Page 1

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

1


2

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

3


Coo l at S c h ool by Tyler Whipkey

Waynesburg University STEAM Camp

Nineteen High school students from Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia attended STAEM Camp at Waynesburg University this summer

T

his summer, Waynesburg University hosted an event for high school students offering an alternative venue to learn in ways that are fun and exciting. It’s called STEAM Camp; STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics – core curriculum categories that are seeing increased focus across secondary education trends right now. July 16-20, nineteen high school students from Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia arrived on campus in Waynesburg for an exciting week of hands-on learning opportunities, activities, lab experiments and classroom instruction. Meals were provided along with lodging in the University’s upperclassmen residence halls. Waynesburg University Fine Arts Department Chair Andrew Heisey covered both the ‘A’ and ‘T’ in STEAM when he instructed a class on digital animation. “The students who attended the Digital Animation class spent the day putting together short stop motion movies,” said Professor Heisey. Making your own movie at school certainly sounds like fun…and it’s a true learning experience. “They quickly realized how much work it takes to make something like this on their own,” he added. Paul Sielski, Professor of Mathematics at WU, conducted a Math class during the week. Students participated in a variety of fun ways to put math skills to practical use, including how to calculate someone’s birthday using a math algorithm; and finding how many squares are on an 8x8 checkerboard (Hint: not 64). “The activities were meant to stimulate thinking and use mental focus and algorithms to solve problems,” said Dr. Sielski. Marietta Wright, WU Associate Professor of

4

Biology, piloted a course on Biotechnology during the week. Students learned how to use instruments like micropipettes, electrophoresis equipment, and staining techniques. “The use of these techniques can be applied to certain areas in biology and genetics such as DNA, RNA and protein analysis,” said Wright, “Campers were guided though each step to understand the process of DNA analysis. This process included agarose gel preparation, electrophoresis, and staining. For the final outcome, the campers, were able to analyze their gels and contemplate the many applications to which this process is used, such as GMOs, cloning and gene therapy.” Additional classes and activities included “Social Technology in Science” with instructors Sarah Bell, WU Alumnus Quicy Hathaway, and Ryan Smith; “Acute Injury Care” with Bobby Bosner; “Chemistry: Pharmacology” with WU Alumnus Sam Sprowls; “Biochemistry” with Heidi Fletcher; “Sign Language” with Joan Stone; “Anatomy” with Christopher Cink; “Mathematics” with James Bush; “Engineering” with Chevron Representative Mario Panucci and WU Student Jacob Restanio; “Nanotech Materials” with Evonne Bauldauff; “Geocaching” with Ryan Smith; “Music” with Melanie Catana; and “Environmental Science” with Janet Paladino and interns. All of this came at a cost of only $250 per student, as much of the expense of presenting the camp was covered by sponsorship from the Chevron Community Fund through the Community Foundation of Fayette County. Waynesburg University also offered a limited number of scholarships for students needing financial aid. GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

5


I Love this P l ace

T

Here is where a fort was built in 1771 when Justice and Jonah Gerard lead a party from Virginia to stake a claim to the land.

here’s always something neighborly going on at the Garards Fort post office – even if it’s only two hours a day. Judy Grimm has been on the job for six months and admits she loves socializing with those who stop by to pick up mail, drop off packages, buy stamps, and send money orders at the smallest post office in Pennsylvania. It’s wide enough to have a door and a window in front, but hardly long enough to hold anything more than a customer or two in a town that’s easy to miss but hard to forget once you take the time to slow down and visit. “This is definitely the community hub, “ Judy says, grinning from behind bars – her official window with old steel rods that go up and stay up if she puts a board under them. The wall around the window is studded with colorful stickers and old post box doors where mail was once accessed with tiny combination locks. Now the remaining postal boxes – all 25 of them - sit in a tidy row outside, beside the official blue U S Mail Box. “Since we’re only open from 10 a.m. to noon, we had to put them where customers could get to them,” Grimm explains, holding the door open for mail carrier Lydia Clark to bring in a carload of packages that online shopping has brought to post offices of the 21st century. “I haven’t been here long enough to hear all the stories, but I know this building became the post office in 1942. We’re getting ready for the Covered Bridge Festival because we have a commemorative cancelation that weekend and it will be available for thirty days afterwards.” Garards Fort is a cluster of mostly very old houses and proud historic markers along the State Road 2011, that branches off in another mile where the signs say “Carmichaels - 6, Bobtown - 6.” This road begins at Rolling Meadows Road, near the Greene County Museum and winds through old family farms still in production and old towns that are no more. The brick schoolhouse is still standing on the right as you drive through Fordyce and the one-room Murdock School that is now the headquarters of Warrior Trail Association is on your left. Once you pass the sign for Interstate 79 near Kir-

Judy Grimm has been on the job for six months and loving it at the smallest post office in Pennsylvania. A special commemorative cancellation stamp celebrating the 2017 Covered Bridge Festival will be available at the White Bridge September 16-17 and letters will be stamped with it from this little office afterwards for 30 days.

6

GARARDS FORT, PA

by Colleen Nelson

by, the White Covered Bridge can be seen through the trees. Finding it is another good reason to know where this road goes – the Covered Bridge Festival is September 16-17 and is a wonderful chance to relive local history. Greene County has two bridges that participate - here and in Carmichaels. If you visit White Bridge you will learn that the first farmers, traders and Baptist preachers who settled around Garards Fort in 1771 needed a fort to protect them and sometimes even that was not enough. Back at the post office, neighbors drop by to tell old stories and give the names of local historians like Joe Henry and Bill Miller who have traced their family ties back to first Baptist preacher John Corbly and his three wives. Jean Johnston, who stopped to get her mail and stayed to chat, is a relative newcomer – she and husband Walter bought the house that once belonged to Dr. Core in the 1982, but she is happy to share the old photo taken in the 1930s that was given to her by Joe Henry. “They totally filled the ground in around my house and moved the road. Now it sits below the road. See, that’s Doc Core’s car parked beside it,” The photo shows the road before it was straightened and a big bump of land by the Corbly Memorial Baptist Church was removed. According to Joe Henry, some of that bump was used to fill in around Dr. Core’s house and office in 1940. “Not a lot of people still remember, but it was called Morris Hill.” Joe’s father Columbus Henry began his career in one-room schoolhouses – Moffatt, Bald Hill, Davistown, Titus, Keener and Wiley Hill, and then taught history for 42 years at Bobtown High School. “Our land has been in the Henry family name since 1842 and I was born in the same house as my grandfather, right here in town.” Joe’s collection of old photos have been copied, swapped and shared with other Garards Fort descendants and relatives over the years. “My father was born in 1907 and he told me he watched while they built the brick school in 1924.” Columbus also helped lay out the property lines when U.S. Steel’s Robena Mine was buying land to build the Garards Fort portal, one of seven in the area, in the years before World War II. “He was the same age as Tom Headlee’s dad Russell. They went to school together and Russell was a teacher too.

Judy Grimm takes a letter from rural carrier Lydia Clark who usually has a car full of packages to deliver now that neighbors are shopping online. The inside of this little post office still has its antique mailboxes in place and on display as a tribute to how things used to be. GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


This is what Garards Fort used to look like in the 1950s, across the street from the John Corbly Memorial Baptist Church.

