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KATE VAN BUSKIRK ON KATE VAN BUSKIRK: HOW I UNLOCKED THE ULTIMATE ME NEW!

LAUNCHING THIS ISSUE:

TRAVEL, TECH, TRAILS, AND TUNES!!! PLUS

'GIRL RUNNER' AUTHOR CARRIE SNYDER TELLS THE STORY OF

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SWEET DREAMS, RACERS

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TIPS FOR GETTING A BETTER NIGHT’S SLEEP


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Mark Logan

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Ex-pro footballer seeking to see the world through running.

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See the video at saucony.com/findyourstrong iRun.ca

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOUNDER Mark Sutcliffe mark@marksutcliffe.com GENERAL MANAGER Ben Kaplan ben@iRun.ca ADVERTISING SALES Jenn Price jenn@iRun.ca 416.938.6556 MANAGING EDITOR Anna Lee Boschetto annalee@iRun.ca ASSISTANT EDITOR Priya Ramanujam EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Megan Black CONTRIBUTORS Andrew Chak, Krista DuChene, Rick Hansen, Rick Hellard, Karen Karnis, Patience Lister, Joanne Richard, Ray Zahab. CREATIVE DIRECTOR & DESIGN Tanya Connolly-Holmes creative@greatriver.ca GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Jamie Dean Regan Van Dusen CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER Darren Calabrese STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Melanie Winter SUBSCRIPTIONS Visit iRun.ca iRun is a publication of Sportstats World CEO Marc Roy marc@sportstats.ca Canada Post Publications P.O. #41639025 Postage paid at Ottawa, ON Return undeliverable Canadian and other addresses to iRun: P.O. Box 3814, Station C Ottawa, ON K1Y 4J8

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KATE VAN BUSKIRK:

UNCENSORED, HARDER, BETTER, FASTER, STRONGER

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awesome: 233 ways to get a better night’s rest. By Joanne Richard

to Our Lady Peace, Chantel Kreviazuk shares her favourite running songs.

unpacking expectations and finding happiness at a race (very far) out of town.

MAKE PEACE WITH SHEETS Sleep well, race well, feel KATE VAN BUSKIRK ON KATE VAN BUSKIRK:

SWEET DREAMS, RACERS

HOW I UNLOCKED THE ULTIMATE ME

KREVIAZUK’S KRAZY JUKEBOX From alt-J to the Killers

DESTINATION: TEL AVIV Embracing the unknown,

233

NEW!

LAUNCHING THIS ISSUE:

TRAVEL, TECH, TRAILS AND TUNES!!!

TIPS FOR GETTING A BETTER NIGHTS SLEEP

PLUS

'GIRL RUNNER' AUTHOR CARRIE SNYDER TELLS THE STORY OF

SPRING'S HOTTEST NEW SHOES

GET iRun's DIGITAL EDITION FREE: GO GREEN and get all the same content ... and more! Subscribe at iRun.ca DON’T MISS ANOTHER ISSUE! Get 6 issues of iRun for $12.95. Delivered to your door and your inbox for one low price! iRun because it grounds me. — Stacia Loft, Ontario

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SPRING SNEAKER GUIDE Girl Runner author

Carrie Snyder tells the story of spring’s hottest new shoes.

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STARTLINE

I CAN DO THAT! To launch our new column for empowering racers, Karen Karnis explains how to get a killer Finishing Kick

W

hen Eric Gillis came around the corner and saw the clock over the finish line of the 2011 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, he knew he couldn’t let up. Watching the live feed from home, I held my breath – it would come down to seconds. To meet the Canadian qualifying standard for the Olympic marathon, Gillis had to finish in under 2:11:29; and [spoiler alert!] his time ended up being 2:11:27.3. How does a person who has run a really hard effort for almost 42 kilometres suddenly find the energy to sprint for 300 to 400 metres? And how does someone who has been nearly redlining it for almost 5K find another gear? The extra power for a finishing kick comes from switching sources. After running a steady aerobic effort, we are able to dive into our anaerobic zone to pull out just a little bit more for a short time. But the ability to actually do it – well, that’s mostly in your head. Homeostasis theory states that your perceived effort – what your brain is telling you is happening – is not always in line with your actual output, because your brain is trying to

keep your body safe by slowing you down. Part of that is a process called teleoanticipation, in which your brain calculated what it should tell you based partly on how much longer you’re going to be at it. So when you actually see the finish line, it can suddenly feel easier, allowing you to dig deep and sprint. While there’s no question that everyone wants to finish strong, planning your race around a finishing kick is probably not a good strategy. As elite runner and coach Michelle Clarke points out, kicking in a long distance race will save you seconds, but training for a strong race with a solid pacing strategy is what will cut your PB my minutes. “Unless you were under the wire for a Boston Qualifier and you HAD to shave off 10 seconds to make the cut, the kick in the longer distances is not at all beneficial,” says Clarke. But she also acknowledges that “when racing shorter distances, having a kick at the end can be that last chance to crack that PB.” Whether or not you have a kick left in you by the end, she says, depends on your pacing. You don’t want to pick it up too soon

iRun because I feel great when I’m done! — Karen Morgenweg, Ontario

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ERIC GILLIS QUALIFYING FOR THE 2012 LONDON OLYMPICS BY .2 SECONDS AT THE 2011 SCOTIABANK TORONTO WATERFRONT MARATHON. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CANADA RUNNING SERIES.

or you risk running out of steam before the end. For a marathon or a half marathon, she suggests picking it up with 3 to 5 kilometres to go. In a 5K or 10K, aim to switch to a higher gear in the final 1 to 2 kilometres. And for anything on the track, the last lap is go-time. “At the end, it will

all come down to three things,” says Clarke. “One: did you fuel properly for and during the race? Two: did you follow your race strategy and not expend too much energy in the first quarter of the race? And three: does your mind want to follow your legs?” When I asked Gillis

where his finishing kick came from on that October day in 2011, he looked at me, smiled and said, “To live with myself if I missed by a second, I had to have no regrets about the effort.” Karen Karnis writes the Endorphin Junkie blog on iRun.ca.

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STARTLINE

RACING TO THE FINISH From the Atlantic Coast to the Pacific, runners are taking their spring starting lines. What secrets should participants know about their races and how can we make the most of each run? To find out, iRun brought together six race directors on the phone. By Anna Lee Boschetto iRUN: Let’s start out on the east coast and work our way out west. Geri, what exactly makes the Scotiabank Bluenose Marathon course so spectacular? GERI WALLACE: Halifax is on a hill so our course is pretty challenging, but it’s a beautiful one that weaves through Point Pleasant and Shubie Parks. We also run over the MacDonald Bridge and people who are coming from other parts of the Maritimes really look forward to the Bridge experience. JOHN HALVERSTON: We have beautiful scenery with Parliament, the Rideau Canal and museums, and running in

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neighbourhoods is also important. Runners want to be where people are cheering during a race. MIKE COLLINS: We consider Toronto a pretty fast course: if people are looking to set a personal best and qualify for Boston, this is the race to do it. KIM ALI: A lot of runners think that it will be really flat, but we’re on the riverbank, so there are some raises. Our goal is to showcase the Meewasin River Valley. The beauty of Saskatoon is the riverbank. CHERYL LOWERY: A few years ago, we moved our start and finish lines to the Stampede Grounds. It’s iconic for Calgary!

CHARLENE KREPIAKEVICH: Runners jump on our Canada Line Train, which takes them into the centre of the city and then they run into the downtown core to the finish line, all with mountains and the cherry blossoms blooming in May. iRUN: Each one of your courses will give a tour of the city, but how should runners, who are coming to your course for the very first time prepare? CHARLENE KREPIAKEVICH: Be really strategic about your pace as you’re going down the hills so that it doesn’t catch up with you later. CHERYL LOWERY: If people

are coming from sea level, take into account that we are at 3,500 feet. People in Calgary go to Vancouver to get a personal best. GERI WALLACE: The first half of the marathon has more elevation than the second so it’s incredibly important to pace yourself in the first half. iRUN: How would you explain the point of difference for your event?

CAST GERI WALLACE Scotiabank Blue Nose Marathon, Halifax, Nova Scotia, May 15 - 17

JOHN HALVERSTON Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon, May 23 - 24

MIKE COLLINS GoodLife Fitness Toronto Marathon, May 3

KIM ALI: A large race, but with a small town feel. MIKE COLLINS: We have psychologists along the course called “Psyches on Bikes.” One was following the last runner and asked him what would help him finish and he said ice cream. So he went and got him one. It’s about supporting your athletes. iRUN: What’s been your biggest challenge as race directors?

CHARLENE KREPIAKEVICH BMO Vancouver Marathon, May 3

KIM ALI Saskatchewan Marathon, Saskatoon, May 31

CHERYL LOWERY Scotiabank Calgary Marathon, May 28 - 31

iRun for fun. — Annie Biron, Québec

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GERI WALLACE: In my first year, it was a hot day and there were 72 medical calls. Even though we had an emergency health services lead in our clinic, they weren’t in the command post and this caused a delay in the sharing of information. By my third year, we had emergency health services, the police and the race director in one post. What a difference in the sharing of information and working as a team. CHERYL LOWERY: Hours of meetings with the city

getting permission for road closures.

personally walk them in and help them get across the finish line. Such a reward.

Ottawa Police and they understood the need for a proper command post—even before Boston happened.

MIKE COLLINS: This is where I met my wife.

iRUN: Some of you have been involved with your events for a number of years, what is the payoff, or rather, where do you find your greatest reward?

CHARLENE KREPIAKEVICH: In Vancouver, there are so many running events that GERI WALLACE: With over the market is saturated. We 4,000 children involved, we go door-to-door! believe we have the largest youth run in Canada. It’s iRUN: How about security really an amazing sight to in Ottawa in particular see them lined up by grade. right now, John? CHERYL LOWERY: I have JOHN HALVERSTON: an amazing group of Things have gone to a volunteers. new level. We had a close relationship with city CHARLENE KREPIAKEVICH: services in the command I run out and I greet post, with EMS and the last ten runners and

iRun not to find the remote for the TV. — Keith Harrison, Ontario

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FACING PAGE, TOP: BMO VANCOUVER MARATHON. THIS PAGE, ABOVE: KIDS START, SCOTIABANK BLUE NOSE MARATHON. THIS PAGE, LEFT: KIDS AT THE SCOTIABANK OTTAWA MARATHON STARTLINE. THIS PAGE, TOP RIGHT: SCOTIABANK BLUE NOSE MARATHON MASCOT HUGS A MARATHON FINISHER.

JOHN HALVERSTON: As a former runner myself, I like the elite aspect, the sporting part of it.

iRUN: Food is a pretty big deal after you’ve raced, so where should people eat in your city? JOHN HALVERSTON: We’re working with a brewery to set up a beer garden on site. GERI WALLACE: Our postrace party starts around 7 p.m. until midnight and we bring in pizza, have live music, a DJ and people dance until midnight. CHERYL LOWERY: I was skeptical about our beer garden because it was 10 a.m., but it was packed every time I went by. Of course, if you’re still hungry at 3 p.m., you should go to my son’s

restaurant, Double Zero. iRUN: For runners who are planning to stay a few extra days, where do you recommend they visit? CHERYL LOWERY: Don’t pass Canmore, which is a bedroom community to Banff. There are many beautiful trails to run. KIM ALI: Just this past year, the Meewasin Trail has been built out to there so you can ride your bike out to there along the river; it’s one of those places you can relax and get back to yourself. GERI WALLACE: The views from Citadel Park are amazing. For day trips, South Shore is beautiful with the little village along the way, Mulholland Bay, Chester, and Lunenburg. And if someone has a few days, I always recommend the Cabot Trail. CHARLENE KREPIAKEVICH: Our famous Grouse Grind! If you’re a fit runner, you have to do this. It’s legendary.

iRun.ca

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ERIN’S TECH

I have a confession: This is not going to be your run-of-the mill tech column. I am more of a minimalist than a gadget freak—and that’s not a bad thing. I want to share tech that you’ll actually find useful for running: The toys that won’t break the bank, but are worth a splurge now and then. Here are a few things on my list worth checking out. By Erin Valois PHOTO BY MELANIE WINTER

[ MUSE ] I used to have a lot of anxiety about racing (and still do). It’s hard for me to relax. The other problem is that I spend a lot of time thinking about work, so I tend to sacrifice my runs and cross training for…more work. At first glance, Muse ($299 at Chapters) doesn’t seem like an obvious choice for must-have running gear. You probably shouldn’t run while wearing it. But the “brain sensing headband” pairs with an app on your phone to teach your mind how to slow down and it’s a great how-to for meditation beginners.

