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FOUR OF OUR OWN PLAY FOR TEAM CANADA EAST LIAM MAGUIRE 5 | OTTAWA 67’s RYAN VAN STRALEN 16 | CATCHING UP WITH TYLER CUMA 15

CENTRE ICE WWW.CENTRE-ICE.CA

DECEMBER 2012

TIPS FOR AND FROM

WOMEN OVER 40

REBECCA TAYLOR LESLIE & THURSTON

HOMETOWN RIVALRY SET ASIDE TO MAKE HISTORY AT THE CANADIAN U-18 WOMEN’S HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIP T H E O F F I C I A L H O C K E Y M A G A Z I N E T O T H E O T TAWA 6 7 ’ S 1


Pre-game ritual.

Š Tim Hortons, 2012


IN THE LINEUP PUBLISHER MARK SUTCLIFFE mark@greatriver.ca ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER & CHIEF STICKHANDLER LIAM MAGUIRE liam@greatriver.ca MANAGING EDITOR DONNA NEIL editor@greatriver.ca CONTRIBUTORS JASON CHEN, LISA GEORGES, DAN PLOUFFE RANDY RAY, KELLY SERJEANTSON

FIRST PERIOD 5 LIAM MAGUIRE 10 WORLD JR A CHALLENGE

COPY EDITOR DAVID SALI

Four Ottawa natives compete for Team Canada East

CREATIVE DIRECTOR TANYA CONNOLLY-HOLMES

12 OTTAWA WEST LADIES SHIMMY

ADVERTISING LIAM MAGUIRE liam@greatriver.ca TERRY TYO, V.P. SALES 613 238-1818 EXT. 268 terry@greatriver.ca CENTRE ICE IS PUBLISHED BY

On being over 40 and new to the game (and why it is so great)

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SECOND PERIOD 18 COVER STORY CANADIAN U-18

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER MARK SUTCLIFFE

WOMEN’S HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIP Two Ottawa natives compete for Team Ontario – Blue

PRESIDENT MICHAEL CURRAN

27 PROUDEST MOMENT

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER DONNA NEIL

How 10-year-old Nolan Reinisch earned his souvenir jersey

OFFICE LOCATION: 250 CITY CENTRE DRIVE, SUITE 500, OTTAWA

THIRD PERIOD COVER PHOTO: JUSTIN VAN LEEUWEN

MAILING ADDRESS: P.O BOX 3814, STATION C OTTAWA, ON K1Y 4J8

29 LIAM MAGUIRE’S HOCKEY TRIVIA This day in hockey history

30 NUMBERS ON ICE

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LIAM MAGUIRE

Should minor hockey coaches be paid?

T

here was an interesting discussion recently on radio and Twitter regarding minor hockey coaches being paid for their services. Although it should be quali�ied this is mostly a discussion pertaining to the AAA or AA level, the question is, do you agree or disagree? I wholeheartedly agree minor hockey coaches should be compensated. If I’m not mistaken — and I’d appreciate any feedback on this because this debate also has an effect on top amateur coaches in other sports — I don’t believe coaches at the top levels generally have children on these teams. I know there is a very exhaustive interview process, the highest levels of quali�ications have to be attained, and your performance and your team’s performance are watched very closely throughout the year, so getting the gig one year and dedicating the time involved is no guarantee you will be back

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012

next season. I coach midget house league and the average week sees me dedicate roughly 6-7 hours to the team. My guess is that at the AA or AAA level, the average coach triples that time commitment. Given that for the most part, these levels are the feeder systems to our junior teams or potentially NCAA schools, Canadian colleges and universities, I believe good coaching is vital. But is that commitment worth as much as $50,000 annually for a coach? What about the assistants? You’d have to assume they are getting paid as well. I posed the question on Twitter recently and the $50,000 �igure was told to me by TSN’s Bob McKenzie, who not long ago had his boys play through the GTA’s highly competitive minor hockey system. Here in the ODMHA, the salaries are apparently much lower. Wayne Gudbranson, the father of Florida Panthers defenceman

My guess is that at the AA or AAA level, the average coach triples that time commitment. Given that for the most part, these levels are the feeder systems to our junior teams or potentially NCAA schools, Canadian colleges and universities, I believe good coaching is vital. Erik Gudbranson, responded to my question also. “From my days as VP Development in the Junior Ottawa 67’s AAA program, we paid a stipend and it was worth it for good volunteer minor hockey coaches,” he said. The other side of the equation is the large amount of

money it costs to play at those levels. Recently, a parent whose son is at the AAA bantam level in the ODMHA told me it will cost him about $10,000 to fund his son’s season. He said he was told by parents of a team Hall of Famer Paul Coffey is involved in that their budget for the 2012-13 season will be closer to $50,000, again at the bantam level. Those numbers seem inconceivable, yet this is a team that apparently has three tournaments scheduled in Europe and three in the U.S., not to mention various local tourneys, provincial championships, league play and practices, plus off-ice workouts with personal trainers and who knows what else. At the end of the day, it does appear as if compensation for high-level minor hockey coaches is necessary to give our children the best chance at success. Got a comment? Send us an e-mail at liam@greatriver.ca. Keep your stick on the ice!

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STARTING LINE-UP

Gloucester Major Peewees take Sudbury 80’s tournament

PHOTO BY CHRYSTIA CHUDCZAK

The Gloucester Rangers Major Peewee AA team won the Sudbury 80’s Tournament on Oct. 14. It was their second consecutive tournament victory of the 2012-13 season. The team’s round-robin

Another successful Junior 67’s Showcase Day The Ottawa Jr. 67’s second annual Showcase Day was a huge success. This year the team supported the Ottawa Food Bank and Do it for Daron as its charities and more than $1,000 was raised during the event at Jim Durrell Arena. There was also a bake sale and gift baskets were raffled. All of the teams contributed to the day, as did the major junior

Ottawa 67’s mascot Riley Raccoon and the 67’s cheerleaders. All five Jr. 67’s teams played games over the course of the day. The minor bantam team started the day with an unfortunate 6-3 loss to the Cyclones. Next up was the major bantams, who tied the Titans 5-5 in a thrilling comeback. The major peewee team skated to a 3-3

games were against the Goulding Park Rangers, West Ferris and the host Sudbury Bulldogs. The championship game against Sudbury proved to be a true test of character, as the players overcame an early 2-0 deficit

tie against the Wild and the minor midget team won 4-2 over the OHA Mavericks. The final game of the day saw the major midget team edge the Cyclones 2-1. Thanks to everyone who came out and helped make the day possible. A special thanks to the partners that made this event special, including Scotiabank, Living Science, Rogers TV, D.I.F.D and the Ottawa 67’s. — Contributed by Zach Riley, Ottawa Jr. 67’s Major Bantam team

