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the world we build NINE STORIES FROM THE HEART OF GFA, PLUS ESSENTIAL INFORMATION ABOUT OUR COMMUNITY AND OUR EXPERIENCE

GREENS FARMS ACADEMY WESTPORT, CONNECTICUT


We’re ready for tomorrow WE’RE READY FOR JOY AND WONDER, FOR COMPLEXITY AND NUANCE, FOR DEVELOPING AND REVISING AND APPLYING NEW IDEAS. WE’RE READY TO STRENGTHEN THE CONNECTION BETWEEN BODY AND MIND, TO EXPLORE UNCHARTED TERRITORY, TO SET AMBITIOUS GOALS—AND FIND THE COURAGE TO MEET THEM.

WE EMPOWER STUDENTS TO DO THE HARD, THRILLING, ESSENTIAL WORK OF SHAPING THEIR OWN WORLD, OF BUILDING THEIR OWN FUTURE.

IN THIS BOOK, WE SHARE A LIST OF ESSENTIAL FACTS, TELL A FEW INSPIRING STORIES, AND COLLECT THE MOST IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT GFA IN A HANDY ALMANAC. IF YOU’RE READY FOR ALL OF THAT (AND MORE!), THEN COME MEET US. WE’RE READY TO DO GREAT THINGS TOGETHER.


The quantitative GFA story 715 students in grades PreK–12, from 23 towns in Fairfield and Westchester

counties 8:1 student to teacher ratio 15 students in the average class 3 Signature Programs spanning all grades:

World Perspectives, STEAM, and Human Ecology and Sustainability 18,000 square feet in our state-of-the-

art Performing Arts Center, including a STEAM shop, a global studies center, and a living roof 64 interscholastic athletic teams 15% of students receive financial aid

grants $32,000 average financial aid grant 3 ecosystems (salt marsh, Audubon

woodlands, Long Island Sound) on our 44-acre campus Roughly 370 steps from the MetroNorth Greens Farms station to campus Founded in 1925 Motto: Quisque Pro Omnibus (Each for All)

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There’s a lot of excitement in the room ALEX • GRADE 3

We take STEAM class in our homeroom. You start sitting at the rug. The teacher explains what project we will work on that day—like designing snowflakes and printing them on the 3D printer. Or building a tower using paper and tape. Then we go to our tables and talk with our teammates and make a plan. We get to work together and be creative. There’s a lot of excitement in the room. Favorite thing about campus: GFA has amazing gardens and trees. Some of the trees are really old. Oh, and the bees!

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We prepare you to be resilient VICTOR LLANQUE, Ph.D. • ASSISTANT HEAD OF UPPER SCHOOL FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

It’s easy to go through school avoiding risk. Taking the courses you think you have to take, not the courses you want to take. Setting aside your passions because you want to be well-rounded, or you don’t want to narrow your options. We see learning—and life!—differently. We want you to discover what you love to do, what you care about, who you really are. We prepare you to succeed—and to fail. To be resilient. To solve problems. To take ownership of your education. Mastery of content gets you only so far. We cultivate curiosity, creativity, and intrinsic motivation—the qualities that help you go further. Free advice: If you want to understand the spirit of the community, come to a morning assembly.

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My friends gave me the motivation to reach higher OLIVIA • GRADE 11

I had attended only one school before I came to GFA. The thought of leaving a place that felt like home was, to be honest, terrifying. But GFA is such a welcoming place. There are smiles everywhere. In the first week of school, each grade had a team-building trip—the perfect opportunity to create new friendships. Actually, it was my friends who convinced me to run for class president. I wanted to step out of my comfort zone and become even more involved in the GFA community. At first I thought about running for student representative. But my friends gave me the motivation to reach higher. That’s how it works here. Favorite class: Chorus! The students are so energized. I was inspired to audition for an a cappella group. 7