Tom’s mother Edith was a Strosnyder and the family donated the land where the school was built.” Russell was a teacher who also had a portable sawmill. Son Tom Headlee, who is retired from the county’s Office of Deeds, picks up the story. “The Headlees go way back in Greene County.” Three times great grandfather Ephraim came from New Jersey to Mt. Morris in the late 1700s and by the mid 1800s there was a Headlee farm a few miles from Garards Fort. Russell used his portable sawmill to build a house in town “in 1928 or 9” and turn the family into urbanites, Tom adds with a grin. By 1947 the family had moved from Garards Fort to open a sawmill and build the town of Headlee Heights near Mapletown, but Tom still remembers going to school through 8th grade in Garards Fort. “There were two of us in first grade and the school had only two rooms.” The school closed in 1964 and has been well maintained. It is now the township building slash community center, where the supervisors do business, residents come to vote and kids can play in the well fenced in front yard. A good view of Garards Fort has always been from the high ground where the Corbly Baptist Church now stands (see related story on page 8). A photo from Tom’s scrapbook shows the Atlantic gas station once owned by Irving and Mattie Fox that offered mechanical work, inspections and was also a little general store. The building is still recognizable by its upstairs porch where Irv and Mattie lived, but the next two buildings – another grocery store and the old Seaton house, are long gone. So is the log cabin Goshen Church that once sat beside Garards Fort Cemetery, up a nearby lane festooned with flags and a sign pointing the way. “I spent a lot of time in that cemetery as a kid. There used to be a line of eight giant oaks near where the church was and I can imagine people sitting under them for service when it was hot in summer. Now there’s just one tree left,” Joe says, looking around at the expanse of well-mown grass surrounding the many rows of markers. The view is spectacular and many of the stones are old and studded with lichen. There’s a mausoleum for J. Garard (one of the founding settlers for whom Garards Fort was named, related story on page 8) and a sad line of stones beside John Corbly’s marker that honor second wife Elizabeth and her three children who died from the injuries they suffered when the family was attacked on their way to church May 10, 1782. There’s a ravine to the left of the graveyard that drops down to a shady pocket of land with a tall granite marker and a mossy path leading to it. The engraved scene at the top of the stone is an artist’s rendering of a moment in time that was only a matter of horrifying minutes, a few hundred yards from the church and the fort. Men would ride out when they heard the screams and pursue the attackers, who fled down the ravine and across Whitley Creek to make their escape. One would be bearing wounds on his legs from the dog that helped save the life of 14-year-old John Corbly Jr. who managed to outrun his attacker and live to become a Baptist minister like his dad.

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

The road through Garards Fort in 1940 when it was being worked on. And that’s five-year old Tom Henry wondering how he was going to get across the street through all that mud!

“People sometimes ask why the family was walking through the woods but you got to understand their cabin was on the other side and this would have been a shortcut,” Joe says, pointing to the tree lined slope. “There’s a hill over there called Indian point and that’s where they would have seen the family leave for church that day.” Don’t let the rose colored glasses of nostalgia fool you – there was nothing easy about frontier life. But as the hundreds of descendants of Abigail, Elizabeth and Nancy Lynn Corbly prove, those who ventured here in the face of danger and hardship and stayed despite sorrow and loss gave those who survived their place in a promised land.

The old Garards Fort school, now the township building, across the road from the post office.

The house that once belonged to Doc Core, shown here in the 1930s before State Road 2011 was straightened, leveled and filled in. You can see this house today, remodeled with yellow siding, sitting at the corner of Carmichaels road.

The White Covered Bridge, seen from the window of engineer Rodney Grime’s coal train that runs from Kirby Mine to Alicia on the Monongahela River.

The lane to Garards Fort Cemetery where members of the Corbly and Garard families are buried alongside other early settlers.

The granite monument that sits in a ravine behind the Garards Fort Cemetery commemorates the Corbly family massacre on May 10, 1782, only a few hundred yards from the log church and fort. The full story has been preserved in first hand accounts, now online as part of the history of Reverend John Corbly and his descendants.

7


JOHN CORBLY MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH

N

o, this isn’t a photo from the yearly Corbly reunion when descendants of Reverend John Corbly’s three wives gather on these same steps for a group shot. This is the congregation of the John Corbly Memorial Baptist Church in Garards Fort, happy to pose for posterity on a sunny Sunday morning. Under the ministry of Reverend Bob Whipkey, membership is growing and vacation bible school is back for a second summer. And yes, that’s a stuffed bear in the front row, part of the VBS “S’mores for Jesus” camping theme. The pulpit is still draped with camping gear this morning and the kids will be singing songs they learned this week, a testimony to a faith that has kept the focus on family for more than three centuries. You are cordially invited to join them any Sunday at 9:30 a.m. and share some fellowship. This stately brick church was built sometime in the mid nineteenth century – a framed photo upstairs(also shown here) shows quite a crowd spilling across the front lawn flanked by horses, buggies and some very early automobiles. Plaques in the basement note that it was remodeled in 1901 and a basement was carefully dug under the stone foundation in 1954. Reverend John Corbly descendant Bill Miller guesses “the present church is at least the third if not the 4th generation building. Goshen was started in 1773 and Corbly had built up the congregation to 167 in 1792.” The original Goshen Baptist Church sat up the road and up the hill from the settlement’s fort and a plaque along the road shows where the fort once spread its outer walls to take in settlers when danger struck. A trim white house sits there now and all that remains of the tunnel that lead underground to the stockade is a mound of earth covered with flowers. “We have a copy of the minutes of the first organizational meeting of the church in 1773,” church deacon Dave Reid said. For those who settled this land in the 1770s, Goshen was their spiritual promised land, brought with them from the Crown colony of Virginia. The Baptist faith was founded in England in the 1600s as a break away from the Anglican Church. It gained popularity with hard working but poor frontier settlers who viewed Anglicans as rigid, dogmatic and wealthy. Baptist preachers were mostly self taught and charismatic, bringing to their followers the emotional message of self-determination and salvation through Jesus. Baptists and other revivalist orders like Methodists and Presbyterians found fertile grounds to grow in the New World. Fourteen-year-old John Corbly left Ireland for the colonies in 1747, apprenticed to John Rice, a Pennsylvania Quaker. During those seven years of indentured service that paid for his voyage, he learned many skills, including surveying. His first wife was Rice’s daughter Abigail, whom he married in 1754. The family eventually moved to Virginia and it was there that Corbly met Elder John Garard and found his passionate voice as a preacher under his mentorship. The established Anglican Church had little patience with charismatic breakaway preachers and Corbly was arrested at least once

for his beliefs and his compelling way of spreading the message of personal redemption. It was in Virginia that Abigail died in 1768, the year her forth child John was born. Two of Elder Garard’s sons, Jonah and Justice had gone to the upper reaches of Monongalia County Virginia to begin a settlement and establish Virginia’s rights to the land in 1771, even though surveyors Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon had drawn the Crown’s official line of demarcation in 1767, some miles south of the fort. Corbly joined the Garard brothers at the settlement and found it to his liking. In 1773 he returned to Virginia to gather up his children and came back to become the first preacher of Goshen. While visiting the nearby Muddy Creek settlement that would one day be Carmichaels, he met second wife, Elizabeth Tyler and they married that year. It would be two years before the opening salvos of the Revolutionary War would ring out in Massachusetts, but the tensions of the time were real and present dangers for frontier families. Elizabeth and three of her five children were killed in the massacre of 1782 and another daughter would succumb to her scalp wounds years later, days before her wedding. Only daughter Delilah would live to marry and move to Ohio territory and raise ten children. According to letters he wrote, Corbly was very shaken by the horror that befell his family, but managed to keep his faith and continued to establish Baptist churches, 30 in all, from Pittsburgh to West Virginia and Kentucky. The life and times of John Corbly is kept alive by his many descendants who have held reunions at the church that bears his name every last week in June since 1932. Bill Miller of Fordyce is twice a Corbly. “On my grandfather Miller’s side it goes back to John’s marriage to his third wife Nancy Ann Lynn, who was from Fayette County near Brownsville - they married in 1784. Grandmother Miller was a Minor and her family goes back to Abigail Corbly’s second daughter, who married Justice Garard.” After professional careers in Florida, Bill and wife Kathy came home to Kathy’s family farm to be near her parents. After finding the Miller family tree paperwork that his mother had researched, Bill’s interest was piqued and he began attending the Corbly reunions in 2006. Now he is the Corbly family historian, happy to be connected by blood to his favorite chapter in America’s past – the Revolutionary years that lead to the birth of a nation. “Corbly was an outspoken supporter of the rights of the settlers to have government protection for their tax dollars, and who would know that better after what happened to his family. He was a first trustee of Washington and Jefferson College and he must have been a convincing speaker because he was arrested for during the Whisky Rebellion and was taken to Philadelphia for trial. I’m glad he made it back.”

Parisioners in front of the Corbly Church today.