Junior 67’s Major Midget AAA wins Waterloo Gold Puck Tournament Despite losing two games in a row for the first time this season, the Ottawa Jr. 67’s Major Midget AAA team managed to bring home the hardware at the Waterloo Gold Puck Tournament . The 67’s kicked off the tournament with a 2-1 win over the Huron-Perth Lakers before falling 5-2 to the Cambridge Hawks and 1-0 to the Mississauga Senators. With a chance to turn their tournament fortunes around, the 67’s prevailed with a 4-3 quarterfinal win over the Guelph Jr. Storm, stamping their ticket to the semi-finals. In the semis, the 67’s faced the undefeated Kitchener Jr. Rangers. Led by a solid performance in goal by Simon Hofley, the 67’s held the Rangers to a 2-2 tie at the end of regulation. In the first overtime period, both teams had their share of chances but failed to ice the game. In the second overtime during 3-on-3 play, Jr. 67’s captain Matthew Hudson found the back of the net on a two-on-one after taking a pass from Ryan Kuffner. 6

Ottawa Jr. 67’s Justin St-Germain and goalie Simon Hofley make a save in the Jr. 67’s semi-final victory over Kitchener. PHOTO BY DAVE HIEBERT

In the championship game, the 67’s got off to a slow start against the Mississauga Senators, finding themselves down 2-0 five minutes into the game. However, this resilient Ottawa crew responded with five unanswered goals to become Waterloo Gold Puck Champions. Goal-scorers were Joey Sollazzo with two, Peter Sigouin, Ryan Kuffner and Daniel Laframboise.

in the first period and scored five unanswered goals to win 5-2. Spectators were treated to a team plan that worked well as the Rangers allowed only three goals in the entire tournament while scoring 25.

From left to right: Chester Burtt, AAA League President; Reg MacDonald, Zone 4 Chair and District 9 Chair; Jim Powell, AAA League Past-President and ODMHA Director at Large; Mike Ennis, Ottawa Jr. 67’s President. PHOTO BY FRANCE BILODEAU

RWC Major Novice Crusaders steal the show at the Eric Leighton Memorial Tournament The Richmond-West Carleton Crusaders Novice team won five straight games on the Thanksgiving weekend to capture the Eric Leighton Memorial Tournament at the Walter Baker Sportsplex in Barrhaven. In the round robin, the Crusaders, who play in the Ottawa B League, beat the Nepean Raiders White 2-1, shut out the Cumberland Grads Blue 6-0, defeated the Stittsville Rams 8-1 and defeated the Cumberland Grads White 11-6. In the final, the Crusaders scored a 6-4 win over the Nepean Raiders White. CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012


STARTING LINE-UP

Sting minor atoms win division at 8th annual Capital Fall Classic

The Renfrew Timberwolves Minor Midgets and the Richmond West Carleton Crusaders Major Midgets won their divisions at the Perth Lanark Minor Hockey Association DUEL Tournament at the Perth Arena. In the minor midget competitive B division, the Timberwolves beat the host Perth Lanark Wings 1-0 in the first game, with the Timberwolves’ Justin KnightLocke scoring the lone goal. Renfrew then beat Richmond West Carleton Crusaders 4-1 on goals by Carson Barber, Justin Visinski, Adam Wright and Billy Karras. In the semi-final, Renfrew and the Wings were deadlocked at two goals apiece at the end of regulation. No goals were scored in the overtime period and the game was decided when Barber scored in the shootout. The final pitted the Timberwolves against their league rivals from Pembroke, and the ’Wolves took the game and the championship with a 3-0 win. Goals were scored by Austin Scheuneman, Knight-Locke and Matt Stuart. In the major midget competitive B division, Richmond West Carleton beat North Dundas 2-0 in the opening game on two goals by Kyle Clarke. Next, RWC edged South Grenville 1-0 thanks to Matt Peltier’s goal. Game 3 saw RWC beat the Shawville Pontiac 3-2, with goals from Jake Oakley, Brad Rintoul and Peltier. In the semi-final, RWC beat the host Wings 4-1, with goals coming from Jacob Melhuish, Coleman Canton, Stuart McFall and Connor Riddell. In the final, the Major RWC Crusaders were 3-1 winners over the Clarence Rockland Castornats with two goals from Oakley and one by Rintoul. Perth Lanark DUEL individual awards went to: Top Goalies: Patrick Bruzas (Minor - Renfrew) and Emerik Faubert Philippe (Major - Shawville); Best Defencemen: Carson Barber (Minor - Renfrew) and Kyle Clarke (Major - Richmond West Carleton); Goal Scorers: Logan Larochelle (Minor - Pembroke) and Jake Oakley (Major - Richmond West Carleton); and MVPs: Austin Scheuneman (Minor - Renfrew) and Jean-Francois Lupien (Major Clarence Rockland).

The Ottawa Sting Minor Atoms were the only Ottawa team to claim a title at the eighth annual Capital Fall Classic at the Bell Sensplex. The Sting won its division with a perfect record of five wins, along the way recording three shutouts in the tournament, which was presented by the Ottawa Valley Silver Seven. The Sting won 3-0 over the Ajax Knights; 9-0 over the Oshawa Minor Generals; 3-0 against the West Hill Gold Hawks; 6-1 over OVSS White; and 2-1 versus the Kanata Blazers. Jax Dubois led the Sting in scoring, notching seven goals. Kaleb Lawrence scored four times.

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012

Cody Ceci. PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

Renfrew and West Carleton victorious in Perth Lanark

Nick Rupert, an intern with the Bell Sensplex Tournament and Adult Programs, poses with Sting goalies Sasha Dilawri, left, and Gabe Ferron Bovies, right. PHOTO BY INACTION PHOTOGRAPHY

Graovac, Monahan find scoresheet as teams split Super Series Of the 34 OHL players selected to play for Team OHL in the 2012 Super Series, three were from the Ottawa 67’s – centers Tyler Graovac, Sean Monahan and defenceman Cody Ceci. All three players took part in the first game in Guelph on Nov. 8 where the 67’s made their presence felt. On a second period penalty kill, Monahan stole the puck and made a short pass to Graovac in the slot, who finished the play off with a quick deke to go backhand shelf. But Team OHL failed to hold the lead as Team Russia stormed back with two goals in 24 seconds in the third period to win 2-1. Graovac was the only 67’s representative in the second game on Nov. 12 in Sarnia, where Team OHL won 2-1.

