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LIAM MAGUIRE 4 | OTTAWA 67’s ANDREW ABOU-ASSALY 15 | CATCHING UP WITH DOUG SMITH 25

CENTRE ICE WWW.CENTRE-ICE.COM

ANATOMY OF A

HOCKEY TEAM

RON TUGNUTT GOALS & EXPECTATIONS

NOVEMBER 2012

CJHL RECORD SET BY ONE OF OUR OWN

Q&A

WITH GENERAL MANAGER OF

2013 IIHF

WOMEN’S WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

VALERIE HUGHES

T H E O F F I C I A L H O C K E Y M A G A Z I N E T O T H E O T TAWA 6 7 ’ S


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There’s a whole lot of truckin’ going on.

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F D FORD

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PUBLISHER MARK SUTCLIFFE mark@greatriver.ca ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER & CHIEF STICKHANDLER LIAM MAGUIRE liam@greatriver.ca

IN THE LINE-UP

22 FIRST PERIOD

MANAGING EDITOR DONNA NEIL editor@greatriver.ca

4 Liam Maguire 5 STARTING LINEUP 8 ANATOMY OF A HOCKEY TEAM

CONTRIBUTORS JASON CHEN, BRAEDON CLARK, LISA GEORGES, DAN PLOUFFE RANDY RAY, KELLY SERJEANTSON

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COPY EDITOR KRYSTLE KUNG

CREATIVE DIRECTOR TANYA CONNOLLY-HOLMES

How this team is preparing for the provincials VOLUNTEER Julie Dunnigan says it is all about the joy on young faces

ADVERTISING LIAM MAGUIRE liam@greatriver.ca

SECOND PERIOD

TERRY TYO,V.P. SALES 613 238-1818 EXT. 268 terry@greatriver.ca

13 CATCHING UP

What you may not know about the garage of Doug Smith’s Dunrobin home 15 Q&A WITH VALERIE HUGHES The GM of the 2013 IIHF Ice Hockey Women’s World Championship plays the game twice a week, year round 17 OTTAWA 67’S ANDREW ABOU-ASSALY Taking it as it comes, and taking nothing for granted

CENTRE ICE IS PUBLISHED BY CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER MARK SUTCLIFFE PRESIDENT MICHAEL CURRAN

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CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER DONNA NEIL OFFICE LOCATION: 250 CITY CENTRE DRIVE, SUITE 500, OTTAWA MAILING ADDRESS: P.O BOX 3814, STATION C OTTAWA, ON K1Y 4J8

THIRD PERIOD 18 COVER STORY RON TUGNUTT

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CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

COVER PHOTO: JUSTIN VAN LEEUWEN

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Why he sometimes has to take a deep breath RECORD-BREAKING REFEREE Scott Loney enjoys the immediacy of the action TALENT WATCH Maggie Brennan has her sights set on playing for a Canadian university PROUDEST MOMENT 14-year-old Cameron Buck shares with Centre Ice

OVERTIME 29 LIAM MAGUIRE’S HOCKEY TRIVIA

This day in hockey

30 NUMBERS ON ICE

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LIAM MAGUIRE

Welcome to midget hockey – where AA meets house league

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or the select few who continue to play AAA and AA at the midget level, theirs is the continuation of a predetermined path that at this point has seen them play to the highest levels of their age group. For the countless others in the 15 to 17 age category, there’s a discernible drop in the willingness to be on the ice three to five times a week, and for many players that means a choice to move to a house league. It’s an opportunity to play with school buddies or friends they may not have had a chance to play with for some time or to fit hockey into a more diverse lifestyle. That’s not to say that the AA or AAA players are not doing other things, but it is a much more significant obligation. As a

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result, in the practices that I have run to date in midget house, the level of talent on the ice has been phenomenal, with at least eight to 10 17-year-olds that could be playing major midget at a higher level and a few 16-year-olds as well. I love it. It just speaks to the talent in minor hockey in our area and when these kids scrimmage, some of the individual skills – skating and shooting in particular – really shine. We’ve had scrimmages where I’ve caught myself just watching the kids play. For

It just speaks to the talent in minor hockey in our area and when these kids scrimmage, some of the individual skills – skating and shooting in particular – really shine.

example, in one scrimmage, when an innocent body check led to the entire group flexing their muscles a little, that was fun to watch also. Many of these kids were part of the Ottawa District Hockey Association pilot project, where for a period of three years the Ottawa District

Minor Hockey Association and two other associations across Canada, one in Halifax and one in Regina, I believe, allowed body checking at nine years of age and up. It was decided that this test would not be implemented nationwide at the conclusion of the pilot project, much to my chagrin. It was good to see that most of the young men in my scrimmage were able to throw a proper check and also take one. Refreshing. On another note, although it’s early in the season, I’m wondering if anybody has witnessed any problems in the post-game glove tap that’s supposed to resemble a handshake? I still maintain it should instead be done prior to all games from minor bantam up. It’s the most useless part of the game and the most meaningless.

Regretfully, in recent years it’s caused some of more inflammatory problems in minor hockey. Case in point: the coach who tripped a player from the other team out west this summer, causing the player to break his wrist when he fell. It will never cease to amaze me to see it done pregame when we travel to play out-of-town tournaments, yet here we just stick our head in the sand and say it’s no big deal. In some cases it’s the most volatile part of the whole game. It does seem to permeate the lower divisions, i.e. Rep B and House. Either way, I find it totally useless to do the post-game glove tap beyond the peewee level. Please email me with any comments or thoughts. Keep your stick on the ice! —  Liam Maguire liam@greatriver.ca CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012


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port Canada, in association with Hockey Canada and the city of Ottawa, is providing $500,000 in funding for the 2013 (IIHF) Ice Hockey Women’s World Championship, in an announcement made on Oct. 11, the International Day of the Girl. The tournament will see Canadian female athletes competing against the best in the world and provide a chance to inspire a younger generation of hockey players. At the time of the inaugural Women’s World Championship in 1990, also held in Ottawa, there were only 8,000 girls registered in minor hockey. Today that number is around 90,000. The theme of this year’s premier international tournament is “Don’t Miss the Moment,” a reference to Team Canada’s late-game heroics to clinch a berth in the gold-medal game when Ottawa hosted the 2009 IIHF World Junior Championship. “This is meant to capture the essence

of these great events,” says Cyril Leeder, president of Senators Sports & Entertainment. “We expect to create more of those ‘Where were you when…?’ moments.” Tournament organizers are aiming for more than 200,000 spectators and $30 million in economic activity, which would break the attendance record previously set in Manitoba for the 2007 Women’s World Championships and exceed the $29 million generated by the 2012 All-Star Game. Meanwhile, the city will also host the Ontario Women’s Hockey Association 2013 provincial championships, which will include more than 400 teams. “Ottawa will not be the same after this women’s world championship,” says OWHA president Fran Rider. Team Canada forward Meghan Agosta will be suiting up for her sixth world championships. Agosta was just three years old when the first women’s world championships were