Old Corbly Church

8

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


W

G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

hen motorized vehicles became the main source of transportation in the late 1920s, gas stations began springing up in every rural village

and town across Greene County and America. Most if not all are gone now, but glimpses of them can be found, like this one from Tom Headlee’s extensive collection of snapshots, artifacts and family

history, much of which has already been donated to Cornerstone Genealogical Society and the Greene County Historical Society Museum. Strosnyder’s Esso Station in Garards Fort can be approximately dated by the 1930 Model A Ford coupe parked in front of the pumps. Tom Headlee knows this station well - his childhood home was right across the street and Strosnyder was his grandpa. Did Tom spend much time there as a kid? “I lived there,” is his cheerful reply. What was your favorite thing? “Ice cream!” When Tom’s dad Russell married Edith Strosnyder, the families began doing business together.

by Colleen Nelson

A contract that uncle Ray Headlee signed in 1932 to rent the station for six dollars a month is part of Tom’s collection of memorabilia. He remembers that Jay Wilson took over later and that the station was “still open in the 60s.” The signs outside and the station and its pumps can be used to locate where it stood, across the road from the yellow brick township building that was once an elementary school. Tom points to the Coca Cola sign. “That’s where the post office is now.” Back when Tom was growing up, Garards Fort had an Atlantic Station too, and each station had snacks and various grocery items to save residents a trip to town. Tom was five years old when the state road that runs through town was straightened, leveled and finally, after a very muddy spring and summer, repaved in 1940. Now cars and trucks barely slow down when they drive through a very small but historically mighty town on their way to Waynesburg, Bobtown or all those side road destinations in between. Esso has changed its name to Exxon, but as this photo attests, Coca Cola has survived the test of time.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenescene.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneScene Community Magazine can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

9


Spo r t Sh o rt s

T

Yellow Jacket Preview

he 11 football-playing members of the Presidents’ Athletic Conference (PAC) made their annual trip to Saint Vincent College for the league’s football media day. The event concluded with the release of the yearly preseason poll, which was voted upon by the assembled coaches, media members and sports information representatives. After finishing 2-8 overall last year (2-6 in PAC play), Waynesburg was predicted to finish 10th out of 11 teams for the upcoming 2017 campaign. First-year interim head coach Chris Smithley made his official conference debut and expressed his appreciation for getting the opportunity to lead the program he once played for. “I feel blessed to have this opportunity, especially to do it at the school that I chose to compete at as a student-athlete,” Smithley said. “But, I think that it’s bigger than me. I think it’s more our about our university, our coaching staff and our young men that we are coaching.” Perhaps the biggest question about the Yellow Jackets is who will appear under center. After an injury ended 2015 honorable mention All-PAC quarterback  Jake Dougherty’s 2016 campaign, sophomore Tyler Perone emerged as the go-to signal-caller down the stretch of the season. With both players expected back and healthy, the competition for the number-one spot is expected to be a heated one. “Two years ago, Jake had a really good year and played a lot of football. It was a really unfortunate injury at Carnegie Mellon where he broke his collarbone,” Smithley said. “Tyler came in and did some really good things last year. That will be a good battle, but we are excited because we bring eight quarterbacks into this year.” Smithley was joined on the campus of Saint Vincent College by senior linebacker  Brent Blacharczyk, who is a returning honorable mention All-PAC selection. He was asked what Waynesburg needs to do to return to the top half of the conference standings. “I’ve said this since day one, we need to finish. Whether we are on the field running our last sprint or working out in the weight

10

room, we have to finish,” Blacharczyk said. “You have to make that tackle. You have to get that last yard. We have to finish.” The day ended with the unveiling of this year’s PAC preseason poll. Thomas More was chosen to repeat as conference champions after receiving 23 of a possible 33 first-place votes and accumulating 345 total points. Washington & Jefferson grabbed the number-

two slot with 308 points (six first-place votes), while Case Western Reserve rounded out the top three with 302 points (three first-place votes). Waynesburg will kick off its 2017 season on Saturday, Sept. 2, with a road game at Muskingum. Kickoff is scheduled for 1 p.m.

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


Art Blast on the Mon

A

rt Blast on the Mon will be presented again – for the 12th year – on Labor Day Weekend in Greensboro. The festival is ONE DAY only this year, Saturday, Sep 2, from 10am – 6pm. Certainly Greene County’s most artsy gathering, this festival is popular for the interactive activities presented by a variety of artists and involving many different media. There are “trythis” activities that can be enjoyed by all ages. Interactive artists on the schedule this year include Linda Metzler who will be engaging participants in a leather project; Potter Steve Belovich who will help you get your hands in clay; Michele Sloan will demonstrate candle making and how to construct bird houses from recycled books, and yes you’ll get to try it too. Glass artist Annette Johnston will help you experiment with color and shine; and Dana Bell will have you creating keychains and pins from caps. Art Blast traditions such as Hillbilly spin-art, face painting and balloon art will also be available. Certain to be a popular is a new interactive presentation by Pittsburgh Filmmakers/Pittsburgh Center for the Arts and Teaching Artist Leah Lavrinc. You’ll want to see Leah to create your own unique embossed aluminum ornament or pendant! Materials and tools will be provided, all you need to provide is your imagination!  Leah Lavrinc has been a Teaching Artist with PF/PCA since 2013.  She is passionate about facilitating art

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

experiences with students of all ages while exploring variations of color, pattern, form, and shape in both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional work. Pittsburgh Filmmakers/Pittsburgh Center for the Arts is the regional Arts in Education Partner with the PA Council on the Arts, providing vital arts programming to schools, nonprofit service agencies, and community organizations working with children and adults in Allegheny, Beaver, Greene, and Washington counties. The live music at Art Blast on the Mon is also one of the festival’s best attractions. This year’s schedule has several acts back by popular demand and some new sounds: 10am – Eighteen Wheels and a Crowbar 11am – Red Turtle String Snappers Noon – 3pm – Bourben Street Band 3pm – 6pm – Vibrations Band The food offerings always rise above common festival fare at Art Blast. This year members of Nathaneal Greene Community Development Corporation, the organization that stages Art Blast every year, will be serving Greek Salad and Ham BBQ sandwiches. Close to a dozen vendors will on site offering everything from 24 flavors of soft-serve ice cream to wine. Crafts and art will also be for sale. Funding for Art Blast on the Mon is provided in part through the Community Foundation of Greene County and the Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency.

11


50’s Fest in Downtown Waynesburg

S

eptember 9, 2017 Downtown Waynesburg welcomes back for the 16th year what has become one of the most popular car cruises in southwestern, Pennsylvania. The 50’s Fest & Car Cruise, presented by Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful, Inc., typically draws 150+ classic vehicles to downtown, including a wide assortment of hot rods, street rods, rat rods, and other classic cars, trucks and motorcycles. It’s a great day of family fun, because 50’s Fest & Car Cruise is so much more than a typical car show. The festival also offers retro fun with dance contests, bubblegum blowing and Hula Hoop contests and oldies music broadcast live all day by Sponsor WANB Radio’s “Greene County Greaser” aka Doug Wilson. There are also plentiful door prizes and unique shopping and specials from many downtown merchants and restaurants. Support is offered by several local sponsors who are featured on the back of the festival’s annual collectible T-shirt. The hand drawn t-shirt art is created each year by local artist Colleen Nelson and usually features an actual classic vehicle belonging to a cruise participant. This year’s shirt features a 1971 Chevy C10 pick-up truck owned by Harold King of Waynesburg. Maintaining its original blue & white color, this unique pick-up has been enhanced with a dump bed and 4-wheel air suspension. “My dad bought the truck brand new in 1971,

12

it was his baby. He took his last ride in it to the cemetery when he passed away October 1990. He said to me, ‘Don’t ever let it leave the family’.” Harold has done just that, and keeps it looking good enough to frequently win awards at shows around the region. When we told him it had been selected for the t-shirt this year, he said, “That’s been on my bucket list for a long time…thank you!” On the t-shirt, the truck will be depicted in front of the log cabin on the grounds of the Greene County Historical Society Museum. “It’s always fun to tie in some local landmark with the vehicle on the t-shirt, and Colleen Nelson has a way of really bringing the personality of both the site and the vehicle alive. Our 50s Fest t-shirts are highly collectible, they will go on sale at the 50s Fest at 10am for just $12, don’t miss getting yours,” advises Shelly Brown, Promotions Committee Chairperson for Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful, who helps organize the 50s Fest event with a co-chair Doug Wilson and their committee of local gear heads, grumpy old men and car collectors. 50s Fest tradition also offers a collectible magnetic dash plaque free to all participants and for sale to spectators as long as they last. This year’s magnet features an exciting rally green 1969 Camaro owned by 50s Fest regular Wayne Hart of Waynesburg. “I had another 1969 Camaro 40 years ago,” reminisces Wayne, “But I don’t seem to fit in this one as well as I did back then.” Wayne likes to make you smile. And you will smile when you see this car. It’s a resto-mod, meaning it has been nut & bolt restored to original with just a few modifications. “1969 was among the most popular years, perhaps the most popular, for the Chevy Camaro, and we’re pleased to honor Wayne Hart, long-time participant and helper with the 50s Fest by featuring this car on our collectible dash magnets,” said Doug Wilson. “The generous support we receive from the downtown merchants and local businesses is what enables us to make this a free event for spectators and participants. There are no admission fees or registration fees for the 50’s Fest & Car Cruise in down town Waynesburg. Make your plans now to be there, or be square,” warns Shelly.