Gloucester Major Atom AA Rangers win Oktoberfest tournament The Gloucester Rangers Major Atom AA team won the 39th edition of the Kitchener Oktoberfest Tournament. The Rangers started with a hard-fought 1-0 win over the Cambridge Hawks thanks to an 18-save shutout performance by Xavier Dusablon and a timely goal from Cameron Butler. Their second game was another tough contest that ended in a 2-2 tie on goals from Simon Labelle and Vincent Labelle. Game 3 was a relatively easy one in which the Rangers dominated the Grey Bruce Highlanders 9-1. The fourth and final round-robin game was a defensive masterpiece against the host Kitchener Rangers which ended in a 0-0 tie and a shutout for Johnny Lemaire. In the semi-final, the Rangers came out flying against an unbeaten Brantford team. From

the start, they controlled the puck and put intense pressure on Brantford. Led by Alex Frechette and Simon Labelle with two goals apiece, the Rangers quickly took the lead, and the team just kept on applying pressure and controlling the play, limiting the opposition to a meagre six shots en route to a 7-1 win. That set up a rematch against the Waterloo Wolves, who had tied the Rangers in round-robin play. In the final, the Wolves took a 2-0 lead in the first period on a couple of lucky bounces. The Rangers showed once again their “never-give-up” attitude and mounted yet another comeback. A beautiful individual effort by

team captain Cameron Butler in the dying seconds of the second period resulted in the Rangers’ first goal. The goal shifted the momentum in the Rangers’ favour and they dominated the third period. Midway through after a flurry of shots, a beautiful tip from tournament MVP Mason Marcellus on a point shot from Ben Sardana gave the Rangers the tying goal. The Rangers fans were still cheering when less than 60 seconds later Butler put in a rebound to give the Rangers their first lead of the game with less than six minutes to go. The Rangers’ stingy defence took over from there to preserve the victory. 7


STARTING LINE-UP

WE ASKED: Why do you play hockey?

Shane Singleton Age: 10 Major Atom ‘AA’, Defense I love the sport and I someday want to be in the NHL.

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Justin Balsevicius Age: 10 Major Atom ‘AA’, Defense I liked watching it (hockey) on TV, so I decided to play.

Cédrik Dandenault

Samson Adeney

Age: 8 Novice, Goalie Because it’s a really fun sport to play!

Age: 8 Novice, Goalie Because it’s fun!

Mathieu Neza

Meagan Pettipas

Age: 8 Novice, Goalie “J’adore faire partit d’un équipe.” / “I love being a part of a team.”

Age: 11 Pewee ‘AA’, Cumberland Jr. Grads I love skating fast, making “cool” plays and celebrating.

Sting vs Sting in Toronto tournament thriller PHOTO BY IAN GORDON

The Ottawa Sting Minor Midget B team won the battle of the Sting at the Avalanche Tournament in Toronto on the Thanksgiving weekend, knocking off the Junior Sting from Sarnia. Ottawa started the tournament with a 4-2 win over the Westmall Lightning. Game 2 was Sting against Sting Part I, but when the final buzzer sounded, Sarnia was on top in that matchup, taking the game 3-2 on the strength of two unanswered third-period goals. Later that day, Ottawa played an outstanding first half against the Toronto TNT Tornados but blew a 3-0 lead. The Sting found its game again with 14 seconds left in the second period, and moved ahead 4-3. The Sting added an insurance goal in the third period to seal a 5-3 victory. In a Sunday morning game against the Guelph Junior Storm, Guelph drew first blood. The Ottawa boys seemed to have trouble summoning their inner ice demon, losing 2-1. The loss left the Sting waiting to learn if a 2-2-0 round-robin performance was enough to advance the team to the playoffs. Meanwhile, Ottawa’s counterparts from Sarnia were racking up the points with a 2-1 win against the Toronto Avalanche, a 3-2 victory over Guelph, a 2-2 tie with the Tornados and a win over Guelph in Monday morning’s semi-final. The Sting was up against the Toronto Avalanche in its semi-final, a game marred by penalties. Lee Verdon scored the winning goal in

a 5-4 victory for Ottawa. The final game was once again Sting vs. Sting – this time for bragging rights and the trophy. Sarnia showed grace and skill early in the game and soon led 3-1. However, Ottawa wasn’t finished yet. “The boys would not give up,” said Ottawa coach Bill Strutt. “They were playing against a very skilled team – one that had dominated all their games – but Ottawa Sting just kept coming back.” Halfway through the third period, it was once again Lee Verdon who sparked the team with a goal that put Ottawa close. With seconds on the clock and the faceoff deep in Sarnia territory, Strutt pulled his goalie. Alexei Therrien snapped the faceoff back to Tyler Watungwa, who drilled the puck at the net. Verdon was there to pop in the rebound and tie the game with 0.9 seconds left. Overtime solved nothing and the game came down to a shootout. The tournament rules required each team to name five sharpshooters before the game. Of Ottawa’s first five shooters, only Adam Allard was able to slip one past the Sarnia goalie – a suspenseful shot that bounced up from the goalie’s pad, over his shoulder, and dribbled in what seemed like slow motion over the line. But at the other end of the ice, Jamie Clarke was able to stop all but one of the five designated Sarnia shooters. The game went to a sudden-death shootout, and Strutt chose Verdon, who rocketed a shot on the low blocker side to complete the hat-trick in the tournament final. At the other end, goalie Jamie Clarke became the co-hero by stonewalling the Sarnia shooter, sealing the victory for Ottawa. Send us your news at editor@ greatriver.ca. CENTRE CENTRE ICE ICE DECEMBER DECEMBER 2012 2012


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Left to right: Blaine Byron, Brent Norris, Philippe Drouin and Dalen Hedges

CCHL rivals join forces for Canada East at

World Jr. A Challenge WRITTEN BY DAN PLOUFFE PHOTO BY MATTHEW MURNAGHAN/HOCKEY CANADA IMAGES

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hey wear opposing colours for their respective Central Canada Hockey League junior clubs, but four Ottawa natives united with a maple leaf on their chest for Hockey Canada’s World Jr. ‘A’ Challenge in early November.

