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A RUNNER'S SPRING STYLE GUIDE P47

WHY I RUN: THE 1970s RUNNER DIDN'T KNOW ANY BETTER P54

NEVER SAY NEVER

INSIDE THE MIND OF DEFENDING CANADIAN MARATHON CHAMPION

ROB WATSON REMEMBERING

EMILIE MONDOR

THE ROAD TO RECOVERY

PATIENTLY MAKE YOUR WAY BACK TO THE STARTLINE

ON PACE

KRISTA DUCHENE’S GREATER PLAN P16 THE BLACK TOE CURSE

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WAYS TO AVOID IT

IN LIVING COLOUR

ADD A SPLASH TO YOUR RACE SCHEDULE WITH A COLOUR RUN

NEXT!

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER YOU’VE COMPLETED YOUR ‘A’ RACE?

PLUS!

UP SPEED ONGER,

GET STR NGER RUN LO FROM TIPS COACHING ITES P21 THE EL

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2014 ISSUE 03 EMILIE MONDOR: COURTESY OF SFU ATHLETICS / BROOKS PURECONNECT 3: COLE BURSTON


TABLE OF CONTENTS

EMILIE MONDOR: COURTESY OF SFU ATHLETICS / BROOKS PURECONNECT 3: COLE BURSTON

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SPRING STYLE GUIDE A little something for every type of runner

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PUBLISHER & EXECUTIVE CONTENT DIRECTOR Lisa Georges lisa@iRun.ca 613.238.1818 x230

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COPY EDITOR Karen Karnis CONTRIBUTORS Anna Lee Boschetto, Cole Burston, Andrew Chak, Krista DuChene, Rick Hellard, Ben Kaplan, Patience Lister, Karen Karnis, Bridget Mallon, Joanne Richard, Heather Roe, Robert Shaer, Mark Sutcliffe, Ray Zahab PROOFREADER Bridget Mallon WEB EDITOR Anna Lee Boschetto anna@iRun.ca

FEATURES

CREATIVE DIRECTOR & DESIGN Tanya Connolly-Holmes creative@greatriver.ca

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GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Sarah Ellis Regan Van Dusen ADVERTISING SALES Jenn Price jenn@iRun.ca 613.238.1818 x252

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GROUP PUBLISHER Mark Sutcliffe mark@greatriver.ca SUBSCRIPTIONS 613.238.1818 x248 subscribe@greatriver.ca iRun is published six times per year by great river media inc. 250 City Centre Ave., Suite 500 Ottawa, ON K1R 6K7

By Karen Karnis COVER PHOTO BY ROBERT SHAER

Give it a tri It’s spring and time to set a few new goals. Tri-curious? Go for it! By Kaydi Pyette

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CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Mark Sutcliffe

Who was Emilie Mondor? Remembering an Olympian and champion of Canadian women's running By Bridget Mallon

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PRESIDENT Michael Curran CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Donna Neil

The road to recovery How to take it and come back strong By Joanne Richard

VICE-PRESIDENT OF SALES Terry Tyo Canada Post Publications PM#41639025 Postage paid at Ottawa, ON Return undeliverable Canadian and other addresses to iRun: P.O Box 3814, Station C Ottawa, ON K1Y 4J8

COVER I’m Rob Watson and iRun

IDE P47 STYLE GU 'S SPRING A RUNNER : RUN WHY I RUNN ER THE 1970s ANY DIDN'T KNOW P54 BETTER

E ON PAC ENE’S

DUCH KRISTA PLAN P16 GREATER

E K TOE CURS THE BLAC

NEVER SAY NEVER

WAYS TO

5AVOID IT

MIND OF N ADIA INSIDE THE ING CAN DEFEND ON CHAMPION MARATH TSON

ROB WA

BERING REMEMMON DOR EMILIE

AD THE RO VERY TO RECO E YOUR WAY

G IN LIVINUR COLO

SH TO YOUR ADD A SPLA DULE WITH RUN RACE SCHE A COLOUR

NEXT!

PENS WHAT HAP YOU’VE AFTER YOUR ED COMPLET‘A’ RACE?

LY MAK RTLINE PATIENT THE STA BACK TO

! PLUS

D UGPER, SPESTERO N ER

GET N LONGFROM S RU G TIP

STARTLINE 9 Black toe curse Five ways to avoid runner’s toe 10 The Obsessive Runner The pit of the long run By Andrew Chak 11

The Director’s Chair Canada Running Series Race Director, Alan Brookes on the charitable side of an event.

12 At the races In Living Colour: a guide to Canada’s colour runs iRun VOICES 14 Running is my teacher Fuel your running the right way By Ray Zahab 15 Feet don’t fail me now Running is not superficial...it’s spiritual

By Ben Kaplan

16 On pace Part of a greater plan

By Krista DuChene

Get iRun | Digital edition FREE

54 Why iRun The 70s runner: the spirit of today's marathon By Mark Sutcliffe NUTRITION 18 Are you iron deficient? Recipe: Whole Wheat Spaghetti with Clams TRAINING 20 EachCoach and iRun Coaching tips from the elites to help iRunNation reach their spring goals (and beyond) 21 Oops Factor After the big race By Rick Hellard RACE CALENDAR 45 A round-up of summer events across Canada GEAR 47 iRun’s spring style guide: An outfit for the runner in all of us

Check out the iRun Raceboard starting on page 35

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ADVERTISING FEATURE

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Seek inspiration from Canada’s best athletes at the Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame

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Chase down delicious curbside cuisine at one of Calgary’s famous food trucks @yycfoodtrucks

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We know you run fast, now try your hand at speed skating on the world’s fastest ice at the Olympic Oval

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Tour the wild frontier of beer and find out why the Wild Rose Tap Room has been voted Calgary’s favorite pub for the past 6 years

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After a long run, waddle along with the Penguins at The Calgary Zoo.

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Bikes, canoes, and rafts, oh my! Visit Rapid Rent in Eau Claire Market and spend the day rafting the Bow River or exploring the 700kms of urban bike paths

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From sidewalks to rooftops, take in Calgary’s patio culture and soak up one of 332 days of sunshine in style

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Slow down and soak it in, Calgary Walks offers guided tours of Calgary’s vibrant neighborhoods

THINGS T O

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CALGARY S

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CALGARY MARATHON

C e l e b r a t i n g 5 0 Ye a r s R u n n i n g J u n e 1 , 2 0 1 4 9

Laugh until your belly hurts at Calgary’s Funnyfest, May 29 – June 8

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Eat like an Olympian and check out the Main Dish’s options for healthy eating on the go

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Take in the best view of the city from Scottman’s Hill #capturecalgary

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Stop by one of eight Running Rooms located in Calgary for any gear, advice or clinics

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Stroll Stephan Avenue and take in the sights and sounds of the many talented buskers and street performers

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From running in the city to running with the buffalo, the Head Smashed in Buffalo Jump is just one of four UNESCO World Heritage Sites around Calgary Pack a picnic basket and relax on

2014 ISSUE 03

Prince’s Island Park, or head to the River Café and grab a gourmet basket prepared with all your favourites 16

Catch live music at one of Calgary’s eclectic venues such as the Ironwood, Palomino, Blues Can or Wine Ohs

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You’ll run through Sunnyside, why not stop in and visit Aviv Fried at the Sidewalk Citizen and try one of his famous sandwiches

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They grow it, then cook it. Be sure to stop by Downtown Food and Rouge restaurant for meals that took months to plan

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Celebrate Heritage Park’s 50th Anniversary and visit the brand new Famous 5 Centre of Canadian Women

Spend an evening on Prince’s Island Park and take in what are considered the best plays ever written at Shakespeare in the Park

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Kick off an evening at Loose Moose, Calgary’s improv theatre delivers a new show every night

Looking for a little extra energy, stop by and sip on locally roasted coffee at Phil and Sebastian Coffee Roasters

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Beat the heat with a cold treat from Village Ice Cream or Fiasco Gelato

C e l e b r a t i n g 5 0 Ye a r s R u n n i n g J u n e 1 , 2 0 1 4

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ADVERTISING FEATURE

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Try fly fishing on the world renowned Bow River in central Calgary.

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You’ve raced your friends on foot, now race them down North America’s longest Skyline Luge track

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Restore your depleted salt levels with authentic Dim Sum for breakfast in Calgary’s Chinatown

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Play eye-spy from the top of the Calgary Tower and take in the beautiful landscape of the city

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Explore a diverse collection of wines at Calgary’s Vin Room

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Kick back and relax pool side at Hotel Arts Raw Bar

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Change out of your running shoes into a brand new pair of handmade boots from AB Boot Company, Canada’s only Western Boot Factory

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All aboard! Tour the Glenmore Reservoir on-board Heritage Park’s S.S. Moyie paddle wheeler Race down the Olympic bobsleigh track, twisting, turning and traveling at speeds up to 100km/h on WinSport’s summer bobsleigh experience Calgary culture comes alive at the EPCOR Centre, take in a live theatre performance and see the best our city has to offer

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Go say hi to Tonto, the world’s largest synthesizer at the National Music Centre

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Ever wanted to walk on air? Be one of the first to check out the new Glacier Skywalk 280 metres above the Sunwapta Valley

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Get sideways and check out the world’s largest skateboard park, Shaw Millennium Park

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Run from prehistoric predators at Dinosaur Provincial Park

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Soar through the sky on North America’s fastest zipline from the top of WinSport’s Canada Olympic Park ski jump tower.

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Take in Western Canadian culture and meet the men and women that shaped Alberta at the Glenbow Museum

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Walk along the historic Stephen Ave and see why Calgary is dubbed the

sandstone city for its architecture 41

Head downtown and check out Wonderland at the Bow and Peacebridge

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Relive memories at Olympic Plaza downtown and celebrate your success where the medal presentations took place during the XV Winter Olympic Games

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Shop til you drop at one of three shopping centres—CrossIron Mills, Chinook Centre, or The Core downtown.

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Exercise your mind at Canada’s newest science centre Telus Spark

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Take a walk down 17th Avenue and stop in and see our friends at UNA pizza

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Shake off the goose bumps following your ride on the Vortex at Callaway Park

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Staying a few extra days? Be sure to head down to Spruce Meadows and check out the Canadian Show Jumping Championship

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Take some well-deserved R&R, and check into one of Calgary’s many luxurious day spas for some pampering

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make sure to treat yourself to a meal out in one of Calgary’s nationally renowned restaurants

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Share your experience with us on Social Media using #capturecalgary

The National Post called Calgary “Canada’s next culinary capital”,

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OBSESSIVE RUNNER 10 DIRECTOR'S CHAIR 11 NUTRITION 18

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STARTLINE

Ways to avoid

Music that moves you For Art of Dying front man Jonny Hetherington, running is a much needed outlet – one that helps him get into the creative zone, especially when he’s writing. It’s no surprise that when Music Heals executive director Chris Brant approached him about joining their fundraising team, Hetherington couldn’t turn it down. “Through the power of music, our fans around the world have been affected,” explains Hetherington, “and using music as therapy makes a lot of sense in my world.” Supporting music therapy programs and initiatives, this year Music Heals has established a team of musicians including Hetherington who will participate in the Charity Challenge at the Scotiabank Vancouver HalfMarathon on June 23. Learn more about Music Heals and find out how you can support the team at musicheals.ca.

F

RUNNER’S TOE

requently plaguing runners, black toe or “runner’s toe” often happens to those logging extra kilometres. But while this blister that forms beneath the toenail isn’t pretty, it’s no reason to slow down.

So why does it happen to some runners but not others? According to Pam Mazzuca Prebeg, BSc, a personal trainer and athletic therapist based in Toronto, the most common cause is ill-fitting shoes. “HAVING A SHOE FITTED BY A PROFESSIONAL IS INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT, you need to speak with staff who are well-trained in this area,” she says. Most importantly, the shoes need to be snug enough to prevent movement, while having enough space in the toe-box to prevent friction. Prebeg offers up four additional prevention tips that can help you keep your feet in top shape.