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


L

ippencott Alpacas, owned & operated by Phil & Lena Galing, is hosting their annual OPEN HOUSE on Saturday and Sunday, September 23 & 24 from 1:00 to 5:00pm. This popular event draws locals and visitors from throughout the region for the hands-on experience of alpaca life and fiber arts. The theme this year is “LET’S CONSIDER OWNING ALPACAS.” According to Lena, visitors will be able to explore three different situations common in alpaca ownership and how to choose right alpacas for your lifestyle and situation. “Alpaca Ownership does NOT need to be expensive,” Lena emphasizes, “Our farm has been in the business since 2005 and we still enjoy and promote ownership of alpacas. It’s an enjoyable lifestyle for everyone from young couples with children to “young” retirees that want to spend more time in nature. We are very proud to own these unique and impressive animals in Greene County. We have knowledge and understanding for new owners that will make the transition to alpaca ownership a smooth and wonderful event.” Experience has taught the Galings that “kids and alpacas are like peanut butter and jelly!” According to Lena, alpacas are more attracted to shorter “humans”. In different counties and states, 4-H kids and other youth groups have alpaca clubs that compete in local, regional and national alpaca shows and they are just as competitive as the adult shows. Children have a chance to develop responsibility when handling and training alpacas and develop a love for the animals as well. They will learn about fiber and how to make a wonderful, soft product from their own personal animals! What an accomplishment and an amazing childhood memory to offer your children. “Today’s busy lifestyles sometimes interfere with the time you have to relax and enjoy what nature provides,” Lena explains, “Having just two alpacas to enjoy will bring calming pleasure to your day. Yes, drink your morning coffee or wine at night with your gentle alpacas! You will enjoy them being near you as they quietly graze. They may even help to lower your blood pressure!” At the Open House event, visitors will have an opportunity to get their hands into the fiber and

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

learn to identify the six grades (thickness) that are made into a variety of products. All alpaca fiber is good for specific products. You’ll be able to feel the differences and get to know the actual alpacas that can provide specific products and yarns for specific needs. For those interested in alpaca ownership, you can “Meet & Greet” the alpacas that interest you. IF you knit, crochet, spin, weave, or felt fiber, this event is for you! Bring friends who may consider owning alpacas and enjoy the activities. A display of financial information showing comparisons with other livestock will be a topic of conversation also. Informal presentations will be given with a few alpacas showing handling procedures and some training techniques. Questions are encouraged. The fun and festivities of the day will be prominent as well. The hayrides are always popular for everyone. The old wagon pulled by a tractor is taken for a high scenic view of the historic farm and neighbors’ lands in Lippencott. Kids love the “Big Bale Slide” and little ones can play in the “Kids’ Hay Square”. Fiber artists will be performing live demos as they make unique & colorful creations for all to see. Beginning fiber artists are encouraged to come and enjoy teaching and helpful tips and techniques from the experts. Yarn, apparel and other products will be available for sale from vendors, and the Lippencott Alpaca Farm Store will be “stuffed” with fall and Christmas products and ideas! Touching IS Believing! Food concessions including 1st United Methodist Church, 5 Kidz Kandy and Anne’s Apple Pies will be on site serving tasty delights. Uncle Dave’s Books are very popular with young children. Last year, he presented, “Cotton Candy, The Pink Alpaca” and sold out! He will have plenty this year as well as his previous and new children’s books. This is a FREE Open House with free field parking. Bring your camera but NO DOGS! Handicap accessible. For more information, call 724852-4084. The address is 265 Meadowbrook Road, Waynesburg, PA. Take exit 19 (Ruff Creek) from I-79. Follow RT 221 South for 4 ½ miles to the village of Lippencott.

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

13


BOWLBY BITS September is National Library Card Sign Up Month - Any Greene County resident can receive a free library card with proof of residence. The library will replace damaged or lost cards at no charge during the month of September. Stop in today! Library will be CLOSED on Monday, September 4, for the Labor Day holiday. The library will reopen on Tuesday, September 5, and begin its Winter business schedule: Monday 10 am - 8 pm Tuesday 10 am - 7 pm Wednesday 10 am - 8 pm Thursday 10 am - 7 pm Friday & Saturday 9:30 am - 4:30 pm Author Book Talk - Pastor John Dorean will be sharing from his new book, “Our Girl,” Monday, September 11 @ 6:00pm. Copies of his book will also be available for purchase on that evening. Creative Crafting for Adults – September 7, at 5:00 pm. Project is a Sunflower Wreath. Cost for materials: $20. Please call library for more info at 724.627.9776. It’s Movie Night – September 13, watch “Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie,” beginning promptly at 6:00 pm. FREE popcorn and beverages! Annual Teddy Bears Picnic - Saturday, September 9, 11:00am-1:00pm. Games, crafts & reading fun -- be sure to bring your favorite stuffed friend! FREE S.A.T. Prep Classes - a series of 3 classes to be held for high school students on Saturdays, September 9, 16 and 23, from 10am - 2pm. Call to register. AFTER HOURS - for children & families on Friday, September 15, 4:00-8:00pm. AFTER-AFTER HOURS FOR TEENS - for teens 13-18yrs, Friday, September 15, 8:00-10:00pm. *NEW PROGRAM ! * BOWLBY ROCKS - Adults are invited to participate in the latest craze painting rocks! First meeting is Saturday, September 16 @ 10:00am. Bring a couple of rocks with you to paint! FLU SHOT CLINIC - Get your vaccine early! Monday, September 25, 12pm - 2pm. Accepts most major insurance companies accepted. T.O.P.S. - weight management support group meets every Sat., 9:30-11:30am. Lego Club – September 2 and 16 at 11:00am. All ages! Library provides the Legos. Bowlby Book Club – September 11 at 6:00pm. New members are always welcome! Free test prep for adults studying for SAT, GED, Civil Service exams, Drivers Licensing and Life skills, and for basic reading and math skills. Free after school tutoring for school-age children. Call to schedule appointments with the Family Literacy Department Call or stop in Eva K. Bowlby Public Library for more info or to register for any of the above events. 724-627-9776 • 311 N. West St., Waynesburg, PA 15370.

14

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

15


16

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

17


18

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


GreeneScene by Joan Ianelli

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

19


Greene: Earth and Sky

By Pete Zapadka

Two Privately Owned Spans Add To County’s Covered Bridge Inventory

W

hat is it about a covered bridge that magically seems to evoke nostalgia, visions of romance, or calm, peaceful feelings? It’s hard to pinpoint the reason for this rural sorcery, but covered bridges have been in use and celebrated for centuries, especially in the eastern United States. In Greene and Washington counties, festivals are held annually next to the intriguing structures, where artists sell their wares, re-enactors bring back memories of bygone days, historic battles are emulated and countless activities are held, often with music filling the air. The annual Covered Bridge Festival this year will be held from 10 a.m. t0 5 p.m. Sept. 16 and 17 at two of the seven remaining covered bridges in Greene County and at eight of the covered bridges in Washington County. Greene County’s celebrations will be focused on the Carmichaels Covered Bridge and the White Covered Bridge near Garard’s Fort. Each event is an entertaining spectacle into itself, well worth the attention they receive each year from festivalgoers. While activities are not held at the county’s other five public covered bridges, they are only a short country drive away for those who love to visit the diminutive viaducts once called “kissing bridges.” There’s a good chance you can guess the origin of that name. There are at least two covered bridges in Greene County, though, that generally are not in the spotlight, but they are splendid structures that add to the portrait of our rural countryside. These are privately built creek crossings that fortunate landowners use each day to go from road to home. Not far from Mount Morris, astride peaceful Big Shannon Run and just above historic Dunkard Creek, a shining red unnamed covered bridge built in 2002 by owner Bob Lemley sits below the main road. He took an existing bridge that stood since 1988 at the site and transformed it into the current eye-catching span. Lemley said it took three months of work for the metamorphosis to be complete. “It’s pretty much frame construction,” he said of the 40-foot span. It stands 14 feet high and about 12 feet wide. The floor of the bridge has narrow spaces that provide what some may consider an unsettling view of the stream below. The spaces allow “the air to come up when the wind blows really hard” Lemley said. “The pressure equalizes inside the bridge.” Lemley said he occasionally gets visitors to his bridge, and some don’t want to leave. He soon will be selling the property very soon to new owners. “They really like it,” he said. “They’re going to put up a plaque inside it that says I built it.” It will be a lasting tribute to Lemley, whose vision helped paint the countryside. In the far western part of Greene County, Wren’s Nest Bridge crosses the South Fork of Dunkard Fork of Wheeling Creek northern in

Lemley Bridge over Big Shannon near Mt. Morris.