“It’s a little funny,” Phil Drouin of the Pembroke Lumber Kings said of suddenly joining forces with guys he’s used to going to war against. “But all the hockey players are pretty much all the same. You might hate each other when you play each other,

but once you’re off the ice, everyone’s nice.” Drouin was selected along with fellow CCHL stars Brent Norris, Blaine Byron and Dalen Hedges to represent Team Canada East Nov. 5-11 in Yarmouth, N.S., as the top players from the country’s 10 Jr. ‘A’ leagues tested themselves against international

competitors from Russia, the Czech Republic, Switzerland and the U.S., plus Canada West. “I was speechless,” Kemptville 73’s centre Byron said of the moment he found out he’d made the team at the end of an evaluation camp in Toronto. “This might be once in a lifetime, so I’ve really

tried to take it all in. It was really overwhelming, to be honest.” The morning of Nov. 1 was stressful for all the players as they waited on pins and needles to �ind out if they’d made the grade. The coaching staff, which includes the Lumber Kings’ Sheldon Keefe, asked them to be awake by 7 a.m. Some of the selected players’ roommates got the unwanted phone call telling them they’d be headed back home, while the rest waited in suspense until they got a knock on their

CENTRE CENTREICE ICEDECEMBER DECEMBER2012 2012


BRENT NORRIS ICE FLOW 1998-99 SouthEnd Minor Hockey Association 1999-2002 Nepean Minor Hockey Association 2002-07 Nepean Raiders AA 2007-09 Ottawa Senators AAA 2009-12 Nepean Raiders Jr. A Why I play the game: I love it. It’s been a part of my life since I was a little kid. I can’t really picture my life without hockey being a part of it. Every time you step on the ice, it’s a privilege. I’m proud that I was given the ability that I have and the privileges my parents have given me. It’s really just an honour to play the game.

BLAINE BYRON ICE FLOW 1999-2003 Osgoode Rideau Minor Hockey Association 2003-04 Osgoode Rideau A 2004-07 Ottawa Valley Titans AA 2007-10 Upper Canada Cyclones AAA 2010-12 Kemptville 73’s Jr. A Why I play the game: I just fell in love with it at a young age. I do it all the time and it just feels right. It’s always been a dream of mine to play at the highest level. It just seems natural.

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012

door from the coaches welcoming them to Team Canada. “I was in my room by myself for about an hour,” recalled Norris, the captain of the Nepean Raiders. “I wasn’t sure if the longer I waited, the better, but it turns out it was worth the wait.” Throughout the tension, Norris was texting back and forth with Hedges, his Raiders teammate. The pair had been linemates en route to a CCHL title last season, but suddenly found themselves competing for the same positions at the “intense” training camp that pitted them on opposing gold and green squads in game action. “It just made us go that much harder,” said Hedges, who’s averaging two points a game as one of the CCHL’s scoring leaders this season. “We’re buddies, so we pushed each other. And it all worked out well because we both ended up making the team.” Hedges and Norris – the elder by one year at age 19 – spent just about every day together this past summer, working out with Scott Heffernan of the Ottawa Sport Performance Centre. “We’re great friends off the ice,” said Norris, who’d grab lunch with Hedges after each workout, further cementing their bond that started on ice last season. “The team we have in Nepean, we’re a tight group and we all get along really well and hang out together. I

think that’s why we do so well.” After the pair was split up to centre the Raiders’ top two lines this season, Hedges was hopeful they’d get to rediscover some of their chemistry with Canada East as they chased a new prize together. “It’s de�initely the same type of feeling,” explained Hedges, who expected the experience of playing in back-toback seven-game series in Nepean’s title run last year would be valuable come the big games at the World Challenge. “When you win, you never forget how you felt that day, and you try to get it every time. Once you win, you can’t lose after that.” The objective was clear for all the members of Team Canada East, the players said. “The main goal is to win the championship,” said Drouin, a defenceman from Orleans who broke into the CCHL with his hometown Cumberland Grads before moving to Pembroke this year. “The coaches were telling us that Canada East had never won gold at this tournament, so it would have been a �irst, and it’d be pretty special to be a part of a gold-winning team at an international championship.” Like Norris and Hedges, Drouin had company from a couple of club teammates at the camp. Lumber Kings leading scorer Ben Dalpe (Paris, Ont.) and fellow defender Mike Crocock (Brantford,

Ont.) were also chosen for the squad. While Byron was the lone representative from Kemptville, he still knew most of the other Ottawa-raised CCHL players from summer hockey or playing against them throughout minor hockey. “It looks like we had a good group,” said the 73’s point-per-game assistant captain from Manotick. “You’re there to represent your country, and since you’re competing for your country, you’re going to come together and do your best”. “The goal is a gold medal for sure.” Cornwall Colts forward Marly Quince (Sioux Lookout, Ont.), and Carleton Place Kings defenceman Christian Weidauer (Keswick, Ont.) were the two other CCHL players competing for Canada East at the tournament. CCHL players Tyler Akeson (Smiths Falls), Elias Ghantous (Carleton Place), Alexandre Boivin (Gloucester), Stephen Johnson (Cornwall), Stephen Hrehoriak (Pembroke), Chris Maniccia (Smiths Falls), Steven Johnston (Nepean) and Michael Pontarelli (Cornwall) also attended the camp but were not selected. Canada East reached the semi-�inal round at the tournament before falling by a single goal to Canada West. They eventually �inished fourth behind Switzerland, Canada West and the champions from USA.

PHIL DROUIN ICE FLOW 1999-2000 Orleans Minor Hockey Association 2000-03 Cumberland Minor Hockey Association 2003-07 Cumberland Barons AA 2007-10 Eastern Ontario Wild AAA 2010-12 Cumberland Grads Jr. A 2012 Pembroke Lumber Kings Jr. A Why I play the game: Being a Canadian-born kid, hockey is pretty much everything in Canada. When I was younger, I watched hockey. My dad never really played hockey – he did when he was a little bit younger, but he lived on a farm, so didn’t really have time to play hockey, but he introduced me to hockey when I was a young kid and when I was young, I was good on my skates, so they put me in hockey, and I’ve never looked back. I love the game and I love being with the guys, and winning, and getting better.

DALEN HEDGES ICE FLOW 1999-2001 SouthEnd Minor Hockey Association 2001-2003 Capital Crusaders Minor Hockey Association 2003-2007 Ottawa Sting AA 2007-10 Ottawa Jr. 67’s AAA 2010-11 Ottawa Jr. Senators Jr. A 2011-12 Nepean Raiders Jr. A Why I play the game: It’s pretty simple. I love playing hockey. Ever since I started, I just haven’t let go. It’s my favourite thing to do.