[ WATERLOGGED ] There’s nothing like a good shaming to get you thinking about how much water you don’t drink daily. Enter Waterlogged: It’s an app that lets you record your intake of liquids and sends you alerts if it looks like you won’t make your daily goal. You can set reminders for certain times of the day and it also charts your progress over time.

[ ARMBAND ] As the late comedian Mitch Hedberg said: “My belt holds my pants up, but the belt loops hold my belt up. Who is the real hero?” It’s not the most exciting addition to your running arsenal, but a reliable armband for your gadgets can be just as important as the devices themselves. I use the Belkin Sport-Fit armband (24.99 at Best Buy) because it keeps my iPhone snug and the cords are out of my way.

[ MICROSOFT BAND ] Yes, we know, the world can’t get enough of the Apple Watch. But the Microsoft Band is worth trying out, even though it’s not in Canada yet ($199 USD). It calculates all the necessary elements with 10 sensors: Heart rate, GPS tracker and calorie burning, but the best part is the sleep tracker. I am restless and often wake up at all hours, so having instant feedback means that for once you can actually feel rested.

[ RUN INJURY FREE ] The best part about apps is that they do the thinking for you—RunInjuryFree helps you figure out weak points, how to get stronger, and the best stretches for before and after your run. It’s not the fanciest app, but if you’re feeling pain, you can pick a part of the body on a diagram to see common ailments and treatment.

iRun to stay fit. — Lesia Luciuk, Alberta

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[ RUNKEEPER ] [ 7-MINUTE WORKOUT ] Half the battle of cross training is thinking about what the hell you’re going to do for cross training. Lunges? Do those even help? What if I did 100 lunges? No? Thankfully, the New York Times is doing the thinking for us and built an app for the “7-minute workout,” a fitness regimen touted as one of the most efficient ways to exercise.

Picking a side in the online battle of run-tracking websites is akin to that dress war sweeping the Internet. (The dress is blue and black). I’ll say it: Runkeeper is king. You can find popular routes for major cities with handy kilometre markers— which helps me with my mental race prep. There are also options to follow training plans and other runners.

[ SEASONAL AND SIMPLE ] We know about the benefits of eating pomegranates or asparagus—but produce can get expensive when it’s not in season. And sometimes, I feel like I’m personally killing the environment with every cherry I buy in May. When I don’t have time for the farmer’s market, and I’m rushing at the grocery store, the Seasonal and Simple app is a guide to what’s in season and local to my area, along with healthy recipes.

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MARATHON MOM

KRISTA DUCHENE, COLUMNIST

WOMEN’S HEALTH MATTERS Krista DuChene may be an elite athlete, but when it comes to dealing with menstrual cycles and urinary incontinence, she’s just like the rest of us.

I

am a woman and I am proud of it. But there are some disadvantages that come along with being a female athlete. While I’ve eluded to some health issues that recreational and elite athletes face, I though it was time that I get right into a few more details, including how I’ve had to handle these situations, especially on race day.

WHY ARE WE TALKING NOW? In the past few months, I’ve personally experienced womanly troubles, more than ever. And what exactly am I talking about: urinary incontinence and menstrual cycles. Because I was either pregnant, breastfeeding or marathon training and racing for eight consecutive years, I rarely had a menstrual cycle. But with a significant training break and my childbearing years that are likely now behind me, the old monthly cycle is back in full swing. And in my two most recent races, I have had to run through this somewhat unknown and greatly undesired territory. Aside from what we runners already do, staying hydrated, eating a healthy diet with plenty of vegetables and lean protein while avoiding processed foods and resting. It’s pretty much one of those things we have to endure.

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LET’S GET PHYSICAL Of course everyone is different. Mary Davies, mother of two, New Zealand’s second fastest marathon runner and winner of the 2012 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon with a time of 2:28:56, says she feels uncomfortable, has heavy legs and a bloated abdomen, especially in the first two days of her menstrual cycle. Some women experience significant physical changes in heart rate, breathing, motivation, perceived effort, digestion and energy. These women even change their birth control pills or take other medications and plan their races around their menstrual calendar. But other women, including Great Britain’s Paula Radcliffe, may have the race of her life. Radcliffe broke the marathon world record while mid-cycle, but she did say she had cramps, so imagine how much faster she may have been. I think most women are likely somewhere in between not completely hindered and not performing to their highest potential.

AN UNCOMFORTABLE SITUATION As if having your period on race day isn’t bad enough, imagine losing control of your bladder mid-race with hundreds of viewing spectators. Urinary incontinence isn’t

fun either. Back in my high school track-and-field and cross-country running days, I often lost control of my bladder near the end of a race. My mother kindly offered to buy me disposable adult diapers. Thanks, but no thanks, mom. After going through the rigors of pregnancy and childbirth three times, like many moms, I put my personal physical issues aside while busily caring for three young children. In the end, I hoped these issues would somehow be resolved. After my third baby, I started treatment with therapists who specialized in women’s health and sports injuries.

PREVENTATIVE MEASURES

An important part in preventing urinary incontinence was my pelvic floor exercises, however, once again I put these things aside. After fracturing my femur at the 2014 Canadian Half Marathon Championships, my focus on recovering from surgery and rehabilitating toward running again was top priority and I neglected my pelvic floor exercise routine. Sure enough, because of the impact that comes with increased running, my pelvic floor weakened and I started losing control on even the easiest runs once my mileage peaked in my return marathon build.

PHOTO BY BARRY GRAY, HAMILTON SPECTATOR

Not fun when already running in uncomfortable wintery conditions with poor footing and temperatures of -35 C with the wind chill. This time, I knew what I needed to do to treat the problem and added the necessary exercises back into my routine with much success.

HOW DO YOU DEAL? Build a professional and personal support team around you. I often view things as an art and science. For the science side, allow the appropriate professionals to provide an on-going assessment, plan, treatment and evaluation of your physical

health needs. And do the homework they advise. For the art side, draw on your family, friends and running group for their personal experiences while sharing and gaining emotional support you need to get through to your finish line, whatever it may be. Krista DuChene holds the second fastest female marathon time in Canadian history. Racing the Canadian Half Marathon Championships last April in Montreal, DuChene finished the course on a broken leg. She took second place. Her website is Kristaduchenerunning. blogspot.com.

iRun because it makes me feel free. — Jess Gibson, Ontario

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FEET, DON'T FAIL ME NOW

BEN KAPLAN, COLUMNIST

FINISH LINE LEGENDS, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: KIM STEMSHORN, EMILY TOMISCH, ERICA FALK, DEANNA BRYANT, BEN KAPLAN, PETER SYMONS, MICHELLE MENDES, AMANDA CRANE AND REGAN CANIE. HIDING IN THE BACK: ANGELA HAMILL. PHOTO BY MELANIE WINTER

WHAT A LONG, STRANGE TRIP IT’S BEEN After training together for an entire year, Ben Kaplan reflects on his team’s journey.

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eople, more than any one workout, any one race, are what make up a great running club. On May 3, the Feet, Don’t Fail Me Now group, which started last summer, will be competing in our final event. Along the way, we’ve lost some members, gained some new ones, and made it through our fair share of injuries and finish lines. Emily Tomisch, the heart and soul of our group, who often walked as much as she ran and never quit — even when it was -32 down on the water and our speedier members had decided to call it a night — will not be participating in our final race. Her leg gave out on her 3K into our second to last long run before the marathon The finish line,

however, is a false ending: we’re not training for a race; we’re adopting a new way of life. In my book, I talk about going from the couch to the marathon in one year. Can a nonrunner run the marathon in only 12 months? Well, that depends. Three women started our course in the middle and I saw a fit 26-year-old go from not being able to run 4K continuously to sprinting hard at the end of her 10K. Someone else started, also young and a gym devotee, and she quickly made it to 14K. She’ll be going from the couch to the half marathon in about eight weeks. Of our original eleven members, four have stuck with the entire program: Peter Symons, Angela Hamill, Erica Falk and Emily Tomisch. Peter,

iRun or iGo crazy… — Bob Connelly, Ontario

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like Emily, is battling injury, though at 63 and with high blood pressure and heart problems, his uphill climb is unique. He’ll be listening to his doctor and opting for the half marathon, not the marathon, May 3. This is common sense. Erica’s doing the half marathon because she likes running quickly. I’ll be running alongside Angela, who still wants to take on the marathon: a run club can help you through training, but ultimately you have to decide what you’re running for. We’ve had lots of good speakers, including Mike Collins, with the Toronto Marathon and Kelly Arnott, with the Chilly Half. Both of the race directors encouraged our group to enjoy their events and not to put too much pressure on

their finishing times. It’s easy for me to become obsessed with my times. Melissa Piercell, nutritionist for the University of Toronto track team, told us that water translates into energy and that we should eat half of our weight in grams of protein. We had the incomparable Christa Davidson and Optimism Ninja Jim Willett offer guest coaching and Totum’s physiotherapist Lindsay Scott help us work out our core. All of these things — what we eat, how we train, how we handle our bodies — come together as we attempt to find new finish lines. We also learned a lot from Mike Anderson, the gentlemanly owner of Black Toe. May Stemshorn, who is 64 and ran nine marathons in 2014, may

have the truest outlook on our sport. In her last marathon, her finishing time was 6:59. “I could do better, but it would mean losing 30 pounds,” she said with a laugh that meant losing 30 pounds is something she’s not going to do. For May, whose daughter Kim is also a member of our run club and will be attempting the Toronto Marathon’s 42.2K, it doesn’t make sense to run a fast race: she goes slow in order to get her full money’s worth. “Remember,” she told the Feet, Don’t Fail Me Now run club, “running is something you do for you. It’s never about anyone else.” Ben Kaplan is the General Manager of iRun magazine. His first book, Feet Don't Fail Me Now, was published by Greystone Press last year.

iRun.ca

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2015-04-09 1:19 PM


RUNNING IS MY TEACHER

RAY ZAHAB, COLUMNIST

PHOTO BY JON GOLDEN

THE CHALLENGE TO CHANGE

Running has taken Ray Zahab onto multiple ultras, expeditions across entire deserts like the Sahara, Atacama and Gobi and it has become a growing passion for his daughters. But as the founder of Impossible2Possible explains, life wasn’t always running free and easy.

I

t all began with a decision, a tough one for me that would change my life forever. Some of the most difficult challenges we face in our lives are relative to each one of us. While one person might find something a hugely difficult obstacle, another may find it a breeze. For me, quitting smoking was the most difficult thing I have ever done. When I decided nearly 15 years ago that

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I wanted a change in my life, a new direction, I had no idea how to begin. Everybody has low points in their lives, and I was in a multi-year funk. At the time, I also felt that deviating from the path I was on would take some ridiculous stroke of selfmotivation, or a whole lot of luck. As it turned out, it took my younger brother John. An incredible athlete, my brother could ride a bike, run a marathon,

scale a rock wall and ski like a pro. His enthusiasm for what he did inspired me in my own search for a new life. In doing so, I found myself following in my younger brother’s footsteps. We would ride our mountain bikes ‑ me pushing mine; hike, more like controlled crawling for me ‑ and I would spend the next few years thinking that things had changed. In truth, it wasn’t until I stopped smoking that the real transformation began. Although I had tried to quit several times and with different methods, it seemed I just couldn’t do it. There I was trying the sports my brother shared with me and yet I was feeling like my lungs were filled with lead. It would take a silent promise to myself to quit. Totally committed, that’s when my life truly took off in a new direction. In a short amount of time the energy

and passion I had put into smoking had transformed into a passion for mountain biking and climbing. I was willing to take risks and try new things that I had been afraid of. Then I discovered running. I had done plenty of adventure racing, but never a running event, until the 2004 Yukon Arctic Ultra. I had read an article about this race and was transfixed by the ability of ordinary people doing something so extraordinary. They were attempting to run 160K in a race in the cold in February, dragging their supplies in their sleds. I was so blown away by their willingness to challenge themselves in this way, I figured they had to be learning something significant about themselves and I needed to find out too. While I prepared as best as I could, many times during that

race, I thought of giving up. But I kept going. Somehow, some way, I made it through to the finish line a day later, and found out I had won the race. This kid who had never played hockey, hated gym class and was smoking just a few years before, actually won an athletic event. The race taught me we underestimate what we are capable of, mentally emotionally and physically. All of us are capable of amazing things if we are willing to make a decision, take on a challenge and commit to seeing it through to the finish line. Ray Zahab is the founder of Impossible2Possible, which educates youth through adventure training. An ultra marathoner, public speaker and author of Running for My Life, Zahab is an iRun contributor. His website is RayZahab.com.

iRun to feel alive. — Joseph Camilleri, British Columbia

2015-04-09 1:19 PM


GOOD FOOD

5 “GREEN” FOOD CHOICES THAT SUSTAIN MORE THAN JUST ENERGY

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unners know firsthand that some foods are better than others for sustaining energy on long runs. But the impact of our diets goes beyond physical health and performance to affect the environment in which we live (and run). Fortunately, there is no need to compromise – runners can maintain energy by making sustainable food choices. In addition to supporting a healthy environment, eating “green” means eating fresh, healthy foods that have higher nutrient levels and fewer contaminants. These five “green” food choices play key roles in keeping the body healthy and the earth healthy enough to run on.

