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University of Greenwich School of Design 11 Stockwell Street Greenwich London SE10 9BD Copyright Š University of Greenwich No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photography, recording or any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the publisher. ISBN: 978-0-9935909-9-3 A catalogue record of this book is available from the British Library Design: Mike Aling + Kam Rehal Production assistants: Philia Yi Sian Chua, Ahad Mahmood Printed in the UK by Astra Printing Group Exeter EX5 2UL


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Contents 008

Introduction to the School of Design

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Introduction to Architecture

Professor Stephen Kennedy Simon Herron

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BA (HONS) ARCHITECTURE

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Year 1

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Y1 Unit 1

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Y1 Unit 2

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Y1 Unit 3

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Y1 Unit 4

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Unit 1

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Unit 3

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Unit 4

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Unit 6

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Unit 7

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Unit 8

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Technology

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History and Theory

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MArch ARCHITECTURE

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Unit 12

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Unit 14

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Unit 16

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Unit 18

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Unit 20

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Unit 21

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Design Realisation

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Histories/Theories/Futures

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POSTGR ADUATE DIPLOMA IN ARCHITECTUR AL PR ACTICE

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Research + Lectures

Susanne Isa Stephanie Reid + Pravin Ghosh + Kenzaf Chung Emily Yeung + Matt Chan + Iris Argyropoulou Evelina Vatzeva + Eric Wong + Seรกn McAlister Louis Sullivan + Jen Wan + Ka man Leung + Joanne Chen Benni Allan + Kieran Hawkins George King + Yeena Yoon Susanne Isa + Nick Elias Tom Noonan + Yianni Kattirtzis Yorgos Loizos + Ned Scott Mark Hatter + Jen Wan Kieran Hawkins + Rahesh Ram + Jon Walker + Simon Withers Dr Stelios Giamarelos + Dr Benz Kotzen

Rahesh Ram Mike Aling Simon Herron + Jon Walker Pascal Bronner + Thomas Hillier David Hemingway + Jake Moulson Dr Shaun Murray + Simon Withers + Yorgos Loizos Rahesh Ram

Mark Garcia

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“ When it came to designing, the modern mind had no equals. Designs were one article of which modern societies, and their members, never ran short. The history of the modern era has been a long string of contemplated, attempted, pursued, seen through, failed or abandoned designs. Designs were many and different, but each one painted a future reality different from the one the designers knew. And since ‘the future’ does not exist as long as it remains ‘in the future’, and since in dealing with the non-existent one cannot ‘get one’s facts straight’, there was no telling in advance, let alone with certainty, what the world emerging at the other end of the efforts of construction would be. Would it indeed be, as anticipated, a benign, user-friendly and pleasurable world, and would the assets budgeted and laid aside for the purpose and the approved work schedules prove adequate for transferring that world from the drawing board into the future present? ” - Zygmunt Bauman, Wasted Lives: Modernity and its Outcasts, 2004 This quote speaks to all of the disciplines that have now come together in the newly formed School of Design, and to the challenges faced in a contemporary context. From the drawing board to the ‘future present’, we all continue to be involved in realising some kind of project, in planning its execution, and ensuring that adequate and appropriate

School of Design 2019 resources are available and accounted for. Whether it be designs for buildings, for spatial arrangements, for concepts, products, or for narrative engagement, we are all critical participants in a complex economy of creative and professional challenges and opportunities. The students’ work that is on display here, supported by the tutors who have worked with them to achieve their ambitions, is testament to the seriousness with which the critical challenges that currently face us are taken. Whether we continue to design our way out of such challenges, and remain on the path to the future, as envisaged by our modern predecessors, or adopt an entirely different mode of engagement – one that embraces non-linearity, uncertainty, and the reconstituted status of the human in a vastly expanded universal matrix of digital and analogue components – is a question that occupies our collective creative energies. The work in this show demonstrates that these challenges are being met with the kind of energy and alacrity that means we can all be confident about the future, even if we do not know exactly what it holds. My thanks and admiration go to all of the students and staff for making this inaugural School of Design show such a great success. Your contribution does not end here though, and we look forward to you returning to contribute to our ongoing endeavours as a creative community. Professor Stephen Kennedy Head of School

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Introduction

Welcome to Architecture Simon Herron

Academic Portfolio Lead - Architecture

This catalogue gathers together and presents a cross-sectional journey through our professionally accredited Architectural courses within the new School of Design at the University of Greenwich. Following a simple structure, this catalogue aims to guide the reader vertically through our courses, across the interconnected modules of Design, Technology, Histories and Theories (and Futures). Our architecture courses are presented as a unified whole, collectively seen through a single pedagogical lens from Year 1, through MArch, to Postgraduate Diploma in Architectural Practice. Design is placed firmly at the centre of everything we do. Technology, histories and theories are parallel strands of creative design based critical thinking. Architecture is presented as a discipline, which is then to be put into practice. Course structures should have inherent simplicity, they need to provide contingency and opportunity for invention and surprise. Curricula should be invisible at the point of delivery – imbedded seamlessly within an intuitive teaching interface. A supportive studio-based culture is at the centre of the School of Design, where students are taught within the unit based design studio system. We ask our students to be speculative; we therefore have a parallel obligation to provide an environment which encourages, supports and enables this to take place and evolve. Within this constructed model, Architecture provides a contingency for the unknown, a speculative imaginary vessel unlocking new uses and new meanings for an uncertain future. In a world facing unparalleled complexities, we have a responsibility to prepare the next generation of architects for the challenges of their time. Architecture must be relevant to the time in which it is produced, balanced with a responsibility for its inheritance and a duty of care for its legacy gifted to the future. Looking again through my copy of Temple Island by Michael Webb, then re-reading the essay by the late Lebbeus Woods, I was transfixed as ever by the sheer craft and technical nuance of the drawings of Webb, and the potency of the Woods’ writing. Both protagonists were located on a fragile plain between art, science and the unconscious, at the heady intersection of the expanding event horizon of pure creation. Both protagonists made an unequivocal and conscious decision to reject the tired shibboleths of Modernism, to challenge the prevailing confirmative rhetoric of their time. Woods asks us to first build buildings, and then discover how to live, use and to work in them – a conscious, back to front, inside out way of working. For both Webb and Woods, drawing, making and thinking are inseparable from breathing. As a community, we aspire to these values.

“The ancient forms appear again as in a dream – mandalas, cabbalistic metaphors of a secret God, the cloud-chambers of infinite certitude granted to Chinese geomantic priests, and to the prophets of the processional equinox, locked in the spiral rooms, descendants of an intrepid race – elements in a dream of space and time continuous and infinitely delayed.” - Lebbeus Woods, Origins Mega II, Architectural Association London, 1985

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BA (Hons) Architecture is the first step in a professional career in architecture. The course offers students a range of approaches to architectural design through studio-based tutorial groups, or ‘Units’. Each Unit explores a different aspect of architectural design, ranging from new technologies, emerging social conditions and contemporary cultural contexts, to more abstract aesthetic and theoretical concerns. Within each year of the course, design accounts for 50% of the marks with a central emphasis on developing high level design skills and the ability to create and communicate complex architectural ideas. Students explore the visual and tactile world, learning drawing and computer skills. Design projects are supported by studies in the history of architecture, sustainability, architectural practice, contemporary theory and technology.

BA (Hons) Architecture Academic Portfolio Lead - Architecture:

Simon Herron

Design Co-ordinator:

Susanne Isa

Technology Co-ordinators:

Rahesh Ram (Year 1) + Simon Withers (Year 1) + Jon Walker (Year 2) + Kieran Hawkins (Year 3) History & Theory Co-ordinators:

Dr Stelios Giamarelos (Years 1 + 2) + Dr Benz Kotzen (Year 3)

013


“If something is not right, this is due to carelessness, and it is the cook’s fault. If something is good, say why, and when it is bad, pick out its faults. If one does not keep the cook in line, he becomes insolent. Before the food comes, send word down that the food tomorrow must be better.” - Yuan Mei

BA (Hons) Architecture

014

Year 1 Susanne Isa

Image > Jekabs Barzdins Project 1 - 1:1 Fragment

Yuan Mei was a Chinese poet in the eighteenth century and author of one of the best books on gastronomy. The word gastronomy derives its roots from the words that mean stomach and rule – rules for the stomach. Like gastronomy, the discipline of architecture is both an art and a science. Architecture is therefore a form of artifice and a disciplined habit. The qualities of architecture are difficult to sum up through generalisations and must be learnt through accretion and practice. Students are required to have an adventurous spirit and like true explorers know when they have found something, then return to it, charting the journeys and approaches, and share it, so that others can also know it. To do this the student does not travel alone, it is an activity that involves others who guide through discussion, dialogue and doing. Aciu, aitah, arigato, blagodarja, cam on ban, chokran, dank, danke, dekuji, djakuju, dziekuje, ederim, efcharisto, faleminderit, giitu, gracias ,grazie, hvala, kiitoskozonom, merci, multumesc, obrigado, paldies, salam, shukran, spacibo, takk, terima kasih, tesekkur; thank you, to all who participated and their generous spirit. You know who you are.


BA (Hons) Architecture, Year 1

016

Y1 Unit 1: Kairos, An Opportune Moment for Action Stephanie Reid + Pravin Ghosh + Kenzaf Chung Students: Elias Baiioud, Simone Bezzi, Mehmet Bingol, Mariah Dechavez, Helin Demirkol, Stephanie Durand, Luke Fiorini, Theodoor Groothuizen-Kirk, Lamar Hamilton, Isabella Hicks, Nahim Islam, Mariah Jover, Haaris Khan, Zi Hao Mo, Gargee Naik, Shirin Naveed, Miriam Nedelcu, Aida Osmani, Anika Rodrigues, Bradley Ruben, Elise Serre-Simpson.

With thanks to: Adam Bell, Thomas Bulmer, Victoria Lee, Alex Schramm. Image > Luke Fiorini Astrological House

Unit 1 explored architecture through the lens of qualitative time. The word Kairos in Ancient Greek culture is defined as an opportune or decisive moment. Kairos is opposed to Chronos, which is linear and chronological time. Kairos cannot be measured except by its quality. Unit 1 walked a meandering route from the centre of the Greenwich Peninsula, branching out to the west and east sides. A handful of sites were identified along this path, each with its own unique historical, cultural, social and architectural context. The first part of the brief was to create a time capsule - a way of measuring and recording a chosen qualitative moment. These moments included conditions specific to the sites and surrounding areas, such as movement, ritual, routine, meditation, weather, meeting, separation, attraction. The students each designed a method of capturing their chosen moment, and developed a process of mapping this in the context of specific site conditions. Students catalogued a spectrum of moments, such as the specific blue of the sky, a collection of found objects, or the effect of the tide movement on the shoreline, and analysed these to identify their chosen moment. Detailed drawings of observed site conditions, showing movement and change over time, were used to map each chosen moment. Collage and model-making techniques were used to make an intuitive leap, to explore its potential spatial qualities. The students explored the colour, texture, volume and materiality of this spatial proposition, and also considered how this would be affected over time. The students identified an opportunity offered by each site: abandoned boats, water pollution, homelessness, recycling waste. Each opportune moment was synthesised with the site research and earlier conceptual spatial investigations to drive an architectural proposal that would benefit the site, its surroundings and embody an aspect of qualitative time.


Luke Fiorini Astrological House

Elias Baiioud Boat Workshop

Elise Serre-Simpson Herbalism Centre

Haaris Khan Purification Spa

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Luke Fiorini Astrological House

Elias Baiioud Boat Workshop

019


BA (Hons) Architecture, Year 1

020

Y1 Unit 2: Chronotope Cyclical Experiences | Architecture | Space Emily Yeung + Matt Chan + Iris Argyropoulou

With thanks to our critics: Barry Cho, Henry Keene, Hugo Keene, Ka man Leung, Ben Masterton-Smith, Simon Withers.

Students: Jekabs Barzdins, Wanshi Chang, Halil Duzgun, Peter Gonsor, Austeja Grabauskaite, Finley Grover, Joel Hilaquita, Julie Hodgon, Mihai Ille, Mindaugas Kairys, Gustav Lindgren, Caterina Lum, Leia Monger, Aksa Mudassir, Pritam Sarker, Benedict Ward, Jennifer Weber, Ellie Worthington.