PHOTO BY ROGER LALONDE, CITY OF OTTAWA

STARTING LINE-UP

Meghan Agosta, Mayor Jim Watson, Bal Gosal, Minister of State (Sport) and Tessa Bonhomme at Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame for the funding announcement.

held in 1990, but since that time she’s been able to draw inspiration from the generation of female hockey players before her. “This sport has grown so much,” says Agosta. “If it wasn’t for them we wouldn’t have got to represent Canada today. “It’s unbelievable that the federal government gave a grant for the world championships. I think the sport is going to keep growing. If we can do whatever we can now to make the path for girls coming up, that

would be pretty cool.” A veteran of four world championships, including two golds, defenceman Tessa Bonhomme will anchor the back end. “Ottawa, from the beginning in 1990, has always been in support of women’s hockey,” says Bonhomme. “Now it says ‘Don’t Miss the Moment,’ and I don’t think you guys will at all.” IIHF Hall of Fame defenceman Geraldine Heaney was a key member of that 1990 squad and served as Bonhomme’s hero and

inspiration. Bonhomme is hoping to replicate what Heaney has done for female athletes across the country. “To watch her score that Bobby Orr-esque goal, that’s something no one will ever forget. To watch them battle and inspire all the older and younger women to play … it caught my eye.” — Jason Chen The IIHF’s Ice Hockey Women’s World Championship takes place April 2-9, 2013 at Scotiabank Place Area and the Nepean Sportsplex.

ATTENTION MINOR HOCKEY VOLUNTEERS: ODHA WANTS TO CHAT WITH YOU If you’re hoping to volunteer to help a minor hockey team, the Ottawa District Hockey Association wants to hear from you. That’s because people interested in coaching, managing or training a team must take courses recognized by ODHA, the umbrella group for 65 associations and three junior leagues in 10 districts. CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

Some moms, dads and other volunteers take courses offered by organizations outside of ODHA. As a result, they could be out of luck when they apply for a position with a team in the ODHA, says Jeff Baker, the association’s technical and marketing director. “If someone were to take a course that was put on by an association

outside of the ODHA, our office would not receive any record of it and this could affect whether or not they are selected to coach at a certain level, or even if they can coach based on the certifications required,” says Baker. “It could affect an association that has selected someone to coach or be a trainer for a team, and then finds

out they do not have the certification they said they had, all because we do not know that they have taken the required course. It can become an administrative and logistical nightmare.’’ To avoid these pitfalls, Baker urges minor hockey volunteers to contact the ODHA office at: (613) 224-7686 or online at: www.odha.com 5


STARTING LINE-UP

Ottawa Junior “A” Senators at Brockville PHOTOGRAPHY BY JASON CODE

CLOCKWISE: #25 DYLAN GIBERSON, HOMETOWN CHESTERVILLE; #28 HUNTER RACINE, HOMETOWN CASSELMAN; #6 CAMERON ROTH, HOMETOWN NEPEAN; #7 PAUL LANDRY, HOMETOWN CUMBERLAND; #18 LUC DESCHAMPS, HOMETOWN ARNPRIOR.

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CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012


The Minor Atom Golden Knights and the Minor Bantam Golden Knights join others at the rink in a moment of silence in memory of Barbara Ann Scott, during a tribute at the arena bearing her name.

PHOTO BY BARBIE COLVIN

STARTING LINE-UP

What will you do with your time while WE ASKED: the NHL players are locked out?

Carlo Zito

Lucas Clarke

Caleb Dicks

Age: 11 Pewee “B” Play more video games.

Age: 11 Pewee “B” Play NHL13

Age: 11 Pewee “B” Watch the 67’s

CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

Jaedon Major-Browne Age: 11 years Pewee “B” NHL on the Wii

Evan Pierce Age: 11 years Pewee “B” Pay more attention to my hockey and watch more 67’s games since they’re at Scotiabank Place

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Back row, L to R (on the boards): Molly Jensen, Sophie Rodenburg, Devon Greenough, Katie Rankin, Jordyn Pimm, Melanie Sweet, Delaney McGill, Sophie Veronneau, Caileah Forrest. Front Row L to R (standing): Anonda Hoppner, Mackenzie Johnston, Regan Toltesi, Tasza Tarnowski, Samantha Bouley. Kneeling: Leanne Baker. Goalies in front (L to R): Rachel Seeley, Abby Dent.

ANATOMY OF A HOCKEY TEAM

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hen a group of 14- and 15-year-old girls gathered in April 2012 to form the bantam AA team representing the Lady Sens in Kanata, their journey to success began.

Formed in 2008, the Ottawa Senators Women’s Hockey Club is an amalgamation of the Kanata Girls Hockey Association, the National Capital Competitive Program and the Ottawa Capital Canucks senior team, who 8

together compete under the Lady Sens team name. This elite group of players competing in junior, midget and bantam AA (since 2010) draw some of the best of women’s hockey in the Ottawa area. Players who are selected

WRITTEN BY KELLY SERJEANTSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

for this team are focused, driven, and trained to get the most out of their hockey experience. Former players at the junior level have gone on to represent universities and colleges in both Canada and the United States. Their effort and dedication has earned them scholarships at schools such as Yale, Brown and Cornell. Playing at this high level requires commitment from each player, but there is more to this bantam team than

simply a coach and 17 players. Working with a dedicated team of trainers, assistant coaches, goalie coaches and a mental health coach, these girls are on the path to achieve their goals and become the best they can be.

THE COACH

Coach Bernie Pimm, hailing from Vernon, B.C., has more than 15 years of experience coaching hockey at this level. His dedication to developing a team that is well-prepared to compete at such a high CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

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level is noted by his players. “We focus on team building and discipline,” says team member Tasza Tarnowski. As the leader of the team, Pimm is responsible for setting target goals and formulating the path the team will follow for the year. “I want the girls to have fun by committing to improve every day,” he explains. This Advanced 1 Certified coach has developed coach-mentor programs and is a certified course conductor, using his expertise to steer his team to a provincial championship in the coming spring.

MATT BENNETT

the head coach, the assistants teach and guide the players through the plan, running drills during practice and providing feedback to the the coach.

RACHEL DENT THE TRAINER Trainer Rachel Dent has her hands full. With 17 girls under her charge, her role is to ensure that their safety is paramount. Injuries are common in hockey – especially at this high level of play. Common complaints run from sore muscles to knee pain, to the dreaded head injury. The trainer’s job is assist players to play safe, proactively prevent injuries and minimize risks. The bantam Lady Sens also participate in a dry land training program once per week to build strength, endurance and agility.

THE MANAGER

JIM CORKERY THE ASSISTANTS Supporting the coach during practices and behind the bench during games, the assistant coaches, Matt Bennett and Jim Corkery, play an integral role on the team. Following the lead of CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

Co-ordinating the flow of information from the league, to the players and coach, as well as to parents, falls to team manager, John Rodenburg. He stays on top of registration for tournaments, submits game sheets to the league and acts as liaison for all administrative tasks.