We’re learning how to teach ourselves WILL • GRADE 10

The soccer team has been on an incredible streak, but there is still more to build on. That’s what I love about practice. That’s where you grow the most. We made it into the playoffs—every fall GFA team did! It’s powerful to see the team come together and execute what we’ve learned. It’s a little like my Design Thinking class—or my algebra II class, where there’s no textbook, and the teacher gives us complex problems to solve. She expects us to get stuck. She expects us to be totally wrong sometimes; she expects us to work through it together. We’re learning how to teach ourselves. There’s no need to be afraid. There’s just growing. On the horizon: I’m applying to spend the fall semester at the High Mountain Institute. My sister said it was the hardest, most beautiful thing she’s ever done. 8


We never stop innovating ALÉWA COOPER • HEAD OF LOWER SCHOOL

For young children, school starts with relationships. That’s what I love about bundling up twice daily to spend recess with the kids. That’s what I love about the ways in which our teachers truly know our students. That’s what I love about family-style lunch in the Lower School. When you break bread with folks, you get to know them at a new level. GFA is a true partnership—not just between the student and the teacher but also between the school and the family. We’ll make a plan for your child together. It might change because children change— because the world changes! We don’t rest on our laurels. We never stop innovating, imagining new possibilities. We’re always asking: What’s happening in education? What’s in the best interests of the students? What I live for: The daily surprise and pleasure of working with our kids. I teach a class called Life Skills to second graders. We talk about issues like identity, inclusion, and character. I love their honesty. They don’t hold back.

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I started to see the world around me SCARLETT • GRADE 8

Last year, for our service learning requirement, I tutored a class of kindergarteners in Bridgeport. For the first time, I started to really see the world around me. When I came through the door, I would be greeted with an avalanche of hugs. I didn’t want that happiness to end. I started to imagine so many ways to make an impact. This year, my grade has been going to the Connecticut Food Pantry. In one day, we helped put together 12,000 meals. To me, GFA is a community of people who are looking out for each other. We’re also looking out for the world. Long-term goal: I’d like to be on the Supreme Court. I know it seems farfetched, but GFA is all about dreaming big and reaching for the stars.

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Dare to be yourself JAMIE • GRADE 8

Our middle school motto is “Dare to be different. Dare to be yourself.” We help each other become the best version of ourselves. I like to DJ—I love to build on a track, bring in new sounds, and make something different—but I’m also interested in politics and economics. I love nature; I want to change the way we treat the planet. In the future, I can imagine myself being a politician, a professional snowboarder, and an architect— in addition to caring for the planet. That’s a pretty GFA way to be. The feeling on campus: Dig deeper. Be curious. 11


I want my work to make a difference LILAH • GRADE 12

A lot of different moments pushed me to pursue the World Perspectives track. I spent a semester at the Island School. An international relations class went deep into global issues. The biggest moment was spending a month in Syrian refugee camps in Jordan. I taught violin and English, worked in a nutrition clinic and an ER, and met people who became true friends. The media tends to portray refugees as helpless, immobilized, and vulnerable. The people I met were innovative and persistent. My thesis project will examine that difference. Now, when I think about going to college and beyond, I’m gravitating towards service. I want my work to make an impact. Biggest surprise: This is a place where you can branch out. I have friends in so many different social circles and from different grades.

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The foundation is deep BOB WHELAN • HEAD OF SCHOOL

If you want to see how tall a building is going to be, look at how deep the foundation is. Great teachers and great schools see in each student more promise, more greatness, than students often allow themselves to see. We do that work. We promise that we will know and love your kids. We provide them with a sense of connection, a foundation of trust and respect, that allows them to embrace challenges, to stretch themselves, to go out into the world with wonder, courage, and compassion. We know that our work is effective. Our graduates go on to make a meaningful impact on the communities where they live and the organizations where they work. They’re grounded. The foundation is deep. What happened this morning: A student brought an injured baby screech owl to class. The teacher called in a parent who does wildlife rehabilitation. And we’re off and running! 13


The Greens Farms Academy Almanac A NOT-AT-ALL MISCELLANEOUS ASSEMBLY OF USEFUL FACTS ABOUT THE GFA EXPERIENCE

