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2011 AN N UA L R E P O RT GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS

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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


table of contents

04 06 08 12 21 24 30 32 34

message from the director history and mission achievements at a glance program achievements funding partnerships volunteering what you can do staff and board internal sustainability

NOTE TO READER: The following charts and figures featured throughout this document reflect independent statistics and analysis from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, August 2012.

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READ MORE

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


CFLs

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gardens

storm drains

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

rain barrels


MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR

The first seed for Green Light New Orleans was planted 5 years ago. I did not expect the simple act of changing a light bulb to develop into a movement involving thousands of people. Beyond exceeding my expectations, I have experienced firsthand that great impact is achieved by a great many people. Green Light New Orleans has only been able to make such an incredible community impact because of help from countless volunteers from across the country, local supporters and program participants, corp members from several AmeriCorps programs, dependable donors, and a dedicated staff and board. Thanks and appreciation to all who have helped drive Green Light’s mission towards success. Together, we look forward to bringing sustainability services to the community for years to come. Andreas Hoffmann, founder and executive director Green Light New Orleans GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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history and mission

HISTORY

Photo Credit: Times Picayune

Andreas Hoffmann founded Green Light New Orleans in 2006 to assist in the sustainable rebuilding of New Orleans and at the same time offset the pollution of his touring band. What began as one man’s “light bulb moment,” Green Light New Orleans now operates one of the largest energy efficiency programs in New Orleans. Green Light’s free CFL (compact fluorescent lamp) and installation program is arguably the most successful large-scale energy efficient light bulb distribution program in the country. The effectiveness of Green Light’s program lies in the organization’s innovative direct installation approach, which guarantees, to a larger extent than any other method, the resultant energy, emissions, and utility cost reductions.

What began as one man’s “ light bulb moment,” Green Light New Orleans now operates one of the largest energy efficiency programs in New Orleans. In addition to the free CFL and installation program, Green Light has expanded its outreach in an effort to engage all New Orleanians. Green Light teaches elementary-age youth through its SPARK environmental action and education program, partners with local high school clubs and university courses to develop youth leaders through community service, and implements an energy efficient light bulb program for small businesses and churches. In 2010, Green Light New Orleans launched an initiative called Tip the Block to increase neighborhood impact and connect residents to an array of local resources specific to their interests and needs.

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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


MISSION Green Light New Orleans invests energy in people by assisting New Orleans residents in person, one household at a time. Volunteers install free energy efficient light bulbs to demonstrate that a mass movement of individual actions creates a significant impact on our environment and community. Green Light connects New Orleans residents to relevant, local opportunities and encourages individual actions so that everyone can benefit from a vibrant, resilient, and sustainable community.

FREE CFL AND INSTALLATION PROGRAM

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TIP THE BLOCK

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

SPARK ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PROGRAM


achievements at a glance

Green Light New Orleans has reached 12,750 New Orleans residents since 2006, with volunteers installing over 300,000 energy efficient light bulbs. The following chart breaks down the program’s reach and impact by year from 2007 to 2011.

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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


CFLS INSTALLED, HOMES IMPACTED, & VOLUNTEERS RECRUITED PER YEAR BY GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS

150, 000 112, 500

65,360

75, 000 37, 500

3,672

4,000 3,000

1,951

2,000 1,000 0

2007 CFLS INSTALLED

2008

2009

HOMES IMPACTED

2010

2011

VOLUNTEERS RECRUITED


13,80

The estimated total number of dollars program p

118,00

The amount of electricity in kWh not consumed by New Orleans res

134,00

Pounds of CO2 not emitted by New Orleans residents a

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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