STEVE GIBSON

MJ LOCKE MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT Never before has youth mental health been so prominent in relation to sport. As the demanding training schedule wears on the girls, mental skills coach MJ Locke is on hand to help them deal with the pressures of school, training, and goal setting. A former player at the Division 1 University level, Locke understands the importance of balance between hockey and school for her team. In pursuit of a master’s degree at the University of Ottawa in intervention and consultation in sport, physical activity and health, she uses key elements of her own experience and knowledge to help the team succeed. “Themes such as goal-setting, focus, and visualization are all central to the progression of the young Lady Senators,” comments Locke. Helping to contribute to the development

of the organization and each player’s personal development by providing mental performance skills and strategies is an important role for those players who wish to successfully move on with their hockey career.

THE TEAM

From Embrun to Arnprior, these girls come together at the Bell Sensplex in Kanata a minimum of four times per week. Whether it’s on the ice, in the gym or running outside, the team is spending nine to 10 hours per week together, more when you factor in games and tournaments. Fostering camaraderie and cohesion is what will help propel the team to win gold at provincials in April. Having coached boys until just this year, Coach Pimm has noticed a difference with the girls. “The girls listen more intently, have a more upbeat and positive demeanour about themselves, seem to enjoy the experience a little more,” he says. Each player has a role to play, from forward to defence to goalie.

ANONDA HOPPNER FOLLOW THE LEADER Co-captain Anonda Hoppner stands guard as the centre for her team. At five feet 10 9


PLAYER STATS CO-CAPTAIN

Anonda Hoppner #17 CENTRE • • • • • •

Started playing at 5 Likes being part of the team Dislikes tryout process Wants to play in university, possibly Olympics Goal next year is to make the junior team Also plays competitive soccer in the summer for the West Ottawa team

Sophie Rodenburg #6 LEFT DEFENCE • • • • •

Started playing at 5 Likes the feeling when she scores Dislikes getting beat one-on-one on a breakaway Hoping for a scholarship and the Olympics Runs long distance with the Ottawa Lions Track and Field Club

inches, she dominates the play from the middle of the ice, covering her wingers and helping the defence as needed. A poised, well-spoken leader, she is thrilled to be part of this like-minded group. “We share the same goals, the same dreams,” says Hoppner. Reaching her potential would mean continuing to play hockey through university and possibly for the national team. Between seven hours of practice, games and frequent tournaments, Hoppner balances her schoolwork by staying organized and having supportive teachers. “We have scheduled homework time during tournaments,” she explains.

Tasza Tarnowski #33 RIGHT WING • • • • •

Started playing at 6 Likes the feeling she gets when she steps on fresh ice. Dislikes losing confidence Wants to be noticed by scouts and play in the Olympics Plays school sports and wants to try kayaking in the summer

Rachel Seeley #44 GOALIE • • • • •

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Started a little later, at 7 Likes being part of a team Dislikes the “Nightmare” drill Wants to play university hockey Plays house league soccer in the summer

TASZA TARNOWSKI FLYING DOWN THE LINE Right winger Tasza Tarnowski loves the feeling she gets when she steps on the ice. “The hockey now is faster, you have to really think about the possibilities,” she says. As a forward player, she is tasked with playing up and down the right side of the ice, digging the puck out of the corners and either trying to score or feeding it to her teammates so they can. The conditioning required for backand-forth play is something on which this player thrives. When “you’re working your hardest,

the skill and the discipline are there,” Tarnowski notes.

SOPHIE RODENBURG COVERING THE BLUE LINE Sophie Rodenburg, who plays left defence, says her demanding schedule is “sometimes a struggle” but she has learned to manage her time as well. A career forward until recently, Rodenburg tried defence two years ago and found that she really enjoyed it. She isn’t thrilled when she is beaten by an opposing player, but works to ensure the puck doesn’t go past her often. With her sights set on playing in the Olympics, she feels that she is in the right environment to succeed. Rodenburg observes, “When I was little, hockey was all about having fun. Now I’m more focused on getting to the next level.”

YOU CAN’T PUT ONE PAST ME As the last player standing between the net and the puck, goalie Rachel Seeley is in the zone. She preps for games by playing handball to focus her hand-eye co-ordination, the skill most in demand for a goalie. Handling the pressure is no problem for this cheerful netminder. “Don’t ever give up, always keep going,” she tells herself. With her sights set on a long hockey career, she, too, puts in extra time to develop her skills. Along with training with the rest of the team, Seeley has extra goalie coaching every week.

With the IIHF’s Women’s World Championship coming to Ottawa in April 2013, the spotlight on girls’ hockey is shining brighter. Looking to experienced mentors such as Hayley Wickenheiser and Charline Labonté, who have contributed so positively to the sport, the bantam AA Lady Sens have every reason to believe that they will achieve their goals this year. The intensity of their play and their commitment to each other, ensures that this team is destined for success. As Sophie Rodenburg explains,”Good players make a good team, but hard workers make a better team.” Watch for this team to play in the Ontario Women’s Hockey Association’s provincial championships in April 2013.

RACHEL SEELEY

CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012


VOLUNTEER

Volunteer, Julie Dunnigan WRITTEN BY KELLY SERJEANTSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

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inor hockey in Canada is primarily run by volunteers. Most are parents who have hockey experience and use their talents to coach, manage teams, and act as trainers both on and off the ice. But what’s a non- hockey-playing parent to do when they want to pitch in and help out? Julie Dunnigan knew she wanted to be involved when her eldest son, Connor, joined the West End Hockey League as a novice player nine years ago. Having never played the sport, she didn’t know much about hockey at all – something that’s totally changed today. In 2003, the WEHL executive committee was facing a turnover of volunteers. Several long-standing members had left, so Julie swiftly stepped in. As a web developer for Statistics Canada, Julie saw a unique way to put her talents to work. Acting as the league’s registrar, she faced the daunting task of co-ordinating the registration of more than 900 players. “I spent my anniversary weekend that summer poring over forms, manually entering data along with my husband,” Julie remembers. She recognized the need for a more user-friendly system for the annual registration process. Working with Hockey Canada to develop a streamlined registration process assigning each player an identification number, has made tracking each player simpler. This year, Julie helped implement online registration for returning players, eliminating the time-consuming paper-based system. As the first league in Ottawa to use both Hockey Canada and online registration, “we’ve been the guinea pigs,” Julie comments. Only two years after joining the WEHL executive committee as registrar, Julie was approached to fill the vacant vice-president of administration position. A professed “lover of details,” the role has been hers ever since. As the league administrator, she oversees the ‘“non-hockey” details of running an organization of over 1,200 players within 55 teams of young people ages five to 20. She continues to oversee the contract for the canteen at

CALL OUT

NTEER DO YOU KNOW A VOLU ? IZE GN WE SHOULD RECO triver.ca Email editor@grea unteer’s to let us know of a vol m or tea r you to contribution association.

CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

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NUMBER OF YEARS VOLUNTEERING FOR MINOR HOCKEY

1,200

2,400

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NUMBER OF PLAYERS FEWER PIECES OF PAPER NUMBER OF HOURS TO BE REGISTER EACH NOW USED EACH DUE TO THAT MAY BE SPENT ONLINE REGISTRATION AT THE RINK WEEKLY SEASON

J.A. Dulude Arena, as well as for Spokes and Edges, the skate sharpening service available at the arena. She rebuilt and maintains the league website, which will be undergoing another overhaul this year. Along with her duties as part of the executive committee, she has acted as manager for both her sons’ teams, registering them in tournaments and coordinating practice schedules. Again seeing a need, Julie developed training courses for both managers and timekeepers to help new parents assist their team. Spending up to 15 hours per week at her “home away from home” has allowed Julie to be a partner in her boys’ love of hockey. Her family – including husband Ed, who coaches and acts as convener

for son Thomas’s peewee division – continues to be a valued part of the WEHL community. She has learned through experience that volunteering has its own rewards. The joy on kids’ faces when they receive their special gift from the league at Christmas (usually in the form a T-shirt) reminds her of why she got involved. Helping out at the 2009 World Junior Championships and with the upcoming Women’s World Championship in 2013 has helped her to see a new future for herself. Julie is now a full time student pursuing an event management certificate at Algonquin College. “It was a natural fit for me,” says Julie, who has no plans to stop volunteering anytime soon. For the WEHL families, this is good news. 11


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CATCHING UP

he was traded to the Buffalo Sabres, where after three seasons he was moved to the Edmonton Oilers and later the Vancouver Canucks and Pittsburgh Penguins. In 535 NHL games, he scored 115 goals and 138 assists and another 22 playoff points. He played 72 games in the Austrian Elite League, scoring 97 regular season points, before his career ended on Feb. 7, 1992 when he accidentally crashed into the end boards, breaking his neck and suffering a serious spinal cord injury that put him in a hospital bed for the next year.

STYLE: A strong skater and shooter who hit everything that moved.

WHERE IS HE NOW?

DOUG SMITH WRITTEN BY RANDY RAY PHOTO FROM THE COLLECTION OF DOUG SMITH

VITAL STATS: Doug Smith was born in Ottawa on May 17, 1963. He played minor hockey for the Nepean Raiders from age nine through 15 and as a teenager he also excelled at golf, tennis and lacrosse. In 1979 he was drafted 18th overall by the Ottawa 67’s and played in 119 games under coach Brian Kilrea, notching 69 goals and 92 assists. Smith was selected by the Los Angeles Kings number two overall in the 1981 National CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER OCTOBER 2012 2012

Hockey League entry draft and played in the NHL for 11 seasons.

CLAIMS TO FAME: Smith, a former captain of the 67’s, was awarded the Bobby Smith Trophy as the OHL’s scholastic player of the year in 1980-81. After being drafted behind Dale Hawerchuk, who played for the Winnipeg Jets, Smith scored 16 goals and 14 assists in his rookie season with the Kings. In the 1985-86 season

After recovering from his injuries and learning how to walk again, Smith spent six years on the Ontario Board of Directors of The Canadian Paraplegic Association and joined the business world as Director of Business Development for a national Internet service provider in 1996. Seven years later he and a long time friend Steven Sewell, started ARC Stainless in the garage of Doug’s home in Dunrobin. The company started out making stainless steel countertops and over the years moved into larger

premises and expanded its line of products, which today focus on infection control equipment used in hospitals around the world. Smith remains a partner in the company but the focus of his career is professional speaking and writing. He has published two books, “Thriving in Transition” and “The Trauma Code” and makes more than 60 presentations a year in Canada and abroad. His talks and books deal mainly with improving personal and business performance. Smith lives in Dunrobin with his wife Patti and their daughters Jenna and Jamie.

QUOTABLE QUOTE: On knocking Gretzky and the Edmonton Oilers out of the playoffs in 1982 in a series that included a game dubbed the “Miracle on Manchester,” that saw the Kings overcome a 5-0 deficit to take the game and eventually the series. “My rookie year was like a dream. I was the only guy on the Kings to play all 80 games. When I assisted on the game- winning goal in the biggest comeback in NHL playoff history and we beat Gretzky and the Oilers out of the playoffs, it was like being in a movie.’’

FABULOUS FACT: As a member of the L.A. Kings, Smith often travelled more than 220,000 kilometres a year. 13


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Q&A

Q&A

Valerie Hughes is the general manager of the 2013 IIHF Ice Hockey Women’s World Championship, which will be held April 2-9 in Ottawa. She was previously an event manager during the 2007 FIFA U-20 World Cup and the 2009 IIHF World Junior Championship. Before taking on her current role, Hughes ran recreational hockey leagues at Carleton University, where she first began playing the game herself. Q: How did you start playing hockey? A: Some of the girls from the Carleton University hockey team taught me how to play. My office was actually right in the arena. Q: How did you enjoy it? A: I loved it. I started in September two years ago playing in a mixed pickup on Friday night and then I joined the Carleton women’s hockey league. Now I play on two teams fulltime, all year round.

CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

Q: How’s your game coming along? A: I’ve been told I’ve vastly improved since I started. I’ve been taught by some elite women, so I’ve had some great coaches. I can score every once in a while now. Q: What are your favourite hockey memories? A: It was incredible when we did the 2009 world juniors because I’d spent 10 years with soccer,

and unfortunately sometimes with soccer and our national teams, the supporters were either mixed, or favoured the visiting team. To actually be in the stands and to see Team Canada win the gold medal for the world juniors, seeing a sea of red, was incredible. Every part of that championship – to see the fans and to see the passion and the joy they get out of the game, and to be there to support our Canadian national athletes, was incredible. Q: Did you get to see the last women’s world championships in Ottawa? A: Unfortunately, no, I still lived in St. Catharines at the time. I did get to see their last game at Scotiabank Place before they went to the Olympics in 2010 when they played the U.S. I can’t believe how fast the game is, the speed of these women and their skill – it’s unbelievable. I have had friends who are a bit jaded and haven’t actually given the women their full attention, but I was down at the 2012 world championships in Burlington, Vt., so I encouraged a lot of my friends to watch on TSN. The product that they saw on the ice, and what I experienced live, it was just incredible.

Q: I hear you have some gold shoes. What is the story behind the gold shoes? A: They are packed away in the house safely and will only be brought out in the gold medal game. Some of the volunteers and staff in 2009, went out and bought gold shoes for the gold medal game. We started a bit of a tradition. I don’t know if it’s bringing any luck, but we kind of think it does.

Q: What’s the biggest difference you think we’ll see between the event that was held here 22 years ago and the one we’ll see next year? A: I think our players are recognizable now, both by face and by name. Hockey Canada has really helped develop the sport, as well as some of the other countries. Now our female athletes are household names, our daughters and our sons know who these players are. They know what they’ve accomplished and they’re role models. Q: How do you think Ottawa will do as the host venue for the 2013 women’s worlds? A: It’s going to be an exceptional event. It’s unique. We’re lucky enough to actually have the

women’s worlds here in the city again after 1990. There probably aren’t many communities or cities within this country even that would get that opportunity a second time around. I think people are intrigued by the history – where it started and where we are now. With Canada defending the gold, there will be a strong crowd coming out to cheer on our Canadian women’s national team to claim the gold again for the second year running, a year ahead of the Olympics. We encourage all the girls’ hockey associations, and the boys too, to come out and do this as a year-end celebration to celebrate their accomplishments over the past season, and to cheer on Team Canada. We want them to show their spirit by wearing their team jerseys as well – not only to don a Team Canada, but we want to see the Nepean Wildcats and the Kanata girls’ jerseys out there during the championship as well. The Ontario Women’s Hockey Association is hosting their provincial championships at the same time, so it really should be the largest celebration and gathering of female hockey in history.

