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January 2016

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Suzy Amis

Cameron on the benefits of a plant-based diet

SAVE THE WURTH HOUSE

Tips for Healthy Digestion SIMPLE RESOLUTIONS FOR A GREEN NEW YEAR

THE RISKS OF RADON EXPOSURE

Paris Climate Summit GREEN INITIATIVES OF THE COLLEGE FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP Green Living magazine is printed by a Forest Stewardship Council certified printer.


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departments

January 2016

on the cover

11 live green 6 Waterways of the Ancients: Lessons Then and Now 8 How Arizona Needs to Plan for its Water Future 10 Holistic Dentistry: Oral Care Without the Toxins 11 Resolve to Start that Exercise Program – Smartly 12 January is Radon Action Month: Find Out More 14 Lung Force: A True Account of How Awareness Can Save Lives 16 Simple Resolutions for a Green New Year 18 Help Save the Wurth House 20 Keep Arizona Beautiful Rural Spotlight: Bisbee Recycles 22 Water & Wine in the Verde Valley 23 Understanding Digestion

30

Suzy Amis Cameron, founder of the MUSE School in Calabasas and wife to director James Cameron, graces our January Healthy Living cover. Read more about her inspirations for living a plant-based lifestyle and implementing plant-based lunches at MUSE on page 24.

January 2016

greenlivingaz.com

Suzy Amis

Cameron on the benefits of a plant-based diet

SAVE THE WURTH HOUSE

Tips for Healthy Digestion SIMPLE RESOLUTIONS FOR A GREEN NEW YEAR

THE RISKS OF RADON EXPOSURE

Paris Climate Summit

GREEN INITIATIVES OF THE COLLEGE FOOTBALL CHAMPIONS HIP Green Living magazine is printed

by a Forest Stewardship Council

certified printer.

play green 32 Earth Friendly Tech Products 34 Meredith Monk Weaves Music and Performance Art for the Earth

36 Keeping Them Wild 38 College Football Playoff Improves Green at the Game

39 Launch Party Photo Collage

36

work green 24 Suzy Amis Cameron: Giving Environmental Education Some Serious Food For Thought

27 Paris Climate Summit:

U.S. Business Community Offers Strong Support

40 Recipes 42 Green Scenes: Calendar of Events 47 He’s Green, She’s Green 48 Cool & Outrageous Stuff

28 A Sustainability Leadership Agenda for 2016

30 The Art of Placemaking

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Special Section: Prescott GREEN BUSINESS Guide on page 46

January 2016 | greenliving

3


January 2016

Editor’s Note

I

t’s a whole new year, which means a whole new range of possibilities. According to a survey from Nielsen, the number one resolution from 2015 was to be fit and healthy. However, of the 45 percent of Americans who make New Year’s resolutions, only about 8 percent are successful in their efforts. Whether you think resolutions are helpful or trite, it can be fun to think of something to better yourself or the planet this year. Check out our Simple Resolutions for a Green New Year on page 16 for easy changes that can become a healthy habit for a lifetime. In our January Healthy Living issue, we are honored to feature Suzy Amis Cameron, founder of the MUSE School in Calabasas and wife of director James Cameron, on our cover. Read more about Suzy’s inspirations for living a plant-based lifestyle and implementing plant-based lunches at MUSE on page 24. We are also featuring fitness tips for the New Year; an article on understanding digestion; a breakdown of the recent Paris Climate Summit; the act of saving a historic house on Roosevelt Row;

SIMPLE RESOLUTIONS FOR A GREEN NEW YEAR

16

“I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes. Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re doing something.” – Neil Gaiman green initiatives of the upcoming College Football Championship game; how to protect your family against radon exposure; and much more. We’re also featuring a Prescott Green Business page for ideas of eco-friendly places to trek to while you’re up north and playing in the snow. In 2016, what do you hope to accomplish? What do you want to see happen in the world? What changes – big or small – would you like to make? It’s important to think about these things early in the year so that we may reflect on them later. So, I ask you the age-old question: What is your New Year’s resolution?

Amanda Harvey Associate Editor

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WATER

WATERWAYS OF THE ANCIENTS:

LESSONS THEN AND NOW BY DAVID SCHALLER

A

new year spent living with less water might best dried and stored in pottery jars and tightly woven baskets. In begin by considering old ways of doing so. Arizona all early indigenous cultures, crop selection and seed saving is blessed with an abundance of indigenous wisdom were instrumental in ensuring continuation of droughtwhen it comes not just to getting by, but to thriving over resistant species, practices that continue to the present day. centuries in a landscape prone to dryness. If anyone Even now, we don’t have very accurate information on the understands the lessons of water scarcity, it is those who have amount of water used on Native American lands in Arizona. been living here the longest. A 2007 report by the Water Education Foundation and the Arizona’s earliest inhabitants clearly grasped the value of University of Arizona estimates that water use on the Navajo water in the desert. They quickly determined what steps were Reservation may be as low as 10 gallons per person per day, needed to live with limited as opposed to 100 gallons TUBA CITY CORNFIELD, ANSEL ADAMS supplies, including both of water per day consumed careful use and fair access to by Arizonans not living on what would be the lifeblood reservations. Another recent of their civilizations. They finding puts the number at maintained firm rules on roughly seven gallons per the use of water, assigning day, 30 percent lower than responsibilities to all, the UA report. Either number including children. In many makes it strikingly clear that societies, there was great if anyone in Arizona knows spiritual significance attached what water scarcity looks like, to water, and its importance it is Native Americans. became embedded in the Some improvement is everyday life of the people. underway as tribal rights In the desert and dryland to Colorado River water regions of Arizona, Native are slowly being quantified American agricultural societies and locked up in legal depended largely on their settlements. Much work proximity to flowing water. Groundwater extraction was not remains to translate these rights into a water infrastructure yet available. Once villages grew to a certain size, cropland that can serve residential, agricultural and other uses on near rivers became harder to find. Rather than moving people, Indian lands. In the meantime, the staggering low amount of the inhabitants began to move water, through complex daily per capita water use on these lands still exists. networks of irrigation canals. Today, we find archaeological If the historical conditions of aridity and episodic drought evidence of this prehistoric network of canals throughout the were not enough, another force is at work that requires Gila River, Salt, Verde and Santa Cruz river valleys. tribes to live with even less water than normal. The legacy of Living with less water also meant eating with less water. uranium mining on the Colorado Plateau still contaminates More than just using each drop wisely, it extended to land Indian water supplies, as waste piles and old mine workings management practices, crop selections and planting patterns leach their poisons deep into the groundwater. In 1979, the (i.e. beans next to corn) that ensured an adequate harvest. tailings pond at a uranium mill in New Mexico overflowed Weeds were burned to put nutrients back into the ground, and sent 93 million gallons of acidic, radioactive waste some making the job easier for each drop of water. Foods were 80 miles downstream to Navajo County, Arizona. In one tragic

6 greenliving | January 2016

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WATER

moment, already scarce tribal water SUGAR MAKING supplies were further compromised. In August 2015, a failed cleanup effort at Colorado’s Gold King Mine released three million gallons of waste sludge that rendered the Animas River – a vital source of water for Navajo livestock, drinking and crops – unusable for weeks. Livestock owners had to haul water, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) brought water to farmers, and the tribal utility stopped pulling water from the river for a time. The Gold King Mine is now back to its pre-accident levels of discharge, but this only means that it now takes 10 days to release the same three million gallons that exited during the initial mine breach. In other words, the tribe’s vulnerability continues well beyond that one incident. Ongoing mine releases can be found at thousands of abandoned sites in the southwest. Tribal water supplies have not been contaminated for the last time from the slow-motion threat of industrial discharges. Looking to the future, historical conditions of desert

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dryness, climate changing droughts, and man-made events will continue to challenge native peoples to find ways to live with less water. When people and crops don’t have enough water, it doesn’t really matter if it’s due to drought, excess groundwater pumping, mine water contamination, or other causes. With so little water available to begin with, every gallon lost to contamination is magnified. This imperative extends to us all. Despite the challenging climate and landscape, ancestral Arizonans found ways to carefully manage the available rainfall and intermittent surface waters that gave rise to their great cultures. What we are willing to learn from them will go a long way in coaching us through our own water and climate changes to come. David Schaller is a retired environmental scientist living in Tucson where he writes on climate, water and energy security. For more articles about water visit greenlivingaz.com/water

January 2016 | greenliving

7


WATER

A RIVER DOESN’T SIMPLY RUN THROUGH IT:

HOW ARIZONA NEEDS TO PLAN

FOR ITS WATER FUTURE BY KEVIN MORAN

I

recently had an opportunity to participate in the Arizona Town Hall – a three day gathering where consensus dialogue and civil discourse is in full force. As a long-time Arizonan and public affairs professional now in the environmental sector, I found it an interesting journey to spend days deliberating with a diverse mix of Arizonans on “Keeping Arizona’s Water Glass Full.” With ongoing news of the drought in California and the recent culmination of climate talks in Paris, a focus on the precious resource of water was timely. First, we truly owe a lot to the vision and commitment of leaders from Arizona’s past. They worked together at critical points in our history to make difficult compromises and investments so that Arizona would have water for growth and quality of life. Roosevelt Dam, the Salt River Project, the Central Arizona Project, the 1980 Groundwater Management Act, and water banking are examples of farsighted investments, compromise, and visionary leadership for our state. Second, we are in one of the worst droughts in recorded history, and scientists say we can expect nature to produce less freshwater – and that will be our “new normal.” In a few decades, without bold new actions, water demand will far exceed water supplies. Water managers recognize that Arizona’s water supply is threatened by what they call a “structural deficit.” Yearly, more Colorado River water is used than the river supplies. For the past 15 years we’ve relied on water stored in Lake Mead to fill this gap. Now we are at risk of the water in Mead running out. Third, there was a strong sense among Town Hall participants that we must work together to prevent a crisis in the future. I was struck by the contrast between this spirit and the prevailing dynamics of our current political process. To secure our water future, citizens must insist on farsighted thinking and compromise from our elected and appointed public servants.

8 greenliving | January 2016

READ MORE...

