S. Amphian, a repair ship.

life.

Son, Terry, is 14 and Cynthia is 12. Sidney Yonce Hunter says carrying mail regularly is fun except when the mountain roads are covered with snow. Sidney has been president of the P.T.A. for two years, vice president of Botetourt County' Episcopal Churchwomen and treasurer of her church. She is district chairman of visiting gardens for 'VFGC and served as arrangements chairman for the recent state

convention.

Sidney

vacationed

in

Miami

summer. She has two sons. The older son was president of student body and salutatorian of his class and was awarded the U.D.C. scholarship at Wash-

and Nassau

ington

&

last

Lee for

this

fall.

ginia.

(Mrs. Seaetary: Jerry Hatcher W. Waring), 1715 Elf land Drive, Greensboro, North Carolina. Hello to everyone from everyone! Many thanks to the gals who sent in the news. This seems to be the year for the girls to begin having freshmen and sophomores in various colleges. Helen Jeffries Miles

Acting B.

(who deserves a medal for prompt letter writing) has a sophomore son at V.P.I. She reports running a "restaurant" on as

many

as

twelve or sixteen for meals. Also that her high school son and Jane Powell Johnson's

November, 1962

growing

Miles,

111,

son of Helen Je/ivM MUes, '40.

son face each other in basketball each time Blacksburg plays Wytheville. It seems that so many of our Farmville girls' sons go to V.P.I.,

also

the

girls!

Frances Lee Russoiv LaFon's daughter was there for the dances. She is in training at

Roanoke Memorial Hospital.

Laura Morris Burrows has a freshman son in Band Company at V.P.I. 1 understand she has such a gorgeous, dreamy house,

all

these

of

mine

than

We

1942

too.

Did you girls know Johnny Lybrook Mothershead lives in Madison, N. J.? She has two other Longwood girls of other within a block of her. Also, since everyone is always so active in everything, she wants to meet somebody who isn't and get her recipe. With three children we all know what she means! Martha Meade Hardaifay Agnew taught the second grade at Burkeville this past classes

year.

Lorana

teen-agers

I, I needed a change were the usual busy visitors, seeing shows, going on tours, and Christmas shopping. My biggest thrill and fright, however, was driving (with me at the wheel) down 42nd Street and then up town. If any of you ever camp, look around to see if we're there, as ours is a camping family. thinking about I do hope everyone is our 25th reunion in 1965. This should be our biggest and best, so be getting in shape with Miss Clairol and Metrecal!

taller

scenery.

of

Moomaw

is

continuing her mas-

work at the University of Virginia. She and her sister, Leona, traveled thru Kentucky last year, and went towards Atlanta this year on their vacations.

ter's

From a delayed Adams Struhs says

letter

last

year.

Ruby

it's a real pleasure to he a housewife and mother after 19 years of teaching various levels of school. Marion Shelton Combs had a most enjoyable week end at Farmville for her daughter's piano recital. Sounds as if she has a real pro in her daughter, and is very

Last

fall

Martha

Cottrell

Harwood was

appointed as a legislative representative for the Virginia Federation of 'Women's Clubs at the current session of the General Assembly and has found that the legislators do give serious thought to women's views.

1943 President and Secretary: Betty Boutchard (Mrs. S. C. Maclntire, III), 1340 Sagewood Circle, Stone Mountain, Georgia. Again with much able assistance from we have news of the a staff of helpers goings and comings of the 1943 class. I picked the right time to go home (Newport News) this past summer. Every-

else decided to come at that particular time also! Visiting from Roanoke was Ann Stone Campbell who is president of the Junior League there. From far oif South

one

Dakota was

A and

Elsie

Smith Casterline.

get-together in Richmond was planned it was the biggest one yet. Those

her.

My

Jane Powell (Mrs. R. E. Johnson), 205 Withers Rd., Wytheville, Vir-

President:

dance week ends, sometimes

With

girls.

Hugh

proud of

Degree 1940

judge.

Marie Gill Clark teaches first grade in one of the Charlottesville schools. She has two children. Bill, Jr., and Kathy, both in school and doing excellent work. As for me, I lived it up in N. Y. the week of Thanksgiving with three other

health.

old stand-by of round robin days Boelt and Mildred Harry thru with letters. Anna is still busy in their grocery store, and reports that Emil Ellis Wood is one of her nicest customers. Also, that Kitty Watkins Welch has a cute little boy. Anna's most time-consuming "outside activity'" recently was serving on the Church Furnishings Committee for her new church. With all that Home Ec. training, 1 know it looks

Anna Maxey Dodge came

pretty.

Mildred

Harry

Dodge

will

have

two

She had an college daughters this fall. exhilarating experience having a foster daughter from Iceland in her home during the past school year. Kiser loves Texas, but Marge

Nimmo

Imogene

Clayton Withers

and family


present were Shirley Turner Van Landingham, Jean Hatton Lugar, Ann Ware Smith, Grace Hutcheson Pearce, Frances Parham Jeanes, Agnes Patterson Kelly, Dot Childress Hill, Helen Leivis Bishop, Sarah Wade Owen, Jeraldine Smith Shawen, Miggie Misb Timberlalce, and Betty Harper Wyatt. You can imagine all the talking making up for years. Shirley's mother, Susie Robinson Turner, dropped by to say hello to all

of us. I had a letter from Helen Briggs Sours, is living in Springfield. She has a fascinating job selling real estate and last March won an award for selling the most

who

homes during that month. This is the first time we've heard from Lucy Sydnor Fay who is living in Crewe while her husband is stationed in Augsburg, Germany. He retires from the Army in two years, and recently they bought a new home next to another alumna, Stella Spencer Robertson. Lucy Lee has two daughters one 3 and the other 4. She subdivision

teaches

first

grade

at Burkeville.

Harper 'Wyatt writes that she and Lilly Bee Gray Zehmer met Miggie JSlish Timberlake and Betty Reid Paradis in Richmond. Bee is visiting from Ethiopia. (Doesn't that sound like her? She could write a book, having lived in Europe and now Ethiopia.) Her husband is one of the Emperor's legal advisors. Shirley Turner Van Landingham and Ann Ware Smith joined them for lunch. Ella Marsh Pilkington Adams has been getting warmed up for substitute teaching regular teaching. Jerry is 16 and Sallie is 11. Jack is Junior 'Warden, Lay reader, sings in the choir and teaches Sunday School at Holy Innocents Episcopal Church. Barbara Tripp Friend is living in San Diego where Les is in the export-import Betty

business.

Rosalie Rogers Talbert is a busy person, spending her winters in Brooklyn and her summers on Long Island. She taught biology at Queens College last year and serves on the Board of Directors of a Mental Health clinic. The Talberts have two daughters, 4 and 6. letter A long from Susie Moore Cieszko in Havelock, N. C, tells of her family of Martin, 13, Ned, 11, Anne, 9, Malcolm, 6, and baby Nancy Rebecca. Her husband, Ed, is a general contractor, and Susie is not only a housewife and mother, but is Ed's secretary and bookkeeper. Both Ed and Susie have taken evening college extension courses. A card from Maggie Kitchen Gilliam of Virginia Beach where she and Charlie are still running "The Halifax" and enjoying seeing old friends. Amy Read Dickey stopped by and paid a call last summer. Leona Moomaw planned to receive her master's degree in Education from the University of Virginia in August. Betty Laird Dixon is living in Roanoke with her two daughters, Diane, 17, and Mary Linda, 10. Diane hopes to enroll in Longwood in 1963. Betty teaches Home

Economics

at

Stonewall

High School. Agnes Patterson Kelly son, 'Wise III,

is

Macon Academy

a

Jackson writes

Juniot that

An interesting letter arrived from Imogene Claytor 'Withers with a picture of her family, Emily 13, Kate 11, and David 7. Imogene

student at Randolph-

Frances Parham Jeanes is busy with her family and activities. Her son, Varrie, is a student at "Woodbury Forest.

Nelda Hunter Sanders became the home demonstration agent in Louisa County in October, 1961, after teaching in the "Wythe and Mecklenburg county schools.

Women

the

of

summer Anne Brooks Givens and family left their home in Tifton, Ga.

Last

her

During

to take a trip to California.

their

month's tour they saw Carlsbad Caverns, Disneyland, Crater Lake, Yellowstone, Salt Lake City and San Francisco. Anne wrote

renew her

that she will

certificate to

con-

tinue teaching.

Martha Anderson Gwaltney is teaching English, and algebra at Smithfield

Latin,

High School and rearing her two daughters,

Ann and

Vicki. Martha's husband is a Staff Auditor for the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company. From Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Nora Beauchatnp de Alvarez wrote that she has been married for 13 years to Humberto de Alvarez and they have three children, Humberto, Jr., Nora Angeles, and Colomita Frances. After Nora left Longwood she taught chemistry for three years, returned to the states to get a master's degree in Public Health at the University of Minnesota and has been working as a School Health Educator since 1947. Nora hopes that some day she will be able to return to Longwood with her family to see all of the people she knew when she

was there. Brookie Benton Dickerman her

family

in

Staunton.

is

busy with

Her

daughter,

Anne, now seven, has just started to school and plans to attend Longwood or Oberlin when time comes for college! Brookie sees Mamie Snow Penland at the alumnae meetings

chapter

as

Mamie

is

living

Waynesboro with her husband and

in

teach-

ing at Fairfax Hall. She sees Inez Jones Wilson occasionally and hopes to have a reunion with her old suite-mates, Alice Seebert Godwin, Dearing Fauntleroy Johnston,

We

and Anne Rogers

Stark.

should begin plans

now

bie,

for a big

Everybody get in touch with close friends and old roommates so that we can really throw a big one! See you March 16, 1963 for Founders Day. twentieth reunion.

in in

8,

sons, RobPaul, 6, and planning to teach in

Her husband died in June, I960. Helen Shaw Edwards has a new home Hampton and a little girl, Leslie, born October, '6l. Helen is working at

the

of

Sunday School.

in

girls

her

in Front Royal.

president

is

Church, and Lawson is president of the Chamber of Commerce. Last Junior Christmas the Witherses visited Imogene's parents in Williamsburg and had an opportunity to see Frances Strohecker Mcintosh ('44) and her husband in Newport News. In March Imogene left the family and flew by jet to Italy to visit a friend. While there she toured Italy and Switzerland and was on the bus that crashed south of Rome. Fortunately, Imogene was not injured. All of this, in addition to finding time to take a course in oils and keep up her painting, surely indicates an active, interesting member of our class of 1943. Jean Carr, who lives in Sarasota, Fla., says her aunt, who has retired, has come to live with her and that it is wonderful to have a "cook" and a "housekeeper" since she has to be away at work all day. She has recently begun teaching the fourth grade

Newport News with her two

to

fall.

NASA. Anne Leatherbury Lowell folk

and

Faye Nimmo (Mrs. Jack W. Webb) 215 Linden Avenue Suffolk, Virginia

with

lives

church

in

Nor-

and

club

Ruth Dugger Sanders is teaching Phys. Ed. at Newport News High School. She has two daughters. Beth Johnson Wright's husband is a Methodist minister in Newport News. She has a charming family and stays active in the church.

Romelia

Sayre

Summerell

is

now

in

FayetteviUe, N. C. where Cosby is a Presbyterian minister. She has two children, Paul, 8, and Susan, 5. They spent a few days with us last summer and we really had a wonderful time. Melie is a very active minister's wife as their church has

1500 members.

Cosby was an exchange

pastor to Scotland for 3 months in '60, so they all went over and had three wonderful months, plus two exciting weeks in

London, Holland, Germany and Belgium. "Cheese" Andrews Adkins looks the same

Paris,

and has a daughter, Barbara, 7, and "Cheese" is still just "Cheese". Laughs a lot and makes you laugh! Margie Lee Culley Wygal had a luncheon in Portsmouth this past summer for Marie Kelly Short who was visiting from New Jersey. She has two sons. It was really grand seeing these girls. Ann Leatherbury Lowell had us to Norfolk in January. Frances Strohecker Mcintosh's husband is the outstanding Superintendent of Newport News schools this year. They live in Maxwell Gardens. Betty Van Arsdale Hoffman has two children, Paul, 12, and Beth, 10.

Husband

is

working

at

NASA

and

Betty is busy in church activities and social functions.

Eileen Bowles Johnson is living in South Norfolk where she taught until her daughter, Susan, came along. In September she

plans to teach again full time. On a recent to Longwood, she was surprised at the number of new buildings and had forgotten how lovely Longwood can be in the early spring. Last November she and her husband took off for N. .C. and had five wonderful days there. Lucille Cheatham Moseley and family enjoyed a trip to Florida this spring. Margaret Laurence Grayson's life is quite active with four children, music. Scouts and dancing school. visit

Y

Sue Harper Schumann lost her mother Mary Elizabeth Grizzard Darby took some classes at R.P.I, this winter to keep her teacher's certificate in force and enjoyed them. She leads a typical life with Scouts, music, G.A.'s and church work. this spring.

President:

President:

'44

busy

is

activities.

'45

Eleanor H. Wade (Mrs. E. G. Tremblay) 2649 Jefferson Park Circle Charlottesville, Va. Acting Secretary: Jane Ruffin (Mrs. Douglas T. House)

Box 116 Ruth Rose Brewer writes that she and her husband, Dewey, enjoy their two-yearold son, John. Margie Lee Culley Wygal is moving back

Louisburg, North Carolina I had a nice long letter from Alice Green Phaler from Dunmore, Pa.

Last winter

Alumnae Magazine


year that I have written this newsletter I have had better response from those of our who are presently living out of the state. Only four of all the many in our class who are still living in Va. sent me news that year. Perhaps it is just because those of us who are "away" seldom have any contact with or news of others in our class except through this newsletter. I'd like one time to have so much news that the problem would be to condense it to the space. Why don't you all write fit class

next

year.-*

1946

8, 4,

and

3, respectively.

Lelia HoUonay Davis wrote from Newport, R. I., that Charlie is entering his 4th year on the staff of the Naval War College there as head of the Internal Affairs Department, specializing in International Law in the U. S. Navy. Her 13-year-oId

Joyce has grown so tall that Lelia always wears heels when standing hy her and the orher children are Jeanne 10, Nancy 7, and Charles 5. Carolyn Huddle Guild and family

husband and Corky 14, and David 10. have moved to Franklin, Tenn., but feel they are all still Virginians. From Aberdeen, Md., Carol Diggs Gentry reported that she sees Ann B/air Brown and family frequently at their home in McLean. When she wrote, Carol was waiting for Gerry to return from Viet Nam. When her youngest started school last year, Elizabeth

teaching

home

in

Alast Halstead

DeKalb County, Ga. Martha

returned to outside her

Hke

Graves wrote from Washington state that Boeing Company was transferring George, but at that point she didn't know whether they'd be in New Orleans, Alabama or back in Seattle this winter. Gin T. Piillen Palmer and family are now on the Naval Base in Key West, Fla., where husband is a surgeon in the Naval Hospital there. Rachel Joyner Taylor, whose husband is a school principal, has been teaching first grade in Norfolk for the past few years. Lorraine Raiford ShefEeld, husband, Sammy, and daughter, Susan, now live in Waverly. Nell Holloway Elwang is teaching in Norfolk, five sections of English, one of them an accelerated group of 36, "all absolutely brilliant." By a very roundabout way through my sister whose sisterin Atlanta,

Watts Harriss returned to her Alma Mater this year as an instructor in the Physical Education Department. Her husband, Clifford, is in the service, so they have traveled in all parts of the U. S., including Alaska where Phyllis learned to

mush

dogs.

'48

President and Acting Secretary: Louise Brooks (Mrs. J. W. Howard, Jr.)

1404 Ruffner Rd. Alexandria, Va.

Thanks for your wonderful response! I had more fun reading all those letters. Johnny and I are still here in Alexandria. We have two boys. Johnny is Vice President of First and Citizens National Bank and President of Belle Haven Country Club.