BC SPOT PRAWNS BC spot prawns are one sustainable seafood you don’t want to miss this spring. They’re not only delicious, but are packed with the powerful antioxidant astaxanthin that helps fight the oxidative stress caused by intense exercise. Studies have shown that astaxanthin helps reduce muscle fatigue, boosts endurance, and may also assist in burning fat during aerobic exercise. Prawns

are high in the omega-3 fatty acids needed for good cardiovascular health and offer an impressive 20 g of protein and only 0.4 g of fat per 100g. Unlike other varieties, BC spot prawns are collected in a sustainable manner using traps that do not impact other marine species. Their collection is managed carefully to keep populations steady and available for future generations to enjoy.

ORGANIC STRAWBERRIES Fresh organic strawberries offer the perfect blend of flavour and nutrition. A half cup of fresh strawberries provides 82% daily value (DV) of vitamin C to help runners fight off colds, build joint collagen, and boost iron absorption. The high fibre and polyphenol contents also help regulate blood sugar. A 2014 study published in Scientia Horticulturae found that organically grown strawberries are denser, sweeter, and have higher levels of vitamin C and beta-carotene than nonorganic varieties. Because strawberries are notorious members of the “dirty dozen” list identifying produce with the highest pesticide loads, it is worth seeking out organically

iRun because it energizes me! — Michele-Marie Beer,Ontario

iRun_ISSUE03_April 23.indd 15

grown varieties. In Canada, organic fruits and vegetables are grown without the use of added chemicals, such as synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, synthetic growth hormones, and more. Buying organic not only reduces your exposure to such potential toxins, but helps combat greenhouse gases and improves soil health naturally.

MEAT-FREE PROTEIN Despite popular belief, cutting back on meat reduces your carbon footprint, but not your protein intake. Vegan athletes, such as two-time Canadian 50K Ultra Marathon Champion Brendan Brazier, have excelled athletically while relying solely on plant-based proteins. Foods such as quinoa, garbanzo beans, legumes, and seeds are excellent sources of the essential amino acids needed to build and repair muscle. In addition, their greater scope of micronutrients aid recovery and reduce inflammation. Because livestock production is a major contributor to greenhouse gases and global warming, cutting back on meat can have serious environmental benefits. A study out of the University of Cambridge calculated that if everyone in the UK cut back on meat, they could reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 27.8 million tons per year and the incidence of chronic disease by up to 12%.

LOCALLY GROWN PRODUCE The average meal covers 1200K to reach your

PATIENCE LISTER, COLUMNIST

plate. This can seriously impact your contribution to greenhouse gases – not to mention the nutritional value of your meals. When fruits and vegetables are grown close to home, they are fresher and picked at their peak ripeness. The more time they spend in transport, the lower their nutrient levels get. Studies have shown that leafy green vegetables, such as spinach, can lose

BC SPOT PRAWN SUSHI ROLLS Sushi is a terrific food for runners. Each roll packs an ideal balance of carbohydrates and protein with a little sodium for eating the night before a long run. Incorporating BC spot prawns into your sushi creates a meal that supports your health and a sustainable food system. INGREDIENTS: 4 cups cooked white rice 120 ml sushi vinegar 4 nori (seaweed) sheets 24 fresh BC spot prawns 1 medium avocado, peeled and thinly sliced 1 small cucumber, peeled and sliced into thin 4 cm long strips Pickled ginger, thinly sliced DIRECTIONS: Remove the heads and shells from prawns and rinse in cool water. Using a steamer basket, steam prawns for 3 minutes. Prepare sushi rice by folding the vinegar into the cooled rice. Lay a bamboo rolling mat flat on the counter and place one sheet of nori on top. Spoon 1 cup of rice onto 2/3 of the nori paper and gently press to a 1 cm thickness using the back of a spoon. Lay a portion of the prawns, avocado, and cucumber evenly along the middle of the rice. Using the rolling mat, tightly roll-up the ingredients by rolling outwards. Slice the roll into six even pieces and garnish with pickled ginger. Repeat for the remaining rolls.

over 50% of their vitamin C within 48 hours of being picked. Similarly, the carotenoids in broccoli drop by at least 42% after six days in the fridge. Maximize the dietary value of your produce by buying locally grown products or even growing your own.

FREE RANGE EGGS It’s hard to beat the versatility and nutrient density of eggs. Just one medium egg is equipped with 6 g of protein, 10% DV of bone strengthening vitamin D, and 35% DV of the choline needed for a healthy nervous system. But is it worth more money to buy free range – meaning eggs from chickens that range freely outdoors to forage on grass, seeds, insects and worms? A study published in a 2014 issue of Nutrition found that free range eggs have almost four times the vitamin D content of those from hens raised indoors. They also contain 38% more vitamin A and 50% more vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids than eggs from caged hens. Buying free range animal products also supports a healthier ecological balance between animal and land. Patience Lister is a food scientist and natural health product researcher. She writes frequently about health and nutrition. Her website is patiencelister.com

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THE OFFICIAL SOCKS OF: 16

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MAKE PEACE WITH YOUR SHEETS by Joanne Richard

P

oor sleep is nothing to yawn at – it takes a toll on our mind, mood and miles. There’s really nothing else that kills your ability to function quite like a lousy night’s sleep. Actually sleep deprivation has been deemed a national health epidemic – five million of us will have trouble sleeping tonight and be tired tomorrow. It’s exhausting just thinking about it. Restless nights are not only a game wrecker, but they put us at an increased risk of all sorts of health issues, including heart attacks, cancer and a shortened lifespan. “For optimal health and fitness, you have to sleep on it,” says Barrie Shepley, runner and trainer of elite athletes at personalbest.ca. “Longer sleeps and naps is what lets the elites train harder and recover faster.” According to Shepley, a former Olympic coach, rest is critical to performance. “Sleep

18

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is one of the most effective ways for a hard training athlete to recover. The biochemical adaptation that occurs during sleep is as important as the actual workout to improve performance.” Fatigued cells and systems need sleep to regenerate, says Shepley. “Whether it’s a nap or a full night sleep, your least expensive training aid you can do is simply to get some more sleep.” Quality sleep also equates to good relationships, says Dr. Judith Orloff, a psychiatry professor at UCLA and author of Emotional Freedom. “It is hell not to get a good night’s sleep.” Irritability and resentment build if your partner’s bad sleep habits keep you from snoozing, says Orloff. “Life is not fun!” Hell hath no fury like a frustrated, sleep-

deprived spouse. “I have saved more marriages as a sleep specialist than I ever would have as a marriage counselor just by getting people back in bed together,” says leading sleep expert Dr. Michael Breus. Sleep affects most areas of a person’s life, says Breus, author of The Sleep Doctor’s Diet Plan. “We know that it affects your cognitive abilities your physical abilities, and your emotions. This appears to be a two-way street; poor sleep will affect these areas in a negative manner and good sleep will affect these areas in a good or positive way.” Most of us will spend an average of more than 10,000 full days of our lives sleeping - or at least trying to fall asleep, stay asleep or worrying about not sleeping! So if you’re wired, tired and sleep deprived, wake up and tame those sleep saboteurs with our exhaustive A-to-ZZZs guide of tricks and tips to get the sleep you’ve always dreamt about. Sleep is a glorious thing – bring it on!

iRun to inspire others. — Mark Kerr, Ontario

2015-04-09 1:19 PM


233. Put yourself

to sleep reading about biomechanical risk factors for patellofemoral pain in distance runners.

232. Rub a bit of

Vicks Vaporub on the outside of your nostrils to help you relax.

226. Unwind with hot yoga and sleep longer and harder.

225. Exercise your foam roller every night to reduce unwanted muscle tension and joint stiffness.

regularity of it does,” says sleep training consultant Tracy Braunstein.

220. Let Sleepyti.me

bedtime calculator let you know when to go to bed.

early curfew – say, 9 p.m. “Rested teens make for a happy household,” says Dr. Carl Pickhardt, adolescent psychologist.

214. No kids in your bed.

a day keeps sleeplessness away,” says Lisa Moore, of fitnessonthego.ca.

208. Put nighttime

hunger pangs to rest with a small bowl of oatmeal, suggests athlete and trainer Brendan Brazier, of myvega.com.

230. Train for a half marathon.

228. Break in

the new Montrail FluidFlex ST lightweight and has a forefoot trail shield.

227. Go hard with

Josh Hewett’s home workout: 10 lunges per leg, eight burpee pushups, 10 prisoner squats (hands behind your head), and eight supermans per side (on hands and knees, extend opposite arm and leg).

224. Hydrate,

hydrate, hydrate.

223. Mind your Pee and Qs - no water too close to bedtime or you’ll need a bathroom break. Totally disruptive.

222. Avoid

overtraining. The flood of adrenaline can over-stimulate and bring on sleeplessness.

221. Train your body to sleep. Set a regular wake time and intended bedtime. “Actual time doesn’t matter but the

219. “Go to bed later,

not earlier - many people get in bed too early!” says Breus, a.k.a The Sleep Doctor.

218. Research

suggests that the best restorative sleep happens between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m.

217. Do not sleep in on weekends. This messes with your sleep patterns.

216. Do not let teens go out on weekends or you’ll never sleep.

215. Okay, compromise. Set an

iRun because it makes everything right. — Wendy Dunlop-Walker, Manitoba

iRun_ISSUE03_April 23.indd 19

A John Hopkins’ study links shedding pounds to improved slumber.

209. So cut out late night treats – for you and Rover.

231. “50 burpees

229. TAKE UP TRAIL RUNNING.

210. Lose weight.

213. Banish Fluffy

too. Pets disrupted rest for 53% of pet owners who let their pets up on the bed, according to the Mayo Clinic.

212. Further reason

to ban pets: 21% of dogs and 7% of cats snore.

211. Cuddling your

pet is okay. “The soft purring sound of a content cat or a peaceful pug will help you get a better night’s sleep,” says psychologist Sara Dimerman.

207. KALE CHIPS MAKE A GREAT SALTY BEDTIME SNACK. 206. “Have whole grain toast and warm milk. It releases

melatonin, the sleep hormone, and endorphins to relax you and help you sleep,” says Rita DeMontis, national food editor for Sun Media.

205. Also: alcoholic

beverages contribute to bad sleep, so no imbibing up to three hours before checking out.

204. Have only one.

Alcohol may help you to fall asleep initially, but ultimately disrupts the sleep cycle.

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203. No pickles. They can cause indigestion, gas or heartburn. 202. Go for pineapple. A few slices help relieve stiffness and muscle aches that contribute to sleeplessness. 201. Cut down on

your caffeine crutch.

from your head.

192. Forget sheep. Count your medals. 191. No medals yet?

Count all the medals you wish you had won, and plan to win.

199. No coffee after

189. Leave work early

190. Work up to 500.

182. Add to that

home health aide or police officer – surebet sleep-sapping jobs.

181. Consider a career as a hairdresser, athlete, logger or engineer. The most well-rested professions.

2 p.m.

and go to the gym.

198. Better yet, forgo the Joe after 10 a.m. “Caffeine effects can last up to nine hours,” says Braunstein, of sleeptightsolutions. com.

188. “Tidy up your to-do list before leaving the office,” says wellness expert Beverly BeuermannKing.

180. Toil from 10

197. Avoid the latenight jolt by going decaf.

187. Research shows

that going without sleep for 17-19 hours is similar to having a blood alcohol level over the legal limit.

179. Do not juggle

more by avoiding coffee-flavoured or chocolate ice cream at night.

195. Get steeped in

sleep with an herbal tea.