...about the Paris Climate Summit on page 27

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WATER THE ARIZONA TOWN HALL DISCUSSES “KEEPING ARIZONA’S WATER GLASS FULL”

Fourth, details, data and local realities matter when it comes to water. The Town Hall final report and its recommendations incorporate many calls for action, including: • Protecting Arizona’s rights to Colorado River water, starting with addressing the “structural deficit” created due to overallocation of the amount of water that historically flows in the river. • Finding ways to address concerns about depleting groundwater in rural Arizona. • Improving management of watersheds and water resources to conserve the environment and enhance flows. Fifth, all of us are water users. We can all play a part by being informed and responsible, and asking the state’s leaders to make sound decisions to improve the sustainability of our

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water supply. The viability of our agricultural industry and the health of our environment are critical to our future. Among your New Year resolutions, educate yourself on the issue of water, incorporate conservation practices at home and at the office, and work with your local leaders to give this problem the important attention it needs. For a river to run through Arizona, it better be a resolution that sticks. The full recommendations and an extensive background report produced by Arizona’s three universities can be found at aztownhall.org. Kevin Moran is Senior Director, Colorado River, with the Environmental Defense Fund. He was a participant in the 107th Arizona Town Hall on water. For more articles about water visit greenlivingaz.com/water

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

HOLISTIC DENTISTRY: ORAL CARE

WITHOUT THE TOXINS BY KIANNA GARDNER

T

wice-yearly teeth cleanings are rarely Her product line is designed to be a simple welcomed with open arms. Impending and convenient alternative to traditional dental dentist appointments cue anxiety for products. She plans to expand the line in most of us, and for good reason. Maybe it’s the 2016 and further introduce her products to unidentified smells. Maybe it’s the uncomfortable naturopathic doctors, dental professionals flossing. Maybe it’s the irony that many dentists and chiropractors. use products labeled “harmful if swallowed.” Audrey’s products are safe for at-home Oral health doesn’t need to be associated with personal use, but more and more professional chemically-ridden products and procedures, dental offices are adopting these types of however. There are many holistic (also known holistic practices professionally. “When looking as biological or alternative) dental offices and at dental issues, we need to examine the body DALE AUDREY, R.D.H. products that make oral care a more healthful as a whole,” said Michael Margolis, a biological and less taxing experience. Holistic dentistry, as dentist with My Dentist, a practice in Mesa opposed to most traditional dental practices, aims that specializes in mercury-safe dentistry. “We to reduce the use of toxins, chemicals and metals. make sure that our products and procedures “The people who are paying close attention are biocompatible with the rest of the patient’s to what goes into their bodies are really body. We want the health of your teeth to align happy to know that they have a chemical-free with the rest of you.” alternative,” said Dale Audrey, president and Holistic dentistry is an ongoing learning founder of Oral Fitness, Inc. and creator of Dale process for patients as it becomes more widely Audrey Oral Health Care, an oral care product incorporated in dental offices. Both Audrey and line that is all natural and nontoxic. Margolis continue to educate their customers Audrey first took a notice to chemical and patients about alternative dentistry. The DR. MICHAEL MARGOLIS sensitivities early in her career when she was more we understand about our oral care, the taking x-rays in a dental office. She noted that more at ease we can feel in the dentist’s chair. patients consistently asked if the x-ray process was harmful, and their concerns furthered concerns of her own. Kianna Gardner is a recent graduate from the University of Arizona where “I want to reach the market of people who are scared to go she studied journalism, marketing and environmental sciences. She is passionate about the environment, particularly water resources, and to the dentist,” Audrey said. “Our whole body health comes would like to be editor of her own environmental magazine one day. from the mouth, but most people believe that if they don’t see Find more health & wellness articles at greenlivingaz.com/health it or feel it, then they don’t need to treat it,” she continued.

10 greenliving | January 2016

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

RESOLVE TO START THAT EXERCISE PROGRAM – SMARTLY

BY KYLE HERRIG

A

t the beginning of each year, many of us make resolutions to exercise and “get fit.” Many times, you set too high a goal for yourself, work out too hard too quickly and hurt yourself. All is not lost! Now is the time to make a smart plan for how you’ll achieve your fitness goals…without injury.

INCLUDE STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE COMPONENTS. We will all have different goals, but there are two components to fitness. Don’t just hit the weights every day and expect to be fit. Likewise, running six days a week is not the key either. Create a balance between strength-training and cardio.

SET REALISTIC GOALS. If you tend to set NUTRITION. The best workout plan can’t your sights too high when making fitness outdo a terrible diet. Just because you’re resolutions and then feel defeated that the burning 800 calories in a workout doesn’t mean TRAINER, KYLE HERRIG number on the scale hasn’t gone down, or you’ll hit your goals if you aren’t at least aware you aren’t running a six minute mile, don’t despair. Start by of the nutrients and calories you’re taking in. trying to do cardio twice a week, and participate in a group strength training class twice a week. Oh, and be kind to CONSISTENCY. This may be yourself…this isn’t a sprint, it’s a marathon. the most important point. Make sure that you are going to be UNDERSTAND YOUR NEEDS. Be sure you know what you committed to making a change are striving to achieve before you begin. Are you looking to and stick with your plan. If you win a bodybuilding competition or hoping to improve your haven’t worked out in awhile, overall fitness and feel better about yourself? Every gym has a the first three weeks will be the different philosophy – make sure you know it. worst, but sticking with the plan is what gets the results. And, at the end of the day, it’s more important that you do “something” rather than “everything.” Kyle Herrig, MS, ATC/L, CSCS, CAFS, USAT Coach, is owner/trainer at Triplex Training, which focuses on functional training. Triplex is located at 2701 W Queen Creek Road, Chandler, AZ 85248. Find more health & wellness articles at greenlivingaz.com/health

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January 2016 | greenliving

11


HEALTH & WELLNESS

DID YOU KNOW?

January is National Radon Action Month

RADON GAS: A BIG PROBLEM WITH A SIMPLE SOLUTION BY KAMILLA GRAHAM

R

adon is a naturally occurring gas that has a huge effect on air quality in the home. Radon is colorless, odorless and tasteless – and it is radioactive. According to the National Cancer Institutes, radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in America, responsible for an estimated 21,000 deaths per year and more than $2 billion in healthcare costs. To raise awareness, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated January as National Radon Action month.

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Bob Brown, the founder of Arizona Foundation Solutions and the only certified radon mitigation specialist in Arizona, explained that radon gas is produced by the natural decay process of uranium, making it a radioactive gas. “Radon makes its way up from the soil and your home, and instead of traveling into the atmosphere, it gets trapped because of the ‘stack effect.’ The hot air from the attic pulls air and gasses upward into the house,” said Brown. People cannot be directly tested for radon

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RECEIVE OUR PERSONAL NEW YEAR AND MINI DIFFUSER FOR 50% OFF. exposure, and there is no way to predict a higher likelihood of exposure. Because of this, said Brown, “The EPA and CDC [Center for Disease Control] recommend every home be tested.” According to radon.com, “A family whose home has radon levels of 4 pCi/l [picoCuries per liter of air] is exposed to approximately 35 times as much radiation as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission would allow if that family was standing next to the fence of a radioactive waste site.” These are scary facts, but radon doesn’t have to be a problem. Every home can be fixed. Brown and the Arizona Radiation Regulation Agency state that every home should test for radon, and that there are two ways to do that: • Contact Rich Baker or visit azrra.gov for a free self-testing kit. • Have Bob Brown and his team come to your home and perform the test professionally. If your home is found to have elevated levels of radon gas, the problem is incredibly simple to solve. Besides opening windows when the weather allows and investing in quality air filters, the Arizona Foundation Solutions team can install a sub-slab depressurization system to reduce radon levels. This can be done while you are at home and, depending on the size and shape of your home, can take as little as one day to install. This is how it works (see above diagram for more): • PVC pipe collects the soil gasses. • Gasses are then piped upward in the building. • A depressurization vent forces the gas out of your house. Cancer affects an estimated 14 million people worldwide, according to CDC statistics. A simple test and an adequate ventilation system are actions that can help prevent 21,000 cancer deaths each year.

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For more information, contact Arizona Foundation Solutions at foundationrepairsaz.com. Kamilla Graham is an Arizona native and avid NPR listener that enjoys rediscovering the world with her kids and husband. Find more health & wellness articles at greenlivingaz.com/health

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January 2016 | greenliving

13


HEALTH & WELLNESS

LUNG FORCE: A TRUE ACCOUNT OF HOW AWARENESS CAN SAVE LIVES BY DORIE MORALES

I

’ve been connected to the American Lung Association since April of 2012, where I originally attended a Clean Air breakfast event. Being the publisher of Green Living magazine, I was interested in the American Lung Association’s efforts to keep our air clean, but not necessarily for their work about promoting awareness for lung cancer. Little did I know that a few years later I would be in a position where the latter would be a vital resource. At another fundraiser for the American Lung Association, a Lung Force Walk Kickoff breakfast this year, I met Jane White, the Senior Director of Integrative Services at Cancer Treatment Centers of America, who shared her story. In February 2014, White’s husband, Gene, suddenly began feeling tired. He was an active man who had just competed in two golf championships. Other than the tiredness, he didn’t experience anything else unusual. He was a former Marine, and he had quit smoking 25 years before. It was more than a shock to discover, a month later, that he was living with stage 4 non-small cell lung cancer. White felt her husband received the best care at the Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Treatment required chemotherapy, but his doctors also provided integrative care by monitoring his fitness, speech and nutrition, which

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included filling his diet with as many organic foods as possible. The Cancer Treatment Centers of America has a 65acre certified organic farm behind its facility. This allows the center to provide farm-to-table seasonal produce, as well as juices and smoothies when patients do not feel like eating. Though he fought hard, Gene’s cancer soon manifested in his brain. The last few months were difficult, and there were many hurdles. In the end, what he needed was more time. Unfortunately, he passed away less than one year after his diagnosis. For White, it is hard to cope with the loss of her husband, especially around the holidays. The grief and pain never go away, but she has found support through Soaring Spirits International, a nonprofit that connects individuals who have lost a life partner. She has found that it is important to channel her grief toward a positive outlet by journaling her feelings. White also uses grief to fuel her passion. She works with the American Lung Association to raise money to fund lung cancer research and awareness. She is also on the American Lung Association’s Arizona Women’s Cabinet, which provides leadership for Lung Force, the national health movement to unite women and support lung health.

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Cancer Treatment Centers of America is the first cancer hospital in the country to provide its patients with organic produce on-site. The 65-acre organic farm grows an abundance of vegetables, which enables patients to eat the freshest foods year-round.

The Clean Air fundraiser that originally connected me to the American Lung Association started a priceless relationship with lung cancer advocacy. In June 2014, my father’s wife, Jeannine, told me he had what seemed like a sinus infection that just wouldn’t go away. Three weeks later, he went to the doctor and they discovered fluid in his left lung. He underwent a pleurodesis surgery and was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer. My father had never smoked a day in his life, although he did live around secondhand smoke. He was treated with the biological drug Tarceva and did not have to receive chemo. Amazingly, his last three doctor’s checkups have shown him to be cancer free. We are very thankful and grateful. Lung cancer kills more women than breast, colon and pancreatic cancer combined, yet only one percent of women claim it as a concern. While smoking increases the risk of lung cancer, more than two-thirds of lung cancer patients have never smoked or had quit smoking.

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To find out more about lung cancer, visit lungforce.org and americanlungassociation.org. Find more health & wellness articles at greenlivingaz.com/health

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January 2016 | greenliving

15


GREEN LIFE

SIMPLE RESOLUTIONS FOR A

GREEN NEW YEAR BY LAUREN GRIFFIN

T

he start of a new year brings with it hope and the opportunity to create a healthier version of you – but good intentions can quickly become a distant memory if your list is too long, too lofty or too complicated. Start with these simple tips to keep your green resolutions realistic and attainable.

TIP #1: SWITCH TO CHEMICALFREE PRODUCTS. The Environmental Working Group has found that the chemical compounds and fumes from many commercial cleaning products and even beauty products have been linked to increased risk of asthma, birth defects and cancer. Swapping harsh chemicals for natural products is an easy way to improve the health of everyone (including pets!) living in your household.

TIP #2: ONLY DRINK FROM REUSABLE WATER BOTTLES. According to Ban the Bottle, the average American uses 167 disposable water bottles annually but only recycles 38, from a 2007 study. This year, buy a metal or glass water bottle to avoid BPAs in plastic, and you’ll be saving money and reducing waste. Pledge to only use your reusable bottle for water. Take this pledge a step further by also graduating to a reusable coffee mug for all your hot beverages.