00,000 00,000 00,000

articipants save on their electricity bills since 2007.*

sidents because of their participation in the free light bulb program.*

s a result of participating with Green Light New Orleans.*

*calculated over the lifetime of the CFL

READ MORE HERE


program achievements

one | 2011 residential program PROBLEM

Over the long term, electricity consumption increases, and most electricity in homes is used for appliances and lighting. It is humanity’s production and use of energy that is the primary cause of climate change. The vast majority of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, about 87 percent, come from energy production and use. As the U.S. population grows, ages, and becomes further concentrated in cities and coastal areas, society is faced with additional challenges. Climate change is likely to exacerbate these challenges as changes in temperature, precipitation, sea levels, and extreme weather events increasingly affect homes, communities, water supplies, land resources, transportation, urban infrastructure, and regional characteristics that people have come to value and depend on. Coastal cities are especially vulnerable to sea-level rise, storm surge, and increased hurricane intensity. Cities such as New Orleans, Miami, and New York are particularly at risk. Vulnerabilities to climate change depend not only on where people are but also on their circumstances. In general, groups that are especially vulnerable include the very young, the very old, the sick, and the poor. READ MORE HERE

One incandescent light bulb uses the same energy as four compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs).

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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

addressing the problem: Volunteers are the backbone of Green Light New Orleans, and their energy fuels the organization’s mission. Residents participate in Green Light programs primarily through word-of-month and concern for their future. Only by working together can the challenges of climate change be addressed. Green Light works to engage thousands of individuals, including volunteers, residents, and supporters, to create a movement and face those challenges with action. In 2011, 1,951 volunteers installed 65,350 CFLs and visited 3,672 homes across the Greater New Orleans area. Those volunteers came from New Orleans, across the US, and abroad. They range from elementary school to retirement age, include families, come from universities and high schools, and serve through church groups. Together, they demonstrate how individual action, face-to-face engagement, and accessibility for all create change. The foundation to a clean energy future requires everyone to consume less energy and support our mutual well-being. Energy efficiency especially benefits those who have the least because it reduces utility cost burdens. In 2011 alone, Green Light volunteers enabled New Orleans residents to conserve 25,700,000 kWh of electricity, save $3,000,000 in utility costs, and reduce household carbon footprints by 29,000,000 pounds of CO2.


RESIDENTS WILL SAVE $3,000,000 in utility costs

2011 achievements

RESIDENTS WILL CONSERVE 25,700,000 kWh

RESIDENTS WILL REDUCE 29,000,000 lbs of CO 2

65,360

3,672 1,951 photo by Brighton Linge 13 INSTALLED, GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS CFLS HOMES IMPACTED &

| 2011 ANNUAL REPORT VOLUNTEERS RECRUITED

PER YEAR BY GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS

YEAR 2011


program achievements (cont.)

two | 2011 small business program PROBLEM

When analyzing only electricity use in commercial buildings, more electricity is consumed by lighting than any other individual end use. READ MORE HERE

USE OF ELECTRICITY IN COMMERICAL BUILDINGS, 2003 2% water heating 2% office equipment 4% space heating

1% water heating

5% computers

12%

38%

other

lightning

12%

refrigeration

13% 13%

ventiliaton

cooking

Source: Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review, Table 8.9 (June 2008).

addressing the problem: Through a partnership with Energy Smart, Green Light New Orleans implements a small business program to assist local businesses in making the switch to energy efficient light bulbs (for more information about Funding, see page 20). Green Light New Orleans has installed energy efficient light bulbs for 50 small businesses since 2010. The program has saved New Orleans businesses $55,880 annually and reduced their energy usage by 651,160 kWh annually. In 2011, the following New Orleans businesses, non-profits and churches participated in Green Light New Orleans’ small business program: Belladoggie, Cafe Rani, New Orleans Women’s Shelter, Pyramid Resources Wellness Institute, St. John Berchman Center, St. Margaret Daughter’s Home, St. Peter African Methodist Episcopal Church, The Adventure, The People’s Program, Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza (Magazine St. and Canal St.), Vom Fass, Feet First, and Marianites of Holy Cross.