GET AN ASSESSMENT.

Make an appointment with a chiropodist who will be able to assess your gait along with determining if you require orthotics to help keep your foot in place.

LACE UP.

While lacing your shoe is a matter of personal comfort, Prebeg suggests using the extra hole at the top of the shoe which can help reduce the movement of your foot, especially as the laces loosen on longer runs.

PRIME PROTECTION.

Use petroleum jelly to reduce

TOP TIP: KEEP YOUR TOENAILS TRIMMED ! the friction between your toes during long runs. You can also purchase toe protectors which will separate your toes.

HEALTHY STEPS.

Keep your toenails trimmed and soak your feet in a postrun Epsom salt foot bath, especially if you know you have a predisposition to it.

In the long run Turns out establishing healthy habits, including regular physical activity, has a lasting impact on your fitness levels nearly 20 years later. According to research recently published in the journal Psychology of Sport and Exercise, which surveyed 500 men and women over an 18 year period, individuals who

were physically active early in life were more likely to not only be physically fit later in life, but were also more likely to have developed better eating habits. Interesting findings that could be incorporated into preventative health programs that focus on encouraging everyone to be more active.

Jonny Hetherington is anything but your run-of-the-mill rocker. Visit Celebrity Treads at iRun.ca for his story. iRun because I am a mom, and I want to teach my youngest daughter strength, discipline and the sweet taste of achievement earned only by hard work. — Suzanne Conner, Ontario

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STARTLINE kilometre is just so sweet and effortless. This is the easy-peasy kilometre, the one I tell myself that I’ll need to repeat 20-30 times over.

HALFWAY TO AWESOME

THE PIT OF THE

My positive disposition usually takes me to the halfway point. For the most part, I’ve kept on pace and being the paranoid fool that I am, I’ve probably banked a little time by picking up my pace What get you through at various points. As I work the long run? The halfway point always through the halfway mark, my gets me through. I know head nods in self-satisfaction that if I can make it to with a bit of an “aw yeah” and the halfway point it's all a fist pump in the air. To the downhill from there! Easy casual observer, it looks like breezy from then on! — Melinda Roy, AB I am cheering myself on and they are absolutely right.

LONG RUN How do you push through to the end? By The Obsessive Runner, Andrew Chak

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recently had my worst long run ever. BE THE MORNING GLORY It was a late afternoon 29K and it There are days when I foolishly opt sucked. There was snow, there was not to do my long run first thing in the ice, and there were puddles, which meant morning. These are bad days. As I go about there was mud. And then there was wind. A doing whatever it is I am doing, I find that I lot of gusty, mind-numbing, why-do-I-do-thisam constantly muttering to myself, “Why am to-myself wind. It was a long run and the worst I doing this? I should be running.” If there is part was the fact that it felt long. an activity I need to attend to, But I’m glad I did it. I cannot help but ask myself, What get you through the long run? In fact, I just had to do it. In “When is this going to end? I Knowing there is a my brief history of running, I should be running.” And as I drive grande light foam have never, ever regretted doing around from place to place, I skinny vanilla latte my long run. But it’s a haphazard inevitably see runners everywhere waiting for me at the journey to get to that end point doing their long runs and I end with my running where you can say that you’ve scream at myself, “Why aren’t friends. — Maureen done it. I out there with those people? I McAndrew, ON should be running!” To avoid such selfPLANNED embarrassing screaming, I make the effort to COMMITMENT wake up early and head straight out the door. Every long run that I do starts the night Mornings are when my legs are well rested and before. I plan my route, charge my GPS I can be fresh as a daisy and a lot less anxious. watch, lay out my best running gear, fill my hydration bottles, and even untie my shoelaces. I get everything ready so that THE FIRST SPLIT IS I have no choice but to hit the pavement THE SWEETEST because everything is all set up for me to go. Getting out there and hitting the pavement Being the feeble-minded, weather-sensitive is an invigorating feeling. With a long run runner that I can be at times, I need to time in mind, my first order of business is to remove any minor barrier that may prevent precisely hit my desired pace for my first split. me from hauling my butt out that door. This is where I feel light on my feet as that first

INTO THE PIT

And then it happens bit by bit, split by split – my pace starts slipping a second here, a second there. I feign ignorance and courage but my GPS watch reminds me otherwise. I’m descending into the dark pit of the long run where I am being swallowed up by my time. Mentally, I shift gears, reminding my legs to run faster but it feels like I’m on a slow moving treadmill. My internal panic voice goes off and I start questioning myself: Why can’t I sign up for shorter race distances? Why did I pick a sport that involves suffering? Why didn’t I take up soap carving instead? The descent is brutal, but there is a way out.

CLOSING THE GREATEST GAP

After running for a couple of years, I figure out a contributing factor to descending into the long run pit: running it alone. When I run with just one other person I feel like I can’t let them down, which means that I have no choice but to keep pace. As it turns out, the greatest long-run gap for me is the one between my ears and when I run with others, closing the gap is that much easier.

THE FINISHING AFTERGLOW

And then it’s over. Whether I hit my pace or not, finishing my long run is always a winwin situation. Why? I gain regardless of the outcome. When I do hit my pace and time, I’ll celebrate by posting a selfie of my GPS watch results. But even if I’m not tweeting like I crushed it this time, I know that my body has learned to run for an extended period of time, which also means that I’ve grown my mental capacity to run for that duration. So no matter how your long run goes, just know that you always gain something out of it. See more from The Obsessive Runner on iRun.ca.

For more inspiration from iRunNation visit iRun Magazine on Facebook. 10

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iRun because I was told I would not be able to because of bad knees and asthma. To prove to my daughter and myself that you can do anything if you apply yourself – Crystal Worthington-Dunbar


FROM THE DIRECTOR'S CHAIR

BY ALAN BROOKES

Running for a reason Alan Brookes of Canada Running Series explains how charities can benefit from today’s digital landscape. PHOTO BY IAN MURCHISON

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ith runners gearing up for the season ahead, Alan Brookes, Race D irector for Canada Running Series and the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, shares some of the added benefits that come from running for a cause. Although the Canada Running Series has always included a charitable component, in the past decade Brookes has witnessed the growing connection between events and local charities. Here’s the low-down on why you need to hit the ground running and raising funds in your community.

RUNNING FOR EVERYONE

Running brings us all together and the Canada Running Series wholeheartedly believes that runners of all levels should have equally opportunity on the course. With races in major cities throughout the nation, at Canada Running Series it’s about building that community connection throughout the year, which not only appeals to a broader audience, but it has given community-based charities, a terrific platform. There’s no doubt that running has become more mainstream. And if we’re going to continue to grow and thrive, then we need to maintain a relevance in communities all year long.

“Charity runners are healthy lifestyle runners who take it one step further by making their neighbourhoods a better place.” — Alan Brookes MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD

There are a lot of media types out there who are running, and they are key influencers, which is one of the main reasons the Canada Running Series established the Media Challenge. There’s no question that the media plays a key role in delivering important messages about healthy living, community and charity building. We thought it would be fun and it’s another way of engaging people and getting them involved. Not to mention that media folks tend to be a pretty competitive collective, which not only drives fundraising goals to epic proportions but also shines the spotlight on neighbourhood organizations, further contributing to community awareness.

GOING DIGITAL

With social media strengthening the connection among the running community, the Canada Running Series Digital Champions program has been a great success

for fundraisers and driving awareness around organizations. It lifts the level of exposure exponentially for several months as you interact with others. Along with continuing to build the Digital Champions program, which includes the Yonge Street 10K and the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, by partnering with EventsOnline.ca, mid-sized and smaller charitable organizations also gain the benefit of the online fundraising tools that are necessary for a successful campaign. It opens a new platform for organizations such as local food banks and youth programs. Taking this multi-platform approach to fundraising, the Canada Running Series plans to continue to extend its reach to audiences. We would like to see a move from an online broadcast to a televised one for the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. We’re a part of the community, opening the roads to people and our reach can be much greater than a few hours.

Want more? See The Obsessive Runner’s ‘The Little Hashtag That Could‘ at iRun.ca. iRun to keep myself sane! — Bobbi-Jo Lodewyks, Manitoba

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AT THE RACES

In Living

C lour 4 With bold and brilliant hues abound this season, ’colour runs’ are continuing to make a major splash across the nation. Check out these seven races that take a back-to-basics approach to running, reminding us that it can really be all about having fun.

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Supporting the Easter Seals Society’s children’s camp programs, the Splash of Color Run (April 19) takes place in Vernon, Kelowna and Victoria B.C. Along with the Easter hues, this family fun run includes plenty of chocolate, children’s entertainment and a visit from the Easter Bunny at the finish line. splashofcolor.ca

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Billed as London, Ontario’s most colourful run, the Colour Fun Run (June 21) offers kids of all ages the opportunity to run through the Graham Family ECO Park. With all proceeds going to Childreach, a family support center for parents with young children, it’s also a great way to support your community. colourfunrun.ca

Celebrating global health, happiness and individuality, this summer The Color Run is spreading the joy across the nation, with events cropping up in big and small locations including Kitchener (June 14), Calgary (August 30), and Montreal (August 16). Rounded out with a music festival with full-on colour throws, it’s a post-run party that you won’t want to miss. ca.thecolorrun.com

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A cross-country event, The Burst of Colour Run (July 21 ) will take place for the third year running in Rosemary, Alberta. Along with being dosed in five vivid hues, registered runners can look forward to brunch at the finish line. burstofcolorrun.com

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Get the whole family up and running at Colour Me Rad where children seven and under participate free of charge. With more events cropping up in cities across the nation including Saskatoon (September 6) and Regina (September 14), you’ll be happy to note that part of the proceeds are donated to local charities. colormerad.com

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With fundraising supporting the Canadian Cancer Society, Colours of Hope is family-friendly noncompetitive five kilometre event that takes place in cities across Ontario. Along with the usual blasts of colour, this is a great way for families and friends to band together in support of a good cause. cancer.ca/coloursofhope

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Bringing Dye Nation to Toronto (June 7) Run Or Dye is a five kilometre event that gives runners a blast of colour at every kilometer. Using eco-friendly cornstarchbased dye, the race culminates in a tie-dye festival where you can colour the sky in vivid hues. ca.runordye.com

Looking for more race information? Visit the iRun Calendar on page 42. 12

2014 ISSUE 03

iRun to be happy! — Janice Luke-Smith, Ontario


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RUNNING IS MY TEACHER

RAY ZAHAB, COLUMNIST

Fuel your running the right way From coconut oil to pre-salted potatoes, iRun’s Runner-in-Chief runner gives you the scoop on how he fuels his expeditions.