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PLAYER PROFILE OTTAWA 67’s

Andrew Abou-Assaly

a standout for Ottawa’s Lebanese community WRITTEN BY JASON CHEN PHOTOS BY MARK HOLLERON

ICE FLOW 2002-03 Initiation Program St. Laurent Bears 2003-04 Initiation Program St. Laurent Bears 2004-05 Novice A St. Laurent Senators 2005-06 Atom AA Capital Crusaders 2006-07 Atom AA Capital Crusaders 2007-08 Peewee AA Ottawa Sting 2008-09 Peewee AA Ottawa Sting 2009-10 Bantam AAA Ottawa Jr. 67’s 2010-11 Bantam AAA Ottawa Jr. 67’s 2011-12 Minor Midget AAA Ottawa Jr. 67’s 2012-13 Ottawa 67’s

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hen Andrew AbouAssaly pulls his Ottawa 67’s No. 9 sweater over his head, he represents more than just the city. The skilled forward is entering his first major junior season, and suiting up for the local OHL team is a dream for the hometown boy, but that barber pole sweater also carries a greater responsibility. Abou-Assaly is of Lebanese descent and he’s ready to be a role model athlete for the roughly 18,000 Lebanese living in Ottawa. Abou-Assaly’s father, Fam, immigrated to Canada from Lebanon when he was 17 and lived with his uncle. His mother, Rose-Ann, is a first generation Canadian of Lebanese descent. Neither had hockey “on the radar” and hadn’t thought about putting a stick in their son’s hands until one of Abou-Assaly’s uncles, who lived in the United States, broached the idea. “Every Canadian boy plays hockey,” his mother remembers his uncle saying. “You better get yourself to the community hockey association and get him registered.” The Abou-Assalys were a little hesitant at first, fearing that their son might get hurt, but decided to let him try anyway. At age four, Abou-Assaly laced up his first pair of skates at the St. Laurent Arena. Soon after, he was playing organized hockey, and by Christmas of his first year, his coach had already

identified him as a player with immense potential. AbouAssaly was quickly moved up to a higher level and he’s played at the top level in his age group ever since. Abou-Assaly’s skill caught the attention of coaches on both sides of the border. Following his dominant performance at the OHL Cup in March, where he finished second in tournament scoring with 15 points in six games, Abou-Assaly was being courted by several high profiled division 1 schools. Entering the 2012 OHL Priority Selection, Abou-Assaly was slated to go in the first round, but teams weren’t willing to take a chance on a player who wasn’t sure he wanted to play OHL hockey. As a result, Abou-Assaly fell to the third round, where the Ottawa 67’s tabbed him with the 59th overall pick. “When we drafted him we knew the NCAA was an option for him,” says 67’s general manager and head coach Chris Byrne. The turning point for Abou-Assaly was the 67’s prospect camp in June, where Byrne had a chance to talk to his family about playing in the OHL. “Allowing our team to speak with him and his family and go over the benefits of playing in our league and playing in Ottawa… living at home for the next four years… were some of the things that swayed him,” says Byrne. “My family, we made the

fe d A p p

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h H q a b a decision that this [route] was the best for us,” says AbouAssaly. “If he wasn’t drafted by Ottawa he was going to the NCAA route,” says his mother. “It didn’t matter what round he went in. What was important was that he stayed here in Ottawa and finished high school at Ashbury College and played here so we could all enjoy watching him.” When Abou-Assaly’s mother says “all,” she means it. Abou-Assaly has two

older sisters, twelve sets of aunts and uncles and 75 cousins, but also plays for the whole Lebanese community. The Abou-Assalys are active members of St. Elias Antiochian Cathedral and the parking lot serves as the location for the annual Ottawa Lebanese Festival, where Abou-Assaly helps out when he can. “Our whole community and Lebanese church are all excited,” says Abou-Assaly’s mother. There are a relatively CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

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Luxury accommodation, on-site spa, restaurant, bar, gym, games room, pools, and much more... few number of hockey players of Lebanese descent, and even fewer have reached the profile Abou-Assaly has achieved. The number of NHL players of Middle Eastern descent, both past and present, can be counted on just two hands. “My family’s been great,” says Abou-Assaly. Though some members of his family aren’t familiar with the game and still learning its nuances, no one gets left behind. “They always come out to support. My cousins, my aunts, my uncles, they look up to me. I look to be the role model that they can look up to,” says Abou-Assaly. Even though Abou-Assaly is just 16 years old, he clearly understands what is expected of him. He looks people in the eye when they ask him a question and he politely responds with eloquent answers, with his arms neatly folded behind his back. When Byrne talks about Abou-Assaly, his attitude and work ethic are mentioned first. Through the first couple games of the season, Abou-Assaly is still adjusting to the much faster and physical style of play. Despite the praise and accolades that have come while playing for the Ottawa Junior 67’s, he’s still humbled by the opportunity to pursue his hockey dream while staying at home. “You never make the team even when you’ve been signed,” says Abou-Assaly. “It’s a great feeling to see my name on one of those stalls.” The obvious parallel for Abou-Assaly is Cody Ceci, the Orleans native who played three seasons with the 67’s before being drafted by the Senators this past June. Abou-Assaly flashes a shy smile when asked if he’d like to follow the same path, but stops short. “[My parents] have taught me to not take anything for granted,” he says. “We’ll take it as it comes, but the next three, four years are really important.” CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

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TUGGER

BACK IN TOWN WITH A MISSION WRITTEN BY DAN PLOUFFE PHOTOS BY JUSTIN VAN LEEUWEN

GOALIE WHO LED SENS TO FIRST-EVER PLAYOFF APPEARANCE WANTS KEMPTVILLE TO RELIVE PLAYOFF FEVER AS NEW OWNER OF 73’S JR. A FRANCHISE

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“THE GOAL HERE IS TO BRING SOMETHING SPECIAL TO A SMALL COMMUNITY. WE WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT YEAR-IN AND YEAR-OUT THE TEAM IS A CONSISTENT PERFORMER. AND OBVIOUSLY THERE’S GOING TO COME A TIME WHERE WE WANT TO WIN A CHAMPIONSHIP.”