194. Where there’s

smoke… there’s sleeplessness. Avoid nicotine.

193. MARIJUANA IMPAIRS SLEEP QUALITY. JUST SO YOU KNOW. 20

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167. Take a chilly

157. Lights out!

shower – 32% report overheating impairs sleep quality.

200. Stop valuing no sleep: “We brag about staying up all night but there’s a cost,” adds Breus.

196. And snooze

168. Sleep with your bedroom window open for fresh air.

I Can’t Wake Up! or Alarmy, deemed the world’s most annoying alarm app; play.google.com.

186. Allow some time

to switch off from your job before going to bed.

185. Work in some

rays on your lunch hour with a walk. Outdoor light sets your biological clock that regulates the sleep-wake cycle.

184. Walk fast to promote the flow of hormones that will help you get through the night. 183. Quit your job if

you are a paramedic, doctor or lawyer. They’re the most sleep deprived professionals.

a.m. to 6 p.m. Every hour that work starts later means 20 more minutes of snooze time. multiple jobs. It’s linked to sleeping less than six hours on average a night.

178. Work hard:

“Farmers never had to have any special plan, they just worked all day outside and went home to sleep!” says Shepley.

177. Run hard, but

work out all your running aches. Get a massage - improved sleep quality is the latest addition to

its tangible health benefits.

176. Unwind at the

spa with a calming ancient moisturizing ritual of milk and sesame seeds in a stone wrap.

175. Drift off to

dreamland after having a lavender foot rejuvenation or lavender aqua treatment.

174. KEEP YOUR FEET OUTSIDE THE COVERS. 173. Sleep entirely

outside the covers – cool body temperatures put sleeplessness to rest.

172. Go naked.

Wearing those flannels may interfere with your body temperature dropping.

171. And turn up the heat between the sheets. 170. Then cool off

with a bedroom temperature around 65 degrees F or 18.3 degrees C.

169. Cool down with the Chillow, a cooling pad for your pillow that pulls heat

166. Wash and change your sheets often; use an all natural, scent-free detergent. 165. Create a

natural calming sleep sanctuary. “The bedroom’s for two things – sleep and intimacy,” says Braunstein.

164. Three’s a crowd:

Ban the big, bad social media monster.

163. Log off to

nod off. Kill the electronics at least an hour before your bedtime ritual.

162. Turn to paperback books, not ebooks, to bring on the ZZZs. 161. Time to get rid of that digital clock. It suppresses melatonin production. 160. Get an old-

fashioned clock but face it away from you so you’re not a stressed-out clock watcher.

159. Better yet, Rise & Shine is an alarm clock app that will only shut up if you smile at it in the morning; get it on iTunes. 158. Sleep tight

knowing you won’t sleep in – download

“Even the glow from a night light may not allow you a deeper sleep,” says Dimerman.

156. Download f.lux to ban that eerie blue glow from computer screens and smartphones; justgetflux.com. 155. No exercise equipment allowed in the bedroom! 154. Or office equipment. Gross. 153. Undo

electrosmog damage and reestablish healthy cellular function for better sleeping with Pulse Electromagnetic Field Therapy sleep; soul7.ca.

152. Get rid of all

pollutants – cut the clutter.

151. Better yet, feng

shui your bedroom for a more peaceful space. Move your bed to face the door.

150. Paint your bedroom a healing hue. Soothing, silvery Guilford green is Benjamin Moore’s top colour for 2015. 149. Decorate with plants, a mini fountain and artworks of beaches you’d love to run on. 148. Add a plush chenille throw to pamper and soothe.

iRun because it connects me to the universe. — Scott Prokopetz, Ontario

2015-04-09 1:19 PM


147. Feng shui your

sheets too. Get ones with a circular pattern to promote a comfort, calmness and good natural energy.

146. NATURAL FIBRE SHEETS, SUCH AS COTTON, ARE BEST. 145. Thread count matters. For comfort, aim for sheets with a thread count between 280 and 400. 144. Revaluate your

mattress every five years. “It’s the single most important piece of furniture in your home,” says McGinn.

143. Spend as much

as you can on a mattress. You get what you pay for.

138. Rice is nice,

especially jasmine, for a successful sleep.

137. Serve up a kale

salad, salmon and rice noodles for dinner.

136. Eat cereal

before bedtime. Try unsweetened whole grains - wheat, kamut, quinoa, buckwheat and oat.

135. Keep the

portions small. “Being mindful of portion sizes will prevent rapid spikes in insulin,” says Erin MacGregor, RD, P.H.Ec.

and sleep better.

128. Just a spoonful

of honey makes you go down, and stay down, for the count.

127. Drizzle organic

honey in your herbal tea, recommends DeMontis. The potassium helps you sleep.

126. Swap sugar for

a natural alternative like Xyla xylitol, xylitolcanada.com.

132. Mangos are

125. Eat the majority

131. Serve turkey,

but hold the gravy. “Tryptophan, the amino acid key to producing melatonin and famous in turkey, can be found in even greater amounts in shellfish, egg whites and spinach,” says MacGregor.

124. Whip up some

dinner two hours before bedtime to allow for initial digestion,” says Braunstein.

Overdoing turkey and tryptophan can leave you tired, but unable to sleep.

129. Eat apple slices dipped in raw honey to relieve heartburn

iRun for bacon. — Helene Carluen, Ontario

iRun_ISSUE03_April 23.indd 21

rich almonds. They’ll fuel your running performance too.

116. Eat two tablespoons of raw almond butter on a celery stick.

113. Plant the seed of a good night’s rest – eat sesame seeds.

141. And sleep on

130. No seconds.

117. Eat magnesium-

of caramelized SaviSeeds before bed.

133. Choose

foods that are rich in tryptophan, carbohydrates and melatonin.

magnesium. Say good morning to pumpkin seeds, swiss chard and spinach.

115. SaviSeeds (sacha inchi) are rich in magnesium and tryptophan, and help boost serotonin levels in the brain.

sleep well: Go for a plant-based diet, says Brendan Brazier, twotime Canadian 50K champion.

especially high in sleep-inducing tryptophan.

139. “Ideally, finish

calcium-rich green, leafy vegetables to your plate to boost melatonin production.

134. Eat well to

142. Seal your mattress, box spring and pillow against allergens.

140. But, even if sleeping on your side, avoid fats at dinner – the digestive system has to work overtime and that’ll keep you up.

121. Add more

118. Munch on

114. Grab a handful

of carbohydrates at night, particularly complex carbs as they are sleep-promoting.

your side. This is the healthiest and most popular position, and 73% of us do it.

is essential for the full activation of tryptophan. They’re also a good source of magnesium which may help you stay asleep,” says MacGregor.

sleep-enhancing whole-wheat pasta and throw in veggies, diced chicken and tomato sauce. Add a sprinkling of Parmesan.

123. Bone up on

120. “Reach for kale, collard greens, spinach, romaine or swiss chard if you want to get some shut eye,” says Brazier, author of Thrive Energy Cookbook 119. Ban blearyeyed mornings by increasing your omega-3 intake.

112. Nuts to no sleep! Walnuts boost serotonin and melatonin production, and actually contain their own source of melatonin, report University of Texas researchers. 111. Add black-eyed peas and lentils to your sleep-inducing arsenal.

110. Love your

lettuce. Lettuce contains lactucarium, which acts like opium on the brain, and relieves joint pain.

109. Sip on a brew

of lettuce leaves, four large, simmered in a cup of water for 15 minutes. Add two mint sprigs.

108. Eating white bread supposedly makes you sleepy. 107. Drink cherry juice - two cups a day, keeps insomnia away. 106. Eat cherries to sleep well - and run well too. This antioxidant-rich fruit will boost athletic performance and decrease muscle soreness. 105. Eat more bacon

– it’s rich in thiamine. A deficiency can lead to poor sleep.

104. Boost B6: “Vitamin B6, found in salmon, bananas and avocados is a key component in the conversion of seratonin, a neurotransmitter, into melatonin,” says MacGregor. 103. Take your vitamins in the morning, particularly B complex.

your calcium. Being calcium deficient is linked to insomnia.

102. Rethink your

122. “Dairy

potassium, says personal trainer Chris Leader. “Potassium is synergistic with

products, including milk and cheese, contain calcium which

ginseng supplement – it’s a stimulant. Take it in the morning.

101. Get your

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magnesium; the combination will remove nighttime leg cramps for most people.”

100. Less cramps = more sleep. 99. Eat a banana every single night. 98. Create a bedtime ritual.

97. Send signals to

the brain to start producing melatonin by lowering the lights around the house a few hours before hitting the sack.

96. Fold or iron

clothes. “There’s nothing like a repetitive task to

92. Brew up a

boost of glycine with a cup of chamomile tea. This body chemical acts like a mild sedative.

91. Catnip tea is an herbal sedative.

90. Drink chilled

chamomile tea to fend off sleep disturbances and digestive ones too.

89. Soothe the senses with a chamomile tea smoothie: Blend 1 cup chilled chamomile tea (brewed for 5 minutes); ½ cup frozen peaches; ½ tsp fresh grated ginger; 1 tsp. lemon juice; ¼ cup ice, and 1 serving plant-based protein powder, like Vega One Natural.

gentle mind/body exercises before bedtime, such as yoga or tai chi.

85. Rub your belly. With eyes closed, move your hand in a slow circular motion.

94. Take your calcium supplement at bedtime – it’s a natural sleep aid.

84. Squeeze your toes and relax them; repeat for a few minutes to release the day’s tension.

22

83. Sing yourself a

lullaby.

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Drift off listening to music and meditations with the Sound Oasis Sleep Therapy Pillow; two ultrathin speakers are buried deep in the pillow; soundoasis. com.

81. Flip and fluff your pillow.

80. Pick a firm pillow if you are a side sleeper, says sleep educator McGinn. 79. Go for a very

thin, almost flat, pillow if you sleep on your stomach.

77. Buy him a Snore

“Add a shot of rum and a touch of sugar,” says food editor DeMontis.

urinate.

82.

87. Stay away from

86. Switch off with

93. Don’t forget to

72. Cover up other

baking soda with eight ounces of water.

peppermint tea, and a peppermint face scrub at night – the scent is too stimulating.

95. Reach for milk.

elbows.

78. Put a pillow between or under your knees to enable perfect sleep alignment.

88. Mix ½ tsp. of

put you out,” says Beuermann-King.

73. Or use sharp

No More Pillow - cheaper than a divorce.

76. Put the squeeze on resentment with the Good Night Anti-Snoring Ring; snorenomore.net.

75. Studies show that couples suffer 50 per cent more sleep disturbances if they share a bed. “Even sound sleepers move 50 to 60 times per night,” reports Power Sleep. 74. Drown out

the snoring with ear plugs, sound machines, and a pillow wall.

noise pollution, like teeth grinding, with a fan or air purifier.

71. DOWNLOAD A FREE WHITE NOISE APP. 70. Share your bed

with Pzizz, mix of music, technology and the human voice to sleep better; pzizz.com.

69. Dream on

with Simply Noise: Each “colour” of noise is based on a different spectrum of low to high sound frequencies.

68. Make it

SimplyRain at iTunes and let the rain lull you to sleep.

67. Stop beating

yourself up when you can’t sleep.

66. STICK TO THE 15 MINUTE RULE. IF YOU CAN’T SLEEP, GET UP. 65. Read until your eyes droop. return to bed after 10-20 minutes.

64. Mentally tell

yourself you are going to have an amazing night’s sleep.

63. “Don’t tell

yourself how tired you’re going to be the next day, it can be self-fulfilling,” says Beuermann-King.

62. Practice affirmation. “Shut out repetitive thoughts, repeat, ‘I fall asleep quickly and easily, I wake up feeling refreshed,’” says Dr. Kathy Gruver, author of Conquer your Stress with Mind/ Body Techniques. 61. Believe you

slept well and you’ll feel like you did. Colorado College research shows that just thinking you had a good night’s sleep creates a placebo effect.

60. Make a list,

and check it twice. Prioritize your next day’s to-dos – including your run – on paper before going to bed.

59. “Don’t dwell on the past. Visualize a stop sign each time the thought enters your head,” says Dimerman.

58. See a therapist. 57. Shake off your fears. “Not being able to sleep is related to having too many unexpressed emotions, especially fear,” says Jude Bijou, author of Attitude Reconstruction. 56. Make love, not war. Going to bed mad is a sure-bet sleep saboteur.

55. Veto emotional discussions right before bedtime.

54. No talking.

Consider a 30-minute time where you meditate or relax, in the dark, in bed, advises Breus.