SMALL BUSINESS TESTIMONIAL

I wanted to bring the costs down and be more effective with the environment.” Since receiving her light bulbs, Chris Heem has seen a $100 decrease in her monthly energy bill. She also says she feels positive about her business becoming more eco-friendly.“Going green is a huge marketing factor. People are really attracted to that,” Chris Heem says. “[Using Green Light’s services] could be another bullet in marketing to promote Magazine Street.” Chris Heem, Vom Fass

MAGAZINE ST

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program achievements (cont.)

three | tip the block OPPORTUNITY

Green Light’s Tip the Block program connects residents to services that enable energy efficiency, incentivize sustainable practices, and foster neighborhood solidarity. Services are provided for free to interested residents through a network of local partner organizations that address energy efficiency, food access, water mitigation, and neighborhood revitalization. Tip the Block cultivates environmental stewardship on a neighborhood level with clear and visible incentives to encourage other residents in the block to tip toward taking similar action. The program is initiated by designating a 9-block area where Green Light installs energy efficient light bulbs in homes. When a home in the area is installed with free energy efficient light bulbs, Green Light volunteers ask residents what other sustainable resources and services they may be interested in, such as weatherization, backyard vegetable gardens, and rain barrels. Green Light then connects residents with existing partner organizations that can provide these expert services and other desired resources.

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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


“

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead

�

Tip the Block program goals Improve access to sustainable living measures for all income levels. Engage community members with information and experiences that incentivize sustainability. Connect residents with each other to support long-term outcomes. 17

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

Support leadership within communities to foster growth and self-empowerment. Reduce CO2 emissions and limit expensive and unnecessary energy consumption. Collaborate with established organizations to create a network of resources for residents.


program achievements (cont.)

four | SPARK

five | university service learning

OPPORTUNITY

OPPORTUNITY

SPARK is Green Light New Orleans’ hands-on environmental education program that helps New Orleans students build an awareness of themselves as members of a shared earth and of their ability to engage in actions to protect it. The program teaches students about the environment, the impact of energy usage, ways to help conserve Earth’s resources, and how smart usage of those resources can help protect the planet. Through hands-on activities, students attain an understanding of how their actions have both a direct and indirect impact on the environment, and that responsible decision-making can create positive change. In March of 2011, Green Light staff taught four SPARK courses: three first grade classes at Ben Franklin Math and Science Elementary School and one third grade class during Success Preparatory Academy’s after school program.

Green Light New Orleans partners with local universities to provide service learning students with relevant volunteer opportunities. In 2011, Green Light joined forces with two classes from Tulane University, one class from Loyola University, and one class from Xavier University. The Loyola class, a PR course, created press kits for Green Light’s programs. Green Light partnered with a freshman seminar class at Xavier, whose students completed eight hours of service with Green Light.

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six | high school service learning OPPORTUNITY Green Light partnered with two local high schools to create service learning projects for participating students. Green Light received funding from the Louisiana Learn and Serve Commission in order to develop a semester-long service learning project with Ben Franklin High School (for more information about the grant from Louisiana Learn and Serve Commission, see page 21). Green Light continued its service learning project with Ben Franklin High School into the 2011-2012 academic year. In 2011, Ben Franklin students installed 3,348 energy efficient light bulbs for 224 households. In the fall of 2011, Green Light expanded its High School Service Learning Program to include KIPP Renaissance. KIPP Renaissance students installed CFLs for 25 residents, helping them save $13,616 in utility costs and reduce their carbon footprint by 132,312 pounds of CO2. KIPP students also canvassed the neighborhood around their school to create a localized impact.

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


‌from replacing light bulbs in homes to teaching about the environment to elementary school students to building vegetable gardens in the blazing heat to getting hugs from the wonderful people at Magnolia School. It has helped me become a leader and be the one to take action and then encourage others to also take action. I will definitely continue to “learn & serveâ€? my community. - Hui Jin, Ben Franklin High School student 18


program achievements (cont.)

seven | internship program development During the summer, Green Light New Orleans developed and intensified its internship program. Green Light recruited nine summer interns to help increase the capacity of the organization. Green Light also developed a paid internship to help with Tip the Block programming and created four goal internship positions to help meet light bulb installation goals.