N

TUGNUTT’S ICE FLOW

ext to Daniel Alfredsson’s OT winner to send the Ottawa Senators to the Stanley Cup finals, fans ranked it as the greatest moment in franchise history. It was the turning point for a team that had never before earned a post-season berth and had won just 51 out of 300 games in its first four years of existence. It was the start of a remarkable run of 11 consecutive playoff appearances. And it was the first time the city came alive in such a manner and truly started to breathe its passion for the hometown NHL club. In 1996-97, the Senators found themselves 12 points out of a playoff spot early in March. But just three losses in 13 games down the stretch gave them the opportunity to earn a postseason berth with a victory in their final game. Tied 0-0 with the Buffalo Sabres and with time ticking YEAR 1973-75 1975-76 1976-79 1979-81 1981-82 1982-83 1983-84 1984-87 1987-88 1988-92 1991-93 1993-94 1993-95 1995-96 1996-99 1999-00 2000-02 2002-03 2003-04

CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

down in the third period, Steve Duchesne created the unforgettable moment by beating Dominik Hasek from the high slot. When the final horn sounded 4:01 later, the winning goalie jumped high in the air, hugging his teammates as they swarmed the man who’d just recorded the biggest shutout in the team’s history. It’s a special memory for Ron Tugnutt – one that was emblazoned on the cardboard boxes that held the Sens’ pocket schedules the next season, he points out – but what the retired netminder remembers just as well is the excitement that spread throughout the nation’s capital, gripped by playoff fever for the first time. “Everywhere we went around the city, it was all about the Senators,” recalls the 44-yearold. “The stores all had Senators memorabilia up. The city itself was electrifying. From the time

I woke up until the time I went to bed, it was all Senators stuff on radio, TV – everywhere we walked, every store we went by, and every person we ran into on the street, they were just so excited. “For us, it was a great time, and for our city it was a great time as well.” Fifteen years later, Tugnutt now wants to bring that same excitement to the town of Kemptville. The 17-year NHL vet purchased the 73’s Central Canada Hockey League Junior A club this past summer, along with team advisor, Bob Thompson. The level is different, but there are many similarities to his former NHL team, says Tugnutt. Unfortunately there’s that lengthy streak of futility. Since Kemptville moved up from the Junior B ranks in 2007, they’ve had just one playoff appearance (in 2009-10), zero post-season wins, and an overall record of 92-183-

TEAM Cedar Hill Minor Hockey West Hill Minor Hockey North York Flames (Atom & Peewee AAA) Toronto Red Wings (Bantam AAA) Wexford Raiders (Minor Midget AAA) Toronto Red Wings (Major Midget AAA) Weston Dukes (Metro Junior B Hockey League) & Toronto Red Wings (Metro Toronto Hockey League Midget AAA) Peterborough Petes (OHL) Quebec Nordiques (NHL) & Fredericton Express (AHL) Quebec Nordiques (NHL) & Halifax Citadels (AHL) Edmonton Oilers (NHL) Anaheim Mighty Ducks (NHL) Montreal Canadiens (NHL) Portland Pirates (AHL) Ottawa Senators (NHL) Ottawa Senators (NHL) & Pittsburgh Penguins (NHL) Columbus Blue Jackets (NHL) Dallas Stars (NHL) Dallas Stars (NHL) & Utah Grizzlies (AHL)

31. And while this season hasn’t produced a terribly great start (3-5-2), the 73’s have a young core, much like the Sens group that went on to become a league powerhouse for many years. “The goal here is to bring something special to a small community,” Tugnutt says, stating that stability through ownership is a key first ingredient. “We want to make sure that year-in and year-out the team is a consistent performer. And obviously there’s going to come a time where we want to win a championship.” There’s an added special connection between Tugnutt’s new venture and that historic 1996-97 season, as he and wife Lisa had just welcomed their second son into the world at the time. Now 16, Matt is in his rookie season – appropriately, for the 73’s. “It’s a lot different than minor midget because guys are bigger, older and stronger,” says Matt Tugnutt, who plays centre, unlike his father. “He was OK with me going forward … I tried the pads a couple times, but I just didn’t like pucks being shot at me. It wasn’t fun.” Tugnutt did manage to get his older son between the pipes though. Eighteen-yearold Jacob plays Junior A for the Peterborough Stars. As a goaltending coach with the Canadian junior team program, Tugnutt enjoys watching his sons play, but sometimes has to take a deep breath and remind himself that they are hard workers since he often expects more of them on the ice. Tugnutt’s primary role at

19


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TUGGER’S TIPS

FOR YOUNG GOALTENDERS Footwork Make sure you’re a good skater. I don’t mean you’ve got to be fast, just agility-wise, you need to be able to move around your crease efficiently, so you have to be able a strong skater. I always say, ‘Stopping the puck is easy. Getting in position is all the work.’

Tracking Watching the puck all the way into the body. That way you know where the rebounds are and you can react to them quicker, rather than losing vision of the puck.

ude

2

73’s practices is working with goaltenders Billy Cooper and Dylan Brind’Amour. “When I heard he was part of the ownership, I was definitely excited to be here. There’s a lot to learn from a guy like that, so overall I think he’s going to make me a lot better goalie,” says Brind’Amour, a fourth-year CCHL player. “I’ve had goalie coaches before, but none of them have the experience and the knowledge that he has. It’s great.” As a first-time owner, Tugnutt has been learning quite a bit too. There’s a lot to be done by a small staff in Junior A hockey, notes the former Peterborough Petes assistant, who’s found himself sharpening players’ skates when the team’s trainer is overworked. His partner, Thompson, takes a greater lead role on the business side, but building connections by getting out in the community, meeting people and

CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

Compete Don’t quit. Don’t give up on the puck whatever it takes. I think Dominik Hasek has proven you can stop a puck a million different ways. As long as you get it done, the guy behind the bench is very happy.

talking to local businesses is also part of the package. As vice-president of hockey operations, Tugnutt consults with head coach and general manager Pat Malloy on personnel decisions, shares what he sees in practice and anything else that may help. “That might not necessarily be that good for our coach because he has to listen to what I have to say,” Tugnutt laughs. “He’s been really open and I think he understands that I’ve got a pretty wide range of experience. At the end of the day, I think he’s a tremendous coach and a tremendous person and I’m hoping that the advice I can give him may further his career as well.”

BUILDING HOCKEY PASSION IN KEMPTVILLE Tugnutt says the support the team has received from the community has been “tremendous” since his arrival.

Attendance is up compared to previous years. And his family has received an uplifting welcome since moving to Kemptville from their country home on Stoney Lake outside Peterborough. “I’ve never been a big-city guy. The small towns have always suited me better,” notes the Scarborough-born former Peterborough Pete, who now enjoys living closer to the airport, as well as the supermarket. “Living up on the lake, it’s 25 or 30 minutes to go get a bag of milk,” Tugnutt smiles. “In Kemptville, now it’s a minute and a half. My gas bill has dramatically dropped off.” Although he’s disappointed in the early-season results, Tugnutt is very impressed that his 73’s are “terrific young men” – a comment repeated to him by organizers of charity events they’ve the team has attended – and strong character

Focus As a goalie, you’re on the ice the whole time, so it’s important to stay focused start to finish. You have to keep yourself in the game. There’s times where you’ll be sitting around when the play’s not in your end, but you have to find a way to keep yourself going because you just don’t know when the next time that chance is going to come.

is the cornerstone to becoming a successful player, he believes. “The most important thing for us right now is to make this a Kemptville team and get them excited about the local team,” Tugnutt emphasizes, noting there’s nothing like a playoff run by a club with the town’s name on its jerseys to ignite hockey passion. “People want to come out and see some real good hockey with young players that are playing for the love of the game,” he adds. “Kemptville has everything needed to carry a team like this and have that excitement in a small town.”

