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SUMMER 2019

Vol. 11 #2

greenmagazinehawaii.com


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SUMMER 2019

GREEN 4 Energy

TRANSFORMING - LAND BACK TO ‘AINA

What will it take to create a more sustainable and resilient energy system for Hawai‘i? According to Hawai‘i Gas, diversification is key

Specializing in Cultural and Ecological Landscapes

7 Education

Executive Strategy Consultant Stacy Kealohalani Ferreira on fostering social enterprise thinking at Kamehameha Schools and beyond

• Hawaii’s largest selection of Native Hawaiian Plants & Endangered Species • Licensed and Insured • Erosion Control • Hydroseeding/Mulching • Xeriscaping • Landscape Services • Landscape Maintenance

Published by Element Media, Inc. VOLUME 11 :: NUMBER 2 :: SUMMER 2019

President Jamie Giambrone Publisher Naomi Hazelton

nativehawaiianplants@gmail.com

808.235.6165

Managing Editor Lauren McNally laurenm@elementmediahi.com

www.HawaiianNativePlants.com

Art Director Keith Usher Publisher’s Assistant Christie Honore Administration Sally Shaner Contributing Writers Tiffany Hervey, Kevin Whitton

Photo Hawai‘i Gas

Contributing Photographers Dave Miyamoto, Darryl Watanabe

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8 Efficiency

A holistic approach to a healthy home starts with efficiency

10 Endemic & Indigenous

A primer on reintroducing native Hawaiian plants into the suburban landscape

16 Eco-friendly

Organic, low waste and responsibly sourced, these made-in-Hawai‘i beauty brands tick all the boxes

Contact Element Media at 1088 Bishop Street, Suite 1130 Honolulu, HI 96813 808.737.8711 Subscribe and read online at greenmagazinehawaii.com Follow Green on Facebook at facebook.com/GreenMagazineHawaii and on Twitter at @greenmaghawaii Green Magazine Hawai‘i is a quarterly publication available through subscription, direct mail and bookstores throughout Hawai‘i. The views expressed within Green Magazine Hawai‘i do not necessarily reflect the opinions of management and ownership. Green Magazine Hawai‘i may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.


GREEN

ENERGY // EDUCATION // EFFICIENCY // ENDEMIC & INDIGENOUS // ECO-FRIENDLY

How Hawai‘i Gas is leading the way with renewable initiatives

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Few issues are more critical for our planet than the need to increase our usage of renewable, resilient and environmentally sustainable sources of energy. That is especially true here in Hawai‘i, a place that is not only exceptionally vulnerable to climate change but also more dependent on imported oil than any other state. Our vulnerability to climate-related changes, such as sea-level rise, ocean temperature increases and shoreline erosion, are matched only by our vulnerability to natural disasters. Hawai‘i is leading in the development of sustainable energy technologies for the future, with options in solar, wind and geothermal. However, during natural disasters common to the islands, including hurricanes, tsunamis or even high winds, without the ability to transmit electricity through power lines, these sources might not be there for us when we need them most. That’s why Hawai‘i Gas is focused on developing another renewable energy source: renewable natural gas, a waste-derived energy. The state’s emergency-management officials tell us to be prepared for 14 days without power in the event of a disaster, but the reality is that a Category 3 or stronger hurricane could knock out


Renewable Natural Gas

Photo Hawai‘i Gas

electricity for months. Living in the islands, we know that even normal weather patterns can affect electricitygenerating renewables. As an island state, reliability is critical for normalcy and survival. As recently as 2005, Hawai‘i experienced 40 days and 40 nights of rain. We should learn from the experiences of others, including Puerto Rico, where recovery efforts are still underway long after its recent natural disaster. A diversified portfolio of renewable energy sources is key, and renewable natural gas is now part of that portfolio. Hawai‘i Gas has a vision that supports the state’s clean-energy goals while providing both resiliency and sustainability for our communities. A holistic view of energy is critical for the state, and Hawai‘i Gas has multiple initiatives that focus on diverse energy sources, including renewable natural gas produced from biowaste, as well as projects related to hydrogen, and a 6.5-megawatt solar farm. These initiatives are just the latest developments in the company’s long history of energy innovation in the islands, which goes back over 100 years.

Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) is intended for commercial and residential use, and it is delivered safely and reliably through Hawaiʻi Gas’ underground utility pipeline. This means that when winds are high and the power goes out, gas users can still cook and access hot water for sanitation. This is a critical piece of Hawaiʻi’s resiliency plan for surviving natural disasters. Hawaiʻi Gas has over 1,100 miles of underground piping and has not experienced a major disruption in gas supply since the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941. The comfort of being able to cook and bathe after a catastrophic event cannot be overstated. Hawai‘i Gas began exploring RNG in 2011, when it launched a pilot project to study the potential for capturing biogas from animal fats. RNG is produced by harvesting and processing the gases that are released when organic materials decay. Raw materials like energy crops, landfill waste and sewage can be used as feedstock in anaerobic digesters to produce biogas. This gas can then be purified and used for cooking, water heating, clothes

drying or outdoor torch lighting. RNG is a carbon-neutral source of energy—it can even be carbon negative when it’s generated from waste that would otherwise release methane emissions into the atmosphere as it breaks down. And since RNG comes from resources like waste or energy crops, it is a completely renewable fuel. In partnership with the City and County of Honolulu, Hawai‘i Gas unveiled the first RNG facility in the state at the Honouliuli Wastewater Treatment Plant in ‘Ewa Beach last December. This $5 million project harvests waste energy that was previously being flared off into the atmosphere. Now, this biogas is collected, processed and injected into Hawai‘i Gas’ O‘ahu utility pipeline to provide thermal energy for homes and businesses. Hawai‘i Gas’ RNG facility at Honouliuli will produce an estimated 800,000 therms per year, eliminating the energy equivalent of 15,000 barrels of oil or the emissions that 400 vehicles would release in a year. This is a win-win for the O‘ahu community, using the city’s waste to create energy. The project is also expected to generate over $1 million in annual revenue for the City and County of Honolulu. With the success of the Honouliuli facility, Hawai‘i Gas is looking for opportunities to add more RNG gas into its fuel supply, including purchasing RNG from other providers. Last year, the utility put out a request for proposals for suppliers who can provide up to 80,000 therms of biogas or biomethane per day. Hawai‘i Gas received a number of bids and is reviewing the proposals based on feasibility and expected cost impacts, if any, for Hawai‘i Gas customers.

GREENMAGAZINE HAWAII.COM

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Solar

Hydrogen Hydrogen is another alternative fuel that has received a lot of attention. When combined with oxygen, its only byproduct is water, making it a perfectly clean-burning fuel. Hawai‘i Gas is unique because it has one of the highest concentrations of hydrogen in its pipelines of any gas utility in the world. That’s because Hawai‘i Gas manufactures 98 percent pure hydrogen at its synthetic natural gas plant, capturing and injecting the gas into its O‘ahu pipeline. Hawai‘i Gas has also conducted a pilot project to study the cost of producing fuel-cell-grade hydrogen and is continuing to work with government and industry partners to develop new opportunities to utilize hydrogen as an alternative fuel source in Hawai‘i. In particular, Hawai‘i Gas is focused on exploring efficient storage and transmission of hydrogen fuel to be used in fuel-cell-powered generators and for transportation purposes.

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Located on a 12-acre parcel at the Honbushin International Center in Mililani, Hawai‘i Gas’ Waihonu solar farm was the largest active solar farm on O‘ahu at the time of its dedication in 2016. The solar farm’s two sites generate a combined total of 6.5 megawatts or enough energy to power 1,000 homes. While gas and solar might seem like they belong on different ends of the energy spectrum, they are ideal partners in creating an affordable, resilient and reliable clean energy system. A great example of how gas and solar can work together is the system developed for Kahauiki Village, an 11-acre planned community near Ke‘ehi Lagoon Park and Sand Island. Hawai‘i Gas joined the aio Foundation in helping to support the community’s groundbreaking initiative to not only provide homeless families with affordable housing but also serve as a demonstration project for the latest energy technology. Each home in the first phase of Kahauiki Village is equipped with solar panels, gas for cooking, battery storage for electricity and backup electricity generators powered by gas. The community’s central laundry facility features efficient, high-volume gas dryers. The homes built in the second phase of Kahauiki Village, which are currently under construction, will have combined solar hot water and tankless gas water-heating systems that will be ultra-efficient in heating water for cooking and showering. This combination of multiple energy sources enables Kahauiki Village to offer its residents a reliable power supply and be financially sustainable in the long term.

Our state’s energy needs and priorities have evolved in the decades since Hawai‘i Gas was founded in 1904, and the company continues to anticipate Hawai‘i’s energy needs by transforming how it serves its nearly 70,000 business and residential customers statewide. With the demand for clean energy sources greater than ever before, Hawai‘i Gas is committed to leading the way with innovative, clean and affordable solutions that support a greener, more resilient future.