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Seven things that make us who we are

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01. OUR MOTTO. (AND THE WAY WE LIVE

05. OUR CAMPUS. It’s a 44-acre working lab, situated

UP TO IT.) Our motto, in English, is “Each for all.” We

on three ecosystems: a salt marsh, Audubon woodlands, and Long Island Sound. The views are breathtaking. There’s tradition here, starting with a magnificent Gilded Age mansion. But the future is here, too. There’s a stunning new Performing Arts Center, including a state-of-the-art theatre, a scene/ STEAM shop, and a Global Studies Center—all topped by solar panels and a living roof. There’s also a new squash center, a new wrestling gym, and a sparkling new fitness center. What matters most is that when you come here, you feel like you belong.

live up to it by lifting each other up. This is a school where everyone—students, faculty, staff, parents, alumni—is seen, and known, and valued. This is a place where you can be your full self—and where everyone supports you as you change and grow. We work across generations, across differences, and beyond stereotypes. The result is a powerful, and empowering, community. 02. OUR FACULTY. Setting modesty aside for

a moment: They’re amazing. They’re smart, they’re compassionate, they love what they do, and they’re always looking for ways to make education more alive. They take seriously our mission to be partners with students and parents in the education of children. Most of all, they’re human: soulful and surprising, generous and goofy, open-hearted and multidimensional. They see—and honor—the humanity of their students. 03. OUR VERY REAL COMMITMENT TO INNOVATION. Our Lower School students wear uniforms,

many of our classes gather around a Harkness Table, and we have a crest that seems to have come from the Middle Ages. And yet: We do not stand still. We experiment. We take bold steps (see #4 and #6!) in response to the needs of our students and to the demands of the wider world. We’re not trendy; we’re relevant, engaged, and looking forward. 04. SIGNATURE PROGRAMS. We developed our

Signature Programs by asking: What do students need to be ready for tomorrow? They need global vision and global experience. They need the capacity to solve cross-disciplinary, cross-cultural problems. They need the skills to understand— and transform—the ways in which humans interact with the natural world. And so, from PreK–Grade 12, we offer coursework and programming around three interdisciplinary themes: World Perspectives, STEAM, and Human Ecology and Sustainability. This is paradigm-shifting work.

06. OUR NEW SCHEDULE. Tomorrow’s school

shouldn’t be bound by yesterday’s routines. We re-engineered our schedule to make our time together more flexible, more collaborative, and more productive. A few examples: Middle and Upper School classes that meet three times a week, in 65-minute periods. Intensive mini-term courses where students and teachers explore a single topic in depth. A midweek block where students gain experience (research, service, civic engagement) off campus. This is a school week built for the future. 07. THE GREENS FARMS METRO-NORTH STOP. More than 200 students arrive here every morning—

from Greenwich and Bridgeport, from Darien and Norwalk— and, in a lively procession, walk a few hundred yards to school. The ride can be both social and studious, a bonding ritual and a mark of independence. The stop itself is a metaphor for who we are: A school that’s connected to the world. An extended exercise in guided liberation. A community that comes together every morning, bringing different histories and experiences, ready to discover what’s possible.

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Yes! It’s the Lower School!

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THE JOURNEY IS THE DESTINATION. Each grade in Lower

School is a step (or a hundred steps!) in a journey. Our teachers create an intentional, immersive experience that moves naturally from one week (and month, and year) to the next. We pay attention to fundamental skills and habits of mind, but we also practice leadership, develop social connections, and explore the outdoors. The result is a safe, fun, challenging education in cooperation and creative thinking, risk taking and resilience, identity and independence. A WORD ABOUT WHAT WE WEAR. Lower Schoolers wear

uniforms. Why? They make getting dressed in the morning super-simple, they keep everything equal, and they convey a general sense of respect for learning. Also: The language in our actual dress code isn’t gendered; the same rules apply to everyone. Details matter. So does an inclusive, affirming community. WHAT LEADERSHIP LOOKS LIKE. Our fourth graders—the oldest