53. Hug, cuddle and hold hands to release feel-good hormones that’ll calm and soothe you to sleep. 52. Make room for an old-fashioned hot water bottle. 51. “Cuddle your

favourite stuffed animal to feel safe and secure,” says Orloff.

50. Practice a mini

meditation. On each inhale, think “I am.” On each exhale, “At peace.”

49. But any mantra is good. Try “ooomm.” 48. See the win.

“This is good for reducing anxiety, but also helps the performer reach a deeper level of sleep quicker,” says Steve Siebold, author of 177 Mental Toughness Secrets of The World Class.

47. Have conversation in your head with an imaginary friend. This will redirect your thinking away from the stressful stuff. 46. While you’re

mind chatting to no one, watch the ceiling fan.

45. Do not let your eyes close. 44. Daydream about all the great running gear you’d like to

iRun to compete with myself. — Gerald Losier, New Brunswick

2015-04-09 1:19 PM


buy, like the Saucony Triumph 12, the Salomon S-Lab X Series or the Hoka One One Clifton.

43. List the

dozens of dreamy destination races you want to take, including the Inca Trail Marathon and the Wine Country Half Marathon in California.

42. Add up how

much it’ll cost you.

41. Don’t! It’s likely a rude awakening.

40. Also: don’t live

pay cheque to pay cheque like 51% of Canadians do.

39. Sleep tight when

you live within your means.

insomnia. Sprinkle a few drops of lavender oil on a piece of tissue and tuck it under your pillow to help you ease into sleep,” says Langlais.

34. Purify the air around your bed with Sweet Orange and Mandarin Ambiance Mists by Lotus Aroma. 33. Get an oil

change. Use a diffuser and experiment with essential oils like ylang ylang or sandalwood.

32. Scents of the Jujube date promote deeper sleep. 31. Geranium, juniper and patchouli oils soothe and promote tranquility.

a calming mixture of essential oils; provinceapothecary. com.

19. Get a sleepworthy, luxurious duvet to match.

27. Spritz the super-

and exhale slowly through your left nostril only; repeat six times.

snoozer Deep Sleep Dreamy Pillow & Bath Mist. As you move around in the night, bursts of active fragrance are released.

26. Monitor your moves with my sleepbot.com and sleepcycle.com

25. SNOOZE WITH FITBIT SURGE AND VIEW YOUR SLEEP STATS. 24. Dream about the upcoming release of Jawbone’s UP3 - it reads skin temperature when you’re exercising, then tracks how much and how well you sleep; jawbone.com. 23. Cover your eyes! Sleep masks rule – inexpensive and no batteries required.

22. Get 40 winks 38. Enlist the help of

a financial planner.

37. Build a three to

six month emergency fund so you’re secure, says Schwartz.

36. When you have

seven month’s worth, reward yourself.

35. “Lavender

can actually be an antidote to

30. Rub a few drops of essential oils between your palms and inhale deeply.

29. Better yet, sniff a fix of chamomile and ylang ylang with Sleep Well Inhaler; escentsaromatherapy. com. 28. Put insomnia to rest with Sleep Well,

iRun because it’s what makes me. — Alicia Chiesa, Ontario

iRun_ISSUE03_April 23.indd 23

18. Tucked in, inhale

with a lavenderscented mask from mercola.com.

21. Blackout

with the witty Dreamstate Sleep Mask; thedreamstate. com.

20. Complete darkness is essential so get heavy duty curtains to block out any light.

12. And trade in your sleep meds for sharp objects. Acupuncture points to improved melatonin secretion.

11. After acupuncture, stir up this sure-bet sleep remedy: Mix of ¼ tsp. of gray Celtic sea salt and two glasses of water – supplies 84 minerals to assist overall relaxation, says Brand. 10. Brew up the holy grail of Ayurvedic herbs, like Tulsi, often referred to as holy basil, and Ashwagandha.

17. Curl your toes

for five seconds and release. Repeat through each muscle group, up to your neck.

16. Now for your eyeballs: release the sleepy hormone, melatonin, by closing your eyes and rolling your eyeballs up and down three times. 15. Take a breath with Universal Breathing Pranayama to destroy the cortisol in your blood and make way for the secretion of melatonin; iTunes.

14. Tap into Neuromuscular Vibration Therapy, which combines brainwave relaxing binaural sounds and vibration therapy to induce a deep state of rest.

9. Don’t disparage

sleep as “lost” time, says Michael K. Scullin, director of Baylor’s Sleep Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory. “It helps memory and learning.”

8. Sleep tight

knowing that “sleeping well in middle age predicted better mental functioning 28 years later,” adds Scullin.

7. Do not attempt the staying awake world record of 11 days – one 26-yearold Chinese man died trying in 2012. 6. Instead, seek sunlight or bright lights as soon as you get up. This sends a message to your body’s biological clock

5. STILL CAN’T SLEEP? SEE A DOCTOR ABOUT YOUR SNORING — IT COULD BE OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA. 4. Treat sleep

apnea with a CPAP breathing mask. Not only sleep better, but it can actually help you appear more alert and youthful.

3. Read this and

weep! Beauty sleep is no mere myth: A Swedish study found that “sleep-deprived people appear less healthy, less attractive and more tired compared with when they are well rested.”

2. Still can’t sleep? The joke’s on you – “have one good, hearty belly laugh every day. It elevates serotonin levels,” says Moore, of fitnessonthego.ca.  1. Double the fun – tell jokes while you run. You’ll not only run with a smile, but sleep tight tonight.

13. Reset your internal clock with Re-Timer glasses; re-timer.com.

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TRAILS

ESCAPE INTO THE WILD

To begin our new trail running section, firefighter Devin Featherstone, winner of Alberta’s Lost Soul 100K, tells us about the appeal of his sport.

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n North America, our world is focused on convenience. Roads, pathways, escalators, elevators – they’re all at our finger tips. We click a button and food arrives at our door. Convenience: it’s defined as the quality of being suitable to one’s comfort, purposes or needs. Perhaps the need to escape the norm, step away from the paths and into the quiet of the wilderness is what draws people to trail running. Convenience is not an option when you escape into the wild. Imagine running through the forest, the sunlight streams through the leaves of the trees. Its reflection bounces off the morning dew that’s settled into the rocks.

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Your feet aren’t touching pavement, instead they are stepping over rocks, branches, puddles and fallen flora. Your mind is tranquil – you can’t focus on your job, your kids, your finances. All you are focusing on is your next step. Knowing that if for one second, your thoughts wander away from the path you’ll fall. This is meditation, this is an escape from reality. This is the place where you focus on no one except yourself. You run, and as you do so, your breath tries to keep up. When you exhale, clouds of steam escape in front of you. The morning is cool, but you welcome the chill. Every step you take burns, the terrain isn’t flat.

You wind up and down hills that most people only dream of hiking. There’s no judgment on the trails. This is a sport that welcomes everyone. There’s no scoreboard, and little reflection to your overall time or pace. This is a journey that has a start and finish that you decide. My personal journey with trail running started simply. When I transitioned back to Calgary, I decided that I was going to start running some of the more simple single track options that were available. Over the course of time, I began to challenge myself and tackle terrain that people struggled to hike. I was moving past them, conquering the distance in minimal times.

Trail running never gets boring. The scenery changes daily. I can run the same track 100 times and still see something that I hadn’t noticed before, be it an animal or a view. My home, and backyard have some of the most inspiring, picturesque views that a person could ask to see. People travel thousands of miles, and spend hundreds of dollars to visit what so many of us who reside here forget to see. I find the people who trail run to be different. The person you’re competing against will stop to help you if you fall. Because of this sport, and passion of mine I’ve had the opportunity to meet so many amazing runners. All of them bringing a unique story to the table: captivated by what’s around me, and content with conversation. I couldn’t ask for more. My best company would have to be my dog Stevie, who never turns down an opportunity

to run. Two of the most amazing trails I’ve conquered would be the North Over Ridge and the Rockwall trail. The North Over Ridge is an intense and very extreme mountain run. You climb up some gnarly scree sections that you top off by walking along a tiny ridge that has no room for error. Although challenging, the rewards are priceless. This trail offers some of the most beautiful scenery in the world. Generally, the Rockwall trail is done as a three-day hike. The best time of year to do it is in the later month of September when the larch trees turn into a beautiful yellow shade. Combined with lakes and massive mountain walls that you can run along, you’ve got yourself a trail run that shouldn’t be missed. I still drop my jaw every time I get to see this area and can’t wait to visit it again.

iRun to inspire and save others. — Michelle Mabe, Nova Scotia

2015-04-09 1:19 PM


HOT TO TROT by Carrie Snyder

The instant I agreed to write about running shoes, my hamstring seized up during a set of interval sprints, while running with my 12-year-old daughter. (Is she faster than me? Well, her hamstrings definitely are.) And so it was that I began regularly visiting my physio and chiro, even while brand-new running shoes started to roll through the door. (Yes, this is a sweet gig. No, I can’t request shoes in your size, honey.) There’s nothing like opening boxes of shiny new running shoes that you temporarily cannot run in: the irony was almost as painful as the leg. I compromised. I wore the shoes to walk through snow and ice to pick up kids from school. I wore them to spin class and boot camp. And, finally, at last, I wore them to run intervals again, thanks to exercises that encouraged me to find my inner glutes of steel. Just a reminder: always test out a shoe for yourself before purchase, keeping in mind that your foot, your gait, and your training goals are unique. PHOTO BY DARREN CALABRESE

iRun so I can play hockey! — David O’Brien, Ontario

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Adidas Ultra Boost

10.6oz; 10.0m drop from heel to forefoot; big bounce and cushion

ARCH SUPPORT

This shoe looks good, and it’s got a techie edge too: the body of the shoe is a flexible rubbery bootie, almost like a sock into which you slide your foot. (Note: with very little protection around or over the toe, this is not a shoe for deep winter running, or puddle-jumping — you will get cold and wet.) The laces are in a plastic overlay that floats around the spongy shell. You can’t adjust the tightness around the ankle; however, I found the fit good. The outsole offers a cushiony stability and the mesh construction of the sock is comfy, but the heel is a little wider than on other shoes: it’s a bit like running inside a sturdy tea cozy. Adidas also sent me wicked awesome running gear — the long-sleeved shirt, light-weight jacket, and snazzy capri tights are super-comfortable and every bit as good-looking as the shoe.

Brooks PureConnect 4

ACE STABILITY

6.6oz; high arch; neutral, minimalist profile Let’s admit that sometimes we’re drawn to a shoe because it’s got flash. This stylin’ shoe is colourful, bright, fun and earned a whole lot of notice from friends in my spin and weights class. As I laced up in the changeroom, they said, “Whoa, new shoes? Sweet!” and “Hey, I’d wear those!” The tread has excellent grip, a must-have when swinging kettle bells at 6 a.m. As for running, at 6.6oz this shoe is featherlight, extremely flexible both heel to toe and across the midline, and makes me speedy, or gives me the illusion that I might be. Either way, the big support beneath the arches and the snug fit of the spongy body are super-comfy. Given the thin profile of the soles, I felt surprisingly well-supported while running. I’ll wear this shoe for shorter distances or to train on the track. Not for those with flat feet or who need support at the ankles.

New Balance, Fresh Foam Zante

6.47oz; 16mm heel; 10mm toe; neutral, cushioning profile

SUPER CUTE

These shoes were instantly coveted by a friend who shares my shoe size. She spotted them during a party I was hosting, tried them on — and I wasn’t sure I’d get them back again. It’s a good-looking shoe, with fluorescent pink details adding a splash of colour to the more muted greys of the mesh body. But how does it move? This is a lightweight shoe with good flexibility and movement from toe to heel. Good arch support combined with a 6mm drop from heel to toe encourages a quick stride. The shoe has a snug fit, with laces that can be adjusted high around the ankle for support. Unlike many other running shoes, the outsole (the bottom of the shoe) is constructed from a single piece of blown rubber, and it’s a shoe I will use for shorter distances and interval training … or wear to parties. (Just kidding. But they are super-cute.)