Aleppo Township. It sits off Aleppo Road just south of Behm Road, but the lovely structure can be overlooked easily by passers-by because it sits downhill and between the trees. Owned by Rick and Eloise Davison, the Wren’s Nest Bridge is 27 feet long, 12 feet high and 15 feet wide. When a job drew Rick Davison north to the Cameron Gas Co. from their home in Georgia, he met local construction expert Fred McCracken, who agreed to do the work. It is a bridge that almost wasn’t. Construction started in October, 1990, but was stopped around Christmas – by an order served by the federal government to the couple while they were at their home in Georgia. “This black Lincoln pulled up and two nicely dressed – and armed – U.S. marshals got out,” Rick Davison said. “They were serving me a cease-anddesist order” to halt work on the bridge “and to begin to remove what I had put in there” during the past three months. The order maintained that the proper state and federal environmental permits had not been issued. The couple went though a costly permitting process that lasted about 18 months, and received the environmental go-ahead. After the delays, the bridge was finished in 1993. A sign on the bridge credits the blacksmith work to Cameron Tool, now Camforge, and cites McCracken with construction and design, but some of the saw work was done by Martin Geho of Garrison. McCracken, who died about four years ago, at the time said Paul Mathews of Cameron, W.Va., did the excavation. The structure is held together not by nails, but by wooden pins. Davison said the bridge, which so nicely fits into its bucolic location, has drawn a lot of attention. He laughs when he recalls the visit of the Theodore Burr Covered Bridge Association in 2001.

Wren’s Nest Bridge in Aleppo Twp.

“Some of their members got knowledge of the bridge and project,” Davison said. “They wanted to have a ‘bridgefest,’ and they wanted us to host” what became a wildly popular event. “We had dozens of cars come up this driveway. Folks going by later

told Eloise that they thought we had one heckuva funeral up here,” he said. What a vivid illustration that is of our collective love for covered bridges. Greene County is fortunate to have two more to fan our passion.

Pete Zapadka is a Greene County property owner and a retired local news editor at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. He can be reached at pzapadka@yahoo.com.

20

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

21


Greene County Rabbit Show Winners

Long Time Volunteers Honored

Alexus Grecoe Rabbit Scholarship

Rabbit BIS & RIS

Showmanship Winners

Washington Health System Greene operations VP Terry Wiltrout was on hand to honor GCMH Auxiliary volunteers with achievement pins at their yearly luncheon this summer at Waynesburg University. Seen here with Terry are, from left, Helen Gusic, Mary Zolars and Alice Souders, who have a total of 17,793 lifetime hours to their credit as Escort and Gift Shop volunteers at the hospital and at the Cherry Door thrift shop, 103 W. High St.

Waynesburg. The auxiliary needs more volunteers, especially at the Cherry Door, because donations need to be sorted and hung have been pouring in and it takes a staff of two to open each day. Applications for all volunteer positions can be picked up at the Cherry Door six days a week from 10 a.m. – 2:45 p.m. Call 724-627-6291.

Stuff the Bus

Nearly 200 rabbits were entered in the annual Greene County 4-H Rabbit Club Show held during the Greene County Fair. American Rabbit Breeders Association Judge Brock Meanor, center, selected Alexus Grecoe’s Dutch rabbit entry as Best in Show and Cara Longstreth’s Holland Lop rabbit for Reserve in Show. Showmanship judge Debbie Smith from Westmoreland County, judged club members in their individual showmanship presentations. Winners are pictured (L-R): Cara Longstreth – Senior 2nd year Plus.  Cara was also named as the Rabbit Master Showman, Jenna Longstreth – Junior 2nd year Plus,   Deakin Whipkey – Junior Novice and Elania Mayle – Senior Novice. During the show, Alexus Grecoe was also presented with the 5th Annual Greene County Rabbit Leadership Scholarship award of $500. Alexus, a

2017 graduate of the PA Cyber Charter School, will be attending Westmoreland County Community College this fall to major in Sonography. The scholarship, a private fund, was established in 2011 by Melody Longstreth and Amber Mankey, club leaders at the time, to reward all graduating seniors from the Greene County 4-H Rabbit Club. One of the first recipients, Christa Ziefel (2013) recently graduated with a degree in Special Education and was hired and will be begin this fall in the Bentworth School District. Emily Shultz (2013) is completing her education degree at Indiana University and will graduate this coming December with a degree in Early Childhood and Special Education. Lindsey Gilbert (2016) is majoring in Sociology of Deviance at California University and will also graduate this December.

Ribbon Cut on New Operations Center

Customers and employees of First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Greene County recently donated more than a dozen bins and bags worth of school supplies for Greene County United Way’s 15th annual “Stuff the Bus” campaign. Supplies from backpacks and lunch boxes to notebooks and crayons, as well as monetary donations, were collected at First Federal of Greene County’s Waynesburg, Carmichaels and Mt. Morris offices and at the Waynesburg drive-thru. Supplies and donations were also collected at 20 other sites around Greene County. Backpacks full of supplies were loaded on a

22

school bus and distributed during the “Stuff the Bus” picnic held on Aug 16th at the JC Pavilion at Lions Club Park in Waynesburg. Students boarded the bus to select a backpack, and enjoyed free food, activities and library books. This year’s “Stuff the Bus” campaign was sponsored by First Federal of Greene County. Pictured with the collected school supplies are (L-R): First Federal of Greene County Senior Vice President/Treasurer Chad Moore, employees Chrystal Allison, Lauren Weaver, Jordan Brooks, Ted Bearer and Sandy Wood, President/ CEO Judi Goodwin Tanner and Greene County United Way Executive Director Barb Wise.

Members of the Board of Trustees, Executive Officers and local dignitaries are posed for the official ribbon cutting ceremony at the new Ralph J. Sommers Jr. Operations Center of Community Bank, now open at the EverGreene Technology Park in Waynesburg. Construction began just last summer on the 22,500 sq. ft. facility named in honor of Community Bank’s Chairman of the Board and former CEO Ralph J. Sommers Jr. The stunning new building is now home to approximately 70 Community Bank employees who were formerly housed in various other locations. “The comfort and security of our employees was a guiding principle in the design of the building,” said President and CEO Pat McCune. Special features such as “quiet rooms,” a spacious dining facility and large, bright working spaces are evidence of that. Architects for the mulitmillion dollar project were SASI Inc., Mark Viola, Susan Viola and Doug Baker and the general contractor was Nello Construction. GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

23


PICTURE PUZZLE WINNER Jon Bunch Jon correctly guessed Cotton Candy as the hidden picture last month. He is excited to take a trip to Kennywood with some special people. Have a great time riding those rides! 24

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


Steps Inside & ByCommunity Recovery Colleen Nelson

Ready to help with recovery, from left Community Recovery chair Bob Terry, Bird House facilitator Bonnie Fisher, Jen’s Second Chance Oxford House president C.J. Porter and Cumberland Oxford House president Steve Bruno after a Monday Community Recovery meeting at Steps Inside.