Image > Jekabs Barzdins Birdwatching Building

Unit 2 students were asked to assess the relationship between cyclonic realities and urban experiences. The year began with two short tasks, one of which challenged the students to make a device that recorded the cyclical qualities of the site, measuring a terrestrial change, an observed event, or even unveiling site-specific rituals that measured both the visible and intangible with a cyclical effect. All of which could be explored via an instrument, item of furniture or recorded installation. These critical observations developed into specific spatial qualities to form narratives of time and space as a building intervention, addressing the chosen event-phenomenon in one of two given sites in the Greenwich Peninsula: Tunnel Wharf, an F-shaped jetty on the Thames Path between high-rise residential blocks; and 87 Blackwall Lane, a soon-to-be-demolished tyre garage adjacent to the Grade II listed Rothbury House, built in 1893 as a church with money provided by an arms manufacturer that is now home to Emergency Exit Arts. The peninsula was once occupied by Dutch engineers in the 16th century and was a notorious location where Pirate corpses were hung in the 17th century. Greenwich was a key port for various industries and trades and was home to the first submarine cable works, effectively beginning the telecoms revolution that has culminated with the internet. Greenwich peninsula is now a rapidly developing area, and the sites offer an exciting urban, cultural and historic context to influence pertinent architectural briefs. Students were encouraged to explore the internal built environment, perhaps as a specific solitary moment within the cycle, and prompted to investigate how the exterior enhances these internal moments. This year the building project aimed to help each student explore their own interests by focusing on their individual findings from site to realise their own architectural vision.


Austeja Grabauskaite Measure of Fear

Leia Monger Stories from the Past

Julie Hodgon Memory House

Gustav Lindgren Artisan Cider Brewery

022


Halil Duzgun Photographer’s House

Austeja Grabauskaite Animal Crematorium Corridor

Wanshi Chang Photographer’s House

023

Peter Gonsor Sanctuary from the City

Leia Monger Tea Room

Finley Grover Dog Day Care Centre


Hybrid, n, c. 1600 1. the offspring of two animals or plants of different breeds, varieties, species, or genera, especially as produced through human manipulation for specific... characteristics. 2. anything derived from heterogeneous sources, or composed of elements of different or incongruous kinds. 3. a word composed of elements originally drawn from different languages.

BA (Hons) Architecture, Year 1

024

Y1 Unit 3: HybridHouse Evelina Vatzeva + Eric Wong + SeĂĄn McAlister Students: Victoria Collins, Marius Dinu, Zeki Emin, Benafsha Gafari, Tony Guo, Pooja Hari, Namrata Harshad, Irene Ilunga, Amendra Madipola, Thulasie Kumar Manoharan, Stefan Oancea, Preslava Pachemanova, Tom Parry, Nikisha Patel, Rebecca Proctor, Colette Roberts Camina, Josh Stares, Dardan Zenuni.

Unit 3 students and tutors are grateful for the intelligence, forthrightness and generosity of our guest critics and workshop leaders: Irene Astrain, Andrew Choptiany, Emma Colthurst, Rowan Mackinnon-Pryde, Laura Mark, Brian Murphy, Sinta Tantra, Nora Wuttke. Image > Amendra Madipola Post-Apocalyptic Taxidermy House

As a unit we designed extraordinary houses with a hybrid aspect. The house was envisaged as a home for an outrageous mongrel client, with its design being idiosyncratic to the client: an expression of a character that is prolific in their creative field. This was a crossbreed house, a bastard house, where the experiences, forms, actions and functions of the design resulted from various sources. First Unit 3 developed a hybrid house brief based on a notable creative person in culture as their client. Students then extracted the essence of their client’s public competency: medium, skill, export, craft, and/or activity. In all cases we were interested in the spatial requirements and opportunities of this competency. 1. Hans Zimmerman (score composer) 2. Yayoi Kusama (artist) 3. Marcel Duchamp (artist) 4. Rachael Whiteread (artist) 5. Lewis Carroll (author) 6. Barbara Hepworth (artist) 7. Henry Ford (automotive industrialist) 8. Wright Brothers, Orville and Wilbur (aviators) 9. Wes Anderson (film maker) 10. Eadweard Muybridge (photographer) 11. Stanley Kubrick (film maker) 12. Vivienne Westwood (fashion designer)


Tom Parry Auction House

026

Preslava Pachemanova The House of Lanterns


Irene Ilunga Glass Bottle Tile House

Thulasie Kumar Manoharan Haiku House

027


BA (Hons) Architecture, Year 1

028

Y1 Unit 4: To Live is to Work Through a Moment in Time Louis Sullivan + Jen Wan + Ka man Leung + Joanne Chen Students: Saif Abbas, Christopher Canada, Gabriela Czaplinska, Angelo De Araujo Moreira, Alisha Gracias, Jackiya Hossain, Ismail Khalil, Deep Matharu, Akeen Murdock, Cansu Onal, Sandra Pielech, Naomi Powell, Dorna Safari, Amiqul Safiq, Anosha Tarar Parveen, Agis Valsamis, Samuel Wright, Shijing Zhang.

With special thanks to our critics: Christopher Gaule, Alastair King, Rahesh Ram, Simon Withers. Image > Christopher Canada Painted Hall Community Ceramic Studio

This year Unit 4 explored what it means to live, and what it means to work. How these two conditions clash in the same environment, what effect one has upon the other, how perhaps one envelopes the other, and how one can define the other. Drawing from their research and observations of London’s Museums and the rich environment of their sites around Greenwich, the students defined their occupier, the profession for which they are designing and the program of their projects. The result of which was a small building proposition; dwellings for both living and working. We choreographed the relationship of their spaces, and how the buildings specifically deal with the requirements of the occupation. We explored the importance of context, and how a building reacts to its surroundings, how it is specialised for its place and function, whether it be through moments of retreat and shielding or opening and embracing. We pondered and drew conflicts of spatial or atmospheric arrangement, and described what occurs when someone or something from within the context is brought to the site. We explored ideas of time, moments in time, and how we can develop methods of recording the passage of time. For everything a reason; the students designed their buildings as bespoke instruments fit for the needs of the protagonist and their narrative. The students explored the personality, investigated what it is to occupy a space, and how those spaces are intended to make the occupier and visitors feel. Our buildings addressed both the temporary and the permanent, and have ephemeral and or transitory natures. The architectures embrace change and evolve over time, adjusting and amending themselves to the shifting context and the requirements of the user.


Naomi Powell Film Noir House

030


Samuel Wright Baking School

Ismail Khalil Canoe Builder’s Workshop

031


BA (Hons) Architecture, Year 2+3

032

Unit 1: Reduce/ Reuse Benni Allan + Kieran Hawkins Year 3: Rihana Alakija, Abby Halfacre, James Millar, Ruth Mukonoweshuro, Habib Najib, Henry O’Neill, Paula Pocol, Sheryl Si, Kunlanan Suwanpradit, Rahima Zikimana, Elina Zvirbule. Year 2: Pedro Herrera-Gomez, Henna Kuolimo, Ana Rose Layosa Delmo, Tung Li, Iina Neittamo, Tamanna Tahera.

We would like to thank everyone who gave their time during the year for crits, seminars and workshops: Alex Bank, Sam Casswell, Max Dewdney, Simon Herron, Susanne Isa, David Warren. Image > Paula Pocol Chalton Commune for Retired Women

Unit One is fascinated by the poetic quality of architecture expressed through materials and structure; how the controlled design of construction impacts on emotional experience. The Unit sees architectural precedent as a source of inspiration and a rich practical resource to employ in our proposals. We work to reveal urban conditions and building composition through refined creative studies, and use the resulting interpretations to establish the basis of new design languages. Through this practice we place special value on the craft of constructing thoughtful drawings and models to explore places and ideas in depth. This year we designed places to encourage both shared communal interaction and peaceful refuge, and through these proposals explored wider relationships of the civic and personal in the city. We looked to address issues of overconsumption and waste ever-present in the production of buildings, reusing constructions, typologies and ideas that are faced with redundancy and provocatively proposing new ways of making buildings and civic space. We began the year by adding layers to existing buildings to create new spaces that combine public and private use. Alongside this we developed shared criteria for assessing the unit’s work by researching the material and spatial qualities of selected building precedents, harvesting ideas for reuse in new proposals. Our study trip took us to Athens where we learned from the relationship of buildings to their context, the forming of public space and the expression of load-bearing structure. The major design investigation was sited amid the density of Kings Cross and Euston. The proposals address the reuse and recycling of existing typologies that are due to become redundant. All the new buildings combine places to live with shared civic functions. Throughout the year we attempted to develop and deploy architectural grammar founded on a controlled use of structural elements. We thought carefully about the relationship between public and private at a variety of scales, and proposed how this can be supported and expressed, whether in an apartment layout, a window design, access strategy or the new edge offered to the street.


Henry O’Neill Exmouth Arms Winery

034


Sheryl Si Workshop and Immersive Theatre Space

035


Henna Kuolimo Starcross Street Housing and Distillery

Pedro Herrera-Gomez Pentonville Fish Market and Bar

Iina Neittamo Allotments, Meeting Points, Market and Apartments

Henna Kuolimo Starcross Street Housing and Distillery

Pedro Herrera-Gomez Pentonville Fish Market and Bar

Tahera Tamanna Brick Vaulted House

036


Ana Rose Layosa Delmo Argyle Street Intergenerational Centre

037

Tung Li Shared Hotel Facilities


Ruth Mukonoweshuro Thandiwe Music Academy

Rahima Zikimana Photography School

Elina Zvirbule Bath House and Retirement Apartments

038

Kunlanan Suwanpradit Community Housing with a Creche Rihana Alakija Community Fine Art School

Abby Halfacre Factory for Furniture Craft

James Millar > Kings Cross Mail Hub


BA (Hons) Architecture, Year 2+3

040

Unit 3: Designing Fast and Slow George King + Yeena Yoon Year 3: Vladimir Broasca, Connor Meighan, Berna Tanis, Charlie Truman. Year 2: George Bainton, Anna Dinis Jensen, Nawres Ghachem, Abdullahi Gure, Mustafa Hussein, Ridhwan Kahn, Julia Lauri De Funes, Rozani Razali, Charles Read, Belgin Sahan, Jessica Sharp, Furkan Tarhan.

With thanks to: Alex Bilton, Joseph Goodwin, Frank Green, Freddie Heaf, Simon Herron, Jonathan Holt, Dan Madeiros. Image > Connor Meighan Russian Beluga Sturgeon Farm

This year Unit 3 continued its fascination with the intersection of craft and technology, the real and the virtual, and the digital and the analogue by exploring the concept of time in both the design and construction of architecture. Inspired by Nobel Prize Laureate Daniel Kahneman’s recent book, Thinking Fast and Slow, we began by examining the speed of the design process itself. We researched examples of the role that time plays in our creative process and built environment before applying them to our own unique design proposals that embodied our individual theory of time in design, function and creation. Kahneman describes two systems of thought, the first, is fast, automatic, instinctive and emotional whilst the second is slow, effortful, deliberative and logical. Unit 3 broke down the design process into a series of explicit fast and slow tasks intended to exploit the advantages of each system. Students used the learnings from their tasks to build an understanding of how time plays a role in the design and construction of architecture. We used the untiring energy of the fast brain to create a large amount of energetic, creative and instinctive output and the logical slow brain to rationalise our outputs into functional, pragmatic designs. We used our exploration of time to address some fundamental questions. We investigated the role that speed played in sustainability and in our society: should we build slowly to last for generations, or does speed and agility provide an opportunity to address contemporary modern issues through the use of constantly updating and upgrading technology? We looked at the concept of flow and asked if there is a benefit to the designer or maker in the act of creation that reveals itself at an optimum speed to provide personal satisfaction and psychological wellbeing. We analysed the products of different design processes and asked if there is a fundamental difference in the character and value of something that has been made over time by a human hand, as compared to an identical item that is artificially created. We mapped the pace of activities within our buildings and asked how architecture plays a role in facilitating them. How do building typologies such as stadiums speed us up and shopping malls slow us down. We looked at how the intelligent and creative use of cross-programming can allow different, even opposing, functions to share the same space over the course of a day, a week or a year. As a point of departure, we took inspiration from Christian Marclay’s The Clock . We applied our observations to our site in Fish Island, Hackney Wick and created a series of site investigation mappings that explored the overlooked relationship of craft and cartography in constructing notions of territoriality. For the main project, students designed infrastructure for the artisans in Fish Island, a once largely industrial area with a long tradition as a home to artists and creative spaces. Students considered how activities of different speeds could co-exist in their design, whilst providing support structures and networks for the local creative community.