Asics Gel-Kayano21

8.9oz; 24mm heel; recommended for a neutral to slight over-pronating stride

FLEXIBLE FIT

This is a nice reliable shoe — a shoe that does its job, without a lot of flash. You won’t mistake it for anything other than what it is: a dependable running shoe, meant to pound out long kilometres on the road. My Thursday morning running partner only noticed them after I’d pointed them out (and she usually remarks on any changes). The fit is snug and comfortable, with support under the arch and the ball of the foot, designed to support a heel-strike gait. The tread is solid and effective, and the toes are protected, which is good for outdoor running in wet or snowy weather. The laces do their job and can be adjusted to support the ankle more or less, as desired. I would put this shoe in the stability camp, and wear it for longer runs rather than speed training. You could also wear this shoe to spin in or to boot camp, for sure.

SMART DESIGN

Saucony, Triumph ISO

9.0oz; 29mm heel; 21mm toe; designed for road or track; high arch; neutral, cushioning profile “You finally found a shoe as bright as your sweatshirt,” observed my trainer, Phil, who likes to bug me about the fluorescent yellow garment in which I frequently turn up for boot camp. And it’s true. This shoe will knock your eye out. It’s become my go-to shoe for boot camp and spin class — the thick sole, though quite pliable, offers just the right amount of support for the foot. I really like running in this shoe too: it’s got a comfortable, cushy feel, and fits snugly around the ball of the foot. The lacing is slightly eccentric, with a support cage that “floats” over the body of the shoe, which apparently allows for a “foot-hugging feel” (so says the marketing material). Overall, I feel speedy and contained (or perhaps hugged) and definitely highly visible when running in this shoe.

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iRun to feel good. — Sebastien Turcotte, Quebec

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Puma Ignite

8.2oz; 12mm heel to toe drop; cushioning range from minimal to medium to full

GOOD GRIP

This is a seriously beautiful shoe that could masquerade as a casual, stylish sneaker. The problem with these shoes is that I want to wear them around town, rather than ruin them by running through miles of muck and mud. Toe to heel the outsole has plenty of give, with solid cushioning under the heel — suits a neutral stride. The fit is a little loose overall and you may want to go down a half-size. I wore them with double-socks for an icy outdoor run, and found the traction good — I had a solid connection with the road, while by contrast my running partner was slipping all over the place. The shoe offers good support for spin class or boot camp. I’m a fan of these shoes, and this will be my new go-to travelling shoe because of its stylish versatility.

WICKED TREAD

Nike Flyknit Lunar3

7.9oz men; 6.5oz women; midsole offset 10mm This shoe arrived a little later than the others, when I was back to running at a nice steady pace for half an hour at a stretch — without pain! Imagine that! On the track, I found the shoe comfortable for the distance I was going, though I’d hesitate to take it out for a superlong, pavement-pounding marathon. While the trim and tidy shoe didn’t draw the notice of my early-morning running friend, on the following day at boot camp, the knitted body attracted the attention of my friend who knits: “Those look different!” The shoe fits a bit differently too. It’s relatively snug across the ball of the foot. The knitted material is tough enough to be supportive, but with flexibity that allows for lateral movement. The outsole is thin, with moderate cushioning under the heel, and good grip at the toe—useful for all the basic moves at boot camp. And while I was happy to wear these shoes to boot camp, it’s awfully sweet to lace ‘em up and be back to running, running, running again.

Mizuno Wave Rider 18

7.8oz; neutral shoe; hard carbon rubber outsole in heel; soft rubber in forefoot This is a neutral shoe with a snug fit. I wore it doing running intervals on an indoor track, and took it outside in the snow and ice a few times. I found it a stable shoe that nevertheless had enough give from heel to toe to allow my foot to move comfortably. On my runs, I appreciated the good arch support and firm lateral structure; however, the mesh front doesn’t provide much protection for the toes. My feet got cold. If you’re not running in the dead of winter, however, this is a problem easily avoided. Overall, I rate this as a safe, steady partner of a shoe.

SMOOTH RIDE Skechers GoRun 4

SWEET FEEL

Pearl Izumi, EM Tri NI

10.2oz; neutral; minimalist cushioning platform The last pair of shoes has arrived just in time for spring to feel real— even with a surprise skiff of snow on the ground. The robins don’t seem to mind, and the snow vanishes almost as quickly as it arrives. My friend and I run through our neighbourhood’s quiet streets in the early morning, stopping to listen to the birds. I’m pretty much busting with happiness because these shoes are comfy and my cardio fitness is returning, even as we crank it up the steepest hill in our ‘hood. Recommended for high-mileage, these shoes lace up snugly and hit the pavement super-smoothly. I’m not familiar with the brand, but it’s due for a break-out—this is a no-nonsense running shoe that appeals to my inner-marathoner (you’re still in there, aren’t you, innermarathoner?). Let’s get training!

iRun because I want to eat more! — Guy Leblanc, Ontario

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5.2oz; 4mm heel drop; minimalist profile; comes with removable insoles for more cushioning This is the lightest shoe of the bunch, and offers a ton of movement for the foot, for those looking for a minimalist style. The bright design earned favourable comments from passersby, and my nine-year-old daughter loved the look: she was convinced the shoes would glow in the dark — and they are highly reflective, which is good for those of us who run after dark or before sunrise. This is a good shoe for boot camp, though too light for spinning. For running, I used the insole, which added some cushioning under the arch and heel; without the insole, I could feel the huge cleats of the tread against the bottom of my foot. I found the fit a little roomy, especially in the toe box, but that worked for winter running: in doublesocks, at -15 degrees C, my feet didn’t get cold, and even in slippery conditions the grip was solid. If you’re aiming to run with a barefoot-style stride, this shoe definitely encourages a natural forefoot strike. Personally, I’d be nervous to run long distances in this shoe, but I found it extremely comfortable for a speedy short run.

LIGHTNING FAST

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> MUSIC

RACE TUNES Kobo Town is Drew Gonsalves, a Trinadian-Canadian who makes ska, reggae and the country’s freshest rock ‘n’ roll. Given his diverse range of influences, we asked him to design a playlist. ALLEGRO FROM JOAQUIN RODRIGO’S CONCIERTO DE ARANJUEZ With its strumming guitar and soaring trumpets, this spirited intro to the Spanish composer’s most famous work is certain to send the runner sallying forth in triumph.

NENA, 99 RED BALLOONS Perhaps the catchiest musical prelude to nuclear apocalypse ever written.

KELLYLEE EVANS, LOSE YOURSELF The Toronto Singer’s jazzified version of Eminem’s famous tune adds a strong melodic element while retaining the intensity of the original.

SERGENT GARCIA, AMOR PA MI From the French pioneer of salsamuffin - the Sergent treats us to his signature blend of dancehall reggae, salsa and cumbia.

THE HOOSIERS, COPS AND ROBBERS As you run, you can imagine you have just plundered the vault of (insert financial institution here) and are on the way to the helicopter that will carry you beyond the long reach of the law.

A-HA, TAKE ON ME For those of us of a certain vintage. . . To hear Kobo Town’s playlist, please visit iRun.ca

PHOTO BY MELANIE WINTER

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iRun because it keeps me happy. — Jane Widdecombe, Ontario

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MUSIC

KREVIAZUK’S KRAZY JUKEBOX To launch our new music column, we asked Chantel Kreviazuk to tell us what she listens to on the run and to name her favourite Our Lady Peace tune. We caught up with her the evening before the Grammy Awards. By Ben Kaplan

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he’s won two Junos, gone platinum four times and written songs for artists like Gwen Stefani, Kelly Clarkson, Avril Lavigne and Drake, but when Chantal Kreviazuk laces up her sneakers, she’s just like everyone else ambling for a PB. Born in Winnipeg and based in L.A., Kreviazuk is a mother, artist, songwriter-in-demand, performer, guitarist, pianist and seriously committed hiker and runner. Ben Kaplan caught up with her the evening before the Grammy Awards.

WHAT SONG DO YOU LISTEN TO WHEN YOU’RE RUNNING THAT WOULD SURPRISE FOLKS? That’s a tough one. Probably some Alt J or The Killers or something percussive. 

I love how inspiring [running] is, how alive I feel at the end, how I can seemingly get pulled out of any mood by running.

WHAT SONG OF YOURS DO YOU THINK WORKS BEST AS A RUNNING ANTHEM? Maybe my song The Way or Souls from Colour Moving and Still.

YOU SANG THE HOOK ON A DRAKE SONG. DO YOU EVER LISTEN TO DRAKE WHEN YOU RUN? IF SO, WHICH ALBUM OR WHICH TUNE? I have not listened

iRun because I am a warrior! (at heart). — Jacinda Sullivan, Nova Scotia

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to Drake under such circumstances before.

AS A RUNNER, WHAT MAKES A GOOD RUNNING SONG FOR YOU? I like the song to have depth, but to also be percussive and at a moderate tempo. 

CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT YOUR BACKGROUND AS A RUNNER—WHEN DID YOU GET STARTED? I ran on and off as a kid. It always seemed like a challenge and very rewarding, both in the moment and in how it builds cardiovascular strength and burns calories.

I’VE ALSO SEEN PICTURES OF YOU RUNNING WITH YOUR DOG. That’s right, I certainly got a bit more into it when Raine and I got our now nearing 16-year-old pup, Chanti. She’s a sporting breed so she required a great deal of exercise from us through the years. Running with her has been a great joy of my life. 

ON AVERAGE, HOW FAR DO YOU LIKE TO RUN? I run probably 4-5 kilometres.

WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT THE SPORT? I love how inspiring it is, how alive I feel at the end, how I can seemingly get pulled out of any mood by running.

THAT’S AWESOME AND, WE HAVE TO ASK: WHEN’S THE LAST TIME YOU RAN LISTENING TO OUR LADY PEACE? I don’t have a ton of music on my device these days, but there is a ton of Our Lady Peace and Raine Maida on there. I love to run to the song Apology by OLP.  Here’s a tip: it has a great tempo for running. 

OVERALL, WHY IS HEALTH AND FITNESS IMPORTANT TO YOU? I think when I am running, active, and investing in my body with exercise and routine, it causes me to make smarter choices in my diet over all. I drink more water, juice more— I’m more conscious and, overall, that’s a very good thing. Chantal Kreviazuk is currently on tour with her husband Raine Maida and they have May tour dates in Toronto, Montreal, Halifax, Peterborough, and Beaumont, Alberta. For complete listings and ticket information, see chantalkreviazuk.com.

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PHOTO BY DARREN CALABRESE

One of the greatest and most counterintuitive things I’ve learned in the four years since returning home from university is that the more vulnerable I’ve allowed myself to be, the stronger I’ve become.

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iRun because it helps my lungs stay strong. — Helene Desormeau, Ontario

2015-04-09 1:19 PM


KATE VAN BUSKIRK ON KATE VAN BUSKIRK: HOW I UNLOCKED THE ULTIMATE ME

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’m sitting on the covered patio in front of our condo in Scottsdale, Arizona sipping on a postrun coffee and stretching my tired legs out on the chair across from me. I gaze down at my sunburnt thighs, a reminder of how close we are to the unrelenting sun. It’s hard to find shade in the desert and most of my runs trace the canal systems that cut like veins through this arid land supplying water to the cities and farms, the life blood of the Copper State. I’m getting darker every day, and the tan lines that give away every athlete are becoming increasingly pronounced: sports bra, shorts, compression socks, sunglasses, watch. My body is a patchwork of white and brown; Canada and Arizona. Training in the American southwest is a new experience for me. Each winter for the last three years I’ve traveled to Florida to escape the snow and cold for a few weeks, but the best early season races are in California so basing in the neighbouring state makes far more sense. March in Scottsdale, April in Flagstaff, May in California … not a bad way to welcome spring! Each workout is faster than the last, and it’s relieving to feel my fitness coming around. This is the good life: when the body is fit and healthy, the mind is tuned in and the heart

is full. But it isn’t always this way. Every track and field athlete in Canada will face a laundry list of obstacles throughout their athletic career that make them question their commitment to this sport: injury, illness, a crushing loss, a disappointing season, nomad’s fatigue, being flat broke, the internal debate between sticking it out for one more year or just moving on to a real job already. Knowing that these experiences are shared by our tight-knit community of athletes provides some solace, but as we watch more and more of our friends walk away from the track and move on to start families, careers and RRSPs, it’s hard not to wonder if this pursuit is worth the sacrifice. Like most elite athletes, I’ve dealt with each of the aforementioned challenges. And, as I’ve realized is also true for many athletes, these challenges have been compounded by anxiety and depression. My struggle with mental illness seemed in its worst moments like the thing that most defined me, even as I was experiencing the greatest athletic success of my collegiate career. In my last year at Duke I set an NCAA record and three Duke school records, earned two All-American

iRun because there’s no greater high in life. — Claire Davis, Alberta

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titles, anchored our Blue Devils to a 4x800m victory at the Penn Relays, and ran personal bests just about every time I stepped on the track. I was being recognized as one of the top mid-distance runners in the NCAA in the same semester that I was struggling to get out of bed or attend classes. I was both protected and terrified by this image, constantly afraid that the grand illusion would be shattered and my vulnerable side would be revealed. One of the greatest and most counterintuitive things I’ve learned in the four years since returning home from university is that the more vulnerable I’ve allowed myself to be, the stronger I’ve become. Just like the injuries, the illnesses, the financial stressors and the uncertainty about the future, the more

of Brampton when I was in middle school. I was preparing for the North American Hershey Track and Field Games, by far the biggest race of my young life. I was running 400m repeats and my dad was coaching me; other than the two of us, the stadium was empty. As I began my last interval, my dad told me to imagine myself running the best race of my life, and to use this as motivation to finish the workout as fast as I could. I’m sure he intended for me to envision myself competing well at the Hershey meet, but the image that came into my 13-year-old mind was of crossing the finish line at the Olympics. I had no real frame of reference for this other than what I’d seen on TV, but as I rounded the final turn on the track I pictured a stadium roaring with