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hen it comes to my long running expeditions, I’m frequently asked what I eat. It’s a great question that has a simple or complex answer, depending on where I am. Along with the weather conditions, it also depends on whether I am on an unsupported, self-contained journey, without outside assistance. Of course, everyone is different, and what works for one person won't work for another, but I can share a bit about what's worked for me. Remember to experiment as part of your training since fuel strategy is an important part of any race plan. During the 2009 South Pole Quest Expedition, my buddies Kevin Vallely, Richard Weber and I each hauled sleds weighing 185 pounds to the geographic South Pole. We had everything we needed to survive in our sleds, and that included a very high-calorie food supply. Richard Weber designed our nutritional program and had included a custom pemmican and amazing macadamia/chocolate combination that I could eat all day. For added energy, the majority of our food was very high in fat and carbohydrates, which gave us more calories per gram of food. In Siberia, which was also unsupported, Vallely and I opted for dehydrated foods during the almost 65-kilometres per day of running and hauling our 100-pound sleds. During our run we ate a custom energy bar made up of ground almonds, almond butter, maple syrup, coconut oil, oat flour, salt, and date paste. While

it sounds weird this energy bar tastes awesome. During supported expeditions such as the Atacama Desert in Chile or the Gobi Desert, I am meeting a crew every 15 to 30 kilometres with a maximum unsupported distance of 50 kilometres. Depending on the weather and terrain, I can move faster without a sled and aim for between 65 to 75 kilometres per day and I rely on local food or what my team has. But during the run I am drinking a hydration solution that I custom mix depending on the climate, along with the custom energy bar. If my support team can find potatoes I will carry some pre-salted ones in my pack. Salted potatoes are an excellent nutritional source for any weekend long run, or for supported or unsupported races, because they are easy prepare, convenient to carry and provide salt and potassium when the body is needing it the most. Although I do my very best to eat as healthy as possible on these longer projects, during the 34 days of running in Mongolia’s Gobi Desert I did have to make some sacrifices. My day to day diet of vegetables, fish and beans would give way to whatever was the best meal option. For my clients, I always recommend they find which foods work best for them during their training. That means that if you feel potatoes are a good option for that ultra marathon, then practice eating them on your training runs. Some of my clients take a small

A fuel strategy is an important part of any race plan.

baggie of mini boiled potatoes coated lightly in olive oil and a dash of salt but others swear by energy gels. Pre-testing is key, you need to experiment and find what your body is satisfied with and can tolerate before race day. Otherwise, it can be a recipe for disaster. On our latest project in Baffin Island we relied on dehydrated foods which we combined with coconut oil. We chose organic brands with fewer ingredients, and

used the custom energy bar mixture. My wife Kathy also made us energy cookies with honey, tahini and sunflower seeds which we ate before even starting. Whether you’re running a half marathon or a 5-hour training run, there are plenty of ways to fuel up. So find a recipe or two that interests your taste buds, make up a batch of energy bars and give them a try on your next run. Your body will tell you very quickly what works best for you.

Join #WorldRun Wings for Life Ambassador Ray Zahab and iRun in supporting this unique global event. 100% of race entry fees go toward Spinal Cord Reserch. Find out more at iRun.ca and register to run for those who can’t.

Where will next expedition take him? Atacama! Visit impossible2possible.com to find out more! 14

2014 ISSUE 03

iRun to be with friends and to keep my sanity. — Deborah Walsh, Prince Edward Island


e!

PEOPLE AND PLACES

BEN KAPLAN, COLUMNIST

Running is not superficial. It’s spiritual. Melissa Mancini is a shining example of a 'typical' runner.

E

veryone has a hard time when they start running. There are a million reasons why today is not a good day to begin. Thoughts about being laughed at, looking funny, not having the right social status, the right personality, or the right body to

iRun to be healthy! EachCoach: iRun because I love it! — Rob Tolman, Ontario

be a runner have curtailed many a would-be runner’s hopes before they ever lace up a shoe. Melissa Mancini, 27, is the antidote to that kind of negative thinking. Born with Down Syndrome, Mancini began running last February. She started because she was sick and

tired of being overweight and insecure. “It took a lot of hard work, but I did it,” says Mancini, who has since lost 54-pounds, completed a 5K race and is currently training six days a week for her first 10K. “I started living it, running, and that got me motivated. Suddenly, things started changing – I had more energy for my life.” Running isn’t about race times or fancy sneakers, winning loads of money or finding the perfect form. Sure, all those things are fantastic, and as you set out on your running quest there are plenty of interesting goals to pursue. But Melissa brings up a fundamental point about why we even bother running. It’s not superficial. It’s spiritual. And it’s something that came to light when Self magazine published their snarky comment about a pair of runners last month. In their goofy version of a “Do’s and Don’ts” section, the author derided Monika Allen and Taramae Baize for running in colourful tutus. About that, there were two things that the magazine missed: 1) the women were smiling; and 2) Baize is a brain cancer survivor, hence she and her girlfriend ran dressed up as superheroes. Needless to say, the blowback was loud. Because this flies in the face of the spirit of running. The point is: what a runner wears, what a runner looks like, where a runner is from or is going, doesn’t matter. What matters is that people – like Rhonda-Marie Avery, a blind

runner who will be taking on the Bruce Trail this summer; or Dick Traum, the amputee who started Achilles Canada, which aids people with strokes, autism, multiple sclerosis and just about any disability – are running. There is no “type” for a runner. And the perfect time to start running is now. “I really didn’t know how Melissa would do, I just knew from myself, when I started running 18 years ago to quit smoking, how good it made me feel,” says Ellie De Sousa, Melissa’s mother-in-law, who helped begin Melissa on her quest. “With Melissa, it’s been amazing, and I don’t just mean the running, but the healthy eating and the overall lifestyle change.” Ellie De Sousa is the race director of the Bread and Honey race in Mississauga, and like most races, her event features a 1K Fun Run. Most people reading this magazine will already be runners. But maybe there’s someone you know who could use a lift up. A Fun Run is the perfect place to begin. But for Melissa, those days are long gone. She’s already taking on eight kilometres on her long runs, and she rightly feels very confident about her 10K in May. It’s no surprise, then, what the future has in store for this runner: a half-marathon. “I feel strong. I feel proud of myself. I feel happy,” says Melissa. “Fear is normal, but one thing I’ve learned during this whole process – you don’t have to be afraid when you run.”

National Post and iRun have partnered to deliver advice from the pros to you, the everyday runner. See page 21 for more! iRun.ca

15


ON PACE

KRISTA DUCHENE, COLUMNIST

Part of a greater plan Even with finely tuned training plans in place, it pays to have a back-up plan.

W

hen things don’t go exactly as we expect, it can be very disappointing and frustrating, especially for athletes. We plan ahead, implement the training, and believe we’ll succeed. We’ve done it before and presume we can do it again. However, we all know that some things aren’t within our control. While we set our initial goals and don’t want to settle for anything less, sometimes we need to lean on a back-up plan. After ten marathons in 11 years with three kids, I’ve learned to be content—and sometimes have pleasantly surpassed my expectations— with the occasional execution of the back-up plan. Holding back on a workout, cancelling a race, or taking an unplanned day off may seem terrible at the time but we must control our emotions, be objective, and always remember the big picture. Here are three ways in which I’ve implemented a successful back-up plan.

KEEP PUSHING THE POSITIVE

When Lanni Marchant and I returned from running the 2012 Rotterdam Marathon and began the appeal process for a spot on the Olympic team, we needed a back-up plan. In preparation for a decent race, marathoners need a good 12-week build. Although we had to keep training should we get to race in London, we didn’t want hard work to go to waste if we lost the appeal. As a result, we planned to run a fall marathon. Once we learned we would not run at the Olympic Games, I quickly dealt with the disappointment, took a week of easier running, and focused on 16

2014 ISSUE 03

what was ahead. THE RESULT: Acknowledging my feelings and taking a break allowed me to move forward with more passion than before.

UNEXPECTED CONDITIONS

After collapsing with heat exhaustion while competing in the 2013 World Championships Marathon in Russia, I had a choice to make. On the one hand, I could dwell on the disappointment with the knowledge that I could have possibly achieved a decent placing if I had adjusted my pace to the sweltering heat. On the other, I could focus on the positive realizing that I recovered quickly, wasn’t injured, and was one of 23 who did not finish the race. As my first ever DNF, it was humbling but I decided that I was not going to let hard work go to waste. I was in the shape of my life, both physically and mentally healthy. After discussions with my coach and husband, the plan to run a fall marathon was set. With amazing food and great relaxation, I also opted to thoroughly enjoy a planned 10day European vacation with my husband, which left me feeling refreshed and ready for the hard training ahead. THE RESULT:A few months later, at the 2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon Lanni Marchant and I broke the 28-year-old Canadian marathon record, becoming the fastest two female marathoners in history.

FOCUS ON THE LONG RUN

In planning for a strong and

Lanni Marchant and Krista DuChene (right) at Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon 2013. PHOTO BY SANDRA LAURIN

“After ten marathons in 11 years with three kids, I’ve learned to be content—and sometimes have pleasantly surpassed my expectations— with the occasional execution of the back-up plan.” fast spring for 2014, my coach and I decided that running a fast 10,000 metres on the track in California would be an excellent goal. That said, we also included the back-up plan which meant not risking injury. In the middle of a brutal winter, which included two weekly early morning runs in -30˚C temperatures, not to mention very poor footing, my body started telling me that it was pushed to the limit. Due to the conditions, easy runs became difficult, wreaking havoc on my legs. After discussion with my coach, we put the 10,000-metre race plan on the back burner.

THE RESULT: I got in some speed work that will eventually benefit me, while avoiding the trap of pushing too hard too soon, which aligns with my long-term goal of making it strong and healthy to the 2016 Olympic Games. Whether we fall short of a goal or succumb to an unexpected injury, we can all learn from our setbacks. And while moving forward may not always be easy, having a back-up plan can not only help you stay focused on your greater goals but also give you a lift when the road you’re on surprises you with an unexpected turn.

iRun because I sit in a cubicle all day and look forward to the open road, fresh air and scenery. — Wendy Tokeson, Ontario


Visit your local Sports Experts store to check out more of Saucony's award-winning styles.

iRun.ca

17


NUTRITION

BY PATIENCE LISTER

Running away from iron deficiency

W

hen running becomes harder than usual– exhaustion sets in easily and muscle cramps take hold more frequently–many runners overlook the obvious: their iron levels. Iron deficiency is more common for endurance athletes than many of us realize, and depending on how extreme the deficiency is, consequences can be huge. Canadian triathlete Paula Findlay unknowingly suffered from iron-deficiency anemia until her devastating last place finish in the London 2012 Olympics raised red flags. Iron has a direct effect on athletic performance and maintaining healthy levels is crucial for all runners – elite and recreational. Caela Fenton, Queen’s University varsity crosscountry athlete, unknowingly

suffered from iron deficiency during her first year of university. “I was tired all the time. I had just moved away from home for the first time; my residence bed was certainly not as comfy as the one at home; the training program of university varsity cross country far exceeded what I’d been doing in high school; the social scene had me staying up later; the academics had me working harder…in other words, I had every reason to be tired, so I didn’t think anything of it,” describes Fenton.

Runners need iron

70 per cent of iron absorbed into the body is used to build oxygen-binding proteins called hemoglobin and myoglobin. Hemoglobin transports oxygen throughout the bloodstream, fuelling the

Holy Iron-rich clams Batman!

production of energy in cells. Myoglobin oxygenates muscle fibres, powering each cycle of contraction and relaxation. The remaining iron is used in enzymes or stored as ferritin to provide a buffer when intake is low. “When you have your iron checked, ensure your doctor looks at both your hemoglobin and ferritin levels. Hemoglobin is always checked but ferritin isn’t necessarily,” says Patricia Chuey, a BC-based dietitian. When iron levels are low enough to decrease hemoglobin production, it is diagnosed as iron-deficiency anemia.

Symptoms of deficiency

With iron-deficiency anemia, feeling sluggish from a lack of oxygen is not the only problem

for runners. Lactic acid is not flushed from muscles effectively, the immune system becomes more vulnerable to infection, endurance goes down, and the time it takes to recover from each workout gets longer. Fenton experienced this first hand. “Despite training harder than I ever had in my life, I wasn’t improving. In fact, as the season progressed, my times got slower and slower. So I tried harder…and felt even more tired,” she said. “I told my coach, and as soon as the words ‘I’m tired all the time’ came out of my mouth, he told me my iron was low. ‘That can’t be it, I’ve taken a supplement every day since the summer’ I responded. ‘Trust me,’ he said.” Cont’d at top of page 19

Whole Wheat Spaghetti with Clams 3 ounces of cooked clams have 24 grams of iron. They are also a great source of protein, calcium, zinc and omega-3 fatty acids. Makes: 2 servings 225 g whole wheat spaghetti 3 tbsp of olive oil 1 clove of garlic, sliced 1 red bell pepper, diced 1/3 cup white wine 1 medium can of baby clams (approx. 142 g) 3 tbsp of chives, chopped 1 tsp fresh ground pepper In a medium pot, bring water to a boil. Add spaghetti and cook until slightly tender (al dente). Drain. In a large pan, sauté garlic and bell pepper in olive oil on medium heat for about 1 minute. Add wine and clams, then simmer gently for 5 minutes. Mix in chives and pepper. Serve spaghetti with clam sauce over top.