students in the Lower School—take an active role in leading their community. Together, we organize committees (Greeting, Garden, Assembly, Community Service, and Student Perspectives) that allow students to debate issues, make recommendations, and take responsibility for the well-being of the school. WHAT IT FEELS LIKE TO BE HERE. It’s spacious, light-filled

classrooms. It’s family-style lunches and bi-weekly assemblies. It’s a full gymnasium and an organic garden, a science lab and a robust service learning program. It’s dedicated classrooms for world languages and music and art and technology. It’s a salt marsh and Audubon trails. It’s a playground and a courtyard and a community assembly room. Most of all, it’s the warmth and spirit and brilliance of the inspiring people who want to be here. AN ALMOST RANDOM, HIGHLY MEANINGFUL EXAMPLE OF THE WAY WE WORK. A little while ago, our PreK students built

an exhibit at Earthplace, a nature center in Westport. The exhibit allows you to work through—and possibly help solve!—nitrogen pollution in Long Island Sound. Building it required hands-on work in specialized topics across disciplines: the biology of kelp and oysters, digital photography and computer applications, exhibit design and engineering, sculpting and painting and measuring. And the result was a form of civic engagement. Oh, and the whole process was a blast. All of those things are happening most of the time in the Lower School.

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Middle School is so much better than “middle school”

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WE BEGIN TOGETHER. Every Middle School

student belongs to a “house”—our intensive, attentive version of a homeroom. The house system allows students to form families within the larger Middle School family (which is like a family within the GFA family). Every student also joins an Advisory—a group of 10 or so students, under the mentorship of a faculty advisor, who meet daily to talk about academic work, social dynamics, and political issues. (Advisors also collect cell phones for the school day.) Crucially, advisors serve as a link between home, house, and school. We also begin new experiences together: At the end of Middle School, seniors meet with eighth graders to talk about what’s ahead in the Upper School. WE (RE)SEARCH TOGETHER. One thread that

runs through the Middle School experience: Research. Students write (and revise!) papers, conduct (and re-try!) lab experiments, and, in eighth grade, complete a semester-long Capstone project, culminating with a defense of their thesis to peers and teachers. It’s like an ongoing workshop in close observation, analytical thinking, and the clear, compelling presentation of evidence and ideas. WE STAY STRONG TOGETHER. That commitment

starts with a three-season athletic requirement. At a time of significant physical growth, we offer interscholastic and

recreational options that develop coordination, confidence, sportsmanship, and sport-specific skills. For much more about athletics at GFA, see page 24. WE SERVE TOGETHER. We believe that service is an

education in empathy, collaboration, and responsibility. That’s why we build it into our curriculum. A few examples: Seventh graders choose an extended engagement: tutoring in local schools, volunteering at an eldercare center, overseeing the Middle School greenhouse. Fifth graders produce a Halloween Carnival for their Lower School friends. The entire Middle School community participates in annual events, from food drives to bike-a-thons. WE GET AMBITIOUS TOGETHER. In our annual

Marketplace of Ideas, teams of students develop and pitch products and programs that address pressing global issues. Our faculty-led travel programs are an immersive intellectual and social experience; recent examples include sustainability at the Island School in the Bahamas, culture and community in the Pacific Northwest, and French language and culture in Quebec. Our students participate in the Connecticut Science & Engineering Fair—and win honors for projects like a charitiesbased app, a reactive climbing helmet, and a prototype for an automated, floating, trash-collecting robot. Anything is possible.