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MANOTICK REFEREE SETS CENTRAL JUNIOR HOCKEY LEAGUE RECORD WRITTEN BY LIAM MAGUIRE PHOTO BY JASON CODE

Editor’s Note: I wrote in an editorial once that parents of minor hockey players should be required to work at least one game a season as an official, just to get a taste of how difficult it can be. The problem with that is so many parents can’t skate; however, they are the first to let someone like Scott Loney know when they think he’s made a mistake on the ice. -LM

S

cott Loney, 38 years old and a native of Manotick, has spent more than 20 years officiating, beginning at 16 years of age in the Osgoode Rideau Minor Hockey Association under its referee-in-chief at the time, Warren Stone. For the last 15 years, he has been a referee in the Central Junior Hockey League. In the recently completed Showcase weekend, now a very successful annual event for the league, Loney set the all-time CJHL mark for referees donning the red stripes with his 494th game. This topped the previous mark of 493 set by Dave Baker, who is currently employed by the NHL, as its officiating manager. That’s a lot of hockey. “I still enjoy it, a lot,” said Loney in a recent interview. “It’s been a good secondary income, I love the immediacy of the action and like most officials will say, if I’m unknown by the end of the game to the fans or most of the players and coaches, that’s a good thing.” There is no bigger challenge for officials at any

22

level than coaches. CJHL teams are, in fact, businesses. Every win and loss means a lot for national rankings, league playoffs, etc. A referee’s call can affect the game, which is always the way it’s been, but at this level, it’s a bit different. “What I do is decide when they’re venting,” said Loney.

“What I do is decide when they’re venting,” said Loney. “I try and stay in control of every situation; as a referee, you have to. But beyond that, I do understand there’s a certain amount of verbal questioning, shall we say, which will come my way on calls.

“I try and stay in control of every situation; as a referee, you have to. But beyond that, I do understand there’s a certain amount of verbal questioning, shall we say, which will come my way on calls. I get that, but 15 years later, I’m very confident in

what I see, what I call and how I react from minute one to minute sixty in any game.” Loney came up the usual way through the ranks of officials embarking in the role, after his very successful run as an AA player ran out. As a youngster playing hockey, one of his coaches was his late father Bill Loney, a tireless volunteer in the local minor hockey circles and amateur sport. This provided the younger Loney with the perfect background in the game, as his father was extremely respected and would have been a great role model for anybody aspiring to stay involved in the game. Working with the very young children in the former Rideau Township progressed to working the lines in midget hockey to the Air Canada Cup, then to Junior B in 1993-94, before moving on to the CJHL where he’s been ever since. It’s been the perfect step-bystep career for Loney, who has now already surpassed 500 career games. When pressed for details on the craziest or wildest game in which he’s been involved, Loney recounted

a match during a Fred Page Cup tournament in the late 1990s between the Maritime champion Summerside Western Capitals and a representative from Quebec. Loney was doing the lines for this particular contest, working with referee Dave Ross and fellow s linesman Derek Nansen, who has since gone onto the NHL. ‘It was chaotic to say the least,’ chuckled Loney, remembering the contest. ‘We had our hands full, there was a fullscale line brawl, it just was one of those crazy games start-to-finish that stands out in my mind.’ (Also notable: the coach for Summerside was Gerard Gallant, who was recently hired as an assistant coach with the Montreal Canadiens and prior to that coached the Saint John Sea Dogs to the Memorial Cup. If it’s Friday night on the CJHL schedule, Scott Loney will be in an arena somewhere calling a game. His tireless dedication and years of service, now recordsetting, are another fine example of the stability of the league and a testament of his dedication to it. CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

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ICE FLOW 1980-1982 Osgoode Rideau Novice B 1982-1985 Ottawa Valley Titans Atom AA 1985-1987 Osgoode Rideau Peewee B 1987-1989 Osgoode Rideau Bantam 1989-1991 Osgoode Rideau Midget B 1990-1991 Began officiating career in Osgoode Rideau Minor Hockey Association 1991-1992 Started officiating hockey at the competitive B, A and AA levels 1993-1994 Started officiating Junior “B” and “C” as a linesman 1996-1997 Started officiating Junior “B” and “C” as a referee as well as officiating for Junior A as a linesman 1997-1998 Officiated for Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) as a linesman 1998-present Officiating for Central Junior “A” Hockey League and CIS as a referee CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

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ICE FLOW

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2003-04 Nepean Wildcats Novice

BRENNAN I

2002-03 Nepean Wildcats Novice

t usually isn’t hard to spot Maggie Brennan on the ice. Being six feet tall in skates with bright red hair will do that for you.

This year, though, things are a little different. The 17-year-old is sharing the blue line for the Nepean Wildcats with Carolyn Williams, who is six feet tall (without skates) and also has bright red hair. “I used to be able to pick her out on the ice easily, but now there are two of them,” said Brennan’s mother, Carolyn, with a laugh. “You can’t imagine how many people can’t tell us apart unless they see us from the front,” Brennan added. In the team’s media guide they are pictured next to each other; hair parted the same way, same smile, and same shirt. They look like they could be sisters. Brennan, who is two years older than Williams, has taken a special interest in her lookalike line mate, according to assistant coach Bill Bennett. “Maggie has taken Carolyn under her wing and has worked really hard with her,” he said. “I think it’s probably the first time that Maggie has played with someone who’s taller than she is.” Bennett describes Brennan as mature and outgoing, a veteran on the team who’s always willing to take a leadership role. Brennan has played defence her whole career allowing her to pass along her

CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

experiences to Williams, who has moved from forward to the blue line. “Bill (Bennett) told me at the beginning of the year to show Williams the ropes,” Brennan explains. “She was new at it but she’s doing really well. I really like her so it’s easy to help her out. “This is the first year I’ve played with girls two years younger than me. Just because I’ve played longer there’s stuff I can pass along to them.” Befitting her mentorship role (“Maggie’s been the captain or assistant captain on nearly every team she’s been on,” noted dad Paul), Brennan is in her third and final year on the Wildcats and has been a member of the Nepean Girls Hockey Association since she was six. A Grade 12 student at St. Pius X Catholic High School, she’s starting to think about life after high school. She wants to play university hockey in Canada and already has several visits lined up. First up is a trip to Nipissing University in North Bay on Oct. 19, followed by a journey to the Maritimes in early December. Sandwiched around a tournament in Moncton, Brennan and her teammates will visit the campuses of St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, N.S., and Dalhousie University in Halifax.