S

teps Inside, Greene County’s addiction and recovery house has been doing good work in the community for more than 15 years. What started as a place to draw strength from others for alcohol - AA - and narcotic – NA – addiction recovery has branched out. In the last decade America has been plagued with an opioid epidemic that is killing users at an unprecedented rate and ruining the lives of many. Services have been slow to catch up with community needs, especially in rural areas. The good news is, more help is available for families and those struggling with alcohol, heroin and prescription drug addiction, thanks to the tireless efforts of Community Recovery volunteers who meet every Monday at 1:30 p.m. at Steps Inside, 1790 Morris St. Waynesburg to find new ways to support prevention, treatment and recovery. Steps Inside formed this committee four years ago to “see what we could do in the community,” past president Bob Terry said. After helping host a first town hall meeting at the Greene County courthouse in 2014, the committee joined with law enforcement, human services agencies, businesses, schools and the community to take action. Calling itself Coalition for a Brighter Greene, these active citizens network with the recovery committee to host the annual town hall meeting to keep the community informed and solicit suggestions for better services. Together they organized a march against opioid addiction in 2015 and began to make themselves known to state and national officials. Recovery committee members man booths at many community events and even put a float in this year’s Coal Show to keep the spotlight on the event, Terry, now chairman of the committee, said. “Our most significant achievement is to shine a light on the problem. It’s not a secret any-

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

more! The disease that has ravished our community has been recognized and is being dealt with using the best tools available.” Another equally remarkable accomplishment has been the services that the committee’s Monday afternoon brainstorming sessions have helped bring to Greene County. “We’re involved in the five school districts with an evidence based prevention program and created video and writing contests for students to address prevention and risk factors,” Terry said. It took donations, fundraisers and untold volunteer hours, but the county now has three long-term living houses based on the international Oxford model, for men and women in recovery. Members live democratically, follow the house rules of clean living and pay the bills and rent themselves, Terry said. All this good work has not gone unnoticed. Steps Inside Community Recovery has been invited to be part of the Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Prevention’s kickoff for National Recovery Month Wednesday September 6 in Harrisburg. It will be a chance for those who go to do some lobbying about three important needs in Greene County: a detox center at the hospital, a half way house for those coming out of detox to live in a structured environment for the time it takes to become “clean” and support for intermural activities for all kids in the county to prevent them from turning to drugs when there’s “nothing to do.” “So far, we’ve done all this at a grassroots level. Now it’s time for the government to work with us and give us the support we need to go forward,” Terry said. For more information about Steps Inside and the recovery committee or to volunteer to go to Harrisburg and tell your story, call 724-8525395.

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

25


Raider Alumni Game

Molly Cheek posts this picture of the selftitled Lady Raider Softball Team “Vintage Edition”, as they posed with the current Lady Raiders before a recently played match-off game. Molly writes, “Ok so the score was 2-1 Waynesburg

Flood Relief

The recent flooding in parts of western Greene County and of our neighbors in Hundred and Littleton, WV has had a devastating and long term effect on many families and businesses in our area. Volunteers are still needed to help with clean-up and repair of the structural damage. Donations of supplies are still welcome. Donation of labor and equipment in hauling, carpentry, construction as well as re-building supplies are needed. There is a volunteer center attempting to coordinate such efforts located in Hundred, in the building that previously housed the State Police Barracks. It is located on Rt. 250 near the public library across from the Hundred High School. Alumni team won, but truly we all won because it Food, cleaning and other supplies are now being was a lot of fun and a great turnout!” The vintage stored and distributed from a different location, team is in grey, in case you couldn’t tell. Also pic- approx. 3 miles south on Rt. 250 in Burton, WV. tured are coaches Jim Armstrong & Ed Cross in This building was formerly known as Core’s Discount Center. back, and a future Lady Raider on the side. Free meals for victims and volunteers are be-

Rain Day Scene Past Identified Joanne Marshall, Director of Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency recognized and shared with us the names of the girls in our Rain Day Scene Past from last month: “The Rain Day Scene of the Past is Kimberly Keller (left) and Michelle Thompson (maiden names, I am not sure of married names as I knew them as kids). Thanks for the info Joanne – we might as well name ‘em as we give this fun pic another go round, and thanks for the smiles Kimberly & Michelle!

ing served daily by community volunteers operating from the Hundred United Methodist Church on the corner of Church & Oak Streets. Monetary donations are also accepted, and accounts have been set-up at both of the financial institutions in Hundred. Checks can be made payable to Hundred/Littleton Disaster Relief Fund and dropped off or mailed to either First Exchange Bank in Hundred, PO Box 780, Hundred WV 26575 or to Union Bank, PO Box 810, Hundred WV 26575. If you or anyone you know sustained any damage to your property, home or business, no matter how minor – as a result of the flooding, you are strongly encouraged to call this number provided by the state of WV, 1-844-WV FLOOD, and report your damage and/or circumstances. This reporting will help official agencies and sources of potential help or funding accurately assess needs and therefore influence possible grants.

New Greene County Gifts

American Pickers Mike Wolfe, Frank Fritz, and their team are excited to return to Pennsylvania! We have word that they plan to film episodes of the hit series AMERICAN PICKERS throughout the region in September 2017. They’re back looking for sizeable, unique collections, and have sent out an invitation to anyone who has a large, private

collection or accumulation of antiques that the Pickers can spend the better part of the day looking through, to contact them. Send your name, phone number, location and description of the The Greene County Tourism has office accollection with photos to: americanpickers@ quired new merchandise for purchase: A pink, cineflix.com or call 855-OLD-RUST. facebook: @ green or gray t-shirt featuring the names of locaGotAPick. tions that form the letters of “GREENE” designed and produced by Direct Results. A Carmichaels Covered Bridge Crock designed by Colleen Nel-

4-H Plat Books On Sale!

4-H in Greene County is offering a tremendous deal on its plat books. The plat books were originally $30, but we are now letting them go for $10. These plat books were created as a fundraiser for the 4-H program in 2011. The books contain outlines of all properties in the county and

if the property is 10 acres or more the owner’s name is listed in the index. If you are interested in obtaining one of these limited edition publications, stop by the Penn State Extension office at Penn State Cooperative Extension in Greene 26 West High St., Waynesburg, PA 15370. Cash/ County is accepting applications for the 2017 check gladly accepted. Master Gardener Program. The program consists of a volunteer training course designed to provide home gardeners with information and skills necessary to share their knowledge with others. nonprofit board volunteers and employees, the Weekly classes are held Thursday evenings, benonprofit leadership program explores leader- ginning October 5 and ending the first Thursday ship, governance and boards of directors, finan- in March. Classes are held at the Penn State Cocial management, team work, strategic planning, operative Extension Office in Waynesburg. After completing the classwork, the candipublic relations, resource development and volunteer engagement. Registration is $150 with a dates will become Interns. During this time they limited number of partial scholarships available. will perform 50 hours of volunteer work under FMI-Community Foundation of Greene County the supervision of another Certified Master Gardener. Once the 50 hours is complete, the Intern 724-627-2010 or cfgcpa@gmail.com

Community Builders The 14th series of Community Builders of Greene County will begin on August 28th. The eight session program will meet on alternating Mondays through December 11th from 5:308:30pm at the Community Foundation office/ meeting room at 106 E. High Street, Waynesburg. Applications available at http://cfgcpa.org/commbuilders.html. Providing training for

26

son and created by Adamson Pottery also joins the selection. To purchase your Greene County Gift, stop by the office at 19 S. Washington Street, Waynesburg or purchase online at www.VisitGreene.org.

Master Gardener Classes will become a Certified Master Gardener. To maintain certification, Master Gardeners must complete 20 hours of volunteer service an 10 hours of continuing education annually. Volunteers participate in community activities, including education, pollinator monitoring, youth education, fair display and more. The program fee is $200. This includes the Master Gardener Manual which was updated and revised last year, training materials and other expenses. Applications are being accepted until September 13. FMI: 724-627-3745 or visit the Extension Office at 26 West High Street, Waynesburg.