For more great recipes, visit iRun.ca! 18

2014 ISSUE 03

Pinning your favourites? Check out @iRunNation on Pinterest! iRun so I can eat whatever I want! – Kevin Johnathan Smith, Ontario


INJURED?

Risk factors for runners

As endurance athletes, runners are inherently at a greater risk for iron deficiency. This is because their blood volume is higher than non-athletes due to a greater VO2 max. Although this is a training benefit, it dilutes blood iron levels. The repeated impact of high-mileage running can also damage red blood cells—a phenomenon called foot strike hemolysis. Iron is also lost through sweat and not absorbed as effectively by those who suffer from post-run gastrointestinal distress. Runners following a vegetarian diet have limited intakes of high-iron foods, while female runners have the added challenge of losing iron through menstruation.

h

BLESSÉ?

Seek The Running ClinicTM’s specialists everywhere in Canada

Strategic eating

Because the lifespan of a red blood cell is about three months, there is no quick fix for iron-deficiency anemia. Only 5 to 35 per cent of iron eaten is actually absorbed, so the best way to keep iron levels (and training) up to speed is to make food choices strategically. “Iron comes from animal sources (called heme iron) and plant sources (known as non-heme iron). Animal sources are better absorbed, but with both plant and animal, eating a vitamin-C rich food or beverage with the iron-containing meal enhances the absorption,” says Chuey. Seafood, poultry and red meat are excellent sources of heme iron, while non-heme iron sources include soybeans, lentils, and eggs. Runners should also be aware that foods high in calcium, caffeine, or tannins can inhibit iron absorption and should be eaten separately.

Iron supplements

When diet is not enough to sustain healthy iron levels, supplements may help with recovery. Karen Marlin, a Nova Scotia runner, also suffered from iron deficiency but was able to recuperate by adding iron supplements to her diet. “Up until 2009 I had many fast races and placed in the top three in my age class but, after that season, I began to slow down. In the first month of 2013, I was told I was anemic, started on iron supplements and miraculously got my speed up. In 2013, I participated in over 20 road races, including 3 marathons and 3 half marathons.  I ran the Oasis Zoo Run as part of Team Timex and team Run Nova Scotia and was a bronze medal finisher in my age category,” says Marlin.

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iRun because it helps me be the very best version of myself! — Geneviève Nicole, Ontario

iRun.ca

19


TRAINING

BY BEN KAPLAN of things to get faster. The best thing to do? Get a coach.”  

When iRun and EachCoach, the running community of the National Post, decided to partner and connect regular runners with celebrity coaches, it was like a runner’s dream come true. The feedback we received was astounding. Unfortunately, we could only oblige six lucky readers, but don’t fret...other runners interested in being paired with a super star, your time will come! Go to eachcoach.com/goal and share your goal. Mention in your email that you’re looking for a dream coach or hit iRunNation on Twitter with the hashtag #dreamcoach. Be sure to check out updates on our lucky six runners’ training at iRun.ca, and remember: there’s nothing that you can’t do (with a little coaching, of course).   runner, keep doing what works for you, but get comfortable with race pace and effort in training.” 

Joseph Emas a 58-year-old lawyer, is an experienced runner. He has twice run the New York City marathon and recently qualified for Boston. A cancer survivor, he’s excited to take on the Boston Marathon in 2015. He wants to improve on his time. Eric Gillis, a two-time Olympic runner, and the training partner of Guelph’s Reid Coolsaet, is a father of two. His goal is becoming the fastest Canadian marathon runner of all-time. To Joseph, he says: “Find a training partner. It’s always easier when you hook up with a group. Since you’re an experienced

Helene Allard 58, is a runner with an old goal. She says, “I am 58 years old and I’ve been trying to run a 5k race for many years, but have never done it! This September, I’d like to do it.” Rob Watson, this month’s iRun cover story (see p26), says: “Pick a goal (done!), then join a group and make a training plan. Commit to it 100% and the rest will take care of its self. You can do this, so enjoy the process — running can change your life.”

Richard Blais 58, lives in Gatineau, Quebec, and is recently retired. Settling in to his new life without work, Blais now wants to run the marathon in four hours (bringing down his 2014 race time of 4:15). Reid Coolsaet, who ran the second fastest marathon finish time in Canadian history and competed in the 2012 London Olympics, offers this: “Run more. Do speed work, drills, sleep more and eat right. It takes a combination

Nicole Shadbolt is a mom and a runner, who has been plagued by injuries. She says, “The injury started as bilateral plantar fasciitis in August and has become a nagging foot pain that two sports med doctors, my family doc and a physiotherapist have all basically described as ‘sore feet.’ I was registered for both the Disney Princess half in February and the Ottawa Race Weekend half, but have bailed on both because of my feet. I’m hoping the third time is a charm! Help?” Lanni Marchant, the fastest female Canadian marathon runner of all-time, isn’t a mother, but she knows all about making time to run. At 30, Canada’s world-record holder also studies law. She says: A) Have the shoes you are training in checked. Is there arch support or not? Is it too supportive or too soft a shoe? Too wide a shoe? B) Instead of looking at the source of the

pain (the bottoms of your feet), try some treatment on your calves and lower legs. C) Some other tricks are putting golf balls in the freezer and using them to roll out the bottoms of your feet. A frozen water bottle works well too. Try to run on softer ground for some of your training. Also, sleeping in one of those socks that pulls your toe into a flexed position can help plantar issues. In terms of getting ready for your goal half, don’t let yourself feel pressured. Just take it slow and steady, gradually build up your training, and have FUN.

Peter Linkletter 47, is based in Ottawa and has followed training programs by John Stanton and Jeff Galloway. A testicular cancer survivor, Linkletter wants to qualify for the Boston Marathon when he runs this year’s Ottawa Marathon. The time he needs is 3:25. Krista DuChene, fresh off her win at Around the Bay and the second fastest Canadian marathon

“In terms of getting ready for your goal half, don’t let yourself feel pressured. Just take it slow and steady, gradually build up your training, and have FUN.” -Lanni Marchant, female Canadian marathon record holder

runner of all-time, says: “Stick with your training program. Be consistent. Trust the training. And take care of yourself.”

Claudia Taboada is a 45-year-old half marathon runner who started running four years ago as a gift to herself. She wants to get faster and knows she can do so. She says she finds inspiration in her son. “My main inspiration for running has been my 12 year old autistic son Nicolas,” she says. “Running has given my the strength and positive energy to accept and deal with my son’s diagnosis every day.” Ben Kaplan (that's me!), a not-so-fast marathon runner. Still, I know a thing or two about running. “By having the right attitude, you’re 99% of the way there,” I told her, “Now, the easy part: alternate your Sunday long runs with a day of speed work. Try drills, running 600-metres eight times quickly, paying careful attention to making your eighth repetition as quick as your first one. You might also try running 200m, 400m, 600m, 800m, and 1,000m drills, and do it twice once a week. You’ll be Flash Gordon in no time!”

Interested in being paired up with a coach? Visit eachcoach.com/goal or connect with iRunNation on Twitter and use hashtag #dreamcoach 20

2014 ISSUE 03

iRun because being a role model and healthy for my two sons is the most important thing to me. — Paul Merrigan, New Brunswick


TRAINING

BY RICK HELLARD

THE ‘OOPS’ FACTOR

After the big race

Hey gang! I heard you missed me and I missed you, so we're back with an Oops Factor that deals with what to do after your 'A' race is DONE.

A

s a coach, I have worked with a lot of people with a life 'to-do list,' with a marathon or Ironman on that list. Along the way, they usually learn to like the training and want to keep going after the box on the list has been checked. What happens next often depends on three things: did they achieve their race goal? Were they fulfilled after achieving it, and how did it go? Assuming they finished their goal event, and finishing is all that matters, they should be satisfied. That is often not the case, though. If it was much harder than they expected, or they thought they could do better, they question themselves and often set out a new goal: try again. So they search for the next challenge. It could be to do another race a bit quicker, or with better race day execution leading to a more comfortable experience. They may want to do another one right away, or as soon as possible, for fear of losing momentum. They may want to blow the doors off their previous results. They may want to wait a long time before trying again. All these options are fine, however, the decision should depend on how the event actually occurred and how much it took out of the runner, physically and psychologically.

SCENARIO NO. 1 In the case of an early blowup and subsequent lower effort for a longer time, it can be a bit of a blessing because it does not necessarily take that much out of the body, and recovery can be quick. It's just a longer day than what was planned. MY ADVICE: I usually suggest they get back to the races fairly quickly, i.e. within a month.

SCENARIO NO. 2 A blowup late in the race means a runner got most of the way at a good effort and did not have to dig TOO deep to get to the finish, but still needed to dig deep. MY ADVICE: I usually suggest they wait two months and rebuild from a 60 per cent training level. They almost made it, so they need more recovery time.

SCENARIO NO. 3 A blowup halfway probably hurts the most in the long term as it usually means the runner went pretty hard, blew, and pushed moderately hard to finish things off because they were over halfway. And if they pushed moderately hard for a long time, this can be difficult to recover from. MY ADVICE: If they pushed really hard after the blowup, they need more time before trying again. If they completely

shut down instead, recovery would be fairly quick and I would suggest they try again fairly soon. If things went reasonably well, but they did not achieve a particular time goal or smooth execution, I would suggest waiting four months working on strengths, weaknesses, and systems, before toeing the line again. The ‘Oops’ would be waiting too long or not long enough to get to the next goal, or taking the event result too personally. Sometimes, unexpected things happen, and there is no rhyme or reason to it, or any reasonable steps to foresee them happening. Just because a race does not go as planned, it does not mean you are a failure, less of a person, or even did anything wrong. That is just the way things go sometimes. All you can do is deal with it, and try again. Hope this helps!

Running

The

Show

Sign up for the podcast and listen while you run! SPONSORED BY

LISTEN LIVE SATURDAYS AT 8-9AM EASTERN ON

in Ottawa the in Ottawa oror onon the web web at TSN1200.ca at Team1200.com Join author and iRun Founding Publisher Mark Sutcliffe and adventure runner and iRun Runner-in-Chief Ray Zahab as they talk running and welcome iRun contributors and other interesting guests with the best advice on nutrition, training and reports from great race experiences across the country and beyond.

About Rick Hellard Rick Hellard, head coach of Zone3sports (zone3sports.com) in Ottawa, is a lifelong running addict. He’s also made or seen just about every mistake under the sun, making him an expert in oops-prevention.

Visit iRun.ca for more ‘Oops’ Factor and training advice from the pros.

For more information, click iRun.ca

iRun because it’s the best way to start my day or the best way to finish the day and one thing that will always go right in my day. — Heather Richardson, Ontario

iRun.ca

21


OTTAWA’S ALSO GREAT FOR A LEISURELY STROLL

Running enthusiasts love Ottawa for our Tamarack Ottawa Race Weekend. But the Capital is also a great place for a relaxing urban escape. Come see the sights, take in art and culture, shop the ByWard Market, dine al fresco at an outdoor patio and head out for a night on the town. Visit online for getaways and special offers.