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“In traditional New Orleans fashion, most residents hear about Green Light’s program via word of mouth… This connectivity, this electricity, can be thought of as an entirely different type of energy generated by community members. A citywide conversation about energy usage carried by residents and volunteers becomes intriguing and relatable because individuals can make a difference for free. This discussion may open up new avenues for individuals to reconsider environmental issues and the economic landscape of New Orleans. - Nicole Mabry, Summer Intern 2011

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


funding

Green Light New Orleans appreciates this year’s sponsors and supporters. “ Funding, supporting, and implementing energy efficiency is very important.  We are proud to partner with Green Light New Orleans because they are a valuable energy efficient resource to a wide range and an incredible number of local residents.” Trent Brackenridge, Energy Smart Program Manager

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CITGO-Venezuela

Green Light New Orleans was awarded the Residential Lighting component of a city-wide energy efficiency program called Energy Smart NOLA. The program was developed by the New Orleans City Council and is administered by Entergy New Orleans. The program aims to reduce energy consumption. This partnership will enable Green Light New Orleans to install up to 90,000 CFLs per year over the next three years.

CITGO-Venezuela’s Energy Efficient Lighting Program, which targets low-income families in 17 U.S cities, provided funding for Green Light to install CFLs for 2,000 New Orleans households starting in Summer 2011.


funding (cont.)

Philips Electronics

Learn & Serve Grant

ServeNext MLK Day Grant

Philips Electronics donated 800 LED (light emitting diode) floodlights to Green Light New Orleans’ free residential program in October 2011. LEDs represent the latest in residential lightning technology and are extremely energy efficient and long lasting. The LED floodlights provided by Philips use 80% less energy than traditional incandescent bulbs and last 25,000 hours, or up to 25 years with intermittent usage. This donation enabled Green Light to provide LEDs as part of the free program, making Green Light the first large-scale energy efficient lighting program in the United States to install free LEDs for residents. Philips also donated 2,000 CFLs to the free program.

As recipient of a Learn & Serve grant supported by the Louisiana Serve Commission in the Office of Lieutenant Governor, Green Light was awarded $10,000 to develop a semester-long service learning project. Participating students from the Ben Franklin Green Society, a student-led environmental organization at Ben Franklin High School, served 40+ hours over the project’s five month duration. Student leaders guided small groups in a SPARK class at Success Preparatory Academy, where they helped teach 20 third and fourth grade students about environmental stewardship; built four backyard vegetable gardens for recipients to grow healthy, fresh produce (see NOFFN, page 25); and installed 2,821 CFLs for 190 households.

Green Light received a $1,000 grant from ServeNext New Orleans to host an event for the 25th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service. Green Light hosted 49 volunteers from ServeNext New Orleans, New Orleans area AmeriCorps Alums Chapter, AmeriCorps NCCC, Catholic Charities, Boys Hope Girls Hope of Greater New Orleans, and Cabrini High School. In several hours of service, volunteers installed 550 CFLs, saving residents a total of $25,300 on utility costs and reducing their carbon footprint by 245,850 pounds of CO2.

345 Additional funders: Baylor University | Citizen Bike | C4 Tech | Entergy Louisiana | Entergy New Orleans | Enterprise Corporation | First Affirmative Financial | Glickenhaus Foundation | Hope | Jewish Federation | Jewish Funds for Justice | Jewish Community Foundation | Kone | New Orleans Rotary Foundation | People Program | Points of Light Institute | Saint Martin de Porres High School | Young Judaea | 130 individual donors

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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


fundraising campaign

Citizens For Light

Christmas Tree Auction & Fundraiser In December 2011, Green Light partnered with Academy of the Sacred Heart to create a Christmas tree display for Magazine Street. Designed by artist Mark Kirk and built by members of Sacred Heart’s Environmental Club, the trees were made of recycled incandescent light bulbs taken from households that participated in Green Light’s free energy efficient light bulb program. Mark Kirk, a local artist known for his artwork made of repurposed materials, reuses Green Light New Orleans’ light bulbs to create his notable lamps. The repurposed Christmas trees were displayed along Magazine Street’s Green Light District to create awareness for Green Light New Orleans’ mission and auctioned to raise funds for Green Light’s Citizens For Light campaign.

Citizens For Light aims to demonstrate community-based demand for a sustainable energy future in New Orleans. The goal of the Citizens For Light campaign is to have installed 343,829 energy efficient light bulbs throughout the city of New Orleans by May of 2012. The campaign goal represents one light bulb per city resident. Achievement of this goal will reduce the city’s carbon footprint by 154 million pounds of CO2, save residents $15.8 million dollars in utility costs, and establish a city-wide movement of individuals in support of sustainable, energy efficient solutions.