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


Lily Bee’s Unique Country Collections

N

o one can deny the seasonal appeal of Greene County, Pa, when nature springs to life with colorful flora, then verdant summer landscapes followed by breathtaking fall foliage. Railroads, covered bridges, rolling hills, rivers and streams…and there’s more. We are seeing a welcome trend with increasing visitors not only discovering our beauty, but also enjoying our attractions and shops. It’s not such a stretch anymore to see out-of- town shoppers taking that exit off I-79 to explore our one-of-a-kind artists’ offerings, specialty shops and unique places in Greene County that rival some of the more popular shopping destinations in the country. For those of us lucky enough to live here, we only have to go as far as downtown to find extraordinary shopping, with the new Lilly Bee’s at the top of our list. Haven’t heard of Lily Bee’s yet? Read on… At the Perfect Arrangement on High Street in Waynesburg, we have decided to create a store that offers product lines that have never before been available in our area. We are committed to creating a floral and gift shop on par with those in the quintessentially charming parts of the country. We have visited more than 50 renowned gifts shops, from Waynesburg to Maine to Texas, to find the most desirable products, the most appealing displays, and the most indulgent experiences. Now we are proud to introduce Lily Bee’s, a unique and indulgent shop that will operate alongside The Perfect Arrangement floral shop. We have renovated the entire space, added authentic antiques to display merchandise, and also added more than 20 new product lines. So far, the response has been overwhelming, and we are committed to continue adding new and exciting products, to improve the ambience, and to create an even more extraordinary experience for our visitors. Our amazing, creative designers enable us to customize all of our products. Their ability to combine florals (both fresh and silk) gives them a creative advantage over other shops. We can combine home

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

décor, soaps, lotions and candles, gourmet foods and more, with silks and fresh arrangements – all displayed in a custom container of your choice. You can even bring in items of your own… like jewelry, wine or “that special something” and our designers will merge it into a gorgeous presentation. And it’s not just for the ladies. We have the incredibly masculine Duke Cannon line of personal care products, soaps, shave creams & beard balms creatively arranged in such appropriate containers as tackle boxes, ammo cases and tool boxes. Our gift baskets are perfect for any occasion. They will be cherished and enjoyed by any recipient, and never viewed as a “last minute’ gift decision. Meet our Designers Floral Designer Dory Daniels Eddy’s energy and talent is playing a big role in the many exciting changes you’ll discover when you visit Lily Bee’s at The Perfect Arrangement. “I love making vintage items become fresh and new, and we’ve really been doing some great “picking” recently, bringing back our finds and giving them new life as country décor for your home,” Dory says. She’s also introduced a new line of Bath & Body products and candles to the store. “We now have Michel Design Works – a very popular line of high quality lotions, creams, soaps and candles that are luscious, good for you AND still affordable,” Dory exclaims. Gifted designer, Gwen Wendell, says, “People often bring in pictures or fabric swatches so we can customize something just right for their space.” This team is creating awesome furnishings out of old mantels, pedestals, crates, ladders, screen doors, and even distressed, re-purposed kitchen chairs “Whether you have your own items that you’d like to have woven into a design, or you are looking for that perfect piece, that’s the beauty of this extraordinary store - it’s like no other,“ says Floral Manager Janet Hopkins. There is a corner of this unique shop dedicated to sympathy and

funerals, with so many meaningful ideas and special ways to share your love during difficult times. Daily delivery for all merchandise is offered to all of Greene County and beyond. And remember, it doesn’t have to be a holiday or special occasion to send a gift. You can bring a smile to someone’s face today. It just takes one call to 724-6273191. Or better yet, treat yourself with a visit to Lily Bee’s, then you’ll be smiling, too. Hours of operation have expanded to 9am- 6pm Monday –Friday, and Saturdays 9am-4pm.

27


T

CFGC Awards $12,500 in Summer Grants

he Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) recently announced a distribution of grants totaling more than $12,000 as a part of CFGC’s summer grant cycle. As a part of the grant cycle, twelve (12) organizations received funding as a part of the Community Grant program. Funding for the grants was provided primarily via the Foundation’s unrestricted Bob Braford Fund and Forever Greene Fund, as well as distributions from the Cindy’s Wind Fund and Consol Energy Excellence in Education Fund. Additional support was provided by the Futures Fund, the Good for Greene Fund, the Fund for Arts & Culture, the Fund for Community and Economic Development, the Kathleen Hamilton Davis & William R. Davis Memorial Fund, the Fund for Children & Youth Services, and the Fund for Health and Human Service. CFGC Board Chairman, Dr. Morris Harper, voiced his excitement regarding this latest distribution: “We are privileged at the Community Foundation of Greene County to be able support these programs and innovations. Educating our youth, assisting those recovering from illness, and bringing new cultural opportunities to Greene County are the desires that lay at our heart.” Congratulations to the following recipients: Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Western PA - $1,000.00 The development of a county’s youth is among its highest priorities, laying a path to success for future generations by ensuring the efficacy of their education in the present. In recognition of this, a $1,000 grant from the Forever Greene Fund is awarded to the Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Western PA for their school-based mentoring program. Bobtown United Methodist Church - $500.00 The Community Youth Outreach program at Bobtown United Methodist Church provides a chance for children in Greene County to build healthy relationships in a safe, encouraging environment. A grant of $500 with support from the Futures Fund and the Forever Greene Fund is awarded to go towards this program. Coalition for a Brighter Greene - $2,000.00 In order to more effectively combat the dangers of substance abuse, it is imperative that Greene County students receive the best education in substance abuse prevention possible. With support from the Good for Greene Fund, a Life Skills Substance Abuse Prevention Curriculum will be made available to three different school districts within Greene County. Flenniken Public Library - $1,000.00 In a world where technology-based skills drive innovation, familiarity with computer coding is an invaluable skill. Flenniken’s “Camp Code” after-school program, then, will offer Greene County students an opportunity to create wonderful new constructs while learning practical skills. Support for this grant was provided by the Forever Greene Fund. Greene County Historical Society - $2,000.00 This grant will bring the “Stone to Steel Native American Cultural Weekend” program to Greene County. A chance to experience living history, the arrival of this program is made possible by support from the Good for Greene, Arts and Cultural, and Forever Greene Funds. Laurel Highlands Council, BSA - $500.00

28

In recognition of the incredible importance of a well-rounded young population to a county, the Laurel Highlands Council will receive a $500 grant for its Comprehensive Youth Development program. Support for this grant was made possible by the Forever Greene Fund. Nathanael Greene Community Development Corporation - $1,000.00 The ability of art to inspire new works of innovation and creativity while bringing individuals together in a common effort is well-known. The Nathanael Greene Community Development Corporation’s Art Blast on the Mon program provides an opportunity for all of these wonderful benefits to take place here in Greene County. Support for this $1,000 grant came from the Forever Greene Fund. SOAR of Greene County - $500.00 Greene County’s beloved Aviation Day is an opportunity for residents of all ages to experience the incredible benefits of having a local airport. This year’s program will be supported by a grant with contributions from both the Community and Economic Development Fund and the Forever Greene Fund. STARS Foundation - $2,000.00 The Community Foundation of Greene County is glad to support the STARS Foundation’s efforts to make a safe, educational environment available for Greene County’s most beloved residents. With their Support for this grant was derived from the Kathleen Hamilton Davis & William R. Davis Memorial Fund, the Children Youth & Families Fund, and the Forever Greene Fund. Washington Hospital Foundation - $1,000.00 In order to provide safe, economic transportation for WHS Greene patients post-operation, the Washington Hospital Foundation’s Patient Transportation System will enter its second phase. Support for this grant was made possible by the Health and Human Services Fund, and the Forever Greene Fund. Greene County Career & Technology Center $500.00 As students at the Greene County Career and Technology Center continue to grow in their understanding of their future profession, it is absolutely essential that they have access to the latest in technology and learning resources. Thanks to a

grant made possible by Consol Excellence in Education Fund, those hopes will be realized. First Assembly of God Church - $500.00 It is imperative for any healthy community to support and encourage its young women as they grow into adulthood. Thanks to a grant made possible by the Cindy’s Wind Fund, First Assembly of God Church’s “Girls Impact” ministry will be able to provide that critical developmental resource to our community. These grants are just part of more than $275,000 in grants and scholarships awarded dur-

ing 2016 through various endowed designated funds, donor advised funds, scholarship funds, and the Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program grants and scholarships. Since 2001, CFGC has been able to award $3 million in grants and scholarships that have helped meet the needs and improve lives of Greene County residents. For more information about CFGC, visit www.cfgcpa.org, or email cfgcpa@gmail.com.