Now

that the

boys are in school, playing golf and tennis. Jane Burchett Womack writes from Suffolk that her husband, Forrest, is quite active with Chamber of Commerce. She went with him to Natural Bridge last fall to an Executive Convention. They have two pre-schoolers, Betty and Clay. Betrj' Burchett Almarode has moved to 1

am

Tallahassee, Fla. where Dick is conneaed with the State University' School of Business.

"Gee Gee" Yonce Gates has four children and may be five by the time you reyour bulletin. Hilda Abernathy Jackson has been un-

ceive

of our class

made

June.

Jackie Hancock Johnson attended sumschool at Longwood last year and had her three children with her. Jackie's husband, Sam, was blinded in a farm accident four years ago so Jackie is now teaching second grade in Courtland.

Addie Dodd Wilkerson writes that Bob, and two children are enjoying

home

Ann Motley Tiedemann

in

is

the

Kyoto,

Japan where Jim teaches at the Universiti' on a Fulbright scholarship. Margie Burns went to Europe last sirnimer. She is teaching in Shreveport, Louisiana.

Martha

Leavitt

moved

O'Donnell

to

Luray where Jim is principal of a school she is enjoying life at home after

and

several years of teaching.

Betsy Scott Bane writes about her two boys and husband. Ned is now Recreation Director in Pulaski. Betsy says she is attending "millions of football, basketball,

and baseball games." Millie Shepherd Blakey sonnel

Office

Commission

of

the

is

the Per-

in

Corporation

State

Richmond where

she has been since leaving Farmville. Millie sees Claire Clark Hines often and states Claire has a nice family of two boys and two in

girls.

Ann

Williams Bond is now employed by TB Control and has three

the Division of boys.

Chambers

J.

is

still

cataloging

Club.

Snapp Fawcett and Grace Kappes to Marion last May for

Cathy Hogge

There's no spectacular news from here. a Cub and a Brownie, plus two smaller children, there aren't enough hours in the day. One of the biggest thrills of

Company

life came this year, however, when I was named Den Mother of the Year for

Douglas McNeill, 4-year-old son of Mary Jane Bond McNeill, '48x.

is

still

is

teaching Vir-

High

working

in as

WinEduca-

Representative with the Telephone but part of her time is spent doing graduate work at the Universitj' of Maryland. Martha Anderson Rollings is teaching at Wakefield High. Her husband, Norman, has a service station in Dendron. Martha had a glimpse of Catherine Bickle at a tional

my

each

she.

they built four years ago.

their 15th reunion. B. J. ginia History in Handley chester part time.

With both

November, 1962

in

mer

B.

business.

that

his

Bishop went back

Evelyn Christian Hill with her husband, Winfield, who had to be in Europe on

me

after

has two children.

She was at the Peninsula Alumnae Chapter annual scholarship benefit. Peggy Cabaniss Andrews lost her father

Woman's

extensive tours of

Europe last year Mary Franklin Woodward Potts with her sister, Betty ('46), who was working in Paris at the time, and

our Scouting District. It still seems strange to

was to pick up John Glenn

Neva Brankley Parker

"Hoot"

they are living there in Albuquerque.

Two

Langley Field, but they were be transferred to Houston, Texas in August. Her husband was on the carrier to

at University of Kentucky Library. She is working on an M.A. in English and planned to attend summer school at the University of London last summer. Nancy Hughes Robinson's two little girls occupy most of her time along with bridge, garden club and church. Ellen Ward Faircloth and husband, who is a pharmacist and owns his own drug store, were getting ready to take a cruise to Bermuda when I heard from her. They have two children. Martha Stringfield Newman is no longer She is secretary of her Junior teaching.

that is

McWilliams Hayes has two chilis with the Space Task Group

Jack

NASA,

at

serials

lives in Albuquerque I learned Marion Orange Turkiewiez's husband stationed at Kirtland Air Base and that

in-law

Millie dren.

orbit.

Phyllis

Marie are now

P.T.A. and also a room mother! Frances Treakle Roundtree stays busy with her two sons and brand-new baby.

that

Ricky, Alice Marie, and Billy, children ot Alice Green Phaler, '45.

she wanted to be sure to make the deadline! After sixteen years in "Yankee land" she still gets homesick whenever she hears a "real honest-to-goodness Southern drawl." Her three children, Ricky, Billy, and Alice

usually busy serving as Residential Chairfor the Cancer Crusade for the entire Peninsula- York County Unit, a three-year term. She is first vice president of her

man


Bridge

conference

language

foreign

last

spring.

Naniral

at

They have an

8-year-

President: Violet Ritchie

old daughter.

AnJerson McCraw has seen Nancy Taylor Chambers several times since Nancy lives at Red Appomattox. living in House and has three children. Katharine Rainey Wingo is spending most of her spare time sewing. Jack and "Teen"

she are building a

a

home.

ters.

the Farmer of the Yeat award for their county last year. Betty is working at the Cletk's Office in Cumbetland.

won

Mary Jean turner Pattetson has three Her husband, Dale, is in proper-

children. ty

management, and they

Hahn

Mitt5'

home

live in Baltimore.

Sledd moved

into

a

new

suitable for five sons.

Betty Epperson Skinner has moved from She has two Franklin to West Point. children.

Dorothy Elizabeth Hubbard Milliner is on the Eastetn Shore where her husband is employed by NASA on Wallops Island. They have two children. Pattie Smith Simmonds' present position living

is

serving as librarian at the Portlock Ele-

mentary School in Norfolk. Lela BouUiii Tomlin attended the Woman's Club State Convention in Richmond. Husband, Charlie, is a land surveyor in the Northern Neck. They built a home at Reno and have three children. Jeane Bentley writes that while attending meeting she saw our class spon-

a Phys. Ed. sor.

Miss Dabney.

man

Miss Dabney

Women's

of the

Physical

Here

She has

Kenn Walton's husband, Coffman,

is

chair-

Education

Department at Texas Technological College in Lubbock, Texas. Jeane is serving as coordinator of Health and Physical Education for Secondary Schools in Roanoke City.

"Be Be" Geyer Redmond has four chilShe coaches 7th grade basketball Frank is head of the Guidance Department at Glen Cove, Long Island. Betty Minton is teaching P. E. in a

Morgan)

Jean Cake (Mrs. Richard A. Forbes, 117 Menchville Road Denbigh, Virginia

in her fourth year

a daughter, Gale, in the fiist grade.

'V.

J.

Secretary:

new home near Dillw7n.

They have two children. Jackie Seymour Carter, at Hampton, has bought Bett)'

(Mrs.

Gloucester, Virginia

'49

it

again

is

had

I

this

started

Jr.)

deadline for class

a good inspitation to morning when I walked

let-

get into

my

Sunday School class of kindergarteneis and there was Mary Towles Waldrop Paris and her little daughter, Frances, visiting from South Boston. We've enjoyed having

them in our church a number of times. Her father was recently ordained an Elder here.

Back

woik

jotting

to

the

down

subject I put her to news items to include

this letter. Jennie Sue Webb Meade adopted a second baby boy. Nancy Dickenson Bridgeforth has moved to Danville and has a new baby her fifth. At our Women of the Chutch meeting the other night, Martha Russell East's ('47) husband. Rev. Wentz Miller, was the speaker. His enthusiasm for Home Mission work

in

has

is

highly contagious. He is serving Princess Plaza Presbyterian Church, Norfolk.

Ann

Nancy Nelson Diggs ('53) Norfolk

w'as

moving

to

June where they will be part David and Martha Gilliam Royster Memorial Presbytetian

in

of the flock of

Burr at Church.

clipped a piaure of Lois Callahan I from the Newpoit News Daily Press. She is on the board of Warwick High P.T.A. as treasurer. I meant to clip one about Dick Chumney, Laura Jean Comerjord's husband. He was recently appointed State Commissioner of Agriculture in Richmond by Gov. Harrison. Ann Amory Knight is a new member of Hampton Roads Junior League. We chatted at Hotel Chamberlin, Old Point Comfort, during the Inter-

dren.

national Ball, the League's annual benefit

team.

project.

Roanoke high Mildred nine years schools in

school.

Jones Griffith resigned after Elementary Supervisor of as

Richmond and Westmoreland

Counties and

is

a

housewife

in Kinsale.

A

letter

from

Jackie

Watson Dudley

brought news of her family. Pet was in the 3rd grade this year, David in the 2nd and Scott and Penny still at home. All four had chicken pox and mumps within five weeks. In spite of nursing broken bones and having an addition built on their

ter's

has been livfor the past five years. Pic chemistry, physics, and coaches

Fla.

football. this

He

will be working on his massummer, so they will go to Alafor ten weeks. They have

bama College

Dot Bevard Owen is teaching third grade in Stony Cieek High School and directs her

reunion.

to find time to becertificate

with

& Mary

course in economic geography! While vacationing at Virginia talking with Vitginia Beach Jackie enjoyed Hollifield Meredith who makes the Beach her permanent home. I am sorry to report that Jackie's father died in March. a

William

I

enjoyed

my

annual

visit

with

Lee

Lambert duting the summer while she was spending time with her sister in Hampton. Her oldest son had flown to Ark. to visit his grandmother and she had the two little boys with her. Gaye Mosteller Garrett and her two little boys, Benjie and Gregg, were models at the annual style show and card party sponsored by Peninsula Alumnae Chapter. A Christmas note from Martha MoreStaples

head Landersman came from Middletown, R. I. and reported the birth of her second son, Mark, on Christmas Day, 1961. They expected Navy orders to Norfolk soon. Also heard from at Christmas weie: Patti Page Bibee and Sam; Gwen Cress Tibbs who expected No. 4 in January; Ann Galloivay Reddish who was spending her spare time in the attic playing with the toys Santa was going to bring her children;

Anne Simpson Alston who

teported

her

third child, Joanne; Violet Ritchie Morgan said the only thing unusual with her was

no mote boys had come to live at her house; also had a darling picture of Evelyn Patterson Venable's four girls. Received a nice letter from Frieda Dansberger Baker telling about her four boys that

Moorman, 8 years. Randy, 2 Stuart, and their aaivities. husband, Zip, is with the Va. Crop and Improvement Association with headquarters at V.P.I. He travels eastern The Bakers had a wonderful Virginia. sightseeing trip thtough Fla. just before Christmas. Frieda enjoys church work and teaches Sunday School and hopes to get back to public school teaching when her youngest goes to fiist grade. She visited Nell Poster Young last summer. She has two school-age children and a lovely home. Anne Verser Hartman wrote from her home at Southwest Harbor, Maine, enHire, 10 years,

and

closing pictures of her family, Anne Tiffin, iVl, John, 2, and Christopher, 9 months. They spent Christmas holidays at a ski resoft near Quebec City. Her husband, a doctor, enjoys sailing in the Southwest Harbor Yacht Club races each Friday dur-

four children.

church choir. Norma Soyars Watkins' husband ran unopposed for Mayor of Farmville. Pete Peterson Wood lives about four blocks from me. I see Tucker Winn and Pete at our Alumnae Chapter meetings. Do hope to see each one of you in Farmville, March 16, 1963 for our 15th

managed

gin renewing her teaching

Frieda's

Maty Lou Bagley Pickhardt in teaches

house, Jackie

5,

Hatriette Sutherlin Overstreet wrote from Norfolk where she has been since last fall as her husband, Jess, a Navy pilot, was recalled to active dut5'. They think they will become civilians in a few months, after which Jess will retutn to his law They have two practice in Clarksville. childten.

ing

Uavid, lom, and Beth Forbes, children of Jean Cake Forbes, '49.

ing the summer. They live on Mt. Desert Island where the internationally known research lab for cancer is located. Leith has presented a paper there and is now engaged

Debbie, Patty, Amy, and Barbara, daughters of Evelyn Patterson Venable, '49.

in teseatch in plastic and reconstructive surgery as well as his general practice.

They had

a

grand

visit

with Lizzie Bragg

Alumnae Magazine


Crafts ('50) whose mother-in-law spends While teaching in the summers there. North Africa in 1955-57 Anne met a friend of Ann Nock Flanigan ('50) from the Eastern Shore. In addition to a husband and three daughters, Gris Boxley Cousins has a pony, four goats, three dogs, and fifteen (or

more)

cats,

and

is

Brownie

a

leader.

We

Bulletin. President:

Norma Roady 1052 Garden Drive Newport News, Virginia Secretary:

Carol Bird Stoops (Mrs. Earl G. Droessler)

4733 N. Dittmar Road Arlington

7,

Virginia

We

noon at the home of Lucille Akers Harvey ('54). Dolores Duncan Smallwood and Jean Anderson Smith were there from our class. I had seen them both just two weeks before when I entertained sixteen Longwood contemporaries of ours in honor of Miss Jessie Patterson who has retired to Columbus, Ohio and was visiting in the Washington area for a few weeks. We sang "The Boy Next Door Has A Rabbit To Sell," "Marching In Our Neighborhood PA-rade" and all the old favorites! Most of my news comes from Christmas cards. Why didn't I hear from YOU this year? Jacky Eagle is still working in N.Y.C. I

with Patsy Bird Kimbrough PetRichmond on my way home from

visited

in

Fall

Council meeting in FarmviUe.

was recovering from

moved uchanan

Patsy

a tonsillectomy. Char-

Flaugher Ferro writes that Angela Jimmy takes piano lessons and baby Charlotte is in kindergarten. Ruth Hathaway Anderson is teaching second lotte

takes ballet,

Virginia Beach. Ruth saw Jean Basto in Richmond at ThanksTurner is teaching in Winstongiving. Salem and all her children are in school. To quote Ann Nock Flanigan, "The Five Fat Florida Flanigans" are enjoying life in Fort Lauderdale. She sent a darling picture of her three very blonde little ones,

grade

Patty, Peggy and Patrick. Anne's mother flew down from the Eastern Shore to be with them for Christmas. Peggy White Crooks is busy with Jeff, Courtney, and Kent, who was born on my birthday in October. Last summer Peggy entertained Annette Jones Birdsong and Tom, Lizzie Bragg Crafts and Buddy. Hank Hardin Luck and David at the Crooks home in London Bridge. Annette dropped by a few weeks ago when she was in Arlington visiting her sister, Betty Jones Klepser, Annette is all whom I see ven' often involved with Cub Scouts, etc., now that

her

Carol Joan,

Maureen,

children of Carol Droessler, '50.

November, 1962

Mary, Bird

and Stoops

three

children

are

.

in

.

school.

Page Burnette Johnson sent a picture from Farmville of her daughters, Judy and Kay. Lizzie Bragg Crafts sent a picture of Lynn, Peggy and Harry from St. Paul, Minn., where they have been transferred. I know Lizzie and Nock wish they could have been back in the Phila. area last May as Dr. Moss was the guest of honor at the Philadelphia area alumnae Spring Luncheon. Patsy Ritter Jack is in Winchester with Jerrie Lee and Scott\' B. Such a cute picture of them. I always look forward to Janie Richards Markuson's card each year, her three boys saying prayers this time. Anne Foreman Tate's children are Terri, Buck Tate is 8, and her son Kim, 2V4. a construction engineer with the Va. State

They see Lucy Highway Department. Vaughan Taylor as Lucy's Buck is Assistant Engineer for Highway Department in Norfolk Residency. Connie Marston Blackwell wrote from Reno that they Resident

on Mill Creek in the northern neck. Her husband is employed by the area school board in charge of school buildHer chilings and pupil transportation. dren, Ann Trible, 4, and Claughton Blackwell, 3, looked so sweet holding hands in front of the fireplace. Cab Overbey Goodman has moved to Bon Air, near Virginia Westbrook. Cab has two children and wrote that Mary Elizabeth Agnes Watson Killiam has adopted a daughter. Harriet Ratchford Schach's daughter, Carey, is in kindergarten and takes ballet and skating lessons. Tracy stays home with her mama. Will is still with Merrill Lynch Co. and has been commuting to N.Y.C. by the week for a training program most of live

year.