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partnerships

Green Light New Orleans has created partnerships with many organizations and networks. “ I believe that Green Light has made a positive change in many peoples’ lives. The extent of that change would not be as great without our community partners.” Andreas Hoffmann, Founder and Executive Director Green Light New Orleans

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City of New Orleans

Academy of the Sacred Heart

Green Light New Orleans partners with the City of New Orleans to enroll New Orleans residents in the city’s free curbside recycling program. Participants of the free light bulb program receive in-person information about curbside recycling from Green Light volunteers, and residents can sign up for the recycling program at that moment, within their homes.

Students from The Academy of the Sarced Heart, a New Orleans high school, have partnered with Green Light New Orleans since 2009. This year, the Sacred Heart Environmental Club pledged to support Green Light’s Citizens for Light campaign. In December, Sacred Heart students created repurposed light bulb Christmas trees using discarded incandescent light bulbs lit up by a CFL for an auction supporting the campaign. (See Christmas Tree Auction & Fundraiser, page 22.)

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JOB1 Young Judaea

JOB1

Young Judaea is an organization that gathers Jewish youth to engage them in projects that emphasize peer leadership, political non-partisanship, and religious pluralism. In 2010 and 2011, youth from throughout the country came to New Orleans to volunteer and raise funds for Green Light New Orleans’ mission along with other local service efforts as part of Young Judaea’s Alternative Winter Break program.

The City of New Orleans JOB1 summer internship program aims to serve young people by connecting them to paid work and learning opportunities. Green Light New Orleans partnered with JOB1 to provide opportunities for two summer youth interns who lived in the nearby neighborhood. JOB1 interns worked from June to August as members of the Green Light team.



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New Orleans Food and Farm Network 

The New Orleans Food and Farm Network (NOFFN) began in New Orleans as a volunteer organization to create a network of local and regional activists, community stakeholders, and non-profits to address issues of food security and equitable access to healthy, sustainable, and culturally appropriate food. Green Light New Orleans partners with NOFFN to provide access to fresh and healthy food to residents who have participated in the free light bulb program. Together, Green Light

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New Orleans and NOFFN have built ten backyard vegetable gardens for residents expressing a need through Green Light New Orleans’ Tip the Block program.

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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partnerships (cont.)

Entergy New Orleans

New Orleans Hornets

Entergy New Orleans and the U.S. Department of Energy launched SmartView, a program aimed at providing free smart meters to 7,400 low-income households across New Orleans. Green Light New Orleans was approached and selected as one of the program’s non-profit partners because of its wide community reach and demonstrated impact. As a program partner, Green Light enrolled residents into this free program to improve large-scale energy efficiency outcomes for participants. To improve household air quality and reduce energy waste, Entergy New Orleans also partnered with Green Light to distribute over 800 free air conditioning filters to New Orleans residents.

The New Orleans Hornets launched Planet Rebound, an initiative aiming to put environmental responsibility at the forefront of the Hornets’ offseason Since 2009, Hornets staff members have devoted an annual day of service to Green Light New Orleans in an effort to promote the mutual goal of an energy efficient New Orleans.



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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

AmeriCorps 

  AmeriCorps is a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service, an independent federal agency whose mission is to improve lives, strengthen communities, and foster civic engagement through service and volunteering. All three AmeriCorps programs play a substantial role at Green Light: National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC), AmeriCorps State and National (Louisiana Delta Service Corps or LDSC), and the AmeriCorps VISTA programs. AmeriCorps increases the organization’s capacity to sustain current programming, provide services to over 15,000 households, and develop new programs. LDSC and Americorps VISTA provide corps members for year-long terms expanding a staff of two into a team of five. AmeriCorps NCCC has sent 15 teams to support Green Light since 2007. NCCC teams consist of 8 to 12 corps members and serve for 4 to 8 weeks at a time. The impact AmeriCorps members have made through Green Light New Orleans has been remarkable.