TIP #3: CARPOOL OR TAKE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION AT LEAST ONCE A WEEK. Public transportation decreases the number of vehicles on the roads and traffic congestion, which saves billions of gallons of gasoline and over 30 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions, according to the American Public Transit Association. By carpooling, working from home, taking public transit or walking/biking when possible, you can make a big difference.

TIP #4: STORE YOUR FOOD IN A MORE EFFICIENT WAY. Using glass containers instead of plastic bags to store food reduces the amount of plastic that winds up in landfills. Glass is easy to wash and can be reused time after time, while plastic bags require frequent purchasing and fewer uses.

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GREEN LIFE

TIP #5: TRADE ONE HOUR OF TV/ COMPUTER TIME PER WEEK FOR AN OUTDOOR ACTIVITY.

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Give your eyes a break from the screen and get outside! Spending too much time in front of a screen is habit-forming and can lead to physiological difficulties, especially in children, so encourage your family to get some fresh air and exercise.

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TIP #6: VISIT FARMER’S MARKETS FOR PRODUCE. By shopping at farmer’s markets, you will find a wide selection of fresh, delicious produce while supporting the local economy. There are dozens of farmer’s markets across Arizona that are open several times per week. Get to know who grows your food!

TIP #7: EAT ONE PLANT-BASED MEAL PER DAY. Follow Suzy Amis Cameron’s advice from page 24, and eat “one meal per day for the planet.” Eating only one plant-based meal per day for one year can save 55,613 gallons of water and reduce your carbon dioxide footprint by 510 pounds, which is equivalent to the average passenger vehicle traveling over 560 miles.

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Lauren Griffin is currently enrolled in her senior year at the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. She is studying to earn a Bachelor’s of Science in communication. Read more green life articles at greenlivingaz.com/greenlife

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January 2016 | greenliving

17


COMMUNITY

LITTLE HOUSE, BIG VICTORY

HELP SAVE THE WURTH HOUSE BY STEPHANIE FUNK

K

imber Lanning, founder and executive director of Local First Arizona, has been an avid supporter of Downtown Phoenix for nearly 20 years. In 1999, she founded Modified Arts, a Roosevelt Row fixture. At this popular art and music venue, Lanning had a direct hand in nourishing the budding arts district, establishing the downtown scene as we know it today. The historic blocks known as Roosevelt Row have come a long way since the 90s. Today, upwards of 20,000 people attend First Fridays Art Walks in the Downtown Phoenix area. Lanning dreams of a downtown that is fully activated and pedestrian-friendly, full of art, food, culture and history. The fight for that downtown dream is an important cause for Lanning. When one of Roosevelt Row’s historic turnof-the-century bungalows known as the Joseph W. Wurth House was scheduled for demolition earlier this year, Lanning entered the arena to save it. “I just kind of jumped. I leaped,” she said. Recent years have seen multiple demolitions of historic buildings, including the building that used to sit to the west of Modified Arts, leaving empty lots. “We’ve lost too much,” said Lanning. “It’s important for us to preserve pieces of history that will help us shape the character and also the scale of our downtown.” Originally built in 1911, the Wurth House was purchased by Vic Armstrong in 1983 to serve as the offices for Armstrong Marketing. After he passed away, his descendants Sam and Debra Moyer acquired the space. The business sold in 2006 and the house sat vacant for years. Lanning made an offer to the owners, knowing in her heart that the historic space was

18 greenliving | January 2016

more valuable intact than as a demolished lot. After the deal was made, next came the herculean task of moving the house from its original land to the empty lot next to Modified Arts. She called on the only person in Arizona with the skillset and expertise for the job – John McCullough, of McCullough Move A Home, who came out of retirement to do this one last job. McCullough’s passion for preserving old buildings drove him to complete the move, said Lanning, even after a prolonged illness set the already lengthy project back several weeks. Without McCullough’s incredible skill and resilience, the Wurth House might not have been saved. The Wurth House now sits on its new home on the southeast corner of Roosevelt and Third Street. Just like with Modified Arts, Lanning has big plans for this little house to enrich the downtown community. The building will serve as a welcome center for Roosevelt Row, as well as an expanded headquarters for Local First Arizona. Lanning envisions an “active corner” with an outdoor courtyard for acoustic concerts and artistic exchanges, as well as a wrap-around porch with sitting areas. But she isn’t flashing any victory signs just yet. The Wurth House needs extensive renovations and repairs before it can be operational; years of vacancy left it susceptible to damage, decay and vandalism. It also needs some help coming into an eco-conscious 21st Century with new low-consumption water fixtures, HVAC and energy-conserving windows. “Everything will be retrofitted with conservation in mind,” said Lanning. That’s where the rest of us come in. The Wurth House now has its very own Indiegogo campaign where people can donate to help renovate an important part of Phoenix’s

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COMMUNITY

You can help to save the Wurth House by contributing to the Indiegogo campaign at igg.me/at/WurthHouse/x. You can also get involved in a more hands-on way by volunteering at the Wurth House Clean Up Day in January. Follow the Wurth House on Facebook for more information. Stephanie Funk is a recent Arizona State University graduate with a degree in Creative Writing. She lives in Mesa with her husband and Yorkie pup. Photos courtesy of the Wurth House. Read more community articles at greenlivingaz.com/community

history. Said Lanning, “We have the opportunity to build a downtown that is really, extremely diverse – in every sense of the word ‘diverse’ – and part of that is our building stock. We can have new existing next to old.” Most people who hear about the Wurth House are very supportive, she explained, but some do not see the value in the project. “I think a lot of people who think it’s obvious why you would save an old house forget that there are people out there that would just as soon tear it down, which is why we’re asking people to contribute. Even if it’s only $10.00, you’re still voting and saying, ‘Yes, I care about older buildings. The history of Phoenix is worth preserving.’”

greenlivingaz.com

January 2016 | greenliving

19


ENVIRONMENT

RURAL SPOTLIGHT: BY JILL BERNSTEIN

K

BISBEE RECYCLES

eep Arizona Beautiful is partnering with Green Living magazine to spotlight environmental success stories in cities and towns throughout the state, with a focus on rural areas. This month, we’re highlighting the City of Bisbee and its successful recycling program. Creating a solution to a community problem takes imagination, follow through, and at least one visionary leader who refuses to take no for an answer. In Bisbee’s case, that person is Andy Haratyk, the city’s operations manager. When originally offered the task of recycling, Haratyk wasn’t sure it was doable. “I didn’t know if it would work for a small town,” he admitted, realizing that the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) single-stream recycling model used in larger cities wouldn’t work in a small town with no budget. Haratyk needed to study his city’s situation and make a plan.

The first step was to analyze the waste stream. “I stood and watched the garbage truck dump into a trench every day for a month,” Haratyk said. “I photographed it and kept track of what was coming out of that truck.” He discovered that the majority of material dumped was what ADEQ and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) call commercial cardboard. He then approached commercial businesses around town and made a deal that if they would let him put a recycle bin next ANDY HARATYK, BISBEE’S to their garbage bin for the OPERATIONS MANAGER sole purpose of collecting

AS PEOPLE BECAME ACCLIMATED TO THE IDEA OF RECYCLING, THE TOWN STARTED TO ELIMINATE DUMPSTERS.

20 greenliving | January 2016

greenlivingaz.com


ENVIRONMENT

TODAY, THERE ARE ALMOST 300 RECYCLING STATIONS AROUND BISBEE.

cardboard, in a year he would bring down their monthly garbage fees by half. The bet was on. Haratyk could only make this work if he could prove to the town that there was economic value behind it. He started with a 20-year-old city van and two prison laborers. In the first month, he made only $1,200. By the second month of recycling, Haratyk was able to show a little profit.

And, as he pointed out, “When you can show numbers, then you have the attention of city and county managers.” The next step was to take on plastics. The first recycling stations went up in Old Bisbee right where the tourists park. He put the garbage cans in a corner and put the Plastic 1 and 2 bins right in the middle of the parking lot. “I’d hear people saying, ‘Honey, get that stuff out of the car, there’s a recycling station,’” said Haratyk. Awareness was building. Getting everyone to participate was the next step, and that took some real effort. “We went to schools and talked to kids, who then influenced the parents,” Haratyk said. Then they went to every 10th house and asked to audit their garbage, pulling out everything that could be recycled: cardboard, plastic bottles, newspapers, magazines, cat food cans, metal food cans, aluminum cans and white paper. “When we pulled all of that out and put it into separate bags, [the residents] realized that they really didn’t have any actual garbage,” Haratyk said. “We told them that we would have those bins at the end of their block and showed them just how much they could actually recycle.” Today, there are almost 300 recycling stations around Bisbee. As people became acclimated to the idea of recycling, the town started to eliminate dumpsters. “Every little town can now recycle in Arizona,” Haratyk said. “The hardest part about recycling is convincing public works departments and the people who run sanitation divisions that it’s not trash.” Jill Bernstein is the Executive Director of Keep Arizona Beautiful, a statewide nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering communities to take care of their environment through litter abatement, recycling and beautification. Read more environment articles at greenlivingaz.com/environment

greenlivingaz.com

January 2016 | greenliving

21


ENVIRONMENT

SUSTAINING THE VERDE VALLEY’S

BLOSSOMING INDUSTRY BY SUSAN CULP

S

ettling on cozy couches in an office building nestled in the well-groomed vineyards and gardens of Page Springs Cellars, I listened to owner and winemaker Eric Glomski tell the story of how he came to run one of the most successful and cutting-edge vineyards and winemaking businesses in the Verde Valley. It is a story of deep connections. “Wines capture places,” Glomski shared. The flavors, aroma and textures of a wine can invoke the earth in which the fruit was grown. Winemaking in the Verde Valley has bloomed in recent years, with local wines earning recognition among savvy connoisseurs. Once known solely for the red rocks of Sedona, visitors are now discovering the charm of other valley communities, and enjoying the local wines and craft beers produced there. For many of these budding industries, including Page Springs Cellars, sustainability is a core value, and simply good business. “My livelihood is linked to how I treat the land,” Glomski explained, speaking with pride about the increase in forest habitat and wildlife diversity on his property since he began his vineyard operation. In the arid high desert, sustainable water use is also a critical concern. As an area that grew up on mining, ranching and agriculture, the transition of some agricultural lands to more water-friendly grape production has been a boon for sustaining small-scale agriculture in the face of resource scarcity. Depending on the grape variety, established vineyards can use about a tenth of the water and enjoy higher profit margins. Data from the Southwest Wine Center has also shown that higher quality grape production trends toward lower water use or even dry-farmed conditions for the vineyard. It is economically rewarding as well, with area wine production generating about $25 million annually, employing more than 100 people, and prompting $6.5 million in spending at tasting rooms, vineyards and wineries. Dating back to the 16th Century, Spanish settlers in Southern Arizona tended vineyards and made wine; in the 1800s, European settlers along Oak Creek produced wine for area miners. Arizona and New Mexico once combined to have more vineyards than California, but with Arizona being an early Prohibition supporter, its wine industry ceased with the passage of the 18th Amendment in 1920.