Shirley Hillstead Lorraine's oldest daughCatherine, goes to Cotillion this year. Last spring Jean Ridenour Appich and family spent a week end with Jane Williams Chambliss in Franklin. Jane had an ear operation in Richmond in June. Jean Ridenour had Jane, Patsy Bird Kimbrough ter,

Martha,

at

Turner

this

Chris,

Hayes,

Muse

and

to the Baltimore atea

manager

.

always seems to take our Washington, D. C. area Spring Tea to give me that extra shove towards writing our class letter. were privileged to have Dr. Moss as well as Liz Jones, Alumnae Secretary, as guests when we gathered for a lovely afterIt

tus

Buck

Tootie

was forced into real old-fashioned I spring cleaning this year when a soot explosion made a mess of everything in the house. I had a lot of help with the cleanup but still there are things to be done. I hope to recuperate beside our new community swimming pool this summer! I have enjoyed being one of the volunteer guides at the Mariners Museum for the interpret the museum's past year. exhibits to scheduled classes of sixth graders and other groups by appointment. Please don't wait for a personal request for a letter from you. Drop me a note any time and I will save it for next year's

'50

Pettus (just back from a trip to Europe), and others to a luncheon. Jane had seen Frances Dodson White's new home in Norfolk and had seen Suzie Bowie Brooks at a football game. She also told us that Leiia Mae Ferratt Leggett's father had passed away. I've had no direct news from LeIia Mae in years.

family

have

where Lee

is

of his office.

Harriette Wade Davis sent a picture of her boys. Wade and Gene (6 and 4), from Buffalo Junaion. Harriette took a Math course to renew her certificate so she can teach when the boys get settled in school. Harriette's family and the family of Jean Anderson Smith, Springfield (D.C. area), spent an enjoyable Sunday with Doria Old Davis at the Davis' lovely new home in Farmville. Doria teaches in the private school system in Farmville. Corky Corvin Wilson is busy with her son, Charles Hayes, who was born last fall. They are moving to a larger home in the Sleepy Hollow section of Falls Church soon. Marjorie Bosivick Michael's girls are 1 Vi and Majorie is recording secretary in AVi. her Garden Club and attends the Peninsula Chapter of Longwood Alumnae. Nancy Lee iMaJdox Carrington's husband has a new position with Weyerhauser Co. the Lynchburg division of a nationwide company that deals with corrugated boxes. Nancy Lee is active in the Junior Woman's Club. Juanita Weeks Handy 's daughter, Susan Marie, was born just a few days after the new year. Carrie Ann O'Loughlin has been attending classes at Univ. of Miami to add Library-Audio Visual Services to her Florida teaching certificate. She enjoys library work and met a recent Longwood graduate from Danville, Margaret Perry. Mrs. Perry is married to a retired minister and this was their first year in Florida. Jane Hunt Gbiselin Lindley is busy with her son and daughter, Ann Sherwood, and is wishing for a Chicago Chapter of Longwood Alum-

nae. Anyone interested? ? ? I always look forward to hearing from Ruth Walker McGhee and Smart at Christmas time and I get lots of news from Marilyn Wheeler Spillman who visited with Marjorie Agee Milan at Thanksgiving

(1961). Agee's children are Susan, and Dickie, 2. Agee's husband, Dick, is at Ferrum Junior College. Marilyn also visited Jean Otis Loving Hart time 6,

Farm Manager

in Louisa in October.

Jean O. has a boy,

and a girl, 5 months. Peggy Lloyd Lowry is teaching at Trewett School in Richmond. She visited Catherine Johnston Wilck there. Catherine has three pre4,

ine.

Joey, Nancy, and Mary CatherMarilyn has a new son. Early Ray-

schoolers

mond, III. and Janet,

Her daughters

are Cynthia, 8,

6.

Picture on card of the three sons of was sorry to I Frances Dodson White. hear recently that Frank has been ill this year. A card from Puckett Asher says she

enjoying Phila. Ann Nichols WesKit and Katie Ann had to evacuate their Texas home temporarily in Hurricane Carla last year. Cansie Rippon Carigan's Army family is due for a move next month. Eccie Rippon Ayres' son is in the first grade. Short)' Long Eddy and family moved to N. C. after Christmas. Troxie Harding had her third baby boy. It's been nine is

still

ler,

years since her last child was born, so you know they are all mighty excited about

Ricky.

41


.

I

saw to

talk

Sallie Land Anderson recently. I Shang Ferguson Patterson on the

phone each year about Longwood Alumnae activities and get the latest news about Betty Ferguson Galilee. Betty and Bull had a trip to N.Y.C. this past year to see some Broadway shows. I received cards from Pat Davis Katie Gray and Hilda Edwards Tall. Bondnrant Carpenter and family spent the summer in San Diego, Calif, where Jim worked on a research project with Scripps Sarah Corbin was Inst, of Oceanography. recently married to Leon Bigby who is connected with the Federal Bureau of Sarah is now enjoying her new a homemaker. Sister Therese (Mary Jean Miller) will be in Washington swdying Library Science at Catholic University and in the fall will return to teaching English in Lancaster, Pa.

Prisons. life

as

Grace Oakes Burton was awarded

first

place in the category of serious poetry by professional writer sponsored by the Virginia Federation of Woman's Clubs for a

1961.

My

family is well, children growing. Earl traveling some. Mary and Marrha are 15 months, Chris, IVi, Maureen, 3'/^, and Carol Joan, 151/2- The four little ones are enjoying the built for them.

You I

—

do

all

just

year will easier list.

have

to put I

daddy

me on next

any

to write as time of the

the

girls

find

their Christmas

May

I'll

it

card

have more

1405

and Bill had had a 30-day trip through Europe. Mary Crowder White's son, Bruce, 5V^, in kindergarten and little Minta is at is home. Mary is staying quite busy with church bazaars and bake sales. It was from that she

that I learned of the illness of "Hop" Critzer Ogilvie, in December. Just recently heard that "Hop" had died so I wrote I

Mary

both Mary and

good enough

Roy G. Klepser) S.

20th

who were

in

time so

I

"Hop"

Peg Ferry Yost sent me a card back in the fall and on it wrote that the pictures she took at Founders Day were typical. Would love to see them. Peg. Enjoyed cards from Fran Minter Whyte and hus-

who

Bob,

band.

are

living

in

Charlotte,

Sutphin Wall and

Iris

Farmville. No special news but Had a card from Jean all are very busy. Carter Watkins Saunders with a picture of Mary Meade and Carson. her two children, in

Bill

Mary Meade

is

kindergarten

in

now.

A

learned

St.

the seventh grade in Chesterfield County. Besides teaching she is keeping house for some of her family and doing church work. Frances had been busy this spring reading books for the exam to renew her teaching

Andy Adams John and I were the only members from the class of '51 present at

certificate.

"Gift-Parry" given by Carol Stoops Droessler ('50) at her home. Just after Christmas, Andy was hospitalized twice, but is feeling better and looking grand now. She and husband, John, were at Virginia Beach for a Junior Chamber of Commerce meeting during May. Andy has two little boys who keep her hopping.

see

the

Christmas cards from Jeanne Parmer Maxwell and husband, Vernon, made me very happy for them on their first Christmas together. Betty McRee Hodges certainly had repercussions from Founders Day. Seems she was hospitalized twice thereafter,

me know

let

that

Arlington, Virginia

shortly

Sutphin Wall

Iris

to

could include this in this letter. died this spring, leaving a two-yearold little girl and her husband, who is a minister in West Virginia. I am sure that all of us will feel the loss of a very fine person we had been privileged to know. that

I

'Virginia

Secretary: Betty Jones

(Mrs.

A newsy card from Ann Kemp Desportes brought news that she and Bill will be returning with their three children to the States this year from Tripoli. Ann wrote

from Frances Everett Brown Dot Dunford has moved from Virginia Beach to Richmond and is teaching

219 Thomas Heights Marrinsville,

'51

versity

card came from Polly Powers Jarrett who is living in Raleigh, N. C, with husband, Guy, and son, Billy. Guy is with the State Labor Department and Polly is teaching at one of the Junior High Schools there.

can use!

President: Betsy Gravely

ÂŤ

where her husband

all

N. C, and from

much time

as

a post card do. Most of

Maybe by

news that

house their

tree

removed. As much talking as we did I'm sure more of us would have had the same problem had we had tonsils!

tonsils

one time

to

have her

Virginia Spencer

is

liv-

for two weeks checked with Chick on something I had heaid and though it recent news, it was never in the isn't Bulletin and I think all of you will be interested. Hilda Leivis Schneider was married in 1956 in Germany. Husband, Dick, was stationed there at that time. In July, 1959, they were in a very bad accident but I am very glad to hear that she is doing all right now. Hilda has two to

North Dakota

in

to see Clyde's family.

little

girls,

Nancy,

5,

and Betsy,

3.

if

she

a

perfect

living

little

girls,

Elsie

with her

is

busy with church work and girl, Deidra, who is four

little

now. Fran Harper Powell was also present She has been teaching on our at Carol's. Educational TV Channel here and was recently elected secretary of our local alumnae chapter. Husband, Phil, has been selected as one of 2 out of 150 men for the Fairfax County Detective Bureau. Fran is busy at home with little Laurie, six months old. Lester and Delores Duncan Smallwood took Miss Patterson to the airport when she left to return to Columbus, Ohio, where she now makes her home. Georgia Bailey Mason has been taking courses

Randolph-Macon

at

College

in

Lynchburg, where she lives, to renew her teaching certificate. Evelyn Farrier Mitchell has two children and is living in New Castle where her husband is Athletic Diin the High School. Evelyn, also, is teaching. Katherine Terry Wilson is living in Halifax and has a little boy. Jean Gilman is teaching art here in Arlington's Thomas Jefferson Junior High School. rector

Talked to Mary Jane Stansbury Peake and most of her news was that she and Billy had begun to take dancing lessons. Mary Jane is busy with her little girl, Jane, who is now JVi- Mary Jane told me that Charlotte Williams Martin's husband, David, was selected by Richmond's

Chamber

Junior

of

Commerce

as

OUT-

STANDING YOUNG MAN OF THE YEAR 1961. Eleanor Heath Hall is teaching English Young Junior High School in Dothan, In the summers, she works toward her master's degree in Education, with a in

Ala.

minor

in English. enjoyed getting the news together year and look forward to doing this again next year. Do, do let me hear from you at Christmas time or anytime. If there is a new baby at your house or if you are getting married, or if you will just send me any news, I'd love it. Also, do let me or the Alumnae Office at Longwood I've

this

know

if

you change your address.

President:

Peggy Harris (Mrs. Garland C. Ames, 4513 Krick Street

'52

Jr.)

Norfolk, Virginia Acting Secretary: Jean Ridenour (Mrs. Charles W. Appich, Jr.) 4605 Stuart Ave. Richmond, Virginia

Elsie

and had any

at Carol's, too,

gold

Grace Thompson Marshall is still in Kenbridge since her marriage. Her husband is connected with the Post Office. Joan McCombs Yow is in Madison, N. C, and working for a doctor in Martinsville. Mary Palmer Chinnis is in Phila. mine.

tion.

June

later called her to see I She's been information.

teaching at the Uni-

Susan, 3, and Cynthia, six months. Sally Ann Smith Sneiderjan is in Lubbock, Texas, and teaching the fourrh grade. Elsie and Jack were going to Denver, Colorado, to the National Education Association Convention this summer. Jack has been elected President of the Fairfax Education Association and is Supervisor of Secondary Educa-

I

Haivley Burkholder was

Carson and Mary Meade, children of Jean Watkins Saunders, '51.

Wnek

ing in Holbrook, Mass. It was so good to Chick Ritchie Oberlander again. She has two children, Steve, 4, and Barbara Ann, 2. I spent the day with Chick and the children ( took my own Judy along ) She is living in Fairfax now and often sees Nancye Gillie Shelton when she goes to West Point to visit her sister, Jackie Ritchie Perry, class of 1946. Chick said Bea Hilton, class of 1950, living in Newporr News and Betty Jefferson, class of 1949, living in Danville, visit Gillie sometimes. Chick and her family took a trip

is

Mary has two

of Pa.

"But

'52

will

beat

them

all,

'cause

we've got Schlegel."

And win we

did,

with

forty-seven became the highall

what our 10th reunion at were thirry-three of Day! There Founders us for our breakfast in the Snack Bar. We agreed that, though each of us looked better than ever and certainly none had of us remrning for light of the year,

Alumnae Magazine


changed, the college had certainly put on a beautiful face in the interiors

who

couldn't in five years.

make Hats

who

Kanner,

many new

We

and grounds.

buildings,

missed those

but we'll all return Dolores Hoback

it,

off to

from Madison, Wis. Hoey stayed with me two days before going to Farmville and when Nancy Walker Reams, from Culpeper, bunked in with us on Friday night, it was like a regular old dorm. The following is a list flew

who attended Nancy Lee Wood Dowdy, Mary Helen Cook Blair, Bobbie Brown Moore, Jerline Korbach Hembree, of those

:

Jane Lee Kellog George, Jo Zitta, Nell Dalton Smith, Anne Motley Ryland, Maria Jackson Hall, Mr. David A. Jackson, Maria's dad, Chris Davis Grizzard, Frances Anne Ramsey Hunter, Mary Frances Spurlock Taylor, Gladys Savedge Baker, Polly Simpson Cocke, Dot Gregory Morrison, Peggy Wilson Samson, Gay Power Mitchell, Ethel Straw Beall, Margaret Thomas Mayo, BiUie Wood Billings, Eleanor Weddle Bobbitt, Lauralee Vritts

Poarch, Rachael Peters,

Whitmore, Bootie Ann Moody Gab-

bert, Nora Pollard Burgess, Dolores Hoback Kanner, Dr. Marvin Schlegel, Nancy Walker Reams, Mary Karr Borkey, Betty Scott Borkey Banks, Becky Mann, Nancy Walthall Avery, May Henry Sadler

Midgett,

Thomas

Anne Moseley Pairet,

Tuggle Miller,

Mary Brame

Akers, Frances Jardine Wall, Pat Marion Beckner Riggins, Jackie

Trotter,

Ann

Connie Blankenship

Oakley

Kellam, Catherine Ann Rosson Runkle, Ruth Lacy Smith, Norma Saunders Gibbons, Sue Nelson Matthews, and Jean Ridenour Appich. Most of our class are busy with children and community and church activities; however, many combine teaching with these other interests. Lee Wood Dowdy teaches in Shipman, Lucy Jane Perkinson Angle, Milton, N. C, Shirley Groggan Duncan in Danville, Bobbie Brown Moore, Roanoke, Mary Frances Spurlock Taylor, Mary Karr Borkey, and Connie Blankenship Faris in Henrico County. Gladys Savedge Baker is taking a class at R.P.L with Mary Frances. Gladys' daughter and Pat Tuggle Miller's Craig go to school together. Branchy Fristoe Choate is taking a home study course from U. of Va. She and her family vacationed at Pawley's Island, S. C. Mary Karr Borkley and Walt spent a week end at Davis, W. Va. State Park and next visit plan to ski there. Eleanor Weddle Bobbitt has received the first scholarship given by Va.. Iota State, Delta Kappa Gamma. Eleanor is now a candidate for her Ph.D. at the U. of Md. Flora Ballowe DeHart and her husband teach at Louisburg College in N. C. They have had Faris,

Toxey

Altizer,

opportunities to tour Fla., and attend the College and University Concert Managers Convention in N. Y. City. Frances Turner Widgen and John are building a new home in Cheriton. Ruth Lacy Smith and Jerry have a new home in Richmond. Jo Price Greenberg has added a new family room in Danville. Ann Oakley Kellam visits Jo when she visits Danville. She also sees Novella

mond. Ann circle.

is

Goode Horner

Richco-moderator in her church

Stokes Overhy

Howard

in

aaive in church work in Charlotte, N. C. and has three boys. Marion Beckner Riggins is president of the Junior Woman's Club and Frances Thomas Pairet in Farmville has completed her term as president of her Junior Woman's Club. Catherine Toxey Altizer is an officer in the

November, 1962

is

Bon Air Junior Woman's Club. Sara Lu Bradshaw Chenery's husband was promoted to assistant principal of Midlothian High School. They are busy during the summer with their daughter, Lu Gay, winning Blue Ribbons on the Bon Air swimming team. Jane Lee Kellogg George's and May Sadler Midgett's sons swim together on teams at Va. Beach. Midge Woods Akers and Pete direct the choir in their church in Florence, Ala. She sees Emma Harris Allen and her family of a son and daughter. Dot Gregory Morrison has moved into a new home in Lynchburg. This spring Carrie Fitzgerald (Dip. '17 retired from teaching in Buckingham County but doesn't plan to be idle so she will raise flowers, have a garden, sew. cook, and care for "Pete", her parakeet. Patricia Lee Matthews of Bedminster, N. J., was elected president of her )

AAUW

Chapter.

very active in civic and social organizations such as the Woman's Club and Garden Club.