…I have learned so much about energy efficiency and now feel like I am educated on things I can incorporate into my every day life to help our environment and go green. I have also enjoyed the opportunity to work so closely with such a hard-working staff. This place truly is a small but mighty non-profit. I felt like I was more than just an AmeriCorps member, I felt like a GLNO employee and was proud.…It was so moving to hear how such a simple thing as switching people’s lightbulbs can have such a huge impact on their lives and how appreciative they were… Becky Masino, Delta 3 NCCC AmeriCorps Member

Tulane University Tulane University’s Academic Service Learning is an educational experience based upon a collaborative partnership between the university and the community. “Learning by doing” enables students to apply academic knowledge and critical thinking skills to meet genuine community needs. Green Light New Orleans partners with Tulane University to provide students with service learning experiences that apply to related coursework. AmeriCorps VISTA support is also provided through a Tulane University and Green Light New Orleans collaboration.

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Green Light Activities 2011

photo by Brighton Linge

Americorps Bayou St. John

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Internship Program 2011

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

Summer Intern


Rotary International

Xavier University

Ben Franklin High School SPARK Program 2011

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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

Greenlight maps out NOLA


“ volunteering

BE A PART OF THE CHANGE

Green Light New Orleans is truly a unique and progressive organization. Through my experience volunteering with Green Light, I have had the opportunity to interact with New Orleans residents, learn more about simple day-to-dayactivities that can save energy, and help the environment one CFL light bulb at a time. I found the volunteer program through Green Light New Orleans to be highly efficient and well organized from start to finish. The variety of neighborhoods which Green Light New Orleans serves truly allows for the volunteers to experience the diversity of this remarkable city. My experience working as a volunteer with this organization has been so fulfilling. I will absolutely suggest for my friends to participate in the future. - Alex Hall, Vanderbilt Alternative Spring Break | March 2011

program details The success of Green Light’s mission depends directly on thousands of dedicated volunteers from New Orleans, all over the US, and abroad who generously donate their time to install light bulbs in New Orleans households. Each year, Green Light hosts volunteers from universities and colleges on 30 29

GREEN GREEN LIGHT LIGHT NEW NEW ORLEANS ORLEANS || 2011 2011 ANNUAL ANNUAL REPORT REPORT

alternative breaks, church groups who travel to the city on service trips, local and national high schools, as well as local families, youth groups, and friends. Volunteer support enables Green Light to reach more residents and continue to expand its impact in the New Orleans community.


MONETARY VALUE, VOLUNTEER HOURS, & NUMBER OF VOLUNTEERS BY YEAR

$170,484

200, 000 150, 000 100, 000 50, 000 ____ ____ ____

7,824hrs

____ 7,000 5,000

1,956

3,000 1,000 800 600 400 200 0

2007 MONETARY VALUE Based on 2011 volunteer rate of $21.79

2008

2009 VOLUNTEER HOURS

Based on 4-hour volunteer day average

2010

2011 NO. OF VOLUNTEERS


what you can do

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who how impact

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


individuals

volunteers

communities

interns | partners | corporations foundations | organizations | neighborhoods donors | hundreds | thousands take action | build a movement | serve invest | experience

provide opportunity

partner | engage | donate energy efficiency | healthy food | lower CO2 flood water mitigation | sustainable households cleaner environment 33