OTTAWA GETAWAY PACKAGES

3

RD 1/2 PRICE † NIGHT

at participating hotels

WWW.OTTAWATOURISM.CA • 1-888-OTTAWA-8 † 3rd consecutive night at half price valid only at some participating hotels. 3rd night price based on 50% of room only rate. Call or visit our website for details.

22

2014 ISSUE 03


THE TAMARACK OTTAWA RACE WEEKEND 2014 EVENT PREVIEW It’s the 40th running of the Ottawa Marathon—and 48,000 runners are ready to help celebrate. Turn the page for tips on getting the most out of Canada’s largest marathon and biggest running weekend.

M AY

24 - 25

2014

MARATHON // 1/2 MARATHON 10K // 5K // 2K // KIDS MARATHON

iRun.ca

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Get ready for a weekend to remember! Get Your Race Kit

See the World’s Best

Fuel Up

The Health and Fitness Expo opens at 4 p.m. on Thursday, May 22nd. Get there early to avoid the line to pick up your race kit and score the best deals on running gear.

Ottawa has no shortage of great spots for pre-race fueling and postrace celebrating all within walking distance of the start and finish lines. See the map for highlights.

The Ottawa 10K and Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon are IAAF Silver Label events that attract top athletes from across Canada and around the world.

RUNNING THE 2K OR 5K? Race kits must be picked up before 1 p.m. on Saturday, May 24th.

NEED MORE IDEAS? Visit www.ottawatourism.ca

NAMES TO WATCH IN 2014.

10K Geoffrey Mutai Boston Marathon and New York Marathon champion Lanni Marchant Canada’s women’s marathon record holder

Cheer! Visiting Ottawa to support family or friends? Join the over 100,000 spectators who come out to cheer along the picturesque courses. FOR CHEERING SPOTS, CHECK http://www.runottawa.ca/weekend/ spectator-information

Marathon

Tune In You don’t have to be standing at Elgin and Laurier to catch all of the action. The Ottawa 10K and Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon will be broadcast live. Visit www.runottawa.ca on race day.

Run like it’s

Wesley Korir Boston Marathon champion and member of Kenyan Parliament Eric Gillis Two-time Canadian Olympian

1975

To celebrate this 40th edition of the Ottawa Marathon, you are invited to a kick-off party and fun run at Ottawa’s City Hall at 12 p.m. on Thursday March 22nd.

Wear your vintage Ottawa Marathon t-shirts, and vintage running gear for the “class photo.” Then take a warm-up jog down the canal with some of Canada’s elite runners.

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2014 ISSUE 03


Event Schedule Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Kick-Off Party & Fun Run

Race Kit Pick-Up & Expo

Race Kit Pick-Up & Expo

The Races 6:55 a.m.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Ottawa City Hall 110 Laurier Avenue

Ottawa Convention Centre 55 Colonel By Drive

Ottawa Convention Centre 55 Colonel By Drive

Scotiabank Wheelchair Marathon

Race Kit Pick-Up & Expo

Friday Pasta Dinner

The Races

Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon

3:00 p.m.

8:00 a.m.

4:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

6:00 p.m.

Ottawa 2K

Ottawa Convention Centre 55 Colonel By Drive

Ottawa Convention Centre 55 Colonel By Drive

4:00 p.m.

Scotiabank Ottawa Kids Marathon

7:00 a.m.

HTG Sports Ottawa 5K

9:00 a.m.

6:30 p.m.

Scotiabank Ottawa Half Marathon

Ottawa 10K

All start lines at Elgin and Laurier

All start lines at Elgin and Laurier

Saturday Pasta Dinner

THE RACES

PASTA DINNER

6:00 p.m.

RACE KIT PICK-UP & EXPO

KICK-OFF PARTY & FUN RUN

Marriott Hotel 100 Kent St.

Landmarks RUNNING 1

Kick Off Party – City Hall

2

Race Kit Pick-Up & Expo Ottawa Convention Centre

ALE

National Gallery of Canada

XAN

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BRI

6

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YO

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4

Finish line – Queen Elizabeth Dr.

Major’s Hill Park

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A OL

SIGHTSEEING

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U LA

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City Hall

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EL

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10 N

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1

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ON

T ER

3

ER RI

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A SL

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AL

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Confederation Park

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RI

U LA

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EL

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QU

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11 Sparks Street

I LL

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10 Elgin Street

ON

T NG

NO ON

Byward Market

NK BA

9

KS

AR

SP

AL

O’C

DINING AND NIGHTLIFE

2

11

Ottawa Convention Centre

GI

Chateau Laurier

Château Laurier

EL

8

IN

LL

WE

TC

Canadian Museum of Civilization

Parliament ON Hill GT ME

7

8

iRun.ca

25

L


COVER I love the road running scene and community. You go out to a road race on a Sunday morning and no one is there because they have to be – everyone chose to be there. They’re happy, they’re excited. They all have their own reasons, goals, motivations, the collection is exciting and I dig it, I thrive off that energy. I’m so friggin’ lucky to be part of the community. It’s pretty rad. By Karen Karnis

PHOTOS BY ROBERT SHAER

I’m

ROB WATSON, and iRun because it brings me

HAPPINESS. R

ob Watson is the defending Canadian Marathon Champion heading into the Ottawa Marathon this May. The 30-year-old London, ON native lives in Vancouver and trains with the BC Endurance Project under coach Richard Lee, and hopes to have another terrific season. While he probably won’t run four marathons like he did in 2013, he never says never: Sinead Brunet is training for the Ottawa Marathon with #LeTeamDuRob,

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iRun to give my brain a break and my body a workout. — Susan Young, Ontario


.

Running is something I’ve always done. I come from an athletic family. I really dig it. I had four brothers. My older brother Pete was always really fast – everyone would say, “That Petie Watson is a fast kid.” He’s a coach now. My aunt Jill [Ross-Giffen] was at the 1984 Olympics for the heptathlon. I did my first 10K when I was 6. I went to the race with my family and I decided I didn’t want to watch, so I just ran it. I took a few years off of road running in high school - going to road races with your parents when you’re 16 isn’t really cool. I was more interested in my social life, but I ran cross country to get out of class. I was okay; I didn’t start to get good until university. Up till then I got away with some talent, but I wasn’t a hard worker. I was at school in the US on a scholarship and running wasn’t my priority. But then gradually, I started to make a switch and running became a priority and a focus for me. It began to factor into my decisions; I started to ask myself, “How is this going to affect my running?” Going out drinking 3 times week really wasn’t conducive to running. As I started to become serious, I realized it was something I really enjoyed. Running fast was way more fun than running slow. I love the road running scene and community. You go out to a road race on a Sunday morning and no one is there because they have to be – everyone chose to be there. They’re happy, they’re excited. They all have their own reasons, goals, motivations, the collection is exciting and I dig it, I thrive off that energy. I’m so friggin’ lucky to be part of the community. It’s pretty rad. I’m ramping up training for the Ottawa Marathon and I’m pretty giddy about it. I love the process, the grind. There’s just something so unique about the marathon – you learn about yourself. It’s more than an athletic endeavour. It will change your life. When I was leading the Boston Marathon, I got to Wellesley College – you know, that spot where all the college girls come out. Man, that wasn’t even a highlight of the year, but of my whole running career –

that moment right there, they were screaming so loud I couldn’t hear myself think – it was pretty special. The biggest thing to remember with marathon training: it’s all about being consistent and patient. You’re not going to get immediate results. You’ve got to build. No one workout will do it – something you do today isn’t going to pay off tomorrow. It’s that collection of workouts - over days, over weeks, over months, over years. It’s about trusting you’re doing it right. My advice to those running the Ottawa Marathon is to prepare for any sort of weather. It’s been hot, it’s been perfect, it’s been cold and rainy – so prepare for anything. Oh, and throw in some hills because there are a few climbs on that course that can really get you.

I friggin’ love Manchester United. Just had to get that in there. I love music. I saw Propagandhi in Seattle not too long ago – they’re from Winnipeg. I was just listening to Chuck Ragan he’s in the band Hot Water Music – I’ve got a whole album side on my list at the moment. A lot of mid-90s skate punk and hard-core – fast and aggressive stuff. There are a lot of great microbreweries here in Vancouver, I love to visit those and hang with friends. But mostly, I sleep. The marathon grind can also be boring – when I am not running I just stay off my feet as much as possible.

visit iRun.ca for for weekly updates! iRun today to help me heal as I start my journey to my new life — Leanne Loney, Ontario

iRun.ca

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TRAINING

Tri it out! It’s spring and time to set a few new goals. Tri-curious? Go for it! By Kaydi Pyette

R

unners that switch to triathlon will experience excitement by training for three different sports. Triathlons keep training interesting and motivating," says Bart Ujack, head coach of Kronos Triathlon Club in Calgary. He has worked with many runners who were burned out but found their competitive urge once again with triathlon training.

"Triathlon training can reduce runningrelated injury potential," he adds. "By alternating your daily training with swimming, biking and running, you develop a more well-rounded muscle symmetry. Swimming is known to increase lung capacity and, if trained properly, a runner may be able to increase running economy by swimming a few times a week." He adds that triathlons can increase capacity as many triathletes work out more frequently than most single sport athletes and exercise different muscle groups at different intensities, allowing for recovery. So, you went from 5K to 10K to half marathon and then, finally, knocked the 28

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A HUGE UPTICK

“Runners who train for triathlon can generally expect less injury, and increased strength and aerobic conditioning.” full marathon off your bucket list? If you’re looking for the next challenge this fall, take on a triathlon – you’re sure to add new tricks to your training, and likely boost your running performance too. “Runners who train for triathlon can generally expect less injury, and increased strength and aerobic conditioning,” says Sara Gross, PhD, a West Coast professional triathlete and coach. “There's also the benefit of avoiding mental stagnation—by adding swimming and cycling to your routine, you can always look forward to something different.” “When I first started, many people didn't even know what a triathlon was, now everyone knows about triathlon and the Ironman,” adds Gross, who recently finished second at Ironman Brazil. A triathlete for 14 years, she got into the sport through running. “People are looking for a challenge and triathlon provides that. Triathlon allows people to aim high and accomplish great things.”

The rate of triathlon participation in Canada has continued to rise for more than a decade. “Across the country annual adult participation has grown by approximately 12,000 participants in the last six years,” says regulatory body Triathlon Canada spokesperson, Chris Dornan. From 2006 to 2012, British Columbia and Quebec saw the highest rise in the number of race participants—BC had approximately 3,500, Quebec approximately 5,600. Across the country, race participation has grown by more than 300 per cent in the last five years, making it one of Canada’s most rapidly growing sports. Dornan attributes this increase in participation to increased exposure of the sport, the success of high profile athletes, including Canadian Simon Whitfield winning the silver medal at the 2008 Olympics and increased opportunities to participate through a growing number of clubs and races. “More people are pursuing a healthier lifestyle and joining the sport as a way of staying fit,” Dornan adds. The triathlon is a young sport—the first recorded event took place in California in 1974, organized by the San Diego Track and Field Club. There were only 46 finishers in a race that consisted of a 5.3-mile run, fivemile bike and 600 yards of swimming. The triathlon has grown by leaps and bounds in registrants and in length in the years since—today there are dozens of triathlons of varying lengths across Canada.

iRun to stay healthy and young and to inspire my children. — Pierrette Boutin, Nova Scotia


“Becoming an Olympic sport [in 2000] has given the sport added publicity, which increased the number of triathletes,” says Gary Pallett, head coach of the Manitoba National Triathlon Centre in Winnipeg. “There has been a huge increase in the numbers of athletes racing in Ironman events—a decade ago there were only two North American Ironman events, now there are a number of Ironman and similar distance events springing up all over North America to meet the demand for entry spots.”