Our

Patricia

most

is

enterprising

members

are

Lauralee Fritts Whitmore in Front Roval and Jackie Jardine Wall in Farmville. They are managing nursery and kindergartens in their homes. Maria Jackson Hall and Virginius have redecorated a house in Richmond. Bunnie Ricks Austin and Milnes have done the same in Waynesboro where Milnes is teaching at Fishburn Military School. Betty Scott Borkey Banks calls me when she comes through Richmond from Greensboro, N. C. So manv of our class have recently scattered all Maxine Watts across the United States: Peschel and Roy have a new house in Dallas, Texas; B. B. Wilson Thompson's Bill was recalled by the Air Force and they are in Chanute Air Force Base, III.; Jo Ann Yow Wills, Hastings, N. Y.; Margaret Thomas Mayo, Garner, N. C; Ilk-ne Russell Harris, El Paso, Texas;

Bobbie Page Bonner, Oakland, N. J.; Ann Moody Gabbert, Wilmington, Del.; Ida Mims Lambeth, Austin, Texas; Joan Pritchett Matthews, Far Hills, N. J.; Virginia Manvell Coates, Johnson City, N. Y.; Pat Lee Mathews, Somerset, N. J.; Inez Hughes Piatt, Topeka, Kansas; Sarah

Graham

Wells,

Laurel,

1953 Betsy Hankins McVay has been living in Honolulu for the past seven years. Betsy has an opportunity to art in the Little Theater in Honolulu when she isn't being wife, hostess, and mothei to four-year-old

Mark.

President:

Nell Copley

510 Second

'54

It

Street

Blackstone, Virginia Secretary: Virginia Sutherland (Mrs. W. B. Knott, Jr.) Dinwiddle, Virginia

was fun receiving your cards again only wish there had been more

this year,

of them.

Pat Altwegg Brown is in Hampton. She her husband had a new boat for in June. Barbara Assaid Mills is in Baltimore. Betsy goes to school and Laura to kinderEric is three. She visited with garten.

and

Bermuda Row

Patricia

Donnelly Ketcham

who

also lives

—

has two children and David, 5 months. Jean Baber Wakefield is busy with new daughter and living in Phila., Pa. Floyd Virginia Stanley Banner is the president of District K Classroom Teachers and principal of Castlewood Elementary

Baltimore. Pat in Elizabeth, 21/2 years,

School.

Mary Bennett Barksdale says she has a all her own with three boys. They Red House.

nursery live at

Betty

Odom

Benton

is

in

Suffolk.

Barbara Blackman Wynne is in Raleigh, N. C, "keeping house, gardening and chasing the two girls." Clara Borum McCarter teaches physical education in St. Petersburg, Fla. She saw Moneta Key in Miami at the F. E. A. convention. Jane Branch Botula, husband and two children began civilian life in May and

Nancy

Miss.;

Garbee O'Connel who teaches in Fort Lee, N. J.; Mary Crawford Andrews who owns a private plane in Geneva, Ind.; Vera Williams,

Bryant

Tampa,

Millie but

Fla.;

Blessing Sallo is in Huntsville, with Betty Lou Harman

visited

Ala.,

Moody

Woodbridge and then went on

to

in

New

Nell Dalton 2nd grade in Colonial Heights. Margaret Jones Cunningham has a new position with the Virginia Retail Merchants Association in Richmond. She visits with Joan Missimer Ross in Crewe. Dr. Schlegel has had five books published and spent the summer traveling and studying in Europe. Edith Kennon Shields Is teaching at Princess Anne High School while Bernie is the Physical Education Su-

England.

Jo Zitta Smith's son in the

teaches

pervisor for the county. She visits Peggy Harris Ames and her two girls and son.

Yours

president of the RichChapter, 2nd vice president Church at our Presbyterian Church, also keeps trying to visit all our classmates in Richmond. How about everyone responding to the Alumnae Association's request for funds this year? A little from many goes a long way. Thank you all for the many nice long letters I truly

is

still

mond Alumnae of the

Women

received.

of the

Clay Ames, age

2,

Ames,

son of trances Marker '54.

43


—

Kreienbaiim Hannan

Claire Lean.

lives

in

Mc-

She, her husband, son and daughbuilt a new home here. Don is a technician at Petersburg General Hospital.

widdle. ter

Jeanne Hamilton Lafoon is president of Junior 'Woman's Club in Farmville and

Mike

president of the Jaycees. is Trianne Lampkin Freese is living in Fairfax County and Ralph is stationed at the Pentagon. She is teaching and active in church work. Elizabeth McClung Grigg She and Bill have three lives in Bristol. children. Ann Mallory Hancock teaches biology at Thomas Jefferson High School in

cation

in

Ames

lives

and Beth, 4 months, children

in

are living in

N. Tonawanda, N. Y.

Mary Lou Burnette Tennessee

for

WMU

is

WMS

and

lives

Director in

Ann Moore Blackstock lives in Poquoson. Mildred Parker Candler is in Lynchburg. Helen Coleman Parrish is a teacher in Kenbridge. Marian Parrish Finch lives in Richmond.

'54.

Nash-

ville.

Carlyle Overstreet lives with her family in Burlington, N. C. where she has Mary Denny Wihon Parr as a new neighbor.

Mary Jean

Beulah Carter Whitehurst is in Danville. Carter Eckrote lives in Hopewell. Nell Copley sailed on the Queen Mary in June for a tour of Europe and Scandinavian countries. She teaches in Norfolk.

Jean Pearce Shell has moved to Blackstone. She enjoyed visiting the Norfolk, Portsmouth area in the spring and seeing Patsy Sanford, 'Virginia Berry, Jean Hodges, Lucy Mann Pierce and Barbara and Glen Vought.

Ann

Perroiv Peerman teaches in Rocky Ellen Porter Koolman has moved Hattie Pugh teaches at N. Charlotte Court House and Bess Purvis teaches in South Norfolk.

Mount.

Holland Cox

Elsie

is

worker

social

in

Elizabeth Crockett Luczak is She has one daughter and part time professional modeling.

Smithfield.

Roanoke.

in

does

Lois their in

Criitchfield

Smith

Her two boys

Mich.

new

sister.

Richmond.

Ilia

in

is

are

very

Dearborn, proud of

Desportes Brown

lives

Gail Dixon Dickson has

new house in Bayside. Janet Diinkum Ayres

a

Richmond.

in

Dorothy Edwards Lassiter keeps housekeeping. two children, Club, church and civic duties at Mary Ann Evans in Boykins. Hallsboro and is a lives in

busy with

Woman's her home McKinney substitute

teacher.

Doris Garlasco Umberger is still on move. She and her family are in South Plainfield, N. J. Betty Lou Gttrrett Becker is a housewife and secretary in Roanoke. She has two children, Lewis, 6, and Elizabeth, 4. Lottie Dixon Garrett is principal Larrymore Elementary of School in Norfolk. Nancy Gilbert Griffin is in Portsmouth. the

Catherine Hamilton teaches in KeysviUe. Dorothy Hughes Harris teaches in Lynchburg. Peggy Hood Smith is in Newport News. Dolly Home Gwaltney lives in Smithfield.

Betty Islifi Saffelle and family live in Salisbury, N. C. Mason Moore Barrett and family visited her last spring.

June Johns Grigg has a new house in Richmond and is "busy learning all about pruning,

flowers,

cultivating,

etc."

is teacher and Elementary School Administrator of Uni

Dorothy Batten Kitchin principal

of

Her son

is

versify

Suffolk Asst.

Center in Richmond.

Dent is living in Alexandria where her husband is a doctor in the Air Force stationed at the Pentagon. Elizabeth Kitts

Reames

Sylvia

Arlington.

in

Picardat

Eric

bank in Farmville. ok there." Shirley Spence

is

housekeeping

is

Robinson works

He

in

a

says, "Everything's

Roby

is

teaching

at

Marion Seymour

University of Mass.

the

a housewife in Lawrenceville.

Helen Short Jennings lives in Richmond and does substitute teaching along with housekeeping. Jean Smith Lindsey teaches first

grade in 'Williamsburg. Betty Southall Midlothian at

Moore teaches chemistry High School. Her husband School

is

C

to Raleigh,

Fill

^^

^7n_)

Secretary:

Eloise

at

Macon

{Mrs. Melvin Smith) 556 Lucia Rd. Pittsburgh

21,

Pennsylvania

Portsmouth.

D.A.R. and B.P.W. work.

3 years,

(Mrs. Harold Edwards) Joist Hire Place Winchester, 'Virginia

416

Mann

Pierce teaches business eduMarker Frances Newport News and enjoys sewing and painting. Sarah Mapp Messick teaches Fairfax County and enjoys in

of Mary Jean Carlyle Overstreet,

'

Richmond. Lucy

Bobby,

President: Betty Davis

is

in

Pharmacy

M.C.V.

Steger Butler lives in Memphis, Tenn. where she is a member of the Junior League, active in Episcopal Church and

Dee

What fun it is in the spring to check the mail! Such interesting and varied lives our classmates live. So let me share their letters with you. Joyce Quick Preble is living in Alexandria where husband, Barry, is with American Airlines at the Sales Office in

Washington. They have been on several wonderful trips in the last few years to Bermuda, Calif, and Cape Cod. Carolyn Stanley Lebo and her husband visited with them last Christmas. They celebrated the 4th of July, 1961, with a baby girl: "a real firecracker," Carolyn says. They have also had an exciting vacation in the Virgin Islands; quite a change from life in Hamilton, Ohio.

Joan Williams wrote from Martinsville where she is teaching. She taught in Lynchburg for three years and then moved on there. Nanci' Inge is teaching at Petersburg High. She and Nell Copley '54 were planning a 7-week tour of Europe. She had seen Beth Kent who is teaching in

Richmond

after

a

year

of

teaching

in

Germany. Nancy corresponds wirh Jo Ann Dyer Ridenour, who lives in Chesapeake, Ohio and has two sons; and with Mary Ann "Galax" Ward Deaton who is living in Columbus, Ohio and has two daughters. Ann Thaxton Daniels now has three They enjoy living on their farm sons. Their most recent hobby near Halifax. raising and riding Quarter horses. Betty Persiiiger Breedlove has retired from teachis

Bob and four boys Daylestown, Pa. June Wilmoth Haley works for Boeing Airplane Company in Seattle doing comShe hopes to see puter programming.

ing and is now housekeeping in Roanoke for her husband and baby daughter. She and Virginia Burgess Newcomb frequently get together. Virginia is now teaching fourth grade. Shirley Osborn Mullins received her master's degree from the University of N. C. and taught retarded children in Chapel Hill for three years. Now she and Tom, who received his Ph.D. from U.N.C., are living in Gainesville, Florida where Tom is on the staff at the University. She taught retarded children there for one and a half years until she "retired" to take

some

care of her

working some at Education TV Station. Dorothy Stringfield Kitchin lives in Marilyn Ivor and teaches at 'Wakefield. Thompson Green lives in Fredericksburg. Laura Trent Roberts lives in Richmond. Else Wetite Bunch is Physical Education

an

the

Memphis

State University,

instructor

in

Department of Memphis, Tenn.

Joyce Booth Wilkerson, live in

of us out there for the Seattle 'World's

Emma Martha

Black

a

is

Estelle

homemaker

Wood

teaches

in

featured

believe that covers

all

the places heard Since last July,

from except Dinwiddle. have made this my home. My husband I operates a dairy farm and we are enjoying keeping house in an old home full of

War history. I am teaching private piano lessons and have as a pupil Chan Ashby, the son of Martha Tomlinson Ashby. Martha and I enjoy seeing each

Civil

other

church

quite

work

often and participating in together. 'We were joined

summer by another classmate when Sadie Hall Bain Marsh moved to Dinlast

in "Christmas in Virginia" over radio: so she really finds her work with her music students interesting. Nancy Nelson Diggs is in Hampton with her Barbara daughter. and husband, son

WRVA

Buckingham. I

girl.

in

W'ilson Jordan lives in Staunton. \\'''ilson

Anchorage, Ky.

little

Karen Spencer Westbrook and her husband gave a 30-minute television show during Christmas, 1961, and were also

Fair.

Hough

Miller

is

now

living in

Richmond

with her son and husband, who works at Nancy the Mortgage Investment Corp. Broii-n Messick is in Roanoke where her husband is with Texaco. She has two children. Frances Northern Ashburn is teaching business education at Lancaster High School in Kilmarnock. She and her husband had a delightful trip to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. to the Southern Business Educa-

Alumnae Magazine


tion Association Convention.

Don's occupation took them

summer Long Island

This to

again.

Betty Lou Jefferson planned to finish her work on her master's degree at WScM She is teaching biology at this summer. George Washington High School in Danville. Jackie W'hile Twynian is busy housekeeping for her husband and little daughbut finds time for some substitute ter 'Vint is with National Biscuit teaching.

She often sees Donnie Devine Clark, Ernestine Johnson Delaney there in Richmond, and Jean Carol Parker Harrell

Company.

in Suffolk. years old. Sally

Ernestine has a

Wilson Lisanick

is

little

girl

four

teaching piano

Foxcroft School in Middleburg in addition to private lessons. Her husband, at

the

John, teaches art in Loudoun County. He was planning a one-man show in 'Washington, D. C. Nancy Tanley Masters Kilgore leads an exciting life as a mother of three and an actress. She and her husband Hanover an old 1723 tavern live in Tavern. They run a restaurant and the curtain in the adjoining Barksdale Theatre goes up every Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening. Somehow they found time for a trip to New Mexico. Phyllis Isaacs Slayton and her husband were hoping to

to 'Virginia this fall where her husband would resume his job with the 4-H Club Staff at V.P.L He has State been working on his Ph.D. at the U. of Wis. They have a son and a daughter. teaching been Greenland has Faye French and Spanish in Fairfax County since her return from Paris where she was secretary-translator at the American Embassy for two years.

return

has Stnallwood Summerson Marge moved to Atlanta, Ga. They miss Richmond, but she keeps busy with her threeyear-old son. Jeanne Lynch Hobhs Dorsey

has just returned from seven months in Europe. Her husband was on a Mediterranean cruise and she writes that she went along as a "camp follower." He is cur-

Oceana attached to at Squadron 101. She sees Audrey Morse Tiller and her boys occasionally. Still in Hawaii for the present is Mary Hundley Hyatt. She and her husband have vacationed in Hong Kong and the Philiprently

stationed

Fighter

pines.