22 greenliving | January 2016

In the 1970s, viticulture slowly began to reemerge in Arizona. The first winemaking license was issued in Yavapai County in 1981, and over the next three decades, dozens of new vineyards were planted. While California wines may grab the spotlight, the climate and soils of Arizona are uniquely suited for vineyards. Alkaline soils layered with minerals and marine sediments mingle with volcanic intrusions and are perfectly blended by climate and elevation. While the Verde Valley remains predominantly rural in character, it is a growing region, largely due to its natural amenities and attractions. Vineyards have been an economically viable means to preserve local agricultural resources, open space, and wildlife habitat in the face of growth pressures. Growth also creates challenges to protecting the Verde River, one of the last free-flowing perennial rivers in Arizona. By focusing on a valuable and less water-intensive crop such as grapes, the wine industry is doing its part to protect the natural resources of this vibrant destination. Popular tourist excursions, such as “Water to Wine” tours, highlight creative ways economic growth and outdoor adventures are paired in the Verde Valley. Imagine paddling a desert stream in the morning, then reflecting upon the adventure under tall cottonwoods at a local vineyard for the afternoon. The Verde Valley wine industry is increasingly touching on three important tenets – protection of environmental values, creation of economic benefits, and supporting social opportunities. Raising a glass of superb, locally produced wine can be one of the most enjoyable ways to do your part for a sustainable future. Susan Culp is a consultant on conservation policy, and works out of her home in Sedona. She currently serves as the Verde River Project Coordinator for American Rivers, a national nonprofit conservation organization dedicated to protecting and restoring America’s rivers and fostering river stewardship. She can be contacted at sculp@nextwestconsulting.com. Photography by Susan Culp. Read more environment articles at greenlivingaz.com/environment

greenlivingaz.com


NUTRITION

UNDERSTANDING DIGESTION BY KAREN LANGSTON

D

igestive disorders account for more than 104 million physician office visits per year, according to Johns Hopkins University. As the medical and research community studies the bacteria inside the gut and how it relates to health, researchers are also beginning to understand the importance of the digestive system and its role in disease prevention. Educating yourself on what digestion is, and being aware of what healthy digestion looks like, could make all the difference in your health and well-being. First, let’s look at food’s passageway: the digestive tract. The digestive tract, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, reaches from the mouth all the way down to the anus, and is an amazing 30 feet long. Its role is to take in nourishment, break it down, release vital nutrients such as vitamins and minerals, and to release water and electrolytes for hydration. Your body takes those nutrients and uses them where they are needed, collects waste from your cellular functions, temporarily stores it, and then releases what you don’t need. Have you ever noticed that when you smell something yummy, like freshly baked bread through an open bakery door, that suddenly you are salivating? There is a physiological occurrence taking place long before you eat. When you think about or smell food, your brain sends messages to your mouth to increase saliva full of enzymes in anticipation of incoming food. At the same time, your brain sends a message to your stomach to increase stomach acid and alerts your gallbladder and pancreas to spring into action when it’s their turn. Giving your body proper time to prepare for digestion is important. By chewing your food 25-50 times before swallowing, you allow for enzymes to break your food apart while alerting your stomach to release the precise amount of stomach acid and other enzymes. Properly chewed food breaks down easier, meaning the nutrients from what you’ve eaten can be more quickly absorbed. Food that is not chewed well makes for larger particles in the GI tract and becomes fuel for bacteria and fungi. When food gets to your stomach, it is treated like laundry in a washing machine. The stomach churns and agitates your food to break apart the nutrients for further digestion in the small intestines. As your food moves through the stomach, it triggers the gallbladder to release just the right amount of bile, salts and baking soda to neutralize and break down fats. Your gallbladder and pancreas release sodium bicarbonate to neutralize stomach acid. Your pancreas is like a double agent. It releases insulin into the bloodstream to tackle the sugar from your food, and also sends enzymes into your small intestine to break down food into tiny molecules to fit through your microvilli so that they can make their way into the bloodstream and to the liver. The liver is the captain of your body. It filters toxins and sends those nutrients where they are needed. The undigested parts of your food continue to the colon where your bacteria ferments it, creating vital nutrients such as B vitamins and vitamin K2. From here, your body adjusts the contents by either adding or subtracting water to allow the mass to form into what we call

poop; this is when we “release the poo into the loo.” This entire process is called transit time and should happen every 12-24 hours. If it’s not, try breathing before you eat, chew your food better, and drink more water. Hippocrates, the Greek physician of the Age of Pericles, was one of the first to suggest that all disease and health begins in the gut. And it starts with how and what you chew. Karen Langston is a certified Holistic Nutritionist who trains health care practitioners to health advocates the keys to preventing and reversing symptoms by having a good poop. healthygutadvisor.com For more articles about nutrition visit greenlivingaz.com/nutrition

greenlivingaz.com January 2016 | greenliving

23


EDUCATION

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION:

GROUNDBREAKING SCHOOL

MODELS SUSTAINABILITY BY GRETCHEN PAHIA

W

hen the students at MUSE school in Calabasas, California, head into class daily, they are greeted just as other students: teachers ready to teach, students ready to learn. However, there is a much deeper learning experience going on, thanks to the hard work of founders Suzy Amis Cameron and her sister Rebecca Amis. MUSE first came to fruition in 2006 after Suzy and her husband director James Cameron spent countless hours searching for the right school for their five children – somewhere they could thrive and learn individually. “We watched our oldest children go to schools that put children in a box and squashed their creativity,” Cameron said. The foods served in most schools are also not ideal, and there is not a big emphasis on the environment and sustainability, she added. “We started looking at schools that would encompass who they are, that would feed them both physically and mentally,

and we couldn’t find anything. So we looked at how we could make things happen on our own,” said Cameron. “I wanted to create something that was going to allow children to learn in their own way,” she continued. Cameron recruited her sister Rebecca, who has a Master’s Degree in Early Childhood Development, to come on board and help create the school. After much planning and discussion, MUSE opened its doors with 11 students in 2006. Today, MUSE has two campuses and 180 students enrolled, with ages ranging from two to 18. MUSE is environmentally based and is focused on passion and interest-based learning. Everything they use and have on campus is safe and sustainable. It is the school’s food, however, that is the true game changer. For years, students were served all-organic snacks and lunches. However, after Cameron and her husband viewed the documentary “Forks Over Knives” three years ago, a light switch flipped.

“I wake up every morning, and the thought that runs through my head is, ‘What else can I do? How else can I bring this message to people to change the world for our children?” – Suzy Amis Cameron

24 greenliving | January 2016

greenlivingaz.com


EDUCATION

Despite having strong roots in the environmental community for nearly 20 years, the pair was in shock by how much animal agriculture contributes to greenhouse gases and the water crisis. The couple converted to a plant-based diet cold-turkey, so to speak, then started to look at how the same could happen MUSE FOUNDERS AND SISTERS, at the school. REBECCA AMIS AND SUZY AMIS CAMERON “All of our lives we are taught that it is important to have dairy and meat to be healthy, and that isn’t true,” said Cameron. “We needed to walk the walk. Here, we have this amazing environmental school on every level – everything is completely green – so we needed to figure out how to educate everyone about a plantbased diet and incorporate it into MUSE.”

Today, MUSE is the first school in the U.S. to serve a completely plant-based diet, and Cameron certainly hopes to lead by example. “We took about a year and a half to educate everyone [teachers, staff, children and their families] about the change. We brought in experts from all areas to help educate. It is a huge part of our community and curriculum, but we knew it would take some time,” she said. The staff and administrators rolled out their sustainability pledge, called OMD (One Meal a Day), which is the idea of eating at least one plant-based meal per day for the planet to help save resources. “Eating one meal per day for the planet for the school year saves 194,600 gallons of water,” said Cameron. “The sustainability piece I wish was discussed more is how much water it costs to raise livestock. One hamburger is 4,500 gallons of water. A gallon of milk is about 2,500,” she continued. The Camerons are also responsible for creating the Food Choice Taskforce, an organization that brings awareness on the impact of animal agriculture on the environment. “Everybody eats food every day. It’s one simple change that everyone can do. And you don’t have to buy a Prius or go solar,” commented Cameron. “It’s important to do those as well if at all possible, but to change what’s on your plate, it’s a simple thing. One person can really make a difference.” Cameron knew that if they wanted to campaign for people to look at their food in a different way, they needed to have

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January 2016 | greenliving

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EDUCATION

TODAY, MUSE IS THE FIRST SCHOOL IN THE U.S. TO SERVE A COMPLETELY PLANT-BASED DIET, AND CAMERON CERTAINLY HOPES TO LEAD BY EXAMPLE.

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the science and experts behind them, which is when Suzy and James created the Food Choice Taskforce. “What we are basically doing is creating media that will be able to speak to many different demographics around what the impact is [of livestock] and why people should look at this bigger issue,” said Cameron. “If you look at the top three sectors that are creating the most greenhouse gases, they are the energy sector (burning fossil fuels, etc), animal agriculture, and transportation. That means animal agriculture takes up more energy than all transportation in the world combined.” For Cameron, MUSE is an important step toward shaping the future. These students will take their knowledge and their commitment to the environment, and they will raise another generation of earth-conscious humans. “I wake up every morning, and the thought that runs through my head is, ‘What else can I do? How else can I bring this message to people to change the world for our children?’” One meal a day is a good start, and with the help of the Camerons’ global platform, those meals really could change the world. For more on Suzy Amis Cameron, go to suzyamiscameron.com. For more information on the MUSE School, visit museschool.org. For more on the Food Choice Taskforce, visit foodchoicetaskforce.org. Gretchen Pahia has 15 years experience in both media and public relations and is an award-winning television news producer in Phoenix, Las Vegas and Portland. Gretchen is a native to Arizona, born and raised in Phoenix, and a graduate of Northern Arizona University. She lives in the Phoenix metro area with her husband, their two children and their dog. Read more articles about education at greenlivingaz.com/education

greenlivingaz.com


INNOVATION

PARIS CLIMATE SUMMIT: U.S. BUSINESS COMMUNITY OFFERS STRONG SUPPORT BY LAUREN POTTER

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ore than 36,000 people representing 195 nations, including government officials, representatives from UN bodies and agencies, members of the media, and others attended the Paris Climate Summit in December to discuss respective commitments to climate change and carbon emissions. Several members of the American Sustainable Business Council (ASBC) who attended the historic conference discussed their insightful takeaways during an open teleconference on December 21. Advocacy groups, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and businesses from around the world participated in discussions and helped frame the issues through side events such as presentations and social gatherings. During the historic event, the 197 Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) developed and adopted an agreement at the Paris Climate Summit that aims to cap global warming at 2 degrees Celsius, and cut carbon emissions. And, for the first time, the U.S. business community were “not a hindrance” to the conference. According to Chris Miller, Social Mission Activism Manager at Ben & Jerry’s, business communities were “very strong supporters” of a global outcome in Paris. However, Miller said there is still a lot of work to be done to ensure the correct policies are in place to put a price on carbon and move away from fossil fuel infrastructure. Michael Green, Executive Director of the Climate Action Business Association, shared a similar experience. According to Green, an attitude of action was a driving force for the Paris Climate Summit’s accomplishments. “We had a bunch of businesses announce their support for a bold outcome in Paris,” said Green, who was pleased to see a lot of specific focus on how to potentially move forward with carbon pricing. At a local level, Green said this gives a “renewed sense of urgency and ambition.” However, the agreement is not without criticism. One of the challenges of the summit was trying to address which nations are most responsible for climate change, which has been an ongoing debate for many years. The agreement’s transparency was also criticized. According to Richard Eidlin, Vice President of Policy and Campaigns at ASBC, greenlivingaz.com