Photo Hawai‘i Gas

HAWAI‘I GAS


EDUCATION

GREEN

STACY KEALOHALANI FERREIRA EXECUTIVE STRATEGY CONSULTANT, STRATEGY & INNOVATION DIVISION KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOLS

| EDUCATION |

BACK TO THE FUTURE By Lauren McNally Photo Dave Miyamoto If you want something to change, begin upstream. That’s precisely what Stacy Ferreira is doing in the education sector at Kamehameha Schools, where Hawaiian values are a central component of the curriculum. “Because we’re a Native Hawaiianserving organization, everything we do is within the context of a Hawaiian worldview,” Ferreira says. “When we teach our kids the Hawaiian way and about the ingenuity of our ancestors, we take that ‘ike küpuna and bring it into a 21st century context.” When it comes to equipping the next generation of Hawai‘i’s leaders and entrepreneurs for the jobs of the future, it’s always with the indigenous principle of “seven generations”—that is, acting in the interest of at least seven generations into the future. “It’s coming with that indigenous lens and saying, yes, you can make a profit, but it’s also about benefiting people and the planet,” Ferreira says. That’s the kind of social enterprise thinking being cultivated

at Hälau ‘Ïnana, a first-of-its-kind collaborative learning space that Ferreira conceived as a hub of culture and innovation. In combination with findings from nearby Ka Waiwai, Hälau ‘Ïnana will serve as an incubator for a larger redevelopment on the horizon for Mö‘ili‘ili, one that will encompass six-and-a-half acres of retail, educational facilities and cultural resources, including another innovation center. The projects Ferreira started at her former post in KS’ extension education division were so far out of the box, it was a natural transition for her to make the move to Strategy and Innovation, a new division formed in 2015 with the launch of Vision 2040, a landmark 25-year vision statement developed by KS for carving out successful life and career pathways for Native Hawaiian learners. “SV2040 was really the impetus for thinking much bigger and more broadly,” Ferreira says. “It was the first time that KS had ever had a group of individuals helping to forecast where we as an enterprise needed to be in order to, one, serve all Native Hawaiians, but also reimagine what teaching, learning and education look like.” The goal? A deeper and more multifaceted picture of success. “Success for us means getting your post-high degree with little to no debt and finding a job you’re passionate about and that provides you with purpose,” Ferreira says. “It means being culturally connected and knowing who you are as a Hawaiian, and making an impact in your community and the world in a positive way.” As one of the largest private landowners in the state and a stakeholder in sectors across the landscape, KS is well positioned for impact, not just on education but innovation, entrepreneurship and economic development as a whole. “These are exciting spaces that KS can really move the needle, not just for Native Hawaiians but for the state of Hawai‘i,” Ferreira says. “What’s good for Hawaiians is good for the state, economically, educationally and beyond.”

“Success for us means making an impact in your community and the world in a positive way.” GREENMAGAZINE HAWAII.COM

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GREEN

ENERGY // EDUCATION // EFFICIENCY // ENDEMIC & INDIGENOUS // ECO-FRIENDLY

| EFFICIENCY |

GREEN MACHINE

A holistic approach to a healthy home By Tiffany Hervey It’s easy and affordable to turn a home into a healthy and green, money-saving machine through a holistic approach to home improvements. Hawai‘i’s climate affords abundant, year-round renewable energy. Plentiful sunlight and energyefficient ventilation solutions offer natural daylighting options and healthier, more sustainable indoor air quality. Lucky for us, companies like RevoluSun Smart Home are dedicated to bringing affordable and cutting-edge home technologies to the Islands, providing a showroom where homeowners and homebuilders can see a variety of holistic home essentials up close and learn more about how they can improve the health of their homes.

VARIABLE-SPEED POOL PUMPS

Pool owners can see cost reductions of up to $1,500 a year and energy savings of up to 90 percent by swapping traditional pool pumps for variable-speed pool pumps. Variable speeds and built-in timers assure optimum energy efficiency.

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NATURAL LIGHTING

High-performance skylights and sun tunnels bring natural light into interior spaces and improve indoor air quality. These affordable lighting options can greatly reduce electricity use and many systems are eligible for federal tax credit.


WHOLE-HOUSE FANS

Whole-house fans provide energy-efficient ventilation and cooling for the entire home while removing pet dander, odors, germs, mold spores, smoke and VOC gases. They can also save homeowners up to 90 percent on their air-conditioning bills.

ENERGY AUTOMATION & HOME SECURITY

BATTERY SYSTEMS

Solar power storage is key to grid independence. Battery systems with indoor and outdoor storage options allow homeowners with PV systems to maximize the energy made on their roof everyday.