Connor Meighan Russian Beluga Sturgeon Farm

042


Connor Meighan Russian Beluga Sturgeon Farm

Anna Dinis Jensen Hackney Wick Museum of Pollution

043

Nawres Ghachem Fish Island Smokery

Anna Dinis Jensen Hackney Wick Museum of Pollution


Charles Read Craft Centre

044

Julia Lauri De Funes Engraving Studio and Rehabilitation Centre


Berna Tanis Canal Boat Community Centre

045


Charles Truman Queens Yard Urban Dairy Farm

046

Charles Truman > Queens Yard Urban Dairy Farm


Albion is the ancient name for Great Britain. Legend goes that its first inhabitants were Giants, as recounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth, which was regarded as fact up until the 17th century. The Ark is a vessel that contains representatives that are to be saved from disaster. This year Unit 4 investigated myths/traditions and rituals/rites and translated them into Architecture. The year started with students designing a ritual for the 21st century. The Unit focused on the now through interpreting the past and the near future.

BA (Hons) Architecture, Year 2+3

048

Unit 4: Ark Albion Revisited Susanne Isa + Nick Elias Year 3: Sarah Aisling, Claudia Bode, Sarah Brooke, Lauren Hawkes, Theodore James. Year 2: Daniel Heijink, Will Jones, Joshua Kirkwood, Soyun Lim, William Munroe, Bowen Ng, Andres Petras, Olesya Pkhakadze, Jack Taylor, Alexandru Zamfir.

Thanks: Lucia Berasaluce, Haptic Architects, Simon Herron, Anja Kempa, Madeleine Kessler, Joe Ridealgh, Hannah Rozenburg, Max Shen, Unit 15 The Bartlett, Jon Walker, Eric Wong. Image > Soyun Lim Sorry, Tree

“A ritual is a performance of acts prescribed by tradition or sacerdotal decree.” - Encyclopaedia Britannica The Encyclopaedia Britannica continues by stating that all societies have rituals, being a means of defining or even describing its participants. Unit 4 reinterpreted this idea and designed invented rituals for the 21st century. The rituals developed from employing design agenda such as individual/tribe, domestic/urban, solitary/communal, daily/annual, private/open, fiction/fact, rational/irrational; a “Twofold Vision” as coined by William Blake where imagination becomes a form of perception. As all traditions are invented and designed, they often rely on a narrative or myth. For Project 01, students were tasked to design a Gift from these rituals, a Postcard view into their Myth for the 21C. The Gifts required specific acts, objects, and places to be considered, which together had an inherent means of transmission to others for preservation. These surfaced as devices, installations and drawings, which were the formative material for Project 02. In Project 02, Year 3 students developed their Gifts into polemical architecture, celebrating the spatial consequences of their designed Myth. The Year 2 students expanded their Gift to challenge and realise a responsive architecture, ruled by myths, traditions, rituals and rites.


Daniel Heijink Crossroads Monument

William Munroe Shooters Hill Exchange

Joshua Kirkwood Moon Observatory

Daniel Heijink Crossroads Monument

William Munroe Shooters Hill Exchange

Jack Taylor House for Tom Thumb

050


Joshua Kirkwood Moon Observatory

051

Will Jones Cauldron Spa


Sarah Brooke The Battle of Watling Street

052

Theodore James Crossbones Chapel Jack Taylor > House for Tom Thumb


Will Jones Cauldron Spa

054

Soyun Lim > Sorry, Tree


BA (Hons) Architecture, Year 2+3

056

Unit 6: Somers Town Stories Tom Noonan + Yianni Kattirtzis Year 3: Dana Al Khammach, Freddie Aleluya, Mie Aspelin, Jamal Blair, Joe Brotherton, Hana Mohammed, Karolina Mykolaityte, Teddy Ngoga, Matilde Perticone, Elina Sembele, Robert Wasawas-Jepsen. Year 2: Fabricio Aguilar Rojas, Miles Barton-Black, Denisa Birtoc, Vasil Georgiev, Trendafil Krastanov, Hessam Ranjbar, Saman Sabzabadian.

Thanks to our Critics and Consultants: Graham Dodd (Arup), Simon Herron, George King, Chris Millar (Arup), Ian Payne (Studio Fractal), Peter Scott (Cityscape), Ian Taylor (Alan Baxter), Aryan Tehrani, Yeena Yoon. Image > Robert Wasawas-Jepsen RMT Headquarters and Night School

There is a long history of architects looking to cultures, traditions and ideas of other places and times to influence and inspire their work back home. In Unit 6, we pursue this tradition to find surprising narratives that may question the future of our cities and spaces. We look to other places, real and unreal narratives and stories to provide a launching pad for creative ideas and journeys that can culminate in fantastical, reactionary, mischievous and joyful architectures and environments. We encourage students to develop a language and means of representation that is specific to their architecture. We see drawings as more than an instruction to build – they are the space to project your imagination and experiences. We experiment with scale and craft, hybridised analogue and digital medias, and model making, to allow the audience to experience the imagination of your architecture. This year our site was around Somers Town – a place at a turning point. With huge infrastructure projects and luxury housing planned over the next few years, we explored how this important part of the city can retain and celebrate its identity, or create a new one. The area is famous for its innovative social housing, and is currently fighting for its identity in the wake of the station redevelopments. We researched the site, its surrounding areas, its past, present and futures and proposed architectures that defined the identity of this new part of the city. We also looked into some of the buildings and spaces around the area to see what clues we can take, including Colin St John Wilson’s British Library, which was influenced in part by Aalto’s Saynatsalo Town Hall, which in turn was inspired by the Italian Renaissance’s courtyards and plazas. Somers Town is a place of change, transition, connections, flux and energy. A place of rich industrial, infrastructural, cultural and social heritage. We examined, harnessed and reframed these past and present conditions to speculate and imagine new futures for the area that celebrate the vibrancy and life of this place. Students were asked to propose a public building as a microcosm of a fantastical, curious and vibrant new city. To begin with, students were asked to seek out a fragment from the site such as a building, idea, book, writer, incident, story, film, history, community or environment. This search informed a detail of the proposed architecture; a threshold, a door, a window, chair, a monument, an artefact… Year 2 students proposed a building on the development site between the British Library and the Francis Crick Institute, currently being developed by developers Stanhope and architects RSHP as an extension to the British Library. Students were asked to reimagine its future as a new ‘town hall’ for the community, and a catalyst for the future of the wider Somers Town and Euston area. Year 3 students built on their earlier research to develop a complex public building.


Hessam Ranjbar Somers Town Museum of the Everyday

Miles Barton-Black London Champagne Headquarters

Saman Sabzabadian Somers Town Geology Society

Vasil Georgiev Brick Museum

Trendafil Krastanov Mental Wellbeing and Craft Centre

Saman Sabzabadian Somers Town Geology Society

058


Teddy Ngoga Yuanlu Institute and Conservation Centre

059

Mie Aspelin Somers Town Forum


Karolina Mykolaityte Bangladeshi Embassy in Somers Town

Hana Mohammed St Pancras Cruising Club

Dana Al Khammach Camden Performing Arts Centre

Matilde Perticone The Cristallo Library

060


Elina Sembele John Soane Institute of the Picturesque

061


Joe Brotherton Post Office Plus

062

Freddie Aleluya > T.A.R.Y.O.G


063


“Architecture is defined by the action it witnesses as much as by the enclosure of its walls.” - Bernard Tschumi

BA (Hons) Architecture, Year 2+3

064

Unit 7: Curtain Twitching Yorgos Loizos + Ned Scott Year 3: Ieva Brazaite, Galina Dimova, Nathalie Harris, Isaiah Javate, Aneliya Kavrakova, Andrius Maguskinas, Minh-Trang Ngoc Nguyen, Maryam Rangel, Ekaterina Staykova, Shakera Sultana, Sana Tabassum. Year 2: Fahdah Albusaily, Gizelle Angel Bridi, Dominika Banelyte, Mara Fetche, Sam Jones, Marcello Maioli, Raeesah Shah, Florence Wright.

Thanks to: Jonathan Allwood, Nick Elias, James Green, Mark Hatter, Simon Herron, Susanne Isa, Larissa Johnstone, George King, Simona Moneva, Rahesh Ram, Professor Neil Spiller, Jen Wan, Alexander Wilford, Yeena Yoon. Image > Nathalie Harris Inhabited Infrastructures in the Anthropocene

Nosiness and gossip have long been reliable tools of informal civic organisation, observing and amplifying the smallest of local actions, helping to maintain strong and vibrant community identities. For these tools to be effective, they rely on our natural curiosity in our neighbours’ private affairs, our compulsion to peer from behind the curtains, and our perception of domestic and shared civic spaces as sites of mystery, scandal and melodrama. This year Unit 7 took a long and unflinching look from behind the net curtains to investigate the impact of urban density on citizenship, and to explore radical new methods for encouraging positive civic tendencies in challenging urban settings. The site was Shoreditch, an area renown for the vibrancy of its street culture and the diversity of its residential and commercial communities. Historically a working-class neighbourhood, Shoreditch has undergone numerous transformations over the past 30 years, resulting in the marginalisation of some of its historic sub-cultures and the introduction of numerous new ones. Against the backdrop of ‘hipsterfication’ and densification, the boundaries of civic responsibility have become uncertain, making it a perfect testing ground for imaginative new approaches that aim to foster local pride and harmony. Students began the year by examining the depiction of fictional domestic spaces in contemporary cinema and speculating on their potential as sites of mystery, scandal and melodrama. Students were asked to choose a scene from a list of films and explore its dynamics through iterative model making, drawings and the production of stop-frame animations. Students then expanded on their findings from the initial task, informing the identification of a community and site of interest in Shoreditch. Following careful research and observation, complex mixeduse programmes were developed for a series of intimate urban interventions that engaged with existing social and political tensions, challenging the relationship between private citizens and the wider community. Unit 7 explores architectural ideas that are current and closely-observed, ideas that require careful development using a variety of different research methods across a range of different scales. Year 2 students designed small-scale, experimental buildings that were informed by design drivers established by their early exploration of fiction domestic spaces. Year 3 students designed complex and ambitious buildings that involved several user groups and considered the way that they adapt and transform over time. Students used their dissertation topics to inform the concepts driving the design and were encouraged to develop urban strategies that can be applied on a wider scale beyond the physical boundaries of the proposals themselves.


Ekaterina Staykova The Grand Budapest Hamam, Folgate Street

Mara Fetche A Hotel for William Burroughs, Bateman’s Row

Florence Wright The Shoreditch Sleep Clinic, Bethnal Green Road

Ieva Brazaite Pho Restaurant and Vertical Farm, Columbia Road

Mara Fetche A Hotel for William Burroughs, Bateman’s Row

Maryam Rangel The Nomadic Community Workshop, Fleet Street Hill

066


Dominika Banelyte The Temple of Trees, Exchange Square

Shakera Sultana Ravenscroft Park Flower Market, Columbia Road

067

Sam Jones The Shoreditch Monitoring Department, Old Street

Galina Dimova Circus School Student Accommodation, Hoxton Square


Minh-Trang Ngoc Nguyen Cotton Factory and Restaurant Quarter, Brick Lane

068

Andrius Maguskinas The Shoreditch Instaline, Bishopsgate Goods Yard


Marcello Maioli Laika Film Studios, Great Eastern Street

069


Sana Tabassum Vietnamese Modular Community and Temple, Kingsland Road

070

Aneliya Kavrakova > Memento Loci, Shoreditch Centre of Arts and Amnesia


071


Seeing In its inaugural year, Unit 8 explored the notion of architecture as a visual construct, as something that is made to be ‘looked at’. While the assertion that architecture is something that is ‘seen’ may appear as a bland truism, it is rarely a starting point for the design process. We questioned the established wisdom of thrashing out a design through plans and sections before a final perspective or model reveals a scheme’s appearance. Instead we began with how our architectures were to be perceived, before developing methods of their realisation. We took cues from existing disciplines of ‘view’, from film, photography and the visual arts, and deployed their techniques in the production of space. We operated with the physical, concentrating on photography, modelmaking, and three-dimensional work from the outset. We were not afraid of beauty, composition, or of things simply being themselves. We believe in empiricism and iterative experimentation, and in projects developing their own narrative through conversation and accident.

BA (Hons) Architecture, Year 2+3

072

Unit 8: Seeing as Believing The Constructed View Mark Hatter + Jen Wan Year 3: May Ashton-Jones, Naushin Chowdhury, Katie FrazerLynn, Cara Marret, Basak Su Sahin, Lincoln Stephano Vaca Hurtado. Year 2: Diana-Maria Buta, Victoria Hajduczenia, Tida Jabi, Emilia Kepista, MariaAntonia Ligeti, MariaAlexandra Mataoanu, Alexandra Nell, Alicja Pronczuk, Tia-Angelie Vijh.