“historically, there has been some gaining in the system” by developing countries. Since the agreement stipulates that $100 billion in financial aid from developed countries will be given to developing countries (the goal is annually, but since the goal was outlined at the Copenhagen Climate Change Conference in 2009 it has not yet been met), developed countries are requesting greater transparency. Contrariwise, developing countries may also ask for greater transparency if the developed countries have not provided funds to the goal. Hence, developing countries feel that transparency will nudge developed countries to become more accountable. Every five years, the agreement outlines that there will be a “global stocktake” to determine how countries are doing in meeting their emission mitigation commitments. One facet of a nation’s carbon footprint that can sometimes be overlooked is that of war and conflict. Amy Van Beek, Director of Marketing for Ideal Energy, discussed this idea at the conference. “By investing in and using renewable energy, we can address some of the global insecurity and conflict issues that we are having that are greatly impacting the safety and security of all populations on Earth,” Van Beek said. Ideal Energy is of the belief that there will be many economic opportunities for technological development and job creation that result from moving towards a decarbonized future. Despite the achievements of the conference, there is still a long way to go. Miller, of Ben & Jerry’s, summed it up nicely, recalling how a member of the Obama Administration referred to the summit as more of a “basecamp” than a “summit.” “All things equal, this is still an incredibly important moment,” Miller said. “It is the first step down the long road to a healthy and sustainable planet.” For more on the Paris Climate Summit, visit whitehouse.gov, iisd.ca, and unfccc.int. Originally from the small Australian town of Wagga Wagga, Lauren Potter has lived in the Valley for eight years and currently studies at ASU’s Cronkite School. A “locavore” at heart, Lauren loves supporting local farmers, producers and artisans. Read more articles on innovation at greenlivingaz.com/innovation

January 2016 | greenliving

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BUSINESS

A SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP AGENDA FOR 2016

BY ANTON G. CAMAROTA, PHD

A

s we begin the New Year, it is important to establish priorities for our companies in order to define needed resources and create a meaningful path forward for employees. Rather than establish complex planning documents, sustainability leaders establish simple and straightforward agendas for action. Such agendas are centered on five fundamental elements: PURPOSE The sustainable company leader defines the core purpose of the organization clearly, and continually reinforces this purpose by modeling values, defining long-term goals, and helping employees to understand both the company credo and its linkages to human needs.

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ENERGY A core leadership task is to energize and motivate a company’s employees. Sustainable company leaders encourage employees to make significant contributions to stakeholder well-being, and inform them of the meaningfulness and importance of their contributions. They do this by defining what is true and good. The leader makes sure that the credo, values and brand resonate with the company’s ecological, social and economic contributions. TIME A sustainable company leader exhibits positive attitudes towards the past history of the company, its mission in the present, and its accountability for the future. These attitudes can be summarized as gratitude for the past, service for the present, and responsibility for the future. The leader creates a sense of both time and place for employees.

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28 greenliving | January 2016

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ADAPTATION Leaders in a sustainable company are continually learning about and adapting to changes in stakeholder trends, values and realities. Adaptation requires being cognizant of the complex interrelationships among the different operational elements of an organization. By maintaining an awareness of – and taking actions to respond to – changing internal and external conditions, sustainability leaders can ensure the continual supply of resources necessary for the company to function. AESTHETICS Sustainability leaders apply a sense of style to the organization’s activities based on an aesthetic sensibility developed from both cultural norms and universal principles. Key activities include manipulating symbols and myths, building a desire to belong, and promulgating an atmosphere of pleasurable engagement with organizational activities. A sustainability leader will present themselves to the world as part of an artistic performance that is a creative expression of their inner self as well as a reflection of the cultural norms of beauty.

Some of the best business plans are the simplest, and you can use this template as a guide to define processes and programs for your company. The important point to remember is that sustainability leaders not only define actions in each of these five areas, but also align these actions so that each supports the others. The goal is to create a unified approach to sustainability based on the unique situation of each organization: the knowledge and skills of its employees, its business model, the technology it uses to create value, and the industry in which it operates. Such a unified approach forms the basis of a competitive advantage that cannot be duplicated, and ensures the long-term viability of the business. Dr. Camarota is Executive Director of Tellari, an Arizona-based research and educational organization dedicated to helping business leaders build sustainable companies. anton@tellari.com, tellari.com Read more business articles at greenlivingaz.com/business

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January 2016 | greenliving

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ARCHITECTURE

THE ART OF PLACEMAKING BY JASON BOYER

A

s residential development in the Valley continues to flourish, Midtown and Downtown Phoenix have become hot destinations for developers looking to capitalize on the growing demand for modern urban JASON BOYER living. artHAUS projects, a locally grown development firm, has captured something special in its first project – artHAUS. Nestled in the Central Corridor in the heart of Phoenix’s arts and culture community, the uniquely designed condominium development has embraced some of the core principles of “placemaking.”

FOUR KEY ELEMENTS THAT MAKE A GREAT PLACE Many attributes contribute to the creation of a memorable “place.” A GREAT PLACE... ...activates the street by engaging the pedestrian experience to present a welcoming and safe environment.

1 2

...leverages the power of what already exists – it promotes connections, celebrates community, and offers a sustainable footprint that increases property values and boosts adjacent redevelopment efforts.

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...is well designed, elegantly positioned on its site, sensitive to its neighboring context, and simply understood as an attractive component of the city.

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...is connected to transit and elevates walkability over vehicular access.

30 greenliving | January 2016

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ARCHITECTURE

STRENGTHENING MIDTOWN’S SENSE OF PLACE First, let’s clarify that making a place is not the same as constructing a building, designing a park, or developing a downtown commercial zone. “Placemaking” is a process that’s related to community engagement and understanding the attributes that make somewhere a great place to live, work and play. artHAUS is an example of just such a project. It is a model transit-oriented residential urban infill development created for those who desire to center their lives within the Phoenix arts and culture district. With construction on artHAUS well underway at 1st Avenue just north of McDowell Road, many of the design features that will eventually make artHAUS a great “place” to live are coming into view. artHAUS units deliver indoor and outdoor living sensibilities with open balconies and light-filled interior spaces. Clean lines and floor-to-ceiling glazing (windows) bring the outdoors in, promoting a healthy lifestyle and a sense of community among its residents. Located minutes from the McDowell and Central Avenue Metro light rail station, the celebrated Phoenix Art Museum, and Arizona State University’s downtown campus, the three-story design delivers an unexpected urban lifestyle that harmonizes with the neighboring Willo historic district. Residents can walk, bike or ride to all that Midtown and Downtown Phoenix have to offer. Twenty-five percent of the units have already sold. For more information on artHAUS, visit arthausphx.com or contact Greg Kilroy with Keller Williams Sonoran Living at 480-235-4312. Jason Boyer, AIA, is the architect and developer of artHAUS, a model transit-oriented urban infill residential development coming to Midtown Phoenix in May 2016. As a built environment entrepreneur with proven experience in design and development projects large to small, Jason’s project work has consistently produced context specific design and development solutions that bring together complex public and private interests – creating projects that contribute to a unique sense of place. Read more architecture articles at greenlivingaz.com/architecture

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January 2016 | greenliving

31


TECHNOLOGY

EARTH FRIENDLY TECH PRODUCTS

BY STEVEN G. ZYLSTRA

L

ooking for the latest tech products designed for a sustainable world? Shopping with the planet in mind can make a big difference in many ways. It’s important to reward environmentally responsible merchandise that discourages waste, helps close the recycling loop, and reduces the amount of toxic materials entering our ecosystems. With this worthy goal in mind, savvy eco-shoppers should check out the following products designed with the objective of keeping our environment greener.

BetR-blok is a “green” building material, made from recycled paper and other cellulose materials, that acts as a substitute for lumber. Building a home from paper is possible, and this Tempe-based startup can show you how to do it. BetR-blok offers a workshop hosted by Barry J. Fuller, who has conducted extensive research on building with paper and has built or worked on a number of paper homes and structures. For information about how you can build your own recycled paper home, visit betr-blok.com. Boogie Board Jot 8.5 eWriter is a paperless memo pad that allows the user to jot down notes without wasting paper or ink. It creates a natural penon-paper experience on a super-thin pad that comes with a stylus. With its supplementary mobile app, a user can snap a quick photo of the notes, continue editing and highlighting on the app itself, and immediately erase notes with the press of a button. Available in multiple colors. $34.99, myboogieboard.com

32 greenliving | January 2016

HyBikes Electric Bikes provides the ultimate way to save money and go green. This full-service Phoenix shop specializes in the sales, parts and service of all HyBikes models. No matter how far your commute, how big the hills, or what you need to carry, there is a HyBike for you. The company offers financing options and monthly payments as low as $99.00. hybikes.com The ilumi is an energy-efficient LED light bulb with a lifespan of up to 20 years and is controlled wirelessly through your Android or iOS mobile app. Users are able to change their lighting from a variation of bright white to an array of rich colors through a phone. Sensing your phone’s proximity, your lights will automatically turn on and off without you hitting a switch. $59.99, ilumi.co Olympia SB5500 lets you harness the power of the sun so you never have to worry about running out of batteries. You can use the sun or plug in the device to charge it up. Use it to power smartphones, tablets, flashlights, two-way radios or anything with a USB or microUSB port. And for those sunless times, the device features a power bank that stores energy. $59.99, olympiaoutdoors.com Steven G. Zylstra is the president & CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. aztechcouncil.org Read more articles about technology at greenlivingaz.com/technology

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MEREDITH MONK WEAVES MUSIC AND PERFORMANCE ART FOR THE EARTH BY AMANDA HARVEY

I

recently had the pleasure of speaking with Meredith Monk, a renowned performance artist and pioneer of the extended vocal technique with a 40+ year career in interdisciplinary performance. Her newest work titled “On Behalf of Nature” is coming to ASU Gammage on January 30. Find out more about the performance in our Q&A below.