“Competing at the Olympics would surely be an unparalleled experience, but it would be just one set of memories within a much larger anthology.” I’ve talked about dealing with depression and anxiety the more I’ve found support, understanding and community. I’ve gained a wealth of knowledge about myself as an athlete and as a person, and I’ve equipped myself with information and tools to move forward on this journey as peacefully and optimistically as possible. And I get more excited about the journey every day. I vividly remember a workout that I did at the Chinguacousy Park track in my hometown

energy, me wearing a Canadian racing kit, and the Olympic rings above me. At 13 I knew innately that I wanted to be an Olympian, and that desire has fuelled my athletic drive for the last 15 years. The Rio 2016 Olympic Games are now just over a year away, and the excitement builds with each passing day. But while my dream of becoming an Olympian has intensified over the years, it now shares its spot in my heart with other experiences and desires.

Over the last decade, I have had the great fortune of representing Canada at eight major international events and each has brought me enormous pride, extraordinary learning opportunities and memories that will stay with me throughout my life. Competing at the Olympics would surely be an unparalleled experience, but it would be just one set of memories within a much larger anthology that will collectively define my athletic career. I’m also never navigating this journey alone. I have such an enormous love affair with the running community, who constantly surprises and inspires me, and which cannot be adequately described as anything other than an awesome, giant family. I feel this community beside me every time I lace up my shoes, and the tremendous sense of purpose that this brings helps to keep me grounded. Through the successes and the disappointments, I am buoyed by my love for my sport and the people which comprise it. There is always something to look forward to, and before the Olympics can fully enter my radar, I have this summer’s Pan Am Games and World Championships to prepare for. Neither team will be announced until late June, so for now I’ll run through the desert, my head full of dreams, my heart full of love, and my body readying itself for whatever the next step may be. Kate Van Buskirk won bronze for Canada at the 2014 Commonwealth Games. She’s currently training for the 2016 Rio Olympics.

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TRAVEL

DESTINATION RACING FOR THE VERY FIRST TIME Although she has participated in events from 5K fun runs to full marathons, Anna Lee Boschetto has never run a race outside of Ontario. Here’s what happens when this first-time destination runner kicks it at the Samsung Marathon in Tel Aviv.

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’m curious by nature, adventurous by choice and always up for travel, but these days my parental status means that I weigh my decisions a little more carefully than I did when my life wasn’t filled with the joys of two children. Still, the winds of January whistled out my window and snow swirled across the front yard. I was dizzy with excitement at the thought of escaping this frigid Canadian winter. Running a half-marathon in shorts, against the backdrop of the Mediterranean Sea? The children would be in good hands with their dad, and my morning running routine needed a change of pace, one that didn’t have me trudging through snow and negotiating icy sidewalks. I decided to run a half marathon in Tel Aviv. A UNESCO World

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Heritage Site, Tel Aviv is an active city that’s a sports-minded person’s dream destination. It’s not uncommon to see runners, cyclists and roller bladers, along the boardwalk that spans the coastline at 1 a.m. Tel Avivians also take surfing pretty seriously, with several beachside surf schools. Add in an immaculately maintained boardwalk that weaves along the seaside from the restaurants and shops in the Tel Aviv harbor to the historic area of Jaffa; there’s so much to explore that it just makes sense to be out there for a half marathon. As my plane landed in Tel Aviv, I could feel the warmth of the air on my face even before I stepped out of Ben Gurion Airport. When my tour guide Ari told me that it was unseasonably warm for February, I didn’t think

much about how this climate might affect me on race day. To be honest, I didn’t really notice the heat all that much, even on race day, and that’s one of the cool facts about a destination race: it gives a few unexpected twists and turns to your usual running perspective. After a couple of critical health situations in 2014, officials for the Samsung Tel Aviv Marathon bumped the date up to late February, banking on cooler temperatures. That didn’t exactly work out, but by adjusting the marathon, along with the other race start times by an hour, the majority of the 2,300 marathoners and nearly 9,000 half marathoners had a reprieve from the heat. With the course weaving along the Mediterranean, the warmth of the sun mingling with

LEFT, WITH AN EARLY MORNING KICK OFF, RUNNERS HEADING TO THE MARATHON START LINE WERE GREETED BY A SPECTACULAR SUNRISE. TOP RIGHT, GIVING ATHLETES OF ALL ABILITIES THE OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE, HAND CYCLISTS COMPETE ON A 30K COURSE. BOTTOM, THE WRITER IS GLOWING AFTER COMPLETING HER FIRST DESTINATION RACE. PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANCESCA BARBIERI.

the salty sea air, the view is exactly what you’d picture on a post card – a turquoise sea, meeting an endless skyline that’s dotted with cumulous clouds. Under the shade of the olive trees that line Sderet Rothesechild Boulevard, I’m making my way to the turnabout while high-fiving with the children who are cheering along the way. Doing so not only reminds me of my own daughters at home, but it also has me reminiscing about my own childhood spent cheering for friends and family at sporting events and how great it feels to be acknowledged. I make a mental note to do this wherever I’m running next. Whether it was the shade, the crowds or the postcard views, I didn’t notice the rising temperatures, until the homestretch, more like the last three kilometres. At that point, I could practically hear my skin sizzling in the sun and I’m pretty sure that if I had cracked a raw egg onto the pavement, it would have promptly sizzled, too. Nevertheless, crossing

that finish line after grinding out those final kilometres, I was beaming. It wasn’t my fastest run, but by far it felt like one of my best. Maybe it was the flavour of the lemon popsicles that were given out at the finish line or the Sprite and potato chips that I chowed in lieu of a sports drink and banana in the post-race tents. Even days later, my post-race satisfaction was at an alltime high. Like most runners, I’m a little type-A, which means that I wasn’t convinced that I could dial it back, put the time goal out of my mind and basically run like a kid. And I know we can’t all escape to far off destinations for every running event, but it’s worth indulging your wanderlust now and again. Whether it’s the waves crashing against the rock cuts or the endlessly winding trails, sometimes you’ve got to get away to put it all in perspective. Anna Lee Boschetto is the managing editor of iRun magazine. She writes about travel, health and food.

iRun to keep myself sane! — Bobbi-Jo Lodewyks, Manitoba

2015-04-09 1:20 PM


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iRun to prove to myself that I can overcome any obstacle. — Christine Dorcin, Ontario

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RACEBOARD

*

@RunCRS 2015 National Marathon Championships

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iRun to eat dark chocolate and drink red wine! — Michelle Kennedy, Ontario

2015-04-09 1:20 PM


MARATHON // 1/2 MARATHON 10K // 5K // 2K // KIDS MARATHON

THE TAMARACK OTTAWA RACE WEEKEND 2015 EVENT PREVIEW

MAY

23 - 24

2015 iRun because it makes my days so much better. — Ron Thurlow, Saskatchewan

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RACEBOARD

HEALTH AND FITNESS EXPO The excitement starts at the Health and Fitness Expo. Pick up your race kit, shop the Expo for great deals on cool running gear, and check out some great talks from running experts.

Volunteers help make the Tamarack Ottawa Race Weekend the best running weekend in the world. Be part of the action on race weekend. Volunteer! Find out how at runottawa.ca/volunteer

Get their early to avoid the line for race kit pick-up!

HEALTH AND FITNESS EXPO LOCATION Shaw Centre 55 Colonel By Drive

HEALTH & FITNESS EXPO HOURS

CHARITY CHALLENGE

Thursday, May 21st – 4 p.m. – 8 p.m. Friday, May 22nd – 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Saturday, May 23rd – 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

RUNNING THE 2KM OR 5KM? Race kits must be picked up before 1 p.m. on Saturday!

You don’t have to be standing at Elgin & Laurier to catch all of the action. The Ottawa 10K and Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon will be broadcast live. Visit www.runottawa.ca on race day.

The Scotiabank Charity Challenge will raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for local charities in 2015. And you can help. Just pick a charity and create a profile. It’s a great way to make a difference and get people cheering you on! Find out more at runottawa.ca/charity.

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iRun because there is no such thing as a bad run. — Jason Bungay, Nova Scotia

2015-04-09 1:20 PM


This is the moment you’ve been training for – and dreaming about. Time to join thousands of your fellow runners on the starting line and give it your all.

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

3:00 p.m. Ottawa 2K

7:00 a.m. Scotiabank Ottawa Marathon

4:00 p.m. HTG Sports Ottawa 5K

8:00 a.m. Scotiabank Ottawa Kids Marathon

6:30 p.m. Ottawa 10K

9:00 a.m. Scotiabank Ottawa 1/2 Marathon Arrive early to check your bag and get to your corral in plenty of time!

All start lines at Elgin and Laurier.

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iRun to connect with my higher self. — Jeff Martin, Ontario

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RACEBOARD

Kids love running too! Find out how to participate at runottawa.ca

TERRY FOX - RUNNING TO THE HEART OF CANADA Thirty-five years after his heroic Marathon of Hope, this unique exhibition at Canada’s Museum of History uses artifacts, photographs and interviews to allow you to retrace Terry Fox’s courageous 143-day, 5,300 kilometre journey from St. John’s, Newfoundland, to Thunder Bay, Ontario. Opens April 2nd. Visit historymuseum.ca for more information.

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iRun because I was made to run. — Pierre Lafontaine, Québec

2015-04-09 1:20 PM


After your race, experience the Capital at a more relaxed pace Before or after your Ottawa Race Weekend event, take time to explore the Capital’s many sights, national museums, and urban delights—including Terry Fox – Running to the Heart of Canada, a 35th Anniversary exhibition about Terry Fox’s courageous Marathon of Hope at the Canadian Museum of History. Book hotels, packages and discounted attraction tickets online.