TRAIN RIGHT, PLAN AHEAD

According to Pallett, “For many people, after finishing a marathon the Ironman is the next great endurance challenge for someone to complete.” He adds that 80 to 90 per cent of the athletes he sees come to triathlon from running backgrounds. The biggest concern for newbies is the water. “The swim, and the risk of drowning, is the factor that deters many from trying. Many of the top wetsuits are so buoyant that if you feel scared you can simply roll onto your back and float. So spending a little more on a good quality wetsuit is a good safety net for those scared of open water swims,” he says, adding that you can also look for a triathlon with a pool swim. Participating in a triathlon isn’t quite as simple as grabbing your runners and heading for the door; it takes a little more planning up front to secure essential gear. A swimsuit, goggles, wetsuit, cycling shorts, bike and helmet are the bare bones minimum for anyone looking to participate—but don’t worry about getting top-of-the-line equipment just yet. “There are options to decrease costs for someone looking to just try the sport,” says Pallett. “For instance, buying a used

bike or borrowing one from a friend can reduce costs and some swim stores will rent wetsuits for events.” Provincial triathlon associations, such as Triathlon Manitoba, offer a buy and sell page on their website which allows new athletes to purchase used items. Competitors often do their first triathlon on a mountain bike, says Pallet. “To try the sport can be quite reasonable, but, like most sports, it can get quite expensive if you decide to get competitive.” Aspiring triathletes should

"Triathlon training can reduce running-related injury potential. By alternating your daily training with swimming, biking and running, you develop a more well-rounded muscle symmetry.”

Tri Gear Tyr Nest Pro Swim Goggles $19.99 / www.tyr.com

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join a club, advises Gross. “Get a coach, or follow a program,” she says. “Don't get stuck in the trap of doing too much run training and too little swim and bike. “Following a program written by someone who knows what they are doing can really help someone improve faster than learning everything by trial and error,” she adds.

READY, SET, GO! Ready to embark on your first triathlon but just need a roadmap? Start with this basic plan provided by professional triathlete and coach Sara Gross.

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“Most good coaches will write a specific program for individual athletes given their various needs and taking into consideration variables like family, work commitments and individual strengths and weaknesses,” she says.

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY Easy mixed recovery swim (40 minute) or day off

AM SWIM Main set, short hard intervals of 100 to 200 metres (1 hour) PM RUN speed work (1 hour)

BIKE Short hard intervals, three to five minutes with short run off (1.5 hours)

AM BIKE Strength work hills or big gear (1.25 hour)

SWIM Longer intervals of 300 to 600 metres (1 hour)

BIKE Long aerobic ride (1.5 to 3 hours)

LONG RUN (1 to 2 hours)

PM TEMPO OR STRENGTH RUN (1 hour)

iRun because I can, to feel alive, to honour god’s gifts and to push my limits. — Julie Michelle, Ontario

iRun.ca

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PROFILE

EN BRIT TOWNS PHOTO BY

PHOTO BY SF U ATHLETICS

Who was

Emilie Mondor? Remembering an Olympian and champion of Canadian women’s running. By Bridget Mallon

C

anada lost one of its most accomplished distance runners when Emilie Mondor died in 2006 at the age of 25. The first Canadian woman to run 5k under 15 minutes at the 2003 World Championships in Athletics, Emilie became known internationally at the 2004 Athens Olympics when she finished 17th in the 5000m. 30

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iRan to lose weight. iRun to keep those 122 lbs gone forever! — Karin Fortin Jackson, British Columbia


Alongside the loss, many want to remember Emilie’s spirit, generosity and contributions to running. After Athens, a rare medical condition led to five stress fractures, sidelining Emilie’s career for two years. An experimental drug helped her return to high intensity training, and in 2006, Emilie launched an incredible comeback. With a time of 32:26, she claimed first place among women in both the Vancouver Sun Run and Ottawa Race Weekend 10k races and set her sights on competing for Canada in the marathon in 2008 Olympics in Beijing. “To run at a world level from such a young age, there’s a lot of expectation on you. It takes a lot of patience and determination to make a comeback,” says Mike Lonergan, who coached her when she studied biology at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. “Emilie did it. She had a burning desire to run.” “Whenever we had a camp or a clinic, Emilie loved to be part of it…she always made participants feel really good about themselves,” says Brit Townsend, head coach of track and field and cross-country at Simon Fraser University. A twotime Olympian herself in the 800m, Townsend remembers Mondor as “one of the most focused, driven athletes I’ve ever worked with.” Emilie sought out Ken Parker to coach her for her marathon debut. Parker founder and renowned head coach of the Ottawa Athletics Club Racing Team - has coached women and promoted women’s running for decades. He created the Runner’s Web Race for Women in 2005 – now called the Sports 4 Emilie’s Run. “I started a women-only race because I wanted women to have a chance to own the road – to lead a race, set the pace and be the overall winners,” he says. “I asked Emilie to come to

PHOTO BY SFU ATHLET ICS

the inaugural race - and she agreed right away even though I had no appearance money to offer her and it meant changing her schedule to miss another event. That’s a big deal, and it showed her commitment to women’s running.” The day of the race Parker noticed Mondor limping, and when she confessed to an Achilles tendon injury, he urged her not to race. She agreed reluctantly, not wanting to let him down, and promised to return the next year. Mondor moved to the national capital region when Parker agreed to coach her. “Not many Canadian women today could match her, performance-wise,” he remembers. After a physiological assessment by Ottawa’s Centre for Peak Performance, Parker notes, “We

iRun to heal from smoking 20 years and from an operation a had. — Eric Silins, Québec

were blown away. After seeing her results and adaptation to longer training runs, I knew that if she didn’t break the Canadian women’s marathon record, it would be my fault, not hers.” Based on her potential, New York City race organizers invited Mondor to race that year as an elite in its illustrious marathon – despite the fact that she had never raced distances longer than 10k. “We used to do a training loop with lots of hills in Rockcliffe Park for the women’s group I coached,” reminisces Parker. “I found a fast (2:20) male marathoner to lead Emilie through the first 1-mile loop. After the first one, he was spent. She’d do five more. Then she would run backwards, down the hill and cheer on the other women. Emilie had a lot of

confidence in her abilities, as you need to at that level, but none of the elite attitude you see sometimes.” Mondor died just hours after completing the longest run of her life. On September 9, 2006, with Parker cycling beside her, she ran 29 kilometres in two hours and four minutes during a training session. "She was just really pleased that she could run for two hours and feel so good. I was pleasantly surprised because she was adapting to the longer runs much faster than I thought she was going to.” After discussing some training plans at Parker's home, Mondor set out to drive to Mascouche, Quebec, just north of Montreal to go to a high school reunion and visit her family. Mondor lost control of her car after passing two others. Ejected from her vehicle and then airlifted to hospital in Ottawa, she passed away without regaining consciousness. Parker, still deeply affected by her passing, decided to rename the 5k race in her honour. The Sports 4 Emilie’s Run attracts more sub-20 minute female runners than any other event in Canada. Every year Emilie’s parents come to the race, serving in an honourary capacity at the start and finish lines. Her hometown of Mascouche, Quebec hosts the Classique Emilie Mondor in October, and SFU hosts the Emilie Mondor Invitational Track Meet each spring. “She influenced so many people – and continues to today,” says Mike Lonergan. “Not many athletes, even Olympians, have as many events named in their honour.” The Sports 4 Emilie’s Run 5k and new half marathon take place in Ottawa on June 21, 2014. somersault.ca iRun.ca

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RECOVERY

recovery THE ROAD TO

How to take it and come back strong. by Joanne Richard

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iRun because the birds are singing, the sun is shining, and spring is finally in the air! — Sue Wemp, Ontario


B

eing sidelined by injury is often painful – but it’s the psychological trauma of being sidelined that can be agonizing. No matter the skill level, all runners can be taken down by a variety of injuries to the feet, knees and hips, and suffer the emotional fallout and uncertainty of ever being on the road again. IT’S NOT ALL IN YOUR HEAD

According to orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Dave Simon, the overt psychological and emotional ramifications produced by injury are finally becoming increasingly recognized by athletes, coaches and clinicians. “All age groups and skill levels can experience psychological distress associated with injury and the subsequent disruption in their training regime, competition schedule or self-identity,” says Simon, who works out of the Carleton University Sports Medicine Clinic and the Rideau Valley Health Centre, both in Ottawa. Injury fallout varies widely according to many factors, including the characteristics and personality of the athlete, severity of injury, timing and level of competition, says Simon. What’s important for all injured runners to keep in mind is that once the underlying cause of injury is identified and addressed, there are plenty of ways to achieve a metabolic stimulus that is equivalent to running without actually running. Being patient and positive, as well as setting realistic and attainable goals, are key factors to a healthy recovery, both physically and mentally, adds Simon.

BE PATIENT

Jason Faber recently banged up his ankle while doing hills as part of his 20-week training schedule for the upcoming Ottawa Marathon in May. The tweak didn’t seem like much at the time but it sidelined the 25-year-old long distance runner, and his road to recovery is not without a few

emotional bumps and bruises. “Being injured sucks,” says Faber, an Ottawa-based marketer who is faithfully stretching, icing, heating, foam rolling and spinning. The gym is not a Faber-favourite but, as he says, “Desperate times call for desperate measures.” Like most runners, Faber is serious about his schedule and interruptions are never easy. “You live by it. You make social plans around it,” he says. “You have to convince yourself that missing those days is not a failure; it is simply part of the process of getting better.” While his competitive drive has been refocused into rehabilitation activities including yoga and physiotherapy, he’s also counting on patience and dedication to help with the healing and get him back on his training schedule to better his 2013 time of 3:33. Mindset is critical. “The second you get yourself down in the dumps, you’re on a slippery slope. Stuff happens. Deal with it, stay positive, and move on,” says Faber, who blogs about his training to qualify for the Boston Marathon at 42kms.tumblr.com.

STAY POSITIVE

Goal setting, positive self-statements and cross training have been critical to recovery for world-class marathoner Dylan Wykes. The 30-year-old Vancouver athlete represented Canada in the London Olympics, finishing 20th in the marathon, but since then he’s had a slew of overuse injuries in the pelvic region that have prevented him from racing another marathon. A case of osteitis pubis this past November forced him to take complete rest. Wykes went from running 180200 kilometres per week to zero. “It has been very difficult emotionally and psychologically to deal with the injury setbacks,” says Wykes. “For me it’s been a matter of trying to put my injury woes in perspective and realize it’s not the end of the world.” The 2016 Olympic hopeful is slowly integrating cross training, including pool running, and cycling, along with some running, into his training. Engaging in other activities, including work, hobbies and spending time with family, helps take his mind off of his injury. “I’m trying to focus on moving forward and not dwelling on mistakes that have contributed to my injuries, while at the same time learning from those mistakes for future training,” he says. Wykes’s road to recovery includes working with a physiotherapist and chiropractor on overall strength, Cont’d on page 34

iRun because I can, even though for a long time I thought I couldn’t. — Dany Whittom, Québec

HEAL YOUR MIND Think positively while nursing an injury with advice from Dr. Dave Simon, orthopaedic surgeon in Ottawa: • Allow yourself time to mourn

and feel a sense of loss. It’s okay to be sad. • Deal with it. “It sucks to sidelined but allow yourself to mourn and then move on.” • Re-evaluate your goals and set realistic, attainable goals for recovery and return to training/competition. • Stay positive. “Patients with positive attitudes about their situation invariably do better in my experience than patients who remain bitter.” • Don’t cut corners in your rehab. Be sure to pick your clinical team wisely. The athlete and clinicians need to be on the same page in moving towards a common goal. • Continue to practice and work out in modified ways that your injury permits. Go to team training sessions or a running club for the social elements and support network. “If physical training isn’t possible, use the down time to develop your mental approach or switch gears altogether and pick up another hobby or short-term project to focus on.”  • Be patient. • Depression is a real side effect of injury. “It’s not weakness or a source of shame or embarrassment,” adds Simon. “Recognizing it and seeking qualified clinical support is a sign of strength.”