Q. WHAT CAN ATTENDEES EXPECT FROM “ON BEHALF OF NATURE?” A. The performance is kind of a ritual. It’s really music-driven, with the music going on throughout the piece. There are simple and transparent movement elements and beautiful lighting. It’s an interdisciplinary piece where the audience is engaged both visually and orally. There are some active sections, but it’s quite meditative. Q. WHAT IS THE OVERALL MESSAGE OF THE PERFORMANCE? A. I think it’s very much acknowledging the fact that we – what poet Gary Snyder would call the “culture of mass distraction” – are running around and don’t take the time to FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: BOHDAN HILASH, ELLEN FISHER, MEREDITH MONK, JOHN HOLLENBECK, KATIE GEISSINGER, BRUCE RAMEKER, SIDNEY CHEN, ALLISON SNIFFIN

actually acknowledge and have a sense of what we have in nature, and we are in danger of losing it. It’s a kind of elegy and acknowledgement of energies and forces in nature that we are in danger of losing. It offers awareness of the importance of slowing down. Q. WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BLEND THEATER AND DANCE WITH YOUR MUSIC? A. I come from both a music and movement/theater background. I think of my work as a tree with two branches – one is my music (and vocal music in particular – the exploration of the human voice), but the second branch is the multi perceptional form, or as I call them, composite forms, that include my music theater pieces, operas, installations and films. Early on, before I really concentrated on the music, the interdisciplinary way of weaving different perceptional modes into one form was really the core of my work and I think that was my contribution. Q. HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE IDEA FOR “ON BEHALF OF NATURE?” A. I read a beautiful article called “Writers and the War Against Nature” by Gary Snyder, who is a poet, environmental activist and Buddhist practitioner. It was so inspiring because he was saying the role of an artist now is to be the spokesperson for non-human entities, giving voice to forces that don’t have their own voices. I feel that a lot of my work is inspired by natural forms. I wanted to make a form that affirms the power of nature, and [I hope] the audience leaves seeing and hearing things in a different way,

34 greenliving | January 2016

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT and being alert to what’s actually in front of them. The audience might leave with a sense of sadness about what’s happening [to the environment], but then maybe they would also think about some way to participate in making some kind of change. Each person has to make an effort. If people have that sense of awareness and those moments of waking up, then change comes. It’s like throwing a stone into a pool and the ripples go out and affect everyone. After a showing in New York, people stopped me on the street and said, “I’m glad you let us have our own imagination” [about the piece, since it is nonverbal]. There are many different ways to look into it. I like that people have the space in their own minds to perceive the piece in their own way. Q. HOW IS THE PERFORMANCE INSPIRED BY BUDDHISM? A. I have been a practitioner since the mid-1980s, but I began teaching at Naropa University in 1975. My pieces are an affirmation of all sentient beings’ interdependence and the fact that our actions can make a difference to the world of humans and also to the world of animals and plants. All our actions have resonance. That interdependence idea is something that you can really sense in this piece. It’s also a fundamental Buddhist principle. Q. WHAT ELSE WOULD YOU LIKE TO SHARE ABOUT “ON BEHALF OF NATURE?” A. Something that I hope people will get from the performance is that these are top-notch performers. Performance is a template of the possibilities of human behavior – you see right before your eyes a sense of generosity and sensitivity. This is the beauty of live performance. It’s one of the only situations where you are getting that sense of touch by being in the same space at the same time and seeing magic happen before your eyes – it’s very different than seeing it on a screen. Through these forms you see the radiance of these people. We’ve worked together for a long time, and I think you see that relationship, that sense of trust. I think that becomes inspiring too, to members of the audience. For more information on Meredith Monk, visit meredithmonk.org. Get tickets to see “On Behalf of Nature” on January 30 at asugammage.com. Photography by Julieta Cervantes. Find more arts and entertainment articles at greenlivingaz.com/artsentertainment FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: ELLEN FISHER, BRUCE RAMEKER, MEREDITH MONK, SIDNEY CHEN

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January 2016 | greenliving

35


WILDLIFE

BY “ALISHA BEE” FORRESTER SCOTT

I

t is the evening of the Green Living magazine launch party in Tucson. A group of us from the Green Team have carpooled from Scottsdale to work the event at the Reid Park Zoo. In a peaceful moment before the event begins, I find myself in a friendly conversation with Reid Park Zookeeper Kimberly Ludwig. Ludwig came to work with the zoo in October 2008 as an apprentice zookeeper, and in January 2011 worked into the official role of Zookeeper. As we sit together in the Conservation Learning Center waiting on a bench made of recycled milk jugs, I am full of assumptions, charmed and fascinated by Zookeeper Kimberly’s wild animal experiences. If you’re like me, you grew up watching movies like “Swiss Family Robinson” and “The Jungle Book.” I remember feeling a deep desire to be like the movie characters, who were allowed to share closeness and affection with wild animals. In truth, I wanted to be led into a secret petting zoo area, where Kimberly the Zookeeper would allow us to have a magical and private moment with a furry wild animal…and take a selfie, of course. A WILD REALITY CHECK Despite what I secretly wished, the real answers to my questions were not adorable like a baby animal. Instead, they were sobering. Here’s a brief checklist of the top five facts you should know about touching wild baby animals.

1

While not possible at Reid Park Zoo, people can pay money to touch wild baby animals in other places. But, baby wild animals kept in small-time animal sanctuaries may be bred

36 greenliving | January 2016

as “entertainment attractions” intended to make the owners or operators money. Wild animal babies may be born and reared away from their mothers, and then used for human entertainment. Ludwig added, “There are situations where hand-raising is necessary, but it is generally not operating in the animal’s best interest to then allow the general public to hold and snuggle them.”

2

If there are babies without mothers, in the worst case scenarios, it means that something may have been “done” to the mother. Not all of the time, but in some cases, an orphaned animal was either taken from their mother, or their mother was destroyed for whatever reason.

3

Once baby carnivores grow big, they may be abandoned or destroyed. Adult animals are often bred for their attractive babies. These animal babies eventually grow up and are bred for their babies. In this way, the cycle of capture, breeding and destruction will repeat itself.

4

Of the baby animals that are bonded with humans when they are young, a relatively low number will get to stay close to the humans that they bond with. When the babies grow into adults, they can no longer interact with their human counterparts because of their natural ferociousness. Ludwig added: “I would say that one of the downsides for hand-reared animals is that they sometimes have a hard time learning how to be a tiger, or a lion, etc., and that can cause problems for them in the future when they must cohabitate, breed, or raise their own offspring. These are just some of the reasons most zoos do everything we can to have the parents raise their offspring.”

5

No “reputable” zoo or sanctuary allows non-medical and non-caretaking people to touch the animals. Sanctuaries are not required to submit for inspections, reporting and certification like the Reid Park Zoo is. Any facility that charges a fee to you and allows you to touch, hold or feed a onceor-should-be wild animal is most likely not doing their part to help animals remain truly stay safe and wild. There are

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WILDLIFE

exceptions, such as teaching facilities, which are registered and operated by certified professionals. LOVING WILD ANIMALS The next time you’re about to pay to get near a wild baby animal, Ludwig suggests that you ask two simple questions: Where is the parent of this baby animal? And what are the plans for this animal when it is too big or dangerous for encounters like this? It was obvious to me that Ludwig enjoys her job protecting animals on both a physical and an energetic level. She was gracious to give time and attention to my child-like questions. What’s more, Kimberly has an amazing, multi-colored tattoo on her leg featuring the Reid Park Zoo tiger named Sita! If that’s not a sign of true dedication, then I don’t know what is. Ludwig finished by sharing: “I feel that a huge thing that zoos do with the animals in our care, is to promote them as ambassadors for their wild counterparts. I would like to add to that. Although the animals are in the same enclosure every day, we, as zookeepers, do our very best to make their lives awesome by giving them enrichment. We use toys, scents, or anything that changes their day-to-day life. We train them to participate in their own care when possible, and we provide them with the very best in medical care.” I am grateful for this humbling conversational experience, and I certainly learned more about how a regular person like me can help to ensure the survival and care of wild animals. When you’re able, travel down to Tucson, Arizona, and visit Reid Park Zoo. If you see her, please say hello to Zookeeper Kimberly Ludwig…and ask to see her cool tiger tattoo! This information was collected through a congenial conversation with Zookeeper Kimberly Ludwig, and was furthered through the writer’s own research. The Reid Park Zoo is not responsible for confirming the accuracy of the information. “Alisha Bee” Forrester Scott is a native resident of Arizona who appreciates the nature of wild animals. You can learn more about Alisha’s life as an activist for pollinators at alishabee.com. Photos courtesy of Reid Park Zoo. For more articles about wildlife visit greenlivingaz.com/wildlife

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January 2016 | greenliving

37


ACTIVE LIFE

COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYOFF

IMPROVES GREEN AT THE GAME BY RODRIC J. HURDLE-BRADFORD

T

he City of Glendale and the entire Phoenix metropolitan area are welcoming the College Football Playoff’s (CFP’s) championship game on January 11. Their efforts off the field, however, will have a positive environmental impact in the Valley long after the 2016 national champions are crowned. “Our job is to analyze all of the activities and events that occur with the college football championship and take a close look at the environmental impact of it all,” said Jack Groh, an industry-leading sustainability consultant who earned his reputation by beginning the Super Bowl’s environment and sustainability programs over two decades ago. “We turn it around and make it into a positive benefit for the community.” Onsite at the college football championship game, sustainability efforts are going to be channeled into several areas, including composting, recycling, sustainability signage and utilizing recycled building material. Excess prepared food will also be donated to local food banks and recovery programs, including Waste Not AZ. The onsite sustainability plan of action took more than eight months to develop and identify the proper local charities, organizations and resources. Those organizations include Phoenix Parks and Recreation, where an urban forestry project will plant dozens of trees at Maryview Park in Glendale on January 7. Four collegiate teams from Arizona State University, the University of Arizona, Grand Canyon University and Maricopa Community Colleges will plant 10 trees each to help mitigate carbon dioxide and greenhouse gases, while giving a much-needed beauty facelift to the park. “It leaves a cool legacy in the city, and it allows the local college students to come together for a greater cause,” said Groh. “When you have high-profile events like this, it is important to get everything right because there are so many eyes on you.” Many of those eyes across the Valley will be on the CFP’s “Green Ambassador” positions – operational volunteers in and around the game who assist with sustainability efforts. Green Ambassadors will be at the game to help direct recycling efforts and break down temporary signage that will be donated to local schools to use in art projects. One of these partnerships will be with Treasures for Teachers, said Groh. “We will also donate materials to Goodwill, the Salvation Army, and the nonprofit group Keep Phoenix Beautiful. The Salvation Army will use many of the materials for its 15-acre urban farm, while several local theater companies will use the materials for their stage sets,” he continued.

38 greenliving | January 2016

Aside from the environment, another benefit of the green efforts from the CFP is giving hundreds of college students real-world professional experiences. “The hands-on experience is vital for the students, because they will be the future sustainability professionals in Phoenix and across Arizona,” said Groh. “We are turning students into attractive hires and making the Phoenix area a greener, more environmentally sustainable place at the same time.” The championship game also aims to bring together the community with a multitude of events occurring the weekend leading up to the game. The CFP will honor teachers with its philanthropy initiative, Extra Yard for Teachers. Three community events will take place in downtown Phoenix to support the initiative – namely, the Extra Yard for Teachers Summit, the Extra Yard 5K run/walk and the Northwestern Mutual Taste of the Championship. Friday through Sunday (January 8-10) will feature a whirlwind of events on each day. An interactive fan festival called Playoff Fan Central will be held at the Phoenix Convention Center through the weekend. Fans can expect mini pep rallies for each participating team with appearances by the participating institutions’ bands, cheerleaders and mascots as well as the opportunity to watch live interviews with student athletes and coaches. Each night, the free AT&T Concert Series will rock downtown Phoenix with headliners such as The Band Perry, Ciara, Walk The Moon and Andy Grammer. Finally, on game day, those that have tickets to the game will have access to the Championship Tailgate. For more information on the College Football Playoff’s championship game and community events, visit collegefootballplayoff.com. Rodric J. Hurdle-Bradford is a freelance writer based in Arizona and Nevada. He covers casinos, energy, entertainment and real estate. He can be contacted at rodric@vegasluxuryvip.com. Read more active life articles at greenlivingaz.com/activelife

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Cree Zischke and Mary Paganelli of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

David Schaller, one of our talented Green Living writers

James Gibson, co-owner of Beast Brewing Company in Bisbee

December launch parties

TUCSON

Thank you to everyone who attended our December launch parties in Phoenix and Tucson! Our parties aren’t just to promote the latest issue of Green Living — they exist to promote community. From advertisers to readers, we love bringing together like-minded individuals to network as a sustainable community. Join us at our next event on January 7 at The Newton in Phoenix! greenlivingaz.com/party

Beautiful hummus provided by Delectables

Delectables Restaurant on 4th Ave

Eco fashion designer Laura Tanzer showing off her work

Leatrice and Jon Kitchell, Joan Baron

Veronica Bahn and Andrea Alfaro

PHOENIX

Theresa Norris with Borderlands Brewing Company

A big shout-out to our sponsors from the parties: PHOENIX Host: Clean Air Cab Sponsors: Arizona Forward, Borderlands Brewing Company, Cookie Girl Cookie Shop, Marilyn Zwak, Monzures Companies, Recycled City, Titina’s Catering, Tower Garden, Veronica Bahn Essential Oils, Whole Foods Market Scottsdale, 24 Carrots! Photography by Rick Carter

Gene Nicholas and Diane Brossart of Arizona Forward

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Charlie Crews and Vielka Atherton of Small Giants

TUCSON Host: Delectables on 4th Ave Sponsors: Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Beast Brewing Company, Flying Leap Vineyards & Distillery, Gourmet Girls Gluten Free Bakery Bistro, Laura Tanzer, Veronica Bahn Essential Oils and Whole Foods Market River Road Photography by Stephanie Funk

January 2016 | greenliving

39


RECIPES

CRISPY THAI SALAD WITH PEANUT DRESSING RECIPE COURTESY OF CHEF DE CUISINE RICHARD GARCIA.