TERRY FOX © Gail Harvey

RUNNING TO THE HEART OF CANADA

WWW.OTTAWATOURISM.CA 1- 888-OTTAWA- 8

iRun to become a stronger person — Jason Cotnam, Ontario

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iRun.ca

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RACEBOARD

Help Bring them Home #EndKidsCancer

REGISTER TODAY! 100KM TEAM RELAY

Inspire Motivate

Encourage TORONTO

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OTTAWA

OCTOBER 3

CALGARY

AUGUST 22

iRun with purpose. — Paul, Radcliffe, Ontario

2015-04-09 1:20 PM


iRun because it makes me ...me. — Anna Turner, Alberta

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Emilies Run 2015 iRun_FNL.pdf

2/12/15

8:41:46 PM

RACEBOARD

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iRun because I want to find focus. — Kyla Kryski, Ontario

2015-04-09 1:20 PM


PEI Marathon 2015 iRun Mag Ad.indd 2

iRun because it makes me a better father and husband. — Jason Evans, Newfoundland

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iRun.ca

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RACECALENDAR

[ WEST ]

Sunday, April 26 Boogie the Bridge Kamloops, BC Boogiethebridge.com Sunday, April 26 Times Colonist 10K Victoria, BC TC10K.ca Saturday, May 9 Shoppers Drug Mart Run for Women Vancouver, BC Runforwomen.ca Saturday, May 16 Lynn Canyon Runoff North Vancouver, BC Sky2coveevents.com/lynncanyon-runoff Saturday, June 6 RunForH20 Vancouver, BC Runforh2o.gwatermala.org Sunday, June 7 Fund Run 2015 Maple Ridge, BC Rmhfoundation.com Sunday, June 14 Edge to Edge Marathon Ucluelet, BC Edgetoedgemarathon.com Friday, June 19 Blueshore Financial Longest Day Road Race Vancouver, BC Thunderbirdstrack.org/longestday-race Saturday, June 27 GoodLife Fitness City Chase Vancouver, BC Goodlifefitnesscitychase. ca.events/vancouver Saturday, June 27 Tenderfoot Boogie North Vancouver, BC Trailwhisperer.ca/Tenderfoot

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Wednesday, July 1 Run Canada Day Vancouver, BC Runcanadaday.com

Sunday, May 31 Scotiabank Calgary Marathon Calgary, AB Calgarymarathon.com

Sunday, April 26 Limestone Race Weekend Kingston, ON Kraa.org

Saturday, July 18 Totem to Totem Marathon Skidegate, BC Totemtototem.com

Saturday, June 6 Shoppers Drug Mart Run for Women Regina, SK Runforwomen.ca

Sunday, May 3 Mississauga Marathon Mississauga, ON Mississaugamarathon.com

Saturday, July 25 Vancouver Pride Run and Walk Vancouver, BC Vancouverpride.ca/events/ pride-run-walk Saturday, August 8 Annual Loop the Lake Invermere, BC Loopthelake.bc.ca

Saturday, July 13 Millarville Run to the Farmers Market Half-Marathon Millarville, AB Millarvillehalfmarathon.com

Sunday, May 3 GoodLife Fitness Toronto Marathon Toronto, ON Torontomarathon.com

Saturday, June 20 Summit Run Prince Albert, SK Summitrun.org

Saturday, May 9 La Course des Rayons de Soleil Brossard, QC lacoursedesrayonsdesoleil.ca

Wednesday, July 1 High River Half-Marathon High River, AB Highriverhalf.com

Sunday, May 10 London Run for Ovarian Cancer London, ON Runforovariancancer.ca

Saturday, July 4 The A-Moose-ing Race Moose Jaw, SK Theamooseingrace.com

Sunday, May 10 Shoppers Drug Mart Run for Women Ottawa, ON Runforwomen.ca

[ PRAIRIES ]

Sunday, April 26 Calgary Police Half Marathon Calgary, AB Halfmarathon.cpsevents.ca Sunday, April 26 Regina Police Service Half Marathon Regina, SK Rpshalfmarathon.com Sunday, April 26 Edmonton Police Foundation Half-Marathon Edmonton, AB Epfhalfmarathon.ca Sunday, May 10 Transplant Trot Saskatoon, SK Transplanttrot.ca Saturday, May 30 Shoppers Drug Mart Run for Women Edmonton, AB Runforwomen.ca Sunday, May 31 Moose Jaw Transplant Trot Moose Jaw, SK Transplanttrot.ca/moosejaw

Saturday, August 22 Edmonton Marathon Edmonton, AB Edmontonmarathon.ca

Saturday, April 25 Demi-Marathon des Erables Mont-Saint-Gregoire, QC Demimarathondeserables.ca Sunday, April 26 Forest City Road Races London, ON Forestcityroadraces.com Sunday, April 26 Banque Scotia 21K de Montreal Montreal, QC Canadarunningseries.com

Saturday, June 6 Healing for Women’s Cancers 5K & 10K Oakville, ON Vrpro.ca Sunday, June 7 Niagara Falls Women’s Half Marathon Niagara Falls, ON Nfwhm.com Sunday, June 14 Spring Fling Toronto, ON Springflingtoronto.com Sunday, June 14 Shoppers Drug Mart Run for Women Montreal, QC Runforwomen.ca Wednesday, July 1 Commonwealth Run Ottawa, ON Commonwealthgames.ca

Sunday, May 17 Whitby WIN 10K Road Race Whitby, ON Winmarathon.com

[ ONTARIO AND QUEBEC ]

Saturday, April 25 Shoppers Drug Mart Run for Women Markham, ON Runforwomen.ca

Saturday, June 6 Annual Redemption Run Ottawa, ON Harvesthouse.org/ redemption_run

Sunday, May 24 Toronto Women’s Half Marathon & 5K Toronto, ON Towomensrun.com

Saturday, July 18 GoodLife Fitness City Chase Ottawa, ON Goodlifefitnesscitychase.ca Saturday, August 15 Night Race Ottawa, ON Nightrace.ca

Sunday, May 31 Shoppers Drug Mart Run for Women Oakville, ON Runforwomen.ca

Sunday, August 23 GoodLife Fitness City Chase Toronto, ON Goodlifefitnesscitychase.ca

Sunday, May 31 Course dete des Isles de Boucherville Boucherville, QC courir.org/evenements/coursedete-des-iles-de-boucherville

Saturday, August 29 Toronto Womens 10K – 5K Toronto, ON Towomensrun.com/km Saturday, August 29 Course Trois 2 1 Go Montreal, QC Trisomie.qc.ca

iRun to be happy! — Janice Luke-Smith, Ontario

2015-04-09 1:20 PM


[ EAST ]

Saturday, April 25 15K de Grande-Digue Grande-Digue, NB Runnb.ca Sunday, April 26 Mundy Pond 5K St. John’s, NF Races.nautilusrunning.com Sunday, May 3 Shoppers Drug Mart Run for Women Moncton, NB Runforwomen.ca Sunday, May 10 Scotiabank Fredericton Marathon Fredericton, NB Frederictonmarathon.ca [ U.S. ]

Saturday, April 25 Crazylegs Classic 8K Madison, WI Crazylegsclassic.com Sunday, May 3 Blue Cross Broad Street Run 10 Mile Philadelphia, PA Broadstreetrun.com Sunday, May 3 UPMC Health Plan Pittsburg Half-Marathon Pittsburgh, PA Pittsburghmarathon.com Sunday, May 3 Border Energy Cincinnati Flying Pig Bank Half-Marathon Cincinnati, OH Flyingpigmarathon.com Saturday, May 16 NYRR Brooklyn Half-Marathon Brooklyn, NY Nyrr.org/races-and-events Saturday, May 23 Fleet Feet Sports Soldier Field 10 Mile Chicago, IL Soldierfield10.com

Monday, May 25 BolderBOULDER 10K Boulder, CO Bolderboulder.com

Sunday, April 19 National Maraton De Nantes Ville de Nantes, France Marathondenantes.com

Sunday, May 31 Rock ‘n’ Roll San Diego Half-Marathon San Diego, CA Runrocknroll.competitor.com

Sunday, May 3 Geneva Marathon for Unicef Geneva, Switzerland Genevamarathon.org

Saturday, June 13 Bellin Run 10K Green Bay, WI Bellinrun.com Saturday, June 13 Rock ‘n’ Roll Seattle Half-Marathon Seattle, WA Runrocknroll.competitor.com/ Seattle Thursday, July 4 Atlanta Journal-Constitution Peachtree Road Race Atlanta, GA Atlantatrackclub.org/ 2015-peachtree Sunday, July 12 Utica Boilermaker 15K Utica, NY Boilermaker.com Sunday, July 19 Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicago Half-Marathon Chicago, IL Runrocknroll.competitor.com/ Chicago Sunday, July 26 Warf to Warf 6 Mile Santa Cruze, CA Warftowarf.com

Sunday, May 3 Haspa Hamburg Marathon Hamburg, Germany Haspa-marathon-hamburg.de Monday, May 4 Belfast City Marathon Belfast, Ireland Belfastcitymarathon.com Saturday, May 9 Dark 50 Mountain Marathon Hong Kong, Sai Kung Active.com/hong-kong-saikung/ running/races Saturday, May 16 The Great Wall of China Marathon Tianjin Province, China Great-wall-marathon.com Sunday, May 17 Great Ocean Road Marathon Victoria, Australia Greatoceanroadmarathon. com.au Sunday, May 31 Edinburgh Marathon Festival Edinburgh, Scotland Edinburgh-marathon.com Sunday, July 5 Gold Coast Airport Marathon Gold Coast, Australia Goldcoastmarathon.com.au

Show

Sign up for the podcast and listen while you run! SPONSORED BY

LISTEN LIVE SUNDAYS AT 7 AM EASTERN ON

in Ottawa the in Ottawa oror onon the web web at TSN1200.ca at Team1200.com Join author and iRun Founding Publisher Mark Sutcliffe and adventure runner and iRun Runner-in-Chief Ray Zahab as they talk running and welcome iRun contributors and other interesting guests with the best advice on nutrition, training and reports from great race experiences across the country and beyond.

[ INTERNATIONAL ]

Sunday, April 26 London Marathon London, England Virginmoneylondon marathon.com Sunday, April 26 Rock ‘n’ Roll Madrid Marathon Madrid, Spain Es.competitor.com/madrid

Sunday, July 26 Fort William Marathon Fort William, Scotland Fortwilliammarathon.co.uk Sunday, August 2 Brisbane Marathon Festival Brisbane, Australia Brisbanemarathon.com

iRun to be with friends and to keep my sanity. — Deborah Walsh, Prince Edward Island

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Running

The

For more information, click iRun.ca iRun.ca

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WHY I RUN

BY MARK SUTCLIFFE

INSPIRATION: UNITED COMMUNITY SUPPORT

SPONSORED BY

O

ne of the reasons I find running both challenging and empowering is that it’s entirely up to you to get from start to finish. Other than shoes, there is no equipment to make your effort more efficient. And even if you run with others, it’s still your legs, your energy and your determination that power every step of your journey. There’s a lot of satisfaction that comes from achieving a goal and knowing almost all of the required strength and energy came from within. But to complete the longest run of my life, I needed a lot of help. Getting to the finish line was a team effort and I couldn’t have done it without the support and generosity of hundreds of people. As the co-chair of Ottawa’s United Way campaign this year, I decided to close the annual fundraising campaign with a challenge. I told my friends, family and the entire community that for every $1,000 they donated to a special run in March, I would run one kilometre. My goal was to raise $50,000, which would produce a nice financial boost for the campaign and push me to run farther than I ever had before. The first helping of support I received was from some very generous people in my network. It helps to be in the running community and work hard. A few friends kickstarted the effort with some early donations and before long we had raised $10,000, then $15,000, then $18,000.

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PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF THE UNITED WAY OTTAWA

With only a few days to go before the run, however, we were still only about halfway to the financial target. Staring at a donation page showing $27,000 felt a lot like starting the second half of a marathon. I was encouraged by the progress, but I still felt like I had a long, daunting path ahead of me. Fortunately, in the final 48 hours, the momentum swelled. Just as the individual steps and kilometres accumulate in a long run, the donations both small and large started to pile up. And by the time I started running on March 24, a cold and sunny, morning, we had raised $49,000 and the contributions were still coming in.

That’s when a different kind of support began. Over the course of many hours, I never ran alone. Friends and volunteers, a few city councillors and the city’s police chief all joined me for parts of the run. One United Way employee, Paul Steeves, accompanied me every step of the way (and had the added responsibility of knowing where we were supposed to be, and when). The route included several stops at United Way agencies, so it wasn’t as challenging as running a 50k race non-stop. But having it spread out over the day created a different kind of endurance challenge and

having the company and encouragement of so many other runners made the time pass quickly. There were many inspiring moments along the way: at a local school where Steeves’ wife is a teacher, we were cheered on by the Grade 2 class as we ran by. Many people honked their horns and pedestrians wished us luck. Just past the halfway point, when we took a break at a community organization that supports young people in crisis, a nearby parking lot attendant walked over and gave us $40. In the end, we exceeded both of our targets. Not long after the run was over, a few people asked me what was harder: raising more than $53,000 or running 50K. Both objectives were challenging, but I certainly worried more about the money than the distance. Once the community showed its support for me and the United Way, I had all the inspiration I needed to run farther than ever before. And there was no way I wasn’t going to hold up my end of the deal.

Mark Sutcliffe is the founder of iRun and the author of Why I Run: The Remarkable Journey of the Ordinary Runner. DOWNLOAD the iRun Podcasts: iRun.ca LISTEN to iRun | The Running Show: TSN1200.ca FOLLOW him on Twitter: @_marksutcliffe SEE excerpts of his book: WhyIRun.ca

iRun because I love it! — Rob Tolman, Ontario

2015-04-09 1:20 PM


RUN YOUR ROUTE Out the front door, under the bridge, loop through the park (watch out for the ducks) and back home again. Paths, trails, gravel and grass, run your route with gear from MEC.

MEC.CA/RUN Mike Savage

Get the MEC app mec.ca/iphone

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PERFECT BOUND

2015-04-09 1:20 PM


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