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Cont’d from page 33

NEW TECHNOLOGY Traditional therapies play an important role in recovery, says Dr. Dave Simon, but there’s some exciting action happening in refining biologic treatments. “These include platelet rich plasma therapy and stem cell therapy applications to enhance and modulate healing for a wide variety of injuries and conditions, ranging from chronic overuse phenomena to acute trauma to post-op cases, and everything in between.” Other exciting developments in recovery include the controlled mechanical loading of tissue earlier in the injury/surgery recovery process with a tool such as the Alter-G treadmill, says Simon. Alter-G technology is also allowing more runners with elements of osteoarthritis in the hips, knees or ankles to maintain or increase training volume in a fashion that is easier on their bodies, allowing them to effectively extend their running careers. Another entrant in the injury treatment and recovery realm is the “cryo-chamber, also known as a cold sauna, which fundamentally represents a modernized approach to ice baths,” adds Simon, whose Ottawa-based practice focuses on orthopaedic sports medicine, arthroscopic joint preservation and upper extremity surgery. Besides helping with injury recovery, new technology boosts recovery time between workouts. “Newer active sequential compression technologies, such as the RecoveryPump system, and small neuromuscular stimulation units, such as Geko, are really effective in promoting active recovery in a passive manner. I’m using these more and more with my elite athletes and seeing fantastic responses, but these technologies are also available to everyone in a portable, easy to use way.”

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stability and mobility, while employing several modalities, including the Alter-G anti-gravity treadmill and the HydroWorx underwater treadmill.

MODIFY YOUR GOALS

Certified athletic therapist Steve Broad’s prescription for recovery success is goal setting and alternate activities that keep athletes active and focused on getting better. “There is absolutely no good that can come from setting goals that are unrealistic. If you don’t obtain them, you risk falling in to a negative tailspin that can really throw a great athlete into a depression,” says Broad of kinemedics.com, which offers a wide range of equipment to help people get back in their game, including the Alter-G treadmill. According to Broad, the Alter-G can “unweight a patient up to 20% of their body weight. This is done through pressurization inside a large bag that fits around the treadmill so that the athlete can move unencumbered inside the bag and allow normal gait mechanics, which is an important aspect of the training and rehabilitation process.”

FOCUS ON WHAT YOU CAN DO

High-performance triathlete Lisa Bentley

says she’s lucky to have suffered few injuries during the past 18 years given the demanding nature of Ironman events. She suffered a patella femoral injury, a torn hip labrum and chronic Achilles issues during her prime racing years. “I dealt with injuries by exploiting what I could do rather than on focusing on what I could not do. It is silly to run in pain so I did anything and everything that did not cause pain,” says the 45-year-old triathlete who has won 11 Ironman competitions since 1996. When injured, Bentley struggled to find workouts to replace running. But once she realized she could come back from injury just as strong or stronger by water running and supplementing with cycling or swimming, “I was emotionally okay with not running.” The key is to be 100% focused on getting healthy, says Bentley. “Sport is a lifestyle and it is forever if you are smart and allow your body to heal. Find other activities to keep you busy.” Everyone gets injured at some point, so be the best injured person you can be, advises Bentley, of Caledon, ON. “Anyone can be a champion when the going is good but a true champ does well when the going gets tough. Injury is tough but be a champion of your injury by respecting it.”

TAKE A BREAK It’s simple: too much running equals injury. “Very, very few, only the elite of the elite, can run seven days a week and never get injured,” says Sheldon Persad, co-owner of personalbest.ca. Stay healthy and improve aerobic capacity by utilizing other modes of activity, says Persad. Try water running, biking, rowing, skipping, cross country skiing and rollerblading. Getting back to being 100 per cent sometimes necessitates a complete break from running, not just running less, says Persad, a certified track coach and distance running coach, as well as a certified strength and conditioning specialist in Toronto. “Someone who is swimming and cross country skiing will still be able to tax their aerobic and anaerobic systems but minimize impact and stress on the body that occurs.” Persad’s surefire recipe for injury: “Too much running and too many garbage miles; not enough cross training; no strength training; attempting to run through injuries, and not enough rest. Most runners would do well to address all five points.” No matter your emotional pain, never further your physical pain by running through an injury, “unless we are talking about the final kick to the finish line of a race,” says Simon, otherwise, you risk ending up in his office or operating room.

iRun because it brings me pure joy! — Leanne Douglas, Ontario


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2014 ISSUE 2014 ISSUE 01 0303

iRun for health, pleasure and pride. Carol Ford, British Columbia


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iRun for health, pleasure and pride. Carol Ford, British Columbia


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iRun for my mental health, to get outdoors and feel the fresh air in my face. — Chantal March, Newfoundland

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RACECALENDAR [ WEST ] TUESDAY, JULY 1 2014 High River Half Marathon, High River, AB highriverhalf.com TUESDAY, JULY 1 Edmonton Canada Day Road Race - 2014, Edmonton, AB runningroom.com TUESDAY, JULY 1 Sechelt Canada Day Mile, Sechelt, BC sunshinecoastathletics.org TUESDAY, JULY 1 Victoria Canada Day 10K 2014, Victoria, BC runningroom.com TUESDAY, JULY 1 Canada Day 5th Streen Mile, Courtenay, BC cvrr.ca TUESDAY, JULY 1 Canada Day Rock 10K and Kids Run, White Rock, BC tryevents.ca TUESDAY, JULY 1 Run Canada Day, Vancouver runcanadaday.com SUNDAY, JULY 6 The Great White North Triathlon, Stony Plain, AB gwntriathlon.com SATURDAY, JULY 12 Hit the Pavement for Panama, Edmonton, runningroom.com SATURDAY, JULY 12 Old Man River Summer Run, Lethbridge, AB runningroom.com

SATURDAY, JULY 19 Summerfast 10K, Vancouver runningroom.com SATURDAY, JULY 19 Totem to Totem Marathon 2014, Skidegate, BC totemtototem.com SUNDAY, JULY 20 2014 Lacombe Half Marathon, Lacombe, AB runlacombe.com SUNDAY, JULY 20 Moose Is Loose - 2014, Edmonton runningroom.com SUNDAY, JULY 20 Seymour River Runoff, North Vancouver, BC runningroom.com SATURDAY, JULY 26 Multiple Miles for Myeloma 2014, Calgary, AB runningroom.com SATURDAY, JULY 26 2014 Vancouver Pride Run and Walk, Vancouver runningoom.com SATURDAY, JULY 26 MEC Calgary Race FIVE, Calgary mec.ca/events SATURDAY, JULY 26 Sea Cavalcade Mile, Gibsons, BC seacavalcade.ca SATURDAY, JULY 26 The Durham Quarter Marathon, Oshawa, ON thedqm.ca

SATURDAY, JULY 5 Trans Canada Trek, Eastend, SK runningroom.com SATURDAY, JULY 12 Jared's Run For Diabetes, Burgis Beach, SK runningroom. com SUNDAY, JULY 13 Grand Beach Sun Run, Grand Beach, MB grandbeachsunrun.com SATURDAY, JULY 19 - 20 Color Me Rad Winnipeg, Winnipeg colormerad.com SUNDAY, JULY 20 Rotgut Run, Maple Creek, SK runningroom.com [ ONTARIO & QUEBEC ] TUESDAY, JULY 1 Brooklin Canada Day Run, Brooklin, ON runningroom.com TUESDAY, JULY 1, 2014 Canada Day Run/Walk, Moonbeam, ON coursemoonbeamrun.org TUESDAY, JULY 1 Commonwealth Run 2014, Ottawa, runningroom.com TUESDAY, JULY 1 Canada Day Run to Get it Done, Avonmore, ON northstormontplace.com

SUNDAY, JULY 27 Jog for the Bog 2014, Delta, BC burnsbog.org

TUESDAY, JULY 1, 2014 Official Canada D'Eh 5k Run, Amherstburg, ON runningflat.com

SUNDAY, JULY 27 Kamloops Marathon 2014, Kamloops, BC kamloopsmarathon.ca

TUESDAY, JULY 1 Green Germann Sakran Canada Day 5K 2014, Burlington, ON runningroom.com

[ PRAIRIES ]

SUNDAY, JULY 13 Tynehead 8 Hour, Langley, BC runningroom.com

SATURDAY, JULY 5 The A-Moose-ing Race 2014, Moose Jaw, SK theamooseingrace.com

SATURDAY, JULY 19 Multiple Miles for Myeloma Edmonton 2014, Edmonton, AB runningroom.com

SATURDAY, JULY 5 The Dirty Donkey Mud Run 2014 Saskatoon, Saskatoon, SK dirtydonkeyrun.com

iRun because NO ONE can do it for me. — Johanne Kenney

SATURDAY, JULY 5 Katies Run 2014, Haliburton, ON katiesrun.ca SATURDAY, JULY 5 The KEE 5K, Bala, ON runningroom.com SATURDAY, JULY 5 ESSO Rebecca Run for SMA, Newmarket, ON rebeccarun.com

SATURDAY, JULY 5 Cancer Crusade Run, Baie d'Urfe, QC runningroom.com SATURDAY, JULY 5 Rock Me Anaphylaxis, Windsor, ON runningflat.com SUNDAY, JULY 6 Wolfe Island Classic 2014, Wolfe Island, ON wolfeisland.com SATURDAY, JULY 12 Beamsville Bench 5K, Beamsville, ON niagararunningseries.com SATURDAY, JULY 12 Defi Relayons-nous pour la vie 2014, Mirabel, QC runningroom.com SUNDAY, JULY 13 MEC Ottawa Race 5, Ottawa mec.ca/events SUNDAY, JULY 13 Big Little Run 2014, Cambridge, ON runningroom.com SUNDAY, JULY 13 Dawn at the Don 2014, Toronto, dawnatthedon.ca SUNDAY, JULY 13 Sydenham Lakeside 5/10K runs and Wylie Ryan 2K, Sydenham somersault.ca THURSDAY, JULY 17 Eaton Downtown Dash 5K and 10K 2014, Burlington, ON downtowndash.ca FRIDAY, JULY 18 Angus Glen Five Miler 2014, Markham, ON angusglenrunningseries.com SATURDAY, JULY 19 St. Clair River Run 2014, Sombra, ON mrhazzard.com/ run SATURDAY, JULY 19 Runners in Windsor, ON, be prepared to transform your clothes from white to tie-dyed during The Colour Run – also known as the “Happiest 5K on the planet.” This colourful 5K race will see runners get sprayed with paint from head to toe at each kilometre. For more information and to register, visit: ca.thecolorrun.com. SUNDAY, JULY 20 Friendly Massey Marathon

2014, Massey, ON masseymarathon.com SATURDAY, JULY 26 Skechers Downhill Classic 5K, Hamilton, ON runningroom.com SATURDAY, JULY 26 The 2014 Durham Quarter Marathon, Oshawa, ON runningroom.com [ EAST ] TUESDAY, JULY 1 Canada Day Moncton 2014, Moncton, NB runningroom.com TUESDAY, JULY 1 Canada Day Bash, Charlottetown, PEI runningroom.com TUESDAY, JULY 1 Canada Day St Johns 2014, St. John's, NL runningroom.com SATURDAY, JULY 5 St Andrews 10K and 5K, St Andrews, NB runningroom.com SUNDAY, JULY 6 Run For The Lobster 5K and 10K, Pictou, NS johnnymiles.ca FRIDAY, JULY 11 4th Annual Sparky 5K, Kingston, NS runningroom.com SATURDAY, JULY 12 Liverpool Privateer 5 Mile Road Race, Liverpool, NS atlanticchip.ca SUNDAY, JULY 13 Covered Bridge Run 2014, Hartland, NB runningroom.com SUNDAY, JULY 13 Pet Projects Fun Run/Walk, Shelburne, NS runningroom.com SUNDAY, JULY 20 Police Chase, Halifax, NS halifaxpolicechase.com SUNDAY, JULY 27 44th Annual Nova Scotia Marathon Half Marathon and 10K, Barrington, NS barringtonrecreation.ca

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ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

iRun to be HEALTHY TEAM MYLES & ADULT ESSENTIALS GUMMIES

S

pring is in the air and Team Myles 5K & 10K race training has begun! Team members, mentors, trainers and coaches have been working hard on their fitness and nutrition regimes. To help, Adult Essentials has supplied them all with a variety of

Gummy Vitamins – Men’s and Women’s Multis along with Vitamin D and B-12. Momentum is running strong and everyone loves the taste and benefits of their ADULT ESSENTIALS GUMMY VITAMINS for Big Kids!