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


A

B

C

D

E

F


GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS staff and board Andreas Hoffmann, executive director | A Andreas founded Green Light New Orleans in 2006. He is a musician, and before founding the organization, he toured internationally with his band B-Goes. Andreas grew up in Switzerland and moved to New Orleans in 1993. He is a graduate of the University of Bern. Bernnel January, Jr., program manager | B Bernnel has worked with Green Light New Orleans since 2008, becoming Program Manager in 2009. Bernnel graduated from Tulane University in 2005 with a degree in neuroscience. Before Green Light, he joined Teach For America. He taught physics, environmental science, and chemistry at a Baton Rouge high school, and was named Most Motivational Teacher in 2006. Bernnel is orginally from Morgan City, LA, and has called New Orleans home for 9 years. Rachel Dorfman, program coordinator | C Rachel joined the Green Light team in November 2010 as a Louisiana Delta Service Corps member after volunteering with the organization. She is originally from the Bay Area and moved to Nashville, TN to attend Vanderbilt University, where she graduated in 2008 with degrees in art history and anthropology. Before working at Green Light, she taught first and second graders at an after school program in Nashville and worked as a tech at a physical therapy office. Cynthia Corrales, service learning, internship and outreach coordinator | D Cynthia worked with Green Light from November 2010 to November 2011 as an AmeriCorps VISTA member through Tulane’s Center for Public Service. She is from California, and came to New Orleans to work with Green Light after she graduated from Cal Poly Pomona with a degree in environmental biology. Selena Poznak, service learning, internship and outreach coordinator | E Selena started at Green Light in November of 2011. Originally from Chicago, IL, she graduated from Tulane University in 2010 with a BFA in theater design and production with an emphasis in lighting design. After graduating, Selena became the resident lighting designer at Cripple Creek Theater Company, where she still volunteers. In November, Selena replaced Cynthia as Green Light’s AmeriCorps VISTA member through Tulane’s Center for Public Service.

Peter Schamp, volunteer coordinator | F Peter started at Green Light in December of 2011. He is originally from Baltimore, MD. He graduated from Columbia University in 2009 with a degree in political science, and prior to working at Green Light he worked in Washington, D.C. at a polling/ communications firm and also worked on organic farms across the United States. He is a Louisiana Delta Service Corps member. BOARD OF DIRECTORS Jim Stratton, board president Owner of a real estate market research and feasibility analysis consulting company and a licensed Louisiana Realtor. He has held board positions in schools and neighborhood associations for the past 12 years and serves on the board of the Commercial Investment Division of the New Orleans Metropolitan Association of Realtors. Jeff Lott, board vice president and treasurer Siemens Site Executive / Chief Information Officer for Touro Infirmary, New Orleans. Has held various management, director, and executive leadership positions with a number of large international, national and local corporations during a career spanning 30+ years. Adele Dauphin, board secretary Attorney for First Bankers Title. She has a degree in business administration from Millsaps College and has a J.D. and a master’s degree in communications from Loyola University. She has been licensed to practice law in Louisiana since 2008. Before moving to real estate title work, Adele was a bankruptcy attorney and admitted to practice in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana. She is the owner of Big Easy Notary & Auto Title in Mandeville, LA. Mike Murphy, board member Designer of solar energy systems. Previously served as the community outreach director for the Tulane Environmental Law Clinic A New Orleans native with an electrical engineering degree from U.N.O., Mike worked as an electrical engineer in Los Angeles for 12 years. His involvement in southern California coastal issues led him to law school. Mike obtained his J.D. and a certificate in Environmental Law from Pace Law School in 2005 where he was president of the Environmental Law Society and interned at the EPA in Washington, D.C.

Photos by Brighton Linge, Elizabeth Real,and Green Light New Orleans staff & volunteers. GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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internal sustainability

Green Light New Orleans

strives to be a model of energy efficiency and sustainability. Green Light takes the following steps to ensure that its dayto-day operations create as little wasted energy and materials as possible: Require staff and board members to use energy efficient CFLs in their homes. Use only 100% recycled printing paper for all printed materials. Reuse paper that has been printed on one side for scratch paper and printing. Save paperwork of residents who cancel or do not show to their installations to be used when they are rescheduled. Print postcards and business cards with soy ink on 100% recycled paper. Print all materials except maps on economy print settings. Design fliers and info sheets given to residents with efficient use of space to reduce paper trail. Catch storm runoff with a rain barrel, which is used to water the office garden. 36

Purchase 5-gallon, refillable water jugs and drink purified tap water instead of water from one-timeuse plastic water bottles. Reduce waste by providing staff with cloth dish rags and bathroom towels. Participate in the citywide curbside recycling program. Use non-toxic and biodegradable cleaning supplies. Require volunteers to bring back light bulb packaging to be recycled at the office. Maintain a small vegetable garden in front of the office. Use sink aerators to reduce water use.

GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


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GREEN LIGHT NEW ORLEANS | 2011 ANNUAL REPORT


Annual Report 2011