When

in

Virginia

last

year she has two

saw June Manlove Pruden who boys and Carolyn Vantm-e Culpepper who also has two boys. They are expecting the Marines to transfer Jack at the end of this year, so we don't know where she'll time next year. Mary Alice Ellington Thomas has moved into a new house near Lawrenceville where her husband runs a farm and works for They the Brunswick Insurance Agency. have a two-year-old son. Linda Bartenstein Frazier is working with the Va. State Board of Education at the District Office She has three boys the in Warrenton. oldest will be in the second grade this year. Her husband was injured last winter in an automobile accident, but at writing he was doing well and had gone back to work. She hears from Gwennie Michael Chaney whose husband has graduated from V.P.L after a period in the Air Force. They have a little girl. Ann Watkins White is living in Montgomery, Ala. and has 3 girls and a boy to keep her busy. Carolyn Watson Yeatts is teaching home economics at Prince Edward Academy in their new building. She has two little girls. Audrey Potiell Pittard was "drafted"

be

this

November, 1962

to

help Johnnie with the book work for

Farm

he owns and from Nancy Taylor who is teaching in Richmond. Clare Davis Wallace lives in Lynchburg where she is active in her church. She has a son. Barbara iMoore Curling and her husband, son and daughter are now living in Annandale. Jo Burley Adams, after taking time

the Halifax operates. She

out

three

for

children,

has

San Francisco doing social welfare work. to Hong Kong on a tour last musn't forget to mention that I "Cecil" has a family of 2 Siamese cats. She has also seen B. J. Staples Glasscock who is living in Chuckatuck and has three children. Phoebe is teaching first grade in Roanoke. Frances Young Brown is living

She went summer.

Charlottesville.

Katherine Miller Hendrick writes from Michigan that her husband has been working on his Ph.D. and has acHaslett,

cepted a position as Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering at Auburn University in Ala. Marlene Lucas Willis is in Cincinnati, Ohio and Mary Campbell Higgins is living in CollinsviUe. Last Christmas (1961), as has been our custom since graduation, Becky Hines Bowling and I, along with our families, got together at the home of Betty Jane Griffin Holland who lives in Carysbrook. Becky has three children and keeps very busy. Betty Jane is teaching and housekeeping for her hus-

band and little girl. We missed Phyllis Powell Swertfeger, who couldn't make our get-together. She is living in Millbrook. N. Y., has a son and a daughter and has been teaching. Last year she was "demoted" from sixth to first grade. I miss seeing Marion Webb Gaylor who, with her husband, three daughters and a son, has moved to Hazardville,

Conn

I

manage

to

now, having

girl

keep busy with retired

my

little

from teaching.

1956 Loretta Bell Brooking Gasswint wrote that she was married December 24, 1956. to Norman L. Gasswint, 11. She has a son, Norman Scott, born in 1957 in Pittsburgh, Pa., and a daughter, Virginia Lynn, born

1960

in

in Calif,

in

Formosa.

_

-0

Warwick, Virginia Acting Secretary: Camille Atwood 7 50 W. Princess Anne Rd. Apt. 8-B Norfolk, 'Virginia

^ '/

^-'

To iHE Class of

1957:

Thank you for the wonderful response!! To those who wrote long letters, I shall make an effort to reply. To those not answering, we would love to know what has been taking place in your life. Do let us hear from you for future Alumnae News

To all green and white classes, watch the mail! The Class of '57 is planning a special event which will demand your interest and support. 'Virginia Pohe Doss, Tom, and children. Tommy, 5, and Lee, 7, enjoyed a gala reunion in May when Tom returned from articles.

months in the Pacific. Hopefully, two years in Calif., they await news

nine after

of a transfer to "ole Va." Margaret Mustard Stickley

and husband, Ken, have moved into a lovely home on hills. Blacksburg's one of Sara cently

Lou Wendenburg McRee moved back to Va. Grif has

work on

his

master's

degree and

has refinished is

now

They have two boys. Butch, 3, and Bobby, 1. Carolyn Smith Stringer and Tick live in Woodbridge with their two boys, Tippy, stationed in Washington, D. C.

5, and Stewart, 2. Welma Wilck Boggs took a break from teaching the fourth grade and flew by jet

to

Hawaii. Patricia Powell

Woodburry

is

busy teach-

ing piano, taking organ lessons, singing in the church choir, and helping direct the choir. She and Anne Thomas Matthews heard the Longwood choir sing at Bruton Parish this spring. Nancy Dee Deaton Jones and Malcolm have three children. This spring they spent eight fascinating days in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Anne Caldwell Cake is teaching, and Charlie is associated with a law firm in

same

Arlington.

Be sure to check the list of births and please drop me a card if you forgot to this year.

her

finished

work for her B.S. from Longwood. We hope she won't decide to change classes! She wrote that they were planning a camping trip to Myrtle Beach this summer. Dot Douglas Daughtrey and Phoebe Warner were bridesmaids in Shirley Ward's wedding. Shirley is continuing to teach at Douglas Freeman High School in Richmond. Dot is teaching biology in Richmond and her husband is practicing law. They have a son. Sally Cecil is in

in

Presulent: Frances Raine 71 Randolph Rd.

Store

hears

Their

where her husband

home is

is

now

a sales engi-

with the Aluminum Company of America. They enjoy Calif, but miss their neer

and family on the East Coast. Suzanne Prillaman Lowry received her

friends

degree at Cornell University in June, 1961, and married Austin Clark Lowry on July 8, 1961. They are living in Ithaca, N. Y. where Suzanne and Austin master's

employed at Cornell. Helen Page Warriner,

are

John M. Austin taught at Longwood during the summer of 1961. At present he is spending much time with his C. B. radio, talking to the countryside. This fall he began another year as head of the science department at Prince Edward Academy. Margaret Hudnall Miller teaches the fifth grade in Raleigh, N. C. She and Skip are avid sports car enthusiasts and participate in the local sports car club.

Roberta Scott Williams taught English Glenville (W. Va.) State College for three years. This summer she received her master's degree in Librarianship from the Univ. of Denver and is headed for Bakersat

College ( Calif. ) where she has accepted a position as assistant librarian. Jeanette Morris Bowman and Herb live only 10 blocks from Bobbie Scott's dormifield

tory in Denver.

tendent of foreign languages. State Board of Education, spoke to Delta Kappa Gamma last December in Amelia, Helen's former home. She explained the changes thai have taken place in teaching foreign Ian guages in the schools.

Arnn Meadows and Joe live in Baswith their two children, Susan, 4, and

Iris

sett

assistant superin-

Joe, Jr.,

I.

Suzanne Garner Leggett is living in N. C. where she is housewife and mother to Ward, 6, and Bobby, 3. Bill is finishing his Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering.

From up north we hear that Mary Anne Jennings Crafton served as treasurer of the


They

school.

saw

the

Icecapades

in

Chicago.

Lu James Saavedra. During 1961 she spent September in Va. She said that they missed seeing Miss Barksdale there in the summer.

^

John Richard

Patterson, son of Patterson, '57.

Ann

F//lkr

duty.

Adams

Jackie

Harrisburg City Panhellenic. Her bouncing baby boy keeps the rest of her time occupied.

Another mother, Jeanette Puckett Wilup teaching for a while. Baby Catherine and the new house keep her days full. Puckett writes that she saw Ann Wayne in Danville during May. Carol Phillips and Mary Jo Davis live near by. Jo has combined quite a bit of guidance work at Robert E. Lee Jr. High with her liams, gave

teaching.

summer

This

is

her

third

at

Wm.

,

,

40

and Mary where she is working on her master's degree through Guidance Institute. From Fla. Anne Fuller Patterson writes that when Dick finishes his residency they will go into the service. They have a son,

NDEA

Johnny.

Frances Raine has big plans for us she is to begin a round-robin letter which will be used for some of our news next year. Please, won't you contribute a line or two? Fran writes that she enjoyed working at NASA and plans to take more math courses this fall.

Barbara Peach

Auby and Tony

live

in

Suffolk where Tony is minister of music the First Baptist Church. They enjoy singing quarter arrangements with another couple, but the majority of their time is devoted to their four children, Kathy, Tony, at

Jr.,

Melody, and Michael. in the mountains

Still

doing a great

work among the deaf children

is

Virginia

Lee Pearce. Diane Acree Sisson and Winton live on a farm where, after five years of teaching, Diane has retired and teaches her own Win and Mary Carol. Because he has been appointed county treasurer, Winton is spending his time smdying bookkeeping a far cry from subjeas taken by most history majors!

Jean

Mann

Donna Kay

Mater,

Donald,

are living in

and

Richmond

baby as

is

Daisy Jane Spain Garner. Occasionally they have a nice chat reviewing the escapades shared on trips to Willie's Hotdog Stand. Daisy Jane and Gary have a new baby too! Another who shared those hot dogs was Kathleen Yates Schneider who lives in 111. She, Roger, Wendy, and baby Kathy have spent much time painting their house. Kathleen and Roger both teach Sunday

Spangler writes that she

was promoted to the second grade

finally

While she isn't teaching, she and Dean enjoy their new home. From the west we heard from Betsy after five years!

Richardson Heyl, not

able

Peter

is

who

regrets that she

anend our reunion the Navy and expeas a

to

in

in

was '62.

transfer

Iwakuni, Japan. Still another who loves west is Christie Hulvey Fulton. She and John are presently at Ft. Belvoir, but plan to return to Portland, Ore. when he is released from service. Baby Stephanie to

the

occupies

much

of Christie's time.

seem sthat Barbara Bum-side Rideout and "Fudge" (Charlotte Fudge Grant) had It

quite

a

ing the

an's Club.

Margaret Hawkins Ennis writes: "No no 'trips to Europe, nothing!" Frances Bays Sublett taught the fourth grade in Petersburg. She and her son, Stephen, 5, looked forward to week ends this summer when Jim would be home from U. Va. where he was smdying under a National Science Foundation Grant. Carol Carson Angstadt devotes her time to home, family, AAUW, and hospital volunteer work. When time allows, she joins Bob on business trips to New England and the midwest. Retiring at an early age is Florence King children,

Elizabeth Elliott Williams spends much time substitute teaching and working part time in the Top Value Redemption Center. Taking care of her new son occupies the rest of her time. Rebecca Riddick Bradshaw has just moved into her new home. She has been working on her master's degree at and Mary and working in the Junior Woman's Club and Education Association in Suffolk and in the Longwood Alumnae Association. Ellen Hamlett Willis and Johnson are in the Navy now that he has completed his internship in Richmond. They hope to adopt a brother or sister for Pam. While they weie stationed in Pensacola, Fla., they saw Anne Thomas Denny. Anne writes that she and Lee have been in Fla. two years now and await a transfer for overseas

Wm.

\

Gayle Peoples Shiner writes from Fla. new house. She is teachfirst grade and has become a club woman: Beta Sigma Phi and Junior Womthat she too has a

From Mexico way we heard from Mary

time getting back to civilization

when they took Hughsie (Nancy Hughes Goodman) home following the class reunion in Farmville, since she lives so far in the "country". She and Ronnie spent a week in Miami in June. "Fudge" certainly had a nice time at our reunion; she got so misty reviewing those years at Longwood that she was ready to uproot each one of us and turn back the clock. If you happen to be in the Registrar's Office of G. W. Univ. in D. C, our own Adele Donaldson Cleary might greet you. She is there as secretary while Tom is working on a degree in Foreign Trade. The summer found her in Bermuda visiting her parents. Adele sends news of Sis Brown Douthat, who lives in Alexandria, and Judy Harris Bailey, who lives in Rich-

Lane. Last year, she taught the seventh grade but plans now to stay home as wife

and mother

in Burkeville.

Dreama Burchett Gorman writes that since their service obligations are complete, she

is concentrating on putting Bobby through college. While he studies, she works as bookkeeper in the Treasury Department of the Baptist Foreign Mission

Board.

Basking

in

usual golden ring.

This

the

sun

brown

is

summer

and

turning

her

Ann Savedge Her-

she

is

taking a

from teaching while Bob works on

rest

his

master's at Fla. State Univ. During the winter Evelyn Rowe Harper teaches Health and Physical Education in N. J., plays on the local hockey and softball teams, and bowls to keep busy. This

summer

she visited in Va. while

Bob was

away

for National Guard duty. Nancy Lenz Harvey works

in

several

capacities with Colonial Williamsburg. She enjoys work also with the Little Theater, but most important is the fact that she has made a good start in portraiture and is

beginning

to

feel

like

a

real

artist.

Jeanne Saunders is teaching English, working on her master's at the Univ. of Richmond and doing some writing in her spare time. In Charlottesville working on her master's this summer was Jackie Pond. Last year she taught fifth grade in Colonial Heights and plans to do the same this fall. "I still talk as much as ever," she writes. The biggest event of her year, wrote Jo Hillsman, was her wedding, which took place July 22. She and Leo will remrn to

mond. EUie Clements Trimble has "retired" from teaching after four years to be fulltime wife and mother to blond, blue-eyed, toddling Baxter. From Fla. we heard from the Rev. R. E. Dunkimi who is head of a mission and does substimte teaching. It seems we have spread as far as Hawaii; Betty Manson Wenzel has adjusted to living in our 50th state where her favorite sport is bowling. Georgia Edmonds Shoop has moved into a new house. Vacationing in 111. were Kitry Naugle Evans, Larry, and baby Connie. Kitty spends her time keeping house. Living in Sufl'olk is Mary Robertson Warner who moved into a new house down the street from Becky Riddick Bradshaw. Mary teaches the third grade in South Norfolk and sends word that Jackie Edwards Bly has moved into a new home in Battlecreek.

Robeit Edward Williams, 8 months, son of Elizabeth £///«// Williams, '57.

Alumnae Magazine


Richmond and

their old jobs. Incidentally, believe that there was a sort of reunion wedding. John Austin, Nancy Lenz Harvey, Jo Davis, Virginia Pearce, MarI

at the

garet Beavers Reed, Jeanne Saunders, Nancy Striplin McClung, and I were among How good to see the those attending. campus, and so many of our former professors again. Among those who enjoy camping are (Bettie) Brame Wallace, her Elizabeth husband, and three children. Chuck, 7,

Mar5, and Karen, 18 months. Beavers Reed, besides being in Jo Hillsman's wedding, taught the sixth and seventh grades at Bethany Lutheran School

Donna, garet

year and plans to do the same this year. Shirley Hardy McCray and Wilton have bought their first home and are enjoying This fall she it and their baby. Tommy. returns to teaching history. last

Mae

Bennett

moved back

to

Guthrie

and

Jim

have

Richmond where Jim

is

studying at Union Theological Seminary and she is teaching third grade at Highland Springs School. Gloria Kratzsch Young and Dave moved to the Univ. of Iowa where he is doing post-doctorate work on a leave of absence from the Univ. of Me. Gloria received her master's degree last summer at Duke. Pat Ashby Robinson sent regrets at not being able to attend our reunion. She said that seven hundred miles was a little far to come for the day. Monte, she writes, is growing "like a weed." From Pat, I learned that Suzanne Bunting Beasley has returned to the Eastern Shore and lives in

Wachapreague and andowski Stenger,

tend

in

lives

also

our

that Hazel

Richmond.

Hanks LewMary Mayo

among

reunion,

hellos to all there. live in Crewe.

those unable to atsent best wishes and

She and Roland

still

Nancy Lea Harris and Loretta Kuhn near Washington where they are

live

teaching.