2004-05 Nepean Wildcats Atom B 2005-06 Nepean Wildcats Atom A (captain) 2006-07 Nepean Wildcats Peewee AA (assistant)

A busy schedule is nothing new; with the Wildcats, Brennan is on the ice five or six times a week and recently played six games in three days at a showcase tournament. In fact, she spent part of last year playing at the intermediate AA level. The higher level of competition was great, but the constant trips to Toronto, where most teams are based, were just too much. This year things are a little less hectic, going from completely unmanageable to crazy but doable. In addition to hockey, Brennan plays soccer and touch football and is the events coordinator for St. Pius’ student council. As such, stories of 6 a.m. practices and constant travel on the weekends don’t scare Brennan or her family off. Brennan’s older sister Kelly was heavily involved

in equestrian and younger brother Jack was loading his hockey gear into the family car as his sister spoke. Brennan is interested in law and wants to pursue a Bachelor of Commerce, but, in some ways, her university experience will revolve around the hockey rink, like so much of the rest of her life has. “My best friends are always on my hockey teams and the social part of it is a lot of fun. I’ve always heard good things about how close teams get, especially at university because you’re always together,” she said. Wherever she ends up next year, Maggie Brennan will be on the ice. She’ll still be playing defence, still having a great time and, unless tall redheads grow on trees, her mom won’t have any more trouble spotting her on the ice.

2007-08 Nepean Wildcats Peewee AA (captain) 2008-09 Nepean Wildcats Bantam AA 2009-10 Nepean Wildcats Bantam AA (captain) 2010-11 Nepean Wildcats Midget AA 2011-12 Nepean Wildcats Intermediate AA 2012-13 Nepean Wildcats Midget AA (assistant) 25


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Tel: (613) 226-5550 Fax: (613) 226-3458

No matter what it’s like outside... J.D. Swallow will keep you comfortable inside. Sales, Rental, Service, Installation, Heating, Ventilation, Duct Cleaning, Air Conditioning, and much more.

24 Hr Emergency Service no over time charges

613 822 7974 www.jdswallow.com

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CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012


LIAM MAGUIRE’S HOCKEY TRIVIA

THIS DAY IN HOCKEY HISTORY October 20 ON THIS DAY IN 2002: Anaheim rookie Martin Gerber records the first victory of his NHL career, a 3-2 OT win over the visiting Colorado Avalanche, in the first game in NHL history to feature two goaltenders from Switzerland in the nets. David Aebischer takes the loss.

October 22 ON THIS DAY IN 1957: Chicago rookie Bobby Hull scores his first career NHL goal in a 2-1 win over the visiting Boston Bruins. The goal is unassisted and the Bruin goalie is Don Simmons.

October 24 ON THIS DAY IN 2002: Boston retires Terry O’Reilly’s #24 jersey in a pre-game ceremony before the Bruins’ home opener of the 2002-03 NHL season, a 2-2 tie against the visiting Ottawa Senators.

October 26 ON THIS DAY IN 1989: Sergei Mylnikov becomes the first Soviet goalie to play in an NHL game, making 31 saves, as his Quebec Nordiques lose 4-2 at Boston.

October 28 ON THIS DAY IN 1976: Rookie goaltender Mike Palmateer plays in his first career NHL game, helping the Maple Leafs win 3-1 against the Detroit Red Wings.

October 30 ON THIS DAY IN 1971: Fred Glover becomes the first man in NHL history to coach two NHL teams in one

season, when he is named coach of the Los Angeles Kings just 12 days after being fired by the California Golden Seals. His Kings debut is marked by a 5-1 loss to the visiting Chicago Black Hawks.

November 2 ON THIS DAY IN 1978: After eight games with the Indianapolis Racers of the WHA, Wayne Gretzky’s contract is sold to the Edmonton Oilers (along with Eddie Mio and Peter Driscoll). Gretzky goes on to score 104 points in 72 games and is named WHA Rookie of the Year.

November 4 ON THIS DAY IN 1977: The New York Rangers’ Phil Esposito scores his 600th NHL goal in a 5-1 win over the Vancouver Canucks. Esposito becomes the third player in NHL history (after Gordie Howe and Bobby Hull) to score 600 goals.

seven years. Denis DeJordy takes his place as the Black Hawks win 3-1 at Montreal. To date, this remains the most improbable record or streak in NHL history and one that is unlikely to be broken.

November 12 ON THIS DAY IN 1980: The Montreal Canadiens’ Guy Lafleur becomes the team’s third all-time scorer with a five-point game, bringing his career total to 966 – one more than Maurice Richard. The Habs win 8-4 against the Los Angeles Kings.

November 14 ON THIS DAY IN 1936: The Toronto Maple Leafs’ “King” Clancy scores on a penalty shot, helping his team beat the Chicago Black Hawks 6-2. This marks the final goal of his NHL playing career. The future Hall of Famer retires one week later. He remains to date the only NHL player to score his final NHL goal on a penalty shot.

November 6 ON THIS DAY IN 1968: Boston Bruins rookie Wayne Cashman scores the first goal of his NHL career, with Bobby Orr adding three assists, in a 7-1 Bruins win over the visiting Philadelphia Flyers.

November 8 ON THIS DAY IN 1952: Maurice “Rocket” Richard scores his 325th career goal, breaking the alltime record for NHL goals held by Nels Stewart. The goal contributes to a 6-4 win over the Chicago Black Hawks in Montreal, exactly 10 years after Richard’s first NHL goal.

November 10 ON THIS DAY IN 1962: Thirty-one-year-old Chicago Black Hawks goalie Glenn Hall is forced to sit out a game, due to a back injury, ending a streak of 503 consecutive games played. The streak spanned

CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012

29


PUCK DROP

NUMBERSON ICE

8

Number of teams Ron Tugnutt played for throughout his NHL career – Quebec Nordiques, Edmonton Oilers, Anaheim Mighty Ducks, Montreal Canadiens, Ottawa Senators, Pittsburgh Penguins, Columbus Blue Jackets, Dallas Stars

1

Number of players to not play in any of Canada’s losing games during the 1972 Summit Series – Serge Savard (4-0-1)

9

30

10,800

Number of T-shirts handed out at Christmas to players in the West End Hockey League since 2003

29

2

8,000

Number of right-hand shots on the Soviet National team during the Summit Series – Vladimir Petrov and Yuri Lyapkin

4

Number of girls registered in minor hockey in Ottawa in 1990

NUMBER OF GIRLS REGISTERED IN MINOR HOCKEY IN OTTAWA IN 2012:

3

Pat Stapleton’s number in the Summit Series. His regular #12 was worn by Yvan Cournoyer

Number of power play goals scored by the Soviet team in the eight games of the Summit Series ( 9/38 – 23.7%) (Canada was 2/23 – 8.7%):

Total number of career NHL shutouts for Ron Tugnutt

7

Number of goalies in training camp for Canada for the Summit Series. Ken Dryden, Tony Esposito, Eddie Johnston and Bunny Larocque

Number of players on Team Canada to play all eight games in the Summit Series – Gary Bergman, Bobby Clarke, Yvan Cournoyer, Ron Ellis, Phil Esposito, Paul Henderson and Brad Park.

CENTRE ICE NOVEMBER 2012



Centre Ice