With thanks to cross-crit tutors and guests: Benni Allan, Kieran Hawkins, Yianni Kattirtzis, Yorgos Loizos, Tom Noonan, Egle Packauskaite, Stephanie Reid. Image > Alexandra Nell The Wonder of Tilbury

Believing It could be said that architecture is fabricated, both in terms of being made, and being ‘made up’. An architectural proposal is an imagined fiction overlaid on the world as it is. An architect needs to sell this fiction to various parties, to the client, to the authorities, to themselves. Techniques and technologies are available to assist an architect in these endeavours; computers can produce photographs of objects that have not yet been built, and models (miniature versions of buildings) can be produced that are still somehow understood as being enormous. We are interested in the notion of architectures as fictions, both in terms of the unrealised (unrealisable) proposal, and the rereading (misinterpreting) of the material world. As is apposite for a post-truth age, we encourage students to frame and present their work from within such a context: a fictionalised proposition may still have material outcomes. Site + Programme The sublime flatlands of the Essex estuary formed the backdrop to our experimentation. We explored the ‘otherness’ of this surreal edgeland where swamps and marshes are interspersed with flood defence walls, eroding military forts, sewage plants and a state-of-the-art logistics hub. Inland, points of reference range from the aptly named Worlds End pub to a radical 1930’s modernist town built by Czech shoe entrepreneur Tomas Bata. From fact to fiction; in H.W. Wells’ War of the Worlds, the estuary was disturbed by a Martian invasion. It was an ideal testing ground to (re-)construct the unrealised and unrealisable. Deploying the tactics and techniques learnt earlier the year, students were asked to design a Gallery. Seen as a space of display, narrative and revelation, the programme explored the notion of architecture as something that is ‘seen’, and also ideas of myth, authenticity and belief. In modern society a gallery can be many things, from a near spiritual space of reverence, instruction and contemplation, to a place for populist entertainment, or an act of defiance and rebellion.


Tia-Angelie Vijh Salt Spa

074


Tia-Angelie Vijh Salt Spa

075


Lincoln Stephano Vaca Hurtado Tilbury Beer Town

076


May Ashton-Jones Nautical Archaeological Gallery of the Thames Estuary

077


Emilia Kepista Coal House Gallery

078


Cara Marett Gallery of Water Deities

079


BA (Hons) Architecture

080

Technology Kieran Hawkins + Rahesh Ram + Jon Walker + Simon Withers

With thanks to: Jonathan Allwood (Barr Gazetas), Adele Brooks (University of Greenwich), Mark Davies (David Morley Architects), Larissa Johnston (Larissa Johnston Architects), Tom Jordan (Barr Gazetas), Tom Noonan (Hawkins\Brown), David Warren (Ingealtoir Structural Engineers). Image > Marcello Maioli BA (Hons) Architecture Unit 7, Year 2

In BA (Hons) Architecture we have a strong pedagogic ambition for the teaching of architectural technology. Behind the delivery of the modules there is a clear strategy of how the students’ knowledge of technology should evolve through their architectural education. We aim to install an ambitious attitude to technology with an eye on innovation and invention, whilst providing a solid grounding for students in the principles of environmental, material and structural design. We equip students with the relevant research methods and a critical approach to the design and making of buildings within an ever-changing trajectory of technologies. Underpinning all of the teaching of the knowledge and principles of architectural technology within the course is an ethos of rigour, experimentation and play. Architectural design is a complex process and requires a wide range of knowledge, experience and collaboration in order to develop an initial idea or concept into a reality. By definition, architectural students at undergraduate level are just starting this process and they are encouraged to grapple with a myriad of concepts and ideas that are largely alien to their previous experience. In essence, this is a process of working in abstraction, which is a huge challenge, considering the ‘real’ world where architects typically cement their understanding of building technology in an office environment. A key aim is to make students aware of the complexities and ranges of technologies and building sciences required to produce good buildings, whilst teaching them the relevant methods and modes of how to implement technology into their designs and how best to communicate these ideas. Within the teaching of technology lies a profound learning tension between understanding and spectating. In Year 1, students undertake an environmental audit of a selected building and critically analyse environmental and structural strategies. In term 2 students apply their understanding of structural and environmental research to their projects. Year 2 students are taught about the architectural profession, the role of the design team and the legislation context in which architects work in term 1. In the 2nd term students carry out a comprehensive technical study of a design project fragment. Year 3 students attend a technology lecture series ahead of undertaking their Technical Dissertation. This is tutored within the design units and aims to equip students with the research skills, aptitude and critical ability to assess key technical aspects of their final design project. The course is taught through a series of seminars, cross-unit reviews and technical workshops with external consultants.


Nathalie Harris BA (Hons) Architecture Unit 7, Year 3

082


Paula Pocol BA (Hons) Architecture Unit 1, Year 3

083


May Ashton-Jones BA (Hons) Architecture Unit 8, Year 3

084


Henna Kuolimo BA (Hons) Architecture Unit 1, Year 2

085


Henry O’Neill BA (Hons) Architecture Unit 1, Year 3

086

Aneliya Kavrakova > BA (Hons) Architecture Unit 7, Year 3


Teaching in history and theory of architecture is conceived as a complete journey over three years through the ideas, politics, art, buildings and landscapes of human civilisation. This journey brings students through a process of gaining skills and knowledge in research and writing, while building knowledge and context. Cultural Contexts of Architecture The first term of Year 1 introduces students to London, Greenwich and the broad range of research undertaken by Greenwich staff. Site visits and workshops balance the content between research, lectures and first-hand experiences of architecture and landscape. The module examines the cultural contexts of the built environment and investigates the relationships between design and society, introducing the premise that architectural ideas are culturally constructed, allied to prevailing ideologies and value systems. It provides a general background for current issues in the built environment, from housing and education to infrastructure and incarceration.

BA (Hons) Architecture

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History and Theory Dr Stelios Giamarelos + Dr Benz Kotzen

History of Architecture and Landscape 1 & 2 A broader overview of architecture, landscape and art history follows in the second term of Year 1 and the first term of Year 2. Students develop their skills in writing and research, beginning to frame a set of interests that will inform their future studies. Lectures over this period span history from the stone age to the twentieth century. The modules address the history of architecture and landscape as the common human quest of designing and constructing a specific relation with nature. They offer a survey of major global architectural traditions and place special emphasis on those that contributed to the rise to modernity. We provide tools to analyse examples and recognise patterns in design solutions, stressing the social and technological contexts that define architectures and landscapes of the past, while highlighting their relevance today. Contemporary Theories of Architecture Greater focus occurs in the second term of Year 2 when contemporary themes, ideas and theories in built work are explored. The research focus developed at this stage often provides an important underpinning for the Year 3 dissertation. The module familiarises students with a range of theoretical propositions through lectures and allows them to test these against diverse examples of architectural practice and urban phenomena. Undergraduate Dissertation In the Year 3 dissertation, each student develops research interests both as individuals and in small, themed and tightly guided groups with a dedicated supervisor whose interests and research are complementary to the theme. A high level of research quality and critical evaluation is expected, and the students are encouraged to pursue themes that they are passionate about and forge connections with their design work. Many students undertake daring studies that are arresting in terms of their written and visual quality, as well as the connections made between sites, projects, and the cutting edge of architectural theory.


Nathalie Harris Caracas: The Crosshatched City Supervisor: Dr Shaun Murray

How does a city go from being a Latin American powerhouse to extreme poverty in a contemporary environment? Caracas, Venezuela is still going through this transition. Once a city of wealth, luxury, and unquestionable natural beauty, the identity of the city has morphed through socialism, greed, and power hungry dictatorships. Caracas is a diverse city with two faces; the formal and the informal.

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Architects have used Caracas as an experimental playground, leaving a series of empty monumental formal structures lying dormant. This dissertation compares the current architectural climate in Caracas with the artistic movement of magical realism and speculates on how architecture and the role of the architect can influence the attitude of the people in order to transform the city.


Sarah Brooke Nostalgic Utopia

Supervisor: Tim Waterman

This dissertation critiques Susanne Stewart’s position that a Nostalgic Utopia is unachievable due to nostalgia’s need for authenticity. By analysing the role of authenticity in nostalgic spaces through the creation of simulacrum and hyperreality, the dissertation argues that authenticity is an unnecessary factor in the experience of such places. This is followed by an analysis of the nostalgic spaces in the John Soane Museum (pictured below) and in Dennis Severs’ House, through an exploration of their narratives, occupants and private collections, in order to claim how illusion is more important

Lauren Hawkes The Vertical Garden City Supervisor: Mark Garcia

London is in the midst of a housing crisis. With the last available square metres of over-priced metropolitan land quickly being taken over by luxury developments such as Nine Elms and Battersea Power Station developments, the availability of land is decreasing. This consequently isolates a large proportion of the population who are left unable to afford accommodation near to their jobs and families. One solution, the Vertical Garden City, will combine all aspects of a healthy and fulfilling lifestyle. Designs have been proposed by prestigious architecture companies; Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, OMA, MRVDV and Ole Scheeren (Sky Forest, Vietnam, pictured below). As many city planners such as Ebenezer Howard, Tony Garnier and Antonio Sant’Elia have described the utopian idea, an ‘ideal city’ should integrate the healthy, beneficial aspects of both city and rural life. Today the mixed-use community is providing residents with access to work and social spaces. The integration of green space in the city is an important factor because of proven health, ecological, environmental and sustainable benefits.

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in the execution of a nostalgic space than authenticity. Finally, the dissertation presents what the reality of a nostalgic utopia would mean for an individual - as well as for a communities - collective memory, allowing for an improved perception of time, and offering a palimpsest of histories in the built environment.

This dissertation will draw conclusions from comparing and contrasting 3 key case studies: J57 Sky City in Changsha, China; the Linked Hybrid, Beijing, China; and the Shard, London, UK that have similar mixed-use programmes with different pricing and location. These studies represent the majority of approaches to vertical communities and demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of the different construction techniques of high-rise buildings. At one extreme, the result is high-priced luxury flats that few people can afford. At the other extreme, costs and time of construction are reduced by using prefabricated elements, however the living qualities of these residential units can be poor. These case studies show the extreme contrast of high-rise luxury developments, against other key exemplars of this building type. They also illustrate the benefits of living in close proximity to work, amenities and social spaces in the city. A combination of mixed-use buildings, as well as the addition of parks and green spaces, is proposed as a viable solution for increasingly overcrowded cities by many contemporary and high-profile architects. This dissertation explores the benefits of this solution, one that satisfies the basic need for a connection to nature, as well as enabling large green spaces in dense urban environments.


Aneliya Kavrakova Irrelevant Architecture

Andrius Maguskinas #INSTARCH

This dissertation is a critical analysis of deconstructivism’s two most renowned architects. It investigates selected projects in which a displacement of the classical binary system takes place, including both built and written works. It aims to expose the voids within these projects in order to emphasise the importance of architecture’s relevancy in times of social anxiety and calamities. Firstly, analysing Peter Eisenman’s work and his complex relationship with philosophical deconstruction provides the reader with a clear understanding of the limits of such a metaphysical task. His (dis)sociation with deconstructivism is explored in order to draw conclusions regarding his theory of presentness

This dissertation examines the ways in which Instagram - the world’s fastest growing social media site with over 1 Billion users - has had an effect on architectural design. It begins with an analysis of different ‘instagrammable’ locations and identifies a range of current and emerging trends, before examining influencer culture and how - and why - this has greatly shaped the design of the built environment. The dissertation then studies how Instagram has transformed the way architectural media is being distributed and consumed, through a comparison of social media with traditional media mechanisms. The new ways in which Instagram has allowed architectural practices, journalists and publications to be more open with their audiences is assessed, highlighting the increasing speed of media distribution and consumption, to its current point of being instantaneous. This dissertation also

Supervisor: Dr Stelios Giamarelos

Supervisor: Mark Garcia

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and its relevance/materialisation within three of his signature projects. Secondly, through studying Bernard Tschumi’s (Parc de la Villette, pictured above) progression between his first built project and a more recent one, this dissertation argues that his methods of building a theory have proven to be successful to certain extents. This is followed by speculations on deconstructivism’s unanswered questions, particularly the relationship between architecture and the public.

explores the new fluid identity of the prosumer, along with the benefits and problems that this has created. Lastly, a study of the way that the representation of architecture has changed in the media due to the success of Instagram is undertaken, charting how architectural representation has altered from exclusive and insular, to inclusive and open to all.