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The incomparable, interconnected Upper School experience

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THE ACADEMIC/INTELLECTUAL/ETHICAL (ALSO SOCIAL/ EMOTIONAL/PHYSICAL) PART. The Upper School academic/intellectual/ethical

experience includes (but is in no way limited to): The World Perspectives Symposium, a conference featuring a renowned keynote speaker and presentation sessions in which students share original research. Intensive, faculty-led travel courses to Spain, China, Peru, Rwanda, and more, most of which involve research and service (studying spider predation at a field station on the Amazon River; working with teachers in Kigali to explore new classroom practices). Full integration of the arts into the curriculum, including required coursework in digital design, photography, and fine arts. Membership in Global Online Academy, a consortium of more than 50 of the world’s finest independent schools, allowing students to take innovative online courses with peers from around the world. Access to adventurous off-campus programs like the School for Ethics and Global Leadership in Washington, D.C., the High Mountain Institute, and School Year Abroad in countries like China. In and out of class, on and off campus, our students go into every experience with their hearts and minds open and their hands ready for work. THE SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL/PHYSICAL (ALSO ACADEMIC/ INTELLECTUAL/ETHICAL) PART. The Upper School social/emotional/physical

experience includes (but is in no way limited to): Class retreats at the beginning of every school year—a chance to bond in a fabulously unfamiliar setting. An always-evolving list of studentsupported clubs. Performances and gatherings sponsored by student groups, including coffee houses, a cappella throwdowns, and Harmony for the Homeless, a musical talent show benefiting local shelters. An accomplished athletics program that in one recent fall season recorded four Fairchester Athletic Association semifinal appearances, one league championship appearance, four New England tournament berths, and a New England girls cross country championship. (For much more about athletics at GFA, please turn the page.) This is an experience—and a community— where everything is connected, where every part belongs to a greater whole, each for all.

A FEW PRESENTATIONS GIVEN BY STUDENTS AT A RECENT WORLD PERSPECTIVES SYMPOSIUM

“ 13 REASONS WHY: A POST-

“THE RACE TO

MODERN OBSESSION WITH

SUPERHUMANITY:

THE MENTALLY ILL”

CHINA’S INVISIBLE EDGE

“CRYPTOANARCHY VS. GOVERNMENT: DOES THE

IN GENE EDITING” “ RADICAL DESIGN FOR A

DEEP WEB UNDERMINE

HOME IN AN EARTHQUAKE

THE POWER OF THE STATE?”

ZONE”

“FINDING AND COMPARING

“ THE USE OF A PIXY

THE BIOFUEL YIELD OF CT

CAMERA AND ROBOTICS TO

INVASIVE PLANT SPECIES”

ELIMINATE HUMAN ERROR

“LOVE, POWER, AND VIOLENCE: HOW CINEMA

BY HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER REFEREES”

CHANGED THE PERCEPTION OF DIAMONDS” 23


dragon nation Our philosophy is that education happens everywhere. Working out in our sparkling fitness center, playing on a team for an award-winning coach, exploring a new activity—all of this is education, and we take it seriously (and joyfully). We learn about integrity and leadership, creativity and resilience, confidence and character. The results are often impressive: in the past 10 years, more than 300 student-athletes have been named 1st team all-league in the Fairchester Athletic Association, more than 60 teams have ranked in the top five in their FAA division, 27 teams have played in the New England Tournament Finals, and GFA has won the conference’s Sportsmanship Award five times. The way we get those results—the process—is transformative. 24


FIND OUR RECENT GRADUATES PLAYING… LACROSSE AT COLBY, HOLY CROSS, KENYON, MIDDLEBURY, OCCIDENTAL, PENN, TUFTS,

IN THE UPPER SCHOOL. Our Upper School athletes

AND THE U.S. NAVAL ACADEMY

participate in 50 activities, including interscholastic sports, independent studies, and fitness classes. Our varsity teams feature outstanding coaching (many of our coaches have coached at the college level or competed professionally; five have won Connecticut Coach of the Year), remarkable individual achievement (in the past ten years, we’ve had ten 1,000-point scorers on our varsity basketball teams), and stellar team results (GFA teams are regular finalists in the FAA and New England Prep School Athletic tournaments). Not surprisingly, in any given year, 15–20% of our seniors are recruited athletes at outstanding college programs.