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


A

Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall

scaled replica of the Vietnam Memorial is coming to the Greene County Fairgrounds in September thanks to support and donations from the local community. The Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall will arrive with a motorcycle escort on Wednesday, Sept. 27. Assembly will take most of Wednesday with the Memorial available for 24-hour viewing beginning Thursday morning. The last day for viewing is Sunday, Oct. 1 with disassembly of the wall beginning Monday morning. Rick Black, veteran of the Vietnam War and Senior Vice President of VFW Post No. 4793 spearheaded the project beginning in February of 2016. Once the wall was secured and the fairgrounds obtained, thanks to the Greene County Commissioners, the Greene County Salute to Veterans committee was formed to organize the event. Black is the chairman of the committee. Black’s goal was to offer the opportunity for the tri-state area to honor and recognize those that made the ultimate sacrifice in the Vietnam War. Especially since not all can make the trip to see the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, D.C. “I hope that people will be able to take the opportunity and honor those that made great sacrifices so that we could have a better life,” said Black. Currently, the committee has discovered nine individuals from Greene County listed on the memorial. One of the individuals, Glenn Chalfont Hopes, attended Jefferson-Morgan Elementary with Black in third through fifth grade before grad-

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

uating together from Waynesburg Central High School in 1964. “He was a real nice and kind of quiet guy,” Black said. “Anyone that knew him says the same thing.” Services are scheduled beginning with an Opening Ceremony on Thursday, Sept. 28 at 6 p.m. with music by Heaven Bound Ministries, posting of colors and a fly-over. Vietnam veteran and Purple Heart recipient Donnie Martin will be speaking. A Recognition Ceremony for Saturday, Sept. 30 at 1 p.m. with music by the American Legion Band, posting of colors and a fly-over. The speaker will be Thomas Stokes, clinical social work/therapist from VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System. The Closing Ceremony is scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 1 at 6 p.m. with music provided by Sandy Huffman and prayer led by Rev. Don Wilson. Prior to the closing ceremony, a patriotic concert, “Warriors Rock!” will be held at the Waynesburg Central High School at 3 p.m. The concert organized by Shelia Stewart will offer tickets for sale at $10 each. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. was unveiled on July 22, 1982 and dedicated on Nov. 13, 1982. As of Memorial Day 2015, there are names of 58,307 fallen from the war on 72 panels. The names are listed by date of injury or casualty

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

beginning with 1959 to allow service members who died together to forever be linked according to the Memorial designer, Maya Lin. The list begins and ends at the middle of the Memorial. The Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall is a 3/5 scaled replica that stands six-feet tall in the center and covers almost 300 feet from end to end. The replica is part of the Vietnam and All Veterans of Brevard located in Brevard County, Florida. Anyone that wishes to volunteer their time to assist with assembly and disassembly, motorcycle

escort, security, parking or name location searches are asked to call Rick Black at 724-998-0598 or Donnie Martin at 724-350-7841.

29


A True Fire Truck Fanatic By Danielle Crooks

Ladder 64 From 1987 to 2011, Ladder 64 served the Borough of West Reading. The 1987 Seagrave Quint, has since appeared in many TV shows & movies, most recently while in the private collection of George Demchak. It is shown here during a filming in New York City. During his time with the famous firetruck, George invited Facebook readers to follow the truck’s acting career @findladder64. Today, Ladder 64 is back in service with the Morrell Volunteer Fire Company in Dunbar, PA.

A

couple months ago, we featured a sign with a miniature fire rescue truck perched on top as our GreeneScene Contest. Our winner recognized the site of the sign on Taylortown Rd. in Dunkard Twp., but in our follow-up, we didn’t share the sign’s real purpose: to serve as a welcome sign to the home of the Demchak Family, which is also home to one of the most amazing collections of fire trucks and emergency service vehicles in the region, if not the entire country. Here’s the story… For George Demchak, it’s a family hobby. It’s a hobby that brings his whole family – wife Lora, sons Brandon and Ryan, daughter Ashley, and Dalmatian Mackcee – together, and has allowed them to go on several interesting adventures. Collecting fire trucks and restoring them at his home in Greene County, PA has taken George and family to many different movie sets around the country, given them the opportunity to meet quite a few celebrities, and has furnished him with some great anecdotes. George’s interest in fire trucks started at a young age. “It’s in my blood,” George says. “I grew up in Crucible and went to school in Carmichaels. I spent a lot of my time around the fire department.” He joined the fire department when he was old enough and spent the next thirty years working as a paramedic. He also worked construction for a time before finally finding his way to the coalmine, where he worked for four years. In 2007, however, George’s life changed drastically when he was involved in mining accident. He was crushed by a long wall shield, which resulted in the loss of his right leg. The accident left him out of work and with a long recovery ahead of him. The long recuperation period left him with a lot of recreational time but not a lot to do with that time - until a close friend suggested George start collecting fire trucks. So George did. He began his collection of fire trucks and emergency vehicles. His first truck purchase came from Staten Island in New York. It was a tower ladder truck from a man that claimed the truck had been “used in some movies.” Heedless of the significance of that comment and the truck’s unlikely past, George bought the truck that was known as Ladder 64. He exchanged information with the man in case someone would ever need it to be used for film or television and then started off for home. By the time he got here, two emails were waiting for him requesting Ladder 64, and the adventures began. Eventually, George got a call from a movie studio asking if he could bring Ladder 64 to Harlem, New York to work on the film The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, starring Ben Stiller and Kristen Wiig. The movie studio would pay all the expenses involved in the trip; George just needed to bring Ladder 64. To keep himself company, George brought along one of his sons and headed for New York. The first day filming lasted twelve hours and didn’t get all the needed shots, leading into another day of filming on Memorial Day. During down time in the course of filming, George was able to get a

30

chance to talk to Ben Stiller and get a picture. Afterwards, Stiller allowed his son to go over and explore the fire truck. Before too much exploring took place, “A blonde lady came running over excitedly to see what was going on, “ George says. It was Christine Taylor, Stiller’s wife. “She wanted to go for a ride in Ladder 64 and so we took the truck out into Manhattan, sirens blasting, traffic pulling over to get out of the way. Then Ms. Taylor wanted to do the same thing on the way back, so we did all the way back to where they were filming and interrupting the movie,” he laughs. Some of the other movies and television series in which Ladder 64 and George’s other vehicles have been featured are: The Amazing Spiderman, Salt, White Collar, Law & Order, Royal Pains, Rescue Me, The Get Down, and John Wick 2. Recently, the studio producing Shades of Blue, starring Jennifer Lopez and Ray Liotta, has contacted George because they might have a need for some of his trucks. However, Ladder 64 won’t be doing the traveling with George anymore. “Ladder 64 is actually back to work and is now part of the Morrell Volunteer Fire Company in Dunbar, PA,” he explains, “I’m sad to see it go, but I really do have my hands full with all the other vehicles…and I’m working on The Demchak family dog, Mackcee, sitting with George’s entire collection of fire trucks, ambulances and emergency vehicles. several restorations.” Like any vehicle left out in the elements, fire trucks begin to rust, their paint and decals begin to fade, and parts begin to dry out. Except, unlike most other vehicles, the parts on fire trucks, especially the older and rare ones, are much more expensive and difficult to replace. As George began to expand his collection even further, he needed a place to house the trucks. So he built his own fire station to house his increasing number of fire trucks, complete with mementos and souvenirs. Rubbing elbows with the stars. George with his wife, Lora, and son, Ryan posing with the likes of Ben Stiller and Kristen Wiig on the set of their new film “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.” Currently, his collection numbers at ten vehicles and includes Salem, PA, the Western PA Fireman’s Association parade in Monesa 1971 customized Chevy Ambulance from Raleigh, a rare 1973 Warsaw fire truck originally from sen, PA, and more. He’s also glad to take the trucks to local charity events, and often takes his vehicles to local Touch-A-Truck events. Queens, and a custom Can-Am Snow Rescue vehicle. When he’s not on set at filming locations, George participates George says, “I really enjoy taking the trucks out. I’d love to be able to in a variety of local events. His fire trucks can be seen at the King do something with Make-A-Wish. I’m always willing to help someone Coal Parade in Carmichaels, Good Neighbor Days in Bruceton, WV, fulfill their dreams.” Pumpkinfest in Confluence, PA, New Salem VFD Hog Roast in New GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017


GreeneScene by Colleen Nelson

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

31


32

GreeneScene Magazine •

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2017

Aug Sep GreeneScene 2017  

See all of the 4-H presenters and buyers in this post-fair issue of the GreeneScene Community Magazine. The 4-H gives a BIG Thank You for ev...

Aug Sep GreeneScene 2017  

See all of the 4-H presenters and buyers in this post-fair issue of the GreeneScene Community Magazine. The 4-H gives a BIG Thank You for ev...

Advertisement