James Millar Intelligent Design in Architecture

Hana Mohammed Reconstructing Charles Jencks’s Methodology

The exponential development of artificial intelligence could propagate a shift in architectural computing that irreversibly alters the architectural experience. This dissertation explores the current relationship experienced between man and machine in an attempt to determine the areas of influence that each contribute to the design process. Cognitive influence on behalf of the designer is examined and compared with the qualities offered by artificial intelligence in order to determine areas of expertise for input into the architectural design process. Intuition, along with experience in the physical environment can only be provided by a designer with real-world experience, therefore it is important for decision making to remain the responsibility of the architect. However, with limitations agreed, AI could provide a valuable scientific aid during the design process.

Charles Jencks is a well-known architect, architectural historian and cultural theorist, most prominently known for his writings on Post-Modernism in Architecture. He also studied comparative literature and many of his references come from art historians and theorists. Jencks has never been explicit about what exactly supported his thinking, or straightforwardly presents his methods to his readers. His writings utilize ideas from a range of thinkers from different backgrounds and fields, such as Claude Levi Strauss, an anthropologist, and a long list of writers, philosophers, and art historians. His broad range of references indicate that he was interested in trying to understand how postmodern culture works, not only in architecture, but also other fields. This dissertation argues that his writing methodology is to synthesise these diverse methods and systems. By analysing multiple texts, mainly Jencks’s, and highlighting elements that indicate his core (potential) influences and methodology, the dissertation puts forward the reasons that Jencks’ introduced Post-Modernism to the world of architecture.

Supervisor: Dr Shaun Murray

Supervisor: Dr Stelios Giamarelos

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Charles Jencks, Evolutionary Tree

Studio With, Emergent City


Teddy Ngoga The Eco-Transcultural Logic: An Evolution of Critical Regionalism Supervisor: Dr Stelios Giamarelos

This dissertation discusses the University of Technology Petronas in Petrak, Malaysia by Foster + Partners, and through it, the issue of disappearing cultural diversity in architectural design. Through research into how architectural theorists have responded to this problem historically, it explores eco-cultural logic and critical regionalism. While globalisation intensifies, it weakens the effects of both of these theories. This dissertation stresses the necessity to evolve from critical regionalism, and supports a broader approach of transcultural architecture, before concluding with the formulation of a new concept, the eco-transcultural logic, allowing diversity and compensating for cultural loss.

Cara Marett Sensitivity and Responsibility: Ecological Design in Architecture Supervisor: Dr Stelios Giamarelos

Individual beliefs collectively form larger societal cultures and perceptions, including the Modern Culture of the Twentieth Century. This dissertation questions whether individual perceptions of autonomy in the Postmodern era, beginning in the 1960s, affected the way that architects approached ecological design. More specifically, it questions whether their perceived autonomy created architectures that were in fact negatively impactful towards their site ecologies.

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Foster + Partners, Petronas University of Technology, Perak, Malaysia


Paula Pocol Back to the Socialist Estate Supervisor: Dr Shaun Murray

The Romanian city of Cluj-Napoca is at a tipping point in terms of its inhabitation. New estates are being built at an alarmingly fast rate, but they fail to become true communities. The ‘Romanian way of living’ is at a crisis and risks extinction. This dissertation argues that this situation can be overcome by analysing how individuals inhabit housing estates erected during the Communist regime and learning from these behaviours. The concepts and ideas behind Romanian Communist housing estate designs are evaluated, before an exploration of the practical characteristics of the communal and private aspects of Cluj-Napoca estates, comparing ‘new’ with communist.

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Sheryl Si The Rented Identity – Through the Kitchen and the Bathroom

Robert Wasawas-Jepsen Future Architectures Through Digital Morphogenesis and Computational Tools

This dissertation argues that there is a disconnection between renters in London and their sense of belonging within their home. As renting is slowly becoming a long-term alternative to homeownership, this disconnection negatively impacts the wellbeing of a renter. This dissertation focuses on the home interior, specifically the kitchen and the bathroom, in order to highlight their importance in forming place attachment during the Adjustment Period. It is important to define one’s personal space within these communal spaces. Improving the dwelling experience in a rented home starts with the interior.

Generative design and form-finding strategies are evident in parametric architecture, this design process is regularly described as “digital morphogenesis”. In nature, the DNA (genotypes) of an organism is the same in each cell, but the form of output (phenotypes) can vary wildly. Digital morphogenesis is a similar process; one designs the inputs for a wide variety of outputs. The dissertation covers the main theories and ideas related to digital architecture, such as generative design, parametricism, digital morphogenesis, scripting and programming, with case studies of work by the Institute for Computational Design (ICD) and the Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design (ITKE) at the University of Stuttgart, alongside Marc Fornes and THEVERYMANY, who are using approaches and strategies derived from these theories. It is evident that digital fabrication and robotic manufacturing will shape the future of architecture, amongst the further developments of computational tools, new materials and structural

Supervisor: Tim Waterman

Supervisor: Mark Garcia

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arrangements. These new architectures can be referred to as ‘second nature’ due to their biomimicry and ability to adapt and respond to genotypes of design. The dissertation discusses concerns around second nature architecture, such as the architect’s creativity, the duties of related professions, and how these new forms will be maintained once built.


Simona Moneva, BA (Hons) Architecture graduate 2018:

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“At Greenwich I developed the valuable qualities of independent and critical thinking. Staff encouraged me to experiment with both analogue and digital methods, all of which have found practical use in the office.�

Piercy&Company, 12-14 Cavendish Place, London


Zachary Higson, BA (Hons) Architecture graduate 2018:

“Studying Architecture at the University of Greenwich cemented my passion for the craft of drawing and making. I was given the freedom to fully explore all avenues when creative thinking was concerned.�

Nicholas Szczepaniak Architects, RIBA Regent Street Windows 2018

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The MArch Architecture course is for graduates of architecture with ARB/RIBA Part I who wish to gain exemption from ARB/RIBA Part 2. Our aim is to prepare students for the complexities of contemporary architectural practice by providing a rich mix of rigorous academic and professional teaching. All students choose a Design Unit in which to undertake their project work – each with a different specialism. Year 1 students develop advanced skills in digital representation that can be applied to the major building project in conjunction with a professionally tutored ‘Design Realisation’ technical and professional report. Additionally, students are exposed to current theoretical trends that form the basis for ambitious speculations on contemporary architecture.

MArch Architecture Year 2 takes the aspirations of the students work to a higher level of academic engagement. An integrated advanced architectural design project and specialist theoretical and/or technological thesis are developed with respect to the students own interests and passions. — Academic Portfolio Lead - Architecture:

Simon Herron

Design Co-ordinator:

Mike Aling

Design Realisation Co-ordinator:

Rahesh Ram

Histories Theories Futures Co-ordinator:

Mark Garcia

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MArch Architecture

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Unit 12: Mythomania Rahesh Ram Year 2: Peter Efe, Rayan Elnayal, Lucian Mocanu, Sven Reindl, Parisa Shahnooshi, Daniela Yaneva. PT Year 2: Michael O’Donnell, Luisa Sommerer. Year 1: Philia Yi Sian Chua, Thorin Costain, Vlad Dumitru, Anna Helliar, Svetoslava Ilieva, Qiuyu Jiang, Chun-Yin Kavika Lau, Aivis Provejs, Sikou Qiu. PT Year 1: Asalsadat Motevallian

With Special thanks to: Samuel Coulton and our practice tutors Mark Davies and Chris Roberts (David Morley Architects), along with our critics: Martin Aberson, Sarah Allen, Liam Bedwell, Harry Bucknall, David Hemmingway, Simon Herron, Steve Kennedy, Marilia Lezou, Yorgos Loizos, Gosia Malus, Alexander Mizui, Jake Moulson, Neil Spiller, Sasha Userdnaja, Jon Walker, Philip Hudson, Simon Withers. Image > Daniela Yaneva Down House 2099

Following on from last year’s brief, Fantastic Ideological Machines, an investigation into architecture as a form of language, this year Unit 12 focused on Mythologies . Roland Barthes famously claimed that myth is a form of speech, a system of communication: a message. Myths are part of every culture and their many sources range from the personification of nature or natural phenomena to truthful or hyperbolic accounts of historical events, to the explanations of rituals. A culture’s collective mythology conveys belonging, offers a tool to discuss shared and religious experiences, provides behavioural models, and propagates moral and practical lessons to the masses. They were usually disseminated through art, performances, rituals, storytelling and through architecture. Traditionally, in architecture, mythologies were overtly displayed on walls, could be read in plans and expressed through forms, decoration, iconography, and symbols. However, the stories can also be hidden from the casual viewer and are often built into the conceptual design of an architectural statement. Since the advancement of science, rational thought, functionalism, modernism, capitalism and the marginalisation of belief systems and meaning, there has resulted, in architecture, a loss (or at least a diminishment) of an important attribute that myths held, i.e. a device that can enable, what psychologists call, a perceptual transformation (a device that would provide an imaginative leap from the architectural space itself into another realm; in the same way as literature might offer a reader). In the west, with the demise of religion and contemporary cathedrals becoming houses of consumerism, the question is: do myths play any part in our contemporary culture? Do we still find meaning from ancient myths or are new mythologies being created for us to find meaning? Certainly, in the fifties, Roland Bathes in his book Mythologies, suggested that myths were being utilised and reinvented though re-readings and re-appropriation. Continuing Bathes theme, Peter Conrad in his book Mythomania (2016), read ancient mythologies into contemporary phenomena including people, events, places and ideas. Laptops and smartphones are sold under a logo that invokes the forbidden fruit of the Garden of Eden; skimpily clad classical nymphs cavort our TV reality shows; Narcissus makes a comeback whenever we snap a selfie. Judge Judy unleashes her judgment like a matronly Roman goddess dispensing justice with a fly swatter, and the metamorphosis of Caitlyn Jenner from Olympic athlete and paterfamilias into idealized female form have parallels to the transformations of the residents of Mount Olympus. Conrad suggests that historic and mythological readings of contemporary events and ideas enrich our everyday experience. Despite the demise of belief, we cannot avoid our past, and even if we are not believers, myths provide a line of flight for the imagination and relief from the mundane and the prosaic. This year students were encouraged to investigate mythologies in contemporary culture and design a cathedral for a modern theme, idea, person(s), company or institute. Final year students were asked to evolve a personal mythology.


Aivis Provejs Kim’s World

Luisa Sommerer Château de Est

Philia Yi Sian Chua Glitchscape

Chun-Yin Kavika Lau The Caring Community

Asalsadat Motevallian Cathedral for the Atonement of Bankers

Anna Helliar The Commodification of Eden

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Qiuyu Jiang Idols on Tour

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Vlad Dumitru A Slice of America on Castle Combe


Svetoslava Ilieva The Institute of Lipstick Feminism

Rayan Elnayal A Magic Realist Afrabia

Parisa Shahnooshi The Vertical Gardens of Persia

Thorin Costain Artificially Responsive (Somers) Town

Lucian Mocanu The Plastic Sovereign State

Peter Efe Crude City - Makotian Dream

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Sikou Qiu Cathedral of Meat 2050

Parisa Shahnooshi The Vertical Gardens of Persia

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Rayan Elnayal A Magic Realist Afrabia

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Sven Reindl The Virtual Utopia of Canary Wharf Peter Efe > Crude City - Makotian Dream


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MArch Architecture

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Unit 14: Arcade! Or, Stimulacra and Simultaneity Mike Aling PT Year 3: Matthew Baldwin Year 2: Alicea Chia, Robert Cropper, Isobel Eaton, Greta Lileikyte, Dominic Rago-Verdi, Katie Stares, Saeid Taghavi, Rebecca Tudehope, Wei Hun Wong. PT Year 2: Yaseen Patel Year 1: Gyuwan Choi, Xiaowen Fang, Charlotte Harris, Ahad Mahmood, Hasan Sahin, Mihaela Sologon, Voon Yin Wong. PT Year 1: Jeff Bray, Harry Parkinson.