CROSS COUNTRY AT THE

IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL. In the Middle School, we have

a three-season athletic requirement—and a year-round belief in the importance of honoring your own health, testing your abilities, and working with teammates toward a shared goal. You can be athletic in lots of ways, from fitness to field hockey, from recreational skating to interscholastic lacrosse. We’re here to help you love it and learn from it. IN THE LOWER SCHOOL. Our physical education and sports

programs in the Lower School focus on staying healthy, learning new skills, and loving being active. Our P.E. teacher is prone to say things like this: “We get outside. We get dirty. We get sweaty. We learn how to take turns, listen to coaching, and work through challenges. The foundation we set for our youngest learners through the sports requirements is an essential part of the Lower School education. We are molding good teammates for life.”

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO VOLLEYBALL AT DARTMOUTH AND EMORY TENNIS AT BOWDOIN, CONNECTICUT COLLEGE, CORNELL, AND MICHIGAN SOCCER AT FRANKLIN & MARSHALL, KENYON, LAFAYETTE, AND GEORGE WASHINGTON SAILING AT CONNECTICUT COLLEGE AND GEORGE WASHINGTON BASEBALL AT WILLIAMS SQUASH AT COLBY AND ST. LAWRENCE BASKETBALL AT GEORGETOWN AND WAKE FOREST TRACK AND FIELD AT DARTMOUTH BASKETBALL AT EMORY, GEORGETOWN, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY, OCCIDENTAL, POMONA, WAKE FOREST,

INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC TEAMS. Baseball,

AND WILLIAMS

Basketball, Cross Country, Fencing, Field Hockey, Golf, Lacrosse, Sailing, Soccer, Softball, Squash, Tennis, Track & Field, Ultimate Frisbee, Volleyball, Wrestling.

WRESTLING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO AND THIS IS JUST A SAMPLING!

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Before and after GFA We’re looking for students—and families!—who are always asking: Why? Students who ask: How can I help? Students who stand up for themselves—and for others. Students who instinctively appreciate the connection between mind and heart and body. Students with wit, in every sense of the word. HERE’S HOW WE HELP: We consider each student’s application without regard to their financial capacity. We maintain (and strive to expand) a financial aid budget of about $3.8 million, dedicated exclusively to families who demonstrate financial need. Our average aid grant is $32,000 per year. Our goal: A campus that reflects the diversity of our region. And a dynamic, pluralistic education in which every voice matters. NOT THAT THIS IS EVERYTHING, BUT: COLLEGE! Our College Counseling Office takes a grounded,

holistic approach to the search process. We consider each student’s achievements and ambitions, and look for a college capable of deepening and extending them. We stay focused on what we’re doing right now (global thinking, compassionate community engagement, cross-disciplinary research, etc.)—and we make smart, strategic plans for what’s next. Not coincidentally, our alumni tend to feel exceptionally prepared for college coursework.

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LET US OVERWHELM YOU WITH SHORT PORTRAITS OF FASCINATING GRADUATES CLAY GARNER ’13 graduated from Stanford with

a degree in East Asian Studies, won a Schwarzman Scholarship, was a pop music sensation in China, interned at the United Nations, and is now a marketing manager at Google’s Nest. DEEPALI GUPTA ’08 earned an MFA in musical

theatre writing from NYU. She recently composed the score for Ski End, “a theatrical examination of apocalyptic despair, ritualistic forms of play, and skiing,” with a Brooklyn-based collaborative called Piehole. KATIE CASSETTA ’07 started CASD USA, a

nonprofit that supports rural development work in Nepal; the organization recently built a pipeline that brings water to a village. SAM SLAUGHTER ’05 is the co-founder and CEO of

PowerGen Renewable Energy, one of Africa’s leading microgrid companies. He was recently listed on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list in the energy sector. SEFRA LEVIN ’03 majored in art history at Colorado

College, got a master’s in agroecological education at Cornell, and is a Genebanks Impact Fellow at the Crop Trust, where she works with international agrarian leaders to preserve native seeds for future generations. PHILLIPE COUSTEAU ’98 is a leading

environmentalist, CNN special correspondent, and founder of the nonprofit EarthEcho. He is the grandson of the famed oceanographic explorer. DAVID HASKELL ’97 graduated from Yale, studied

architectural history as a member of the inaugural class of the Gates Cambridge Scholarship, co-founded Kings County Distillery, and is the editor-in-chief of New York Media.