Smart home automation and security offers a holistic approach to energy management, employing technologies such as home automation, video monitoring, keyless entry and motion sensors.

PV HOT WATER

PV technology uses the abundant energy of the sun to deliver clean, reliable hot water. Solar hot water heaters don’t require utility approval or oversight and are often eligible for PV tax credits.

EV CHARGING

Home chargers are a perfect marriage of technologies for electric vehicle drivers with home solar.

GREENMAGAZINE HAWAII.COM

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GREEN

ENERGY // EDUCATION // EFFICIENCY // ENDEMIC & INDIGENOUS // ECO-FRIENDLY

Landscaping with native Hawaiian plants By Kevin Whitton Photos Darryl Watanabe Rick Barboza and Matt Schirman, coowners of native Hawaiian plant nursery Hui Kū Maoli Ola, are on a mission to reintroduce native Hawaiian plants into the suburban landscape. Since 2005, they’ve been growing them at their He‘eia nursery in Ha‘ikū Valley and educating landscapers

and backyard-gardening enthusiasts about the care and importance of these environmentally and culturally significant species. To this day, they hear the same gripes about native Hawaiian plants—that they’re ugly, slow growing and difficult to keep alive. The two native Hawaiian plant specialists are adamant that these misconceptions stem from a lack of knowledge about the specific growing conditions that native Hawaiian plants require. Most residential areas have been cleared of their naturally occurring native vegetation. If you’re looking to landscape

ALULA SCIENTIFIC NAME: BRIGHAMIA INSIGNIS DESCRIPTION: Small to medium shrub with a fat, succulent stalk—sometimes branched—that produces a rosette of large, rounded, light green leaves. Grows up to six feet tall and three feet wide. Small, star-shaped yellow flowers protrude from the leaf axis on long stems. Blooming is sporadic. When in bloom, its fragrant flowers can completely encircle the top of the plant, resembling a crown. LANDSCAPE USE: Shrub, accent, container. Plant alula in dry areas with full sun. Soil should dry out completely between watering.

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with native Hawaiian plants, you need to pick them based on where you live. You wouldn’t want to plant beach plants in the back of Mānoa Valley, and you would definitely kill a hapu‘u tree fern if you planted it on the windward side of a beach house. The trick to maintaining a beautiful landscape of native Hawaiian plants is to learn about the plants that once grew in the area, so you can then mimic that biodiversity. Done properly, nature will take care of most of the plants’ needs once they are established.


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‘UKI‘UKI SCIENTIFIC NAME: DIANELLA SANDWICENSE DESCRIPTION: ‘Uki‘uki has two forms: short,

INDIGENOUS VS. ENDEMIC Hawai‘i is home to approximately 1,500 native plant species, 90 percent of which are endemic.

compact growth with dark green leaf blades about a foot tall and less compact growth with lighter green foliage up to three feet tall. When in bloom, the short form sends up a short, central stalk covered with small purple and yellow flowers that develop into dark purple berries. The taller form sends up a stalk with many small white and yellow flowers. Both forms bloom year round.

LANDSCAPE USE: Ground cover, accent plant, container. Plant ‘uki‘uki in full sun to partial shade. Requires light to moderate watering.

Hawai‘i indigenous plants are native to Hawai‘i as well as other parts of the world— think naupaka kahakai.

Hawai‘i endemic plants are native only to Hawai‘i—think koa trees. Hawai‘i’s endemic plants arrived by wing, wind or waves before the arrival of Captain Cook and gradually evolved into new species shaped by its environment, predators and pollinators.

Of the approximately 20,000 plant species introduced into Hawai‘i over the last 200 years, 8,000 have become naturalized—they are established and growing on their own in nature.


‘O-HAI SCIENTIFIC NAME: SESBANIA TOMENTOSA DESCRIPTION: Partially woody, lowsprawling shrub with extremely soft, silvery-pubescent pinnate leaves that help reflect sunlight and retain moisture. Leaves at the stem tips are highly aromatic in full sun. Striking pink and yellow pea flowers, each about one to two inches in length, form in clusters under the leaves. ‘O-hai blooms sporadically throughout the year with peak blooming periods following heavy rain in winter and spring. Long, greenish bean pods form after flowering. LANDSCAPE USE: Shrub, tree, accent, hedges, screening. Plant ‘o-hai in full sun in well-draining soil. Prefers dry growing conditions and is generally tolerant of wind. ‘O-hai enriches the soil with nitrogen, benefiting neighboring plants. GREENMAGAZINE HAWAII.COM

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‘O-HI‘A LEHUA SCIENTIFIC NAME: METROSIDEROS POLYMORPHA DESCRIPTION: Fast-growing tree with variable leaf shape, size and color. Leaves range from half an inch to three inches in length and from dark purple to gold. Some trees are bushy and others stretch to 30 feet tall. Healthy trees are nearly constantly in bloom, attracting bees and other insects. Their colorful pompoms range from dark red to yellow to white.