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SURVEY SAYS: FAVOURITE THINGS ABOUT PLAYING HOCKEY Great workout and love of the game — tied BIGGEST PET PEEVE Lack of available ice CHILDREN OR SPOUSE WHO PLAY/PLAYED? 90%

Left to right: Becky Nuth, Wendy Jeffery, Lucie Berthiaume, Pat Owen, Nancy Desjardins, Val Fournier, Janet Creighton, Elaine Kendall, Anne-Marie Hadden, Nat Verberk (goalie), Janet Stenger (goalie), Nancy Manningm, Lorraine Morneau, Monica Bialikm, Julie Thurston, Dawne Gallant, Andrea Feeley, Sandy Dusseault, Pat Laurich

Sharing

WISDOM WRITTEN BY KELLY SERJEANTSON PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

Organizer Pat Owen has been playing for nine years, four times a week. Her favourite thing about the game is the well-executed playground.

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ountless youngsters have strapped on the blades and taken to the ice with pucks and sticks, often continuing to play into adulthood in recreational leagues across the country.

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012


participants are over 40, and most hope to continue to play for as long as they can. Organizer Pat Owen watched her son lace up his skates for years, always happy to cheer from the stands. Nine years ago, she decided to see for herself what all the fuss was about. After convincing her sister to join her for lessons, she hasn’t looked back. From starting in a clinic for beginners, Pat has progressed to playing the less formal shinny as well as in a recreational league. “At our rec-level hockey, the game is fun and friendly,” she says. This lively group of part-time workers, retirees, self-employed professionals, shift workers and stay-at-home moms has plenty of advice for other women who are thinking of getting off the bench and on to the ice. Here are a few pointers from the players for those considering getting into the game:

DON’T BE SHY!

The members of the OWLS league are all over 40 and they find the benefits of playing wide-ranging

For much of hockey’s history, though, those leagues were con�ined to men. But over the past couple of decades, more and more women have been laying claim to the sport. Today, more than 85,000 female players are registered with Hockey Canada. Girls’ hockey leagues have sprouted up across the country. In April 2013, the city of Ottawa will welcome the IIHF Women’s World Championship, where Team Canada will battle to defend its 2012 gold medal. For one group of women who gather

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012

to play hockey every Monday morning in Kanata, this couldn’t be happier news. Created two years ago, the Ottawa West Ladies Shinny league was formed by players who met while playing in another shinny group. While a few have played for several years, most are relatively new to the sport and are eager to hone their skills. A regular group of 20 skaters and two goalies rotates each week, enabling the women to play different positions and face different opponents, keeping the game fresh and challenging their skills. All

There are several women’s-only hockey clinics, both private and city-sponsored, available for beginners. Skaters are put through their paces in full equipment, learning to pass, shoot and stickhandle. Not having skated in 30 years, and never on hockey skates, Becky Nuth was, at �irst, a nervous player. “I went twice a week for a month to a public skate to make sure I could do it,” says Noth. Taking part in a clinic is the �irst step most players in the Ottawa West league took. “Learning how to stop and turn are important skills to keep you safe on the ice,” explains Sandy

FORGET THE PAST

Almost all players say they wished they had started playing hockey when they were younger. “It’s hard to teach an old brain new tricks,” says Julie Thurston. Learning

13


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new skills can be an exercise in frustration when your body won’t do what your brain wants – but that doesn’t mean it can’t happen. “I often think I wouldn’t have met the same great women that I have through this level ... so, no regrets!” says Dusseault.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

While no member of the shinny league claims to be the next Hayley Wickenheiser, all of them say you can improve your skills by playing as often as your schedule allows. With so many teams and players vying for ice time, this can be a challenge. “Women get lousy ice times” is a common refrain heard in the dressing room. “Playing 11 p.m. games and then going to work the next day is very demanding,” concedes Owen. Fortunately, for this group comprised of retirees and others with �lexible work schedules, nabbing a morning slot at the rink works. Many play two or three times per week and it has de�initely helped their game. And while these women are having fun, they’re also getting �it. A terri�ic cardio workout is one of the bene�its of playing hockey. These women are also strengthening their legs, abdominal, and back muscles.

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Many of the shinny leaguers play in mixed recreational leagues as well as on women’s-only teams. This gives them an interesting perspective on the game. Many assume that men are more competitive than women on the ice, but it is not always so. “A lot of women take the game more seriously,” remarks Dusseault. Having a sense of humour helps to take the pressure off a missed pass or a wide shot. “That Y chromosome doesn’t have a tendency to ease up, or see the humour in a messed play,” Dusseault says with a laugh. Playing recreationally allows women to be more relaxed and focus on team play. “Hockey is very humbling – it’s way harder than it looks and mistakes are

made on every shift,” comments Owen. These women choose to focus on the skills they need to improve for each game.

PUT YOUR BEST FOOT FORWARD

In hockey, as in life, these women strive to give their best effort. Working as a team reminds them there is more to the game than simply putting the puck in the net. “It’s a great team sport,” says player Janet Creighton. “You need to support all your team members. It’s not a group where you only put out your �ive best players.” Their combined life experience serves them well on the ice. From team play, encouragement and support for others to persistence and respect, valuable life skills are shared to ensure that each player can grow and develop. As “one of the slower skaters on the ice,” player Monica Bialik maintains a positive attitude with support from her teammates. “The top players will usually go on a breakaway, but then slow down and make a pass,” she says. It’s this spirit that helps more women join in and become part of the team.

LEAVE IT ON THE BENCH

One of the many bene�its of playing hockey is the focus it requires. “I forget about all my worries,” explains player Lorraine Morneau. The concentration required to perform at your best demands that you clear your head of everyday worries and focus on the moment – a welcome task for many women. The stress relief and endorphin rush from exercise help to carry the players through the rest of their day. Most noted the camaraderie that playing with women provides. The laughs, the fun and the social atmosphere of the dressing room are healthy reminders of why they joined the group in the �irst place. “I love the ladies we play with – it’s such a great group,” says Anne Marie Hadden. And hopefully, it’s a group that will continue to grow.

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012


CATCHING UP

PHOTO BY HOUSTON AEROS

Torchetti. In his first two years, he played 104 games and scored one goal and 12 assists and established himself as one of the team’s most reliable blueliners, often averaging more than 25 minutes per game. He’s often paired with Marco Scandela, a native of Montreal. During the 2011-12 season, he was called up by the parent Minnesota Wild and played one game, a home encounter against Chicago in which he was held pointless and registered a minor penalty. He spends his summers in Bowmanville.