Visit irun.ca/teammyles regularly for reviews, updates & inspiring stories of training success. PAIGE HOVELING SAYS: #AdultEssentials hooked us up with delicious Gummy Vitamins – they’re healthy & tasty! It’s like eating candy after my meal – WIN! Paige tells us, iRun because I didn’t think I could. VERA FORD SAYS: When I brought home my #AdultEssentials Gummy Vitamins, my teenagers were also excited & now we all take them. We check in with each other daily – “did you have your Adult Essentials today? Which flavour?” Thank you, Adult Essentials for taking care of us! Vera tells us, iRun because I have not before & thought I should.

iRun & ADULT ESSENTIALS wish all members of Team Myles an enjoyable training experience & a successful, fun race on May 17, 2014!

iRun beca when I saw use p running I th eople ou “Why am ght I not doing that? ”

iRun to be . e a better m ie n – Stepha MacAskill

BACK ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: Trainer Luke MacDonald, Mentor Christine White, Mentor Shawn Woodford, Trainer Jason Davis MIDDLE ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: Mentor Aaron Legge, Paige Hoveling, Mentor Deborah Dalzell, Coach Devin Sharington, Wendy Hudson, Emily Haynes, Mentor Katy Parsons, Vera Ford, Mentor Colin Richardson, Tanya Wagner-Wile FRONT ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: Stephanie MacAskill, Nellie Renzelli, Tina Griggs, Mentor Carol Harvey, Mentor Sheryl Grant

Register at BlueNoseMarathon.com

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– Trevor A dams

You can WIN one of two prize packs of Adult Essentials Gummies and experience optimal health alongside Team Myles! Enter at irun.ca/teammyles

AdultEssentials.com

iRun to prove to myself that I can overcome any obstacle. — Christine Dorcin, Ontario


SPRING STYLE GUIDE A little something for every type of runner.

1 Adidas Women’s climachill short sleeve tee 2 Ryders eyewear COCO 3 Nathan Sonic Boom iPhone 5 Carrier 4 Skechers Performance Division GoRun Ride 3

4 Pant elastic on inside seam to prevent it from riding up!

5

5 Brooks Infiniti Capri III 6 Wigwam Velocity Pro

3

7 Mizuno Lotus Sport Bra

iRun everyday (or almost!) They run without a watch. They run to feel the sun on their face and the air in their lungs. They run for me time, not chip time. Some runners just do it for the love of the run.

6

7

1

Climachill provides premium ventilation and moisture management and cooling effect. 3D metallic execution at backneck for an additional cooling effect.

2 Casual appearance but made for performance.

What's your favourite running app? Visit The Buzz on Gear at iRun.ca. iRun to prove to myself there is always room for improvement and my body can do amazing things given the chance. — Neysa McLeod, Ontario

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SPRING STYLE GUIDE

iRun to get a personal best Hills, speedwork, fuelling and strength training all contribute to runner’s performance. What we wear can also help us get into the zone and perform better when the time comes to put our training to the test.

4 1 MEC Quantum Shortsleeve T-Shirt 2 Saucony Guide 7 3 Mizuno Maverick 1.5 Split short 4 Wigwam Velocity Pro

1

5 iRun cap 6 Nathan Quickshot Plus Insulated Handheld

Power Grid

2

3

5

Fire & Ice™ Flask keeps your drink colder for longer!

6

What liquid would you put in here? Enter at iRun.ca to win it! 48

2014 ISSUE 03

iRun to see how far I can go. — Kim Curtin, Ontario


SPRING STYLE GUIDE

The simplicity of the act. When I am struggling, I deconstruct running to it’s basic parts. Breathe. One foot. Other foot. Breathe. One foot. Other foot. I shut out the external and focus only on those 3 simple tasks.

4

Misti Press Sayani 2 Running with a great playlist makes a perfect long run!

Sandrine Leduc

iRun long

1 Adidas Women’s Supernova Graphic Tight 2 Mizuno Wave Rider 17

Taking in all the sights, the river running through our city, the smell of clean air, fresh cut grass, and a break from all the stresses of life.

Suzie Lowthers

Getting out the door for your long run includes mental and physical preparation. When you’re out there for long periods of time comfort is KEY. On the iRun Magazine Facebook page we asked the question: What does it take to get you through the long run?

3 MEC Vitality Sleeveless 4 Brooks Run Happy Versatile Bra in Poppy/Fushia 5 Nathan Mercury 2 Hydration Belt

Thinking about all I have been through with my bad back and how far I’ve come because of running always gets me through any long run!

6 CEP Progressive Running Compression Socks

Greg Faber

3

7 Clif Shot Blocks energy chews

Reflective stripes!

The nap after ... aaahhh.

Akbar Khan

5

6

Packing great running treats and promising myself which one I’ll eat at every 5k mark. Honor Ceh

7

Coffee at the end with friends.

Chantal March

iRun.ca

1

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SPRING STYLE GUIDE #selfie

iRun to be social Whether they're chatting over post-run coffee with their running group pals or sharing their challenges, selfies and accomplishments through social media, social runners add colour and excitement to Canada's running landscape!

3

5 Exclusive bottom material matching ECCO Performance shoes

1 Ryder Eyewear VIA

#whereirun

2

2 Wigwam Velocity Pro 3 Ecco Performance Lite Hobo Bag 4 Columbia Zero Rules skort 5 Saucony Velo Print Singlet 6 Brooks PureConnect 3

4

6

1

#whyirun Biodegradable midsole

Find @iRunNation on Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat! 50

2014 ISSUE 03

iRun because 4 years ago I could barely walk. — Lara Camille, Ontario


SPRING STYLE GUIDE

2

1

iRun to commute Whether trying to get it all in or reducing your environmental footprint, running to work (or errands!) is an efficient way to travel. Having the right gear makes the commute much more pleasant. Packable in it's own pocket

3

4 1 Mizuno Geo 8.5 SQ men's short

Hey runnercommuters!

2 Adidas men’s adizero short sleeve tee 3 Brooks LSD Lite Jacket III

5

4 Mizuno Wave Rider 17 5 Wigwam Endur Pro

iRun because it makes me feel good. — Tammy Butler, Newfoundland

What’s your favourite piece of gear you use to run to work with?

@bridgetwaits Definitely

my little Osprey Daylite pack. Just the perfect size at 13L. Enough room for lunch and extra clothes!

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WHY I RUN

BY MARK SUTCLIFFE

The 70s runner: the spirit of today’s marathon

SPONSORED BY

I

n 1977, a 13-year-old kid named Adrian “Punky” Baird entered a marathon one week after running through what was supposed to have been a 55K charity walk. “I was pretty naïve,” says Baird. “But the key thing was nobody told you what you could or couldn’t do, or how bad it was going to be. “Now you plan for the worst. Back then we had no idea.” When running a marathon, ignorance may not quite be bliss. In Baird’s case, it was quite painful. Still, there’s something special about running headlong and somewhat unaware into a new experience. And in the 1970s, long before there were dozens of books, countless online training programs and thousands of other runners to turn to for guidance, most of the small number of people who attempted a marathon had little idea what they were in for. Over the course of the past year, in researching a book about the history of the Ottawa Marathon, I’ve talked with scores of runners who have completed the event since it was founded in 1975. I was especially intrigued and inspired by the pioneering spirit of the athletes who decided to try the marathon in the early days of the event, when less was known about longdistance running and no one foresaw events with tens of thousands of participants. Even today, when many events are sold out,

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marathoners are an exclusive group. In North America, with a population of 350 million, there are fewer than half a million marathon finishers a year (and that includes some people who are counted more than once because they cross two or more finish lines). But unless you choose to train alone, the loneliness of the long-distance runner is a thing of the past. In the 1970s, however, marathoners were almost as rare as astronauts. When you think of the New York City Marathon, you might picture the sea of 50,000 runners crossing the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. But in 1970 only 55 people crossed the finish line in Central Park. The first Ottawa Marathon had 146 participants, and it was the largest marathon in Canada that year. “We just said, ‘Let’s see if we can run that far,’” says Eleanor Thomas, who was the first woman across the finish line in Ottawa in 1975. “We just trained and did it. And nobody had a clue what

training actually was.” Like so many runners today, the few non-elites that ran marathons in the 1970s did it for a love of running. But the objective was neither as fashionable nor as manageable as it is today. Not only was there scant information to turn to, the running shoes and apparel were a far cry from the

The marathon wasn't new in the 1970s; the race has been around since 1890s, when it was created as part of the first modern Olympics. And events like Boston Marathon and the Around the Bay Road Race in Hamilton are more than a century old.

And while many of the events were well-organized, they were hardly the sophisticated, professional operations of today. Almost all of them were put together entirely by volunteers, many of whom spent hours setting up the course and then changed into shorts and ran the race themselves – or stood at the finish line for hours recording runners’ times on a clipboard. The marathon wasn’t new in the 1970s; the race has been around since the 1890s, when it was created as part of the first modern Olympics. And events like the Boston Marathon and the Around the Bay Road Race in Hamilton are more than a century old. But the foundation of the popular sport we know today was built by those pioneers who organized and ran marathons in the 1970s. Like Punky Baird, they didn’t know what to expect. But they inspired a generation of passionate runners and developed the outstanding events that all of us enjoy today.

modern gear we wear now. No wick-away fabrics, no specially designed footwear to cushion the impact of thousands of pounding steps.

Mark Sutcliffe is the founder of iRun and the author of Why I Run: The Remarkable Journey of the Ordinary Runner. READ his blog and download his podcasts: iRun.ca LISTEN to iRun The Running Show: TSN1200.ca FOLLOW him on Twitter: @_marksutcliffe SEE excerpts of his book: WhyIRun.ca

iRun because I see more of my community then I do from my car window. — Paul Gilbert, Ontario


Go beyond the edge of comfort with the Brooks Transcend, a self-tuning trainer that smartly adapts its cushioning to your every step, creating your ultimate run. This is the next revolution of comfort. This is Brooks Transcend. brooksrunning.com/transcend

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YOU’VE GOT THIS The MEC Race Series has everything you need in a race – low entry fees, marked routes, timed results, finish-line bananas – in cities across Canada, all year long. Great for newbies and families, athletes with training schedules, or any runner who values the basics. MEC RACE SERIES

5K /10K /15K $15

Half Marathon $20

Marathon* $25

Register online mec.ca/events

BARRIE BURLINGTON CALGARY* EDMONTON HALIFAX LANGLEY LONDON LONGUEUIL MONTREAL* NORTH VANCOUVER OTTAWA* QUEBEC CITY TORONTO* VANCOUVER* VICTORIA WINNIPEG 56

2014 ISSUE 03

RIGHT HAND PAGE

iRun April 2014 Issue 03  

IRun | Digital Edition | Issue 03 2014 The magazine for Canada's running community, iRunNation. Inside this issue: Inside the mind of Canad...

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