LANDSCAPE USE: Accent, container,

screening, shade tree. Plant ‘o-hi‘a lehua anywhere in full sun.

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‘ILIMA PAPA SCIENTIFIC NAME: SIDA FALLAX DESCRIPTION: Prostrate plant with pale green leaves, woody stems and bright orange flowers. Grows in many different varieties, from bushes to ground covers. Sprawling shrub has a four- to eight-foot spread. Blooms year round in clusters or single flowers that are fully open by noon and last a day. Attracts native pollinators such as yellowfaced bees.

LANDSCAPE USE: Groundcover, shrub, accent. Plant in full sun in non-clay soil.

GREENMAGAZINE HAWAII.COM

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GREEN ECO-FRIENDLY | ECO-FRIENDLY |

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SKIN IS IN Between the zero-waste movement, no-makeup makeup trend and rising demand for clean beauty, it’s clear consumers are looking to strip down in more ways than one. Organic, low waste and responsibly sourced, these made-in-Hawai‘i brands tick all the boxes. 1. O‘O HAWAII Developed by a holistic health and nutrition coach who donates a $1 of every online purchase to Keauhou Bird Conservation Center Discovery Forest on Hawai‘i Island, O‘o Hawaii marries clinical-level actives and superfood ingredients from nature. For best results, use the topicals of your choice in combination with the brand’s skinboosting dietary supplements for better skin from the inside out. [Birdseed Detoxifying Face Scrub, $78] oohawaii.com 2. HONUA HAWAIIAN SKINCARE Originally formulated for clients at her apothecary facial studio on O‘ahu, Honua Hawaiian Skincare was founded by a licensed esthetician and Hawai‘i native whose handmade products feature wildcrafted and regeneratively farmed botanical superstars like ‘olena, noni and hibiscus. The company donates a portion of proceeds from its reef-safe SPF to Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii and offsets its use of sandalwood through the Hawaiian Legacy Reforestation Initiative. [Moana Mask, $38] honuaskincare.com 3. MAHALO SKIN CARE Crafted with care on Kaua‘i and packaged in luxurious, eco-friendly glass and bamboo, Mahalo Skin Care products feature high-performance ingredients grown and processed in-house or sourced directly from local co-ops and biodynamic farms. Visit the website for the 411 on all of Mahalo’s go-to plant extracts as well as posts on self-care and sustainability. [Hawaiian Hydration Advanced Cellular Repair Concentrate, $140] mahalo.care

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4. OSHAN ESSENTIALS This luxurious after-sun care line features raw, organic, ethically sourced skin savers blended in small batches on Maui. In addition to housing its products in glass containers, Oshan uses retail boxes that are composed of 50 percent postconsumer waste, and its shipping boxes and packing material are made from 100 percent post-consumer recycled content. [‘Ele Face Wash, $26–$66] oshanessentials.com

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5. LEAHLANI Turn your skincare routine into a self-care ritual with Leahlani, a line of products made fresh every week on the north shore of Kaua‘i by a former spa director and holistic esthetician. Visit the Leahlani blog for tips on using the company’s aroma-therapeutic potions and recommendations on upcycling its frosted glass containers. [Meli Glow Illuminating Nectar Mask, $52] leahlaniskincare.com

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WEEKDAYS AT 6 AM - 10 AM | KHVHRADIO.COM


NATURAL, RENEWABLE, CARBON NEUTRAL. RNG IS ABOUT AS GREEN AS IT GETS. Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) is a carbon neutral fuel created right here in Hawai‘i from waste. We capture it and put it to use for Hawaii’s homes and businesses. In fact, since December of 2018, we have been providing Renewable Natural Gas created at Honouliuli Wastewater Treatment Plant through a partnership between Hawai‘i Gas and the City & County of Honolulu. We are creating enough RNG to provide hot water to thousands of Hawai‘i homes…and growing. Learn more at HawaiiGas.com.

Green Magazine Hawaii - Summer 2019  

Green Magazine Hawaii - Hawai‘i's Sustainability Living Magazine featuring Hawaii Gas and the future of clean energy.

Green Magazine Hawaii - Summer 2019  

Green Magazine Hawaii - Hawai‘i's Sustainability Living Magazine featuring Hawaii Gas and the future of clean energy.

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