THIS ZESTY ASIAN SALAD recipe from Hotel Valley Ho’s ZuZu restaurant is a flavorful, healthy way to kick off the New Year. INGREDIENTS THAI PEANUT DRESSING INGREDIENTS 6 cups spinach 1/4 cup soy sauce 4 cups napa cabbage, chopped 1/2 cup rice wine vinegar 1 red pepper, julienned 2 tsp Dijon mustard 1 yellow pepper, julienned 1 clove garlic 1/2 cucumber, seeded and cut on the bias thinly 1 oz. powdered ginger 1/2 red onion, julienned 1 shallot 2 avocados, diced 1/4 cup peanut butter 1 1/2 cup dry roasted peanuts 1/3 cup honey Thai peanut dressing, to taste 1/2 cup cilantro 2 cups fried won tons, thinly sliced, fried 3 green onions, whole Sesame seeds (black and white, toasted), to taste 1 3/4 cups salad oil Salt and pepper, to taste DIRECTIONS 1. In a mixing bowl, add the spinach, napa cabbage, red and yellow peppers, cucumbers, red onions, avocado and dry roasted peanuts and mix until all items are incorporated. 2. Add the Thai peanut dressing, enough to coat the greens. 3. Add the sesame seeds, fried won tons, and salt and pepper to taste. 4. Separate into four of your favorite large chilled bowls and serve.

DIRECTIONS 1. Place all ingredients, except salad oil, in a blender. Blend on high until smooth. 2. Slowly add the salad oil and blend until all oil is incorporated. You may need to add a little water if it becomes too thick. Yields 2 1/2 cups.

Yields four servings.

40 greenliving | January 2016

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RECIPES

BASIL PESTO STUFFED MUSHROOMS RECIPE COURTESY OF KATHY KIRCHNER OF MY RAWSOME FOODS, LLC. PHOTO BY KELLIE ANN MURPHY.

THESE VEGAN, GLUTEN-FREE basil pesto stuffed mushrooms are a party favorite! They can be made raw in a dehydrator or baked in the oven. INGREDIENTS 24 cremini mushrooms 1/2 cup pine nuts 1 1/2 cups basil 1/2 teaspoon Himalayan sea salt

1 cup walnuts 3 cloves garlic 1/2 cup spinach 1/4-1/2 cup olive oil

DIRECTIONS 1. Wash mushrooms and remove stems. Place top down on a plate or dehydrator tray. 2. Place walnuts, pine nuts and garlic in food processor. Pulse a few times. Add basil, spinach and sea salt to food processor. Process until well combined. With processor running, pour in olive oil and process until smooth. 3. Using a small spoon, scoop a small amount of filling into each mushroom cap. 4. If using a dehydrator, place on dehydrator tray and dehydrate at 115 degrees for 4-5 hours. They come out warm, soft and dark. 5. If using an oven, place on a cookie sheet at bake at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes, checking after 10 minutes.

RAW VEGAN CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES RECIPE AND IMAGE BY KELLIE ANN MURPHY, PLANT BASED LIVING FOOD CHEF AT KELLIE ANN’S KITCHEN IN TUCSON.

THIS NUTRITIOUS NO-BAKE dessert is the perfect guilt-free treat after a satisfying meal – and it takes only a few minutes to make! INGREDIENTS 3 cups Medjool dates (pitted) 1 tsp Himalayan salt 1 Tbsp coconut oil, melted

3 1/2 Tbsp raw cacao powder 2 tsp pure vanilla extract 2 tsp Maca Powder

Optional toppings: cinnamon, cayenne, hemp seeds, chopped nuts, chopped cacao nibs, etc. DIRECTIONS 1. Place pitted dates in a food processor and pulse a few times. 2. Add the rest of the ingredients (except toppings). 3. Pulse until the consistency is of a pasty texture, about 90 seconds or more. 4. Put a small bit of coconut oil on your clean palms. With your hands, scoop and roll the truffles into balls, one at a time. 5. For a delicious variety, roll the balls into one or more of the toppings listed. 6. Place in an airtight container and refrigerate for 15 minutes, or freeze for 5 minutes. Serve and enjoy! Yields two dozen truffles. For more recipes, visit greenlivingaz.com/recipes greenlivingaz.com

January 2016 | greenliving

41


EVENTS

GREEN SCENES JANUARY CALENDAR OF EVENTS

1/9 Uptown Farmers Market – Neighborhood Chef Series

1/14 ASU EcoCAR 3: The Big Reveal

1/30 Cruise to the Cosmos

CENTRAL ARIZONA

January 9 UPTOWN FARMERS MARKET – NEIGHBORHOOD CHEF SERIES 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Central Ave. and Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix The Uptown Farmers Market Neighborhood Chef Series features local chefs from restaurants between 7th Street and 7th Avenue. This month, Chef Doug Robson of Otro Café will perform a cooking demo, turning seasonal Arizona products into delicious meals for the community to sample. uptownmarketaz.com

January 9-10 VEGETARIAN FOOD FESTIVAL 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Scottsdale Civic Center Amphitheater 3939 N. Drinkwater Blvd., Scottsdale The Vegetarian Food Festival by U.S. Veg Corp is returning to Arizona! Bring your family and furry friend for two days of plant-based food, information and festivities. Both days will feature innovative speakers in the veg food industry as well as 100+ exhibitors showcasing cruelty-free products. Tickets are $25.00 at the door; children ages 10 and under are free. azvegfoodfest.com

42 greenliving | January 2016

January 14 ASU ECOCAR 3: THE BIG REVEAL 3:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m. ASU Polytechnic Simulation Building 7442 E. Tillman Ave., Mesa EcoCAR 3 is a competition between universities in which students transform a 2016 Chevrolet Camaro into a high performance hybrid vehicle. ASU’s EcoCAR 3 Team just received the brand new Camaro and are eager for the community to see it. Come take a look at the car before the students take it apart, and learn about how this project will put ASU and the state on the map! Attendance is free. Parking available across from the Simulation Building. greenlivingaz.com/eco-car3-reveal

January 15-17 ELECTRIC BIKE EXPO Various times Tempe Diablo Stadium 2200 W. Alameda Dr., Tempe The first stop in a six-city tour, the Electric Bike Expo is coming to Tempe. Dozens of worldwide manufacturers, experts and local retailers will be in attendance to share the latest in electric bike technology. Test the newest electric bike models on the closed course and connect with an electric biking community. Attendance is free. electricbike-expo.com

January 18 COOKING WITH COLORS FOR HEALTH & VITALITY 6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. Whole Foods Market Scottsdale 7111 E. Mayo Blvd., Phoenix Visit Whole Foods Market Scottsdale for a free cooking demonstration focusing on health and vitality. Learn how cooking with a variety of colors can increase your energy level, improve your overall health and keep you looking young and fresh! Please RSVP. cookingwithcolors.eventbrite.com

January 30 CRUISE TO THE COSMOS 5:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. Dolly Steamboat Cruises 16802 AZ-88, Tortilla Flat Experience the beautiful night sky with Steve Kates, affectionately known as Dr. Sky, on a boat cruise on Canyon Lake. Embark on a tour through the cosmos on the historic Dolly Steamboat, enjoy a gourmet meal and preview Dr. Sky’s new programs, while celebrating his 60th birthday. Adult dinner reservations are $72.95, children reservations are $44.95. drsky60th.eventbrite.com

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EVENTS

1/8-10 Green Film Festival

1/13 Citizens’ Climate Lobby Flagstaff Meets

1/16 The Art of Brewing Your Own Kombucha

NORTHERN ARIZONA

January 8-10 GREEN FILM FESTIVAL Various times Mary D. Fisher Theater 2030 W. SR 89A, Suite A-3, Sedona The Sedona International Film Festival presents a weekend of sustainabilityminded documentaries to start the year off on an inspirational note. The theme of the weekend is “Recycling.” Friday, January 8, 7:00 p.m.: “The Clean Bin Project.” Saturday, January 9, 1:00 p.m.: “Garbage: The Revolution Starts At Home.” Sunday, January 10, 7:00 p.m.: “Garbage Into Gold.” sedonafilmfestival.org

January 13

January 16

CITIZENS’ CLIMATE LOBBY FLAGSTAFF MEETING

THE ART OF BREWING YOUR OWN KOMBUCHA

6:00 p.m. Church of the Epiphany 423 N. Beaver St., Flagstaff If your New Year’s resolution is to do something more concrete about climate change, here is a great place to get started. Join the Flagstaff Citizens Climate Lobby group and learn about the Carbon Fee and Dividend proposal and more. This first meeting of the year is simply for orientation and informal conversation, perfect for newcomers. 928-699-3441 or citizensclimatelobby.org

9:00 a.m. One Root Tea 500 W. Gurley St., Prescott Learn the whys, how-tos and benefits of this DIY ancient elixir. A marvelous taste testing, starter kit and recipes for creating delicious twists to your own brew are included. $25.00 pre-registration is required. 928-221-2533

BUSINESS EVENTS

January 8 TRANSFORM YOUR BUSINESS Residence Inn 3021 E. Banner Gateway, Gilbert Rick Krug, the John Maxwell business coach and author, will lead this “Complete Business Changing Workshop” and spill the “secrets of leading a world-class small business.” The workshop will outline the key frustrations to owning your own business and give you the solutions to solve them. The registration fee is $397.00. keyfrustrations.com

greenlivingaz.com

January 14 LISTING & LEASING HOMES WITH SOLAR 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 2212 E. Williams Field Rd., Suite 220, Gilbert As more homeowners install solar panels, it is important for realtors to know the facts. Be able to advise your clients about current market statistics and solar trends, and the benefits and drawbacks to buying versus leasing. Realtors will earn three hours in Disclosure credits with ADRE, and LEED professionals can earn 3.0 credits with GBCI. Tickets are $20.00. greenlivingaz.com/listing-leasing-solar