QUOTABLE QUOTE:

TYLER CUMA – former Ottawa 67’s VITAL STATS: Tyler Cuma was born in Scarborough, Ont., on Jan. 19, 1990 and grew up in Bowmanville, east of Toronto. He played his minor hockey with several teams in the Greater Toronto Hockey League, including the Wexford Raiders, Toronto Canadiens, and the Mississauga Ice Dogs, before being drafted sixth overall by the Ottawa 67’s, under head coach of the day Brian Kilrea. In four seasons with the 67’s, he played in 195 regularseason games, scoring 13 goals and 69 assists. In

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012

the 2008 NHL entry draft, Cuma was selected by the Minnesota Wild in the first round, No. 23 overall.

CLAIMS TO FAME: In the year he was drafted by the 67’s, Cuma was most valuable player in a Silver Stick tournament in Whitby, which raised his stock from a third- or fourth-rounder to a first-round Ontario Hockey League pick. In his inaugural season, he was the 67’s rookie of the year and during his career was named the team’s top defenceman and scholastic player of

the year several times. He represented Ontario twice in exhibition games against Russian junior teams and in 2008, he helped Team Canada earn a gold medal at the world under-18 championship, collecting a goal and three assists in seven games.

STYLE: The 6-foot-2, 192-pounder is a stay-at-home defenceman with the ability to help shut down the opposition’s top shooters.

WHERE IS HE NOW? Cuma is in his third season with the Houston Aeros of the American Hockey League, where he wears No. 61 and is coached by John

On earning a permanent spot on the Wild’s roster: “If I am going to make the big club I have to continue playing how I have been playing and making progress … last year was successful; I had no injuries and I intend to work off of that this season.”

FABULOUS FACT: NHL draft day in June 2008 was a long one for Cuma. While he was excited about the draft being held in Ottawa where he played his junior hockey, he wasn’t selected by Minnesota until 10:30 p.m. His many supporters let out a loud cheer when his name was called. For the record, the No. 1 pick that year was Steven Stamkos, who was selected by the Tampa Bay Lightning.

15


PLAYER PROFILE ICE FLOW 1998-99 Initiation Program 1999-2000 South Grenville Rangers Novice D 2000-01 South Grenville Rangers Novice C 2001-02 South Grenville Rangers Novice B 2002-03 South Grenville Rangers Atom B 2003-04 Rideau St. Lawrence Kings Major Atom AA 2004-05 Rideau St. Lawrence Kings Minor Peewee AA 2005-06 Rideau St. Lawrence Kings Major Peewee AA 2006-07 Rideau St. Lawrence Kings Minor Bantam AA 2007-08 Upper Canada Cyclones Major Bantam AAA 2008-09 Upper Canada Cyclones Minor Midget AAA 2009-10 South Grenville Rangers Jr. B/ Smiths Falls Bears Jr. A 2010-11 Smiths Falls Bears Jr. A 2011-12 Ottawa 67’s 2012-13 Ottawa 67’s 16

Ottawa 67’s

RYAN

VAN STRALEN’S journey to the top

WRITTEN BY JASON CHEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

S

ure, they might have some talent, but the best athletes don’t get to where they are without hard work. Ryan Van Stralen is proof. A 6-foot-3 power forward with a blistering shot and a nose for the net, the Ottawa 67’s winger would be hard to miss on the ice even if he wasn’t an elite player. The Prescott native is on a roll, having picked up three points in four games upon returning from a shoulder injury. Nestled comfortably on the left wing on the 67’s top line with Sean Monahan and Brett Gustavsen, Van Stralen knows his No. 1 job is to create some room for his linemates. But he also knows he can score. At his current rate, Van Stralen is on pace to set career highs on offence. Still, Van Stralen didn’t get to Ottawa’s top line without a few heartbreaks and hard work. After all, he did get cut from the team -- twice. “It was a tough thing to get cut the second time,” says his father, Dave. “The �irst time around we expected that.” The 67’s drafted Van Stralen in the ninth round of the 2009 OHL draft, and he faced an uphill battle to make a team that was a perennial contender. “The second time around, he really felt that he was ready and that he had done well enough to make the team,” says his father.

“He was pretty upset.” Van Stralen didn’t know it yet, but that was the start of a roundabout journey that would eventually see him end up on the 67’s No. 1 line. In a country where the most talented kids are identi�ied early on and funneled into playing at the highest levels, Van Stralen has had to do it the hard way, working his way up from the bottom. No problem. He’s been doing that his entire life. Van Stralen played house league hockey and didn’t compete in the highest levels until Atom. “Ryan was always the underdog, the smallest kid on the team,” says his father. Worried about Ryan being overmatched by bigger, stronger players, the elder Van Stralen approached his son’s Minor Bantam AA coach, Lawrence Hinch, and told him that Ryan wouldn’t be trying out for the Major Bantam AAA team the next year. This didn’t seem to bother Hinch. Not only did Van Stralen make the team, he was named an alternate captain. The development of Van Stralen’s work ethic and leadership qualities, key intangibles Hinch wanted in his locker room, isn’t

surprising to those who knew him well. Once Van Stralen started competing at higher levels, he’s always remained focused and on task. At age 14, he asked if he could train with Peak Performance in Ottawa, meaning that his parents would have to make the one-hour drive from Prescott a few times a week. “I said to him, ‘Your mother and I will support you and do the things we need to do to get you where you need to be, but the effort on your part has to be 100 per cent,’ ” says his father. “ ‘If it’s not, we’re not going to go through the time and effort and cost of doing it.’ ” Van Stralen hasn’t looked back since. Once a detriment, his size soon became an asset. Over one summer, he grew eight inches and put on 30 pounds, erasing any worry that he wouldn’t be able to compete against bigger players. But there still weren’t any spots on the 67’s for Van Stralen. After a hot start to the 2010-11 season playing Jr. A for the Smiths Falls

Bears in the Central Canada Hockey League, Van Stralen started to attract attention from NCAA schools. In early November, Van Stralen went down to Potsdam, N.Y., to visit Clarkson University, and before the tour was over, Van Stralen was offered a full scholarship. Disappointed after being cut from the 67’s a second time and not knowing what other opportunities lay ahead, Van Stralen verbally committed to the school. Just a few weeks after his visit, the 67’s called. The team was in need of bodies and wanted Van Stralen to join them right away. But under NCAA rules, if Van Stralen suited up in the OHL, he would no longer be eligible to play college hockey and would lose his scholarship. Having already given Clarkson his word, Van Stralen declined. Van Stralen was named the CCHL’s Most Improved Prospect, and that May the 67’s again made a push to sign him. The rising star faced a dif�icult decision. “[Ryan] had never believed playing pro was

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012


a real possibility for him,” says his father. “It’s every kid’s dream, as it was his, but to really believe you have a chance to do that is a whole other game.” There have been a signi�icant amount of NCAA players who have turned pro, but Van Stralen would have to play another year of Jr. A hockey before moving to Clarkson. Education was important, but the Van Stralens felt that if their son really wanted to turn pro, choosing the OHL would give him more exposure to scouts and a chance to play against the best. “I �igured if I want to play pro, this is the best route to go,” says Van Stralen. “He’s consistently worked so hard,” says his father. “That’s what kept us supporting him and that’s ultimately what made us feel that he could handle the OHL life and the commitment that it would take.” Even during the summer, Van Stralen goes to bed early and wakes up at 6 a.m., just so he can put in two workouts a day. Van Stralen joined the 67’s last season, and just making the team was quite an accomplishment. Of the 20 players drafted in the ninth round in 2009, only Van Stralen and teammate Remy Giftopoulos are playing in the OHL.