CHARLIE HALL ’92 is the drummer in The War on

Drugs, a Grammy award-winning band that melts the hearts of cynical music critics. PRASANTH AKKAPEDDI ’92 majored in English at

Yale, earned a J.D. at Columbia, and is now a deputy general counsel at Kraft-Heinz Foods in Chicago. SEAN DRISCOLL ’89 is the head women’s soccer

coach at Princeton University. The team recently won the Ivy League title and an NCAA tournament berth. Sean has won Ivy League Coach of the Year three times in four seasons. TOM SACHS ’85 is an artist whose work is housed

in The Museum of Modern Art (N.Y.), the Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris), the Art Institute of Chicago, and the NASA Permanent Collection. His work was STEAM before STEAM existed. ELIZABETH MACDONOUGH ’84 is the

U.S. Senate parliamentarian, the first woman to hold that position in either the Senate or the House of Representatives (!). OTHAR HANSSON ’83 studied computer science

at Columbia and UCLA and earned a Ph.D. from the University of California Berkeley. His name is on 16 patents. He’s a principal engineer at Google Play. REED KRAKOFF ’82 is the chief artistic director of

Tiffany & Company and the first designer in the company’s 180-year history to join the executive suite. DEIRDRE DALY ’79 is the former United States

Attorney for the state of Connecticut. JEREMY ZIMMER ’76 is the chairman and CEO of

United Talent Artists, one of the world’s foremost talent agencies.

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A FEW COLLEGES WHERE GFA GRADUATES ARE CURRENTLY ENROLLED Bates College Boston College Bowdoin College Brown University Bucknell University University of California Berkeley University of California Los Angeles Carnegie Mellon University University of Chicago Claremont McKenna College Colby College Colgate University

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Colorado College Columbia University Connecticut College Cornell University Dartmouth College Davidson College Duke University Emory University Georgetown University Georgia Institute of Technology Hamilton College Johns Hopkins University Lehigh University University of Michigan Middlebury College Massachusetts Institute of Technology New York University Northwestern University University of Pennsylvania

Pomona College Princeton University University of Richmond Santa Clara University University of Southern California Stanford University Trinity College Tufts University United States Military Academy West Point United States Naval Academy University of St. Andrews Vanderbilt University University of Virginia Wake Forest University Washington University in St. Louis Wesleyan University Williams College Yale University


The world we build. IT’S A WORLD WHERE PEOPLE DEFINE SUCCESS ON THEIR OWN TERMS. WHERE THEY KNOW THAT CURIOSITY IS THE BEGINNING OF EMPATHY. WHERE THEY STRIKE A BALANCE BETWEEN PASSION AND INTEGRITY. WHERE THEY HOLD THEMSELVES TO HIGH STANDARDS—AND PUSH THEMSELVES TO SET NEW STANDARDS. WHERE THEY RESPECT THE POWER OF COLLABORATION. WHERE THEY MAKE SPACE FOR EVERY VOICE; EMBRACE DIFFERENCE; BUILD CONNECTIONS AND COMMUNITIES ACROSS BORDERS. IT’S A JOYFUL, INTERDEPENDENT, LIBERATING WORLD. WE’RE PROUD TO WORK TOWARD IT, EVERY DAY.


GFA ENGAGES STUDENTS AS PARTNERS IN AN INNOVATIVE, INCLUSIVE, AND GLOBALLY MINDED COMMUNITY TO PREPARE THEM FOR A LIFE OF PURPOSE. GFACADEMY.ORG

The paper used for this book is made of 30% post-consumer recycled material, produced by wind power, in a mill that is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. This book was printed at a 100% wind-powered, FSC-certified facility.

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