January 21 LOCAL FIRST MEMBER 101 SESSION 10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m. Webinar The New Year is a great time to get your business connected with Local First Arizona, and the Member 101 Sessions are a great place to start. This monthly webinar gives you everything you need to know about LFA, member benefits, and how you can be a part of the Local First movement. Attendance is free. localfirstaz.com

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EVENTS

1/9 Grease Collection and Recycling

1/13-17 Wings Over Willcox Birding & Nature Festival

1/30 Yuma Medjool Date Festival

SOUTHERN ARIZONA

January 9 GREASE COLLECTION AND RECYCLING 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Pima County, Various locations After 10 years of hosting this event the day after Thanksgiving, Pima County has moved it to after the New Year, giving folks an opportunity to collect grease from all their holiday cooking. Grease will be recycled and used as biodiesel, a cleaner burning fuel for the environment. Used cooking oil will be collected, as well as kitchen greases like bacon fat and lard. To find a collection location near you, visit the Save Our Sewers website. greenlivingaz.com/grease-collection

January 13-17 WINGS OVER WILLCOX BIRDING & NATURE FESTIVAL Various times 1500 N. Circle I Rd., Willcox The Wings over Willcox Birding & Nature Festival gives you the opportunity to see all of the feathered winter visitors in Southeastern Arizona. Go on one of the many guided tours focusing on bird watching, photography, botany, geology, history and more. Enjoy free seminars, a crafts and trade show, live animal educational booths and more. Tickets range from $6.00 to $100.00. 800-200-2272 or wingsoverwillcox.com

January 30 YUMA MEDJOOL DATE FESTIVAL 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Yuma Historic Main Street The 5th Annual Medjool Date Festival celebrates Yuma’s best desert-grown commodity. Bring the whole family for a full day of sticky-sweet fun, with food and drink, chef demos, live music, art exhibitions, recipe contests, garden tours and more. The event is free. 928-373-5028 or yumaaz.gov/events

For more events, visit greenlivingaz.com/events

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GREEN PAGES

thank you to our partners! WE APPRECIATE OUR READERS SUPPORTING OUR ADVERTISERS! All Natural Cosmetics.................................... 46

Essential Oils/Andrea Alfaro........................13

Organic Living.....................................................25

Allstate Appliances......................................... 44

Fair Trade Café.................................................... 14

PurMaid....................................................................9

Anti-Aging Clinic...............................................33

Friendly Pines Camp....................................... 26

Sedona Yoga Festival.........................................2

Arizona SciTech Festival...................................5

Gourmet Girls Gluten-Free

Seshi Organic Salon...........................................2

AZ Shade Design & Consulting................... 15

Bakery/Bistro...................................................... 14

Southern Arizona Arts & Cultural

Baobab Body Butter/

Green Leaf Realty............................................. 15

Alliance (SAACA)............................................... 19

Veronica Bahn.................................................... 28

Jan Green, REALTOR®, GREEN®, SFR,

Tank’s Green Stuff...............................................7

Bauman’s Xtreme Training............................. 17

EcoBroker®............................................................33

The Hippie Hobby.............................................37

Body Beautiful Spa........ Inside Front Cover

Jay’s Bird Barn...................................................... 46

The Natural Healing Garden....................... 46

Clean Air Cab...................................Back Cover

Keep Arizona Beautiful............................. 17, 37

Tryst Café..............................................................35

Copenhagen Imports.......................................33

KFNX..........................................................................5

Unified Brands.................................................... 45

Covenant Kingdom International...............13

Laura Tanzer Designs....................................... 14

United States Green Building Council -

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Monzures Companies......................................13

Arizona Chapter................Inside Back Cover

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OMS Organic Modern Solution................. 16

Wells Fargo Advisors...................................... 29

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Prescott GREEN BUSINESS Guide THE CITY OF PRESCOTT was founded in 1864, when it was designated the capital of the Arizona Territory. The capital was moved to Tucson in 1867, but Prescott was named the Territorial Capital again in 1877, up until Phoenix became the capital in 1889.

DID YOU KNOW?

Along with its rich history, Prescott also boasts dozens of small businesses, which make up the thriving downtown Prescott area and other spots favored by tourists and locals alike. This winter season, visit the beautiful, snow-capped Prescott Valley, and don’t miss these eco-friendly businesses while you’re there.

The Natural Healing Garden & Goods From the Garden

Health Centered Foods, Events, Wellness & Massages

Bringing wild birds to your backyard Wild bird supplies Nature observation Optics for bird watching jaysbirdbarn.com /JaysBirdBarn

928-237-4116 • Debbie Maranville naturalhealinggarden@gmail.com 119 Garden St., Prescott, AZ 86305 www.naturalhealinggarden.com

WE CHOOSE PRODUCTS WITHOUT: Animal Testing, Artificial Colors, Artificial Fragrance, Etahanols, Parabens, Solvents, Sulphates, Toxic Chemicals

NEW YEAR, NEW STORE Come visit our new retail store in Prescott Valley!

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46 greenliving | January 2016

Your conscious life

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HE’S GREEN SHE’S GREEN PAMPER YOURSELF Product reviews by our eco-conscious couple John and Jennifer Burkhart Happy New Year! Have you made any resolutions? Going “green” to care for the planet is always a great idea, but what if you could take care of yourself as well? Now that the season of giving is over, it’s time for some self-love. We indulged in these ecofriendly pampering products to find out which offered the best “me time.” Definitely the best resolution we’ve ever made! ALBA BOTANICA | MINI PEEL HE SAID: This mini peel did a wonderful job at hydrating my skin, but that’s about all it did. I used this product for a couple of days and I didn’t notice any changes in my pores or skin clarity. I guess I expected this mini peel to be a bit more, uh, peel-y.

SHE SAID: A quick and easy regimen to improve my skin? Yes, please! This is a cooling gel that felt great on my face and was simple to apply. Five minutes is all it took, but I didn’t see any results until the second day I applied it. My skin did feel softer, but visibly looked the same.

He gave it:

She gave it:

NUBIAN HERITAGE | COCONUT PAPAYA BODY WASH HE SAID: This has to be girliest smelling body wash ever. It reminded me of one of those tropical drinks with the umbrellas and fruit on top. It did its job as a body wash well, and my skin didn’t feel dry afterward. I guess smelling like a frou-frou cocktail is just the price I have to pay to be able to review beer and other cool guy stuff. First-world problems.

SHE SAID: Loved it! Smelled so good it made my mouth water. I definitely felt pampered with these creamy, moisturizing suds – as if I was transported to a tropical island where I was enjoying one of those cherry-pineapple Big Stick popsicles (at least that’s what the aroma reminded me of).

He gave it:

She gave it:

AURA CACIA | REFRESHING TANGERINE GRAPEFRUIT FOAM BATH HE SAID: It’s been forever since I’ve had a bubble bath. I felt like kid again. I sang songs and played with a toy boat while sporting a grapefruit-tangerine-scented Santa Claus bubble beard. I’m only kidding, I couldn’t find a toy boat. This bubble bath was relaxing and invigorating at the same time. The minerals relaxed my muscles all the way down to the bone. I should do this more often.

SHE SAID: The bubble bath definitely smelled refreshing, like a freshly squeezed juice, and the soak made my skin feel silky smooth. The fluffy white bubbles only lasted about 10 minutes, which was a bummer. Still, this soaky bath was a much-needed moment of relaxation.

He gave it:

She gave it:

QUEEN HELENE | FOOTHERAPY MINERAL FOOT BATH HE SAID: “Hulk smash puny corns and calluses!” This foot therapy soak makes a big tub of bright green water, and I can’t prove it, but I think they used gamma radiation to soften my feet – they have never been so smooth. Be ready for a minty-smelling house, though. This has one of the strongest menthol-eucalyptus smells I’ve ever come across.

SHE SAID: Phew! Be sure to use this foot soak in a wellventilated area! Unless you’ve got a stuffy nose, then go for it – the menthol fumes will clear out your sinuses. Besides the smell, it did a fabulous job of softening and removing the tough skin on my heels, and my feet had a nice cooling sensation afterwards.

She gave it:

He gave it:

HUGO NATURALS | KUMQUAT BROWN SUGAR SCRUB HE SAID: This is one of the best exfoliators I’ve ever used. It is literally a tub of brown sugar and vitamin E oil. The oil and the sugar separates, so I had to stir the scrub for quite a bit before use. I felt like I was about to make chocolate chip cookies in the shower, but it left my callused worker’s hands much softer.

SHE SAID: Sounds tasty, but the bitter orange aroma didn’t entice me. This was a fantastic body scrub, however. The super-fine sugar granules spread quickly and evenly without being too harsh. They quickly dissolved, leaving my skin smooth. The oil doesn’t wash away, leaving my skin super moisturized long after toweling off.

He gave it:

She gave it:

See more product reviews at greenlivingaz.com/hgsg greenlivingaz.com

January 2016 | greenliving

47


COOL OUTRAGEOUS

STUFF 2

1

Upcycling at its most beautiful, the Deep Currents Vase from Ten Thousand Villages is made entirely of recycled glass bottles. Skilled artisans craft these bracing green vases by hand, ensuring that each one has its own unique color and pattern. $59.00 TENTHOUSANDVILLAGES.COM

VITAMIN A SERUM AND FACE CREAM

New year, new skincare regimen. Used together, Mad Hippie’s Vitamin A serum and face cream will help reduce the appearance of wrinkles and sun damage with natural active ingredients like coffee berry, acai and argan oil. Not to mention, both products smell and feel “mad” good. $33.00 serum, $26.00 face cream MADHIPPIE.COM

3

4

NOURISHING BATH & BODY OIL

LOCAL!

Our favorite local olive oil company, Queen Creek Olive Mill, now has a spa line! Use Olivespa Bath & Body Oil just after a shower to nourish your skin and lock in much-needed moisture. A little aromatherapy doesn’t hurt either; choose from lavender, orange blossom, vanilla bean or eucalyptus mint. Perfect for thirsty Arizona skin. $12.00 QUEENCREEKOLIVEMILL.COM

INVIGORATING COFFEE SCRUB

Wake up tired skin with Coffee Body Scrub by LaBosh. Coffee is rich in antioxidants, and the caffeine helps to draw out excess moisture, leaving your skin smooth and firm. The scrub is filled with natural ingredients to feed your skin, like avocado oil and sea salt. $24.00 LABOSH.COM

5

UPCYCLED PHOENICIAN GLASS VASE

ALCOHOL-FREE ORAL RINSE

LOCAL

!

Ditch burning mouthwash and opt for this alcohol-free, sulfate-free oral health rinse by CloSYS. A patented ingredient called cloralstan is scientifically formulated to kill 99.9 percent of germs, while the balanced pH reduces new germ growth. The Gentle Mint flavor is made with natural mineral oil and peppermint. $11.39 for 32-ounce bottle CLOSYS.COM

6

AYURVEDIC PURE COPPER TONGUE SCRAPER

TruthPaste’s Ayurvedic Pure Copper Tongue Scraper is the perfect blend of useful and beautiful. The comfortable, ergonomic shape is made from 100 percent copper, which looks pretty and also acts as a natural antimicrobial. TruthPaste also makes an excellent botanical toothpaste to round out your oral hygiene routine. $10.25 TRUTHPASTE.COM

EDITOR ’S PICK

Find more cool outrageous stuff at greenlivingaz.com/cos

48 greenliving | January 2016

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