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012

Still, Van Stralen’s rookie season didn’t go quite as he’d hoped. “I didn’t prepare well enough for the year,” says Van Stralen. “I found the transition from the Central League to the OHL was bigger than I thought.” Van Stralen struggled with the speed of the game, but he certainly hasn’t looked out of place this season. “I put a lot of effort into this past summer. I lost some weight and I got faster,” he says. Though the odds of getting drafted by an NHL team as an overager are slim, if the 19-year-old’s career trajectory continues to climb, he won’t stay under the radar for long. He has one more year of major junior eligibility left after this season. “He’s trying to get to a pro contract,” says 67’s head coach and GM Chris Byrne. “If he continues to work hard I can see that happening for him.” Those are words Van Stralen loves to hear. And if his dream of a pro career does come true, he won’t forget what got him there and what will take him places in the future. “I want to get noticed for my work ethic, my compete level,” he says. “This is the most fun I’ve ever had.”

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TEAMMATES, ENEMIES & FRIENDS: NATIONALS COMPETITORS SHARE LONG HISTORY AND MAKE SOME HISTORY WRITTEN BY DAN PLOUFFE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JUSTIN VAN LEEUWEN AND ANDY DEVLIN/HOCKEY CANADA IMAGES

T

hey were teammates back when they were 12 and 13 years old with the Kanata Rangers before their paths switched, but Rebecca Leslie and Taylor Thurston were back together wearing

the same jerseys for Team Ontario - Blue at the Canadian under-18 women’s hockey championship in Dawson Creek, B.C. For the first time in the history of the Championship, Ontario — Blue won gold.

18

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012


CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012

19

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JUSTIN VAN LEEUWEN


“We get along very well. We both have similar personalities. Even though we switched teams, our relationship didn’t change. I can always trust her. And she’s an awesome person to hang out with.” — TAYLOR THURSTON

www.peakacademy.ca

They’re now assistant captains with rival Provincial Women’s Hockey League junior teams — Leslie for the Ottawa Senators and Thurston for the Nepean Wildcats — but both enjoyed the opportunity to skate together again on a big stage. “There’s no friends when we play against each other on the ice, but we’re still really close off the ice,” explains Leslie, a rookie PWHL forward who is leading the Sens in scoring this season with eight goals and six assists in 10 games. “It feels good to be back with Tay. I know I can always trust her. And she’s someone I can relate to and someone who can be there for me. If I ever need something, I know that she’s close enough that I can talk to her.” Thurston was also thrilled to share a special experience with someone who grew up not too far away in Ottawa’s west end. “We get along very well. We both have

similar personalities,” says the stay-at-home defender, who played for the Senators last season before moving over to Nepean this season. “Even though we switched teams, our relationship didn’t change. I can always trust her. And she’s an awesome person to hang out with.” Thurston experienced a bit of a “weird” situation at nationals, since her regular PWHL teammate Lauren Miller of Brockville competed for the Team Ontario - Red squad. Wildcats general manager Jody Campeau wasn’t worried about two of his players beating each other up, however — in fact, he was looking forward to the bene�its once they returned. “They become kind of role models for our younger players. It shows them what they can shoot for,” Campeau says, noting the whole team back home was rooting them on proudly. “Two great, great kids.

They’re as good in the dressing room as they are on the ice.” Describing Thurston as a responsible shutdown defender who is always matched up against opponents’ top lines, Campeau also praises her for her leadership abilities. “She’s a kid where you’re happy when you see her. She just lights up the room,” adds the �irst-year PWHL GM, who’s also a registered NHLPA player agent. “She’s good with all the girls on the team. She doesn’t just hang out with one or two. Every time you see her, she’s talking to someone else.” Ottawa Senators coach Brent Carty sees similar leadership traits in Leslie, who was tabbed as an assistant captain in her �irst year in the junior league. “She leads by example. She has good work ethic, and the kids watch her doing different things on the ice,” says Carty, who believes Leslie’s exceptional puck-handling

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CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012


PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDY DEVLIN/HOCKEY CANADA IMAGES

TAYLOR THURSTON WHY I PLAY THE GAME I love it. And the people I meet throughout the experience, I’ll know them for my lifetime. I’ve always grown up in a family with hockey.

ICE FLOW 2000-04 Kanata Girls’ Hockey Association 2004-10 Kanata Rangers ‘AA’ 2010-11 Ottawa Senators ‘AA’ 2011-12 Ottawa Senators PWHL 2012 Nepean Wildcats PWHL CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012

REBECCA LESLIE WHY I PLAY THE GAME I play the game because I get a feeling on the ice that brings so much happiness to me

ICE FLOW 2001-05 Canterbury Crusaders Minor Hockey 2005-06 Gloucester-Cumberland Stars Atom ‘AA’ 2006-07 Gloucester Rangers ‘A’ (boys) 2007-08 Gloucester Rangers ‘AA’ (boys) 2008-10 Kanata Rangers ‘AA’ 2010-12 Ottawa Senators ‘AA’ 2012 Ottawa Senators PWHL 21


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“There’s no friends when we play against each other on the ice, but we’re still really close off the ice.” — REBECCA LESLIE

Proud sponsor of Minor Hockey in Ottawa TD Waterhouse Private Investment Advice* is a strong supporter of athletics in Canada. The lessons that sport imparts live on, long after the game is over. We thank the hard-working coaches, officials and volunteers who make sure the lessons learned are the right one. For more information call (613) 783-3375 Chris Vickers, Branch Manager