Special thanks to: Our practice tutor Melisa Clinch (Wilkinson Eyre), Mark Garcia and Lukas Pauer for thesis support, Phil Hudson and Robbie Munn for AV support, Sam Sheard and Mark Sutherland for workshop support, and our critics; Steve Dippin, Mark Garcia, David Hemingway, Colin Herperger, Simon Herron, Kate Lynham, Keiichi Matsuda, Jake Moulson, Luke Olsen, Katie Parsons, Caroline Rabourdin, Professor Neil Spiller, Gosia Starzynska, Ben Sweeting, Jon Walker, Yeena Yoon. Image > Katie Stares Silicon Valley World Fair

From Hellenistic passageways to neon-clad strip malls, from turn-of-the-century Penny Arcades to 1970’s–90’s gaming dens, The Arcade has a long and complex history. In his unfinished proto-postmodern Arcades Project (Passagenwerk) of 1927-40, Walter Benjamin pronounced that the arcades of Haussmann’s Paris were the most significant architectural form of the C19th, being synchronous interio-exterior incubators for the dynamics of urban life. In 1971 the first (pre-Pong) video game arcade machine ‘Computer Space’ was developed, inspiring numerous other machines that would unite into the great ludic social condenser of the video game arcade. Today this typology sees a resurgence with Virtual/VR Arcades emerging in cities across the globe. Arcades continue to evolve as spaces of amusement, whilst maintaining (and often relishing in) their retrograde and low code qualities. Following Benjamin’s lead, are these new proprioceptive playgrounds a signpost for future urban life? The broader themes of the unit this year were mixed reality, simulation and its interplay with modelling. The mixing of realities in our ‘arcades’ however was not limited to the current conventions of Mixed Reality (MR); we speculated on conceptual toolkits for mixing, hybridizing and synergizing a multitude of spaces, realities, regimes and objects across the full gamut of the mixed reality spectrum and beyond, in order to create chimeric and chiasmatic multimodal architectures that ask more of the human sensoria. We interrogated texts by thinkers such as Baudrillard, Carpo and specifically Delanda’s Philosophy and Simulation: The Emergence of Synthetic Reason, along with texts on the histories and theories of the architectural model. Unit 14 develops work through the processes of modelling and the outputting of models. We are interested in the architectural opportunities that emerging modelling processes and technologies afford, such as deep learning generative design and intuitive AI, and (in relation to mixed reality) interreal physics and visuo-haptic models. We aim to propose new model languages and methods (physical, immaterial, co-existing and otherwise), as well as exploring models of thought, both as ways of understanding the world, and as devices to aid speculative work. At its most ambitious, Unit 14 is interested in how modelling has the capacity for both worldbuilding (the construction of an imagined worldspace) and Worldmaking (or Cosmopoiesis, the design and making of the actual world). We began the year by materializing and modelling a selection of thought experiments (types of thought models) that questioned notions of simulation and reality. Year 1 students were asked to consider ‘the Arcade in the 21st Century’ as a starting point for their building programme. Year 1 proposals were sited either side of Piccadilly; the opulent arcades of St.James’ to the west, or the not-so-opulent arcades of Soho to the East. Final year students developed their projects based on their individual themes and agendas.


Voon Yin Wong Soho Patisserie Garden

Ahad Mahmood The Shim Sham Arcade

Hasan Sahin Royal Astronomical Society

Xiaowen Fang Fringe Theatre, Soho

Jeff Bray Soho Retirement Village

Mihaela Sologon Shadow Puppet Theatre

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Alicea Chia The Soho Credit System

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Robert Cropper Volcano Museum, Izu Oshima

Greta Lileikyte Sealand 2.5

Robert Cropper Volcano Museum, Izu Oshima

Wei Hun Wong Shenzhen Data Monastery

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Matthew Baldwin Graphene City

Yaseen Patel Le Grand Paysage de la Mode

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Isobel Eaton (overleaf, left) > Hotel Hypnagogia

Rebecca Tudehope (overleaf, right) > The Tsinghua Initiative


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MArch Architecture

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Unit 16: Trade... The Course of Empire Simon Herron + Jon Walker Year 2: Opeoluwa Adeyileka, Che Caines, Atim Kilama-Oceng, Katy Scotter, Steffan Turner. PT Year 2: Jack Powley Year 1: Chen Yang, Luigi Di Vito Fransesco, Malaika Donkor, Jichen Fan, Denislav Lyubenov, Tsz Kit Ngai, Meriel Serlin, Mohamed Shoble, Margarita Strelyaeva. PT Year 1: Burcak Ates, Robert Coakley, Negar Khoshooee.

Thanks to: Our practice tutor Adam Bell (Foster + Partners), along with our critics: Mike Aling, Pascal Bronner, Thomas Hiller, Susanne Isa, Rahesh Ram, Martin Reynolds, and (sincere thanks to) Mike Webb. Image > Katy Scotter Heilbronn: The Home of Lidl

UNITSIXTEEN continued its restless exploration into the myths of the near future, reflecting again on the complex physical and immaterial boundaries of Wealth and Power at the centre of state in the age of the Anthropocene. Trade in its simplest form is a transactional arrangement or exchange, between peoples or countries, for the buying and selling of goods and services. Trade is a fundamental mechanical unit of labour and commerce. Trade is both noun and verb. Free Trade, by definition, is a laissez-faire practice with little or minimal interference. This requires the strategic policy of governmental to not discriminate against imports or interfere with exports by the application of tariffs. That said, even an established free trade policy does not necessarily imply that governments relinquish or abandon all control and taxation of imports and exports. All activity, all work, has an economic cost, all of which needs to be balanced. Trade has consequences, economic, social and political. Unitsixteen has explored the mechanisms, apparatus, and infrastructure of trade. Central to trade is the protective ownership of ideas, allowing their commercial exploitation. Copyright, Patent, Trademarks and Trade-Secrets were considered as analogous but still distinct up until the mid 20th Century. Boundaries have become blurred, now collectively seen as Intellectual Property, managing the slippery complexities and distinctions between the material and immaterial nature of matter. We have focused our studies on the heart of Empire, Trafalgar Square, the epicentre of wealth and power, surrounded by the institutions of state: a bridge to capital. A static scene, curiously out of step in both time and space. “...I am convinced that the future is lost somewhere in the dumps of the non-historical past; it is in yesterday’s newspapers, in the jejune advertisements of science fiction movies, in the false mirror of our rejected dreams. Time turns metaphors into things .” - Robert Smithson


Margarita Strelyaeva Cowshed: A Temporary Parliament

Malaika Donkor London Air Scrubbing System

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Jichen Fan British Bottled Water Facility

Mohamed Shoble Airport Palace


Luigi Di Vito Francesco The National Bank of Salt

Meriel Serlin UK Border Customs Drive-In

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Opeoluwa Adeyileka The Commodification of Electronic Waste in Lagos State

120

Robert Coakley The General Metal Exchange


Jack Powley Operation Stack

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Che Caines Plastic Island

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Atim Kilama-Oceng > Goat Mountain: An Architectural Prophecy of Uganda’s Agriculture


MArch Architecture

124

Unit 18: Extreme Consumerism Pascal Bronner + Thomas Hillier PT Year 3: Rachael Smith Year 2: Michael Daw, Yasmin Freeman, Winnie Yin Ip, Samiur Rahman, Joe Randall, Lucy Sanders, Connie Shorrocks, Elena Slezaite. PT Year 2: Tousif Islam Year 1: Gytis Bickus, Christopher (Harry) Clarke, Josh Dobson, Bethany Hird, Philip Hutton, Fatimah Ishmael, Neelab Yarkhil, Zinab Zaaiter, Marine Zub.

Unit 18 would like to thank: Martin Reynolds (Martin Reynolds Architecture), for his practice support, Mike Aling, Mark Garcia and Simon Withers for thesis support, along with CJ Lim and all our guest critics who so generously gave up their time, knowledge and expertise across the year. Image > Samiur Rahman GramLiving

This year Unit 18 explored the future of consumerism and its’ impact on the built environment. As consumers we are becoming ever more reliant on unreliable products, and dependent on superfluous gadgets with an ever decreasing shelf-life. Buying the latest smartphone is the elixir of our 21st century virtual selves. As Gertrude Stein put it almost a century ago: ‘ Whoever said money can’t buy happiness simply didn’t know where to go shopping.’ But it doesn’t always come easy… Whilst most of us no longer need to go to the trenches, we now have Black Fridays where we must don our uniforms, trample on people and punch aimlessly at the person in front of the queue in order to come home with the latest 55” television set. Last year on the 24th of November, the now infamous Black Friday, customers spent over £5 billion on online shopping. No wonder, according to research, over 12% of Black Friday shoppers are supposedly under the influence. This is the age of extreme consumerism, where Americans have over 300,000 items in the average home. An average child will accumulate 238 toys by the time they are 10 years old but they will only play with around 12 of them. To feed our insatiable appetite for shrinkwrapped burgers and fizzy drinks we produce about 300 million tons of plastic each year with only 10% being recyclable. 7 million tonnes ends up in the sea, killing a million seabirds every year. Whilst consumer society has been stunningly effective in harming the environment, has it failed to provide us with a sense of fulfilment? Are we being hoodwinked into gorging on material things because we suffer from social, psychological, and spiritual hungers? We are targeted by 2000 commercial messages every day to ensure we spend more than eight years of our lives shopping, alongside spending, on average, about 8 years watching TV. Combined, that makes up a quarter of our waking lives, unless we succumbed to tobacco adverts, in which in case it’s probably half. Architecture is no saint here either; casinos and shopping malls are designed to make people lose track of time, removing clocks and windows to prevent views to the outside world. Simply obscure the windows and fill the shelves with products, although it is proven that we are more likely to buy items from an emptier shelf - this is known as ‘social proofing’ - as we are reassured that others have bought into the offer before us. Shopping is in our DNA. The oldest customer service complaint was written on a clay cuneiform tablet in Mesopotamia 4000 years ago. A customer named Nanni complained that he was sold inferior copper ingots. We may no longer need ingots, but what would we do without those customer reviews! Shopping is a skill that we learn. It is a cognitive process requiring us to acquire, interpret and act on information from the store environment. As with all learnt skills, our ability to shop efficiently improves with practice. At Boston University, students can sign up for ‘The Modern American Consumer’, a course on the history of shopping. At the University of Greenwich, Students have signed up for ‘Extreme Consumerism’, a course on the future of shopping and its’ impact on the built environment.


Elena Slezaite Hylozoist Island

126

Rachael Smith Monument to the Ocean


Lucy Sanders Polymatlantis

127


Bethany Hird TreeHab

Marine Zub The Heygate Dream

Fatimah Ishmael Vending Machine Museum

Gytis Bickus Institute of Freegamism

Tousif Islam Viral Machine

Zinab Zaaiter Reliquary of Divine Humors

128


Connie Shorrocks Big Beef

129


Winnie Yin Ip Amazon Smile

130

Yasmin Freeman Artichoke Fort Michael Daw > A Sunny Place for Shady People


131


“ We are entering a new Dark Age. We find ourselves today connected to vast repositories of knowledge, and yet we have not learned to think. In fact, the opposite is true: that which was intended to enlighten the world in practice darkens it. We have been conditioned to think of the darkness as a place of danger, even death. But the darkness can also be a place of freedom and possibility... uncertainty can be productive, even sublime.” – James Bridle, New Dark Age Diminishing Knowledge As we are increasingly navigated by algorithmic certainties and unknowable volumes of information, what changes our relation to the object, its housing, and distribution? What are the consequences for architecture? Unit 20 has been collecting and creating, recording and observing alternative archives to elucidate and reflect on what it is to be human, animal, vegetal, or posthuman.

MArch Architecture

132

Unit 20: Dark Age David Hemingway + Jake Moulson Year 2: Stephanie Adebayo, Florence Graham, Maksimilijan Luzaic, Muhamad Fariz Bin Mohd Azahar, Sandra Skjolde, Michael Waters. PT Year 2: Luis Rojas Paipilla Year 1: Saphia Al-Haboubi, Sharan Bahra, Daniel Hurst, Daniela Larbalestier, Anastasiya Luban, Lorenzo Ravaioli, Shandri Van Rooyen, Adam Wadsley, Tania Yeganeh, Yang Zhou. PT Year 1: Alexandra Ciobanu, Myrsini Kocheila.