(Delores Winder) Grimestead Noifolk where Lloyd is city editor and Peanuts is teaching. Mabel Wells Simmons, Jean Mines Motris, Peggy Puckett Straughan, Virginia Lee Hinton Hayden, Barbara Roller Hardy, Jane Wood Witt, Jerry Luck Siekirski, B. J. Jenkins Ware, Joyce Pulley Bryant, Hazel Bell Boyer, Elba Flynn Hubbard, Norma Kearny Shanaburger, Barbara Benedia, and Loretta Kesterson McMenamin were among those who remrned to Longwood for our reunion

Peanuts

still

lives

in

on March 31. Gale Branch

&

spring Martha ]oyner Dulong visited in Farmville and was interested to note the many changes at Longwood. Her two sons had fun trying to get the parakeet out of its cage in the lobby of the Last

Weyanoke. Calif, must have some

special

attrac-

Everett Benton, her husband, and daughter drove out this spring. Lee took a new job with the Dept. of Interior in Menlo Park, Calif. Ellie

There were many of our class members couldn't return to our reunion we missed you. We appreciated your letters of good wishes and wished you were there.

—

who To

each of the absent members of the Class of 1957, we asked news of you and traded stories of days gone by and our escapades on the campus of Longwood College. gave the freshmen around the

We

November, 1962

for laughter with our squeals of delight at seeing so many old friends. What a delight it was to have coffee in the beautifully decorated Alumnae House and listen to plans of the future growth and expansion of our school. The end product of a most satisfying day was our dedication that the Class of '57 would have

gomery, Ala., on

100% in attendance for our 10th reunion. Mark your calendar! Besides contacting each of you and writing this letter a job I thoroughly enjoyed) I keep busy with trips to Hanover, N. H., and New York City where I enjoy

and

(

the theater! I went to Washington, D. C. as a delegate to the National Medical Technicians meeting. This winter I look forward to visiting New Orleans, having received a fellowship to attend a workshop in Medical Technology Education. My thanks to each of you who replied with news; keep in touch so that we can write of your adventures in the 1963 Alumnae

News.

President: Shirley Hauptman

(Mrs. Hunter *

tO

OO

M. Gaunt,

312 Fairmont Ave., Apt. Winchester, Va.

Jr.)

1

Betsy

and

Charlotte Hall Padera and Chuck are in Winter Park, Fla. He is a design engineer with Martin Company in Orlando. At the time Charlotte wrote they were looking forward to buying a small cabin ciuiser

making

to the Bahamas and thought we would be that Mrs. Eva is back in church work in Detroit, Mich. Jackie Sawyer Taplin is teaching in a senior high in New Otleans. Dr. Taplin is associate professor of English at Newcomb College, part of Tulane Univ. They planned to stop in Farmville on their way to Boston in June. Nancy Drudge Fawcett and Ray are now in Greenville, S. C, where he is assistant professor of physics at Furman Univ. He received his master's degree in August at Chapel Hill. Shirley Grubb Hall and Ben have moved from Wake Forest following Ben's graduation from Southeastern Seminary in May to the Chatham area. Ben is

Nassau.

trips

Charlotte

interested

to

know

serving the Liberty Baptist Church near Callands. Their son is 3 and full of life. Shirley saw Grace Hannah Bowles Watkins

summer. Mary Susan is 2. Maxine Crowder Crowder and Charles have a

Secretary: Elizabeth A. Brierly

(Mrs.

way down.

the

said they left Va. in the January snow arrived in Tex. in sun and heat!

last

Alumnae

daughter, Lina Sue, 2.

Charles

is

a gen-

and Maxine is owner and manager of a day nursery for pre-kindereral practitioner,

Thomas R. Fulghum)

4104 Forest Circle Richmond 25, Va.

garten children.

Jane Crute Sowards, Al, and son, Alan, in Leesburg. Al teaches instrumental

are

Although I had time to send out only a handful of letters this year, the response was the best evei. Please continue to give your new secretary, to be elected next Founders

Day,

make her

job

been.

your support and you'll rewarding as mine has

as

Everyone

who

possibly

can,

come

down

to Farmville for our fifth reunion on Founders Day, March 16. So far, Shirley Hauptman Gaunt, Carole Wolfe, and I plan to be there to greet you! Put your

name in the pot too! From Englewood, Colo., Marjorie Anderson Solack wrote that she entered school at Geo. Washington Univ. Hospital the fall after graduation and was certified in medical technology a year later. She and her doctor husband, George, were married in 1960. George interned in Harrisburg, Pa. where he was born. He is now serving two years with the U. S. Public Health Service in the Bureau of Prisons Depart-

ment

Gillispi, Joe, and their three children live in Annapolis where Joe is working with the C P Telephone Co. of Md.

tions;

Rotunda cause

at the Federal Correctional Institution in Englewood. They will be in Col. another year and then plan to leturn to Philadelphia where George will take his residency in radiology. Ann Jeter Collins wrote from Germany

would be back in the States by end at Fort Monmouth, N. J. She said "that old Statue of Liberty will be a most welcomed sight." They've traveled some while in Europe but not as much as they would have liked. They have two small children. For news of "Jeet," Mary Ann Barnett Trapp, Lucia Hart Gurley, and others, please see the list of that they the year's

births.

Lucia Hart Gurley and John like HousBetsy Ruckvian Modlin and Tommy Betsy thought things would settle down after their wedding, but when the Manned Spacecraft Center was moved from Langley to Houston, they "had a nice long ride." (Tom is an engineer with NASA.) They visited Liza Buchanan Sullivan, Jack, and son in Montton.

are also in Houston.

in nine elementary schools

on

and

is

working

in elementary administraMarshall Univ. in Huntington, W. Va. during the summer. Jane sounds busy substituting, teaching shorthand at night, and doing some secretarial work. She sees Mary Anne Foster Rust and Ellen

his master's

tion

at

Anne Webb and is

Dan

at

often.

Gwen White

McChord

Harrison's

daughter,

Jacqueline

They have opened

\V2. Warfield.

a

Scott,

is

new motel

in

Marge Crismond Tremaglio, Charlie

Pruitt

Tacoma, Wash. Dan AFB. Marjorie Allgood

are living in

are

still

in

Cheshire,

Jack,

Conn,

and at

Cheshire Academy. Jack is working part time on his master's. Sue Taylor Paschall and Pete of Paoli, Pa. vacationed in Fla, this spring, leaving their little boy with Mrs. 'Taylor in Richmond. Janet Lloyd Adams wrote from Baltimore that in June they planned a move to Alexandria where Wayne was to sell real estate. Sarah Hackworth Ryan visited Wayne and Janet last summer while Walt was on a cruise. They have moved from Seattle back to San Diego. Another Navy wife is Sue Jett Russler. She and Dan are living in Manila. Carole Wolfe and Lou Heier ('59) have an apartment in Arlington. Carole planned to visit Ann Hart Hamrick, Spencer, and

two children

in Ma.xton, N. C. and summer. June Strother and George are in Columbia, S. C. where he is manager of the Forest Lake Country Club. Cornelia Anne Batte Roberts, husband Max, Tom, and I attended their wedding in July, '61, at Sts. Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox Church in Richmond. June was a lovely bride! Betty "Boots" Cantrell Owen wrote from Franklin that they have a brick home furnished with Colonial antiques and reproductions. She and Robbie have two sons, Irma Setchel Steve, 5, and David, XVi. Lane, Bobby, Gloria, 6, and "Chuckle,"

their

to travel to Fla. this

Shissias

47


;

IVz, have a farm in Surry. Kathy O'Leary Kirby is reaching in Germany. "Boots" reported rhat Kathy's father died some time ago. Our belated condolences, Kathy. Kitty Watson is still in Aberdeen, Md. Pat Worrell Grizzard of Courtland is president of her Junior Woman's Club and the busy

the

mother of two. Christmas brought greetings from Pat Patton, teaching in Roanoke; Norma Jenrett,

teaching

seventh

grade

math

at

Churchland Junior High; Jack, Anne Marie Thacker Kitchen, Stephan, and Cheryl Anne in Hopewell; Anne Rountree Shinn, Jerry, and Leslie in Charlotte, N. C; and many more. Shirley Hauptman Gaunt, Hunter, and Cary, I'/S, have moved to Winchester where Hunter has set up practice with another doctor. Sue Barr Kendall and Bobby are in Oklahoma City, Okla. where Bobby is interning. Sue Amory Jenkins, Larry, and two sons visited Shirley and Hunter in Richmond in May. Mary Lee Teel Webb and Charles are in Charlottesville where he has a law office. Frances Harman Ray, "Chip," and three children

moved

she

looks

Brian. terian

courses

says

at

RPL

After

working

in

Wil-

liamsburg at the college this summer, she planned to return to teaching at Va. Beach. Marodith Nichols has left Boston her destination, Madrid, Spain! Ann Foster Rust and Morris have returned to Richmond. Ann taught for rwo years in York County while Morris finished school at Wm. and Mary. "Em" Irby McDowell has a l4-month-old son. She and

—

John move around quite a bit. When I last talked to Em's brother, they were in Charlottesville.

Carolyn "TiPi"

has stopped counting seeds and English at Manchester High

Ashland. Liz Mosteller has an interesting job with Richmond City Libraries. Linda Chambers works for an insurance company in Richmond. "Cle" Kooiis Cohron and Glenn have three redheaded little boys. Glenn, Steve, and Doug, to

Bruce is minister of the PresbyChurch. They planned a visit to August. Jane Karicofe Elliott, husband, Roger, and two sons, Kenneth and Timothy, live

like

oldest

of

whom

Huckleberry Finn. Glenn is with GoodTire and Rubber Company. Carole Stroupe Wirt and Roy have two sons, Barry and David. Roy is with Eastern Air Lines, presently in Irving, Tex. Frances Patron Davis and Curtis have a 14-monthold son, Curtis, Jr. Jean Aniierson Terrell was eagerly awaiting her husband's return in September from the Army (he was stationed in Ark.) when I talked to her on the phone. Amanda Dillon returned to Ashland this spring to take education year

Waugaman teaching School in

is

She is a hard "-erson to catch with. The be:t I've managed to do is meet her going to work in the mornings! Carol King Robertson and husband,

Chesterfield.

up to

Bruce, live in Pleasant Hill, Mo., with son,

last

'Va.

in

Forrest

where Roger

is

also a Presby-

terian minister.

Carol Hepler Odom, husband. Bill, and small son are now living in Ashland where

he teaches

at the college.

Wearer Dove and husband, Joe, Vienna with their children, Mandy, and "Skeeter", 17 months.

'Vee

live in

2

1/2,

Sarah Friend Dickerson, husband, T. C, and son, Jim, live in Charlottesville where T. C. works for State Farm Insurance Company.

Norma

Miller

Stone

and Bob

Roanoke where he works

live in for Stone Print-

ing.

Frances Rosenkrans Witt lives in Crozet with husband, Charles, and two sons, Ricky, I't4, and Chuck, Charles is principal of Red Hill Elementary School near Crozet. Ellen Ann Webb is still working with

Department in D. C. Jo Ma.\ey White is teaching in Windsor and keeping house for her farmer husband in their large white farmhouse. Friday, the 13th, was lucky for Joan Coakley. She received word that she had been awarded a six-weeks full fellowship to Union College in Schenectady, N. Y. the State

48

GRANDDAUGHTERS CLUB The e of the mother or grandmother follows the student's name. From left to right. Fiotit Row: Ann Howard Evans (Elva Margaret Stephens '41); Mary th Dickinson essie Florence Cooper '20); Carolvn Clements Hargrove (Pauline Clements 58); Elizabeth Lindsay Spicer (Eunice Lindsay White 32); Betty Suzanne Adams (Pattie Armi! d Jeffreys '38); Martha Frances Muire (Josephine Duvall Quinn '38); Marv Ruth Reynolds (Ruth Staples Shocklev '23); Carol Ann Martin (Sarah E. Culpepper "OO-grand ther); Nancy Carol Combs (Marion Shelton '40). Second Row: Mary Evelyn Allen (Evelvn 'Wells West '31); Jessie Elizabeth Sledge (Eleanor Abbit 'OSgrandmother); Maude Fra res Haga (Mary Louise Partridge '36); Shelby Jean Lucy (Alice Michael-ent. '25); Priscilla Ann Salle (Mary Hill Christian 'S5-grandmother); Alice Joy Peele (Blanche Lane-e t. '34); Susan Louise Shepherd (Mildred Allen Deans '29); Paula Margaret Kirbv (Nan Gwendolyn Meats '32). Third Row: Elizabeth Faye Lewis (Jane Blair Maben-grandn )ther-ent. '13); Elizabeth Penn Blackburn (Elizabeth Penn Wilkinson '40); Marv Tane Blackburn (Elizabeth Penn Wilkinson '40) Roberta Anne Rilee (Chloe Snow-grandn )ther-ent. '05); Marv McCraw Ward (Marv McCraw Chappell '3^); Mary Elizabeth Crandol (Marv D. Butcher '02-grandmother'); Marguerite Anne Shelburne (Martha Judkin grandmother-cnt. '96); Evelyn Viola Smith (Maude Hurt '26); Mary Stratjon Walker (Birdie Oliver Wooding '35, Elizabeth Carter-grandmother); Doris Bruce Harwell (Dor Bruce Steere '28); Dallas Armstrong de Kraft iMildred White Steere '32). Foiirlh Row: Judith Anne Corson (Charlotte Myets 15); Barbara Jean (Sara Shelron Barnes '24); Mary Turner (Frances Elder '35. Homey Monroe. OT-grandmother);- Mildred Smith Johnson (Mildred Winston Smith '36); Sara Nelson Pearson .. .. ._ -jovce Fave Powell Lou Penington (Sara Carey '08). Fifth Row abeth Marshall Hall (Maf 1 Anderson-ent. '33); Catolyn Gay Ramsey (Ka (Nell Prosise); Elizabeth Louise Bowles (Dorothy Davis '40); Mary Kay Richeson (Marv Evelvn Burford '40. Ruth Watts-grandmother); Doris Kathleen Harrison (Kathleen Sanford '28); Elizabeth Carey Howell (Miriam 'Vannerson Ficklen '39); Linda Mae Fore (Dorothy i/iola Rudder '39); Laurice Lee Hamlett (Virginia Cassie Dickerson '34); Frances Mattox Lipford (Lelia Ruth Mattox '35). Sixth Row: Nancy Lee Connell (June Allen-ent. '33); Laura Harris Soyars (Elizabeth Virginia Butterworth '38); Virginia Mayo Summers (Ora Mayo '57); Dorothy Daille Prichard (Doris Adkins '39); Diane Virgina Pezzella (Mabel Virginia Aydlett-ent. '34); Annice Whitehurst Bailey (Martha Elizabeth White '27) Amy Louise Sandidge (Amy Louise Powell 39) Beverly Jane Hargrove (Ellen Pauline Clements '55) Evelvn Elaine Mancil (Rebecca Louise Phillips '42) Catherine Webster Cobb (Sarah Catherine Bovette '3"'). Seventh Row: Susan Scott Harwood (Mary Scott Martin-ent. '30); Kittv Sydnor Pettit (Hattie Courter Pettit '45); Rosa Courier Pettit (Hattie Courter Pettit '45); Anne Fontaine Greene (Ann Fontaine Smith '26); Mary Scott Whitehead (Marv Scort Shelton '34); Barbara Jean Fields (Lois Jinkins '37); Elizabeth Ann Rex (Sarah Lewis Button '39. Bessie Price '13, Minnie Blanton '09-grandmothers); Lou Johnson (Louise Godwin Floyd '35, Louise Godwin 'O4.grandmother) Susan Gay Sweeney (Matgaret Ann Giles Dip. '22); Sally Tod Pottage (Sally Elliott '62); Carol Jean Gibson (Carrie Jennings 'lo-grandmothet) Olivia Juanita Gibson (Carrie Jennings 'lO-grandmorher); '(Norma Fisher '11-grandmother). I

'

;

'

;

.._._-

.