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abilities and foot speed are what set her apart. “For a young kid, she dominates a lot of the game because she’s a very, very quick player and a tremendous puck-handler.” Another thing Leslie and Thurston have in common is they have older siblings who are excelling in hockey. Leslie’s brother Zac is a defender for the OHL’s Guelph Storm, while Thurston’s sister Mackenzie is a senior with the NCAA’s Bemidji State Beavers. “She’s my inspiration — knowing how much time and effort she put in and how much she loves it too,” says Thurston, a Grade 12 student at All Saints High School. “My dream would be to play Division 1 in the States like my sister.” Playing in the NCAA is an objective Leslie shares. “And hopefully one day I’ll be able to represent Canada,” adds the Grade 11 Sacred Heart High School student. Getting to play at the national championship, both players note, is a great opportunity to open doors to future opportunities of that nature since they’re playing in front of college scouts and national team staff. “There’s de�initely some nerves, but once you get out there and get into the game, it all goes away,” explains Leslie, who scored the insurance goal to give Ontario - Blue some breathing room in the third period of her team’s tournament-opening 4-2 victory over Quebec. Both players feel they held their own at the event where Ontario –Blue, for the �irst time in the history of the Championship, won gold. “It’s de�initely a lot faster. Everyone’s a lot stronger and quicker, but I’m feeling good,” says Thurston, who jumped high in the air in the hallway at school and hugged her nearest friend after reading a text message from her dad telling her she’d made the team for nationals. “It’s an awesome opportunity. It’s quite an honour.”

CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012


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LIAM MAGUIRE’S HOCKEY TRIVIA

THIS DAY IN

December 4 ON THIS DAY IN 1948: Detroit’s Gordie Howe suffered torn cartilage in his right knee in the Red Wings’ 3-2 win at Boston. The injury forced him to miss the next 20 games, the longest period of inactivity in his NHL career.

HOCKEY November 18 ON THIS DAY IN 1992: Washington’s Reggie Savage became the fourth player in history to score his first NHL goal on a penalty shot, but the Capitals lost 5-4 to the visiting Minnesota North Stars. Savage followed Ralph Bowman, Phil Hoene and Ilkka Sinisalo.

November 20 ON THIS DAY IN 1943: Montreal’s rookie goalie Bill Durnan improved his career record to 8-0-1, with a 7-2 win at Toronto. Durnan set an NHL record for rookie goalies by going 12-0-2 in his first 14 games. This mark stood until surpassed by former Ottawa Senators goalie Patrick Lalime, who still holds the record of 16 games without a loss to start his NHL career when he was a member of the Pittsburgh Penguins in 1996-97.

of Fame, along with referee Andy Van Hellemond and builder Scotty Morrison. Nov. 22 is also the birthday of Yvan Cournoyer, former captain of the Montreal Canadiens, a 10time Stanley Cup winner, a member of Team Canada in 1972 and arguably the fastest skater from a standing start in hockey history.

November 24 ON THIS DAY IN 1984: Montreal’s Mats Naslund scored his first career hat trick to lead the Canadiens to a 6-4 win against the Red Wings at the Forum.

November 26 ON THIS DAY IN 1978: Boston coach Don Cherry recorded his 200th NHL victory, as the Bruins won 4-2 over the visiting Atlanta Flames. Cherry, who was in his fifth season behind the bench, reached 200 victories faster than any coach in NHL history up to that point.

November 28 November 22 ON THIS DAY IN 1999: Seven months after retiring as a player, Wayne Gretzky was inducted into the Hockey Hall

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ON THIS DAY IN 1925: Playing in his 328th consecutive game for Montreal, goaltender Georges Vezina collapsed during a game against Pittsburgh. Suffering from tuberculosis, he died

played their 5,000th game in team history, and came away with a 3-0 win over the visiting Dallas Stars. Felix Potvin recorded his eighth career shutout, as the Leafs improved their all-time record to 2,1392,135-726.

December 10 ON THIS DAY IN 1997: Michel Petit became the first player in NHL history to score a point for 10 different teams, when his first assist of the year helped the Phoenix Coyotes to a 3-3 tie at Chicago.

four months later. At the conclusion of the season, Canadiens management donated the Vezina Trophy in his honour, which is still awarded to this day to the best goaltender in the NHL as voted by the league’s general managers.

November 30 ON THIS DAY IN 1972: Bobby Orr scored twice and added two assists to lead the Bruins to a 5-4 win over Buffalo.

December 12

December 6 ON THIS DAY IN 1952: Detroit’s Alex Delvecchio had two assists, and Terry Sawchuk shut out Chicago 2-0 in Indianapolis, the first time since 1928 that a regular season game was played outside an NHL city. Both teams’ stadiums were unavailable that night.

December 2 ON THIS DAY IN 1909: The National Hockey Association was formed in Montreal. The NHA was the forerunner of the National Hockey League. Charter members included the Montreal Wanderers, Renfrew Creamery Kings, and the Montreal Canadiens. It should be noted that the NHA gave way to the NHL after an ownership dispute in 1917. Perhaps history will repeat itself in 2013.

ON THIS DAY IN 1970: Orland Kurtenbach became the first player in Vancouver Canucks history to score a hat trick. He had his only career three-goal game and added an assist in a 5-2 win over the Oakland Seals, three months into the team’s first NHL season.

December 14 ON THIS DAY IN 1968: Boston’s Bobby Orr recorded his first career NHL hat trick and added two assists in a 10-5 win over Chicago at Boston Garden.

December 16

December 8 ON THIS DAY IN 1997: Toronto Maple Leafs

ON THIS DAY IN 1977: Bruce Boudreau scored the only hat trick of his NHL career, and Borje Salming added five assists as the Toronto Maple Leafs won 8-5 against the North Stars in Minnesota. Boudreau currently coaches the Anaheim Ducks.

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PUCK DROP

6’9”

NUMBERSON ICE

Age of the youngest player in NHL history. Armand “Bep” Guidolin, Boston Bruins, 1942

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Height of the tallest player in NHL history. Zdeno Chara, currently with the Boston Bruins

17,16,15 First sweater numbers worn by Gordie Howe, Bobby Hull and Rocket Richard respectively. All later switched to No. 9 for different reasons.

Number of associations in the 12 districts of the ODMHA

3 5’3” Number of minutes in the shortest NHL career. Goaltender Robbie Irons, St. Louis Blues, 1968 in relief of Glenn Hall and subsequently was relieved by Jacques Plante

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12 Height of the shortest player in NHL history. Roy “Shrimp” Worters, goaltender in the NHL, 1925-1937

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Number of districts in the Ottawa District Minor Hockey Association

8 The most consecutive years leading the NHL in penalty minutes. Red Horner, Toronto Maple Leafs, 1933-1940

Age of the oldest player in NHL history. Gordie Howe, Hartford Whalers, 52-year-old grandfather, 1980 CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012


CENTRE ICE DECEMBER 2012

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