Thanks to: Our practice tutor Katie Parsons (BPTW), along with our critics: Martin Aberson, Mike Aling, Will Bryan, Sanjay Ghodke, Fred Heaf, Marillia Lezou and Gosia Malus. We would also like to thank Dr Guan Lee and Daniel Widrig for their assistance at Grymsdyke farm, along with Sam Sheard and Mark Sutherland in the workshop. Image > Luis Rojas Paipilla ABYA YALA

Archive as Catalyst In an increasingly authoritarian world, the framing of records can be used to reinforce post-factual unrealities. Equally, a re-viewing of material can reveal new histories of the under-represented. How can these critical repositories begin to reassemble understandings in a world threatened by anthropogenic transformation? As new architectural typologies develop, U20 prompts enquiry into the scale of the institution of these priceless archives and collections; from the new megastructures of the micro/macro digital archive to the vast freeport of the art market tax haven. U20 speculated on this near/present future through the historic context of Florence, Italy; from the autocracy and conspiracies of the Medici to the residue of the Italian avant garde who sought to incite new histories. Dark Age was filtered through 4 lines of enquiry: Permeability-Opacity 01 Autocracies. Corporatocracies. What are the boundaries, borders and jurisdictions of the freeports, of the clouds? Who are the guardians and where is architecture positioned? Dispersion 02 How is knowledge and history dispersed and preserved? Migrations, refugees, collapsed states, climatic and economic change perpetuate this flow. Uselessness 03 Redundancy and obsolescence, the new geological layer of the techno-fossil, ruins of the industrial age, the consequences of automation. Superfluity 04 The Freeport tax heaven: some £100billion of arts and artefacts lie archived and concealed as commodity. Socio-economic status governs access to education, medicines and clean air. Accrued forms Personal ‘knowledge zones’, a set of artefacts and their interrelationships, formed the springboard for enquires into the Dark Age. Is there an antithesis to this relocation of knowledge, of these stateless infrastructures and controls? Are we creating new luminescent connections, or further acts of monument-building to ourselves?


Stephanie Adebayo Terminal Free

Alexandra Ciobanu Temple of Power – Cryogenic Capital

Fariz Azahar Living Monument – Sentient City for a Post-Socialist Proletariat

Daniela Larbalestier Kensington and Chelsea Public Data Centre

Yang Zhou Whale Radio Station

Lorenzo Ravaioli Istituto Veritas

134


Michael Waters AI at Home

135


Luis Rojas Paipilla ABYA YALA

136

Florence Graham London’s Lost Sharan Bahra > Phantasmagorical Futures


137


Fariz Azahar Lving Monument – Sentient City for a Post-Socialist Proletariat


MArch Architecture

140

Unit 21: Downriver Dr Shaun Murray + Simon Withers + Yorgos Loizos Year 2: James Bullmore, Xingchen Li, Yuhao Liu, Slaveya Peneva, Dovydas Talacka. Year 1: Ayu Suriani Binti Abdul Halim, Dhaniah Binti Abdul Samad, Ludovico Altieri, Anastasiia Babenko, George Baciu, Denis Herberg, Arbana Izairi, Silvia Miah, Georgia Semple, Matthew Smith, Adam Stacey, Sharifah Nur Amirah Binti Syed Muhammad Radhi. PT Year 1: Luke Bird

With thanks to: Our Practice tutor Harry Bucknell (Piercy&Company), along with our critics: Pascal Bronner, Simon Herron, Thomas Hillier, Rahesh Ram. Image > Matthew Smith The Experimental Surgery School

A two headed river rises on the twinned heights of Hampstead and Highgate to flow sinuously over and under London for seven miles, crossing fields, running under streets, through buildings and all the while accumulating water from hidden tributaries and rainfall shearing off the impervious city to become a torrent, encased within a vast network of exquisitely engineered brick tunnels to finally cascade into the Thames at Blackfriars. Now enclosed, but once a major navigable trading river and London’s busiest port, the River Fleet is visible at its sources as two brooks, the western and the eastern, each flowing into a series of reservoirs until they disappear underground to unite below Camden Town. Once underground the Fleet reveals itself topographically as declivities and deep valleys, meandering roads, architectures swerved by a now buried river, the names of streets and by careful archival research. From Jack Straw’s castle to Chalybeate Well, past Riceyman Steps and Cold Bath Fields, to Little Italy, Snow Hill and Saffron Hill then Red Well, Turnagain Lane and on to Watergate, flowing through the Fleet Valley and the Liberty of the Fleet once known as Alsatia, a free territory and self-governing enclave that harboured artists, runaways and those needing sanctuary. We walked downriver, navigating the courses of the Fleet, closely observing and recording what we discovered, mapping the environments, topographies, technologies, people, architectures and of course our speculations. These notational maps were brought together in log books forming distillations and analyses of the very specific context from which buildings were developed. We are interested in agile and highly attuned architectures, in elements that combine and re-combine opportunistically, anticipating environmental and programmatic variations.


Dhaniah Binti Abdul Samad Thames Water Filtration Tower

142

Sharifah Nur Amirah Binti Syed Muhammad Radhi Disclosing the Old Bailey


Matthew Smith The Experimental Surgery School

143


Adam Stacey Creative Respite on the Heath

144

Georgia Semple > River Fleet Spa


145


Silvia Miah Fly Fishing Academy

146

Yuhao Liu > 1 Day’s Work for 3 Days’ Play


147


MArch Architecture

148

Design Realisation Rahesh Ram We would like to thank the following architects, practices and consultants that provided their expertise and hard work with enthusiasm: Practice Tutors: Adam Bell (Foster+Partners), Harry Bucknall (Piercy& Company), Melissa Clinch (Wilkinson Eyre), Mark Davies (David Morley Architects), Katie Parsons (BPTW), Martin Reynolds (Martin Reynolds Architecture), Chris Roberts (David Morley Architects).

Consultants: Lucas Bauer (Arup), Hannah Chalmers-Stevens (Barr Gazetas), Chris Clarke (Arup), Tara Clinton (Arup), Marc Easton (Arup), Orlando Gibson (Arup), John Gunstrone (Max Fordham), Larissa Johnston (Larissa Johnston Architects), Catrina Ni Rian (DAR Engineering), Ed Osley (Max Fordham), Hugh Pidduck (Arup), Hareth Pochee (Max Fordham), Lauren Walter (Arup). Lectures: Ivan Clark, Tony Clelford, Tara Clinton (Arup), Hugh Pidduck, Hareth Pochee (Max Fordham). Image > Thorin Costain Unit 12

As the discussions on the relationship between the architectural profession and architectural education heighten, schools that have promoted the idea of experimental and speculative design have on occasions been accused of ignoring the ‘real’ world in favour of the abstract. Design Realisation (DR) in Year 1 of MArch Architecture is a gateway between these two worlds. As a school, we encourage and enjoy the speculative and the experimental, but we use the DR module to juxtapose these ideas up against the ‘real’ world constraints and opportunities. The result of which is the surfacing and resurfacing of tensions, which in turn has the ability to ask questions of the status quo and provide a conduit for learning. It could be said that architecture technology education begins when ‘real’ world experience and the speculative world of architectural education collide. The friction between the two is where the excitement is. At worst the DR can be a tick box exercise, and at its best it can be a provocation. With this in mind, the module engages with the profession in earnest, employing architects from established practices to support the teaching. This year they brought a wealth of experience and provided one-to-one tutorials on every aspect of the delivery of an architectural project. In a pedagogic strategy of mimicking ‘real’ world experience, students were given the opportunity to consult with structural engineers and M & E consultants about their projects. The highly respected practices of Arups and Max Fordham Engineers provided this support with workshops, one-to-one tutorials and lectures. Students are expected to bring the practical experience that they gained from their architectural practices and apply it at Masters level. We are aware that one year in an office is not sufficient to gain the knowledge that is required to be experimental and be speculative. So we reinforce, in depth, their knowledge of architectural technology and the profession before we encourage students to think outside the box. After discussions with students and Design Tutors, we made some fundamental changes to the course to enable the DR to run concurrently with the evolution of the design process; site context, followed by the professional component, followed by studies into materials, structures, construction and performance. We hope that we have provided firm ground for our students to start a learning trajectory that will continue well beyond their university lives.


Burcak Ates Unit 16

150


Bethany Hird Unit 18

151


Dhaniah Binti Abdul Samad Unit 21

152


Luigi Di Vito Francesco Unit 16

153


Thorin Costain Unit 12

154

Jeff Bray > Unit 14


‘If new technologies are more relevant to the production of a cultural discourse, for architecture to remain relevant as a cultural discipline, it must engage with this new transformation by informing the development of new media and new technologies, and while avoiding the standardisation of culture.’ - P. Lorenzo-Eiroa ‘Post-Digital As Design Authorship’ (from Instabilities and Potentialities: Notes on the Nature of Knowledge In Digital Architecture, 2019)

MArch Architecture

156

Histories/ Theories/ Futures: MArch Architectural and Spatial Design Research Mark Garcia

MArch HTF Co-ordinator HTF Essay Lectures + Seminars: Mark Garcia HTF Essay Tutors: Mark Garcia, Lukas Pauer. HTF Thesis Lectures + Seminars: Mark Garcia Thesis Supervisors: Mike Aling, Mark Garcia, Simon Herron, Dr Shaun Murray, Lukas Pauer, Simon Withers.

With special thanks to our critics: Professor Mario Carpo, Helen Castle, Professor Nat Chard, Professor Nigel Coates, Professor David Gloster, Professor Jonathan Hill, Phil Hudson, Dr Kate Jordan, Robbie Munn, Frazer Nicolaides, Dr Caroline Rabourdin, Rahesh Ram, Professor Neil Spiller, Dr Robin Wilson. Our thanks also go to the workshop staff, Sam Sheard and Mark Sutherland.

Architectural Histories/Theories/Futures (HTF) consists of two taught modules, on the central philosophies and theories of architecture: HTF Essay in Year 1 and HTF Thesis in Year 2 of MArch Architecture. This academic year has had a total of over 110 students across both years. These modules develop the skills, understanding, imagination and curiosity for historical, contemporary and prospective ideas, and innovations in the contexts and concepts of the critical products, practices, techniques, processes, organization and questions of global spatial design. HTF modules provide our students with advanced skills, knowledge and awareness of key architectural texts, writings and other architectural cultures, discourses and their evolving and contested forms. These modules are researched, designed and developed each year to integrate with MArch Architecture design studio/ unit work. Architectural Histories/Theories/ Futures Essay HTF Essay is a Year 1 module in which students design, research and write a 4000-word essay from around 150 questions. These are updated each year to reflect the rapidly changing world of spatial design research as much as to enhance the intellectual trajectories and questions pursued by each MArch design studio/ unit. Together these form a dynamic, timely and relevant diagram of contemporary, emerging, projective and prospective research in HTF. Students are also able to choose tutored, self-designed personal essay questions options and topics. All essays engage with the HTF of the genealogies, forms and media of international and multidisciplinary architectural writings and their related strategies and tactics for research into, through and for the HTF of architectural and spatial design. We creatively, innovatively and imaginatively communicate, curate and exhibit these essays with architectural scholarship and intelligently reassemble and redesign research.


Michael O’Donnell HTF Essay tutor: Mark Garcia

Architectural Histories/Theories/ Futures Thesis HTF Thesis in Year 2 is a two-term individual research project in the HTF of architectural and spatial design. This module develops state of-theart critical/postcritical, intellectual and discursive skills, understanding and awareness of the key paradigms, schools of thought and practices of spatial design research. Thesis seeks significant and impactful innovation and originality in the design, technical and artful aspects of architectural and spatial works, as much as in the products and processes of intelligent spatial design research. This year our students explored HTF Thesis through the research, design and production of documents and related artefacts that develop new concepts, practices and research in the design, techniques and arts of contemporary spatial design research. These were analysed in more rigorous and intense studies for the continuous evolution of Research Methods Statements (RMS) that incorporate other means of architectural investigation. Seminars, lectures, workshops and open reviews are provided throughout terms one and two by Mark Garcia to support teaching and learning in the scholarship and design training for research project management, infrastructure and resourcing as well as the appropriate strategies and tactics of the methods and techniques of spatial design research. Students then join individual thesis supervisors to progress their specific projects. Final presentations for students with external educators and experts in January and February further refine and enhance each thesis. Theses range across multiform, multimedia and multidisciplinary means of designing and deploying the equipment, systems, events, performances, networks, installations and instruments of theory and theorising, of historiography and historicising, and of creative speculation in futurological research. Research extends into the ways of exhibiting, installing, constructing, performing, editing, photographing, curating and exhibition design for Thesis. Whether historical, local, prospective, descriptive, global, projective, normative, prescriptive, speculative, predictive or experimental, these radical discourses and their forensic evidence is present in the details of Theses (written or non-written) as much as the larger polemical and critical projects that they exist within. ‘ The architect [...] has the task of confronting the design of history for neither man nor god but for an empty future. Yet even that thought relies on a theory of design, the oldest theory of design — creatio ex nihilo — because for humans there is no thought outside design, not even the thought of nothing.’ - S. Lavin, ‘History For An Empty Future’ (from N.Leach et. al. Digital Fabrication, 2018)

Voon Yin Wong HTF Essay tutor: Mark Garcia

157


Samiur Rahman Instagram and Architecture https://www.instagram.com/instaandarch/ @instaandarch Supervisor: Mark Garcia

158


Lucy Sanders Beauty in the Architectural Ornament of Plastic Waste [Book + Upcycled Plastic Sculpture] Supervisor: Mark Garcia