;

;

;

Alumnae Magazine


—

"

through a General Electric program in Economics, which was competitive for SoScience teachers in

13 states. My husband, Tom, works for the Chesterfield County School Board as supervisor of transportation. Many, many thanks to all of you who have written, called, and passed news. I have enjoyed every minute of news-gathering. Also, thanks to Jane Crute Sowards and Frances Rosenkrans Witt for sending in news of the '58 Alumnae. A letter to Ella Carter was returned. If anyone knows of her whereabouts, please notify the Alumnae Office. See you at cial

Workman,

Young,

Natalie Tudor Brown has been instructing zoology labs at the Univ. of Md. Ann Glover O'Dell and Denton spent the last year at Southwestern Seminary in Memphis. Denton was assistant to the chaplain and also assistant to the local Presbyterian minister. Ann had her first experience teaching in senior high school. They spent the summer in Holly Springs, Miss, and

delinquent

in

correspondence

year!

was

delighted to hear from "Cat Ozmon who spent the 1961-62 school year teaching in Pirmasens American School in

active

Sandidge is now head of the Physical Education Department at Lee Jr. High in Roanoke. She plays goalie on the Campus Characters hockey team and takes graduate courses. Shirley Saunders Harwood returned to Longwood to be a senior

November, 1962

me,

in

and

hope

organize

to

more

am

teaching

at

Mount

write a letter. Please keep the Alumnae Office and of your address. Also, will vou remember to write me a letter on the hrst of May, 1963.' Everyone remember a letter to Patsy on May 1st! I

me informed

President:

Connie Goodman 124 Matoka Court Williamsburg, Virginia

'/Tji

Secretary

Rebecca Jones 309 W. Jackson Boulevard Self-Rising Flour and Cornmeal Program, Room 1509 Chicago 6, Illinois

of

other than teaching we find Doles, a child welfare worker in

In

areas

Va. Beach, and Bett^' Lee Smith, director of religious activities at Va. Intermont College. She is a member of the International Service Organization, Altrusa. In her job Betry Lee coordinates the religious activities for the six denominations on

campus. Jane for

I

teaching business educa-

School Administration at Geo. Washington Univ. I hope to report that I've finished my M.A. degree by the next time

Great Books Discussion

interest

Groups

Linda

Sandy

for

is

Eagle School, have been elected secretary of our 3,600-member Fairfax Education Association, and have completed 21 hours towards my master's degree in Elementary

are back in Richmond where Denton comhis training. They have shown an

up the notes. Cat. I hope to do the same! Higher education has occupied much

Danville.

As

Frances

pletes

these.

time for certain members of our class. Barbara Heck and Charlotte Gray spent the summer at Wm. and Mary College making good use of scholarships. Barbara returned to Alexandria in September to begin her second year as a guidance counselor in Fairfax County. Liz Nichols attended a summer workshop at the Appalachian State Teachers College, and Betty Lee Smith studied at VPI. Virlinda Joyner worked towards her M.A. degree at Geo. Washington Univ. Delo Dole Eanes was at Madison College. She received a fellowship from the National Science Foundation. Nanc)' Andrews is currently on leave of absence from Andrew Lewis High School, Salem, while she works toward her master's degree. Ruth Looper Hartman, who completed dental school at the Univ. of Md., had an exciting year with her first anesthetic injections and tooth extractions. She says that hubby, Paul, sends his friends for dental work but hasn't submitted himself! Gloria Gardner Buchanan is in Louisville, Ky. still hoping to see the Ky. Derby. Becky Parker has completed three years of teaching fifth grade in Portsmouth. She reported the wedding of Daphne R-Arango de Rivera. Teaching near Richmond at Highland Springs High School are Connie Carlton and Gwen Melton Baucom. Shirley Lucy Leyland was with them before she moved to Newport News. Also near Richmond is Nancy George. In Prince George County, Pat Campbell is teaching. Carolyn Copeland Dix is teaching first grade in

ville.

!

She visited many European an enviable experience. Keep

countries,

Jean

Nichols, Joan Dorsey, Molly and I, Patsy Powell, are teach-

Pa.

Again the time has come for me to report on the current status of the Class of '59. I regret that I have not had contact with a large number of you. Some are

Germany.

Liz

Patsy E. Powell 204 Belle View Blvd. Alexandria, Virginia

Rosson

(Mrs. Lewis Spicer, Jr.)

I

tion at Prince Edward Academy in FarmviUe. She has a son, Wayne, 3. Jackie Fore Southall is also teaching at the Academy and living in FarmviUe.

Helen

school.

Forrest,

1209 Maywood Road Richmond, Virginia

Lillian

this

Nancy

law

Secretary:

President:

somewhat

Church. For news of weddings and births check the list elsewhere in the BULLETIN. Frances Carticright Moore and husband, Billy, are building a new home near Keys-

ing in Fairfax County. Helen Jean vacationed in Maine last summer. Joann Fivel and Mary Ellen Moore Pilen spent the school year 61-62 at Ferguson High School in Newport News. Joann has been working with the Peninsula Opera Co. and sang a leading role in // Trovatore, receiving very good notices. Margaret "Fig" Newton Weston and son, David, III, are in Nev. where Fig began teaching this fall. Dave is "trying his luck in Hollywood" so Fig says. We'll be watching for him in the movies or on TV. Margaret Layman Forte is teaching in Brvn Mawr,

Founders Day, March 16!

'59

during the 61-62 session. She and her minister husband live in DiUwyn. Martha Rucker Coleman taught home economics in an all-girl high school in Macon, Ga. last year. Bob is a student in

Adams

NASA

at

still

is

a

technical

Langley Field.

editor

She visited

Nadine Dazell in Costa Rica last Christmas and was Nadine's maid of honor when she married Amolda Soto in May. Nadine and Amolda are now living in San Francisco. Jane is living with Jean Turner. Librarian for the Press and Information Office, Embassy of Viet Nam, is Amy McFall Meyer. Amy played Mrs. Kennedy in the Hexagon Club's annual review for charity and received a very notable newspaper mention for the "look-a-like" qualities. She and husband, Ed, work in

many Washington While Ed on

A

haven't the

I

area stage productions.

Amy,

seen

WMAL-TV

large

number

I

have se;n

news.

of the class of '59 are

very busy being mothers and homemakers. Taking care of the young are Barbara Odoin Wright in Sufl'olk, Sarah Hastings Jones and Bett^' Sue Barbee McKinley in Richmond, and Betty Culpepper Holland in Philadelphia where Bill is an intern. Pat Lyons Areford and Rod are near Va. Beach where Rod is a salesman. Lois Ogburn Elsam and Eric are at Patrick AFB near Cape Canaveral. Jackie Harper

Class of '60 was really busy this school, trips, and weddings. Chris Jones asked me to take both ends of the alphabet as she was planning her marriage. Barbara Bishop has completed her master's and will teach at Southern Seminary this year. Frances Gray went

The

year with

Europe for a month. Linda McPherson Minwood Sawyer in August, '61, and they went to the Miss America Pageant for a honeymoon. Ruth Denton and Nancy Harnsburger planned a trip to Nassau. Becky McGrath Daughtey worked at Peabody Demonstration School while her husband finished his master's at ScarPaulita Patterson Wade had ritt College. to

m.arried

party that included among the guests Mary Eustace Smith and Lorraine Robins Brown and their husbands. Jean O'Connell a

is modeling for adult art classes in Arlington along with her teaching. Joanne Tench seems to spend her summers at LSU in

their

Language Schools. Matthews Williams, Air Force is the mother of Todd, and the

Carol wife,

family

planned

Omaha

for six

Jo Bearing

to

be

months

the

at

after

Smith has a

Univ.

September

of 1.

John, Jr., who is reported to be a 26-hour-a-day job! Frieda Hamlet had a recipe published in Farorite Meat Recipes of Home Economics little

Meador and Max have moved house

in

Lynchburg,

Va. Episcopal School.

He

into a new teaches Latin at

Carole Manley Lynn

is in Hagerstown, Md. where hubby works with sales and public relations for Atlantic Refining Company. Doris Ayers McElfresh is still in Blacksburg taking care of Ginger and hubby. Bill. Vicki Brinkley Hunter and George are living in Arlington and Barbara Mitchell Van Landingham in Falls

Bobby, Roy, and Mark, children of Janie Richards Markuson, '60.


Teachers

this

year.

the Clnss of '60,

Helen Wente

If

go

you

want to

to Va. Beach. and she told

I

see

saw

me

of her plans to teach in Cleveland this winter. Alice Waring Mundie, who was teaching in Henrico Count}', died on November 24, 1961. She had only one precious year to give to teaching prior to her illness, but in that short time she made lasting impressions on her students, parents, and fellow teachers. there,

Bonnie Keys Pattie and husband have moved to Okla. John is in the Army, and Bonnie is teaching seventh grade math. Dorothy Harrison Wells taught the 1960-61 school year in Lee-Davis High School in Hanover while her husband. Charter,

completed

Union Seminary

second

his

Richmond.

in

year

in

Teaching

was

Farrington Joyce ('59). Mitchell At present Dorothy, Charter, and two children, Elizabeth Lee and Charter, III, are living in Spring Garden between Danville and Chatham where Charter is pastor of the Spring Garden Presbyterian Church.

with

Dorothy

President:

Pat Southworth (Mrs. William Mahler)

Kidd 6319 Three Chopt Road Richmond 26, Virginia

Ann Kovacevich S.

Buchanan

Street

Arlington, Virginia

Ann

Kovacevich has a secretarial job at the American Chemical Societ)'. Matilda Powell Conley and Ed are well and very happy. Lee Walker planned a trip to Europe last June. She is teaching near Va. Beach. Barbara Elder

teaching

at

Amherst

Amherst College

in

September.

Janice McClenny Mahone is teaching at Warwick High and is happily married.

Clara Lee Parker finished a successful year at E. C. Glass High School in Lynchburg. Shirley Murray is teaching at Suffolk High School. Nancy Morris hoped to receive her master's in English last August from the Univ. of Va. and planned to teach at Lane High School in Charlottesville. Dodie Webster had another jaunt to "merrye old England" in June for several

months. Pat Southworth Mahler will be moving around with her pilot husband for a while.

Owen is teaching in at Grange Hall School Rose Marie very much. Johnson still has her job with the government in Baltimore. Lou Ella Culler had a busy year at Deep Creek High School, Norfolk County, teaching English and serving as Dramatics Director. Patsy Chaney Felts is teaching fourth grade at Forest Hills School in DanMary

Thomas

Chesterfield and enjoys

County it

ville.

in

Mary Anne Hamner Copley is teaching Beatrice Gay Wallace will in Amelia. begin her third summer as a "firefly collector." The fireflies are used in cancer research.

Dancey

Scott has been teaching junior high school in Roanoke to Denver, Colo, this summer to be with her Air Force husband. Barbara Moore worked this past summer in the Halifax ASC office. Emily Shelton Good is teaching English in the seventh grade at Crewe. Jennette Talbott has a wonderful job at Huguenot High School in the Physical Education Depattment. Betty Sue Dickenson and Melissa Harrell have had an eventful year sharing an apartment while teaching near Rich-

Jean

music but

at a

moved

Hampton

Bolt and Charles are Janet Underwood is teaching in Roanoke. Earline Queen will return to Roanoke to teach this fall. Sandra Clements is teaching at Brookland Junior High near Richmond. Sally Thomas Wallace is teaching part time where she is now housewife and mother to her infant son, John, III, botn in August, 1961. Her husband, Lt. Wallace, is stationed with the Nike Base in to

Suffolk.

Wilmington, Ohio. Frances Norton and

Iris

Wall worked

towards their master's degrees this summer at VPI. Cherry Gorham Partington tells

me is

Nancy Lemen reSchool. Library in ceived her master's degree Science in August fiom the Univ. of Mich. assistant cataloger as She has a position County High

at

Roanoke.

moving

Cecil

2200

a trip to last summer. Betty Abbott is teaching second grade at Crystal Springs School,

Mexico

Pat

Virginia

Secretaries:

'61

a lovely Christmas present. Mary Lee Barnes planned

mond.

1106 Green Gate Road Fredericksburg,

tary to the Undergraduate Committee, School of Education, Univ. of Va. She is working on her master's degree. Nancy Martin Dickerson and Raymond are choosing plans for their future home. Nancy Evans Cobb is busy taking care of Debra Jean, born December 23, 1961,

Joyce Toley Whitlock taught third grade Lexington while husband, Jim, attended

law school. They moved to Richmond

this

simimer. Pat Callahan has been working as Secre-

that she is proud of Don who in his law class and a member of

is

first

"Moot

Court" at W&L. Virginia Havener worked hard at nursing this summer while many others, like Gerry Ludwick, who is teaching math at Patrick Henry High School in Roanoke, had the summer free. Finally, Norma Routt Gore writes that she and Jim are in Germany enjoying travel and the opportunity to add to their memories. Carolyn Oliver Wilke's husband, Walt, will be in the Norfolk area next fall to attend OCS school, and Carolyn will teach art.

Mary Leach Elmore, Pat Hickey, Dibby Mohr, and Lois Peters left June 8 Detrich,

from Idlewild Airport for their tour of They have traveled by train, bus, and river boat through Belgium and the Europe.

Netherlands. In Cologne, Germany they had a waiting car enabling them to tour Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Spain, and France. Then they left the car to travel on to England, Scotland, and Ireland. Their last stop was London. Quite a way to end four years of college, huh? ? Helen Eugenia Taylor and Peggy Green spent most of their summer smdying at the Univ. of Valencia, Valencia, Spain. All of these girls will teach this fall. Peggy Green will teach Spanish and English at Fairfield Junior High School, Henrico County, and Helen Taylor will teach at York High School, Yorktown. Mary Leach Elmore and Pat Hickey will teach in Woodlawn School, Fairfax County. Judy Detrich will teach English at Wakefield High School, Arlington, and Dibby Mohr at King's Grant Elementary, Princess

Anne. Taylor Rowell spent a week at the Phi National Convention in Miami. Even though she caught a virus while there, it didn't keep her from enjoying her last week end in Nassau. Taylor will be teach-

Mu

ing in

Hampton

Other

this fall.

have been traveling around too. Maybe not so far away, but very interesting! Keaton Holland had three jobs during the summer. She first worked at Va. Beach. She wasn't making enough money, so she went to Norfolk to sell cosmetics door-to-door. After one week she decided she didn't want to do that, so '62er's

she went to Richmond to set up her apartment for the winter. The last report said she was working in the S & Cafeteria at Willow Lawn, Richmond. Keaton plans to teach biology at Tucker High School, Henrico County, in the fall. Claudia Wilson had her gloriously "famous day" when she visited Kansas City this summer. She had her picture in the Kansas City Star; she was getting an autograph from Astronaut Virgil (Gus) Grissom. She even rode in a parade which was in honor of the astronaut. Maybe one of our class WILL get her "wings." Good luck, Claudia! Claudia will live near home and teach the fifth grade at Linkhorn Park School, Princess Anne County. Nancy Nelson, Grace Belvin, Betty Ruth Dunnavant, and Jane Martin did some traveling, too. They attended Jackie Boggs' wedding in Lynchburg. Betty Ruth worked

W

Rec Leader at HoUiday Lake Camp, Appomattox, and will teach first grade in the Roanoke County School System in the fall. Jane Martin worked in Lynchburg and will teach biology at Great Bridge High School, Norfolk County, in the fall. She has set her wedding for December, 1962. Nancy Nelson went on to Patsy Skellie's wedding in Elkton. Nancy Nelson and Gerry Edmonds worked for Kelly Girl in Richmond. Both lived at Gerry's home in Richmond. Nancy will teach at York High School with Susan Crisman this fall. Gerry will begin her teaching duties this fall at Randolph Tucker High, Henrico as

President:

Becky Tuck 2327 Hiawatha Drive Greensboro, North Carolina

Alumnae

62 >

Secretaries:

dy D. Smith Greeneland Boulevard Portsmouth, Virginia Peggy Green 303 Mistletoe Drive Newport News, Virginia

Thank you very much, Class, for all your correspondence this summer. You have made my job an enjoyable one with your quick response and cooperation. Please keep in touch whenever you have any news or have changed your "status" in any way!