159


Isobel Eaton EmBEDed Space [Book + Audiobook Thesis (mp3)] Supervisor: Mark Garcia

160


Rebecca Tudehope The Theoretical and Design Implications of Advanced Human Cognitive Enhancement Via Artificial Intelligence [Graphic Novel/Pictographic Dypt-Book] Supervisor: Simon Withers

161


Fariz Mohd-Azahar Monument(al) Reader [Marbled-recycled Plastic Box + Text-Model + Book] Supervisor: Lukas Pauer

162


Michael Waters The Architecture of Multisensory Dining [Dining Cutlery Set + Model + VR Spaces + Book] Supervisor: Simon Withers

163


Robert Cropper Monstrous Reality: The Teratological Reality-Virtuality Continuum and Neo-monstrosity in Architecture [Book + App/App Design + AR Content] Supervisor: Mark Garcia

164


Opeoluwa Adeyileka The Lagosian Gate: Architecture of Prosperity and Fear in the Megacity [Book + Diagrams + 100x Photographs] Supervisor: Simon Herron

165


Peter Efe Black Architectures [Book + Ultra-Black Mirror] Supervisor: Mark Garcia

166


Rayan Elnayal Revisiting Magic-Realism [Books + Lamp-Sculpture + Animation (mp4) + Photographs] Supervisor: Mark Garcia

167


Wing Yin Ip Pick-Pack-Ship: Tracking the Pace of Amazon Fullfillment Centers [Package + Book] Supervisor: Lukas Pauer

168


Sven Reindl AR Spaces for Virtual Architectures in Algorithmic DeĚ rive [Installation of Multimedia (Animated and Interactive) Projected-Book] Supervisor: Mark Garcia

169


Rachael Smith A Monument to the Ocean: Retarding and Accelerating Decay in Marine Environments [Book + Case of Polaroid Photographs, Petri-Dishes and other Toxic Waste Equipment] Supervisor: Simon Withers

170

Matthew Baldwin The Wild East: Projections of the Future Factory through ‘Graphene City, Beijing’ [Reinforced Aluminium Case + Book + Graphene+ Banner + 3 Sets of Blue Nitrile Gloves] Supervisor: Mark Garcia


Daniela Yaneva Archopsychology of the Posthuman Villa https://archo-psychology-of-the-posthuman-villa.webf low.io [Website + Digital Audiobook] Supervisor: Mark Garcia

171


Parisa Shahnooshi The 4th Dimension of the Ardabil Carpets [Book + Sculpture + Carpet] Supervisor: Simon Withers

172

Michael Daw The Architect’s Guide to Power [Book + Super-Large Diagrams] Supervisor: Simon Withers


Li Xingchen On Touch and It’s Virtualisation: Haptics in Mixed Reality [Book + Mixed Reality Installation] Supervisor: Mike Aling

Atim Kilama-Oceng A Shoppers Guide To Debunking Retail Deceptology [Book + 10x VR Spaces] Supervisor: Lukas Pauer

Saeid Taghavi Alexandra Palace as VR Time Machine [Website + 7x VR environments] Supervisor: Mike Aling

173


RIBA Presidents Medal Winners 2018 University of Greenwich

Alexander Wilford 2018

174

Commendation, Part 1 RIBA Presidents Medals Alexander Wilford, BA (Hons) Architecture graduate 2018 Smithfield Lorry Depot


RIBA Presidents Medal Winners 2018 University of Greenwich

Maria Marilia Lezou 2018

175

Serjeant Award, Part 2 RIBA Presidents Medals Maria Marilia Lezou, MArch Architecture alumni 2018 Hotel Mollino


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PDAP (Postgraduate Diploma in Architectural Practice, Greenwich’s ARB/RIBA Part 3 course) is designed to be enjoyable, engaging and interactive. Small group teaching encourages students to share experience and critically appraise their own professional practice. The ensuing debate is always fresh, contemporary, relevant, and fascinating. We want architects to thrive in uncertain times, creating new models of professional practice and client service when the old norms are changing fast. This one year course can be easily extended at no additional cost. Each year there are two joining points and two exit points, the result being a course that can easily accommodate personal, professional and project circumstances. There are no formal examinations, but

PDAP [Postgraduate Diploma in Architectural Practice] continuous assessment of coursework will keep you busy. PDAP’s pass rate is one of the best in the country. PDAP students (already based in full time architectural practice) translate and transfer their design skills into the world of business, money, and professional practice. So their work is more about the realities of buildings and construction, and less about marks on paper; more about other people (clients, users) and less about themselves; and going beyond the promise of talent to delivering buildings, using business plans, compressed and complex programmes, and legally binding contracts. — Academic Portfolio Lead - Architecture Part 3:

Tony Clelford

177


Tim Evans, MArch Architecture alumni:

178

“Greenwich nurtures a diverse architectural culture that prepares students for their future. I was encouraged to be creative and innovative, giving me the confidence to go out into the world and make a difference.�

Project: BUJ Architects, Orchard Wharf, Poplar, London


Sean Allen, MArch Architecture alumni:

“My time at Greenwich gave me space to think. It allowed me time to develop the skills that I required to express my ideas and solve problems, and to ponder how my niche might contribute to the profession.”

Hawkins\Brown, ‘The Diving Bell’ Aqua:Culture Visitor and Kayak Centre

179


Tom Phillips, MArch Architecture and PDAP alumni:

180

“Greenwich was a wonderful personal and communal experience. It has prepared me for the profession, not only in being innovative, but also with the confidence and interpersonal skills so necessary.�

Broadway Malyan, Bathgate Road, Wimbledon


Amrit Seera, MArch Architecture alumni:

“Studying at Greenwich has given me the confidence and freedom to develop and express my own voice and ideas, whilst giving me a greater understanding of my position within a wider architecture and design industry.�

Studio Partington, Hospital Fields, City of York competition

181


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The creation of the School of Design provides enormous opportunities for intradisciplinary as well as inter- and multi-disciplinary research and other collaborations across the School, the University and the wider world. Building on the multitude of disciplines that the energetic and talented staff bring to research, we have the opportunity to grow research and enterprise, creating our mark, fashioning centres of excellence in a variety of fields encompassing the theoretical, technological, scientific and the creative. All serious research needs to have a purpose, break new ground and have social and/or economic impact and our research does this in spades. We are indeed breaking new ground, innovating with our collaborations with EU partners in COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology), ERASMUS + and INTERREG projects. Our PhD students are similarly pushing the boundaries in their various fields, and our cohort is expanding in line with the technical capabilities enhanced amongst other things, through the purchase of new kit including 3D scanning, 3600 camera and allied equipment that will allow research in 360° narrative filming, and the use of immersive technologies, as well as the launch of the first weather station in the heart of Greenwich that will provide data for research across

School of Design Research many disciplines. The work in the Aquaponics Lab has indicated that a number of Asian vegetables imported from South East Asia could well be grown aquaponically, reducing carbon and ecological footprints and potentially costs. Architecture is benefitting greatly by this broadening of our research culture across the new School of Design, developing a range of new research groups and clusters working collaboratively with other disciplines to produce world leading outputs and generate externally funded income. We have the opportunity within this new structure to develop the next generation of researchers, providing support for PhD’s and embedding a research culture across all of our courses within the School. In preparing for the REF 2021, we realise the strength of our research, much of which is internationally excellent and some of which is world-leading, but we also know that we can do better and to this end we will endeavour to enhance the facilities and the supporting conditions, for both staff and students to undertake high quality research at the School of Design.

Dr Benz Kotzen

Research and Enterprise Lead, School of Design

+ Simon Herron

Academic Portfolio Lead - Architecture

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School of Design Public Lecture Series: Spring 2019

From Bugs to Features

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Stefan HÜltgen Monday 14 January 2019, 5pm Computer games are meant to disperse a player’s sense of reality through immersion. This process is interrupted when a computer error occurs. Instead of stopping play, the gamer can focus their attention on erroneous process and transgress the black boxes borders. This lecture examines different forms of computer errors (glitches and bugs in hardware and software) historically and epistemological by focussing on early games of the 1970s and 1980s when bugs were common and hacking practices were used to debug and modify game codes. The connection between the real world and media technology will be shown by a comparison of the languages spoken, and de/ bugging hacks as transgressions of this border.


School of Design Public Lecture Series: Spring 2019

Phase I: Painting, Drawing, Architecture

Benet Spencer Monday 28 January 2019, 6pm Benet Spencer will talk about the co-curated project Phase I: Painting, Drawing, Architecture and introduce the third stage Phase III, an exhibition planned in October 2019 at the HLM Gallery, Marseille, in collaboration with the research Marseille Mediterranee. This is the third exhibition in a series of four; Cambridge, Toulouse, Marseille, London (Greenwich). In Phase III, aspects of Le Corbusier’s architecture and, in particular, Le Corbusier’s concept of ‘the modulor’, will be explored by a diverse group of artists and architects, both individually and through collective interactions. Phase IV, the final stage of this project, will be held at the Stephen Lawrence Gallery, University of Greenwich in January 2020.

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School of Design Public Lecture Series: Spring 2019

Concrete Wave, 2014. Photo: Adrian Taylor

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Lynn Kinnear Monday 11 February 2019, 6pm Lynn Kinnear will talk about the role of a landscape architect not just as a designer but as a supporter of social change. As a practice, Kinnear Landscape Architects (KLA) work in a way that allows others to participate and demystifies the design process. These processes support a deeper understanding of place and social need. Strategies have developed from the multicultural context of London to support different sectors of the community, who often have polarised positions, to come together over the design of open space. The talk will emphasise the importance of always having an eye on the bigger picture and, for students, using their role and training as landscape architects to inspire change and challenge the status quo.


School of Design Public Lecture Series: Spring 2019

Turning the Place Over, 2008

Richard Wilson Monday 18 February 2019, 6pm One of Britain’s most renowned sculptors, Richard Wilson is celebrated for his interventions in architectural space, which draw heavily for from the worlds of engineering and construction. He is also known for his performance works both with the Bow Gamelan Ensemble (formed in 1983) as well as other solo and collaborative projects. His projects have met with widespread critical acclaim. The installation 20:50 was described as “one of the masterpieces of the modern age” by art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon in his BBC television series The History of British Art . This work, a sea of reflective sump oil, is permanently installed in the Saatchi collection. This lecture will be followed by a live performance by Richard Wilson, with Ian Thompson and Stephen Shiell.

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School of Design Public Lecture Series: Spring 2019

Staging Jackson Pollock: Trevor Dannatt’s Design

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Nayia Yiakoumaki Monday 11 March 2019, 6pm The 1958 Jackson Pollock exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery has long been accorded a special place in the history of 20th century British art. It has since been recognised as a catalyst for change in the post-war British art scene. The exhibition currently being displayed at the Whitechapel Gallery revisits that historical moment, and importantly the role that its architect Trevor Dannatt played in making the exhibition so vital through his constructivist exhibition designs. Forty years later, he oversaw the conversion of the Old Royal Naval College to house the University of Greenwich. Trevor Dannatt will be present at the lecture to give us the benefit of his experience and memories of his innovative exhibition design.


School of Design Public Lecture Series: Spring 2019

Two Journeys

Michael Webb Thursday 14 March 2019, 6pm Formed in the early 1960’s, the renowned avantgarde architectural group Archigram aimed to keep the spirit of modernism alive. Archigram were awarded the RIBA gold medal in 2002 for their outstanding contribution to the field of architecture. Founder member and documenter of the group, Michael Webb, will introduce a new monograph of his work and speak to some of the history of the group. He will also discuss the wide variety of his individual projects, some of which have been developed and refined over a period of more than 50 years. This will include his ongoing Temple Island project. Michael Webb’s monograph, Two Journeys, published by Lars Müller, will be available on the night of the lecture for a reduced price.

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Come and visit us at Blueprint For The Future 9/10/11 July at Knauf in Clerkenwell. We will be showing the pick of our Part 2 graduates’ work, along with 12 other architecture schools from around the UK.

Find out more and register at www.blueprint-future.co.uk


Work by James Lawton (MArch Architecture, University of Greenwich) at Blueprint For The Future 2018


Profile for University of Greenwich School of Design

Architecture: University of Greenwich School of Design, Show 2019  

Catalogue to accompany the exhibition of Architecture courses at the University of Greenwich School of Design show, 12-28 June 2019.

Architecture: University of Greenwich School of Design, Show 2019  

Catalogue to accompany the exhibition of Architecture courses at the University of Greenwich School of Design show, 12-28 June 2019.

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