Remember those "1962 seniors" who were planning their overseas tours? ? ? I have heard from several of them. Judy

County. After

Thomas husband.

graduation

Rosemary

Henry

by jet to Tex. to join her Both traveled from there by

flew

sports car to Sacramento, Calif. Her husband is a Lt. and stationed at Mather in Sacramento.

AFB

Joyce Grizzard Porter

is

living in Char-

Alumnae Magazine


and work towards

where her husband is attending She of Va. Graduate School. Albemarle County High School until her husband has completed his graduate work. Ann Howell Griffin worked this summer for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway Company. She will lottesville

the

a

Diana Snow Campbell for

the

working

is

summer and

as

sixth grade at Madison. Helen Fox teach home economics at Lee-Davis High, Ellerson. Barclay Woodward Smith will be working as a research assistant in will

Charlottesville while her husband finishes his schooling. Merle HolaJay Stone is teaching in the grammar grades and at the same time taking a government course

work as the receptionist at the Harvard Faculty Club. Check the marriage list for the marriages.

Many have written about their aaivities the summer which include beaches and sun fun. Katie Fulton taught Red Cross swimming and lifesaving at Gypsy Hill Park in Staunton. Katie will teach art at Fort Defiance High School, Fort Defiance. Trina Childress taught swimming at the Cavalier, Va. Beach, and finished her summer working at the Princess Anne Country Club at Va. Beach. Trina will teach at the F. W. Cox High School. Faye Ripley, Morag Nocher, and Virginia Parker will attend Univ. of Tenn. during

.

.

Succeed "^o^un

Ruth Clendening Gaver,

.

I^M 0^

'03

Mary Lou Campbell Graham, '04

Clark,

'06

heard

Most

in Danville this fall. Niki received her "Pert" Betsy 'Wilson degree in August. will teach sixth grade at Princess Anne Plaza Elementary School and live at the beach. Her math knowledge landed her a job for the summer with the Danville Schools. Sandie Parish will teach fifth gtade at Thoroughgood Elementary School and will live with Pat Foster and Mary Kay Susan Brown will be at John B. Rice. Dey Elementary School right next door to F. W. Cox High where Mary Rob Harris will be teaching general science. Mary Rob has been practicing up on her reading as she spent the summer working at the Library of Wm. and Mary.

Ann Gould

has also been putting her talents to use she spent the summer singing solos at various church services and

Louise Brooks Howard,

Jean Cake Forbes, '49

will

—

whenever

'28

Jean Ridenour Appich, '52

Clements Hanna,

Virginia Sutherland Knott, '54

'31

Eloise

Nancy Shaner

'32

Camille Atwood, '57

Strickler,

Margaret Woodard Vanderberry, '34 Stalling,

Williams Draine,

Macon Smith,

Jane Elizabeth Crute Sowards, '58

'39

Frances Rosenkrans Witt,

'40

Patsy E. Powell, '59

Rebecca Jones, '60

Margaret Mish Timberlake, '43

Cecil Kidd, '61

Agnes Patterson Kelly,

Ann

working for an attorney this summer. David will be back from Tex. in September. Our wedding date

is

set

for

December

22.

Fm

forward to heating more about

Red

'n

looking

YOU!

White

!

!

love,

Judy

'58

In appreciation of fourteen '43

Kovacevich, '6l

Judy D. Smith, '62

'43

Eileen Bowles Johnson,

November, 1962

appreciate

Lm

'55

'36

Betty Boutchard Maclntire, '43

Wade Owen,

would

I

Elizabeth Brierley Fulghum, '58

Jerry Hatcher Waring,

Sarah

possible.

hearing from you. About me? Well,

'48

'29

Eloise

her daughter, Anne Balderson, teach at Washington and Lee High School in Montross. Another one "taking easy" is Sue Caravella. Her moments it of leisure were spent at beaches and with friends from school. She and Patti Barnes have helped entertain their guests, Sally Smith and Nancy Burke. Sue will teach second grade at Manhattan Elementary School in Tampa. Traveling a while and working a while for the summer has made a "busy" Jean Cloud. She has visited Fla., Ohio, and W. Va. Jean will teach fourth grade in Sterling, Loudoun Count)'. Carolyn Lee Davis had a most ideal job for the summer working for her father in his office. Carolyn will teach second grade at Glen Allen Elementary School in Henrico. That seems to be about all the news. If your news isn't included, it is because I didn't receive it on time. Please send me information any time of the year and

Warsaw;

Betty Jones Klepser, '51

Boyette,

Nimmo

.

'44

Mildred Maddrey Butler,

Valla

.

Carol Bird Stoops Droessler, '50

Carolyn Cogbill, '22

Elsie

.

Jane Ruffin House, '45

'08

Amory

Emmy

Elizabeth Grizzard

Van Arsdale Hoffman,

'09

Elenor

fourth grade Lu Critcher

teach

head for Quantico Marine Base in September where she will teach at the Dependents' School. She says, "I am looking forward to it with quite a few butterflies." Loafing with a capital "L" is Jane Hanger. She plans to change this September she will he teaching the third grade at Armstrong Elementary School, Hampton. Mrs. Ruby B. Balderson will he on the faculty at Warsaw High School,

^icu^

Georgeanna Newby Page,

'13

will

in Chesterfield County.

—

Mildred Blanton Button,

Ada Bierbower,

Ann

weddings. will

Darby, '44 Betty

Mary Preston

and service company.

Maddie MacNeil will teach music at Warren County High, Front Royal. Niki Fallis and Nancy Pretty will be teaching

/iCcim^tae

Mary

degrees.

of our other classmates I only what they plan to do of them, I am glad to say, will be teaching. Laura Carson McClenny is busy setting up housekeeping in Danville where she will either teach sixth grade or be a librarian. Pat Sadler, a business major, has an ideal job at the Medical College of Va., Richmond, as secretary. Nedlee Chapman is teaching math at Northside High in Roanoke County. Evelyn Ford is teaching home economics year 'round in Clark County High. all Music "gal" Jane Pennington worked at Natural Bridge in the summer and will teach music this fall at Sussex County.

a

will

sales

this fall.

teach Brittain

more information about

TV

have

will

at UNC. Jeanine McKenzie Allen is living in Norfolk where she will teach while her husband attends Wm. and Mary College. Carol Sprague Blaydon is living in Cambridge, Mass. where husband, Colin, will enter Harvard Graduate School. Carol

master's

From many

begin teaching eighth grade general science at Monroe Junior High School in Roanoke City while her husband completes his studies in Blacksburg. secretary

their

Morag and Virginia are to be freshman dorm counselors! Morag is living at home this summer and working part time for

Univ.

will teach in the

'44

Peggy Green, '62

years of exceptionally fine service as

manager of the Snack Bar, Mrs. Frances Farrier was presented a silver bowl by the Alumnae Association during the dinner hour of the Fall Council meeting on October 5. Mrs. Farrier is now manager of the College Book Stote.

51


An Adventure

Gloria Newton,

This

wood

summer College,

for the first time in the history

of Long-

an organized group sought

new educa-

Although not

sponsored by

tional horizons abroad.

directly

Learning

In

'63

To complement these experiences, Ann Friedman, Peggy Pond, PnsciUa Salle, Gloria Newton, Mary Morris, and Edward Ernouf felt a sense of accomplishment when

an administrative or educational organization of the college, twelve undergraduates and one graduate planned a

they received certificates of achievement in addition to the

Europe under the guidance of Mrs. Anita Ernouf, a professor of foreign languages. Although they mixed pleasure and travel with study, from the initial

Morris, in addition, successfully completed two

three-month

to

trip

stages of planning to the tense

moments of examination

at

the Sorbonne, the students strongly emphasized the educa-

of the

tional purposes

One

trip.

student

quoted

is

as

answering certain inquiries made by foreigners with, "No, I am not a tourist; I am an American student" to which

of Presence given by the Sorbonne.

certificates

Miss

summer

courses of study and received a certificate of achievement in Spanish following her four-week studies during August at the University of Aliconte, Spain.

Mrs. Ernouf, the group

good example by undertaking some research Paris and by later completing a summer course in

director, set a

studies in

German

at the University

and an award of merit

of Heidelberg to receive a diploma

as an

outstanding student.

often she received the response, "oui, c'esr une grande difference."

chance to

The group, composed of girls who were acquiring majors languages or

in foreign

who had

similar interests, included

Miss Nancy Hoffaker, a 1962 graduate from Norfolk, Virginia, Margaret Alice Pond of Portsmouth, Frances Jo Ann Cattwright of Newport News, Joan McKenna of Newport

5

2

News, Anne Friedman of Charlottesville, Harriet Hunt of Roanoke, Betsy Grant of Norfolk, Glendon Merchant of Cascade, Alice Boggs of Chester, PrisciUa Salle of Hallsboro, Gloria Newton of Arvonia, and Mary Morris of Richmond, Virginia. Mrs. Ernouf and her two sons accompanied the group that left Dr. Maurice Airport June 8. history and social sciences at

the group to

months of

who mixed

For these students

New Yoik P.

Sneller,

Longwood,

Luxembourg before

also

International

travel,

the

from that of formal study. The number of countries visited by the various members of the group was fifteen. Some of the group spent the longest periods of time in either France, Spain, Italy or Germany; tional experience different total

while others traveled in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales,

Belgium, Switzerland, Austria, Luxembourg, and Greece. In addition, Mrs.

Ernouf and her sons went

to Berlin and Joan McKenna, Jo Ann Cartwright, and Gloria Newton had the extra-

took

a short

guided tour

in East Berlin.

ordinary privilege of being to enter Algeria since

its

among

the

first

foreign students

independence; they were for four

professor of

days guests of an Algerian family in Algiers where they

accompanied

witnessed

his departure for three

the

joyful

announcing

parade

Ben

Bella's

entrance into Algiers on August 3 and enjoyed typical Arab

Miss Newton also spent

food in the Algerian home.

throughout Scandinavia.

travel

study with

countries presented a type of educa-

visit several

twenty-four hours in Reykjavik, the capital of Iceland, to

The highlight of entire ers

the trip was a

group enrolled

in the

month

in Paris

where the

Vacation Courses for Foreign-

climax her

trip,

which took her into

typical

homes

in six

countries.

held under the auspices of the Sorbonne during the

The

month of July. French

in the

courses included classes in Practical

Returning to the United States and to Longwood College,

morning, and afternoon lectures on subjects

the group brought back accounts of their experiences and

within the fields of French arts.

On

literature, history,

and beaux-

Saturdays, the French professors conducted class

tours around

and excursions to distant spots of were available under guided tours spon-

Paris,

historical interest

sored by the Sorbonne.

The four-week study presented

to

the students an opportunity to study under native French professors,

methods

to

witness

in France,

experience

vatious

aspects

and to broaden

through

content

of educational

intellectual

learned

and

and cultural

contact

with

pictures of their sightseeing, long address

made

ftiends,

These

are the tangible things.

and

that the trip was

lists

certificates signifying their

more than

But each student

these.

of newly-

study

efforts.

will testify

meant the witnessing,

It

the understanding, the acceptance, and the appreciation of

many

things not Ameiican; renewed appreciation of things

American.

It

was, for some, an inspiration to continue

their progress in the learning

emphasize in

of a foreign language and to

their future teaching the

importance of foreign

students from various countries and cultural backgrounds.

languages in the curricula of elementaty and secondary

Moreover, the one-month stay

schools and colleges.

in

the capital of France

enabled students to familiarize themselves with Paris as a city

of vast cultural treasures and with some of the customs

of Parisian

life

not readily observed by passing

tourists.

In essence, the 1962

summer

vacation of this group was

"an adventure in learning."

Alumnae Magazine


3u iirmoriam Nin.1 E. Ailiivorlh

Gemmill.

ent. '91

Irene E. Lution Middleton, ent. '15

Virginia Frances Alexander Curtis, '42

Viola L.

Ellen Armiiteud Guerrant, '95

Era

Virginia

Mary

W.

Atkinson Borden, '14

11

Irene iHassie Smott, '03x

Elizabeth Bt// Blagg. ent. '12

Lida F.

Bessie Bhiikmoi-e Morgan, '04x Esther R. Bowles Knibb, '16

Mary Hamilton Boyd, '24x Ethel M. Booker Wooking, ent.

McNames Brightwell, '23 M. Marshall Kent. Ele. Prof. Jones, '00

M;'//f)-

Ethel Lavernia

iVlills

'09

Moore.

Carrie AI//<Af// Ellett, '24x

Mary M. Moorman Thompson,

'09

Billie

Ophelia Isabell Booker Barnes, '34

Morgan,

ent. '44

'34, '36

Anna Morris Covington, Emma MiUan Moss, '27, '50 Waring Mundie, '60 Mary (Mamie) E. Not-/ Smith, '95x Mary E. Oliver Watkins, ent. '05 Mattie D. 0ÂŤ/(/ Show alter. '13 ent. '01

Ellen V. (Nellie) Gzrae^// Richardson, '06

Elizabeth Casey Riggs, '29

Alice

Emily Cole Grant,

ent. '09

McKay Compton, '06 Mmta Hopkins Critzer Ogilvie, Isa

S.

'51

Frances Currie, '20

Wray

Bessie

Mary

Sally

Curtis Sinclair, '06x

Jessie Dey,

W.

Overbey Green, '45x

Lucy Haile Overby Webster,

B, P,;/;/f/ Jones, '97

Frances

0-4

M.

Fannie R. Phelps, ent. '32

Mattie W. Edirards Tynes, '19x Susan Marie Farrell Yues. ent. '10

Virginia

Anne

M. Kate

Mary

Read Montague,

Fergnson Morehead, '88

Florme Hunt Fowler, '94 Ella

M. Garer

Geltle

B.

Phelps Gentry, '55

Carolyn Rice Andrews,

Pierce, ent. '89

Ruth Anderson

Montgomery,

'27

Penick Wiltshire, '29x

Alma ent.

'08

'39, '54

Robertson Eutsler, '18

Edith Schanhach Strawser, ent. '14

'12

Reta M. Carrie B. Gihboney Grimsley, '42

Charlotte Glasgow, ent.

Mary

'2.i

E.Jeffries Gilliam.

05

Ruth

L.

Mrs.

S.

Godwin. lOx

Gregory Hamilton, T. Habel, ent. '23

Martha Haizlip Sampson,

Anna

E.

Hamlett,

'47

'40

Myrtle Elizabeth Huddle,

'12

tl

Martha Taylor Ingram, '20x

Meadows,

Annie Upson Draper,

Lizzie S. Hodges Fitzgerald, ent. '93

'31,

L. Staton Biscoe, ent. '14

Florence E. Toioles

Delia Hitt, '07x

Jr., ent. '46

Spain Meade, '98

Helen Elizabeth Spencer Smith, Eva

'28

M.

Cora

14

ent, '01

Mary Louise Holland,

ent. '05

Alger Rixie Southall,

Mrs. Mary E. Glenn, ent. '25 Otelia Darden

Seal, ent. '07

Chloe Snow Cox, Martha A. Sours,

'97x

ent. '12

Sarah Elizabeth Vai/ghan

Frissell,

'l6x

Nancy W. Walktip Wilis, '10 Calva H. Watson Wooten, '05 Annie Virginia Whitehorn, '20x

Nell Douglas Ingram, '06 J ulii Johnson Davis, '10

Mary

Leatie L.Jones Golden, '19x

Sylvia Winer, '28

Lucy B.Jones Quisenberry, '15x Gertrude Lash Asher, '20x

Lucile Bryan Woodson Nicholson, '16

Miss

Daisy V. Lee Temple, ent. '06

Margaret Sprnnt Ha

Cecelia Wilkie, '97

Willie

Nurse '41

McKee,

Former

College



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